Science.gov

Sample records for address wavelength shifts

  1. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  2. Additive-Subtractive Two-Wavelength ESPI Contouring by Using a Synthetic Wavelength Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Frei, B; Kästle, R; Sennhauser, U

    1998-05-01

    The addition correlation of two speckle fields by simultaneousillumination at different wavelengths is used for object contouring ina Twyman-Green-type interferometer. Fringe visibility is enhancedwhen the stochastic speckle background intensity obtained from areference plane modulation is subtracted. We calculate the contourphase map by using a phase-shift algorithm in the syntheticwavelength. A comparison with a sequential illumination, phasedifference method based on a laser wavelength phase shift isgiven. The test setup does not need to be stable on aninterferometric scale, and therefore a method is provided that lendsitself to applications in noisy environments.

  3. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  4. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  5. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Worstell, William A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  6. Cerenkov Light Collection With an Acrylic Wavelength Shifting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Michael; Reinhold, Joerg

    2003-04-01

    Collection of Cerenkov light with an acrylic wavelength shifting plate was investigated. The test setup consisted of a plate, 30cm long, 10cm wide, and 1 cm thick placed behind a 5 cm deep stack of aerogel tiles. On the long ends the wavelength shifter was read out by two 5 inch photomultipliers. The response of the system to pions and protons at 1.2 GeV/c momentum was measured at the KEK PS facility in Japan. On average 6 photoelectrons radiated from the aerogel could be detected. The results will be presented and possible designs for future detectors will be discussed with emphasis on particle identification for high momentum spectrometers at an upgraded Jefferson Lab facility.

  7. PMT signal increase using a wavelength shifting paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allada, K.; Hurlbut, Ch.; Ou, L.; Schmookler, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-05-01

    We report a 1.65 times increase of the PMT signal and a simple procedure of application of a new wavelength shifting (WLS) paint for PMTs with non-UV-transparent windows. Samples of four different WLS paints, made from hydrocarbon polymers and organic fluors, were tested on a 5-in. PMT (ET 9390KB) using Cherenkov radiation produced in fused silica disks by 106Ru electrons on a 'table-top' setup. The best performing paint was employed on two different types of 5-in. PMTs (ET 9390KB and XP4572B), installed in atmospheric pressure CO2 gas Cherenkov detectors, and tested using GeV electrons.

  8. Improved Detection of Cherenkov Radiation using Wavelength-Shifting Paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmookler, Barak; Ou, Longwu

    2014-03-01

    Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) are often used to detect Cherenkov radiation in accelerator-based physics experiments. Since the Cherenkov spectrum is inversely proportional to the square of the photon's wavelength, PMTs with relatively good quantum efficiencies in the ultraviolet region can produce on average a higher number of photoelectrons. The application of certain paints, which absorb light at ultraviolet wavelengths and emit in the visible spectrum, to the surface of some PMTs allows for better sampling of the Cherenkov spectrum. The effects of various wavelength-shifting (WLS) paints designed by Eljen Technologies were tested on ET Enterprises, Model: 9390KB PMTs. Using a 106Ru β-source, Cherenkov light was produced in disks of fused silica. The charge spectrums of the PMTs were measured before and after application of the paint. The average number of photoelectrons produced from the Cherenkov radiation could be determined by knowing the value of the single-photoelectron peak and the mean of the charge spectrum. Four paints were tested, and the gain in the number photoelectrons produced varied from 10-35% for the different paints. Work Conducted at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  9. Phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry at EUV wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Sang Lee

    1997-04-01

    A novel phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is being used to perform wavefront-measuring metrology at 13.4-nm wavelength to characterize aberrations in a multilayer-coated 10x Schwarzschild objective designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography experiments. To achieve 0.1-micron critical dimension pattern transfer with EUV projection lithography at 13.4-nm wavelength, nearly diffraction-limited all-reflective multilayer-coated optical systems with 0.1 numerical aperture are required. The EUV wavefront, determined by the mirror surfaces and the reflective multilayer coatings, is measurable only at the operational wavelength of the system. The authors goal is to measure the EUV wavefront to an accuracy of 0.01 waves rms (0.13 nm). The PS/PDI is a type of point-diffraction interferometer, modified for significantly improved throughput and phase-shifting capability. The interferometer design utilizes a grating beamsplitter and pinhole spatial filters in the object and image planes of the optical system under test. The 10x-reduction Schwarzschild objective, with image-side numerical aperture of 0.08, is illuminated by a sub-micron pinhole in the object plane. A coarse, 20-micron pitch grating placed between the illumination pinhole and the Schwarzschild system serves a dual role as a small-angle beam-splitter and a phase-shifting element. The first-order diffracted beam from the grating is spatially filtered in the image plane of the Schwarzschild with a sub-100-nm pinhole and becomes the `D reference` wave in the interferometer. The zero-order beam is the `test` wave, and it passes unobstructed through a 4.5-{mu}m window in the image plane. The test and reference beams are separated by several microns in the image plane to minimize beam overlap. The interference fringes are recorded with a CCD detector placed about 12 cm from the Schwarzschild image plane.

  10. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  11. A paradigm shift in the excitation wavelength of upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    The past two decades witnessed the emergence of upconversion nanoparticles as promising luminophores finding multifarious uses from biological studies to solar cells. Progress in their practical use, however, has been hampered by requirements to be excited within a narrow absorption band at around 980 nm. Since the main constituent of biological tissue - water - absorbs strongly in this region, significant reduction in the penetration depth is anticipated as the 980 nm light gets attenuated travelling through tissues, besides also risking tissue damage from the overheating effect. Just recently, remarkable efforts to engineer the excitation of upconversion nanoparticles to a more suitable wavelength for biological applications were reported. This article gives an insightful view on the different ingenious designs that have been reported and their progression towards the development of upconversion nanoparticles with biologically friendlier excitation wavelength.

  12. Bichromophoric Dyes for Wavelength Shifting of Dye-Protein Fluoromodules

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ha H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Brotherton, Wendy L.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Zanotti, Kimberly J.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Dye-protein fluoromodules consist of fluorogenic dyes and single chain antibody fragments that form brightly fluorescent noncovalent complexes. This report describes two new bichromophoric dyes that extend the range of wavelengths of excitation or emission of existing fluoromodules. In one case, a fluorogenic thiazole orange (TO) was attached to an energy acceptor dye, Cy5. Upon binding to a protein that recognizes TO, red emission due to efficient energy transfer from TO to Cy5 replaces the green emission observed for monochromophoric TO bound to the same protein. Separately, TO was attached to a coumarin that serves as an energy donor. The same green emission is observed for coumarin-TO and TO bound to a protein, but efficient energy transfer allows violet excitation of coumarin-TO, versus longer wavelength, blue excitation of monochromophoric TO. Both bichromophores exhibit low nanomolar KD values for their respective proteins, >95% energy transfer efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yields. PMID:25679477

  13. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Markus; Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  14. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Wahle, Markus Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-16

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  15. Derivation of the center-wavelength shift of narrow-bandpass filters under temperature change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hwa; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2004-11-15

    We derive a simple equation to predict the center-wavelength shift of a Fabry-Perot type narrow-bandpass filter by using the conventional characteristic matrix method and the elastic strain model as the temperature varies. We determine the thermal expansion coefficient of substrate from the zero-shift condition of the center wavelength of the filter. The calculated shifts are in a good agreement with the experimental ones, in which the narrow-bandpass filters are prepared by plasma ion-assisted deposition on four substrates with different thermal expansion coefficients.

  16. Oscillation wavelength shifts of visible and infrared laser diodes in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kouichi; Toujou, Shin-ya; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ohkawa, Masashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Shimba, Minoru

    1998-10-01

    The shift, which occurs in the oscillation wavelength of a semiconductor laser in a magnetic field, has been the subject of great interest, since the early 60's. During the course of the investigation, the observed shift was toward the short wavelength side, i.e., a blue shift, which was well accounted for, in terms of the Landau level. At present, we are studying how wavelength shift is affected, by applying, at room temperature, a relatively weak magnetic field, using recently developed visible and infrared diode lasers. By doing so, we have observed a red shift and a decrease in laser output-power, under a certain magnetic field conditions in its strength and direction. Since these two changes in wavelength and output power correspond to those observed at higher temperatures, we assumed that the orientation of the magnetic field affects current density in laser diodes. And then it alters temperatures around the active layer, which in turn influence oscillation wavelength and laser output-power. Also of note, was the fact that the red shift and the decrease in laser output-power occurred simultaneously, revealing an almost linear dependency on one another. This might possibly explain the heat, which developed as the result of applying the magnetic field. However, we recently observed an instance, in which visible MQW laser diodes did not exhibit this linear dependence. Because this phenomenon cannot be traced simply to the effects of heat, we are now examining it in terms of current-density alteration.

  17. Low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry for high-speed quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-08-01

    We propose low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry and demonstrate its application to quantitative phase imaging of dynamic specimens. By shifting the source wavelength, multiple interferograms of the sample can be acquired at different spectral bands. A sample phase is thus encoded in the phase step between consecutive acquisitions. For the particular case of four-band imaging, we show that the phase can be extracted with a modified Carré algorithm. We describe signal demodulation in detail and discuss its implication on system implementation. A swept laser-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to demonstrate the technique for real-time imaging of live sperm cells at 62.5 Hz. The dynamic dry mass of the sperm head is measured with a full-scale error of ±2%, validating the technique's capability for high-sensitivity, high-speed quantitative phase imaging. PMID:27472586

  18. Atom interferometer gyroscope with spin-dependent phase shifts induced by light near a tune-out wavelength.

    PubMed

    Trubko, Raisa; Greenberg, James; Germaine, Michael T St; Gregoire, Maxwell D; Holmgren, William F; Hromada, Ivan; Cronin, Alexander D

    2015-04-10

    Tune-out wavelengths measured with an atom interferometer are sensitive to laboratory rotation rates because of the Sagnac effect, vector polarizability, and dispersion compensation. We observed shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths as large as 213 pm with a potassium atom beam interferometer, and we explore how these shifts can be used for an atom interferometer gyroscope.

  19. Atom Interferometer Gyroscope with Spin-Dependent Phase Shifts Induced by Light near a Tune-Out Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Greenberg, James; Germaine, Michael T. St.; Gregoire, Maxwell D.; Holmgren, William F.; Hromada, Ivan; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2015-04-01

    Tune-out wavelengths measured with an atom interferometer are sensitive to laboratory rotation rates because of the Sagnac effect, vector polarizability, and dispersion compensation. We observed shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths as large as 213 pm with a potassium atom beam interferometer, and we explore how these shifts can be used for an atom interferometer gyroscope.

  20. A Wavelength-shifting Optical Module (WOM) for in-ice neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebecker, Dustin; Archinger, Markus Gerhard; Böser, Sebastian; Brostean-Kaiser, Jannes; Del Pino Rosendo, Esther; Di Lorenzo, Vincenzo; DuVernois, Michael; Falke, Peter Johannes; Fösig, Carl-Christian; Karg, Timo; Köpke, Lutz; Kowalski, Marek; Looft, Andreas; Sand, Krystina; Tosi, Delia

    2016-04-01

    We report on the development status of a single-photon sensor that employs wavelength-shifting and light-guiding techniques to maximize the collection area while minimizing the dark noise rate. The sensor is tailored towards application in ice-Cherenkov neutrino detectors embedded in inert and cold, low-radioactivity and UV transparent ice as a detection medium, such as IceCube-Gen2 or MICA. The goal is to decrease the energy threshold as well as to increase the energy resolution and the vetoing capability of the neutrino telescope, when compared to a setup with optical sensors similar to those used in IceCube. The proposed sensor captures photons with wavelengths between 250 nm and 400 nm. These photons are re-emitted with wavelengths above 400 nm by a wavelength shifting coating applied to a 90 mm diameter polymer tube. The tube guides the light towards a small-diameter PMT via total internal reflection. By scaling the results from smaller laboratory prototypes, the total efficiency of the proposed detector for a Cherenkov spectrum is estimated to exceed that of a standard IceCube optical module. The status of the prototype development and the performance of its main components will be discussed.

  1. Static wavelength shift for multielectrode DFB lasers with longitudinal mode spatial hole burning using a two-dimensional numerical simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kiyoyuki; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Seki, Shunji; Lui, Wayne

    1993-06-01

    The static wavelength shift for multielectrode DFB LDs with a lambda /4-phase-shift is studied using a two-dimensional numerical simulation program. This program gives a self-consistent carrier distribution and the corresponding refractive index distribution under nonuniform carrier injection. Accordingly, it helps us better understand the wavelength shift related to spatial hole burning. The wavelength shift and spatial hole burning effects for a multielectrode DFB LD are studied under various operating conditions and electrode lengths. It is demonstrated that the earlier proposed wavelength and shift model for a single-electrode DFB LD is a universal model for a multielectrode DFB LD. The validity of the model is also confirmed by reported experimental results.

  2. A Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tube Based Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Detector for neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Kevin D; Clonts, Lloyd G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber scintillator neutron detectors were developed for two time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffractometers (POWGEN, VULCAN) at Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent module (v3.0), however, there are 32 1-inch-diameter photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are bulky and expensive. We built a new detector module (v3.1) based on four multi-anode (MA) PMTs, and tested its performance including detection efficiency, count rate capability, spatial resolution, ghosting properties, and gamma-ray sensitivity. The v3.1 module was compared with two prior v3.0 modules, and 3He tube detectors.

  3. Dual-wavelength in-line phase-shifting interferometry based on two dc-term-suppressed intensities with a special phase shift for quantitative phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    To efficiently promote the phase retrieval in quantitative phase imaging, a new approach of quantitative phase extraction is proposed based on two intensities with dual wavelength after filtering the corresponding dc terms for each wavelength, in which a special phase shift is used. In this approach, only the combination of the phase-shifting technique and subtraction procedures is needed, and no additional algorithms are required. The thickness of the phase object can be achieved from the phase image, which is related to the synthetic beat wavelength. The feasibility of this method is verified by the simulated experiments of the optically transparent objects. PMID:27244381

  4. Wavelength Shifts of the 7.7 Micron Emission Band in Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Temi, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Using spatial-spectral data cubes of reflection nebulae obtained by ISOCAM, we have observed a shift in the central wavelength of the 7.7 micron band within several reflection nebulae. The band shifts progressively from approx. 7.8 microns near the edge of the nebulae to approx. 7.6 microns towards the center of the nebulae. The ratio of the 11.3/7.7 micron bands also changes with distance from the central star, first rising from the center towards the edge of the nebula, then falling at the largest distances from the star, consistent with the 11.3/7.7 micron band ratio being controlled by the PAH ionization state. The behavior of the 7.7 micron band center can be explained either by assuming that anions are the origin of the 7.85 micron band and cations the 7.65 micron band, or that the band center wavelength depends on the chemical nature of the PAHs.

  5. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  6. Enhancement of astaxanthin production using Haematococcus pluvialis with novel LED wavelength shift strategy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Tianqi; Kim, Dae Geun; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Yoon-E

    2016-07-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a green microalga of particular interest, since it is considered the best potential natural source of astaxanthin, which is widely used as an additive for natural pigmentation. In addition, astaxanthin has recently garnered commercial interest as a nutraceutical, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical. However, producing astaxanthin from H. pluvialis necessitates separation with distinctive culture conditions, dividing between the microalgae growth and the astaxanthin production stages. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have emerged as a replacement for traditional light sources, and LED applications are now rapidly expanding to multiple areas in fields such as biotechnology. However, further detail application into microalgae biotechnology remains limited. In this study, we have attempted to establish new protocols based on the specific wavelength of LEDs for the cultivation and production of astaxanthin using H. pluvialis. Specifically, we applied red LEDs for microalgae cell growth and then switched to blue LEDs to induce astaxanthin biosynthesis. The result showed that astaxanthin productions based on a wavelength shift from red to blue were significantly increased, compared to those with continuous illumination using red LEDs. Furthermore, additional increase of astaxanthin production was achieved with simultaneous application of exogenous carbon with blue LED illumination. Our approach based on the proper manipulation of LED wavelengths upon H. pluvialis cell stages will enable the improvement of biomass and enhance astaxanthin production using H. pluvialis. PMID:26860938

  7. Enhancement of astaxanthin production using Haematococcus pluvialis with novel LED wavelength shift strategy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Tianqi; Kim, Dae Geun; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Choi, Yoon-E

    2016-07-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a green microalga of particular interest, since it is considered the best potential natural source of astaxanthin, which is widely used as an additive for natural pigmentation. In addition, astaxanthin has recently garnered commercial interest as a nutraceutical, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical. However, producing astaxanthin from H. pluvialis necessitates separation with distinctive culture conditions, dividing between the microalgae growth and the astaxanthin production stages. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have emerged as a replacement for traditional light sources, and LED applications are now rapidly expanding to multiple areas in fields such as biotechnology. However, further detail application into microalgae biotechnology remains limited. In this study, we have attempted to establish new protocols based on the specific wavelength of LEDs for the cultivation and production of astaxanthin using H. pluvialis. Specifically, we applied red LEDs for microalgae cell growth and then switched to blue LEDs to induce astaxanthin biosynthesis. The result showed that astaxanthin productions based on a wavelength shift from red to blue were significantly increased, compared to those with continuous illumination using red LEDs. Furthermore, additional increase of astaxanthin production was achieved with simultaneous application of exogenous carbon with blue LED illumination. Our approach based on the proper manipulation of LED wavelengths upon H. pluvialis cell stages will enable the improvement of biomass and enhance astaxanthin production using H. pluvialis.

  8. Phase retrieval based on temporal and spatial hybrid matching in simultaneous phase-shifting dual-wavelength interferometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiang; Zhong, Liyun; Xiong, Jiaxiang; Zhou, Yunfei; Tian, Jindong; Li, Dong; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2016-06-13

    In simultaneous phase-shifting dual-wavelength interferometry, by matching both the phase-shifting period number and the fringe number in interferogram of two wavelengths to the integers, the phase with high accuracy can be retrieved through combining the principle component analysis (PCA) and least-squares iterative algorithm (LSIA). First, by using the approximate ratio of two wavelengths, we can match both the temporal phase-shifting period number and the spatial fringe number in interferogram of two wavelengths to the integers. Second, using above temporal and spatial hybrid matching condition, we can achieve accurate phase shifts of single-wavelength of phase-shifting interferograms through using PCA algorithm. Third, using above phase shifts to perform the iterative calculation with the LSIA method, the wrapped phases of single-wavelength can be determined. Both simulation calculation and experimental research demonstrate that by using the temporal and spatial hybrid matching condition, the PCA + LSIA based phase retrieval method possesses significant advantages in accuracy, stability and processing time. PMID:27410297

  9. Final results from the SDC dopant search for new green wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G.W.; Zhang, G.

    1993-12-01

    A scintillating tile/fiber design had been selected for the SDC calorimeter. It consisted of scintillator plates embedded with a wavelength shifting (WLS) fiber which was spliced to a clear fiber. Based on the results from previous radiation damage studies on different scintillating materials, SCSN38 had been chosen for the scintillating tile and BCF91 or Y7 for the WLS fiber. SCSN38 is a blue-emitting scintillator and both WLS fibers use K-27, a green-emitting compound, as dopant. K-27 has a decay time of approximately 12 ns which is long in comparison to that of most blue-emitting materials. Of all the factors that affect the speed of the scintillator tile/fiber calorimeter, the lifetime of the green-emitting dopant is the dominant component. To increase the speed of the calorimeter, it would be desirable that the green WLS fibers utilized had lifetimes between 3 and 5 ns. However, currently available green WLS fibers exhibit decay times between 7 and 12 ns. Development of new green-emitting WLS fibers with short decay times must be investigated. The goal of this project was to search for commercially available fluorescent compounds with {lambda}{sub abs} = 400--450 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 450--550 nm, {tau} = 3--7 ns, and quantum efficiency of minimum 0.7 (current K-27 baseline). Large Stokes shift and low self-absorption were not important requirements since the optical pathlength for the shifted light was small. Characterization of the spectroscopic properties of these compounds after styrene polymerization is important since this is an essential part of the manufacturing of WLS fibers. This summary presents the transmittance and fluorescence data for each dopant tested. However, many fluorescence measurements using different excitation wavelengths and orientations were recorded. Volume 1 presents a plot for each dopant combining transmittance and the most representative fluorescence measurement.

  10. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression.

  11. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression. PMID:24826823

  12. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy at multiple wavelengths for in-situ meat species differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-09-01

    Two miniaturized Raman measurement heads containing microsystem diode lasers emitting at 783 and 671 nm suitable for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) were applied for the non-invasive in situ differentiation of selected meat species. This allows using the fingerprint characteristics of Raman spectra without a disturbing fluorescence background. At 783 nm, two emission lines with a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1) and optical powers of up to 110 mW were realized. For 671 nm excitation, the spectral shift amounts to 0.6 nm (12 cm-1) and optical powers of up to 40 mW were obtained. In both cases, meat Raman spectra could be recorded with integration times of 10 s. The investigations were carried out using selected cuts from the most commonly consumed meat species in the US and Europe, i.e. beef, pork, chicken, and turkey. A principal components analysis of the SERDS spectra revealed a clear separation of the meat species into four distinct groups for both excitation wavelengths. This classification is based on the myoglobin content and gradual differences of protein Raman band intensities and positions. The results demonstrate the potential of SERDS as rapid and non-destructive screening method for the discrimination of selected meat species.

  13. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methodswere proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover,more » these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  14. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. C. Liu, F. Q. Yao, D. Y.; Wang, L. J.; Yan, F. L.; Liu, J. Q.; Wang, Z. G.

    2014-01-21

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around λ ∼ 4.6 μm is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (λ/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6° × 16.8° is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB and wavelength coverage range of 72 nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period.

  15. High-speed 3D imaging using two-wavelength parallel-phase-shift interferometry.

    PubMed

    Safrani, Avner; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-10-15

    High-speed three dimensional imaging based on two-wavelength parallel-phase-shift interferometry is presented. The technique is demonstrated using a high-resolution polarization-based Linnik interferometer operating with three high-speed phase-masked CCD cameras and two quasi-monochromatic modulated light sources. The two light sources allow for phase unwrapping the single source wrapped phase so that relatively high step profiles having heights as large as 3.7 μm can be imaged in video rate with ±2  nm accuracy and repeatability. The technique is validated using a certified very large scale integration (VLSI) step standard followed by a demonstration from the semiconductor industry showing an integrated chip with 2.75 μm height copper micro pillars at different packing densities. PMID:26469586

  16. Measurement of Cerenkov radiation induced by the gamma-rays of Co-60 therapy units using wavelength shifting fiber.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Seon Geun; Kim, Jae Seok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-04-21

    In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%.

  17. Measurement of Cerenkov Radiation Induced by the Gamma-Rays of Co-60 Therapy Units Using Wavelength Shifting Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Seon Geun; Kim, Jae Seok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%. PMID:24755521

  18. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  19. Monolithic Single-Mode DFB Laser Array with Precise Wavelength Control for Optoelectronic Integration using an Equivalent Phase Shift Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingsi; Cheng, Julian; Microelectronics Research Center Team

    2013-03-01

    The integrated distributed feedback (DFB) laser array is a key component in photonic integrated circuits for wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) system. However, it is difficult to precisely control the wavelength of individual lasers. When the rear facet of the laser is coated with a high-reflectivity mirror, a random phase change is introduced that shifts the lasing wavelength, making monolithic integration of a wavelength-controlled WDM array very difficult. To solve this problem, we propose a method to precisely control the lasing wavelength of DFB lasers over a wide range by introducing an equivalent phase shift in the cavity using sampled Bragg gratings, using wafer-scale optical lithography and requiring only coarse dimension control. The wavelength can be fine-tuned by applying different DC currents. It is shown that a WDM-DFB laser array with uniform wavelength spacing can be controlled accurately in this manner. Integrated arrays of single-mode DFB lasers for WDM systems can thus be fabricated in a low-cost manner without using low-throughput e-beam lithography, and is scalable for mass-manufacturing.

  20. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Lowell; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  1. Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Scintillation Detectors for Thermal Neutron Imaging at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Ellis, E Darren; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have developed wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with 0.3 m2 area per module. Each module has 154 x 7 pixels and a 5 mm x 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A ZnS/6LiF scintillator combined with a novel fiber encoding scheme was used to record the neutron events. A channel read-out-card (CROC) based digital-signal processing electronics and position-determination algorithm was applied for neutron imaging. Neutron-gamma discrimination was carried out using pulse-shape discrimination (PSD). A sandwich flat-scintillator detector can have detection efficiency close to He-3 tubes (about 10 atm). A single layer flat-scintillator detector has count rate capability of 6,500 cps/cm2, which is acceptable for powder diffractometers at SNS.

  2. Elimination of ghosting artifacts from wavelength-shifting fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.; Diawara, Y.; Hannan, B. W.; Hodges, J. P.; Clonts, L. G.

    2013-01-15

    Misassignment of neutron position (ghosting) produces artifacts which have been observed in wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber detectors developed for time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffraction. In position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) with WLS fiber encoding, thermal and cold neutrons interact with a monolithic {sup 6}LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen, and scintillation photons are generated and transported through the crossed fibers to photomultipliers (PMTs). The neutron position is determined by photon counts in the PMTs within a preset time window. Ghosting occurs when neutrons hit the group boundaries of two neighboring PMTs for x-position multiplexing, which is modeled as resulting from a long travel length (about 3-5 mm) of a small number of scintillation photons. This model is supported by the change observed in aperture images when the threshold number for photon-pulses was adjusted for neutron event determination. When the threshold number of photon-pulses was set above 10 for each PMT, the ghost peaks in the aperture images and TOF spectra of powder diffraction were strongly suppressed or completely eliminated, and the intrinsic background levels of the WLS detectors were significantly reduced. Our result indicates that WLS fiber detector is a promising alternative for {sup 3}He PSDs for neutron scattering.

  3. Elimination of ghosting artifacts from wavelength-shifting fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Hannan, Bruce W.; Hodges, Jason P.; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2013-01-31

    Misassignment of neutron position (ghosting) produces artifacts, which have been observed in wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber detectors developed for time-of-flight (TOF) neutron powder diffraction. In position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) with WLS fiber encoding, thermal and cold neutrons interact with a monolithic 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillator screen, and scintillation photons are generated and transported through the crossed fibers to photomultipliers (PMTs). The neutron position is determined by photon counts in PMTs within a preset time window. Ghosting occurs when neutrons hit the group boundaries of two neighboring PMTs for x-position multiplexing, which is modeled as resulting from a long travel length (about 3-5 mm) of a small number of scintillation photons. This model is supported by the change observed in aperture images when the threshold number for photon-pulses was adjusted for a neutron event determination. When the threshold number of photon-pulses was set above 10 for each PMT, the ghost peaks in the aperture images and TOF spectra of powder diffraction were strongly suppressed or completely eliminated, and the intrinsic background levels of the WLS detectors were significantly reduced. Our result indicates that WLS fiber detector is a promising alternative for 3He PSDs for neutron scattering.

  4. Performance study of wavelength shifting acrylic plastic for Cherenkov light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckford, B.; De la Puente, A.; Fujii, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Kaneta, M.; Kanda, H.; Maeda, K.; Matsumura, A.; Nakamura, S. N.; Perez, N.; Reinhold, J.; Tang, L.; Tsukada, K.

    2014-01-01

    The collection efficiency for Cherenkov light incident on a wavelength shifting plate (WLS) has been determined during a beam test at the Proton Synchrotron facility located in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan. The experiment was conducted in order to determine the detector's response to photoelectrons converted from photons produced by a fused silica radiator; this allows for an approximation of the detector's quality. The yield of the photoelectrons produced through internally generated Cherenkov light as well as light incident from the radiator was measured as a function of the momentum of the incident hadron beam. The yield is proportional to sin2θc, where θc is the opening angle of the Cherenkov light created. Based on estimations and results from similar conducted tests, where the collection efficiency was roughly 39%, the experimental result was expected to be around 40% for internally produced light from the WLS. The results of the experiment determined the photon collection response efficiency of the WLS to be roughly 62% for photons created in a fused silica radiator and 41% for light created in the WLS.

  5. Nonlinear optical crystal development for laser wavelength shifting at AFRL Materials Directorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernelius, Nils C.; Hopkins, Frank K.; Ohmer, M. C.

    1999-06-01

    Our objective is to develop crystals that shift the light from well developed laser sources to application specific wavelengths which may be tunable. Military applications extend across the entire spectrum from ultraviolet through the far-infrared but our greatest interest has been in materials for the mid-IR (3-5 μm) and far-IR (8-12 μm) atmospheric windows. Our primary applications that drive crystal development are infrared countermeasures and remote sensing of chemical and biological warfare agents. To achieve these results we have pursued two tracks: birefringent bulk materials and quasi-phase-matched structures. Birefringent studies include the grey track problem in KTiOPO4 (KTP) plus growth of its isomorphs, KTIOAsO4 (KTA), RbTiOAsO4 (RTA), CsTiOAsO4 (CTA), and KxRb1-xTiOPO4 (KRTA); chalcopyrites: ZnGeP2, CdGeAs2, AgGaS2, AgGaSe2, AgGa(1-x)InxSe2, AgGaTe2; plus GaSE, and HgGa2S4. A small portion of the effort is pursuing UV materials, the foremost being the borates MM'(B3O5)3 where M=Sr, Ba, Pb; M'=Li,Na. Previously, work was done on LiB3O5 (LBO), β-bonding (GaAs), by periodic poling (LiNbO3, LiTaO3, KTP, BaTiO3) and by periodic doping. Th cover the 4.5-5.0 μm band, work is being done on RTA and Pb{MgxNbyTi1-x-y}O3 (PMNT). For periodic poling in the 8-12 μm region studies are being made on CGC (CsGeCl3), CGB (CsGeBr3), Tl3PbBr5, Tl4PbI6 and Tl4HgI6. QPM can also be obtained using total internal reflection devices (GaAs, ZnSe).

  6. Error-compensating phase-shifting algorithm for surface shape measurement of transparent plate using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    When measuring the surface shape of a transparent sample using wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry, the calculated phase is critically determined by not only phase-shift errors, but also by coupling errors between higher harmonics and phase-shift errors. This paper presents the derivation of a 13-sample phase-shifting algorithm that can compensate for miscalibration and first-order nonlinearity of phase shift, coupling errors, and bias modulation of the intensity, and has strong suppression of the second reflective harmonic effect. The characteristics of the 13-sample algorithm are estimated with respect to Fourier representation in the frequency domain. The phase error of measurement performed using the 13-sample algorithm is discussed and compared with those of measurements obtained using other conventional phase-shifting algorithms. Finally, the surface shape of a fused silica wedge plate obtained using a wavelength tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 13-sample algorithm are presented. The experimental results indicate that the surface shape measurement accuracy for a transparent fused silica plate is 3 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is discussed by comparing the amplitudes of the crosstalk noise calculated using other conventional algorithms.

  7. Signal processing method based on group delay calculation for distributed Bragg wavelength shift in optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka; Murayama, Hideaki; Kasai, Tokio

    2014-03-24

    A signal processing method based on group delay calculations is introduced for distributed measurements of long-length fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). Bragg wavelength shifts in interfered signals of OFDR are regarded as group delay. By calculating group delay, the distribution of Bragg wavelength shifts is obtained with high computational efficiency. We introduce weighted averaging process for noise reduction. This method required only 3.5% of signal processing time which was necessary for conventional equivalent signal processing based on short-time Fourier transform. The method also showed high sensitivity to experimental signals where non-uniform strain distributions existed in a long-length FBG.

  8. Optimal demodulation of wavelength shifts in a fiber Bragg grating sensor using an adaptive two wave mixing photorefractive interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Kirikera, Goutham R.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2008-03-01

    Recent work by our research group on the dynamic demodulation of strain-induced wavelength shifts in fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors show that these sensors are suitable for the detection of high frequency ultrasonic waves produced by impact loading. A FBG sensor is incorporated into an optical detection system that uses a broadband tunable laser source in the C-band, a two wave-mixing photorefractive interferometer, and a high-speed photodetector. When an ultrasonic wave interacts with the FBG sensor, the wavelength of the reflected light in the fiber is dynamically shifted due to strain-induced perturbation of the index of refraction and/or the period of the grating in the fiber. The wavelength shift is converted into an intensity change by splitting the light into signal and pump beams and interfering the beams in an InP:Fe photorefractive crystal (PRC). The resulting intensity change is measured by a photodetector. The two-wave mixing (TWM) photorefractive interferometer allows for several FBG sensors to be wavelength multiplexed in one PRC and it also actively compensates for low frequency signal drifts associated with unwanted room vibrations and temperature excursions. In this work, we present preliminary experimental results on the detection of impact signals using a low power (1 mW) TWM PRC based demodulation system. The response time of the PRC is optimized by focusing the signal and pump beams into the crystal allowing for adaptivity of the demodulation system to quasi-static strains or temperature drifts. The TWM intensity gain of the system is optimized for efficient wavelength demodulation through resonant enhancement of the space charge electric field formed in the PRC. The low power demodulation system would facilitate significant reduction in the overall cost of the system.

  9. Wavelength shifts in fluorescence maxima of stressed and non-stressed Norway spruce needles over the growing season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banninger, Cliff; Chappelle, E.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory fluorescence measurements of first and third year metal stressed and non stressed Norway spruce needles collected in May, Jul. Sep. and Nov. display significant wavelength shifts in the intensity maxima in the blue, green, red, and near infrared spectral regions, with the largest shifts occurring in the blue spectral region for both first and third year needles from Nov. Smaller, but the otherwise significant shifts also take place in the blue spectral region for first year needles from Sep. in the red spectral region for third year neddles from May, Jul. and Sep. and in the near infrared spectral region for first and third year needles from Jul. and Sep. Wavelength shifts in needle fluorescence maxima over the growing season are greatest in the blue and to a lesser extent, greenspectral regions from Sep. to Nov. but are also significant in the red and near infrared spectral regions from Jul. to Sep. and Sep. to Nov., and in the near infrared spectral region also from May to Jul.

