Science.gov

Sample records for addresses long-term developments

  1. Is Current Hydrogeologic Research Addressing Long-TermPredictions?

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-09-10

    Hydrogeology is a field closely related to the needs of society. Many problems of current national and local interest require predictions of hydrogeological system behavior, and, in a number of important cases, the period of prediction is tens to hundreds of thousands of years. It is argued that the demand for such long-term hydrogeological predictions casts a new light on the future needs of hydrogeological research. Key scientific issues are no longer concerned only with simple processes or narrowly focused modeling or testing methods, but also with assessment of prediction uncertainties and confidence, couplings among multiple physico-chemical processes occurring simultaneously at a site, and the interplay between site characterization and predictive modeling. These considerations also have significant implications for hydrogeological education. With this view, it is asserted that hydrogeological directions and education need to be reexamined and possibly refocused to address specific needs for long-term predictions.

  2. Near-Term Actions to Address Long-Term Climate Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Addressing climate change requires effective long-term policy making, which occurs when reflecting on potential events decades or more in the future causes policy makers to choose near-term actions different than those they would otherwise pursue. Contrary to some expectations, policy makers do sometimes make such long-term decisions, but not as commonly and successfully as climate change may require. In recent years however, the new capabilities of analytic decision support tools, combined with improved understanding of cognitive and organizational behaviors, has significantly improved the methods available for organizations to manage longer-term climate risks. In particular, these tools allow decision makers to understand what near-term actions consistently contribute to achieving both short- and long-term societal goals, even in the face of deep uncertainty regarding the long-term future. This talk will describe applications of these approaches for infrastructure, water, and flood risk management planning, as well as studies of how near-term choices about policy architectures can affect long-term greenhouse gas emission reduction pathways.

  3. The role of business in addressing the long-term implications of the current food crisis.

    PubMed

    Yach, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Before the onset of the current food crisis, the evidence of a severely neglected nutrition crisis was starting to receive attention. Increased food prices are having severe impacts on the nutritional status of populations. Our current food system has evolved over decades in a largely unplanned manner and without consideration for the complexity and implications of linkages between health, nutrition, agricultural, economic, trade and security issues. The underlying causes for the nutrition crisis include the above, as well as decades of neglect with regard to nutrition, and agricultural science (especially in emerging markets); a failure of governance with respect to the major players involved in nutrition, a weak response by government donors and Foundations to invest in basic nutrition (in contrast to growing support for humanitarian aspects of food aid), and a reluctance to develop private-public partnerships. The emergence of new business models that tackle social problems while remaining profitable offers promise that the long term nutrition needs of people can be met. Businesses can have greater impact acting collectively than individually. Food, retail, food service, chemical and pharmaceutical companies have expertise, distribution systems and customers insights, if well harnessed, could leapfrog progress in addressing the food and nutrition crises. While business can do lots more, its combined impact will be minimal if a range of essential government actions and policies are not addressed. Governments need to create innovative and complementary opportunities that include incentives for businesses including: setting clear nutritional guidelines for fortification and for ready-to eat products; offering agreements to endorse approved products and support their distribution to clinics and schools; eliminating duties on imported vitamins and other micronutrients; and providing tax and other incentives for industry to invest with donors in essential nutrition

  4. The role of business in addressing the long-term implications of the current food crisis

    PubMed Central

    Yach, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Before the onset of the current food crisis, the evidence of a severely neglected nutrition crisis was starting to receive attention. Increased food prices are having severe impacts on the nutritional status of populations. Our current food system has evolved over decades in a largely unplanned manner and without consideration for the complexity and implications of linkages between health, nutrition, agricultural, economic, trade and security issues. The underlying causes for the nutrition crisis include the above, as well as decades of neglect with regard to nutrition, and agricultural science (especially in emerging markets); a failure of governance with respect to the major players involved in nutrition, a weak response by government donors and Foundations to invest in basic nutrition (in contrast to growing support for humanitarian aspects of food aid), and a reluctance to develop private-public partnerships. The emergence of new business models that tackle social problems while remaining profitable offers promise that the long term nutrition needs of people can be met. Businesses can have greater impact acting collectively than individually. Food, retail, food service, chemical and pharmaceutical companies have expertise, distribution systems and customers insights, if well harnessed, could leapfrog progress in addressing the food and nutrition crises. While business can do lots more, its combined impact will be minimal if a range of essential government actions and policies are not addressed. Governments need to create innovative and complementary opportunities that include incentives for businesses including: setting clear nutritional guidelines for fortification and for ready-to eat products; offering agreements to endorse approved products and support their distribution to clinics and schools; eliminating duties on imported vitamins and other micronutrients; and providing tax and other incentives for industry to invest with donors in essential nutrition

  5. The role of business in addressing the long-term implications of the current food crisis.

    PubMed

    Yach, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Before the onset of the current food crisis, the evidence of a severely neglected nutrition crisis was starting to receive attention. Increased food prices are having severe impacts on the nutritional status of populations. Our current food system has evolved over decades in a largely unplanned manner and without consideration for the complexity and implications of linkages between health, nutrition, agricultural, economic, trade and security issues. The underlying causes for the nutrition crisis include the above, as well as decades of neglect with regard to nutrition, and agricultural science (especially in emerging markets); a failure of governance with respect to the major players involved in nutrition, a weak response by government donors and Foundations to invest in basic nutrition (in contrast to growing support for humanitarian aspects of food aid), and a reluctance to develop private-public partnerships. The emergence of new business models that tackle social problems while remaining profitable offers promise that the long term nutrition needs of people can be met. Businesses can have greater impact acting collectively than individually. Food, retail, food service, chemical and pharmaceutical companies have expertise, distribution systems and customers insights, if well harnessed, could leapfrog progress in addressing the food and nutrition crises. While business can do lots more, its combined impact will be minimal if a range of essential government actions and policies are not addressed. Governments need to create innovative and complementary opportunities that include incentives for businesses including: setting clear nutritional guidelines for fortification and for ready-to eat products; offering agreements to endorse approved products and support their distribution to clinics and schools; eliminating duties on imported vitamins and other micronutrients; and providing tax and other incentives for industry to invest with donors in essential nutrition

  6. Focusing Events and Constrains on Policy Addressing Long-Term Climate Change Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donovan, K.

    2014-12-01

    When policy makers are aware of immediate and long-term risks to communities, what do they do to plan for and mitigate the effects of climate change? This paper addresses that question in two ways. First, as an organizing framework it presents an overview of the empirical evidence on focusing events. Focusing events are defined as sudden, rare events that reveal harm or the potential for future harm that the general public and policy makers become aware of simultaneously. These large-scale events are typically natural and disasters, crisis, or technological accidents. This paper considers the empirical evidence of the relationship between focusing events, the harm revealed by the event and policy change aimed at reducing future risk of harm. Second, this paper reviews the case of flood mitigation policy in the United States from 1968 to 2008. It considers the ways in which policy makers have and have not integrated future flood risks into mitigation policy and planning, particularly after large-scale floods. It analyzes the political, intergovernmental, demographic and geographic factors that have promoted and constrained long-term flood mitigation policy. This paper concludes with a discussion of the meaning and implications of potential focusing events and constrains on policy for long-term climate change concerns.

  7. Long-term athletic development- part 1: a pathway for all youth.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The concept of developing talent and athleticism in youth is the goal of many coaches and sports systems. Consequently, an increasing number of sporting organizations have adopted long-term athletic development models in an attempt to provide a structured approach to the training of youth. It is clear that maximizing sporting talent is an important goal of long-term athletic development models. However, ensuring that youth of all ages and abilities are