  10. Two-wavelength method for endoscopic shape measurement by spatial phase-shifting speckle-interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kandulla, Jochen; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; von Bally, Gert

    2004-10-10

    A two-wavelength method for endoscopic topography reconstruction is introduced that can be applied to out-of-plane sensitive electronic-speckle-pattern interferometry systems based on rigid endoscope imaging systems. The surface measurement is performed by detection of the phase-difference distribution affected by a change in the applied laser wavelength. Furthermore, the off-axis endoscopic illumination geometry is taken into account by an approximation. Experimental results of the characterization of the endoscopic surface reconstruction technique and the measurement accuracy obtained are described and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the method is demonstrated with results from the topographic reconstruction of a free-form surface. PMID:15508598

  11. Quasi-distributed and wavelength selective addressing of optical micro-resonators based on long period fiber gratings.

    PubMed

    Farnesi, D; Chiavaioli, F; Baldini, F; Righini, G C; Soria, S; Trono, C; Conti, G Nunzi

    2015-08-10

    A novel all-in-fiber method for coupling light to high-Q silica whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical micro-resonators is presented, which is based on a pair of long period fiber gratings (LPGs) written in the same silica fiber, along with a thick fiber taper (15-18 μm in waist) in between the LPGs. The proposed coupling structure is robust and can be replicated many times along the same fiber simply cascading LPGs with different bands. Typical Q-factors of the order of 10(8) and total coupling efficiency up to 60% were measured collecting the resonances of microspheres or microbubbles at the fiber end. This approach uniquely allows quasi-distributed and wavelength selective addressing of different micro-resonators along the same fiber. PMID:26367967

  12. Two-way shift of wavelength in holographic sensing of organic vapor in nanozeolites dispersed acrylamide photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dongyao; Geng, Yaohui; Liu, Hongpeng; Zhou, Ke; Xian, Lihong; Yu, Dan

    2016-08-10

    Holographic sensing of alcohol organic vapor is characterized in detail at transmission and reflection geometries in Y nanozeolites dispersed acrylamide photopolymer. The two-way shift of the diffraction spectrum and its temporal evolution with various vapor concentrations are measured. Obvious blueshifts of diffraction spectrum peaks are observed and analyzed in two recording geometries. The competition mechanism between decreasing the average refractive index and swelling the grating fringe space is proposed for exploring the wavelength shift mechanism. In the reflection grating, as organic vapor increases, the redshift after the blueshift of the wavelength peaks are observed clearly. We further demonstrate the significance of this competition mechanism. In the low concentration region, at transmission <700  ppm and reflection <400  ppm in nanozeolites dispersed polymer, the blueshift of the wavelength is a significant factor in identifying an organic vapor with a low refractive index. These experimental results provide a probability for improving the applicability of a holographic sensor. This work can accelerate the development of the holographic sensing strategy and provide a novel identification method for organic vapor. PMID:27534461

  13. 2000 ICA Presidential Address: Shifting Voices, Oppositional Discourse, and New Visions for Communication Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Linda L.

    2001-01-01

    Advocates using the construct of voice rather than paradigms, theories, and academic divisions to develop complimentary ways of understanding. Advocates taking inventory of multiple and shifting voices in reviews and critiques of the literature; connecting through exploring shifting concepts and theories; and engaging in joint actions in ways that…

  14. Enhancement and wavelength-shifted emission of Cerenkov luminescence using multifunctional microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Li, Joanne; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) imaging is a new molecular imaging modality that utilizes the photons emitted during radioactive decay when charged particles travel faster than the phase velocity of light in a dielectric medium. Here we present a novel agent to convert and increase CL emission at longer wavelengths using multimodal protein microspheres (MSs). The 64Cu-labeled protein microspheres contain quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated within a high-refractive-index-oil core. Dark box imaging of the MSs was conducted to demonstrate the improvement in CL emission at longer wavelengths. To illustrate the versatile design of these MSs and the potential of CL in disease diagnosis, these MSs were utilized for in vitro cell targeting and ex vivo CL-excited QD fluorescence (CL-FL) imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in rats. It was shown that by utilizing both QDs and MSs with a high-refractive-index-oil core, the CL emission increases by four-fold at longer wavelengths. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these MSs generate both an in vivo and ex vivo contrast signal. The design concept of utilizing QDs and high-index core MSs may contribute to future developments of in vivo CL imaging. PMID:25555157

  15. Enhancement and wavelength-shifted emission of Cerenkov luminescence using multifunctional microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Joanne; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) imaging is a new molecular imaging modality that utilizes the photons emitted during radioactive decay when charged particles travel faster than the phase velocity of light in a dielectric medium. Here we present a novel agent to convert and increase CL emission at longer wavelengths using multimodal protein microspheres (MSs). The 64Cu-labeled protein microspheres contain quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated within a high-refractive-index-oil core. Dark box imaging of the MSs was conducted to demonstrate the improvement in CL emission at longer wavelengths. To illustrate the versatile design of these MSs and the potential of CL in disease diagnosis, these MSs were utilized for in vitro cell targeting and ex vivo CL-excited QD fluorescence (CL-FL) imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in rats. It was shown that by utilizing both QDs and MSs with a high-refractive-index-oil core, the CL emission increases by four-fold at longer wavelengths. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these MSs generate both an in vivo and ex vivo contrast signal. The design concept of utilizing QDs and high-index core MSs may contribute to future developments of in vivo CL imaging.

  16. Multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry for micro-structures measurement based on color image processing in white light interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Li, Feng; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2016-07-01

    Conventional multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry utilizes two or three monochromatic light sources, such as lasers, to realize the measurement of the surface topography with large discontinuity. In this paper, the white light source, with a single-chip CCD color camera, is used to accomplish multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry. In addition, we propose an algorithm which combines white light phase-shifting algorithm, equivalent wavelength method and fringe order method to achieve measuring and calibrating the micro-structures ranging from nanometer scale to micrometer scale. Finally, the proposed method is validated by a traceable step height standard.

  17. Line centers, pressure shift, and pressure broadening of 1530-1560 nm hydrogen cyanide wavelength calibration lines

    SciTech Connect

    Swann, William C.; Gilbert, Sarah L.

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the line centers and pressure-induced shift and broadening of 25 lines in the 2{nu}{sub 3} rotational-vibrational band of hydrogen cyanide H{sup 13}C{sup 14}N. These lines can be used as wavelength references in the optical fiber communication wavelength division multiplexing C-band (approximately 1530-1565 nm). We find that the pressure shift varies with line number from +0.09 pm/kPa to -0.15 pm/kPa (approximately -1.5 to +2.5 MHz/Torr). The pressure broadening also varies with line number and is typically between 1 and 5.4 pm/kPa (17-90 MHz/Torr). We determined the line centers of 21 lines with an expanded uncertainty (2{sigma}) of 0.01 pm ({approx_equal}1 MHz), an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude over previous line center measurements of this band. We also calculate the molecular constants for the band, yielding improved determination of the band origin frequency and the excited-state molecular constants.

  18. Prediction of spectral shifts proportional to source distances by time-varying frequency or wavelength selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, V.

    2008-08-01

    Any frequency selective device with an ongoing drift will cause observed spectra to be variously and simultaneously scaled in proportion to their source distances. The reason is that detectors after the drifting selection will integrate instantaneous electric or magnetic field values from successive sinusoids, and these sinusoids would differ in both frequency and phase. Phase differences between frequencies are ordinarily irrelevant, and recalibration procedures at most correct for frequency differences. With drifting selection, however, each integrated field value comes from the sinusoid of the instantaneously selected frequency at its instantaneous received phase, hence the waveform constructed by the integration will follow the drifting selection with a phase acceleration given by the drift rate times the slope of the received phase spectrum. A phase acceleration is literally a frequency shift, and the phase spectrum slope of a received waveform is an asymptotic measure of the source distance, as the path delay presents phase offsets proportional to frequency times the distance, and eventually exceeding all initial phase differences. Tunable optics may soon be fast enough for realizing such shifts by Fourier switching, and could lead to pocket X-ray devices; sources continuously variable from RF to gamma rays; capacity multiplication with jamming and noise immunity in both fibre and radio channels, passive ranging from ground to deep space; etc.

  19. Addressing the "Shift": Preparing Preservice Secondary Teachers for the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Stephanie M.; Hart, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Common Core represents a shift in content-area literacy instruction, broadening from a narrow focus on generalizable skills to also include a disciplinary perspective of literacies specific to the specialized language and habits of thinking within particular subjects. This requires teachers to be knowledgeable in their content and possess…

  20. Shifting the HIV Training and Research Paradigm to Address Disparities in HIV Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levison, Julie H; Alegría, Margarita

    2016-09-01

    Tailored programs to diversify the pool of HIV/AIDS investigators and provide sufficient training and support for minority investigators to compete successfully are uncommon in the US and abroad. This paper encourages a shift in the HIV/AIDS training and research paradigm to effectively train and mentor Latino researchers in the US, Latin America and the Caribbean. We suggest three strategies to accomplish this: (1) coaching senior administrative and academic staff of HIV/AIDS training programs on the needs, values, and experiences unique to Latino investigators; (2) encouraging mentors to be receptive to a different set of research questions and approaches that Latino researchers offer due to their life experiences and perspectives; and (3) creating a virtual infrastructure to share resources and tackle challenges faced by minority researchers. Shifts in the research paradigm to include, retain, and promote Latino HIV/AIDS researchers will benefit the scientific process and the patients and communities who await the promise of HIV/AIDS research. PMID:27501811

  1. Tunable microwave generation based on a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode fiber laser using a phase-shifted grating on a triangular cantilever.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Meng; Lin, Bo; Shum, Perry Ping; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Dong, Xinyong; Sun, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Frequency tunable microwave signal generation, based on a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser, incorporating a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) with two π-phase shifts, is demonstrated. In the proposed configuration, the PS-FBG with two ultranarrow transmission bands is embedded in a triangular cantilever to serve as a wavelength spacing tunable filter with a fixed center wavelength by applying various strains on the cantilever. A section of unpumped EDF is employed as a saturable absorber to ensure SLM operation in each of the two lasing lines. By beating the two wavelengths at a photodiode, a tunable microwave signal ranging from 8.835 to 24.360 GHz is successfully achieved.

  2. A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting fibre readout for search of η-nucleus bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betigeri, M. G.; Biswas, P. K.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Jahn, R.; Guha, S.; Hawranek, P.; Jain, B. K.; Jawale, S. B.; Jha, V.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Kirillov, Da.; Kirillov, Di.; Kolev, D.; Kravcikova, M.; Kutsarova, T.; Lesiak, M.; Lieb, J.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Martinska, G.; Nedev, S.; Piskunov, N.; Prasuhn, D.; Protić, D.; Ritman, J.; von Rossen, P.; Roy, B. J.; Shukla, P.; Sitnik, I.; Siudak, R.; Tsenov, R.; Ulicny, M.; Urban, J.; Vankova, G.; GEM Collaboration

    2007-07-01

    A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting optical fibre readout has been designed and built to detect the decay particles of η-nucleus bound system (the so-called η-mesic nuclei), namely, protons and pions. The detector, named as ENSTAR detector, consists of 122 pieces of plastic scintillator of various shapes and sizes, which are arranged in a cylindrical geometry to provide particle identification, energy loss and coarse position information for these particles. A solid angle coverage of ˜95% of total 4 π is obtained in the present design of the detector. Monte Carlo phase space calculations performed to simulate the formation and decay of η-mesic nuclei suggest that its decay particles, the protons and pions are emitted with an opening angle of 150±20∘, and with energies in the range of 25-300 and 225-450 MeV, respectively. The detailed GEANT simulations show that ˜80 % of the decay particles (protons and pions) can be detected within ENSTAR. Several test measurements using alpha source, cosmic-ray muons, etc. have been carried out to study the response of ENSTAR scintillator pieces. The in-beam tests of fully assembled detector with proton beam of momentum 870 MeV/c from the Cooler synchrotron COSY have been performed. The test results show that the scintillator fibre design chosen for the detector has performed satisfactorily well. The present article describes the detector design, simulation studies, construction details and test results.

  3. Photonic crystal fiber with a dual-frequency addressable liquid crystal: behavior in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, A; Kitzerow, H-S; Schwuchow, A; Kobelke, J; Bartelt, H

    2008-11-10

    Wave-guiding in the visible spectral range is investigated for a micro-structured crystal fiber filled with a dual-frequency addressable nematic liquid crystal mixture. The fiber exhibits a solid core surrounded by just 4 rings of cylindrical holes. Control of the liquid crystal alignment by anchoring agents permits relatively low attenuation. Samples with different anchoring conditions at the interface of the silica glass and the liquid crystal show different transmission properties and switching behavior. Polarization dependent and independent fiber optic switching is observed. Due to a dualfrequency addressing scheme, active switching to both states with enhanced and reduced transmission becomes possible for planar anchoring. Even a non-perfect fiber shows reasonable transmission and a variety of interesting effects.

  4. Photonic crystal fiber with a dual-frequency addressable liquid crystal: behavior in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, A; Kitzerow, H-S; Schwuchow, A; Kobelke, J; Bartelt, H

    2008-11-10

    Wave-guiding in the visible spectral range is investigated for a micro-structured crystal fiber filled with a dual-frequency addressable nematic liquid crystal mixture. The fiber exhibits a solid core surrounded by just 4 rings of cylindrical holes. Control of the liquid crystal alignment by anchoring agents permits relatively low attenuation. Samples with different anchoring conditions at the interface of the silica glass and the liquid crystal show different transmission properties and switching behavior. Polarization dependent and independent fiber optic switching is observed. Due to a dualfrequency addressing scheme, active switching to both states with enhanced and reduced transmission becomes possible for planar anchoring. Even a non-perfect fiber shows reasonable transmission and a variety of interesting effects. PMID:19582031

  5. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3 μm for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ∼1 μm can be transferred to the valuable 1.3 μm wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4 μm. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90 fs.

  6. The effects of longitudinal chromatic aberration and a shift in the peak of the middle-wavelength sensitive cone fundamental on cone contrast.

    PubMed

    Rucker, F J; Osorio, D

    2008-09-01

    Longitudinal chromatic aberration is a well-known imperfection of visual optics, but the consequences in natural conditions, and for the evolution of receptor spectral sensitivities are less well understood. This paper examines how chromatic aberration affects image quality in the middle-wavelength sensitive (M-) cones, viewing broad-band spectra, over a range of spatial frequencies and focal planes. We also model the effects on M-cone contrast of moving the M-cone fundamental relative to the long- and middle-wavelength (L- and M-cone) fundamentals, while the eye is accommodated at different focal planes or at a focal plane that maximizes luminance contrast. When the focal plane shifts towards longer (650 nm) or shorter wavelengths (420 nm) the effects on M-cone contrast are large: longitudinal chromatic aberration causes total loss of M-cone contrast above 10-20 c/d. In comparison, the shift of the M-cone fundamental causes smaller effects on M-cone contrast. At 10 c/d a shift in the peak of the M-cone spectrum from 560 to 460 nm decreases M-cone contrast by 30%, while a 10 nm blue-shift causes only a minor loss of contrast. However, a noticeable loss of contrast may be seen if the eye is focused at focal planes other than that which maximizes luminance contrast. The presence of separate long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones therefore has a small, but not insignificant cost to the retinal image via longitudinal chromatic aberration. This aberration may therefore be a factor limiting evolution of visual pigments and trichromatic color vision. PMID:18639571

  7. Method of calibration to correct for cloud-induced wavelength shifts in the Aura satellite's Ozone Monitoring Instrument.

    PubMed

    Voors, Robert; Dobber, Marcel; Dirksen, Ruud; Levelt, Pieternel

    2006-05-20

    The in-flight wavelength calibration for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument is discussed. The observed variability in the wavelength scale is two orders of magnitude larger than caused by temperature changes in the instrument. These wavelength variations are the result of rapid changes in time in the radiance levels during an individual observation in the presence of clouds or snow and ice. We have developed a data processing method to account and correct for these changes. In February 2005 this correction was implemented in the official data processing stream. We explain in detail how and how accurately this method works. Before correction, the error in the wavelength scale can be as much as a few tenths of a pixel; after correction it is mostly less than 1/100th of a pixel, which is the required preflight accuracy. This means that higher-level products such as the total column amounts of ozone, NO2, and SO2 are not significantly affected. It is expected that these wavelength variations will be observed in other hyperspectral Earth observation spectrometers and that the correction mechanism should apply equally well.

  8. Photon detectors with high quantum efficiency at NUV range using a confinement of wavelength-shifted signals and optical couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hadaway, J.; Pakhomov, A.; Takizawa, Y.

    Near-UV wavelengths 300 - 400 nm have been in a death-valley for photon detectors due to very low quantum efficiencies QE in this range Conventional bi-alkali photocathodes of PMTs do not have QE better than 20-26 Much better photo-cathodes like GaAsP GaN and similar give better efficiencies but only at wavelengths 400nm and are severely plagued by very short lifetimes Avalanche Photo-diodes perform better at low temperatures but no better than 35 QE in the NUV region Silicon Photo-multipliers at Geiger mode SiPM with micro-pixels have high QEs 90 like CCD and CMOS as bare silicon but are severely plagued by very poor geometrical fill-factors 30 and their overallQMis limited to no better than 20 at NUV regime An optical interference-filter works as a half-mirror passing more than 90 of NUV lights 300-400 nm and reflect more than 90 of longer wavelength lights 400 nm UV photons after converted into blue-green lights by wavelength-shifter are reflected back and confined without much loss back into space A specific dichroic interference mirror with WLS was made by RIKEN Japan H Shimizu Y Takahashi Y Takizawa Patent pending 2000-399940 for this optical principle It also allows a better use of limited photo-sensitive micro-cells of SiPM overcoming the past serious problem of its very poor fill-factor As a result Half-mirror SiPM yields high final efficiency for NUV photons This new detector TRAPPER with optical couplers for SiPM or by GaAsP PMTs could be used for photon-hungry space experiments at NUV range TRAPPER

  9. Isotope shift measurements in the 660 spectral lines of Er I covering the 340-605 nm wavelength region with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankush, B. K.; Deo, M. N.

    2015-04-01

    Isotope shift measurements in 660 spectral lines covering the 340-605 nm wavelength region of Er I were carried out using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. The spectra were recorded using a liquid nitrogen cooled hollow cathode discharge source containing highly enriched 166Er and 170Er isotopes in the oxide form and two different detectors namely PMT and silicon photo diodes. Out of 660 spectral lines involving 216 even and 182 odd Er I levels, the isotope shift data were new in the 406 lines. On the basis of their level isotope shifts out of 114 unassigned even parity levels 27 levels assigned to 4f116s26p, 72 to 4f115d6s6p and 15 to 4f126s6d configuration whereas 12 each of unassigned odd parity levels assigned to 4f115d6s2, and 4f126s6p configurations and 16 unassigned odd parity levels assigned to 4f115d26s configuration. Configuration mixing for 30 odd parity energy levels has been theoretically calculated applying 'Sharing Rule' to the experimentally derived level isotope shifts, which were finally compared with mixings available in the literature.

  10. Intrapulse temporal and wavelength shifts of a high-power 2.1-µm Ho:YAG laser and their potential influence on atmospheric lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, M; Killinger, D K

    1994-11-20

    A high-power, flash-lamp-pumped, Q-switched Ho:YAG laser has been developed to produce up to 150 mJ in a 100-ns Q-switched pulse. The Ho laser was initially used in a direct detection lidar-differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to measure vertical density profiles of aerosols and water vapor in the atmosphere. It was found, however, that the Ho laser operated simultaneously on two closely spaced spectral emission wavelengths (2.090 and 2.097 µm) and that the distribution of energy between the two wavelengths could change significantly on time scales of several seconds to minutes. Such intrapulse temporal and wavelength shifts were found to alter the atmospheric lidar return significantly because one of the laser lines coincided with a water vapor absorption line in the atmosphere. This laser spectral output problem was overcome by the use of intracavity étalons that controlled the laser spectral-temporal characteristics but reduced the laser output energy to approximately 75 mJ/pulse in a 100-ns pulse length. These results are important as they serve to point out the difficulties of developing and using a high-power 2.1- µm Ho laser for atmospheric lidar when high-resolution spectral and temporal characteristics can significantly influence the lidar return and be misinterpreted as resulting from atmospheric signals.

  11. Center wavelength shift dependence on substrate coefficient of thermal expansion for optical thin-film interference filters deposited by ion-beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey T

    2004-08-10

    Single-layer films of Ta2O5 and multilayer thin-film filters of Ta2O5 and SiO2 were deposited by ion-beam-sputter deposition. Postdeposition annealing of the structures resulted in increased optical thickness of the films, resulting in an upward shift in the wavelength of the transmission-reflection spectra. Modeling of the single-layer films by means of the effective media approximation indicates an increase in the void fraction of the film after annealing. This increase is consistent with an observed decrease in refractive index and an increase in physical film thickness. The multilayer structures, deposited on substrates of varying coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), were annealed at various temperatures, and the change in the center wavelength was measured. The measured change is dependent on the annealing temperature and the substrate CTE, indicating that the increase in the void fraction is caused in part by thermally induced stress during the annealing process. A simple model is proposed that relates the void fraction present in the films after annealing with the substrate CTE and the annealing temperature.

  12. Raman Shifting a Tunable ArF Excimer Laser to Wavelengths of 190 to 240 nm With a Forced Convection Raman Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Tunable radiation, at ultraviolet wavelengths, is produced by Raman shifting a modified 285-mJ ArF excimer laser. Multiple Stokes outputs are observed in H2, CH4, D2, N2, SF6, and CF4 (20, 22, 53, 21, 2.1, and 0.35 percent, respectively). Numbers in parentheses are the first Stokes energy conversion efficiencies. We can access 70 percent of the frequency range 42000-52000 cm (exp -1) (190-240 nm) with Stokes energies that vary from 0.2 microJoule to 58 mJ inside the Raman cell. By using 110 mJ of pump energy and D 2 , the tunable first Stokes energy varies over the 29-58 mJ range as the wavelength is tuned over the 204-206 nm range. Dependence on input energy, gas pressure, He mixture fraction, and circulation of the gas in the forced convection Raman cell is discussed; Stokes conversion is also discussed for laser repetition rates from 1 to 100 Hz. An empirical equation is given to determine whether forced convection can improve outputs for a given repetition rate.

  13. The influence of hyperfine structure and isotope shift on the detection of Rb by 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry—experimental verification of simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Jörgen; Axner, Ove

    1998-12-01

    This work presents an experimental verification of a previously developed methodology for simulation of the 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry technique (2 f-WM-DLAS) when the influence of hyperfine structure, isotope shift and collisional broadening and shift of an atomic transition is taken into account [J. Gustafsson, D. Rojas and O. Axner, Spectrochim. Acta, 52B, 1937-1953 (1997)]. The pilot element in the simulations was Rb, detected at the 780 nm 5s 2S 1/2-5p 2P 3/2 transition, in low-pressure cells and atmospheric-pressure reservoirs (e.g. graphite furnaces). This experimental investigation verifies that the simulations are able to predict, with good accuracy, experimental 2 f-WM signals from Rb atoms under both low-pressure, room-temperature conditions and atmospheric-pressure, high-temperature conditions. This implies that the previously published simulation methodology can be used for predicting and optimizing 2 f-WM signal strengths and shapes from Rb atoms (and thereby presumably also from other atoms) under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions.

  14. The Buffalo Model: Shifting the Focus of Clinical Licensure Exams in Dentistry to Address Ethical Concerns Regarding Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Gambacorta, Joseph E; Glick, Michael; Anker, Ashley E; Shampaine, Guy S

    2016-06-01

    Most jurisdictions grant dental licensure to graduating students following successful completion of a clinical exam. Testing agencies, which are independent of dental schools, nevertheless conduct their exams at school facilities. Patient participation in these exams raises ethical concerns regarding such issues as unlicensed providers' performing irreversible procedures with minimal supervision and graduates' limited accessibility to provide follow-up treatment. To address these concerns, a collaborative effort between University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine faculty and testing agency personnel was launched. The aims of this article are to describe the development and implementation of the resulting Buffalo Model, to highlight ethical advantages in its application, and to identify areas of improvement to be addressed in future iterations. With the Buffalo Model, modifications were made to the traditional exam format in order to integrate the exam into the school curriculum, enabling candidates to take it at various points during their fourth year. In addition, after calibration of school faculty members, 98.5% of cases verified by faculty were accepted by the Commission on Dental Competency Assessments for use in the exam. In two cases, restorative treatment completed during the exam did not meet the school's competency standard. This new approach ameliorates ethical concerns associated with clinical licensure exams because treatment is provided only to patients of record within a sequenced treatment plan and timely and appropriate treatment is provided to all patients. The results of this first year of implementation also suggest that calibrated faculty members will not show bias in the selection of lesions or competency evaluations of candidates.

  15. Utilization of wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for simultaneous detection of alpha/beta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifergan, Y.; Dadon, S.; Israelashvili, I.; Osovizky, A.; Gonen, E.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Smadja, D.; Knafo, Y.; Ginzburg, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Cohen, Y.; Mazor, T.

    2015-06-01

    Low level radioactive surface contamination measurements require lightweight, large area and high efficiency detector. In most existing scintillation detectors there is a tradeoff between effective area and scintillation light collection. By using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers the scintillation light may be collected efficiently also in a large area detector. In this study, WLS fibers were coupled to a beta sensitive plastic scintillator layer and to a alpha sensitive silver-activated zinc sulfide ZnS(Ag) layer for detecting both alpha and beta particles. The WLS fibers collect the scintillation light from the whole detector and transfer it to a single PMT. This first prototype unique configuration enables monitoring radioactive contaminated surfaces by both sides of the detector and provides high gamma rejection. In this paper, the detector structure, as well as the detector's measured linear response, will be described. The measured detection efficiency of 238Pu alpha particles (5.5 MeV) is ~63%. The measured detection efficiency for beta particles is ~89% for 90Sr-90Y (average energy of 195.8 keV, 934.8 keV), ~50% for 36Cl (average energy of 251.3 keV), and 35% for 137Cs (average energy of 156.8 keV).

  16. Shifting wavelengths of ultraweak photon emissions from dying melanoma cells: their chemical enhancement and blocking are predicted by Cosic's theory of resonant recognition model for macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Dotta, Blake T; Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M; Lafrenie, Robert M; Persinger, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    During the first 24 h after removal from incubation, melanoma cells in culture displayed reliable increases in emissions of photons of specific wavelengths during discrete portions of this interval. Applications of specific filters revealed marked and protracted increases in infrared (950 nm) photons about 7 h after removal followed 3 h later by marked and protracted increases in near ultraviolet (370 nm) photon emissions. Specific wavelengths within the visible (400 to 800 nm) peaked 12 to 24 h later. Specific activators or inhibitors for specific wavelengths based upon Cosic's resonant recognition model elicited either enhancement or diminishment of photons at the specific wavelength as predicted. Inhibitors or activators predicted for other wavelengths, even within 10 nm, were less or not effective. There is now evidence for quantitative coupling between the wavelength of photon emissions and intrinsic cellular chemistry. The results are consistent with initial activation of signaling molecules associated with infrared followed about 3 h later by growth and protein-structural factors associated with ultraviolet. The greater-than-expected photon counts compared with raw measures through the various filters, which also function as reflective material to other photons, suggest that photons of different wavelengths might be self-stimulatory and could play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication.

  17. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  18. Broadband ultrasound field mapping system using a wavelength tuned, optically scanned focused laser beam to address a Fabry Perot polymer film sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2006-07-01

    An optical system for rapidly mapping broad-band ultrasound fields with high spatial resolution has been developed. The transduction mechanism is based upon the detection of acoustically induced changes in the optical thickness of a thin polymer film acting as a Fabry Perot sensing interferometer (FPI). By using a PC-controlled galvanometer mirror to line-scan a focused laser beam over the surface of the FPI, and a wavelength-tuned phase bias control system to optimally set the FPI working point, a notional 1D ultrasound array was synthesized. This system enabled ultrasound fields to be mapped over an aperture of 40 mm, in 50-microm steps with an optically defined element size of 50 microm and an acquisition time of 50 ms per step. The sensor comprised a 38-microm polymer film FPI which was directly vacuum-deposited onto an impedance-matched polycarbonate backing stub. The -3 dB acoustic bandwidth of the sensor was 300 kHz to 28 MHz and the peak noise-equivalent-pressure was 10 kPa over a 20-MHz measurement bandwidth. To demonstrate the system, the outputs of various planar and focused pulsed ultrasound transducers with operating frequencies in the range 3.5 to 20 MHz were mapped. It is considered that this approach offers a practical and inexpensive alternative to piezoelectric-based arrays and scanning systems for rapid transducer field characterization and biomedical and industrial ultrasonic imaging applications. PMID:16889340

  19. Single Brillouin frequency shifted S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Hambali, N. A. M. Ahmad; Shahimin, M. M.; Wahid, M. H. A.; Anwar, Nur Elina; Alahmed, Zeyad A.; Chyský, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is focusing on simulation and analyzing of S-band multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser performance utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier in ring cavity. Raman amplifier-average power model is employed for signal amplification. This laser system is operates in S-band wavelength region due to vast demanding on transmitting the information. Multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on hybrid Brillouin-Raman gain configuration supported by Raman scattering effect have attracted significant research interest due to its ability to produced multi-wavelength signals from a single light source. In multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber, single mode fiber is utilized as the nonlinear gain medium. From output results, 90% output coupling ratio has ability to provide the maximum average output power of 43 dBm at Brillouin pump power of 20 dBm and Raman pump power of 14 dBm. Furthermore, multi-wavelength Brillouin-Raman fiber laser utilizing fiber Bragg grating and Raman amplifier is capable of generated 7 Brillouin Stokes signals at 1480 nm, 1510 nm and 1530 nm.

  20. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  1. BODIPY-modified Ru(II) arene complex--a new ligand dissociation mechanism and a novel strategy to red shift the photoactivation wavelength of anticancer metallodrugs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian-Xiong; Lei, Wan-Hua; Hou, Yuan-Jun; Chen, Yong-Jie; Li, Chao; Zhang, Bao-Wen; Wang, Xue-Song

    2013-02-28

    A Ru(II) arene complex [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(bpy)(py-BODIPY)](PF(6))(2), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine and py-BODIPY is a 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene dye containing a pyridine group at the 8-position, was designed and synthesized. BODIPY modification renders the monodentate pyridine ligand with long wavelength absorbing capability, and an absorption maximum at 504 nm. Upon selective irradiation of the absorption band of the py-BODIPY ligand, the dissociation of the monodentate ligand occurs efficiently, followed by substitution by 9-ethylguanine if it is present in the solution. The photoinduced ligand dissociation quantum yield was measured to be 4.1% at 480 nm. The photoinduced electron transfer from the BODIPY chromophore to the Ru(II) arene moiety plays an important role in the ligand dissociation. Such a photosensitization strategy can be utilized to develop novel anticancer metallodrugs that may respond to light in the phototherapeutic window (650-900 nm).

  2. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage. PMID:26582021

  3. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage.

  4. Using Dual-wavelength Fiber Bragg Gratings for Temperature and Strain Sensing at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Prosser, William H.; Rogowski, Robert S.; DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2003-01-01

    By using dual-wavelength fiber-optic Bragg gratings, a new technique has been developed for sensing both temperature and strain simultaneously in cryogenic temperature range. Two Bragg gratings with different wavelengths were inscribed at the same location in an optical fiber to form a dual-wavelength sensor. By measuring the wavelength shifts that resulted from the fiber being subjected to different temperatures and strains, the wavelength-dependent thermo-optic coefficients and photoelastic coefficients of the fiber were determined. These coefficients were used to construct the elements of the K matrix, which enables to determine inversely the strain and temperature changes by measuring the wavelength shifts of the dual-wavelength Bragg grating. In this study, measurements were made over the temperature range from room temperature down to about 10 K, addressing much of the low temperature range of cryogenic tanks. A structure transition of the optical fiber during the temperature change was found from about 70 K to 140 K. This transition caused splitting of the waveforms characterizing the Bragg gratings, and the determination of wavelength shifts was consequently complicated. Several alternatives are proposed to resolve this problem. The effectiveness and sensitivities of these measurements in different temperature ranges are discussed. The separation of two wavelengths for the dual-wavelength Bragg grating has been widened to increase the sensitivities of measurement; however, this separation can still be covered in the scanning range from single scanning laser.

  5. Simultaneous Temperature and Strain Sensing for Cryogenic Applications Using Dual-Wavelength Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Prosser, William H.

    2003-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for sensing both temperature and strain simultaneously by using dual-wavelength fiber-optic Bragg gratings. Two Bragg gratings with different wavelengths were inscribed at the same location in an optical fiber to form a sensor. By measuring the wavelength shifts that resulted from the fiber being subjected to different temperatures and strains, the wavelength-dependent thermo-optic coefficients and photoelastic coefficients of the fiber were determined. This enables the simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain. In this study, measurements were made over the temperature range from room temperature down to about 10 K, addressing much of the low temperature range of cryogenic tanks. A structure transition of the optical fiber during the temperature change was found. This transition caused splitting of the waveforms characterizing the Bragg gratings, and the determination of wavelength shifts was consequently complicated. The effectiveness and sensitivities of these measurements in different temperature ranges are also discussed.

  6. High-power frequency comb in the range of 2-2.15  μm based on a holmium fiber amplifier seeded by wavelength-shifted Raman solitons from an erbium-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate a room-temperature high-power frequency comb source covering the spectral region from 2 to 2.15 μm. The source is based on a femtosecond erbium-fiber laser operating at 1.55 μm with a repetition rate of 250 MHz, wavelength-shifted up to 2.06 μm by the solitonic Raman effect, seeding a large-mode-area holmium (Ho) fiber amplifier pumped by a thulium (Tm) fiber laser emitting at 1.94 μm. The frequency comb has an integrated power of 2 W, with overall power fluctuations as low as 0.3%. The beatnote between the comb and a high-spectral-purity, single-frequency Tm-Ho laser has a linewidth of 32 kHz over 1 ms observation time, with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 30 dB.

  7. Spectral shift amplification.

    PubMed

    Han, Pin

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of a limited bandwidth light wave reflected from a material interface is studied theoretically. It is shown that near the anomalous dispersion zone, if the incident center wavelength is shifted by a small amount, this shift can be amplified by about three times in the reflected light. PMID:23202082

  8. Spectral shift amplification.

    PubMed

    Han, Pin

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of a limited bandwidth light wave reflected from a material interface is studied theoretically. It is shown that near the anomalous dispersion zone, if the incident center wavelength is shifted by a small amount, this shift can be amplified by about three times in the reflected light.

  9. Addressing Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg; Helmig, Mary; Kaplan, Bill; Kosch, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Four camp directors discuss how the September 11 tragedy and current world events will affect their camps. They describe how they are addressing safety concerns, working with parents, cooperating with outside agencies, hiring and screening international staff, and revising emergency plans. Camps must continue to offer community and support to…

  10. Controlled peak wavelength shift of Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} (S {sub y} Se{sub 1-} {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+} phosphor for LED application

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, Mihail . E-mail: nazarov.mihail@samsung.com; Yoon, Chulsoo

    2006-08-15

    The highly efficient red-orange-yellow-emitting phosphor (Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} )(S{sub 1-} {sub y} Se {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+} in combination with commercial green phosphor SrGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} and blue LED are proposed for a three-band white LED. The luminescence mechanism and optimization parameters are discussed on the basis of proposed peak wavelength diagram. - Graphical abstract: 'Peak wavelength diagram for (Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} )(S{sub 1-} {sub y} Se {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+}'.

  11. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  12. Dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with tunable wavelength spacing using a twin core fiber-based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guolu; Lou, Shuqin; Wang, Xin; Han, Bolin

    2014-05-01

    A dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with tunable wavelength spacing was proposed and experimentally demonstrated by using a twin core fiber (TCF)-based filter. Benefiting from the polarization dependence of the TCF-based filter, the laser operated in dual-wavelength oscillation with two orthogonal polarization states. By adjusting the polarization controller, the wavelength spacing was tuned from 0.1 nm to 1.2 nm without shifting the centre position of the two wavelengths. By stretching the TCF, the two wavelengths were simultaneously tuned with fixed wavelength spacing. Such a dual-wavelength fiber laser could find applications in optical fiber sensors and microwave photonics generation.

  13. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  14. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  15. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  16. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Ghatowar, P S

    1993-07-01

    The Union Deputy Minister of Health and Family Welfare in India addressed the 35th convocation of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay in 1993. Officials in developing countries have been concerned about population growth for more than 30 years and have instituted policies to reduce population growth. In the 1960s, population growth in developing countries was around 2.5%, but today it is about 2%. Despite this decline, the world will have 1 billion more individuals by the year 2001. 95% of these new people will be born in developing countries. India's population size is so great that India does not have the time to wait for development to reduce population growth. Population needs to be viewed as an integrated part of overall development, since it is linked to poverty, illiteracy, environmental damage, gender issues, and reproductive health. Despite a large population size, India has made some important advancements in health and family planning. For example, India has reduced population growth (to 2.14% annually between 1981-1991), infant mortality, and its birth rate. It has increased the contraceptive use rate and life expectancy. Its southern states have been more successful at achieving demographic goals than have the northern states. India needs to implement efforts to improve living conditions, to change attitudes and perceptions about small families and contraception, and to promote family planning acceptance earlier among young couples. Improvement of living conditions is especially important in India, since almost 33% of the people live in poverty. India needs to invest in nutrition, health, and education. The mass media and nongovernmental organizations need to create population awareness and demand for family planning services. Improvement in women's status accelerates fertility decline, as has happened in Kerala State. The government needs to facilitate generation of jobs. Community participation is needed for India to achieve

  17. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  18. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  19. Generalized phase-shifting color digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takanori; Kawakami, Takaaki; Shinomura, Kazuma

    2016-06-01

    Two methods to apply the generalized phase-shifting digital holography to color digital holography are proposed. One is wave-splitting generalized phase-shifting color digital holography. This is realized by using a color Bayer camera. Another is multiple exposure generalized phase-shifting color digital holography. This is realized by the wavelength-dependent phase-shifting devices. Experimental results for both generalized phase-shifting color digital holography are presented to confirm the proposed methods.

  20. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  1. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  2. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  3. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  4. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  5. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths. PMID:26723331

  6. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths.

  7. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  8. Plasmonic All-Optical Tunable Wavelength Shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Flugel, B.; Macararenhas, A.; Snoke, D. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K.

    2007-12-01

    At present, wavelength-division-multiplexed fibre lines routinely operate at 10 Gbit s{sup -1} per channel. The transition from static-path networks to true all-optical networks encompassing many nodes, in which channels are added/dropped and efficiently reassigned, will require improved tools for all-optical wavelength shifting. Specifically, one must be able to shift the carrier wavelength (frequency) of an optical data signal over tens of nanometres (a THz range) without the bottleneck of electrical conversion. Popular approaches to this problem make use of the nonlinear interaction between two wavelengths within a semiconductor optical amplifier whereas more novel methods invoke terahertz-frequency electro-optic modulation and polaritons. Here we outline the principles and demonstrate the use of optically excited plasmons as a tunable frequency source that can be mixed with a laser frequency through Raman scattering. The scheme is all-optical and enables dynamical control of the output carrier wavelength simply by varying the power of a control laser.

  9. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  11. Light detection and the wavelength shifter deposition in DEAP-3600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerman, B.; Retière, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Dark matter Experiment using Argon Pulse-shape discrimination (DEAP) uses liquid argon as a target medium to perform a direct-detection dark matter search. The 3600 kg liquid argon target volume is housed in a spherical acrylic vessel and viewed by a surrounding array of photomultiplier tubes. Ionizing particles in the argon volume produce scintillation light which must be wavelength shifted to be detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Argon scintillation and wavelength shifting, along with details on the application of the wavelength shifter to the inner surface of the acrylic vessel are presented.

  12. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  13. Long-wavelength shift and enhanced room temperature photoluminescence efficiency in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs-based heterostructures emitting in the spectral range of 1.0–1.2 μm due to increased charge carrier's localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhkov, D. I. Yablonsky, A. N.; Morozov, S. V.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a study of the photoluminescence (PL) temperature dependence in quantum well GaAs/GaAsSb and double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with different parameters of GaAsSb and InGaAs layers has been performed. It has been demonstrated that in double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, a significant shift of the PL peak to a longer-wavelength region (up to 1.2 μm) and a considerable reduction in the PL thermal quenching in comparison with GaAs/GaAsSb structures can be obtained due to better localization of charge carriers in the double quantum well. For InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, an additional channel of radiative recombination with participation of the excited energy states in the quantum well, competing with the main ground-state radiative transition, has been revealed.

  14. Dispersion management for wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton transmission.

    PubMed

    Forysiak, W; Devaney, J F; Smith, N J; Doran, N J

    1997-05-01

    Residual frequency shifts that are due to two-soliton collisions in stepwise exponentially dispersion-tapered fiber are calculated. Two-step dispersion profiles to minimize the frequency shifts and associated timing jitter are specifically identified. These profiles will improve the performance of wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems and permit operation with longer amplifier spans over an increased bandwidth. PMID:18185603

  15. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  16. Dynamic wavelength conversion in copropagating slow-light pulses.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Baba, T

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained by controlling copropagating slow-light signal and control pulse trajectories. Our method is based on the understanding that conventional resonator-based DWC can be generalized, and is linked to cross-phase modulation. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated by two-photon absorption of the control pulse dynamically shift the signal wavelength. Matching the group velocities of the two pulses enhances the shift, elongating the interaction length. We demonstrate an extremely large wavelength shift in DWC (4.9 nm blueshift) for the signal wavelength. Although DWC is similar to the Doppler effect, we highlight their essential differences. PMID:24949770

  17. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  18. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties. PMID:27003328

  19. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties.

  20. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  1. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  2. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  3. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  4. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  5. Adaptive gain, equalization, and wavelength stabilization techniques for silicon photonic microring resonator-based optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Samuel; Chiang, Patrick; Yu, Kunzhi; Bai, Rui; Li, Cheng; Chen, Chin-Hui; Fiorentino, Marco; Beausoleil, Ray; Li, Hao; Shafik, Ayman; Titriku, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Interconnect architectures based on high-Q silicon photonic microring resonator devices offer a promising solution to address the dramatic increase in datacenter I/O bandwidth demands due to their ability to realize wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) in a compact and energy efficient manner. However, challenges exist in realizing efficient receivers for these systems due to varying per-channel link budgets, sensitivity requirements, and ring resonance wavelength shifts. This paper reports on adaptive optical receiver design techniques which address these issues and have been demonstrated in two hybrid-integrated prototypes based on microring drop filters and waveguide photodetectors implemented in a 130nm SOI process and high-speed optical front-ends designed in 65nm CMOS. A 10Gb/s powerscalable architecture employs supply voltage scaling of a three inverter-stage transimpedance amplifier (TIA) that is adapted with an eye-monitor control loop to yield the necessary sensitivity for a given channel. As reduction of TIA input-referred noise is more critical at higher data rates, a 25Gb/s design utilizes a large input-stage feedback resistor TIA cascaded with a continuous-time linear equalizer (CTLE) that compensates for the increased input pole. When tested with a waveguide Ge PD with 0.45A/W responsivity, this topology achieves 25Gb/s operation with -8.2dBm sensitivity at a BER=10-12. In order to address microring drop filters sensitivity to fabrication tolerances and thermal variations, efficient wavelength-stabilization control loops are necessary. A peak-power-based monitoring loop which locks the drop filter to the input wavelength, while achieving compatibility with the high-speed TIA offset-correction feedback loop is implemented with a 0.7nm tuning range at 43μW/GHz efficiency.

  6. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks. PMID:26196619

  7. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks.

  8. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  9. Aperture-synthesis interferometry at optical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Bernard F.

    1987-01-01

    The prospects for applying aperture-synthesis interferometry to the optical domain are reviewed. The radio examples such as the VLA provide a model, since the concepts are equally valid for radio and optical wavelengths. If scientific problems at the milliarc-second resolution level (or better) are to be addressed, a space-based optical array seems to be the only practical alternative, for the same reasons that dictated array development at radio wavelengths. One concept is examined, and speculations are offered concerning the prospects for developing real systems. Phase-coherence is strongly desired for a practical array, although self-calibration and phase-closure techniques allow one to relax the restriction on absolute phase stability. The design of an array must be guided by the scientific problems to be addressed.

  10. Dual-wavelength diode laser with electrically adjustable wavelength distance at 785  nm.

    PubMed

    Sumpf, Bernd; Kabitzke, Julia; Fricke, Jörg; Ressel, Peter; Müller, André; Maiwald, Martin; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-08-15

    A spectrally adjustable monolithic dual-wavelength diode laser at 785 nm as an excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is presented. The spectral distance between the two excitation wavelengths can be electrically adjusted between 0 and 2.0 nm using implemented heater elements above the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings. Output powers up to 180 mW at a temperature of 25°C were measured. The spectral width is smaller than 13 pm, limited by the spectrum analyzer. The device is well-suited for Raman spectroscopy, and the flexible spectral distance allows a target-specific adjustment of the excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). PMID:27519065

  11. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  12. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  13. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  14. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  15. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe. xml:lang="fr"

  16. Holographic topography using acousto-optically generated large synthetic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywickrema, U.; Beamer, D.; Banerjee, P.; Poon, T.-C.

    2016-03-01

    Digital holography uses phase imaging in a variety of techniques to produce a three-dimensional phase resolved image that includes accurate depth information about the object of interest. Multi-wavelength digital holography is an accurate method for measuring the topography of surfaces. Typically, the object phases are reconstructed for two wavelengths separately and the phase corresponding to the synthetic wavelength (obtained from the two wavelengths) is obtained by calculating the phase difference. Then the surface map can be obtained using proper phase-unwrapping techniques. Usually these synthetic wavelengths are on the order of microns which can be used to resolve depths on the order of microns. In this work, two extremely close wavelengths generated by an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) are used to perform two-wavelength digital holography. Since the difference between the two wavelengths is on the order of picometers, a large synthetic wavelength (on the order of centimeters) can be obtained which can be used to determine the topography of macroscopic surface features. Also since the synthetic wavelength is large, an accurate surface map can be obtained without using a phase-unwrapping technique. A 514 nm Argon-ion laser is used as the optical source, and used with an AOM to generate the zeroth-order and frequency-shifted first-order diffracted orders which are used as the two wavelengths. Both beams are aligned through the same spatial filter assembly. Holograms are captured sequentially using a typical Mach-Zehnder interferometric setup by blocking one beam at a time. Limitations of the large synthetic wavelength are also discussed.

  17. Variable addressability imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala, Kenneth Scott

    The use of variable addressability for creating an optimum human-machine interface is investigated. Current wide field optical systems present more information to the human visual system than it has the capacity to perceive. The axial resolution, and/or the field of view can be increased by minimizing the difference between what the eye can perceive and what the system presents. The variable addressability function was developed through the use of a human factors experiment that characterized the position of the eye during the simulated use of a binocular system. Applying the variable addressability function to a conventional optical design required the development of a new metric for evaluating the expected performance of the variable addressability system. The new metric couples psycho-visual data and traditional optical data in order to specify the required performance of the variable addressability system. A non-linear mapping of the pixels is required in order to have the system work most efficiently with the human visual system, while also compensating for eye motion. The non-linear mapping function, which is the backbone of the variable addressability technique, can be created using optical distortion. The lens and system design is demonstrated in two different spectral bands. One of the designs was fabricated, tested, and assembled into a prototype. Through a second human factors study aimed at measuring performance, the variable addressability prototype was directly compared to a uniform addressability prototype, quantifying the difference in performance for the two prototypes. The human factors results showed that the variable addressability prototype provided better resolution 13% of the time throughout the experiment, but was 15% slower in use than the uniform addressability prototype.

  18. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  19. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  20. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  1. Portable shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M[sup 3]CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M[sup 3]CA; like the M[sup 3]CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel.

  2. A novel technique for an integrated optical wavelength demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy Rabeh, M.; Mohanna, M.; Hosny, Tarek; Gabr, Mohamed I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new technique for optical wavelength demultiplexing (DEMUX) relaying on two phenomena: Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift and continuous refraction at a graded-index medium interface. In the first case, two light beams are totally reflected at a plane interface separating two dielectric lossless media. The reflected beams suffer different lateral shifts (GH shifts) depending on the wavelength; thus accomplishing the required spatial beam separation. In the second case, the two light beams have different "turning points" inside the graded index medium; hence, the "back-refracted" beams are spatially separated. In this paper, we optimized the conditions of operation of such demultiplexing technique. This makes possible the integration of such technique in "planar integrated-optics" structures which can be used reliably in optical fiber communication networks.

  3. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  4. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  5. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  6. Tunable and switchable dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on in-line tapered fiber filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, He; Cao, Ye

    2016-07-01

    A tunable and switchable dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) based on all-fiber single-mode tapered fiber structure has been demonstrated. By adjusting the variable optical attenuator (VOA), the laser can be switched between the single-wavelength mode and the dual-wavelength mode. When the temperature applied on the tapered fiber structure varies, the pass-band varies and the wavelength of the output laser shifts correspondingly. When the temperature changes from 30 °C to 180 °C, the central wavelength of the EDFL generated by branch A shifts from 1 550.7 nm to 1 560.3 nm, while that of branch B shifts from 1 530.8 nm to 1 540.4 nm, indicating the wavelength interval is tunable. These advantages enable this laser to be a potential candidate for high-capacity wavelength division multiplexing systems and mechanical sensors.

  7. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement. PMID:27131662

  8. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  9. Tunable all-optical wavelength broadcasting in a PPLN with multiple QPM peaks.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Meenu; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Pandiyan, Krishnamoorthy; Cha, Myoungsik; Kashyap, Raman

    2012-11-19

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable multiple-idler wavelength broadcasting of a signal to selective channels for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). This is based on cascaded χ(2) nonlinear mixing process in a novel multiple-QPM 10-mm-long periodically poled LiNbO3 having an aperiodic domain in the center. The idlers' spacing is varied utilizing detuning of the pump wavelength within the SHG bandwidth. The temperature-assisted tuning of QPM pump wavelengths allows shifting the idlers together to different set of WDM channels. Our experimental results indicate that an overall idler wavelength shift of less than 10 nm realized by selecting pump wavelengths via temperature tuning, is sufficient to cover up to 40 WDM channels for multiple idlers broadcasting.

  10. Method for measuring Doppler shifts in arc-heated flows.

    PubMed

    Aeschliman, D P; Hill, R A

    1972-01-01

    A novel method of determining both the Doppler and Stark shifts in a single measurement of spectral lines emitted by the arc-heated flow from a plasma jet has been successfully demonstrated. The method uses a spherical mirror arranged with its optical axis coincident with the optical axis of a Fabry-Perot interferometer and with its center of curvature at the center line of the flow. The common optical axis lies at an angle to the flow. With this system, both red-and blue-shifted line profiles are recorded in the same spectral scan. If conditions are such that the red-and blue-shifted profiles are not resolvable, the blue-shifted component is chopped so that the recorded signal consists of the envelopes of both the red-shifted profile and the superimposed red-and blue-shifted profiles. The wavelength difference between the blue-and red-shifted line profiles is exactly twice the Doppler shift integrated along a line of sight through the flow and is independent of a Stark shift. The Stark shift is given by the wavelength difference between the absolute line center and the midpoint of the red-and blue-shifted lines. Abel inversion of integrated line shift data has yielded radial velocity profiles to an accuracy of +/-3% in a supersonic, arc-heated argon flow.

  11. Holographic content addressable storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas; Reyes, George

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a Holographic Content Addressable Storage (HCAS) architecture. The HCAS systems consists of a DMD (Digital Micromirror Array) as the input Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), a CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) sensor as the output photodetector and a photorefractive crystal as the recording media. The HCAS system is capable of performing optical correlation of an input image/feature against massive reference data set stored in the holographic memory. Detailed system analysis will be reported in this paper.

  12. Gear shift control mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, D.A.

    1987-03-10

    A gear shift control mechanism is described comprising: multiple shift rods directed substantially parallel to one another, each rod carrying a shift fork for axial movement; a shift lever supported for pivotal movement about a first axis directed parallel to the axes of the shift rods and for pivotal movement about a second axis directed substantially perpendicular to the axes of the shift rods. The lever is moveable about the first axis and the second axis into engagement with a selected shift fork; interlock means located on each lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis for blocking engagement with the shift forks; detent means for holding the shift lever in multiple predetermined angular positions about the second axis; and spring means located on a lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis into interference contact with the shift forks for producing a force tending to resiliently bias the shift lever out of engagement with the selected shift fork.

  13. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  14. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  15. Thermal characterization of optical fibers using wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we report a new method of thermal characterization of optical fibers using wavelength-sweeping interferometry and discuss its advantages compared to other techniques. The setup consists of two temperature-stabilized interferometers, a reference Michelson and a Mach-Zehnder, containing the fiber under test. The wavelength sweep is produced by an infrared tunable laser diode. We obtained the global phase shift coefficients of a large effective area fiber and gold-coated fiber optics with a 10{sup -7} accuracy.

  16. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  17. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  18. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  19. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  20. A color sensor wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Jackson, Jarom; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Archibald, James

    2016-05-01

    We will discuss a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip consisting of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined with picometer-level precision and with picometer-scale calibration drift over a period longer than a month. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  1. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  2. Long wavelength vertical-cavity light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Gina Lee

    Long wavelength tunable transmitters are essential in the field of optical communications. Wavelength control and cost reduction are very important issues, especially in applications such as wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, where several closely spaced wavelengths are transmitted and processed simultaneously. This thesis introduces a transmitter design that can alleviate these problems. This work involves the development, fabrication, and characterization of a narrowband tunable resonant cavity light-emitting diode (LED). The emission is centered at 1.51 mum, an important wavelength for optical communications. The linewidth is only 4 nm and the tuning range covers 75 nm. Wafer bonding and surface micromachining techniques have been integrated in the design to produce a structure that combines the assets of each technology. Wafer bonding is used to build the base for a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) structure, which is composed of an InP-based active layer on a GaAs-based mirror. Surface micromachining is then used to fabricate the suspended top mirror of the VCSEL, in place of the traditional top mirror that is grown directly on the VCSEL structure. The suspended mirror moves towards the substrate with the application of a voltage, thus changing the Fabry-Perot cavity length and providing the wavelength tunability of the device. This transmitter design relaxes the need for preset wavelengths in VCSEL processing by allowing the user to adjust the central wavelength after processing. Arrays of transmitters with identical wavelengths for high power applications or with gradually decreasing emission wavelengths across a wafer can also be achieved. The tunability of the devices allows for real time wavelength monitoring and tracking to ensure stability of the wavelengths with temperature or environmental changes, as well as compensating for shifts in wavelength due to degradation of the devices over time. Due to the monolithic, vertical

  3. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), “Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities—Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015”, we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  4. Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health inequalities refer to health hazards disproportionately or unfairly distributed among the most vulnerable social groups, which are generally the most discriminated, poor populations and minorities affected by environmental risks. Although it has been known for a long time that health and disease are socially determined, only recently has this idea been incorporated into the conceptual and practical framework for the formulation of policies and strategies regarding health. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), "Addressing Environmental Health Inequalities-Proceedings from the ISEE Conference 2015", we incorporate nine papers that were presented at the 27th Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This small collection of articles provides a brief overview of the different aspects of this topic. Addressing environmental health inequalities is important for the transformation of our reality and for changing the actual development model towards more just, democratic, and sustainable societies driven by another form of relationship between nature, economy, science, and politics. PMID:27618906

  5. High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuechun; Li, Simin; Chen, Xiangfei; Li, Lianyan; Li, Jingsi; Zhang, Tingting; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Tang, Song; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H.; Qiu, Bocang

    2014-12-01

    Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of +/-0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of +/-0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

  6. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I.

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  7. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  8. Bax: Addressed to kill.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Manon, Stéphen

    2011-09-01

    The pro-apoptototic protein Bax (Bcl-2 Associated protein X) plays a central role in the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. In healthy mammalian cells, Bax is essentially cytosolic and inactive. Following a death signal, the protein is translocated to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it promotes a permeabilization that favors the release of different apoptogenic factors, such as cytochrome c. The regulation of Bax translocation is associated to conformational changes that are under the control of different factors. The evidences showing the involvement of different Bax domains in its mitochondrial localization are presented. The interactions between Bax and its different partners are described in relation to their ability to promote (or prevent) Bax conformational changes leading to mitochondrial addressing and to the acquisition of the capacity to permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:21641962

  9. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  10. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers.

  11. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  12. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to obtain the most comprehensive and coherent picture of changes under weightlessness, a set of measurements on Skylab 2 was initiated and at every opportunity, additional studies were added. All pertinent information from ancillary sources were gleaned and collated. On Skylab 2, the initial anthropometric studies were scheduled in conjunction with muscle study. A single set of facial photographs was made in-flight. Additional measurements were made on Skylab 3, with photographs and truncal and limb girth measurements in-flight. Prior to Skylab 4, it was felt there was considerable evidence for large and rapid fluid shifts, so a series of in-flight volume and center of mass measurements and infrared photographs were scheduled to be conducted in the Skylab 4 mission. A number of changes were properly documented for the first time, most important of which were the fluid shifts. The following description of Skylab anthropometrics address work done on Skylab 4 primarily.

  13. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  14. Magic Wavelength for the Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2016-05-01

    The state of the art precision measurement of the transition frequencies of neutral atoms is performed with atoms trapped by the magic wavelength optical lattice that cancels the ac Stark shift of the transitions. Trapping with magic wavelength lattice is also expected to improve the precision of the hydrogen 1S-2S transition frequency, which so far has been measured only with the atomic beam. In this talk, I discuss the magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition, and the possibility of implementing the optical lattice trapping for hydrogen. Optical trapping of hydrogen also opens the way to perform magnetic field free spectroscopy of antihydrogen for the test of CPT theorem.

  15. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G. T.; Nomura, H.; Adachi, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 μm using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  16. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D.

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  17. Multi-wavelength narrow linewidth fiber laser based on distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jingsheng; Qi, Haifeng; Song, Zhiqiang; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2016-09-01

    A narrow linewidth laser configuration based on distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) with eight wavelengths in the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid is presented and realized. In this laser configuration, eight phase-shifted gratings in series are bidirectionally pumped by two 980-nm laser diodes (LDs). The final laser output with over 10-mW power for each wavelength can be obtained, and the maximum power difference within eight wavelengths is 1.2 dB. The laser configuration with multiple wavelengths and uniform power outputs can be very useful in large scaled optical fiber hydrophone fields.

  18. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  19. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for authentication of cheese and cheese analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Food authentication and the detection of adulterated products are recent major issues in the food industry as these topics are of global importance for quality control and food safety. To effectively address this challenge requires fast, reliable and non-destructive analytical techniques. Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS) is well suited for identification purposes as it combines the chemically specific information obtained by Raman spectroscopy with the ability for efficient fluorescence rejection. The two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths necessary for SERDS are realized by specially designed microsystem diode lasers. At 671 nm the laser (optical power: 50 mW, spectral shift: 0.7 nm) is based on an external cavity configuration whereas an emission at 783 nm (optical power: 110 mW, spectral shift: 0.5 nm) is achieved by a distributed feedback laser. To investigate the feasibility of SERDS for rapid and nondestructive authentication purposes four types of cheese and three different cheese analogues were selected. Each sample was probed at 8 different positions using integration times of 3-10 seconds and 10 spectra were recorded at each spot. Principal components analysis was applied to the SERDS spectra revealing variations in fat and protein signals as primary distinction criterion between cheese and cheese analogues for both excitation wavelengths. Furthermore, to some extent, minor compositional differences could be identified to discriminate between individual species of cheese and cheese analogues. These findings highlight the potential of SERDS for rapid food authentication potentially paving the way for future applications of portable SERDS systems for non-invasive in situ analysis.

  20. Chemical shifts in biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary NMR chemical shifts are sensitive probes of stucture and dynamics in proteins. Empirical models, based on a large database of measured shifts, take an input structure and provide increasingly accurate estimates of the corresponding shifts. Quantum chemical calculations can provide the same information, with greater generality but (currently) with less accuracy. These methods are now providing new ways to approach NMR structure determination, and new insights into the conformational dynamics of proteins. PMID:23422068

  1. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  2. Experimental study of the phase-shift miscalibration error in phase-shifting interferometry: use of a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjit K; Kothiyal, Mahendra P

    2007-08-01

    The white-light interferogram in a spectrally resolved white-light interferometer is decomposed in its constituent spectral components by a spectrometer and displayed along its chromaticity axis. A piezoelectric transducer phase shifter in such an interferometer can give a desired phase shift of pi/2 only at one wavelength. The phase shift varies continuously at all other wavelengths along the chromaticity axis. This situation is ideal for an experimental study of the phase error due to the phase-shift error in the phase-shifting technique, as it will be shown in this paper.

  3. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Multi-wavelength modeling of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinte, C.; Ménard, F.; Duchêne, G.; Augereau, J.-C.

    2006-06-01

    The on-going revolution of high angular resolution observations and increasing wavelength coverage promises to unlock tightly-kept secrets of circumstellar disks. Thanks to these advances, many issues have already been addressed : large scale geometry of disks, evidence of grain growth, of dust settling, ldots Most of these results are based on models that emphasize on fitting either SEDs or scattered light images or, more recently, interferometric visibilities. In this contribution, we present a global approach which aims at interpreting the increasing amount of observational data coherently, in the framework of a single model, in order to get a more global picture and to better characterize both the dust population and the disk properties. Results of such a modeling approach, applied to a few disks for which large observational data-sets are available, are presented.

  6. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on innovative long wavelength (lambda less than 17 microns) infrared (LWIR) detectors with the potential of meeting future NASA and DoD long-duration space application needs. Requirements are for focal plane arrays which operate near 65K using active refrigeration with mission lifetimes of five to ten years. The workshop addressed innovative concepts, new material systems, novel device physics, and current progress in relation to benchmark technology. It also provided a forum for discussion of performance characterization, producibility, reliability, and fundamental limitations of device physics. It covered the status of the incumbent HgCdTe technology, which shows encouraging progress towards LWIR arrays, and provided a snapshot of research and development in several new contender technologies.

  7. Quantum cascade lasers with dual-wavelength interdigitated cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosely, Trinesha S.; Straub, Axel; Gmachl, Claire; Colombelli, Raffaele; Troccoli, Mariano; Capasso, Federico; Sivco, Deborah L.; Cho, Alfred Y.

    2002-03-01

    A quantum cascade (QC) laser with a dual-wavelength interdigitated cascade is presented. Its active core consists of a stack of active regions and injectors designed for emission at one wavelength (8.0 μm) interleaved with a second stack emitting at a substantially different wavelength (9.5 μm), and the two injectors were designed to either bridge the 8.0 μm active region to the 9.5 μm one, or vice versa. Clear two-wavelength laser action is observed, demonstrating the viability of this approach to achieve multi-wavelength laser emission in the mid-infrared. Aside from providing two-wavelength operation, this laser design can also be used to test the role of charge transport in the injectors, which customarily bridge successive active regions together. We will present early results of this study. The work was partly supported by DARPA/US ARO under contract number DAAD19-00-C-0096. A. S. acknowledges the support of the Deutsche Studienstiftung. T. S. M. present address: Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA.

  8. Two-wavelength ghost imaging through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongfeng; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Pengfei; Shen, Hong; Zhang, Jinghui; Qiao, Chunhong; Wang, Yingjian

    2013-01-28

    Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging might find useful application in standoff sensing where atmospheric turbulence is a serious problem. There has been theoretical study of ghost imaging in the presence of turbulence. However, most work has addressed signal-wavelength ghost imaging. Two-wavelength ghost imaging through atmospheric turbulence is theoretically studied in this paper. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral, the analytical expressions describing atmospheric turbulence effects on the point spread function (PSF) and field of view (FOV) are derived. The computational case is also reported.

  9. Wavelength calibration of imaging spectrometer using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2012-11-01

    Imaging spectrometer is a promising remote sensing instrument widely used in many filed, such as hazard forecasting, environmental monitoring and so on. The reliability of the spectral data is the determination to the scientific communities. The wavelength position at the focal plane of the imaging spectrometer will change as the pressure and temperature vary, or the mechanical vibration. It is difficult for the onboard calibration instrument itself to keep the spectrum reference accuracy and it also occupies weight and the volume of the remote sensing platform. Because the spectral images suffer from the atmospheric effects, the carbon oxide, water vapor, oxygen and solar Fraunhofer line, the onboard wavelength calibration can be processed by the spectral images themselves. In this paper, wavelength calibration is based on the modeled and measured atmospheric absorption spectra. The modeled spectra constructed by the atmospheric radiative transfer code. The spectral angle is used to determine the best spectral similarity between the modeled spectra and measured spectra and estimates the wavelength position. The smile shape can be obtained when the matching process across all columns of the data. The present method is successful applied on the Hyperion data. The value of the wavelength shift is obtained by shape matching of oxygen absorption feature and the characteristics are comparable to that of the prelaunch measurements.

  10. High power pumped mid-IR wavelength systems using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength systems include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  11. High power pumped MID-IR wavelength devices using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  12. Label-free pathological evaluation of grade 3 cancer using Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, Stokes shift spectroscopy (S3) is used for measuring the aggressiveness of malignant tumors. S3 is an optical tool which utilizes the difference between the emission wavelength (λem) and the absorption wavelength (λabs) (the Stokes shift) to give a fixed wavelength shift (Δλs).Our analysis of tumor samples using S3 shows grade 3 (high grade) cancers consistently have increased relative tryptophan content compared to grade 1 or 2 tumors. This technique may be a useful tool in the evaluation of a patient's cancer.

  13. Style Shift in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qinai, Jamal

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of style shift in translated texts is ascribed mainly to textual incompatibility in terms of rhetorical asymmetry and divergence at the formality level. Mandatory shifts result from a systematic dissimilarity between the source language and the target language in terms of the underlying system of syntax, semantics and rhetorical…

  14. Making Shifts toward Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The Leading for Mathematical Proficiency (LMP) Framework (Bay-Williams et al.) has three components: (1) The Standards for Mathematical Practice; (2) Shifts in classroom practice; and (3) Teaching skills. This article briefly describes each component of the LMP framework and then focuses more in depth on the second component, the shifts in…

  15. Critical Review--Outsourcing: A Paradigm Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakabadse, Nada; Kakabadse, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Discusses trends in outsourcing, provision of goods and services to an organization that were previously delivered in house. Addresses outsourcing in the public sector, advantages and disadvantages, implications for human resource development, and the shift to the new "psychological contract" between employers and employees. (Contains 227…

  16. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  17. Laser wavelengths and oral implantology.

    PubMed

    Romanos, George E; Gutknecht, Norbert; Dieter, Sandra; Schwarz, Frank; Crespi, Roberto; Sculean, Anton

    2009-11-01

    In modern implant dentistry there are several clinical indications for laser surgery. Different laser systems have a considerable spectrum of application in soft and hard peri-implant tissues. The literature was searched for clinical application of different laser wavelengths in peri-implant tissues: second-stage surgery of submerged implants, treatment of infrabony defects, removal of peri-implant hyperplastic overgrowths, and, possibly, the preparation of bone cavities for implant placement. This report describes the state-of-the-art application of different laser systems in modern implant dentistry for the treatment of peri-implant lesions and decontamination of implant surfaces. Our study evaluated in vitro examinations, clinical experience and long-term clinical studies. The exact selection of the appropriate laser system and wavelength was dependent on the scientific evaluation of recent literature and the level of changes in implant and tissue temperatures during laser application. The significant reduction in bacteria on the implant surface and the peri-implant tissues during irradiation and the cutting effects associated with the coagulation properties of the lasers are the main reasons for laser application in the treatment of peri-implant lesions and the successful long-term prognosis of failing oral implants. The various applications of lasers in implant dentistry are dependent on the wavelength and laser-tissue interactions.

  18. A distinct contribution of short-wavelength-sensitive cones to light-evoked activity in the mouse pretectal olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Allen, Annette E; Brown, Timothy M; Lucas, Robert J

    2011-11-16

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) combine inputs from outer-retinal rod/cone photoreceptors with their intrinsic phototransduction machinery to drive a wide range of so-called non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light. Defining the contribution of each photoreceptor class to evoked responses is vital for determining the degree to which our sensory capabilities depend on melanopsin and for optimizing NIF responses to benefit human health. We addressed this problem by recording electrophysiological responses in the mouse pretectal olivary nucleus (PON) (a target of ipRGCs and origin of the pupil light reflex) to a range of gradual and abrupt changes in light intensity. Dim stimuli drove minimal changes in PON activity, suggesting that rods contribute little under these conditions. To separate cone from melanopsin influences, we compared responses to short (460 nm) and longer (600/655 nm) wavelengths in mice carrying a red shifted cone population (Opn1mw®) or lacking melanopsin (Opn4⁻/⁻). Our data reveal a surprising difference in the quality of information available from medium- and short-wavelength-sensitive cones. The majority cone population (responsive to 600/655 nm) supported only transient changes in firing and responses to relatively sudden changes in light intensity. In contrast, cones uniquely sensitive to the shorter wavelength (S-cones) were better able to drive responses to gradual changes in illuminance, contributed a distinct off inhibition, and at least partially recapitulated the ability of melanopsin to sustain responses under continuous illumination. These data reveal a new role for S-cones unrelated to color vision and suggest renewed consideration of cone contributions to NIF vision at shorter wavelengths.

  19. Shifting Roles, Shifting Contexts, Maintaining Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Renee Tipton

    2011-01-01

    This self-study describes the ways in which a move to a different state, university, and academic role has shaped my sense of self as a scholar, teacher educator, and college administrator. I draw from role theory and from conceptions of habitus and field to provide a conceptual lens for interpreting the data and my experiences. I then address two…

  20. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE VLT-UVES SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Griest, Kim; Murphy, Michael T. E-mail: mmurphy@swin.edu.a

    2010-11-01

    We attempt to measure possible miscalibration of the wavelength scale of the VLT-UVES spectrograph. We take spectra of QSO HE0515-4414 through the UVES iodine cell which contains thousands of well-calibrated iodine lines and compare these lines to the wavelength scale from the standard thorium-argon pipeline calibration. Analyzing three exposures of this z = 1.71 QSO, we find two distinct types of calibration shifts needed to correct the Th/Ar wavelength scale. First, there is an overall average velocity shift of between 100 m s{sup -1} and 500 m s{sup -1} depending upon the exposure. Second, within a given exposure, we find intra-order velocity distortions of 100 m s{sup -1} up to more than 200 m s{sup -1}. These calibration errors are similar to, but smaller than, those found earlier in the Keck HIRES spectrometer. We discuss the possible origins of these two types of miscalibration. We also explore the implications of these calibration errors on the systematic error in measurements of {Delta}{alpha}/{alpha}, the change in the fine-structure constant derived from measurement of the relative redshifts of absorption lines in QSO absorption systems. The overall average, exposure-dependent shifts should be less relevant for fine-structure work, but the intra-order shifts have the potential to affect these results. Using either our measured calibration offsets or a Gaussian model with sigma of around 90 m s{sup -1}, Monte Carlo mock experiments find errors in {Delta}{alpha}/{alpha} of between 1 x 10{sup -6} N {sup -1/2}{sub sys} and 3 x 10{sup -6} N {sup -1/2}{sub sys}, where N{sub sys} is the number of systems used and the range is due to dependence on how many metallic absorption lines in each system are compared.

  1. Passive cavity surface-emitting lasers: option of temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength for uncooled dense wavelength division multiplexing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Slight, T.; Meredith, W.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Nadtochy, A. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Maximov, M. V.; Blokhin, S. A.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Maleev, N. A.; Ustinov, V. M.; Choquette, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    A concept of passive cavity surface-emitting laser is proposed aimed to control the temperature shift of the lasing wavelength. The device contains an all-semiconductor bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), in which the active medium is placed, a dielectric resonant cavity and a dielectric top DBR, wherein at least one of the dielectric materials has a negative temperature coefficient of the refractive index, dn/dT < 0. This is shown to be the case for commonly used dielectric systems SiO2/TiO2 and SiO2/Ta2O5. Two SiO2/TiO2 resonant structures having a cavity either of SiO2 or TiO2 were deposited on a substrate, their optical power reflectance spectra were measured at various temperatures, and refractive index temperature coefficients were extracted, dn/dT = 0.0021 K-1 for SiO2 and dn/dT = -0.0092 K-1 for TiO2. Using such dielectric materials allows designing passive cavity surface-emitting lasers having on purpose either positive, or zero, or negative temperature shift of the lasing wavelength dλ/dT. A design for temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength (dλ/dT = 0) is proposed. Employing devices with temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength in wavelength division multiplexing systems may allow significant reducing of the spectral separation between transmission channels and an increase in number of channels for a defined spectral interval enabling low cost energy efficient uncooled devices.

  2. Wavelength interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors using tapered hollow Bragg waveguides.

    PubMed

    Potts, C; Allen, T W; Azar, A; Melnyk, A; Dennison, C R; DeCorby, R G

    2014-10-15

    We describe an integrated system for wavelength interrogation, which uses tapered hollow Bragg waveguides coupled to an image sensor. Spectral shifts are extracted from the wavelength dependence of the light radiated at mode cutoff. Wavelength shifts as small as ~10  pm were resolved by employing a simple peak detection algorithm. Si/SiO₂-based cladding mirrors enable a potential operational range of several hundred nanometers in the 1550 nm wavelength region for a taper length of ~1  mm. Interrogation of a strain-tuned grating was accomplished using a broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source, and potential for single-chip interrogation of multiplexed sensor arrays is demonstrated. PMID:25361125

  3. Wavelength interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors using tapered hollow Bragg waveguides.

    PubMed

    Potts, C; Allen, T W; Azar, A; Melnyk, A; Dennison, C R; DeCorby, R G

    2014-10-15

    We describe an integrated system for wavelength interrogation, which uses tapered hollow Bragg waveguides coupled to an image sensor. Spectral shifts are extracted from the wavelength dependence of the light radiated at mode cutoff. Wavelength shifts as small as ~10  pm were resolved by employing a simple peak detection algorithm. Si/SiO₂-based cladding mirrors enable a potential operational range of several hundred nanometers in the 1550 nm wavelength region for a taper length of ~1  mm. Interrogation of a strain-tuned grating was accomplished using a broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source, and potential for single-chip interrogation of multiplexed sensor arrays is demonstrated.

  4. Addressable Inverter Matrix Tests Integrated-Circuit Wafer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing elements indirectly through shift register reduces number of test probes. With aid of new technique, complex test structure on silicon wafer tested with relatively small number of test probes. Conserves silicon area by reduction of area devoted to pads. Allows thorough evaluation of test structure characteristics and of manufacturing process parameters. Test structure consists of shift register and matrix of inverter/transmission-gate cells connected to two-by-ten array of probe pads. Entire pattern contained in square area having only 1.6-millimeter sides. Shift register is conventional static CMOS device using inverters and transmission gates in master/slave D flip-flop configuration.

  5. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  6. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  7. Our World: Fluid Shift

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about the circulatory system and how gravity aids blood flow in our bodies here on Earth. Find out how NASA flight surgeons help the astronauts deal with the fluid shift that happens during s...

  8. Differential Shift Estimation in the Absence of Coherence: Performance Analysis and Benefits of Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villano, Michelangelo; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos P.

    2011-03-01

    The estimation of the local differential shift between synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images has proven to be an effective technique for monitoring glacier surface motion. As images acquired over glaciers by short wavelength SAR systems, such as TerraSAR-X, often suffer from a lack of coherence, image features have to be exploited for the shift estimation (feature-tracking).The present paper addresses feature-tracking with special attention to the feasibility requirements and the achievable accuracy of the shift estimation. In particular, the dependence of the performance on image characteristics, such as texture parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution, as well as on processing techniques (despeckling, normalised cross-correlation versus maximum likelihood estimation) is analysed by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. TerraSAR-X data acquired over the Helheim glacier, Greenland, and the Aletsch glacier, Switzerland, have been processed to validate the simulation results.Feature-tracking can benefit of the availability of fully-polarimetric data. As some image characteristics, in fact, are polarisation-dependent, the selection of an optimum polarisation leads to improved performance. Furthermore, fully-polarimetric SAR images can be despeckled without degrading the resolution, so that additional (smaller-scale) features can be exploited.

  9. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  10. Vehicular transmission shift mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, K.

    1988-12-27

    This patent describes a vehicular transmission having a main speed change mechanism and a sub speed change mechanism both housed within a transmission case. The main speed change mechanism has gear trains in plural shifting stages provided between input and output shafts and capable of being established selectively and also has a plurality of synchronizing mechanisms operable by shift forks to establish the gear trains selectively. The sub speed change mechanism has a reduction gear train for obtaining a still lower speed than the lowest shifting stage in the main speed change mechanism and also has a sub speed gear shifting synchronizing mechanism operable by a sub speed gear shift fork to establish the reduction gear train. This sub speed change mechanism is disposed in parallel with the main speed change mechanism, the sub speed gear shift fork having means connected to one end of a lever pivotably supported at an intermediate part thereof by a pivot pin, the pivot pin being mounted on the transmission case from the outside thereof.

  11. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10-8.

  12. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8). PMID:27587172

  13. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  14. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  15. Geometric basis for the far red shift. [in crop canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative explanation is offered for the redshift (an abrupt change in the ratio of scattering to absorption in the radiance spectra of heading canopies of such crops as wheat and grain sorghum). The shift occurs abruptly at wavelengths near the red-infrared boundary towards the longer wavelengths. The new explanation, following that of Collins (1978) and Schutt et al. (1984), is based on one particular architectural change that occurs in any heading plant canopy. Specifically, the newly extended heads alter the interaction between light and the established foliage. The heads reduce the amount of sunlight striking the topmost leaves which are generally comparatively good specular reflectors. The heads also reduce the ability to observe the specularly reflecting leaves. The reduction in the amplitude of the radiance (due to decreased specularly reflected light) at heading appears to be a shift in the wavelength of the red edge. It is proposed that vertical (amplitude) shifts - due to changes in the amount of specularly reflected light as a function of heading - have been misinterpreted as horizontal (wavelength) shifts due in part to the characteristic shape of the radiance curve at the red edge.

  16. Magic and tune-out wavelengths for atomic francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammalapati, U.; Harada, K.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The frequency dependent polarizabilities of the francium atom are calculated from the available data of energy levels and transition rates. Magic wavelengths for the state insensitive optical dipole trapping are identified from the calculated light shifts of the 7 s 2S1/2, 7 p 2P1/2,3/2, and 8 s 2S1/2 levels of the 7 s -7 p 2S1/2 2P1/2,3/2 and 7 s -8 s 2S1/2 2S1/2 transitions, respectively. Wavelengths in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared region are identified that are suitable for cooling and trapping. Magic wavelengths between the 600-700 nm and 700-1000 nm regions, which are blue and red detuned with the 7 s -7 p and 7 s -8 s transitions, are feasible to implement as lasers with sufficient power are available. In addition, we calculated the tune-out wavelengths where the ac polarizability of the ground 7 s 2S1/2 state in francium is zero. These results are beneficial as laser cooled and trapped francium has been in use for fundamental symmetry investigations like searches for an electron permanent electric dipole moment in an atom and for atomic parity nonconservation.

  17. Optical modulation of quantum cascade laser with optimized excitation wavelength.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Chen, Gang; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer

    2013-04-15

    The excitation wavelength for all-optical modulation of a 10.6 μm mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade laser (QCL) was varied in order to obtain maximum modulation depth. Both amplitude and wavelength modulation experiments were conducted at 820 nm and 1550 nm excitation respectively, whereby the latter matches the interband transition in the QCL active region. Experimental results show that for continuous-wave mode-operated QCL, the efficiency of free carrier generation is doubled under 1550 nm excitation compared with 820 nm excitation, resulting in an increase of the amplitude modulation index from 19% to 36%. At the same time, the maximum wavelength shift is more than doubled from 1.05 nm to 2.80 nm. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrated the optical switching of a QCL operated in pulse mode by simple variation of the excitation wavelength.

  18. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short-wavelength FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the 'microspikes' associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with P(omega) approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, P(omega) grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with z. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic S(omega, t), it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct 'sinews' whose widths (Delta) (lambda) remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can 'chirp' by varying a small extent with t.

  19. Absolute analytical prediction of photonic crystal guided mode resonance wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-08-18

    A class of photonic crystal resonant reflectors known as guided mode resonant filters are optical structures that are widely used in the field of refractive index sensing, particularly in biosensing. For the purposes of understanding and design, their behavior has traditionally been modeled numerically with methods such as rigorous coupled wave analysis. Here it is demonstrated how the absolute resonance wavelengths of such structures can be predicted by analytically modeling them as slab waveguides in which the propagation constant is determined by a phase matching condition. The model is experimentally verified to be capable of predicting the absolute resonance wavelengths to an accuracy of within 0.75 nm, as well as resonance wavelength shifts due to changes in cladding index within an accuracy of 0.45 nm across the visible wavelength regime in the case where material dispersion is taken into account. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the model is valid beyond the limit of low grating modulation, for periodically discontinuous waveguide layers, high refractive index contrasts, and highly dispersive media.

  20. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  1. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  2. 2015 ASHG Awards and Addresses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Each year at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG), addresses are given in honor of The Society and a number of award winners. A summary of each of these is given below. On the following pages, we have printed the presidential address and the addresses for the William Allan Award, the Curt Stern Award, and the Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. Webcasts of these addresses, as well as those of many other presentations, can be found at http://www.ashg.org.

  3. Making Displaced Holograms At Two Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, William K.; Ecker, Andreas

    1989-01-01

    Two-wavelength holographic system augmented with pair of prisms to introduce small separation between holograms formed simultaneously at two wavelengths on holographic plate. Principal use in study of flows. Gradients in index of refraction of fluid caused by variations in temperature, concentration, or both. Holography at one wavelength cannot be used to distinguish between two types of variations. Difference between spacings of fringes in photographs reconstructed from holograms taken simultaneously at two different wavelengths manipulated mathematically to determine type of variation.

  4. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clemb, Rebecca M.; Serabyn, Gene

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique1,2,3,4 transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/D) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output planes. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective. Second, the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and or arbitrary size. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument

  5. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/diameter) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output plane. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective, and second the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and can be made arbitrarily large. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument.

  6. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  7. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  8. Use of two wavelengths in microscopic TV holography for nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Umapathy, Somasundaram; Pramanik, Manojit; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad; Nandigana, Krishna Mohan

    2014-11-01

    Single wavelength TV holography is a widely used whole-field noncontacting optical method for nondestructive testing (NDT) of engineering structures. However, with a single wavelength configuration, it is difficult to quantify the large amplitude defects due to the overcrowding of fringes in the defect location. In this work, we propose a two wavelength microscopic TV holography using a single-chip color charge-coupled device (CCD) camera for NDT of microspecimens. The use of a color CCD allows simultaneous acquisition of speckle patterns at two different wavelengths and makes the data acquisition as simple as that of the single wavelength case. For the quantitative measurement of the defect, an error compensating eight-step phase-shifted algorithm is used. The design of the system and a few experimental results on small-scale rough specimens are presented.

  9. Multi-wavelength fiber laser based on a fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Jauregui-Vazquez, D.; Haus, J. W.; Perez-Maciel, M.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Avila-Garcia, M. S.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Lopez-Dieguez, Y.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report experimental studies of an erbium-doped fiber laser design that simultaneously emits up to three wavelengths. The laser cavity configuration has an all-fiber, Fabry-Perot interferometer, based on the insertion of air cavities in the fiber, near one end of a conventional single-mode fiber. The laser emissions have a side-mode suppression ratio over 25 dB, wavelength variations around 0.04 nm, and 2 dB power fluctuations. By using a simple, controlled fiber curvature technique cavity losses are varied over a section of convectional single-mode fiber and the laser output is switched between single-, dual-, and triple-wavelength emission. Moreover, by applying a refractive index change over the fiber filter the emission wavelengths are shifted. The fiber laser offers a compact, simple, and low-cost design for a multiple wavelength outputs that can be adopted in future applications.

  10. Fiber-optic current sensor with self-compensation of source wavelength changes.

    PubMed

    Müller, G M; Quan, W; Lenner, M; Yang, L; Frank, A; Bohnert, K

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate a method for self-compensation of scale factor changes of an interferometric fiber-optic current sensor caused by source wavelength shifts, e.g., due to changes in source temperature or drive current. An adequately tailored fiber-optic retarder in the optical circuit introduces wavelength-dependent mixing of the orthogonal polarization modes of the sensor. The resulting change in scale factor balances the variation of the Faraday effect with wavelength. The wavelength dependence of the sensor is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude to <0.2% over wavelength spans of at least 10 nm around 1305 nm. The retarder is designed as an athermal device for operation between -40°C and 80°C. PMID:27304309

  11. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  12. Predicting catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2016-05-21

    Catastrophic shifts are known to pose a serious threat to ecology, and a reliable set of early warning indicators is desperately needed. However, the tools suggested so far have two problems. First, they cannot discriminate between a smooth transition and an imminent irreversible shift. Second, they aimed at predicting the tipping point where a state loses its stability, but in noisy spatial system the actual transition occurs when an alternative state invades. Here we suggest a cluster tracking technique that solves both problems, distinguishing between smooth and catastrophic transitions and to identify an imminent shift in both cases. Our method may allow for the prediction, and thus hopefully the prevention of such transitions, avoiding their destructive outcomes. PMID:26970446

  13. Ultra-low-power silicon photonics wavelength converter for phase-encoded telecommunication signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, C.; Ettabib, M. A.; Cristiani, I.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Richardson, D. J.; Petropoulos, P.

    2016-03-01

    The development of compact, low power, silicon photonics CMOS compatible components for all-optical signal processing represents a key step towards the development of fully functional platforms for next generation all-optical communication networks. The wavelength conversion functionality at key nodes is highly desirable to achieve transparent interoperability and wavelength routing allowing efficient management of network resources operated with high speed, phase encoded signals. All optical wavelength conversion has already been demonstrated in Si-based devices, mainly utilizing the strong Kerr effect that silicon exhibits at telecommunication wavelengths. Unfortunately, Two Photon Absorption (TPA) and Free Carrier (FC) effects strongly limit their performance, even at moderate power levels, making them unsuitable for practical nonlinear applications. Amorphous silicon has recently emerged as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon (c-Si), showing both an enhanced Kerr as well as a reduced TPA coefficient at telecom wavelengths, with respect to its c-Si counterpart. Here we present an ultra-low power wavelength converter based on a passive, CMOS compatible, 1-mm long amorphous silicon waveguide operated at a maximum pump power level of only 70 mW. We demonstrate TPA-free Four Wave Mixing (FWM)-based wavelength conversion of Binary Phase Shift Keyed (BPSK) and Quadrature Phase Shift Keyed (QPSK) signals at 20 Gbit/s with <1 dB power penalty at BER = 10-5.

  14. Long-wavelength photonic integrated circuits and avalanche photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Yi-Jen D.; Zaytsev, Sergey; Pauchard, Alexandre; Hummel, Steve; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    Fast-growing internet traffic volume require high data communication bandwidth over longer distances. Access network bottlenecks put pressure on short-range (SR) telecommunication systems. To effectively address these datacom and telecom market needs, low-cost, high-speed laser modules at 1310 to 1550 nm wavelengths and avalanche photodetectors are required. The great success of GaAs 850nm VCSEls for Gb/s Ethernet has motivated efforts to extend VCSEL technology to longer wavelengths in the 1310 and 1550 nm regimes. However, the technological challenges associated with materials for long wavelength VCSELs are tremendous. Even with recent advances in this area, it is believed that significant additional development is necessary before long wavelength VCSELs that meet commercial specifications will be widely available. In addition, the more stringent OC192 and OC768 specifications for single-mode fiber (SMF) datacom may require more than just a long wavelength laser diode, VCSEL or not, to address numerous cost and performance issues. We believe that photonic integrated circuits (PICs), which compactly integrate surface-emitting lasers with additional active and passive optical components with extended functionality, will provide the best solutions to today's problems. Photonic integrated circuits have been investigated for more than a decade. However, they have produced limited commercial impact to date primarily because the highly complicated fabrication processes produce significant yield and device performance issues. In this presentation, we will discuss a new technology platform of InP-based PICs compatible with surface-emitting laser technology, as well as a high data rate externally modulated laser module. Avalanche photodetectors (APDs) are the key component in the receiver to achieve high data rate over long transmission distance because of their high sensitivity and large gain- bandwidth product. We have used wafer fusion technology to achieve In

  15. Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Engel, James R.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia

    2013-05-01

    We report on our current status towards the development of a prototype Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer (FTIR-PS-CRDS) system under a U.S. EPA SBIR contract. Our system uses the inherent wavelength-dependent modulation imposed by the FTIR on a broadband thermal source for the phase shift measurement. This spectrally-dependent phase shift is proportional to the spectrally-dependent ring down time, which is proportional to the losses of the cavity including those due to molecular absorption. Our approach is a broadband and spectral range enhancement to conventional CRDS which is typically done in the near IR at a single wavelength; at the same time our approach is a sensitivity enhancement to traditional FTIR owing to the long effective path of the resonant cavity. In this paper we present a summary of the theory including performance projections and the design details of the prototype FTIR-PS-CRDS system.

  16. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  17. Regime shifts in models of dryland vegetation.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bel, Golan; Meron, Ehud

    2013-12-13

    Drylands are pattern-forming systems showing self-organized vegetation patchiness, multiplicity of stable states and fronts separating domains of alternative stable states. Pattern dynamics, induced by droughts or disturbances, can result in desertification shifts from patterned vegetation to bare soil. Pattern formation theory suggests various scenarios for such dynamics: an abrupt global shift involving a fast collapse to bare soil, a gradual global shift involving the expansion and coalescence of bare-soil domains and an incipient shift to a hybrid state consisting of stationary bare-soil domains in an otherwise periodic pattern. Using models of dryland vegetation, we address the question of which of these scenarios can be realized. We found that the models can be split into two groups: models that exhibit multiplicity of periodic-pattern and bare-soil states, and models that exhibit, in addition, multiplicity of hybrid states. Furthermore, in all models, we could not identify parameter regimes in which bare-soil domains expand into vegetated domains. The significance of these findings is that, while models belonging to the first group can only exhibit abrupt shifts, models belonging to the second group can also exhibit gradual and incipient shifts. A discussion of open problems concludes the paper.

  18. Regime shifts in models of dryland vegetation.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bel, Golan; Meron, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Drylands are pattern-forming systems showing self-organized vegetation patchiness, multiplicity of stable states and fronts separating domains of alternative stable states. Pattern dynamics, induced by droughts or disturbances, can result in desertification shifts from patterned vegetation to bare soil. Pattern formation theory suggests various scenarios for such dynamics: an abrupt global shift involving a fast collapse to bare soil, a gradual global shift involving the expansion and coalescence of bare-soil domains and an incipient shift to a hybrid state consisting of stationary bare-soil domains in an otherwise periodic pattern. Using models of dryland vegetation, we address the question of which of these scenarios can be realized. We found that the models can be split into two groups: models that exhibit multiplicity of periodic-pattern and bare-soil states, and models that exhibit, in addition, multiplicity of hybrid states. Furthermore, in all models, we could not identify parameter regimes in which bare-soil domains expand into vegetated domains. The significance of these findings is that, while models belonging to the first group can only exhibit abrupt shifts, models belonging to the second group can also exhibit gradual and incipient shifts. A discussion of open problems concludes the paper.

  19. Activating the Disadvantaged. Variations in Addressing Youth Transitions across Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Axel; Walther, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The term activation refers to a shift in social policies, through which individuals are given more responsibility for their own social inclusion. This article provides a comparative analysis of the different ways in which EU member states interpret and implement the concept of activation by addressing the transitions of disadvantaged young people…

  20. THz QCLs for heterodyne receivers and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alan W. M.; Kao, Tsung-Yu; Zimmerman, Ian A.; Cole, William T. S.; Thurston, Richard; Saykally, Richard J.; Han, Ningren; Hu, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Milliwatt average power terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs, 2 THz to 5 THz) have been developed for spectroscopy and as local oscillators for heterodyne receivers. Novel DFB THz-QCLs have been fabricated and show single-mode operation. The narrow line widths of <10 MHz and stark shift tuning of of 6 GHz, allows for wavelength modulation spectroscopy of low pressure gasses in the unexplored THz frequency band. The same devices also act as local-oscillators for heterodyne receivers for remote-sensing and astronomy. Lastly we report on improved tunable DFB devices for use in spectroscopy.

  1. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  2. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  3. Addressing single trapped ions for Rydberg quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachor, P.; Feldker, T.; Walz, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the excitation of ions to the Rydberg state 22F by vacuum ultraviolet radiation at a wavelength of 123 nm combined with the coherent manipulation of the optical qubit transition in {}40{{Ca}}+. With a tightly focused beam at 729 nm wavelength we coherently excite a single ion from a linear string into the metastable 3{D}5/2 state before a VUV pulse excites it to the Rydberg state. In combination with ion shuttling in the trap, we extend this approach to the addressed excitation of multiple ions. The coherent initialization as well as the addressed Rydberg excitation are key prerequisites for more complex applications of Rydberg ions in quantum simulation or quantum information processing.

  4. FWM-based wavelength conversion of 40 Gbaud PSK signals in a silicon germanium waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ettabib, Mohamed A; Hammani, Kamal; Parmigiani, Francesca; Jones, Liam; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris; Brun, Mickael; Labeye, Pierre; Nicoletti, Sergio; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate four wave mixing (FWM) based wavelength conversion of 40 Gbaud differential phase shift keyed (DPSK) and quadrature phase shift keyed (QPSK) signals in a 2.5 cm long silicon germanium waveguide. For a 290 mW pump power, bit error ratio (BER) measurements show approximately a 2-dB power penalty in both cases of DPSK (measured at a BER of 10(-9)) and QPSK (at a BER of 10(-3)) signals that we examined.

  5. Optimized wavelength selection for molecular absorption thermometry.

    PubMed

    An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Lipor, John J; Sanders, Scott T

    2015-04-01

    A differential evolution (DE) algorithm is applied to a recently developed spectroscopic objective function to select wavelengths that optimize the temperature precision of water absorption thermometry. DE reliably finds optima even when many-wavelength sets are chosen from large populations of wavelengths (here 120 000 wavelengths from a spectrum with 0.002 cm(-1) resolution calculated by 16 856 transitions). Here, we study sets of fixed wavelengths in the 7280-7520 cm(-1) range. When optimizing the thermometer for performance within a narrow temperature range, the results confirm that the best temperature precision is obtained if all the available measurement time is split judiciously between the two most temperature-sensitive wavelengths. In the wide temperature range case (thermometer must perform throughout 280-2800 K), we find (1) the best four-wavelength set outperforms the best two-wavelength set by an average factor of 2, and (2) a complete spectrum (all 120 000 wavelengths from 16 856 transitions) is 4.3 times worse than the best two-wavelength set. Key implications for sensor designers include: (1) from the perspective of spectroscopic temperature sensitivity, it is usually sufficient to monitor two or three wavelengths, depending on the sensor's anticipated operating temperature range; and (2) although there is a temperature precision penalty to monitoring a complete spectrum, that penalty may be small enough, particularly at elevated pressure, to justify the complete-spectrum approach in many applications.

  6. Magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1 S -2 S transition: Contribution of the continuum and the reduced-mass correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, C. M.; Kawasaki, A.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we studied the magic wavelength for the atomic hydrogen 1 S -2 S transition [A. Kawasaki, Phys. Rev. A 92, 042507 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.042507]. An explicit summation over virtual atomic states of the discrete part of the hydrogen spectrum was performed to evaluate the atomic polarizability. In this paper, we supplement the contribution of the continuum part of the spectrum and add the reduced-mass correction. The magic wavelength, at which the lowest-order ac Stark shifts of the 1 S and 2 S states are equal, is found to be 514.6 nm. The ac Stark shift at the magic wavelength is -221.6 Hz /(kW /cm2) , and the slope of the ac Stark shift at the magic wavelength under a change of the driving laser frequency is -0.2157 Hz /[GHz (kW /cm2)] .

  7. Trophic shift, not collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Stow, Craig A.; Roseman, Edward F.; He, Ji X.

    2013-01-01

    scientists who are closely monitoring Lake Huron’s food web, we believe that the ongoing changes are more accurately characterized as a trophic shift in which benthic pathways have become more prominent. While decreases in abundance have occurred for some species, others are experiencing improved reproduction resulting in the restoration of several important native species.

  8. Eluding catastrophic shifts

    PubMed Central

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A.; Levin, Simon A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  9. Eluding catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A; Levin, Simon A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-04-14

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences.

  10. Array of Bolometers for Submillimeter- Wavelength Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James; Turner, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A feed-horn-coupled monolithic array of micromesh bolometers is undergoing development for use in a photometric camera. The array is designed for conducting astrophysical observations in a wavelength band centered at 350 m. The bolometers are improved versions of previously developed bolometers comprising metalized Si3N4 micromesh radiation absorbers coupled with neutron- transmutation-doped Ge thermistors. Incident radiation heats the absorbers above a base temperature, changing the electrical resistance of each thermistor. In the present array of improved bolometers (see figure), the thermistors are attached to the micromesh absorbers by indium bump bonds and are addressed by use of lithographed, vapor-deposited electrical leads. This architecture reduces the heat capacity and minimizes the thermal conductivity to 1/20 and 1/300, respectively, of earlier versions of these detectors, with consequent improvement in sensitivity and speed of response. The micromesh bolometers, intended to operate under an optical background set by thermal emission from an ambient-temperature space-borne telescope, are designed such that the random arrival of photons ("photon noise") dominates the noise sources arising from the detector and readout electronics. The micromesh is designed to be a highly thermally and optically efficient absorber with a limiting response time of about 100 s. The absorber and thermistor heat capacity are minimized in order to give rapid speed of response. Due to the minimization of the absorber volume, the dominant source of heat capacity arises from the thermistor.

  11. Vernier-cascade label-free biosensor with integrated arrayed waveguide grating for wavelength interrogation with low-cost broadband source.

    PubMed

    Claes, Tom; Bogaerts, Wim; Bienstman, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Recently, cheap silicon-on-insulator label-free biosensors have been demonstrated that allow fast and accurate quantitative detection of biologically relevant molecules for applications in medical diagnostics and drug development. However, whereas the sensor chip can be made cheaply, an expensive tunable laser is typically required to accurately monitor spectral shifts in the sensor's transmission spectrum (wavelength interrogation). To address this issue, we integrated a very sensitive Vernier-cascade sensor with an arrayed waveguide grating spectral filter that divides the sensor's transmission spectrum in multiple wavelength channels and transmits them to spatially separated output ports, allowing wavelength interrogation with a much cheaper broadband light source. Experiments show that this sensor can monitor refractive index changes of watery solutions in real time with a detection limit (1.6·10(-5) RIU) competitive with more expensive interrogation schemes, indicating its applicability in low-cost label-free biosensing. The relaxation on the complexity of the source, moreover, offers the prospect to integrate the source and detectors to further reduce the device cost and to increase its portability.

  12. THE CIRCULAR POLARIZATION OF SAGITTARIUS A* AT SUBMILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, D. J.; Moran, J. M.; Marrone, D. P.; Rao, R.

    2012-02-01

    We report the first detections of circularly polarized emission at submillimeter wavelengths from the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate Sgr A* at a level of 1.2% {+-} 0.3% at 1.3 mm wavelength (230 GHz) and 1.6% {+-} 0.3% at 860 {mu}m (345 GHz) with the same handedness, left circular polarization (LCP), as observed at all lower frequencies (1.4-15 GHz). The observations, taken with the Submillimeter Array in multiple epochs, also show simultaneous linear polarization (LP) at both wavelengths of about 6%. These properties differ sharply from those at wavelengths longer than 1 cm (frequencies below 30 GHz), where weak circular polarization (CP) ({approx}0.5%) dominates over LP, which is not detected at similar fractional limits. We describe an extensive set of tests to ensure the accuracy of our measurements. We find no CP in any other source, including the bright quasar 1924-292, which traces the same path on the sky as Sgr A* and therefore should be subject to identical systematic errors originating in the instrument frame. Since a relativistic synchrotron plasma is expected to produce little CP, the observed CP is probably generated close to the event horizon by the Faraday conversion process. We use a simple approximation to show that the phase shift associated with Faraday conversion can be nearly independent of frequency, a sufficient condition to make the handedness of CP independent of frequency. Because the size of the {tau} = 1 surface changes by more than an order of magnitude between 1.4 and 345 GHz, the magnetic field must be coherent over such scales to consistently produce LCP. To improve our understanding of the environment of SgrA* critical future measurements includes determining whether the Faraday rotation deviates from a {lambda}{sup 2} dependence in wavelength and whether the circular and linear components of the flux density are correlated.

  13. Power-ratio tunable dual-wavelength laser using linearly variable Fabry-Perot filter as output coupler.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Wang, Zhongfa; Bu, Yikun; Chen, Lujian; Cai, Guoxiong; Huang, Wencai; Cai, Zhiping; Chen, Nan

    2016-02-01

    For a linearly variable Fabry-Perot filter, the peak transmission wavelengths change linearly with the transverse position shift of the substrate. Such a Fabry-Perot filter is designed and fabricated and used as an output coupler of a c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser experimentally in this paper to obtain a 1062 and 1083 nm dual-wavelength laser. The peak transmission wavelengths are gradually shifted from 1040.8 to 1070.8 nm. The peak transmission wavelength of the Fabry-Perot filter used as the output coupler for the dual-wavelength laser is 1068 nm and resides between 1062 and 1083 nm, which makes the transmissions of the desired dual wavelengths change in opposite slopes with the transverse shift of the filter. Consequently, powers of the two wavelengths change in opposite directions. A branch power, oppositely tunable 1062 and 1083 nm dual-wavelength laser is successfully demonstrated. Design principles of the linear variable Fabry-Perot filter used as an output coupler are discussed. Advantages of the method are summarized.

  14. Addressing Transgender Issues in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Marian

    2016-01-01

    As mainstream media focus more attention on transgender issues, and as anti-discrimination laws evolve, a shift is taking place on campuses. Many schools now include gender identity and expression in their inclusivity work and seek to establish policies and procedures to support transgender students and their families. It's not an easy task. In…

  15. 12 hour shifts the Nambour Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    Union members have a lengthy history of campaigning for fair working hours and conditions. The success of such campaigns has led to the implementation of the eight hour working day and the 40 hour and then 38 hour week as industrial standards. More recently though, calls for greater flexibility in their shift arrangements by nurses at Nambour Hospital have led to a voluntary 12 hour shift being implemented in their Intensive Care Unit. While union members are protective of their hard won gains in achieving reduced working hours through the 8 hour day--ICU nurses at Nambour Hospital say the voluntary 12 hour shift initiative goes a way in addressing their work/life balance issues.

  16. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation. PMID:25145716

  17. Addressing adolescent pregnancy with legislation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M; Folken, Lori; Seitz, Melody A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a concern among many women's health practitioners. While it is practical and appropriate to work to prevent adolescent pregnancy by educating adolescents in health care clinics, schools and adolescent-friendly community-based organizations, suggesting and supporting legislative efforts to reduce adolescent pregnancy can help address the issue on an even larger scale. This article aims to help nurses better understand current legislation that addresses adolescent pregnancy, and to encourage support of future adolescent pregnancy prevention legislation.

  18. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  19. Time-multiplexed, optically-addressed, gigabit optical crossbar switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor); Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A time-multiplexed, optically-addressed, crossbar switch (38) is provided using a two-dimensional, optically-addressed, reflective spatial light modulator (O-SLM) (20). Since the optical addressing is time-multiplexed, only N addressing lines are required for an N.times.N crossbar, rather than the N.sup.2 lines needed in the prior art. This reduction in addressing lines makes possible the development of enormous crossbar switches, such as 100.times.100, for the first time. In addition, since data paths remain entirely in the optics domain, data speeds can reach the multi-gigabit level. In the switch, a row (40) of N inputs (42) at the read wavelength is spread over one axis of the O-SLM. The light is refocused along the other axis to an output array (48) of detectors (50), so that each input has the potential to talk to any one output. The O-SLM is normally off, i.e., non-reflective, so that the output is, in the absence of an input signal, zero. A one-dimensional array (52) of lasers (54) at the write wavelength is imaged onto the O-SLM. Each laser scans across an entire row of the O-SLM; where the laser is on, it turns on a portion of the O-SLM and establishes a connection between a particular input and a particular output. A full row is scanned in a time much shorter than the response time of the O-SLM, so that state of the O-SLM is capacitively stored and dynamically refreshed. The scanning is accomplished by tuning the wavelength of the laser and passing it through a grating, which sweeps the beam in space.

  20. Introducing sub-wavelength pixel THz camera for the understanding of close pixel-to-wavelength imaging challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, A.; Marchese, L.; Bolduc, M.; Terroux, M.; Dufour, D.; Savard, E.; Tremblay, B.; Oulachgar, H.; Doucet, M.; Le Noc, L.; Alain, C.; Jerominek, H.

    2012-06-01

    Conventional guidelines and approximations useful in macro-scale system design can become invalidated when applied to the smaller scales. An illustration of this is when camera pixel size becomes smaller than the diffraction-limited resolution of the incident light. It is sometimes believed that there is no benefit in having a pixel width smaller than the resolving limit defined by the Raleigh criterion, 1.22 λ F/#. Though this rarely occurs in today's imaging technology, terahertz (THz) imaging is one emerging area where the pixel dimensions can be made smaller than the imaging wavelength. With terahertz camera technology, we are able to achieve sub-wavelength pixel sampling pitch, and therefore capable of directly measuring if there are image quality benefits to be derived from sub-wavelength sampling. Interest in terahertz imaging is high due to potential uses in security applications because of the greater penetration depth of terahertz radiation compared to the infrared and the visible. This paper discusses the modification by INO of its infrared MEMS microbolometer detector technology toward a THz imaging platform yielding a sub-wavelength pixel THz camera. Images obtained with this camera are reviewed in this paper. Measurements were also obtained using microscanning to increase sampling resolution. Parameters such as imaging resolution and sampling are addressed. A comparison is also made with results obtained with an 8-12 μm band camera having a pixel pitch close to the diffractionlimit.

  1. Observation of giant Goos-Hänchen and angular shifts at designed metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yallapragada, Venkata Jayasurya; Ravishankar, Ajith P.; Mulay, Gajendra L.; Agarwal, Girish S.; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces with sub-wavelength features are useful in modulating the phase, amplitude or polarization of electromagnetic fields. While several applications are reported for light manipulation and control, the sharp phase changes would be useful in enhancing the beam shifts at reflection from a metasurface. In designed periodic patterns on metal film, at surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate Goos-Hanchen shift of the order of 70 times the incident wavelength and the angular shifts of several hundred microradians. We have designed the patterns using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) together with S-matrices and have used a complete vector theory to calculate the shifts as well as demonstrate a versatile experimental setup to directly measure the shifts. The giant shifts demonstrated could prove to be useful in enhancing the sensitivity of experiments ranging from atomic force microscopy to gravitational wave detection.

  2. Goos-Hänchen shift in a standing-wave-coupled electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liang, Zhi-Peng; Xu, Yan; Fan, Cun-Bo; Liu, Cheng-Zhi; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-03-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift of the system composed by two cavity walls and an intracavity atomic sample is presented. The atomic sample is treated as a four-level double-Λ system, driven by the two counterpropagating coupling fields. The probe field experiences the discontinuous refractive index variation and is reflected. Moreover, under the phase-matching condition, the four-wave mixing effect based on electromagnetically induced transparency can cause effective reflection. The Goos-Hänchen shifts appear in both situations and are carefully investigated in this article. We refer to the first one with the incident and reflected light having identical wavelength as the linear Goos-Hänchen shift, and the second one with the reflection wavelength determined by the phase-matching condition as the nonlinear Goos-Hänchen shift. The differences between the two kinds of shifts, such as the incident angle range, conditions for the shift peaks, and controllability, are discussed.

  3. Observation of giant Goos-Hänchen and angular shifts at designed metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yallapragada, Venkata Jayasurya; Ravishankar, Ajith P.; Mulay, Gajendra L.; Agarwal, Girish S.; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces with sub-wavelength features are useful in modulating the phase, amplitude or polarization of electromagnetic fields. While several applications are reported for light manipulation and control, the sharp phase changes would be useful in enhancing the beam shifts at reflection from a metasurface. In designed periodic patterns on metal film, at surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate Goos-Hanchen shift of the order of 70 times the incident wavelength and the angular shifts of several hundred microradians. We have designed the patterns using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) together with S-matrices and have used a complete vector theory to calculate the shifts as well as demonstrate a versatile experimental setup to directly measure the shifts. The giant shifts demonstrated could prove to be useful in enhancing the sensitivity of experiments ranging from atomic force microscopy to gravitational wave detection. PMID:26758471

  4. Observation of giant Goos-Hänchen and angular shifts at designed metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Yallapragada, Venkata Jayasurya; Ravishankar, Ajith P; Mulay, Gajendra L; Agarwal, Girish S; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces with sub-wavelength features are useful in modulating the phase, amplitude or polarization of electromagnetic fields. While several applications are reported for light manipulation and control, the sharp phase changes would be useful in enhancing the beam shifts at reflection from a metasurface. In designed periodic patterns on metal film, at surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate Goos-Hanchen shift of the order of 70 times the incident wavelength and the angular shifts of several hundred microradians. We have designed the patterns using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) together with S-matrices and have used a complete vector theory to calculate the shifts as well as demonstrate a versatile experimental setup to directly measure the shifts. The giant shifts demonstrated could prove to be useful in enhancing the sensitivity of experiments ranging from atomic force microscopy to gravitational wave detection. PMID:26758471

  5. Interferometric measurement of surface shape by wavelength tuning suppressing random intensity error.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-08-10

    In this research, the susceptibility of the phase-shifting algorithms to the random intensity error is formulated and estimated. The susceptibility of the random intensity error of conventional windowed phase-shifting algorithms is discussed, and the 7N-6 phase-shifting algorithm is developed to minimize the random intensity error using the characteristic polynomial theory. Finally, the surface shape of the transparent wedge plate is measured using a wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 7N-6 algorithm. The experimental results indicate that the surface shape measurement accuracy for the transparent plate is 2.5 nm.

  6. Interferometric measurement of surface shape by wavelength tuning suppressing random intensity error.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hibino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-08-10

    In this research, the susceptibility of the phase-shifting algorithms to the random intensity error is formulated and estimated. The susceptibility of the random intensity error of conventional windowed phase-shifting algorithms is discussed, and the 7N-6 phase-shifting algorithm is developed to minimize the random intensity error using the characteristic polynomial theory. Finally, the surface shape of the transparent wedge plate is measured using a wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometer and the 7N-6 algorithm. The experimental results indicate that the surface shape measurement accuracy for the transparent plate is 2.5 nm. PMID:27534496

  7. Alignment and absolute wavelength calibration of imaging Bragg spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Marchuk, O.; Barnsley, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the present and the next generation of fusion devices, imaging Bragg spectrometers are key diagnostics to measure plasma parameters in the hot core, especially ion temperature and plasma rotation. The latter quantities are routinely obtained using the Doppler-width and -shift of the emitted spectral lines, respectively. Line shift measurements require absolute accuracies Δλ/λ of about 10 ppm, where λ-is the observed wavelength. For ITER and the present fusion devices, spectral lines of He-and H-like argon, iron, and krypton as well as Ne-like tungsten are foreseen for the measurements. For these lines, Kα lines can be found, some in higher order, which fit into the narrow energy window of the spectrometers. For arbitrary wavelength settings, Kα lines are also used to measure the miscut of the spherical crystals; afterwards the spectrometers can be set according to the geometrical imaging properties using coordinate measurement machines. For the spectrometers measuring Lyα lines of H-like ions, fluorescence targets can provide in situ localized calibration lines on the spectra. The fluorescence targets are used best in transmission and are excited by the thermal x-ray radiation of the plasma. An analytic theory of fluorescence is worked out.

  8. Laser wavelength meter: analysis of measurement uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Zyczkowski, Marek; Dlugaszek, Andrzej

    1999-08-01

    Principle of operation of laser radiation wavelength meter based on Fabry-Perot interferometer and linear CCD camera is presented in the paper. A dependence, on the base of which laser wavelength can be calculated, is found and a way of defining of all component uncertainties of a measurement is shown. An analysis of an influence and examples of definition of uncertainties of a measurement for four wavelength meter structural sets of different objective focal lengths are presented.

  9. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  10. Wavelength-selective plasmonics for enhanced cultivation of microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Sinton, David

    2015-02-09

    Optimal photon management is a key challenge for photobioreactor design, since light gradients and varying spectral sensitivities between organisms result in uneven illumination and unused photons. This paper demonstrates wavelength specific scattering from plasmonic nano-patterned surfaces as a means of addressing the challenge of photon management in photobioreactors. Modular photobioreactors were constructed with different reflective substrates including arrays of plasmonic nanodisks, broadband reflectors, and untreated glass. It was found that the growth rate of cyanobacterium S. elongatus in photobioreactors equipped with a plasmonic substrate (R{sub 623 nm} ∼ 35%) was enhanced by 6.5% compared to photobioreactors equipped with untreated glass. Furthermore, plasmonic reflectors showed a normalized power efficiency improvement of 52% over broadband reflectors. Wavelength-specific reflection from plasmonic reflectors increases the flux of useful light to cultures without sacrificing the full spectrum.

  11. Reversible Control in Surface Plasmon Resonance Wavelength of Gold Nanoparticles by Using Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Yushi; Fudouzi, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Nogami, Masayuki

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate reversible control in surface plasomon resonance (SPR) wavelength of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by changing their interparticle distance, which is dependent on the length of alkyl chain of alkanethiol adsorbed on GNPs and the swelling effect of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) used as a host material. A SPR wavelength was first positioned at a given wavelength dependent on the length of alkanethiol when GNPs were immobilized in PDMS. It was found that SPR wavelength red-shifted when the length of the carbon chain was shortened. On the other hand, when silicone oil was transfused to PDMS, SPR wavelength was blue-shifted by the swelling effect (volume expansion) of PDMS. And once silicone oil was volatilized, the particles returned to the original position and SPR did as well. Additionally, the coefficient of expansion of PDMS could be changed by changing the kind of silicon oils. From these results, it could be concluded that the SPR control due to their interparticle distance of GNPs was reversible and the varying degree of swelling of PDMS led to good controllability of SPR in a wide range of wavelength.

  12. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  13. Effective wavelength for multicolor/pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J L

    1980-09-15

    The concept of a temperature varying effective wavelength has recently been applied in multiwavelength pyrometry. The effective wavelength is shown to be discontinuous at a particular temperature, and the properties of the effective wavelength over a wide temperature range are explained. It is shown that a simple relationship is sufficient to calculate the effective wavelength and hence radiance at a given temperature without resorting to a convolution integration, in particular where broad filters are used to improve signal levels in a pyrometer. PMID:20234565

  14. Ammonia sensing system based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, Duarte; Ferreira, João; Silva, Susana O.; Ribeiro, Joana; Flores, Deolinda; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando; Baptista, José M.

    2015-06-01

    A sensing system in the near infrared region has been developed for ammonia sensing based on the wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species, presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region by using the optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity were modulated by applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allowed the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise was typically lower. Two multi-pass cells based on free space light propagation with 160 cm and 16 cm of optical path length were used, allowing the redundancy operation and technology validation. This system used a diode laser with an emission wavelength at 1512.21 nm, where NH3 has a strong absorption line. The control of the NH3 gas sensing system, as well as acquisition, processing and data presentation was performed.

  15. Addressing the water budget with SMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y. H.; AlBitar, A.; Tomer, S. K.; Merlin, O.; Pellarin, T.

    2012-12-01

    SMOS, a L Band radiometer using aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution, was successfully launched on November 2, 2009. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Teccnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz h protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and the atmosphere is almost transparent enabling to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS as been now acquiring data for almost 2 years. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and of China. However, many different international teams are now addressing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. In parallel different teams are now starting addressing data use in various fields including hydrology. It requires coupling with other models and or disaggregation to address soil moisture distribution over watersheds. Significant new results were obtained for floods and drought events, together with new potential applications in terms of precipitation monitoring This paper thus gives an overview of the science goals of the SMOS mission, a description of its main elements, and a taste of the first results including

  16. Reduction of reabsorption effects in scintillators by employing solutes with large Stokes shifts

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Renschler, C.L.

    1984-08-01

    A radiation or high energy particle responsive system useful as a scintillator comprises, a first component which interacts with radiation or high energy particles to emit photons in a certain first wavelength range, and at least one additional solute component which absorbs the photons in said first wavelength range and thereupon emits photons in another wavelength range higher than said first range. An improvement is provided wherein at least one of said components absorbs substantially no photons in the wavelength range in which it emits photons, due to a large Stokes shift caused by an excited state intramolecular rearrangement.

  17. Reduction of reabsorption effects in scintillators by employing solutes with large Stokes shifts

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Renschler, Clifford L.

    1986-01-01

    In a radiation or high energy particle responsive system useful as a scintillator, and comprising, a first component which interacts with said radiation or high energy particle to emit photons in a certain first wavelength range; and at least one additional solute component which absorbs the photons in said first wavelength range and thereupon emits photons in another wavelength range higher than said first range; an improvement is provided wherein at least one of said components absorbs substantially no photons in said wavelength range in which it emits photons, due to a large Stokes shift caused by an excited state intramolecular rearrangement.

  18. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  19. Tunable dual-wavelength ytterbium-doped fiber laser using a strain technique on microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, H; Salim, M A M; Azzuhri, Saaidal R; Jaddoa, M F; Harun, S W

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, stable dual-wavelength generation using a strain technique for a ytterbium-doped fiber laser is successfully demonstrated. A microfiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is inserted into the laser ring cavity and stretched using the xyz translation stage. Four sets of dual-wavelength output lasing are obtained when the strain is applied onto a microfiber. The dual-wavelength output possesses spacing between 7.12 and 11.59 nm, with displacement from 2 to 190 μm from the central wavelength. The obtained side-mode suppression ratio is ∼48  dBm, while the maximum power fluctuation and wavelength shift are less than 0.6 dB and 0.01 nm, respectively. The results demonstrate that this setup generates a stable dual-wavelength laser in the 1 μm region. PMID:26836079

  20. Giant field enhancement and resonant wavelength shift through a composite nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingquan; Zuo, Yiping; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Pan, Leiting; Yao, Jianghong; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports a kind of nanostructure composed of a metallic nanosphere pair and a rectangle nanoaperture, which can dramatically enhance the localized optical near-field up to 2100 times larger than the incident optical field. The FEM calculation method was used to investigate the enhancement factors and the coupling effects of different nanostructures. When the composite nanostructures are periodically arranged, the resonance peak can be varied from 560 nm to 760 nm and the electric field enhancement is about 37 percent larger than that of single composite nanostructure. We attribute these phenomena to two-step confinement of the optical electric field and the coupling effect of the composite nanostructures. Both enhancement factors of single and periodic composite nanostructures are sufficient for single molecule detection.

  1. Wavelength Shifting Phoswich Detectors for Superior Depth-of-Interaction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Charles L; Eriksson, Lars

    2012-10-25

    In order to simultaneously achieve both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity in small Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, scintillation detectors must be long in the radial direction as well as able to provide depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. DOI information is typically provided by constructing detectors from two or more layers of scintillators that are identifiable due to their different decay times. This approach has worked well in tomographs such as the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, CTI PET Systems, Inc.) in which the emission and excitation bands of the scintillator layers do not overlap each other. However, many potentially important pairs of scintillator crystals exist in which the emission of one crystal is, in fact, absorbed and re-emitted by the second crystal, thus impacting the pulse shape discrimination process used to identify the scintillator layers. These potentially useful pairs of scintillators are unlikely to be implemented in phoswich detectors without a comprehensive understanding of the complex emission that results when the light of one crystal is absorbed by the second crystal and then reemitted. Our objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of the optical phenomena that occur in phoswich detectors and to exploit these phenomena to achieve improved spatial resolution in small high sensitivity PET scanners.

  2. Design of a muon tomography system with a plastic scintillator and wavelength-shifting fiber arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun-Il; An, Su Jung; Lee, Chae Young; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Recently, monitoring nuclear materials to avoid nuclear terrorism has become an important area of national security. It can be difficult to detect gamma rays from nuclear material because they are easily shielded by shielding material. Muon tomography using multiple -Coulomb scattering derived from muons can be utilized to detect special nuclear materials (SNMs) such as uranium-235 and plutonium-239. We designed a muon tomography system composed of four detector modules. The incident and scattered muon tracks can be calculated by two top and two bottom detectors, respectively. 3D tomographic images are obtained by extracting the crossing points of muon tracks with a point-of-closest-approach algorithm. The purpose of this study was to optimize the muon tomography system using Monte Carlo simulation code. The effects of the geometric parameters of the muon tomography system on material Z-discrimination capability were simulated and evaluated.

  3. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  4. Development of fusion neutron camera using organic liquid scintillator and wavelength shifting fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, D.; Iguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Nishitani, T.

    2004-10-01

    For fusion neutron profile monitoring, we propose to use a new position sensitive fast neutron detector (PSFND). We have considered an applicability of the present PSFND to two types of fusion neutron camera; a pinhole camera and a double crystal time-of-flight camera.

  5. Photonic downconversion with tunable wideband phase shift.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianwei; Yu, Song; Wu, Ruihuan; Wang, Dongsheng; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-06-01

    A microwave photonic frequency downconversion system with wideband and continuous phase-shift function is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, a radio frequency (RF) and a local oscillator (LO) signal drive two arms of a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used for reflecting the first-order sidebands of both RF and LO signals. Due to phase independence between RF and LO optical sidebands, the phase-shifting operation for an output intermediate frequency (IF) signal can be implemented either by adjusting the bias voltage of DMZM or by controlling the optical wavelength of laser. Experimental results demonstrate a full 0° to 360° phase shift, while an RF signal between 12 GHz to 20 GHz is downconverted to IFs below 4 GHz. The phase deviation is measured less than 2°, and the fluctuation of magnitude response is measured less than ±1  dB over a wideband frequency range. PMID:27244434

  6. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  7. Every Other Day. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiller, Tom

    Schools need to be reoriented and restructured so that what is taught and learned, and the way in which it is taught and learned, are better integrated with young people's real-world experiences. Many indicators suggest that the meaningful aspects of school have been lost in the encounter with modern times. The title of this address--"Every Other…

  8. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  9. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  10. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  11. Elective automatic shift transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Redzinski, G.E.

    1986-09-02

    For use in vehicle of the type having an engine coupled with traction wheels through a driveline including a change-speed transmission, the transmission includes drive direction reversing means, a drive direction selector for manual control of the reversing means and having a forward and reverse position, the transmission including ratio changing means, a manual gear selector for operation of the ratio changing means for shifting the transmission into a selected gear, and control means responsive to a control signal for upshifting and downshifting between first and second gears.

  12. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  13. Compact wavelength de-multiplexer design using slow light regime of photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Akosman, Ahmet E; Mutlu, Mehmet; Kurt, Hamza; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate the operation of a compact wavelength de-multiplexer using cascaded single-mode photonic crystal waveguides utilizing the slow light regime. By altering the dielectric filling factors of each waveguide segment, we numerically and experimentally show that different frequencies are separated at different locations along the waveguide. In other words, the beams of different wavelengths are spatially dropped along the transverse to the propagation direction. We numerically verified the spatial shifts of certain wavelengths by using the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The presented design can be extended to de-multiplex more wavelengths by concatenating additional photonic crystal waveguides with different filling factors. PMID:22109439

  14. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E {times} B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  15. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  16. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  17. Transmission shift control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dzioba, D.L.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a transmission shift control assembly mounted on a steering column having a longitudinal axis comprising: bracket means secured to the steering column; transmission shift cable means having a portion secured to the bracket means and a portion linearly movable relative to the secured portion; mounting means on the bracket cable drive arm means having an axis and being rotatably mounted on the rotary axis on the mounting means oblique to the longitudinal axis and including a cable connecting portion secured to the movable portion of the cable means and lever mounting means adjacent the mounting means; operator control means including lever means, pin means for pivotally mounting the lever means on the lever mounting means on an axis substantially perpendicular to the rotary axis and positioning arm means formed on the lever means and extending from the pin means; and detent gate means disposed on the bracket means in position to abut the positioning arm means for limiting the extent of pivotal movement of the lever means.

  18. GHRS Cycle 5 Echelle Wavelength Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1995-07-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle A. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  19. Ontogenetic shift of spectral phototactic preferences in anuran tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, R G; Hailman, J P

    1976-10-01

    Tadpoles of three species of anurans initially had a midspectrum ("green") preference in laboratory phototactic tests, which was shown experimentally to involve a form of true color vision in one species and probably in the other two as well. During development, the preference shifted to shorter wave-lengths (higher frequencies) until a short-wavelength ("blue") preference predominated in the pre- and postmetamorphic stages and in the adults of six species tested; color vision was involved in all of these stages. The green preference of young tadpoles is ecologically adaptive, in that it directs larvae to green plants that provide food or shelter. Tadpoles observed in a pond congregated heavily in vegetated areas rather than in open water. Spectroradiometric field measurements showed that pond illumination in vegetated areas had a more highly saturated yellow-green spectral dominance compared with a desaturated white illumination in open water. During all ontogenetic stages and as adults, the animals had a preference for high illuminance of white light, which correlates with the high illumination of their habitat. Microspectrophotometric data from Liebman and Entine suggested that the green rods are active receptors in tadpoles, making unlikely Muntz's hypothesis that the ontogenetic shift in spectral preferences is due to premetamorphic maturation of these receptors. However, the visual pigments of all five types of photoreceptors shifted from vitamin A2- to vitamin A1-based chromophores during ontogeny, and the resulting shift in spectral response of the receptors might be related to the spectral shift in phototactic preferences.

  20. Soliton Self-Frequency Shift: Experimental Demonstrations and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer H.; van Howe, James; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS), a consequence of Raman self-pumping that continuously red-shifts a soliton pulse, has been widely studied recently for applications to fiber-based sources and signal processing. In this paper, the fundamentals of SSFS are reviewed. Various fiber platforms for SSFS (single-mode fiber, microstructured fiber, and higher order mode fiber) are presented and experimental SSFS demonstrations in these fibers are discussed. Observation of Cerenkov radiation in fibers exhibiting SSFS is also presented. A number of interesting applications of SSFS, such as wavelength-agile lasers, analog-to-digital conversion, and slow light, are briefly discussed. PMID:23055656

  1. Soliton Self-Frequency Shift: Experimental Demonstrations and Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer H; van Howe, James; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS), a consequence of Raman self-pumping that continuously red-shifts a soliton pulse, has been widely studied recently for applications to fiber-based sources and signal processing. In this paper, the fundamentals of SSFS are reviewed. Various fiber platforms for SSFS (single-mode fiber, microstructured fiber, and higher order mode fiber) are presented and experimental SSFS demonstrations in these fibers are discussed. Observation of Cerenkov radiation in fibers exhibiting SSFS is also presented. A number of interesting applications of SSFS, such as wavelength-agile lasers, analog-to-digital conversion, and slow light, are briefly discussed.

  2. Experimental Stark widths and shifts of Ti II spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, J.; Aguilera, J. A.; Aragón, C.

    2016-10-01

    Stark widths and shifts of Ti II lines with wavelengths in the range 2500-4600 Å have been determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The temperature and electron density of the plasma vary in the ranges 11 970-15 520 K and (2.0-7.2) × 1017 cm-3, respectively, for the different measurement instants from 0.6 to 1.8 μs. The samples used are fused glass discs with different titanium concentrations, selected to control the self-absorption of the lines. The Stark widths and shifts are compared with the experimental and theoretical data available in the literature.

  3. Dispersion blue-shift in an aperiodic Bragg reflection waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesenko, Volodymyr I.; Tuz, Vladimir R.

    2016-04-01

    A particular feature of an aperiodic design of cladding of Bragg reflection waveguides to demonstrate a dispersion blue-shift is elucidated. It is made on the basis of a comparative study of dispersion characteristics of both periodic and aperiodic configurations of Bragg mirrors in the waveguide system, wherein for the aperiodic configuration three procedures for layers alternating, namely Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and Kolakoski substitutional rules are considered. It was found out that, in a Bragg reflection waveguide with any considered aperiodic cladding, dispersion curves of guided modes appear to be shifted to shorter wavelengths compared to the periodic configuration regardless of the modes polarization.

  4. Blue shift of laser mode in photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengchao; Feng, Z. G.; Qi, Fan; Qi, Aiyi; Wang, Yufei; Zheng, W. H.

    2014-11-01

    We report the first demonstration of blue shift of optical pumping photonic crystal (PhC) laser. A femtosecond laser was used to pump the InGaAsP based two dimensional photonic crystal laser at room temperature. Linear dependence of the resonance wavelength with respect to the pump power is observed: dλ/dP=-1.5×10-2 nm/μW . Blue shift of overall 1.1nm was obtained with the increase power of pump laser. These results are in agreement with theoretical expectation while the carrier-induced index change is introduced into the PhC semiconductor laser. It shows a possibility that by proper wafer design and careful optimization, we may obtain wavelength stable photonic crystal laser, which is important in photonic integration.

  5. Coating induced phase shift and impact on Euclid imaging performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar Venancio, Luis M.; Carminati, Lionel; Lorenzo Alvarez, Jose; Amiaux, Jérôme; Bonino, Luciana; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Vavrek, Roland; Laureijs, René; Short, Alex; Boenke, Tobias; Strada, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    The challenging constraints imposed on the Euclid telescope imaging performances have driven the design, manufacturing and characterisation of the multi-layers coatings of the dichroic. Indeed it was found that the coatings layers thickness inhomogeneity will introduce a wavelength dependent phase-shift resulting in degradation of the image quality of the telescope. Such changes must be characterized and/or simulated since they could be non-negligible contributors to the scientific performance accuracy. Several papers on this topic can be found in literature, however the results can not be applied directly to Euclid's dichroic coatings. In particular an applicable model of the phase-shift variation with the wavelength could not be found and was developed. The results achieved with the mathematical model are compared to experimental results of tests performed on a development prototype of the Euclid's dichroic.

  6. Optically addressed near and long-wave infrared multiband photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellek, O. O.; Reno, J. L.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2012-06-01

    Optically addressed dual-band photodetector incorporating of a 0.82 μm cut-off wavelength near-infrared (NIR) AlGaAs/GaAs p-i-n photodetector and a 8.2 μm peak wavelength long-wave infrared (LWIR) AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well infrared photodetector on GaAs substrate is fabricated and characterized. Switching between NIR and LWIR bands is demonstrated by using external light bias. The dual-band photodetector gives 65% quantum efficiency in NIR band and specific detectivity of 2 × 109cm Hz1/2/W in LWIR band at 68 K. Spectral crosstalk is better than 25 dB. These devices enable the use of only a single indium-bump per pixel for multiband image sensor arrays to have maximum fill factor.

  7. Shifting epidemiology of Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lyle R; Marfin, Anthony A

    2005-04-01

    The dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses are important mosquito-borne viruses whose epidemiology is shifting in response to changing societal factors, such as increasing commerce, urbanization of rural areas, and population growth. All four viruses are expanding geographically, as exemplified by the emergence of West Nile virus in the Americas and Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia. The large, recent global outbreaks of severe neurological disease caused by West Nile virus, the increasing frequency of dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the Americas, and the emergence of yellow fever virus vaccination-associated viscerotropic disease, are new clinical epidemiologic trends. These worrisome epidemiologic trends will probably continue in coming decades, as a reversal of their societal and biological drivers is not in sight. Nevertheless, the substantial reductions in Japanese encephalitis virus incidence resulting from vaccination programs and economic development in some Asian countries provide some encouragement within this overall guarded outlook.

  8. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  10. Wavelengths Effective in Induction of Malignant Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlow, Richard B.; Grist, Eleanor; Thompson, Keith; Woodhead, Avril D.

    1993-07-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions.

  11. Multiple Wavelength Observations of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    The radio emission of quiescent active regions at 6 cm wavelength marks the legs of magnetic dipoles, and the emission at 20 cm wavelength delineates the radio wavelength counterpart of the coronal loops previously detected at X-ray wavelengths. At both wavelengths the temperatures have coronal values of a few million degrees. The polarization of the radio emission specifies the structure and strength of the coronal magnetic field (H ≈ 600 Gauss at heights h ≈ 4 x 109 cm above sunspot umbrae). At 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength the solar bursts have angular sizes between 5" and 30", brightness temperatures between 2 x 107 K and 2 x 108 K, and degrees of circular polarization between 10% and 90%. The location of the burst energy release is specified with second-of-arc accuracy. At radio wavelengths the bursts occur within the central regions of magnetic loops, while the flaring Ha kernels are located at the loop footpoints. Coronal loops exhibit enhanced radio emission (preburst heating) a few minutes before the release of burst energy. The radio polarization data indicate magnetic changes before and during solar bursts.

  12. 2011 Society of Counseling Psychology Presidential Address: Exploring Privilege in Counseling Psychology--Shifting the Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Within a system of societal inequities, privilege consists of unearned advantages that are conferred on individuals based on membership or assumed membership in a dominant group. This article describes the relationship between privilege and oppression, dimensions of privilege, characteristics of privilege, costs of privilege, and resistance to…

  13. Wavelength and bandwidth-tunable silicon comb filter based on Sagnac loop mirrors with Mach-Zehnder interferometer couplers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinhong; Wu, Jiayang; Yang, Yuxing; Pan, Ting; Mao, Junming; Liu, Boyu; Liu, Ruili; Zhang, Yong; Qiu, Ciyuan; Tremblay, Christine; Su, Yikai

    2016-02-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength and bandwidth-tunable comb filter based on silicon Sagnac loop mirrors (SLMs) with Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) couplers. By thermally tuning the MZI couplers in common and differential modes, the phase shift and reflectivity of the SLMs can be changed, respectively, leading to tunable wavelength and bandwidth of the comb filter. The fabricated comb filter has 93 comb lines in the wavelength range from 1535 nm to 1565 nm spaced by ~0.322 nm. The central wavelength can be red-shifted by ~0.462 nm with a tuning efficiency of ~0.019 nm/mW. A continuously tunable bandwidth from 5.88 GHz to 24.89 GHz is also achieved with a differential heating power ranging from 0.00 mW to 0.53 mW.

  14. Wavelength initialization employing wavelength recognition scheme in WDM-PON based on tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sil-Gu; Lee, Eun-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jyung Chan

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to initialize the wavelength of tunable lasers in WDM-PON employing wavelength recognition scheme with an optical filter as a function of wavelength and accomplished plug and play operation. We also implemented a transceiver based on our proposed wavelength initialization scheme and then experimentally demonstrated the feasibility in WDM-PON configuration guaranteeing 16 channels with 100 GHz channel spacing. Our proposal is a cost-effective and easy-to-install method to realize the wavelength initialization of ONU. In addition, this method will support compatibility with all kind of tunable laser regardless of their structures and operating principles.

  15. Addressing Challenges for Chemical Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, William B.; Brandes, Jay A.

    2009-05-01

    Unknown Knowns and Known Unknowns: Chemical Oceanography in a Changing World; Savannah, Georgia, 22-24 February 2009; Rapid climate change in recent decades has resulted in significant shifts in ocean chemistry. A group of more than 80 chemical oceanographers from the United States and Europe met in Savannah, Ga., to consider the challenges facing the field in upcoming decades and to reflect on what studies and resources are needed to meet these challenges. The primary focus was on carbon and related nutrient cycling and the tools, such as biomarkers, used to investigate these processes. Over the course of 2 days, a series of provocative talks and spirited discussions highlighted several challenges facing chemical oceanographers.

  16. Spectral shift of infrared LEDs and resistive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedde, M. L.; Lowry, H. S.; Mansfield, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    The Space Chambers at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) are continually exploring new technologies to improve their characterization, calibration, and mission simulation testing capabilities for imaging sensors. Part of this task is to develop and integrate methods to simulate high-temperature sources (on the order of 3,000 K) while maintaining the integrity of the low radiometric background within the cryovacuum chambers. The High Temperature Source Simulator project at AEDC is exploring the use of laser diodes, LEDs, and resistive sources of varying IR wavelengths to simulate these high-temperature sources within AEDC's Space Chambers. A brief summary of previous work will be presented with a more detailed discussion of the recent cryospectral shift of the tested sources. We found that the IR LEDs spectrally shift up to about 20% from their ambient center wavelength while the resistive sources do not shift at all (as expected). Several different resistive sources as well as LEDs of varying wavelengths have been procured and will continue to be tested.

  17. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  18. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  19. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  20. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month. PMID:26699036

  1. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  2. Addressing Passive Smoking in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Sasha G.; Kuijlaars, Jennifer S.; Mesters, Ilse; Muris, Jean W. M.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward; Feron, Frans J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant number of parents are unaware or unconvinced of the health consequences of passive smoking (PS) in children. Physicians could increase parental awareness by giving personal advice. Aim To evaluate the current practices of three Dutch health professions (paediatricians, youth health care physicians, and family physicians) regarding parental counselling for passive smoking (PS) in children. Methods All physicians (n = 720) representing the three health professions in Limburg, the Netherlands, received an invitation to complete a self-administered electronic questionnaire including questions on their: sex, work experience, personal smoking habits, counselling practices and education regarding PS in children. Results The response rate was 34%. One tenth (11%) of the responding physicians always addressed PS in children, 32% often, 54% occasionally and 4% reported to never attend to it. The three health professions appeared comparable regarding their frequency of parental counselling for PS in children. Addressing PS was more likely when children had respiratory problems. Lack of time was the most frequently mentioned barrier, being very and somewhat applicable for respectively 14% and 43% of the physicians. One fourth of the responders had received postgraduate education about PS. Additionally, 49% of the responders who did not have any education about PS were interested in receiving it. Conclusions Physicians working in the paediatric field in Limburg, the Netherlands, could more frequently address PS in children with parents. Lack of time appeared to be the most mentioned barrier and physicians were more likely to counsel parents for PS in children with respiratory complaints/diseases. Finally, a need for more education on parental counselling for PS was expressed. PMID:24809443

  3. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  4. Addressing inequities in healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Hattersley, Libby; Ford, Laura; O'Rourke, Kerryn

    2015-09-01

    What, when, where and how much people eat is influenced by a complex mix of factors at societal, community and individual levels. These influences operate both directly through the food system and indirectly through political, economic, social and cultural pathways that cause social stratification and influence the quality of conditions in which people live their lives. These factors are the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence base for addressing these determinants and for the promotion of equity in healthy eating. PMID:26420812

  5. Identifying and Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Lori A.; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    In the 20th century, the introduction of multiple vaccines significantly reduced childhood morbidity, mortality, and disease outbreaks. Despite, and perhaps because of, their public health impact, an increasing number of parents and patients are choosing to delay or refuse vaccines. These individuals are described as vaccine hesitant. This phenomenon has developed due to the confluence of multiple social, cultural, political and personal factors. As immunization programs continue to expand, understanding and addressing vaccine hesitancy will be crucial to their successful implementation. This review explores the history of vaccine hesitancy, its causes, and suggested approaches for reducing hesitancy and strengthening vaccine acceptance. PMID:25875982

  6. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  7. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  8. Band shifting for ocean color multi-spectral reflectance data.

    PubMed

    Mélin, Frédéric; Sclep, Gert

    2015-02-01

    An approach to perform band shifting applied to multi-spectral ocean remote sensing reflectance RRS values in the visible spectral range is presented. The band-shifting scheme aims at expressing RRS at a wavelength not originally part of the spectrum from data at neighboring bands. The scheme relies on the determination of inherent optical properties (IOPs) by a bio-optical model, the calculation of the IOPs at the target wavelength using the spectral shapes assumed for each IOP, and the operation of the bio-optical model in forward mode to express RRS at the target wavelength. The performance of the band-shifting scheme applied to bands typical of satellite missions is assessed with hyper-spectral data sets obtained from radiative transfer simulations or from field measurements. The relative error ε on the conversion factors from 488 to 490 nm is mostly within 1%. Analogous results are obtained for conversions in the red spectral domain (665, 667 and 670 nm) only for synthetic data sets. The range of ε for conversions between green bands (547, 555 and 560 nm) is within 2% to 5% depending on the data set considered. Similar results are obtained when RRS values are computed at 510 nm from data at 488 and 531 nm. In the case of the assessment with simulated data, all band-shifting operations are characterized by an ε range within 2% for all conversions when the concentration of chlorophyll-a is lower than 1 mg m(-3). Applied to satellite data, the band-shifting scheme noticeably improves the agreement between RRS data from different missions.

  9. Multiple wavelength photolithography for preparing multilayer microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2003-06-24

    The invention relates to a multilayer microstructure and a method for preparing thereof. The method involves first applying a first photodefinable composition having a first exposure wavelength on a substrate to form a first polymeric layer. A portion of the first photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the first exposure wavelength to form a first pattern in the first polymeric layer. After exposing the first polymeric layer, a second photodefinable composition having a second exposure wavelength is applied on the first polymeric layer to form a second polymeric layer. A portion of the second photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the second exposure wavelength to form a second pattern in the second polymeric layer. In addition, a portion of each layer is removed according to the patterns to form a multilayer microstructure having a cavity having a shape that corresponds to the portions removed.

  10. Multiple-Wavelength Pyrometry Independent Of Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-wavelength pyrometric method provides for determination of two sequential temperatures of same surface or temperatures of two surfaces made of same material. Temperatures measured, without knowing emissivity, by uncalibrated spectral radiometer.

  11. Controllable Dual-Wavelength Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Jun; He, Bing; Liu, Hou-Kang; Liu, Chi; Wei, Yun-Rong; Dong, Jing-Xing; Lou, Qi-Hong

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a controllable dual-wavelength fiber laser which contains a master laser and a slave laser. The master laser is a kind of ring cavity laser which can be injected into by the slave laser. The output laser wavelength is controlled by injected power of the slave laser; both single- and dual-wavelength operation can be achieved. Under free running, the master laser generates 1064 nm laser output. Here the slave laser is a 1072 nm fiber laser. The 1064 nm and 1072 nm laser coexist in output spectrum for relatively low injected power. Dual-wavelength and power-ratio-tunable operation can be achieved. If the injected power of the slave laser is high enough, the 1064 nm laser is extinguished automatically and there is only 1072 nm laser output.

  12. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  13. Passive Fraunhofer-wavelength atomic filter at 422.7 nm.

    PubMed

    Gelbwachs, J A; Chan, Y C

    1991-03-01

    We have demonstrated 25% internal photon conversion efficiency of a new passive atomic filter. The signal wavelength matches an intense Fraunhofer line at 422.7 nm, thereby offering enhanced sunlight rejection. A quasimolecular interaction promotes rapid energy transfer between the 4p (1)P(1) level and the 4p (3)P(J) level of neutral calcium for wavelength shifting of 422.7-nm light into 657.3-nm emission. We discuss augmentation of the photon conversion efficiency by radiation trapping.

  14. Magic wavelength to make optical lattice clocks insensitive to atomic motion.

    PubMed

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E Yu; Ovsiannikov, V D

    2009-10-01

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  15. Magic Wavelength to Make Optical Lattice Clocks Insensitive to Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E. Yu.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  16. Young's experiment with a double slit of sub-wavelength dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-08-12

    We report that the interference pattern of Young's double-slit experiment changes as a function of polarization in the sub-wavelength diffraction regime. Experiments carried out with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy reveal that diffracted waves from sub-wavelength-scale slits exhibit either positive or negative phase shift with respect to Gouy phase depending on the polarization. Theoretical explanation based on the induction of electric current and magnetic dipole in the vicinity of the slits shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring a plurality of spectral wavelengths present in electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Buican, Tudor N.; Martin, John C.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method simultaneously measures a plurality of spectral wavelengths present in electromagnetic radiation. A modulatable birefringent optical element is employed to divide a polarized light beam into two components, thereby producing a phase difference in two resulting light beams such that the two beams can be made to interfere with one another when recombined, the interference pattern providing the wavelength information required for the analysis of the incident light. The interferometer thus created performs in a similar manner to a Michelson interferometer, but with no moving parts, and with a resolution dependent on the degree of phase shift introduced by the modulator.

  18. In-service communication channel sensing based on reflectometry for dynamic wavelength assigned wavelength- and time-division multiplexed passive optical network systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Daisuke; Kuwano, Shigeru; Terada, Jun

    2015-04-01

    In future radio access systems, base stations will be mainly accommodated in wavelength- and time-division multiplexing passive optical network (PON) based mobile backhaul and fronthaul networks, and in such networks, failed connections in an optical network unit (ONU) wavelength channel will severely degrade mobile system performance. A cost-effective in-service ONU wavelength channel monitor is essential to ensure proper system operation without failed connections. To address this issue, we propose a reflectometry-based remote sensing method that provides ONU wavelength channel information with the optical line terminal-ONU distance. The proposed method enables real-time monitoring of ONU wavelength channels without data signal quality degradation and is also able to determine if the ONUs are connected to the PON. Experimental results show that it achieves wavelength channel distinction with a high distance resolution (˜10 m). Additionally, with the method, the distance resolution for distinguishing the ONUs after the PON splitter is determined by the received signal bandwidth or the test light modulation speed rather than by the pulse width as in conventional optical time-domain reflectometry.

  19. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  20. Observations of Venus at 1-meter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Bryan J.

    2014-11-01

    Radio wavelength observations of Venus (including from the Magellan spacecraft) have been a powerful method of probing its surface and atmosphere since the 1950's. The emission is generally understood to come from a combination of emission and absorption in the subsurface, surface, and atmosphere at cm and shorter wavelengths [1]. There is, however, a long-standing mystery regarding the long wavelength emission from Venus. First discovered at wavelengths of 50 cm and greater [2], the effect was later confirmed to extend to wavelengths as short as 13 cm [1,3]. The brightness temperatures are depressed significantly 50 K around 10-20 cm, increasing to as much as 200 K around 1 m) from what one would expect from a "normal" surface (e.g., similar to the Moon or Earth) [1-3].No simple surface and subsurface model of Venus can reproduce these large depressions in the long wavelength emission [1-3]. Simple atmospheric and ionospheric models fail similarly. In an attempt to constrain the brightness temperature spectrum more fully, new observations have been made at wavelengths that cover the range 60 cm to 1.3 m at the Very Large Array, using the newly available low-band receiving systems there [4]. The new observations were made over a very wide wavelength range and at several Venus phases, with that wide parameter space coverage potentially allowing us to pinpoint the cause of the phenomenon. The observations and potential interpretations will be presented and discussed.[1] Butler et al. 2001, Icarus, 154, 226. [2] Schloerb et al. 1976, Icarus, 29, 329; Muhleman et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1081; Condon et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1075; Kuzmin 1965, Radiophysics. [3] Butler & Sault 2003, IAUSS, 1E, 17B. [4] Intema et al. 2014, BASI, 1.

  1. Marine regime shifts: drivers and impacts on ecosystems services

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, J.; Yletyinen, J.; Biggs, R.; Blenckner, T.; Peterson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems can experience regime shifts, in which they shift from being organized around one set of mutually reinforcing structures and processes to another. Anthropogenic global change has broadly increased a wide variety of processes that can drive regime shifts. To assess the vulnerability of marine ecosystems to such shifts and their potential consequences, we reviewed the scientific literature for 13 types of marine regime shifts and used networks to conduct an analysis of co-occurrence of drivers and ecosystem service impacts. We found that regime shifts are caused by multiple drivers and have multiple consequences that co-occur in a non-random pattern. Drivers related to food production, climate change and coastal development are the most common co-occurring causes of regime shifts, while cultural services, biodiversity and primary production are the most common cluster of ecosystem services affected. These clusters prioritize sets of drivers for management and highlight the need for coordinated actions across multiple drivers and scales to reduce the risk of marine regime shifts. Managerial strategies are likely to fail if they only address well-understood or data-rich variables, and international cooperation and polycentric institutions will be critical to implement and coordinate action across the scales at which different drivers operate. By better understanding these underlying patterns, we hope to inform the development of managerial strategies to reduce the risk of high-impact marine regime shifts, especially for areas of the world where data are not available or monitoring programmes are not in place.

  2. Dual-frequency addressed hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-Qing; Liang, Xiao; Wu, Yung-Hsun; Du, Fang; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-10-01

    Dual-frequency addressed hybrid-aligned nematic (HAN) liquid crystal cell is demonstrated as a variable optical attenuator at 1.55μm wavelength. By controlling the low- and high-frequency electric field, the dual-frequency liquid crystal (DFLC) molecules can be reoriented parallel or perpendicular to the substrates so that the maximum obtainable phase modulation is doubled. In comparison to a homogeneous cell, the DFLC HAN cell shows a lower operating voltage and faster response time. Furthermore, the DFLC HAN cell exhibits three stable states that have some applications such as ternary photonic devices.

  3. Interrogation of a wavelength tunable fiber Bragg grating sensor based ring laser for dynamic strain monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-03-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are wavelength selective optical reflectors with excellent strain sensitivity and small sensing footprint, which makes them suitable as diagnostic sensors for structural health monitoring applications. In this work, we explore the narrowband wavelength selectivity of FBGs for optical feedback in a tunable fiber ring laser. The fiber ring laser consists of an erbium doped fiber laser that is pumped with a Raman laser (980 nm) to produce population inversion and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the C-band. The ASE light is used to illuminate a FBG sensor connected to the ring, and the reflected light from the sensor is fed back into the laser cavity to produce stimulated emission at the instantaneous center wavelength of the sensor. As the wavelength of the sensor shifts due mechanical or thermal strains, the wavelength of the optical output from the ring laser shifts accordingly. By combining the ring laser with a dynamic spectral demodulator for optical readout, the instantaneous wavelength of the ring laser is tracked with high temporal resolution. The fiber ring laser system offers several potential advantages in the diagnostic sensing of mechanical strains for SHM applications including, fully integrated laser and sensor system, high source power levels at the sensor wavelength, narrow spectral line-width, coherent spectral demodulation, and low system costs. In this work, we present experimental results that detail the feasibility of dynamic spectral tuning of the fiber ring laser at frequencies up to hundreds of kilohertz using a single FBG sensing element. Using multiple sensing elements, the fiber ring laser system would allow for active monitoring of dynamic strains in a multi-point sensor array configuration, which is particularly suitable for the localization of high frequency mechanical strains produced by impact loading and cracking events in structures.

  4. Wavelength scanning achieves pixel super-resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Göröcs, Zoltan; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Lensfree holographic on-chip imaging is a potent solution for high-resolution and field-portable bright-field imaging over a wide field-of-view. Previous lensfree imaging approaches utilize a pixel super-resolution technique, which relies on sub-pixel lateral displacements between the lensfree diffraction patterns and the image sensor's pixel-array, to achieve sub-micron resolution under unit magnification using state-of-the-art CMOS imager chips, commonly used in e.g., mobile-phones. Here we report, for the first time, a wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution technique in lensfree holographic imaging. We developed an iterative super-resolution algorithm, which generates high-resolution reconstructions of the specimen from low-resolution (i.e., under-sampled) diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths within a narrow spectral range (e.g., 10-30 nm). Compared with lateral shift-based pixel super-resolution, this wavelength scanning approach does not require any physical shifts in the imaging setup, and the resolution improvement is uniform in all directions across the sensor-array. Our wavelength scanning super-resolution approach can also be integrated with multi-height and/or multi-angle on-chip imaging techniques to obtain even higher resolution reconstructions. For example, using wavelength scanning together with multi-angle illumination, we achieved a halfpitch resolution of 250 nm, corresponding to a numerical aperture of 1. In addition to pixel super-resolution, the small scanning steps in wavelength also enable us to robustly unwrap phase, revealing the specimen's optical path length in our reconstructed images. We believe that this new wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution approach can provide competitive microscopy solutions for high-resolution and field-portable imaging needs, potentially impacting tele-pathology applications in resource-limited-settings.

  5. Strategies for the implementation of new shift systems.

    PubMed

    Knauth, P

    2001-12-01

    Implementation barriers may be caused by deficiencies in the knowledge, skills, motivation, or support of those involved in the process of implementation of a new shift system. There is no 'one and only' way of planning and implementing a new shift system. However, if the following factors of success are taken into consideration there is a better chance that workers will accept a new shift system: worker participation, information, communication, training, promoter commitment, professional project management, tailor-made solutions and an adequate organizational framework. These factors are particularly relevant in addressing barriers to the implementation of new shift systems. The most important measures to cope with resistance to change of shift systems are: worker participation, information, communication, training, promoter commitment, professional project management, tailor-made solutions and an adequate organizational framework. PMID:14564851

  6. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-09-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths.

  7. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths. PMID:27659800

  8. Shift related dietary intake in day and shift workers.

    PubMed

    Lennernäs, M; Hambraeus, L; Akerstedt, T

    1995-12-01

    To study the impact of work hours on eating habits the dietary intake of 96 male industrial workers on day work and two- and three-shift work was investigated using repeated 24 h recall. The intake of energy, 14 nutrients, and coffee and tea was computed, using a nutrient data base, for 8 h work and shifts (day, morning, afternoon, night) and for the 24-h periods including these work shifts. No changes in intake of energy, nutrients and coffee/tea were observed between 8 h morning and afternoon shifts, but there was a reduction in intake during 8 h night shifts. Night shift work caused a redistribution of food and coffee intake, but not an overall 24 h reduction. On the whole, the energy-intake and the quality of food intake (percentages of energy from macronutrients and density of micronutrients) were not affected by shift work, although the intake of carbohydrates was lower in day- and three-shift workers during days off. The intake of alcohol was higher during days off in all groups. In summary, two- and three-shift work in this study affected the circadian distribution of food intakes and coffee consumption, but not the overall 24-h consumption.

  9. GEOSS: Addressing Big Data Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Ochiai, O.

    2014-12-01

    In the sector of Earth Observation, the explosion of data is due to many factors including: new satellite constellations, the increased capabilities of sensor technologies, social media, crowdsourcing, and the need for multidisciplinary and collaborative research to face Global Changes. In this area, there are many expectations and concerns about Big Data. Vendors have attempted to use this term for their commercial purposes. It is necessary to understand whether Big Data is a radical shift or an incremental change for the existing digital infrastructures. This presentation tries to explore and discuss the impact of Big Data challenges and new capabilities on the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) and particularly on its common digital infrastructure called GCI. GEOSS is a global and flexible network of content providers allowing decision makers to access an extraordinary range of data and information at their desk. The impact of the Big Data dimensionalities (commonly known as 'V' axes: volume, variety, velocity, veracity, visualization) on GEOSS is discussed. The main solutions and experimentation developed by GEOSS along these axes are introduced and analyzed. GEOSS is a pioneering framework for global and multidisciplinary data sharing in the Earth Observation realm; its experience on Big Data is valuable for the many lessons learned.

  10. Reduction of reabsorption effects in scintillators by employing solutes with large Stokes shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrah, L.A.; Renschler, C.L.

    1986-06-10

    A radiation or high energy particle responsive system is described useful as a scintillator, and comprising, a first component which interacts with the radiation or high energy particle to emit photons in a certain first wavelength range; and at least one additional solute component which absorbs the photons in the first wavelength range and thereupon emits photons in another wavelength range higher than the first range; the improvement wherein at least one of the components absorbs substantially no photons in the wavelength range in which it emits photons, due to large Stokes shift caused by an excited states intramolecular rearrangement, with the proviso that the component having a large Stokes shift is not methyl salicylate or salicyclic acid.

  11. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  12. Changing concepts: the presidential address.

    PubMed

    Weed, J C

    1974-09-01

    A discussion of conceptual change in areas related to fertility and medicine is presented in an address by the president of the American Fertility Society. Advances in technological research and medicine, particularly in steroids and reporductive physiology, have been the most readily acceptable changes. Cesarean section and surgical sterilization have also become increasingly accepted. Newer developments such as sperm banks, artificial insemination, and ovum transfer have created profound ethical, moral, and medical issued in human engineering research and evolutionary theory. The legalization of abortion has brought moral, ethical, and legal problems for many members of the medical profession. It is urged that the Society promote education of the people in reproductive function, sexual activity, and parental obligation while being acutely aware of the problems in influencing or altering human reproduction.

  13. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  14. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  15. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Latching operation in a tunable wavelength filter using Si sampled grating waveguide with ferroelectric liquid crystal cladding.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuhara, Katsumi; Kato, Akifumi; Hayama, Yoshiki

    2014-04-21

    A tunable wavelength filter fabricated with a latching function is proposed. The proposed tunable wavelength filter consists of a silicon sampled grating waveguide and ferro-electric liquid crystal (FLC) cladding. The sampled grating waveguide in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer achieved narrower stop bands than that with the conventional uniform grating structure. Enhanced wavelength shift was also obtained due to the increased effect in FLC by using a thinner silicon core. Bistable switching operation with the fabricated device, which was latching without state-sustaining power, was successfully demonstrated. Its switching and latching characteristics are also reported. PMID:24787847

  17. Wavelength assignment for locally twisted cube communication pattern on optical bus network-on-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Xianyong

    2014-06-01

    Optical network-on-chip (NoC) is a new designing of Multi-Processor System-on-Chip (MPSoC). Global bus is the simplest logical topology of optical NoC. Static routing and wavelength assignment is one important communication mechanism of optical NoC. This paper addresses the routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) problem for locally twisted cube communication pattern on global bus optical NoC. For that purpose, a routing scheme, that is an embedding scheme, is proposed, and a wavelength assignment scheme under the embedding scheme is designed. The number of required wavelengths is shown to attain the minimum, guaranteeing the optimality of the proposed scheme.

  18. Description, performance, and wavelengths of iodine stabilized lasers.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, W G; Kessler, E G; Deslattes, R D; Layer, H P; Whetstone, J R

    1973-12-01

    A description is given of lasers stabilized to components of the (129)I(2) spectrum in the region of the 633-nm laser lines for (3)He-(20)Ne and (3)He-(22)Ne. Relationships between operational characteristics such as power output, peak size, and peak width are shown, along with their relationships to some of the controllable parameters such as excitation level, iodine absorption, and iodine pressure. We found an iodine pressure broadening of about 13 MHz/Torr with a 2.6-MHz zero-pressure intercept. The frequency shift associated with iodine pressure is roughly 2 x 10(-9) nu/Torr to the red. Power broadening and power shifts are small, about a 10% increase in width and about 2 x 10(-11) nu variation in frequency for a fivefold to sixfold increase in power. These lasers exhibit a frequency stability for 10-sec sampling time of about 2 x 10(-12) nu and a resetability of about 1 x 10(-10) nu. The absolute vacuum wavelength for one iodine component has been measured against the (86)Kr standard-(3)He-(20)Ne:(129)I(2), kappa lambda = 632 991.2670 +/- 0.0009 pm. The wavelengths of several other iodine components have been determined by measuring the frequency difference between them and the (129)I(2), kappa component. Among these are (3)He-(20)Ne:(129)I(2), i lambda = 632 990.0742 +/- 0.0009 pm: and (3)He-(20)Ne:(127)I(2), i lambda = 632 991.3954 +/-0.0009 pm. These results were obtained using the Rowley-Hamon model for asymmetry in the krypton line and assume that the defined value for the standard is axssociated with the center of gravity of the line profile. The indicated uncertainties are statistical. No allowance has been included for imperfect realization of the krypton standard or for uncertainty in the asymmetry model.

  19. Current-induced spin wave Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, Matthieu

    2010-03-01

    In metal ferromagnets -namely Fe, Co and Ni and their alloys- magnetism and electrical transport are strongly entangled (itinerant magnetism). This results in a number of properties such as the tunnel and giant magnetoresistance (i.e. the dependence of the electrical resistance on the magnetic state) and the more recently addressed spin transfer (i.e. the ability to manipulate the magnetic state with the help of an electrical current). The spin waves, being the low-energy elementary excitations of any ferromagnet, also exist in itinerant magnets, but they are expected to exhibit some peculiar properties due the itinerant character of the carriers. Accessing these specific properties experimentally could shed a new light on the microscopic mechanism governing itinerant magnetism, which -in turn- could help in optimizing material properties for spintronics applications. As a simple example of these specific properties, it was predicted theoretically that forcing a DC current through a ferromagnetic metal should induce a shift of the frequency of the spin waves [1,2]. This shift can be identified to a Doppler shift undergone by the electron system when it is put in motion by the electrical current. We will show how detailed spin wave measurements allow one to access this current-induced Doppler shift [3]. From an experimental point of view, we will discuss the peculiarities of propagating spin wave spectroscopy experiments carried out at a sub-micrometer length-scale and with MHz frequency resolution. Then, we will discuss the measured value of the Doppler shift in the context of both the old two-current model of spin-polarized transport and the more recent model of adiabatic spin transfer torque. [4pt] [1] P.Lederer and D.L. Mills, Phys.Rev. 148, 542 (1966).[0pt] [2] J. Fernandez-Rossier et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, 174412 (2004)[0pt] [3] V. Vlaminck and M. Bailleul, Science 322, 410 (2008).

  20. Crosstalk Penalty in an OXC with Wavelength Converter in the Presence of Interferometric Intensity-Relative Output-ASE Noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karfaa, Yasin M.; Ismail, M.; Abbou, F. M.; Shaari, S.; Majumder, S. P.

    A semi analytical analysis is carried out to investigate the effect of linear crosstalk due to wavelength converters and other Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) components in the presence of interferometric intensity noise and amplified spontaneous emission on the performance of an optical multi-wavelength transport network employing wavelength converters based on XPM in a Single Mode Fiber (SMF) and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI), where a new parameter names Relative Output Noise (RON) is identified and accounted for. Theoretical study is done for the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance analysis due to crosstalk and ASE noise. It is found that linear crosstalk induces higher penalty when the number of transmitted channels is increased in the presence of all the above effects. The conditions for conversion at 10 Gbps or more are identified. The initial results for monolithic integrated interferometric wavelength converters are reviewed by transmission of 10 Gb/s converted signals over non-dispersion shifted single mode fiber.

  1. Active wavelength selection for mixture identification with tunable mid-infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2016-09-21

    This article presents a wavelength selection framework for mixture identification problems. In contrast with multivariate calibration, where the mixture constituents are known and the goal is to estimate their concentration, in mixture identification the goal is to determine which of a large number of chemicals is present. Due to the combinatorial nature of this problem, traditional wavelength selection algorithms are unsuitable because the optimal set of wavelengths is mixture dependent. To address this issue, our framework interleaves wavelength selection with the sensing process, such that each subsequent wavelength is determined on-the-fly based on previous measurements. To avoid early convergence, our approach starts with an exploratory criterion that samples the spectrum broadly, then switches to an exploitative criterion that selects increasingly more relevant wavelengths as the solution approaches the true constituents of the mixture. We compare this "active" wavelength selection algorithm against a state-of-the-art passive algorithm (successive projection algorithm), both experimentally using a tunable spectrometer and in simulation using a large spectral library of chemicals. Our results show that our active method can converge to the true solution more frequently and with fewer measurements than the passive algorithm. The active method also leads to more compact solutions with fewer false positives. PMID:27590540

  2. A programmable optical few wavelength source for flexgrid optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, M.; Fresi, F.; Meloni, G.; Bhowmik, B. B.; Sambo, N.; Potì, L.

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength (MW) sources will probably replace discrete lasers or laser arrays in next generation multi-carrier transponders (e.g., 1 Tb/s), currently called multi-flow transponders or sliceable bandwidth variable transponders (SBVTs). We present design and experimental demonstration of a few wavelength (FW) source suitable for SBVTs in a flexgrid scenario. We refer to FW instead of MW since for an SBVT just few subcarriers are required (e.g., eight). The proposed FW source does not require optical filtering for subcarrier modulation. The design exploits frequency shifting in IQ modulators by using single side band suppressed carrier modulation. A reasonable number of lines can be provided depending on the chosen architecture, tunable in the whole C-band. The scheme is also capable of providing symmetric (equally spaced) and asymmetric subcarrier spacing arbitrarily tunable from 6.25 GHz to 37.5 GHz. The control on the number of subcarriers (increase/decrease depending on line rate) provides flexibility to the SBVT, being the spacing dependent on transmission parameters such as line rate or modulation format. Transmission performance has been tested and compared with an array of standard lasers considering a 480 Gb/s transmission for different carrier spacing. Additionally, an integrable solution based on complementary frequency shifter is also presented to improve scalability and costs. The impact on transceiver techno-economics and network performance is also discussed.

  3. Precision measurement of transition matrix elements via light shift cancellation.

    PubMed

    Herold, C D; Vaidya, V D; Li, X; Rolston, S L; Porto, J V; Safronova, M S

    2012-12-14

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10(-3) level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s - 6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 and 423 nm zeros through diffraction of a condensate off a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3235(9)ea(0) and 0.5230(8)ea(0) for the 5s - 6p(1/2) and 5s - 6p(3/2) elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information. PMID:23368314

  4. Shift work, safety, and aging.

    PubMed

    Folkard, Simon

    2008-04-01

    It has long been recognized that older shift workers may have shorter and more disturbed day sleeps between successive night shifts than their younger colleagues. This has given rise to considerable concern over the safety of aging shift workers because of the increasing age of the work force and increases in retirement age. Because there have been no direct studies of the combined effects of shift work and age on safety, the present paper begins by reviewing the literature relating safety to features of shift systems. It then considers the general effect of age on occupational injury rates before examining existing evidence of the combined effects of shift work and age on performance capabilities. The results of the literature review indicate that when the a priori risk is constant, there is reasonably clear evidence that injury rates are higher at night, and that they increase over successive night shifts more rapidly than over successive day shifts. Further, although occupational injuries are less frequent in older workers, those that do occur tend to be more serious. Finally, there is some suggestive evidence from studies of objectively measured performance capabilities that older workers may be less able to both maintain their performance over the course of a night shift and cope with longer spans of successive night shifts. It is concluded that it seems possible, even though unproven as yet, that older workers may be at greater risk both to injury and accident on the night shift. There is a strong need for future epidemiological studies of the combined effects of shift work and age on injuries and accidents, and that these should attempt to separate the effects of age per se from those of generation. PMID:18484360

  5. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  6. Optically addressed multiband photodetector for infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellek, O. O.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Multiband infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) with small pixel pitch have increased device processing complexity since they often need more than two terminals per pixel for readouts. Simpler FPAs are enabled by our newly demonstrated optically-addressed two-terminal multiband photodetector architecture. For long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and midwavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging applications, the use of quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) has been investigated. The results show that the utilization of unipolar QWIPs with bipolar near infrared (NIR) devices is feasible with this new optical-addressing scheme. Potential device performance is analyzed with an equivalent AC circuit model. Proposed design maximizes fill factor and enables small pixel-pitch FPA with single indium-bump per pixel for NIR/MWIR/LWIR multiband detection capability.

  7. Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    King, Jacquelynne R.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; Punt, André E.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, fisheries management was based on optimizing yield and maintaining a target biomass, with little regard given to low-frequency environmental forcing. However, this policy was often unsuccessful. In the last two to three decades, fisheries science and management have undergone a shift towards balancing sustainable yield with conservation, with the goal of including ecosystem considerations in decision-making frameworks. Scientific understanding of low-frequency climate–ocean variability, which is manifested as ecosystem regime shifts and states, has led to attempts to incorporate these shifts and states into fisheries assessment and management. To date, operationalizing these attempts to provide tactical advice has met with limited success. We review efforts to incorporate regime shifts and states into the assessment and management of fisheries resources, propose directions for future investigation and outline a potential framework to include regime shifts and changes in ecosystem states into fisheries management.

  8. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  9. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  10. A region addresses patient safety.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Karen Wolk; Grunden, Naida; Harrison, Edward I

    2002-06-01

    The Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative (PRHI) is a coalition of 35 hospitals, 4 major insurers, more than 30 major and small-business health care purchasers, dozens of corporate and civic leaders, organized labor, and partnerships with state and federal government all working together to deliver perfect patient care throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. PRHI believes that in pursuing perfection, many of the challenges facing today's health care delivery system (eg, waste and error in the delivery of care, rising costs, frustration and shortage among clinicians and workers, financial distress, overcapacity, and lack of access to care) will be addressed. PRHI has identified patient safety (nosocomial infections and medication errors) and 5 clinical areas (obstetrics, orthopedic surgery, cardiac surgery, depression, and diabetes) as ideal starting points. In each of these areas of work, PRHI partners have assembled multifacility/multidisciplinary groups charged with defining perfection, establishing region-wide reporting systems, and devising and implementing recommended improvement strategies and interventions. Many design and conceptual elements of the PRHI strategy are adapted from the Toyota Production System and its Pittsburgh derivative, the Alcoa Business System. PRHI is in the proof-of-concept phase of development. PMID:12032502

  11. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  12. Gender: addressing a critical focus.

    PubMed

    Thornton, L; Wegner, M N

    1995-01-01

    The definition of gender was addressed at the Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, China). After extensive debate, the definition developed by the UN Population Fund in 1995 was adopted: "a set of qualities and behaviors expected from a female or male by society." The sustainability of family planning (FP) programs depends on acknowledgment of the role gender plays in contraceptive decision-making and use. For example, programs must consider the fact that women in many cultures do not make FP decisions without the consent of their spouse. AVSC is examining providers' gender-based ideas about clients and the effects of these views on the quality of reproductive health services. Questions such as how service providers can encourage joint responsibility for contraception without requiring spousal consent or how they can make men feel comfortable about using a male method in a society where FP is considered a woman's issue are being discussed. Also relevant is how service providers can discuss sexual matters openly with female clients in cultures that do not allow women to enjoy their sexuality. Another concern is the potential for physical violence to a client as a result of the provision of FP services. PMID:12294397

  13. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  14. SWCam: the short wavelength camera for the CCAT Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Gordon J.; Parshley, Stephen; Nikola, Thomas; Cortes-Medellin, German; Schoenwald, Justin; Rajagopalan, Ganesh; Niemack, Michael D.; Jenness, Tim; Gallardo, Patricio; Koopman, Brian; Dowell, Charles D.; Day, Peter K.; Hollister, Matthew I.; Kovacs, Attila; LeDuc, Henry G.; McKenney, Christopher M.; Monroe, Ryan M.; Yoshida, Hiroshige; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Swenson, Loren J.; Radford, Simon J.; Nguyen, Hien Trong; Mroczkowski, Anthony K.; Glenn, Jason; Wheeler, Jordan; Maloney, Philip; Brugger, Spencer; Adams, Joseph D.; Bertoldi, Frank; Schaaf, Reinhold; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Marsden, Galen; Sayers, Jack; Chapman, Scott; Vieira, Joaquin D.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the Short Wavelength Camera (SWCam) for the CCAT observatory including the primary science drivers, the coupling of the science drivers to the instrument requirements, the resulting implementation of the design, and its performance expectations at first light. CCAT is a 25 m submillimeter telescope planned to operate at 5600 meters, near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. CCAT is designed to give a total wave front error of 12.5 μm rms, so that combined with its high and exceptionally dry site, the facility will provide unsurpassed point source sensitivity deep into the short submillimeter bands to wavelengths as short as the 200 μm telluric window. The SWCam system consists of 7 sub-cameras that address 4 different telluric windows: 4 subcameras at 350 μm, 1 at 450 μm, 1 at 850 μm, and 1 at 2 mm wavelength. Each sub-camera has a 6' diameter field of view, so that the total instantaneous field of view for SWCam is equivalent to a 16' diameter circle. Each focal plane is populated with near unit filling factor arrays of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKIDs) with pixels scaled to subtend an solid angle of (λ/D)2 on the sky. The total pixel count is 57,160. We expect background limited performance at each wavelength, and to be able to map < 35(°)2 of sky to 5 σ on the confusion noise at each wavelength per year with this first light instrument. Our primary science goal is to resolve the Cosmic Far-IR Background (CIRB) in our four colors so that we may explore the star and galaxy formation history of the Universe extending to within 500 million years of the Big Bang. CCAT's large and high-accuracy aperture, its fast slewing speed, use of instruments with large format arrays, and being located at a superb site enables mapping speeds of up to three orders of magnitude larger than contemporary or near future facilities and makes it uniquely sensitive, especially in the short submm bands.

  15. Coherent ultra dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpari, Ali; Ferreira, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Vitor; Sousa, Artur; Ziaie, Somayeh; Tavares, Ana; Vujicic, Zoran; Guiomar, Fernando P.; Reis, Jacklyn D.; Pinto, Armando N.; Teixeira, António

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we firstly review the progress in ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (UDWDM-PON), by making use of the key attributes of this technology in the context of optical access and metro networks. Besides the inherit properties of coherent technology, we explore different modulation formats and pulse shaping. The performance is experimentally demonstrated through a 12 × 10 Gb/s bidirectional UDWDM-PON over hybrid 80 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) and optical wireless link. High density, 6.25 GHz grid, Nyquist shaped 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) and digital frequency shifting are some of the properties exploited together in the tests. Also, bidirectional transmission in fiber, relevant in the context, is analyzed in terms of nonlinear and back-reflection effects on receiver sensitivity. In addition, as a basis for the discussion on market readiness, we experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of a Nyquist-shaped quaternary phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal using simple 8-bit digital signal processing (DSP) on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  16. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  17. Raman shifting of KrF laser radiation for tropospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Ismail, Syed

    1991-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement of tropospheric ozone requires use of high average power UV lasers operating at two appropriate DIAL wavelengths. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a KrF excimer laser can be used to generate several wavelengths with good energy conversion efficiencies by stimulated Raman shifting using hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2). Computer simulations for an airborne lidar have shown that these laser emissions can be used for the less than 5 percent random error, high resolution measuremment of ozone across the troposphere using the DIAL technique. In the region of strong ozone absorption, laser wavelengths of 277.0 and 291.7 nm were generated using H2 and D2, respectively. In addition, a laser wavelength at 302.0 nm was generated using two cells in series, with the first containing D2 and the second containing H2. The energy conversion efficiency for each wavelength was between 14 and 27 percent.

  18. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  19. Integrated nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear interference based on four wave mixing (FWM) is extremely attractive due to its phase sensitivity. On the other hand, wavelength multicasting, which supports data point-to-multipoint connections, is a key functionality to increase the network efficiency and simplify the transmitter and receiver in the wavelength-division multiplexing systems. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality based on single-stage FWM in an integrated silicon waveguide. With a three-pump and dual-signal input, four phase sensitive idlers are obtained at the interferometer output. For a proof-of-concept application, we further theoretically demonstrate the multicasting logic exclusive-OR (XOR) gate for both intensity and phase modulated signals. The proposed scheme would be potentially applied in various on-chip applications for future optical communication system. PMID:27505786

  20. Wavelength agile holmium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, N.; Daniel, J. M. O.; Ward, J.; Clarkson, W. A.; Hemming, A.; Haub, J.

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, an electronically-controlled, wavelength-agile tuneable holmium-doped fibre laser is presented. A narrow-band acousto-optic tuneable filter was characterized and used as the wavelength selective element to avoid any inertial effects associated with opto-mechanical tuning mechanisms. We demonstrate operation over a 90 nm wavelength range spanning 2040 - 2130 nm. The laser produced >150 mW over this entire range with a signal-to-noise ratio of >45 dB and line-width of ~0.16 nm. Switching times of ~35 μs and sweep rates of up to 9 nm/ms were also demonstrated.

  1. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  2. Mechanisms and Methods for Selective Wavelength Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Brown, Thomas G. (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical filter includes a dielectric waveguide layer, supporting waveguide modes at specific wavelengths and receiving incident light, a corrugated film layer, composed of one of a metal and a semiconductor and positioned adjacent to a second surface of the waveguide layer and a sensor layer, wherein the sensor layer is capable of absorbing optical energy and generating a corresponding electrical signal. The metal film layer supports a plurality of plasmons, the plurality of plasmons producing a first field and is excited by a transverse mode of the waveguide modes at a wavelength interval. The first field penetrates the sensor layer and the sensor layer generates an electrical signal corresponding to an intensity of received incident light within the wavelength interval.

  3. Fast wavelength-tunable picosecond pulses from a passively mode-locked Er fiber laser using a galvanometer-driven intracavity filter.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Daigo

    2015-06-15

    We experimentally investigate fast wavelength-tuning characteristics of a polarization-maintaining Er fiber laser, which is mode-locked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. Wavelength tuning was accomplished with an intracavity filter incorporating a galvanometer mirror and a diffraction grating. Within the tunability of 30 nm, we achieved a wavelength-tuning speed of <5 ms. We also show that the variation of repetition rates can be suppressed to <200 Hz by simply shifting the position of the grating. The presented scheme for generating wavelength-tunable pulses will be potentially useful for coherent Raman spectral imaging.

  4. Fast wavelength-tunable picosecond pulses from a passively mode-locked Er fiber laser using a galvanometer-driven intracavity filter.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Tashiro, Daigo

    2015-06-15

    We experimentally investigate fast wavelength-tuning characteristics of a polarization-maintaining Er fiber laser, which is mode-locked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. Wavelength tuning was accomplished with an intracavity filter incorporating a galvanometer mirror and a diffraction grating. Within the tunability of 30 nm, we achieved a wavelength-tuning speed of <5 ms. We also show that the variation of repetition rates can be suppressed to <200 Hz by simply shifting the position of the grating. The presented scheme for generating wavelength-tunable pulses will be potentially useful for coherent Raman spectral imaging. PMID:26193501

  5. Effect of diode wavelength broadening in a diode end-pumped solid-state amplifier.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Gilbert L; Casagrande, Olivier

    2007-05-10

    The effect of the spectral broadening in cw diode pumping and the wavelength shift in pulsed pumping of a solid-state laser is investigated theoretically. A very simple model allowing the computation of the reduction of the absorbed pump energy is developed. The results are applied to an ytterbium-doped solid-state laser and should be fruitful for amplifier and laser design. PMID:17446921

  6. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    PubMed

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  7. Response of some pi-phase-shifted Bragg gratings to elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Harpreet K.; Dragomir, Nicoleta M.; Sidiroglou, Fotios; Wade, Scott A.; Baxter, Greg W.; Collins, Stephen F.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of pressures up to 200 kPa on pi-phase-shifted Bragg gratings was investigated in several types of fibers placed in a pressure chamber. Standard and alternative types of pi-phase shifted gratings were studied, and changes in reflection spectra caused by pressure changes were monitored. The alternative pi-phase shifted grating was fabricated using a phase mask with 536-nm pitch exhibiting features at twice the Bragg wavelength near 1552 nm due to the interleaved refractive index modulations along the fiber core with the periodicity of the phase mask. The three gratings studied exhibited quite different variation in Bragg wavelength with increased pressure for the different fiber types, and the alternative pi-phase-shifted grating in Corning HI 1060 FLEX fiber also suffered a significant change in the shape of the peaks.

  8. All-optical wavelength conversion for mode division multiplexed superchannels.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiaxin; Xu, Jing; Luo, Ming; Li, Xiang; Qiu, Ying; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xinliang; Yu, Shaohua

    2016-04-18

    We report in this work the first all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of a mode division multiplexed (MDM) superchannel consisting of 2N modes by dividing the superchannel into N single-mode (SM) tributaries, wavelength converting N SM signals using well developed SM-AOWC techniques, and finally combining the N SM tributaries back to an MDM superchannel at the converted wavelength, inspired by the idea of using SM filtering techniques to filter multimode signals in astronomy. The conversions between multimode and SM are realized by 3D laser-writing photonic lanterns and SM-AOWCs are realized based on polarization insensitive four wave mixing (FWM) configuration in N semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). As a proof of concept demonstration, the conversion of a 6-mode MDM superchannel with each mode modulated with orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK)/16 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signals is demonstrated in this work, indicating that the scheme is transparent to data format, polarization and compatible with multi-carrier signals. Data integrity of the converted superchannel has been verified by using coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Bit error rates (BERs) below the forward error correction (FEC) hard limit (3.8 × 10-3) have been obtained for QPSK modulation at a net bitrate of 104.2 Gbit/s and BERs below the soft decision FEC threshold (1.98 × 10-2) have been achieved for 16-QAM format, giving a total aggregate bit rate of 185.8 Gbit/s when taking 20% coding overhead into account. Add and drop functionalities that usually come along with wavelength conversion in flexible network nodes have also been demonstrated. The working conditions of the SOAs, especially the pump and signal power levels, are critical for the quality of the converted signal and have been thoroughly discussed. The impact of imbalanced FWM conversion efficiency among different SM

  9. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.

    1994-08-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  10. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  11. Miniature integrated-optical wavelength analyzer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R. E.; Dübendorfer, J.

    1995-11-01

    A novel integrated-optical chip suitable for realizing compact miniature wavelength analyzers with high linear dispersion is presented. The chip performs the complete task of converting the spectrum of an input beam into a corresponding spatial irradiance distribution without the need for an imaging function. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally by monitoring the changes in the mode spectrum of a laser diode on varying its case temperature. Comparing the results with simultaneous measurements by a commercial spectrometer yielded a rms wavelength deviation of 0.01 nm.

  12. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  13. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  14. Cancellation of nonlinear Zeeman shifts with light shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Acosta, V. M.; Higbie, J. M.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.

    2009-02-01

    Nonlinear Zeeman (NLZ) shifts arising from magnetic-field mixing of the two hyperfine ground states in alkali-metal atoms lead to splitting of magnetic-resonance lines. This is a major source of sensitivity degradation and the so-called “heading errors” of alkali-metal-vapor atomic magnetometers operating in the geophysical field range (B≈0.2-0.7G) . Here, it is shown theoretically and experimentally that NLZ shifts can be effectively canceled by light shifts caused by a laser field of appropriate intensity, polarization, and frequency, a technique that can be readily applied in practical situations.

  15. Wavelength-tunable mid-infrared femtosecond Raman soliton generation in birefringent ZBLAN photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sneha; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-03-01

    A solid core high birefringent ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with low confinement loss is proposed for the generation of Raman soliton source in the mid-infrared region. The birefringence value of the PCF reaches the magnitude of 10- 3 and confinement loss is 0.05 dB/m at 3000 nm wavelength. Numerical simulation of femtosecond Raman soliton generation based on soliton self-frequency shift in the birefringent PCF is analyzed using the coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equation and split-step Fourier method. We investigate the dependence of output pulse width, wavelength shift, and conversion efficiency of Raman soliton formation on several input parameters. A femtosecond Raman soliton source with its wavelength tunable from 1500 to 3600 nm can be obtained. It is found that the maximum conversion efficiency is 93% when the wavelength is tuned by varying the initial input chirp.

  16. Writing 2003: Shifting Boundaries and the Implications for College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Examines six shifting boundaries: time and space, authorship, writing skills, medium, availability, and the senses. Addresses what the new perimeters might mean for teaching writing at the college level, for student writing, and for instructional management. Considers the challenges of plagiarism. (SG)

  17. Shining a Light on Task-Shifting Policy

    PubMed Central

    Katende, Godfrey; Donnelly, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In terms of disease burden, many low- and middle-income countries are currently experiencing a transition from infectious to chronic diseases. In Uganda, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have increased significantly in recent years; this challenge is compounded by the healthcare worker shortage and the underfunded health system administration. Addressing the growing prevalence of NCDs requires evidence-based policies and strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality rates; however, the integration and evaluation of new policies and processes pose many challenges. Task-shifting is the process whereby specific tasks are transferred to health workers with less training and fewer qualifications. Successful implementation of a task-shifting policy requires appropriate skill training, clearly defined roles, adequate evaluation, an enhanced training capacity and sufficient health worker incentives. This article focuses on task-shifting policy as a potentially effective strategy to address the growing burden of NCDs on the Ugandan healthcare system. PMID:27226906

  18. Linear photonic technique for fixed and time varying RF phase shifts of radar signals.

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Manik; Stepanov, Dmitrii

    2012-07-30

    A simple linear photonic technique is proposed to achieve fixed or time varying radio-frequency (RF) phase shifts which can be used in applications such as radar signal manipulation. The technique is based on fixing or tuning the wavelength of an RF modulated optical signal within the reflection band of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter with a step group delay profile. The scheme is verified in a realistic simulation to achieve a Doppler shift in a pulsed CW signal return.

  19. Silicon waveguide polarization rotation Bragg grating with phase shift section and sampled grating scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, Hideaki; Onawa, Yosuke; Shimura, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Sasaki, Hironori

    2016-08-01

    We describe a Bragg grating with a phase shift section and a sampled grating scheme that converts input polarization to orthogonal polarization. A very narrow polarization-independent wavelength peak can be generated by phase shift structures and polarization-independent multiple diffraction peaks by sampled gratings. The characteristics of the device were examined by transfer matrix and finite-difference time-domain methods.

  20. Laser Doppler phase shifting using a high-speed digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, D.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the use of a binary spatial light modulator (Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device) to impart a phase shift to the beams of a laser Doppler velocimeter. Advantages of this approach to laser Doppler phase shifting include low cost, low power consumption, a precisely known phase-stepping frequency and the capability of working with a broad range of optical wavelengths. In the implementation shown here velocities of order 1 cm/s are measured.

  1. Multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lai; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qing; Gao, Xuejian; Qin, Guanshi E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn; Qin, Weiping E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn; Liao, Meisong; Hu, Lili; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2014-11-03

    We report the generation of multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored tellurite photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The temporally regulated group velocity dispersion (GVD) is generated in the fiber by soliton induced optical Kerr effect. Two red-shifted dispersive waves spring up when two Raman solitons meet their own second zero-dispersion-wavelengths in the PCF. These results show how, through temporally tailored GVD, nonlinearities can be harnessed to generate unexpected effects.

  2. Using an Atom Interferometer to Measure Changes in Tune-Out Wavelength caused by Rotation and Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Greenberg, James; St. Germaine, Michael T.; Gregoire, Maxwell D.; Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William F.; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of tune-out wavelengths made with an atom interferometer are shown to change by 150 pm due to inertial displacements. Because tune-out wavelengths can be measured with picometer precision in our laboratory, we explore how to use shifts in tune-out wavelengths to measure rotation rates with respect to an inertial frame. For example, measuring the earth's rotation rate with an uncertainty of 1% appears possible with this technique. The origin of shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths (λzero , lab) as compared to tune-out wavelengths in an inertial frame (λzero) is explained by dispersive inertial phase shifts, the vector dynamic polarizability αv (ω) , and dispersion compensation. An atom beam with a velocity spread and an ensemble of atomic spin states is required. Because accurate measurements of λzero can be used for reporting ratios of dipole matrix elements, we also discuss methods for reducing systematic errors in measurements of λzero.

  3. Health effects of shift work.

    PubMed

    LaDou, J

    1982-12-01

    More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturing the proportion of shift workers is greater than 50 percent. As the popularity of shift work and other "alternative work schedules" grows, concern is increasing over the disturbance created in the lives of workers and their families by these economically and socially useful innovations. Twenty percent of workers are unable to tolerate shift work. Daily physiologic variations termed circadian rhythms are interactive and require a high degree of phase relationship to produce subjective feelings of wellbeing. Disturbance of these activities, circadian desynchronization, whether from passage over time zones or from shift rotation, results in health effects such as disturbance of the quantity and quality of sleep, disturbance of gastrointestinal and other organ system activities, and aggravation of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and thyrotoxicosis. Worker selection can reduce the number of health problems resulting from shift work. The periodic examination of shift workers is recommended.

  4. Health Effects of Shift Work

    PubMed Central

    LaDou, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturing the proportion of shift workers is greater than 50 percent. As the popularity of shift work and other “alternative work schedules” grows, concern is increasing over the disturbance created in the lives of workers and their families by these economically and socially useful innovations. Twenty percent of workers are unable to tolerate shift work. Daily physiologic variations termed circadian rhythms are interactive and require a high degree of phase relationship to produce subjective feelings of wellbeing. Disturbance of these activities, circadian desynchronization, whether from passage over time zones or from shift rotation, results in health effects such as disturbance of the quantity and quality of sleep, disturbance of gastrointestinal and other organ system activities, and aggravation of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and thyrotoxicosis. Worker selection can reduce the number of health problems resulting from shift work. The periodic examination of shift workers is recommended. PMID:6962577

  5. [Shift work and cardiometabolic risk].

    PubMed

    Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Bracci, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Shift work is frequently associated with coronary heart disease. Medical research indicate metabolic disturbance among shift workers, which is characterized by associated modifications in the concentration of serum glucose and serum lipids, hypertension and obesity, especially addominal weight. Atrasversal study has been carried out: 193 (126 females and 67 males) healthcare shift workers were compared with 221 (160 females and 61 males) day workers. Medical history, health examination including anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements were assessed. All participants were submitted a standardized questionnaire on health-related behaviours and biochemical determinations (fasting plasma glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides). Job seniority of shift work resulted at 13.5 +/- 8.2 among shift workers and 19.0 +/- 11.3 among day workers. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome relevance was defined according to the criterions proposed by the International Diabetes Federation. The 20% shift workers (33% males and 13% females) was affected by metabolic syndrome against 12% non shift workers (20% males and 9% females). The most frequently altered parameter, apart from metabolic syndrome, was high abdominal obesity, which occurred in 64% of the sample (70% shift workers vs 58% day workers). The results of multiple logistic regression attested the presence of a higher relative risk among shift workers regarding both the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome (OR 2,1 - 95% Cl 1.15-3.86) and the excess in abdominal obesity (OR 1.8 - 95% Cl 1.16-3.25). After adjusting confusing factors such as smoke, age, alchool, consumption, physical activity, scholastic degree, a OR 2.9 - 95%Cl 1,53-5.53 and a OR 1.9 - 95%.Cl 1.32-3.86 were confirmed. PMID:20066881

  6. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  7. Superiority of half-wavelength helicon antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porte, L.; Yun, S. M.; Arnush, D.; Chen, F. F.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma densities produced by half- and full-wavelength (HW and FW) helical antennae in helicon discharges are compared. It is found that HW antennae are more efficient than FW ones in producing plasma downstream from the antenna. The measured wave amplitudes and the apparent importance of downstream ionization do not agree with computations.

  8. Wavelength control of visible light laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, N.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Suzuki, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Otsu, M.

    1990-04-01

    Wavelength control of visible light laser diodes was studied. By combining an interferometer and a diffraction grating, it became possible to control the wavelength of continuous oscillation in the range of 664 to 673nm, the frequency fine control range being 2GHz. And the spectral linewidth was narrowed to about 44kHz (10 exp minus 7 nm). With the use of a collimator lens, the beam expansion was narrowed to 2mrad. It was confirmed that the pulse output of continuous oscillation visible light laser diodes can be amplified by the YAG laser excitation dye laser. In the case of pulse oscillation, oscillation of 1GHz spectral width was obtained at the wavelength of 0.8 micro m by using an injection synchronization method. In the injection synchronization method, other laser beam is injected in an oscillator and a superior laser beam of synchronized components alone is obtained. As the wavelength control method is now stabilized and satisfies the conditions of narrow band, it has the prospect to be applied to the laser uranium enrichment technology.

  9. Resolving the Moth at Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchêne, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as "The Moth," is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back "wings" thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the "wings" observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  10. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  11. SDIO long wavelength infrared detector requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duston, Dwight

    1990-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has a significant requirement for infrared sensors for surveillance, tracking and discrimination of objects in space. Projected SDIO needs cover the range from short wavelengths out to 30 microns. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several approaches including innovative concepts based on semiconductors and superconductors.

  12. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    PubMed

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  13. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  14. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  15. Devices for wavelength switching in optical networks

    SciTech Connect

    d`Alessandro, A.; Baran, J.E.; Smith, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Wavelength routing crossconnects are considered the core of WDM optical networks. They consist of optical switches independently rearrangeable for each wavelength channel and for any input-output configuration so that any path can be chosen almost arbitrarily by the network users. In general the implementation of the wavelength routing function requires complex switch arrays. Very simple wavelength-selection crossconnects can be realized by using acousto-optic switches (AOS), because of their unique ability of processing several optical signals simultaneously and their low driving power consumption, less than 10 mW/channel. AOS`s can be considered a particular evolution of acousto-optical tunable filters, whose integrated optic version on lithium niobate has been developed in several research institutions around the world in the past decade. This paper reviews the last accomplishments of AOS`s, whose specifications are directly tied with optical network requirements, the foremost challenge being a strong suppression of crosstalk. Dilated AOS`s can reduce interport crosstalk to below {minus}30 dB and apodization of acousto-optic interaction can reduce interchannel crosstalk to below {minus}15 dB during multiwavelength operation.

  16. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  17. Self Calibration of a 2-wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometers require calibrations to determine their instrument constants before they can be used in remote temperature measurements. These constants reflect the combined effects of detector response, the transmissivities of intervening optical media (windows and gases) and the emissivity of the measured surface. We describe here the principal and the demonstration of self calibrating 2-wavelength pyrometer.

  18. Phase-shifted helical long-period grating-based temperature-insensitive optical fiber twist sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ran; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Yi, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    In smart structure monitoring, twist angle is one of the most critical mechanical parameters for infrastructure deterioration. A compact temperature-insensitive optical fiber twist sensor based on multi-phase-shifted helical long period fiber grating has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A multi-phase-shifted helical long period fiber grating is fabricated with a multi-period rotation technology. A π / 2 and a 3π / 2 phase shift is introduced in the helical long period fiber grating by changing the period. The helical pitch can be effectively changed with a different twist rate, which is measured by calculating the wavelength difference between two phase shift peaks. Although the wavelength of the phase shift peak also shifts with a change of the temperature, the wavelength difference between two phase shift peaks is constant due to two fixed phase shifts in the helical long period fiber grating, which is extremely insensitive to temperature change for the multi-phase-shifted helical long period fiber grating. The experimental results show that a sensitivity of up to 1.959 nm/(rad/m) is achieved.

  19. Color Shift Investigations for LED Secondary Optical Designs: Comparison between BPA-PC and PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangjun; Yazdan Mehr, M.; van Driel, W. D.; Fan, Xuejun; Fan, Jiajie; Jansen, K. M. B.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, color shift of LED-based lighting products has attracted much attention due to its increasing impact on the field application. However, significant research investigations on the color shift mechanisms are not publically available especially for important transmission materials used for secondary optical design. In this paper, broadly used such commercial materials (BPA-PC and PMMA) are experimentally investigated on the color shift effects during aging. Besides this, color shift mechanisms of degradation of transmittance are also studied. Results revealed: (1) Inconsistent degradation of wavelength-dependent transmittance induces the decrease of the blue/yellow light intensity ratio and thus gives rise to the color shift toward the yellow field, which is the color shift mechanism of BPA-PC; (2) Even for the non-aged BPA-PC, the transmittance varies with wavelength in the visible light field due to the chemistry of the material, which caused the change of intensify ratio of blue light to yellow light in the SPD, leading to color change in perception; (3) Oxidation plays a key role in the degradation of transmittance at around the peak wavelength of the blue light field, which is in correlation with the discoloration of thermally-aged BPA-PC materials. By contrast, for the PMMA specimen aged up to 3000 h, oxidation was neither occurred at 85 °C, nor with additional exposure to blue light, nor even with additional humidity of 85%RH.

  20. Nurse Fatigue and Shift Length: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Deborah Maust

    2015-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on patient quality and concerns about the impact of health care worker fatigue has stimulated efforts for leaders to address patient quality and caregiver satisfaction. Shift length has been associated with nurse fatigue and has become a growing concern in the United States with the routine shift length of 12 hours. In this project, shift lengths from 12 hours to 8 hours for a 4-week period to evaluate fatigue levels associated with 12-hour and 8-hour shifts. Lessons learned from this experience: nurses are agreeable to try a proposed change, numerous ideas should be tried to develop additional innovative solutions to the issue of nurse fatigue, and nurses may not want to work 5 days per week.

  1. Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Engel, James R.; Dupuis, Julia Rentz

    2014-05-01

    OPTRA has developed a Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer (FTIR-PS-CRDS) system under a U.S. EPA SBIR contract. This system uses the inherent wavelength-dependent modulation imposed by the FTIR on a broadband thermal source for the phase shift measurement. This spectrally-dependent phase shift is proportional to the spectrally-dependent ring down time. The spectral dependence of both of these values is introduced by the losses of the cavity including those due to the molecular absorption of the sample. OPTRA's approach allows broadband detection of chemicals across the feature-rich fingerprint region of the long-wave infrared. This represents a broadband and spectral range enhancement to conventional CRDS which is typically done at a single wavelength in the near IR; at the same time the approach is a sensitivity enhancement to traditional FTIR, owing to the long effective path of the resonant cavity. In previous papers1,2, OPTRA has presented a breadboard system aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the approach and a prototype design implementing performance enhancements based on the results of breadboard testing. In this final paper in the series, we will present test results illustrating the realized performance of the fully assembled and integrated breadboard, thereby demonstrating the utility of the approach.

  2. Remote picometer fiber Bragg grating demodulation using a dual-wavelength source.

    PubMed

    Clement, Juan; Torregrosa, Germán; Maestre, Haroldo; Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2016-08-10

    We report on the self-referenced, intensity-based, remote and passive interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for point sensing, by use of a reconfigurable dual-wavelength source composed of a tunable wavelength and subsequent suppressed-carrier, electro-optic amplitude modulation. The demodulation procedure is based on the measurement of the reflected power at two different wavelengths within the FBG spectral response. The grating was interrogated by use of conventional spectral analysis, and also after 32.9 km of single-mode fiber using a dispersive incoherent optical Fourier-domain reflectometry technique. Both procedures provide picometer resolution in the determination of Bragg wavelength shifts at a comparatively similar scan time (∼1  s) and received power (-16  dBm). The main limitations in each interrogation scheme have been identified. These results show the feasibility of interrogation systems incorporating relatively simple frequency combs at a calibrated, and eventually reconfigurable, wavelength grid with an, at least, similar performance to that of commercial FBG interrogators. PMID:27534505

  3. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs.

  4. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs. PMID:26901630

  5. The human factors of implementing shift work in logging operations.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Gallagher, T V; Thomas, R E

    2008-10-01

    A fairly recent development in the forest industry is the use of shift work in logging in the southeastern U.S. Logging company owners are implementing shift work as an opportunity to increase production and potentially reduce the cost of producing each unit of wood, without consideration of the potential impacts on the logging crew. There are many documented physiological and psychological impacts on workers from shift work in a variety of industries, although few address forestry workers in the U.S. Semi-structured interviews were performed to gather information about how logging company owners were implementing shift work in seven southeastern states. Data collected during the interviews included employee turnover, shift hours, shift scheduling, safety considerations, and production impacts. Various work schedules were employed. The majority of the schedules encompassed less than 24 hours per day. Permanent and rotating shift schedules were found. None of the logging company owners used more than two crews in a 24-hour period. Additional safety precautions were implemented as a result of working after dark. No in-woods worker accidents or injuries were reported by any of those interviewed. Results indicate that a variety of work schedules can be successfully implemented in the southeastern logging industry. PMID:19044168

  6. Noninvasive diagnosis of oral cancer by Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Aruna, Prakasrao; Muralinaidu, Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of stokes shift (SS) spectroscopy (S3) for normal, precancer and cancerous oral lesions in vivo. The SS spectra were recorded in the 250 - 650 nm spectral range by simultaneously scanning both the excitation and emission wavelengths while keeping a fixed wavelength interval Δλ=20 nm between them. Characteristic, highly resolved peaks and significant spectral differences between normal and different pathological oral lesions observed around 300, 355, 395, and 420 nm which are attributed to tryptophan, collagen, and NADH respectively. Using S3 technique one can obtain the key fluorophores in a single scan and hence they can be targeted as a tumor markers in this study. In order to quantify the altered spectral differences between normal and different pathological oral lesions are verified by different ratio parameters.

  7. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  8. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  9. Measurement of absolute optical thickness of mask glass by wavelength-tuning Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Hbino, Kenichi; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2015-07-01

    Optical thickness is a fundamental characteristic of an optical component. A measurement method combining discrete Fourier-transform (DFT) analysis and a phase-shifting technique gives an appropriate value for the absolute optical thickness of a transparent plate. However, there is a systematic error caused by the nonlinearity of the phase-shifting technique. In this research the absolute optical-thickness distribution of mask blank glass was measured using DFT and wavelength-tuning Fizeau interferometry without using sensitive phase-shifting techniques. The error occurring during the DFT analysis was compensated for by using the unwrapping correlation. The experimental results indicated that the absolute optical thickness of mask glass was measured with an accuracy of 5 nm.

  10. CCCC Chair's Address: Representing Ourselves, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the text of the author's address at the fifty-ninth annual convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in March 2008. In her address, the author picks up strands of previous Chairs' addresses and weaves them through the fabric of her remarks. What she hopes will give sheen to the fabric is her…

  11. 32 CFR 516.7 - Mailing addresses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mailing addresses. 516.7 Section 516.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION General § 516.7 Mailing addresses. Mailing addresses for organizations referenced...

  12. 47 CFR 13.10 - Licensee address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee address. 13.10 Section 13.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.10 Licensee address. In accordance with § 1.923 of this chapter all applications must specify an address where...

  13. 75 FR 49813 - Change of Address

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... COMMISSION 11 CFR Parts 9405, 9407, 9409, 9410, 9420, and 9428 Change of Address AGENCY: United States... Assistance Commission (EAC) is amending its regulations to reflect a change of address for its headquarters. This technical amendment is a nomenclature change that updates and corrects the address for...

  14. 77 FR 48429 - Commission Address Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION 29 CFR Parts 2700, 2701, 2702, 2704, 2705, 2706 Commission Address Change AGENCY... to inform the public of the address change. DATES: This final rule will take effect on August 27... because the amendments are of a minor and administrative nature dealing with only a change in address....

  15. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  16. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  17. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  18. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  19. 47 CFR 97.23 - Mailing address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mailing address. 97.23 Section 97.23 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is...

  20. 193-nm-laser-induced spectral shift in HR coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungil; Rudisill, J. Earl; Danielewicz, Edward

    2012-12-01

    High-reflectance mirrors, fabricated by use of fluoride coating materials, were irradiated for extended periods by a 193-nm kilohertz repetitive laser source. This irradiation promoted a spectral shift in the reflectance band towards shorter wavelengths. In efforts to determine the mechanism for the observed spectral shifts, various models were investigated by employing such techniques as spectrophotometry, surface profile interferometry, coating design simulation, and x-ray diffraction. The result of the investigation indicates that layers near the top surface of the coating structure underwent densification, which resulted in the observed spectral shift.

  1. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  2. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE HAMILTON ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Zhao, G.

    2013-10-01

    We present the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. The main problem with the calibration of this spectrograph arises from the fact that thorium lines are absent in the spectrum of the presumed ThAr hollow-cathode lamp now under operation; numerous unknown strong lines, which have been identified as titanium lines, are present in the spectrum. We estimate the temperature of the lamp's gas which permits us to calculate the intensities of the lines and to select a large number of relevant Ti I and Ti II lines. The resulting titanium line list for the Lick hollow-cathode lamp is presented. The wavelength calibration using this line list was made with an accuracy of about 0.006 Å.

  3. Dual-wavelength laser with topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum in solid-state lasers for the first time to our knowledge. Single tunable Hermite-Gaussian (HG0,n) (0 ≤ n ≤ 7) laser modes with dual wavelength were generated using an isotropic cavity. With a mode-converter, the corresponding Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0,n) laser modes were obtained. The oscillating laser modes have two types of photons at the wavelengths of 1077 and 1081 nm and equal orbital angular momentum of nħ per photon. These results identify the possibility of simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal and controllable orbital angular momentum. It can be proposed that this laser should have promising applications in many fields based on its compact structure, tunable orbital angular momentum, and simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum.

  4. The Long Wavelength Array Software Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jayce; Wood, Daniel; Stovall, Kevin; Ray, Paul S.; Clarke, Tracy; Taylor, Gregory

    2012-12-01

    The Long Wavelength Array Software Library (LSL) is a Python module that provides a collection of utilities to analyze and export data collected at the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, LWA1. Due to the nature of the data format and large-N (≳100 inputs) challenges faced by the LWA, currently available software packages are not suited to process the data. Using tools provided by LSL, observers can read in the raw LWA1 data, synthesize a filter bank, and apply incoherent de-dispersion to the data. The extensible nature of LSL also makes it an ideal tool for building data analysis pipelines and applying the methods to other low frequency arrays.

  5. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  6. Measurement of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in Zr II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, S. D.; Holt, R. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have applied fast-ion-beam laser-fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the isotope shifts (IS) of 51 optical transitions in the wavelength range 420.6-461.4 nm and the hyperfine structures (hfs) of 11 even parity and 30 odd parity levels in Zr II. The IS and many of the hfs measurements are the first for these transitions and levels. These atomic data are very important for astrophysical studies of chemical abundances, allowing correction for saturation and the effects of blended lines. They also provide important constraints on stellar diffusion modeling and provide a benchmark for theoretical atomic structure calculations.

  7. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  8. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  9. High-speed wavelength-swept lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    High-speed wavelength-swept lasers capable of providing wide frequency chirp and flexible temporal waveforms could enable numerous advanced functionalities for defense and security applications. Powered by high spectral intensity at rapid sweep rates across a wide wavelength range in each of the 1060nm, 1300nm, and 1550nm spectral windows, these swept-laser systems have demonstrated real-time monitoring and superior signal-to-noise ratio measurements in optical frequency domain imaging, fiber-optic sensor arrays, and near-IR spectroscopy. These same capabilities show promising potentials in laser radar and remote sensing applications. The core of the high-speed swept laser incorporates a semiconductor gain module and a high-performance fiber Fabry- Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) to provide rapid wavelength scanning operations. This unique design embodies the collective advantages of the semiconductor amplifier's broad gain-bandwidth with direct modulation capability, and the FFP-TF's wide tuning ranges (>200nm), high finesse (1000 to 10,000), low-loss (<3dB), and fast scan rates reaching 20KHz. As a result, the laser can sweep beyond 100nm in 25μsec, output a scanning peak power near mW level, and exhibit excellent peak signal-to-spontaneous-emission ratio >80dB in static mode. When configured as a seed laser followed by post amplification, the swept spectrum and power can be optimized for Doppler ranging and remote sensing applications. Furthermore, when combined with a dispersive element, the wavelength sweep can be converted into high-speed and wide-angle spatial scanning without moving parts.

  10. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  11. Effective wavelength scaling of rectangular aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Jiasen; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-04-20

    We investigate the resonances of aperture antennas from the visible to the terahertz regime, with comparison to comprehensive simulations. Simple piecewise analytic behavior is found for the wavelength scaling over the entire spectrum, with a linear regime through the visible and near-IR. This theory will serve as a useful and simple design tool for applications including biosensors, nonlinear plasmonics and surface enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:25969079

  12. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  13. Biosensing with the integrated-optical difference interferometer: dual-wavelength operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Ch.; Dangel, R.; Lukosz, W.

    1998-08-01

    Integrated-optical difference interferometers - operated at a single wavelength - were developed in our group as biosensors for monitoring bio-specific interactions in real time. Their potentially very high resolution cannot be exploited in practice, because refractive-index and/or temperature variations of the sample solutions also contribute to the sensors' response, i.e., to the time-dependent phase difference ΔΦ˜(t) between the TE 0 and TM 0 modes excited in a planar or rib waveguide after their polarization-dependent interaction with the sample. In single-wavelength operation of the difference-interferometric biosensor we show experimentally and theoretically that its cross-sensitivities for refractometric perturbations can be greatly reduced by optimisation of the waveguide thickness. We also investigate how the temperature sensitivity of the biosensors depends on the waveguide thickness. We demonstrate that a difference interferometer, where the phase shifts ΔΦ˜(t) are determined from the lateral displacements of spatial interference fringes, can be simultaneously operated - without any additional hardware components - at two laser wavelengths λ1 and λ2; in our experiments with 80-160 nm thick Si 3N 4 planar or rib waveguides we used the wavelengths λ1=633 nm and either λ2=491 or 488 nm, respectively. We show that from the two independent sensor responses, viz., the two phase shifts ΔΦ˜λ 1(t) and ΔΦ˜λ 2(t) , the biosensing effect, can be differentiated from simultaneously occurring time-dependent refractive-index and/or temperature variations of the sample. As an experimental test of dual-wavelength operation in biosensing, we monitor the affinity binding between avidin and biotinylated proteins, with superimposed refractive-index and/or temperature variations as perturbations.

  14. Two-wavelength lidar inversion algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kunz, G J

    1999-02-20

    Potter [Appl. Opt. 26, 1250 (1987)] has presented a method to determine profiles of the atmospheric aerosol extinction coefficients by use of a two-wavelength lidar with the assumptions of a constant value for the extinction-to-backscatter ratio for each wavelength and a constant value for the ratio between the two extinction coefficients at the two wavelengths. Triggered by this idea, Ackermann [Appl. Opt. 36, 5134 (1997)] expanded this method to consider lidar returns that are a composition of scattering by atmospheric aerosols and molecules, assuming that the molecular scattering is known. In both papers the method is based on the well-known solutions of Bernoulli's differential equation in an iterative scheme with an unknown boundary transmission condition. This boundary condition is less sensitive to noise than boundary extinction conditions. My main purpose is to critically consider the principle behind Potter's method, because it seems that there are several reasons why the number of solutions is not limited to one, as suggested by his original work.

  15. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  16. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  17. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  18. Long Wavelength Ripples in the Nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcinov, T.; Hay, A. E.

    2008-12-01

    Sediment bedforms are ubiquitous in the nearshore environment, and their characteristics and evolution have a direct effect on the hydrodynamics and the rate of sediment transport. The focus of this study is long wavelength ripples (LWR) observed at two locations in the nearshore at roughly 3m water depth under combined current and wave conditions in Duck, North Carolina. LWR are straight-crested bedforms with wavelengths in the range of 20-200cm, and steepness of about 0.1. They occur in the build up and decay of storms, in a broader range of values of the flow parameters compared to other ripple types. The main goal of the study is to test the maximum gross bedform-normal transport (mGBNT) hypothesis, which states that the orientation of ripples in directionally varying flows is such that the gross sediment transport normal to the ripple crest is maximized. Ripple wavelengths and orientation are measured from rotary fanbeam images and current and wave conditions are obtained from electromagnetic (EM) flowmeters and an offshore pressure gauge array. Preliminary tests in which transport direction is estimated from the combined flow velocity vectors indicate that the mGBNT is not a good predictor of LWR orientation. Results from tests of the mGBNT hypothesis using a sediment transport model will be presented.

  19. Peripheral detection and resolution with mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength sensitive cone systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Feng; Zele, Andrew J; Suheimat, Marwan; Lambert, Andrew J; Atchison, David A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared neural resolution and detection limits of the human mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength cone systems with anatomical estimates of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell spacings and sizes. Detection and resolution limits were measured from central fixation out to 35° eccentricity across the horizontal visual field using a modified Lotmar interferometer. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system was studied using a green (550 nm) test stimulus to which S-cones have low sensitivity. To bias resolution and detection to the short-wavelength cone system, a blue (450 nm) test stimulus was presented against a bright yellow background that desensitized the M- and L-cones. Participants were three trichromatic males with normal visual functions. With green stimuli, resolution showed a steep central-peripheral gradient that was similar between participants, whereas the detection gradient was shallower and patterns were different between participants. Detection and resolution with blue stimuli were poorer than for green stimuli. The detection of blue stimuli was superior to resolution across the horizontal visual field and the patterns were different between participants. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system's resolution is limited by midget ganglion cell spacing and its detection is limited by the size of the M- and L-cone photoreceptors, consistent with previous observations. We found that no such simple relationships occur for the short-wavelength cone system between resolution and the bistratified ganglion cell spacing, nor between detection and the S-cone photoreceptor sizes.

  20. Peripheral detection and resolution with mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength sensitive cone systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Feng; Zele, Andrew J; Suheimat, Marwan; Lambert, Andrew J; Atchison, David A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared neural resolution and detection limits of the human mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength cone systems with anatomical estimates of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell spacings and sizes. Detection and resolution limits were measured from central fixation out to 35° eccentricity across the horizontal visual field using a modified Lotmar interferometer. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system was studied using a green (550 nm) test stimulus to which S-cones have low sensitivity. To bias resolution and detection to the short-wavelength cone system, a blue (450 nm) test stimulus was presented against a bright yellow background that desensitized the M- and L-cones. Participants were three trichromatic males with normal visual functions. With green stimuli, resolution showed a steep central-peripheral gradient that was similar between participants, whereas the detection gradient was shallower and patterns were different between participants. Detection and resolution with blue stimuli were poorer than for green stimuli. The detection of blue stimuli was superior to resolution across the horizontal visual field and the patterns were different between participants. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system's resolution is limited by midget ganglion cell spacing and its detection is limited by the size of the M- and L-cone photoreceptors, consistent with previous observations. We found that no such simple relationships occur for the short-wavelength cone system between resolution and the bistratified ganglion cell spacing, nor between detection and the S-cone photoreceptor sizes. PMID:27580041

  1. Wavelength-selective visible-light detector based on integrated graphene transistor and surface plasmon coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christian W.; Maukonen, Doug; Peale, R. E.; Fredricksen, C. J.; Ishigami, M.; Cleary, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    We have invented a novel photodetector by mating a surface plasmon resonance coupler with a graphene field effect transistor. The device enables wavelength selectivity for spectral sensing applications. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are generated in a 50 nm thick Ag film on the surface of a prism in the Kretschmann configuration positioned 500 nm from a graphene FET. Incident photons of a given wavelength excite SPPs at a specific incidence angle. These SPP fields excite a transient current whose amplitude follows the angular resonance spectrum of the SPP absorption feature. Though demonstrated first at visible wavelengths, the approach can be extended far into the infrared. We also demonstrate that the resonant current is strongly modulated by gate bias applied to the FET, providing a clear path towards large-scale spectral imagers with locally addressable pixels.

  2. Two-Color Laser Speckle Shift Strain Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Greer, Lawrence C., III; Spina, Daniel; Barranger, John

    1996-01-01

    A two color laser speckle shift strain measurement system based on the technique of Yamaguchi was designed. The dual wavelength light output from an Argon Ion laser was coupled into two separate single-mode optical fibers (patchcords). The output of the patchcords is incident on the test specimen (here a structural fiber). Strain on the fiber, in one direction, is produced using an Instron 4502. Shifting interference patterns or speckle patterns will be detected at real-time rates using 2 CCD cameras with image processing performed by a hardware correlator. Strain detected in fibers with diameters from 21 microns to 143 microns is expected to be resolved to 15 mu epsilon. This system was designed to be compact and robust and does not require surface preparation of the structural fibers.

  3. Oxide mediated spectral shifting in aluminum resonant optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Patrick M; Moosmann, Carola; Dopf, Katja; Eisler, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    As a key feature among metals showing good plasmonic behavior, aluminum extends the spectrum of achievable plasmon resonances of optical antennas into the deep ultraviolet. Due to degradation, a native oxide layer gives rise to a metal-core/oxide-shell nanoparticle and influences the spectral resonance peak position. In this work, we examine the role of the underlying processes by applying numerical nanoantenna models that are experimentally not feasible. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are carried out for a large variety of elongated single-arm and two-arm gap nanoantennas. In a detailed analysis, which takes into account the varying surface-to-volume ratio, we show that the overall spectral shift toward longer wavelengths is mainly driven by the higher index surrounding material rather than by the decrease of the initial aluminum volume. In addition, we demonstrate experimentally that this shifting can be minimized by an all-inert fabrication and subsequent proof-of-concept encapsulation.

  4. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  5. Low-Light-Shift Cesium Fountain without Mechanical Shutters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzer, Daphna

    2008-01-01

    A new technique for reducing errors in a laser-cooled cesium fountain frequency standard provides for strong suppression of the light shift without need for mechanical shutters. Because mechanical shutters are typically susceptible to failure after operating times of the order of months, the elimination of mechanical shutters could contribute significantly to the reliability of frequency standards that are required to function continuously for longer time intervals. With respect to the operation of an atomic-fountain frequency standard, the term "light shift" denotes an undesired relative shift in the two energy levels of the atoms (in this case, cesium atoms) in the atomic fountain during interrogation by microwaves. The shift in energy levels translates to a frequency shift that reduces the precision and possibly accuracy of the frequency standard. For reasons too complex to describe within the space available for this article, the light shift is caused by any laser light that reaches the atoms during the microwave- interrogation period, but is strongest for near-resonance light. In the absence of any mitigating design feature, the light shift, expressed as a fraction of the standard fs frequency, could be as large as approx. 2 x 10(exp -11), the largest error in the standard. In a typical prior design, to suppress light shift, the intensity of laser light is reduced during the interrogation period by using a single-pass acoustooptic modulator to deflect the majority of light away from the main optical path. Mechanical shutters are used to block the remaining undeflected light to ensure complete attenuation. Without shutters, this remaining undeflected light could cause a light shift of as much as .10.15, which is unacceptably large in some applications. The new technique implemented here involves additionally shifting the laser wavelength off resonance by a relatively large amount (typically of the order of nanometers) during microwave interrogation. In this

  6. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  7. Testability and epistemic shifts in modern cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade new developments in theoretical and speculative cosmology have reopened the old discussion of cosmology's scientific status and the more general question of the demarcation between science and non-science. The multiverse hypothesis, in particular, is central to this discussion and controversial because it seems to disagree with methodological and epistemic standards traditionally accepted in the physical sciences. But what are these standards and how sacrosanct are they? Does anthropic multiverse cosmology rest on evaluation criteria that conflict with and go beyond those ordinarily accepted, so that it constitutes an "epistemic shift" in fundamental physics? The paper offers a brief characterization of the modern multiverse and also refers to a few earlier attempts to introduce epistemic shifts in the science of the universe. It further discusses the several meanings of testability, addresses the question of falsifiability as a sine qua non for a theory being scientific, and briefly compares the situation in cosmology with the one in systematic biology. Multiverse theory is not generally falsifiable, which has led to proposals from some physicists to overrule not only Popperian standards but also other evaluation criteria of a philosophical nature. However, this is hardly possible and nor is it possible to get rid of explicit philosophical considerations in some other aspects of cosmological research, however advanced it becomes.

  8. Filter-less frequency-doubling microwave signal generator with tunable phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueqin; Pei, Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Yiqun; Yuan, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A prototype for frequency-doubling microwave signal generator with tunable phase shift based on a filter-less architecture is proposed and analyzed. In the proposal, one dual parallel polarization modulator is used as the key component to generate two ±1st order sidebands along the orthogonal polarization directions with suppressed carrier. Then the polarization states of the two sidebands are aligned with the principal axes of an electro-optical phase modulator (EOPM). Tunable phase shift is implemented by controlling the direct current voltage applied to the EOPM. Without using any filters or wavelength-dependent components, the system possesses good frequency tunability and it can be applied to multi-wavelength operation. Taking advantage of the ability of frequency multiplication, the frequency tuning range can be wider than the operation bandwidth of the modulator. By theoretical analyses and simulated verifications, a frequency-doubling microwave signal ranging from 22 to 40 GHz with full range phase shift is achieved.

  9. The shifting foundations of nursing.

    PubMed

    Law, Kate; Aranda, Kay

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we argue that the concerns generated by the development of Foundation Degrees and the Assistant and Associate Practitioner roles have rekindled some of the unresolved debates regarding the status and identity of nursing and nurses. Through the application of the sociological theories of professionalisation and nostalgia we have identified the shifting and unresolved nature of nursing. We argue that these theories continue to have resonance in the current climate of change and 'upskilling' of the health care workforce and argue, that the shifts illuminated are perhaps so significant as to demonstrate that we have entered a post-nursing era.

  10. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  11. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  12. A high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer for astronomical observations and development of wavelength standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Ulrike; Reiners, Ansgar; Schäfer, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    At the Institute for Astrophysics Goettingen (IAG), we are purchasing a high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrograph (FTS) for astronomical observations and development of calibration standards aiming at high wavelength precision. Astronomical spectrographs that work in the regime of very high resolution (resolving powers λ/δλ>=105) now achieve unprecedented precision and stability. Precise line shifts can be investigated to conclude for an objects radial velocity relative to the observer. As a long-term scientific goal, the evolution of galaxy redshift due to dark energy can be monitored. Also, the detection of lower mass, down to Earth-like planets will become feasible. Here, M-dwarfs are promising objects where an orbiting exo-Earth can cause a wavelength shift large enough to be detected. Emitting mainly in the near infrared (NIR), these objects require novel calibration standards. Current schemes under consideration are gas cathode lamps (e.g. CN, UNe) and a highly stable Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to act as a cost-efficient alternative to the laser frequency comb (LFC, [1]). In addition to experiments exploring novel wavelength calibration types, light will be fed from our telescopes at IAG. A Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) for solar observations and the 50 cm Cassegrain telescope allow to investigate stellar and spatially resolved light at our facilities.

  13. Gemini planet imager observational calibrations IV: wavelength calibration and flexure correction for the integral field spectograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Schuyler G.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Maire, Jérôme; Ingraham, Patrick J.; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Hibon, Pascale

    2014-08-01

    We present the wavelength calibration for the lenslet-based Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) that serves as the science instrument for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The GPI IFS features a 2.7" x 2.7" field of view and a 190 x 190 lenslet array (14.3 mas/lenslet) operating in Y, J, H, and K bands with spectral resolving power ranging from R ~ 35 to 78. Due to variations across the field of view, a unique wavelength solution is determined for each lenslet characterized by a two-dimensional position, the spectral dispersion, and the rotation of the spectrum with respect to the detector axes. The four free parameters are fit using a constrained Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares minimization algorithm, which compares an individual lenslet's arc lamp spectrum to a simulated arc lamp spectrum. This method enables measurement of spectral positions to better than 1/10th of a pixel on the GPI IFS detector using Gemini's facility calibration lamp unit GCAL, improving spectral extraction accuracy compared to earlier approaches. Using such wavelength calibrations we have measured how internal flexure of the spectrograph with changing zenith angle shifts spectra on the detector. We describe the methods used to compensate for these shifts when assembling datacubes from on-sky observations using GPI.

  14. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Montagut, Y. J.; Garcia, J. V.; Jimenez, Y.; Arnau, A.; March, C.; Montoya, A.

    2011-06-15

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed.

  15. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications.

    PubMed

    Montagut, Y J; García, J V; Jiménez, Y; March, C; Montoya, A; Arnau, A

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed. PMID:21721715

  16. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagut, Y. J.; García, J. V.; Jiménez, Y.; March, C.; Montoya, A.; Arnau, A.

    2011-06-01

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed.

  17. Improving shift workers' health and tolerance to shiftwork: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Kogi, K

    1996-02-01

    Recent developments in research in relation to health and tolerance to shiftwork offer useful guidance for improving conditions of shiftwork. These developments were discussed by the papers of this special issue, presented at the Mini-symposium on improving shift workers' health and tolerance to shiftwork in the 24th International Congress on Occupational Health in Nice, France, in 1993. While there is evidence that shiftwork is regarded as a risk factor with respect to the health of shift workers, many shift workers are engaged in shift systems for years while coping with associated burdens in their working life. In order to improve shift workers' health and tolerance, recent research points to the importance of multifaceted measures addressing both the effects of disruptions in circadian rhythms, and the actual interferences with daily routines at work and in family and social life. Increasing attention is paid to changed working hours and shift systems, including more flexible shiftwork systems, as well as to supporting effective coping activities and occupational health services. As shown by the new ILO Convention on night work, a consensus is being built internationally that multifaceted actions are necessary for improving shiftworking conditions and that such actions should be based on participatory planning and implementation.

  18. Multi-wavelength access gate for WDM-formatted words in optical RAM row architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Alexoudi, T.; Vagionas, C.; Miliou, A.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.

    2013-03-01

    Optical RAM has emerged as a promising solution for overcoming the "Memory Wall" of electronics, indicating the use of light in RAM architectures as the approach towards enabling ps-regime memory access times. Taking a step further towards exploiting the unique wavelength properties of optical signals, we reveal new architectural perspectives in optical RAM structures by introducing WDM principles in the storage area. To this end, we demonstrate a novel SOAbased multi-wavelength Access Gate for utilization in a 4x4 WDM optical RAM bank architecture. The proposed multiwavelength Access Gate can simultaneously control random access to a 4-bit optical word, exploiting Cross-Gain-Modulation (XGM) to process 8 Bit and Bit channels encoded in 8 different wavelengths. It also suggests simpler optical RAM row architectures, allowing for the effective sharing of one multi-wavelength Access Gate for each row, substituting the eight AGs in the case of conventional optical RAM architectures. The scheme is shown to support 10Gbit/s operation for the incoming 4-bit data streams, with a power consumption of 15mW/Gbit/s. All 8 wavelength channels demonstrate error-free operation with a power penalty lower than 3 dB for all channels, compared to Back-to-Back measurements. The proposed optical RAM architecture reveals that exploiting the WDM capabilities of optical components can lead to RAM bank implementations with smarter column/row encoders/decoders, increased circuit simplicity, reduced number of active elements and associated power consumption. Moreover, exploitation of the wavelength entity can release significant potential towards reconfigurable optical cache mapping schemes when using the wavelength dimension for memory addressing.

  19. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  20. Light-induced growth of monodisperse silver nanoparticles with tunable SPR properties and wavelength self-limiting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xianliang; Lombardi, John R.

    2008-08-01

    We present a technique for the tunable synthesis of a variety of monodisperse silver nanoparticles. Utilizing different optical wavelengths to irradiate initially grown seed crystals, the size and shape of the products can be controlled. Monitoring the absorption spectrum during growth, we observe that initially the absorption maximum shifts to longer wavelengths and broadens, indicating increasing particle size and dispersion. Remarkably, this effect gradually comes to a halt and reverses, displaying a shift to shorter wavelengths and simultaneously narrower bandwidths, until on completion, a final size and relatively narrow distribution is reached. The final morphology is found to depend on control of the laser wavelength and power. Discs, triangular prisms as well as pyramidal and pentagonal prisms may be produced. A process based on a wavelength dependent self-limiting mechanism governed by the surface plasmon resonance controlling the photochemical reduction of particles is suggested. By a similar mechanism, we show that by using a sodium lamp instead of a laser as an excitation source, a monodisperse sample of nanotetrahedra can be produced.

  1. Quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using phase-shifting white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Mehta, Dalip; Srivastava, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    We report quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) using phase-shifting interference microscopy. Five phase-shifted white light interferograms are recorded using colour charge coupled device camera. White light interferograms were decomposed into red, green, and blue colour components. The phase-shifted interferograms of each colour were then processed by phase-shifting analysis and phase maps for red, green, and blue colours were reconstructed. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of RBCs were computed from the single set of white light interferogram. The present technique has great potential for non-invasive determination of refractive index variation and morphological features of cells and tissues.

  2. Short-wavelength electrostatic waves in the earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent observations with the ISEE-1 spacecraft have found electric field emissions in the dayside magnetosheath whose frequency spectrum is modulated at twice the spacecraft spin period. The upper frequency cut-off in the frequency-time spectrum of the emissions has a characteristic parabola shape or festoon shape. The low frequency cutoff ranges from 100 Hz to 400 Hz, while the high frequency limit ranges from about 1 kHz to 4 kHz. The bandwidth is found to minimize for antenna orientations parallel to the wave vectors. The wave vector does not appear to be related to either the local magnetic field direction of the plasma flow velocity. The spacecraft observed frequency spectrum results from the spacecraft antenna response to the Doppler shifted wave vector spectrum which exists in the plasma. Imposed constraints on the plasma restframe wave vectors and frequencies indicate that the emissions occur within the frequency range from about 150 Hz to 1 kHz, with wavelengths between about 30 meters and 600 meters. These constraints strongly suggest that the festoon-shaped emissions are ion-acoustic waves. The small group velocity and k direction of the ion-acoustic mode are consistent with wave generation upstream at the bow shock and convection downstream to locations within the outer dayside magnetosheath.

  3. Psychophysics of reading. IV. Wavelength effects in normal and low vision.

    PubMed

    Legge, G E; Rubin, G S

    1986-01-01

    Does the color of text influence its legibility? There are reasons why it may do so for specific groups of low-vision observers. We used psychophysical methods to measure the effects of wavelength on the reading performance of four normal observers, two dichromats, and twenty-five low-vision observers. Reading rates were measured for text scanned across the face of a television (TV) monitor. We compared performance under four luminance-matched conditions in which sets of neutral-density and Wratten color filters were placed in front of the TV screen--blue (lambda max = 430 nm), green (lambda max = 550 nm), red (lambda max = 650 nm), and gray. Under photopic conditions, the reading rates of normal subjects were independent of wavelength, with the exception of characters near the acuity limit. At lower luminances, wavelength effects could be explained by the shift from photopic to scotopic vision. It was hypothesized that light scatter or absorption in eyes with cloudy ocular media would result in depressed performance in the blue. Only one of seven subjects demonstrated this effect, which we traced to wavelength-specific absorption. Observers with advanced photoreceptor disorders tended to read blue text faster than red text. This could not be explained on the basis of photopic spectral sensitivities alone. Finally, the presence of central or peripheral field loss was not predictive of wavelength-specific effects in reading. On the whole, wavelength only occasionally plays a significant role in reading. When it does, performance tends to be depressed either in the red or the blue and to be nearly optimal for green or gray.

  4. Bulk acousto-optic wavelength agile filter module for a wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2005-05-01

    An acousto-optic tunable filter-based wavelength-selection module with features optimized for a wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is proposed and demonstrated. The W-MOS produces high-speed multiple scan beams if it is engaged with an agile tunable source with multiwavelength generation capability. In particular, the proposed fiber-connected module features high-speed, low-loss, narrow-linewidth, and single-multiple wavelength selection by means of radio frequency drive signal control for single- or multiple-beam scan operations. The unique module offers input laser beam power control that in turn delivers the desired scanned laser beam power shaping. Experimental results match module design theory and demonstrate a fast 5.4-micros wavelength selection speed, a low (1.53-dB) fiber-to-fiber optical insertion loss, a 5.55-nm 3-dB spectral width, and a 1500-1600-nm agile wavelength operational band.

  5. Dual-band wavelength tunable nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber lasers induced by birefringence variation and gain curvature alteration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Fong; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-09-01

    With the combining effects of the fiber birefringence induced round-trip phase variation and the gain profile reshaping induced spectral filtering in the Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) cavity, the mechanism corresponding to the central wavelength tunability of the EDFL passively mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation is explored. Bending the intracavity fiber induces the refractive index difference between orthogonal axes, which enables the dual-band central wavelength shift of 2.9 nm at 1570 nm region and up to 10.2 nm at 1600 nm region. The difference between the wavelength shifts at two bands is attributed to the gain dispersion decided by the gain spectral curvature of the EDFA, and the spacing between two switchable bands is provided by the birefringence induced variation on phase delay which causes transmittance variation. In addition, the central wavelength shift can also be controlled by varying the pumping geometry. At 1570 nm regime, an offset of up to 5.9 nm between the central wavelengths obtained under solely forward or backward pumping condition is observed, whereas the bidirectional pumping scheme effectively compensates the gain spectral reshaping effects to minimize the central wavelength shift. In contrast, the wavelength offset shrinks to only 1.1 nm when mode-locking at 1600 nm under single-sided pumping, as the gain profile strongly depends on the spatial distribution of the excited erbium ions under different pumping schemes. Except the birefringence variation and the gain spectral filtering phenomena, the gain-saturation mechanism induced refractive index change and its influence to the dual-band central wavelength tunability are also observed and analyzed.

  6. Leadership Shifts in Changing Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    As groups representing local and state education players struggle to remain relevant in a policy conversation often dominated by foundations, think tanks, new advocacy groups, and political and business figures, a shift in leadership has been under way at major associations. Most of the changes have come as part of the natural churn; former…

  7. Shifting Patterns of Deadly Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiden, Richard H.; Freitas, Raymond P.

    1980-01-01

    While it is true that the total suicide rates has varied little, this composite figure masks a dramatic shift in the risk of suicide by age. In recent years there has been a reduction of suicide at older ages reciprocated by an unprecedented increase of suicide and homicide at younger ages. (Author)

  8. Illinois Shifting Gears Policy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Illinois Shifting Gears is a multilevel initiative that has simultaneously created bridge programs in the field and altered state policy to facilitate the creation of more programs in the future. These efforts have informed each other, giving policymakers the opportunity to interact with practitioners, troubleshoot bridge programs, and make…

  9. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several observations of body size, shape, posture, and configuration were made to document changes resulting from direct effects of weightlessness during the Skylab 4 mission. After the crewmen were placed in orbit, a number of anatomical and anthropometric changes occurred including a straightening of the thoracolumbar spine, a general decrease in truncal girth, and an increase in height. By the time of the earliest in-flight measurement on mission day 3, all crewmen had lost more than two liters of extravascular fluid from the calf and thigh. The puffy facies, the bird legs effect, the engorgement of upper body veins, and the reduced volume of lower body veins were all documented with photographs. Center-of-mass measurements confirmed a fluid shift cephalad. This shift remained throughout the mission until recovery, when a sharp reversal occurred; a major portion of the reversal was completed in a few hours. The anatomical changes are of considerable scientific interest and of import to the human factors design engineer, but the shifts of blood and extravascular fluid are of more consequence. It is hypothesized that the driving force for the fluid shift is the intrinsic and unopposed lower limb elasticity that forces venous blood and then other fluid cephalad.

  10. The Shift Needed for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharicz, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research is to begin to assess to what extent organizations have in practice begun to make the shift towards triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, and key elements of TBL sustainability considered necessary to success are identified…

  11. Technology Counts 2012: Virtual Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Virtual education is moving into that intersection where rising popularity meets calls for greater accountability. How the virtual education movement responds to those calls will have a significant impact on how it evolves in K-12 over the next five to 10 years. This report tackles this shift in the virtual education landscape. It examines the…

  12. Dual-wavelength moisture meter for clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgia, Michele; Pesatori, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    An optical sensor for measuring the moisture level of clay has been realized by a couple of telecommunications lasers at 1300 and 1550 nm. The sensor can operate directly during building material production. The measurement principle is based on the measurement of the optical reflection at different wavelengths in the infrared region. Custom low-noise electronics allows rejecting disturbances of ambient light, and a digital processing makes the system independent on the clay distance. By means of a proper calibration, the sensor can monitor the moisture level during brick production, without moving parts or optical filters.

  13. High performance optical wavelength multiplexer-demultiplexer.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, J A; Hara, E H; Sullivan, B T; Waldorf, A J

    1992-07-01

    The principle of an optical wavelength multiplexer-demultiplexer is described in which the signals undergo repeated reflections from special filter elements that can be designed for a wide range of cross-talk ratios. The insertion losses of these units can be quite small and they can be implemented to provide simultaneous multichannel two-way transmission. In a preliminary investigation of an experimental prototype an insertion loss of 0.5 dB and a cross talk of -35 dB were demonstrated. The multiplexer-demultiplexer is expected to have a long life and high reliability.

  14. Wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Li, Junjie; Kan, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram composed of subwavelength metallic antennas is designed and demonstrated experimentally in the terahertz (THz) regime. Different character patterns are generated at the separated working frequencies 0.50 THz and 0.63 THz which determine a narrow frequency bandwidth of 130 GHz. The two working frequencies are around the central resonance frequency of the antennas where antennas behave strong wavefront modulation. Each antenna is fully utilized to control the wavefront of the metasurface at different frequencies by an optimization algorithm. The results demonstrate a candidate way to design multi-colors optical display elements. PMID:27752118

  15. Quasi-optical diplexer for millimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Wordeman, M R

    1978-12-01

    A quasi-optical diplexer for injection of signal and local oscillator frequencies into a mixer at millimeter wave-lengths is described. The diplexer accepts both image and signal bands, presents low loss at both the signal and local oscillator frequencies and rejects local oscillator noise at the signal frequency. The configuration of the device makes it particularly useful for Cassegrain receivers using a cooled mixer and a lens corrected feed system. The diplexer has been tested at 150 GHz on the 11-m radio telescope operated by The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Tucson, Arizona.

  16. Multi-wavelength compressive computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Stephen S.; Edgar, Matthew P.; Jonathan, Phillip; Sun, Baoqing; Padgett, Miles J.

    2013-03-01

    The field of ghost imaging encompasses systems which can retrieve the spatial information of an object through correlated measurements of a projected light field, having spatial resolution, and the associated reflected or transmitted light intensity measured by a photodetector. By employing a digital light projector in a computational ghost imaging system with multiple spectrally filtered photodetectors we obtain high-quality multi-wavelength reconstructions of real macroscopic objects. We compare different reconstruction algorithms and reveal the use of compressive sensing techniques for achieving sub-Nyquist performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of this technology in non-visible and fluorescence imaging applications.

  17. Quantum cascade lasers designed toward shorter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jilian; Liu, Lei; Li, Bing Hui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Ma, Jian; Liu, Kewei; He, Jun; Shen, D. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are normally based on one-dimensional confined quantum wells. In this scheme, it is still a challenge to produce lasing with a frequency higher than mid-infrared. Here, we discuss the possibility to extend the spectral range of QCLs to the higher frequency region by adding another dimensional confinement. Taking the ZnO/MgO system as an example, we demonstrate theoretically that such a two-dimensional confined QCL can operate at wavelengths from the near-infrared λ =2.95 μm, 1.57 μm, 1.13 μm to the visible 734 nm.

  18. Quantum cascade lasers designed toward shorter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jilian; Liu, Lei; Li, Bing Hui; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Ma, Jian; Liu, Kewei; He, Jun; Shen, D Z

    2016-02-17

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are normally based on one-dimensional confined quantum wells. In this scheme, it is still a challenge to produce lasing with a frequency higher than mid-infrared. Here, we discuss the possibility to extend the spectral range of QCLs to the higher frequency region by adding another dimensional confinement. Taking the ZnO/MgO system as an example, we demonstrate theoretically that such a two-dimensional confined QCL can operate at wavelengths from the near-infrared [Formula: see text] μm, 1.57 μm, 1.13 μm to the visible 734 nm.

  19. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  20. Fourier optics for wavefront engineering and wavelength control of lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Romain

    Since their initial demonstration in 1994, quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become prominent sources of mid-infrared radiation. Over the years, a large scientific and engineering effort has led to a dramatic improvement in their efficiency and power output, with continuous wave operation at room temperature and Watt-level output power now standard. However, beyond this progress, new functionalities and capabilities need to be added to this compact source to enable its integration into consumer-ready systems. Two main areas of development are particularly relevant from an application standpoint and were pursued during the course of this thesis: wavelength control and wavefront engineering of QCLs. The first research direction, wavelength control, is mainly driven by spectroscopic applications of QCLs, such as trace gas sensing, process monitoring or explosive detection. We demonstrated three different capabilities, corresponding to different potential spectroscopic measurement techniques: widely tunable single longitudinal mode lasing, simultaneous lasing on multiple well-defined longitudinal modes, and simultaneous lasing over a broad and continuous range of the spectrum. The second research direction, wavefront engineering of QCLs, i.e. the improvement of their beam quality, is relevant for applications necessitating transmission of the QCL output over a large distance, for example for remote sensing or military countermeasures. To address this issue, we developed plasmonic lenses directly integrated on the facets of QCLs. The plasmonic structures designed are analogous to antenna arrays imparting directionality to the QCLs, as well as providing means for polarization control. Finally, a research interest in plasmonics led us to design passive flat optical elements using plasmonic antennas. All these projects are tied together by the involvement of Fourier analysis as an essential design tool to predict the interaction of light with various gratings and periodic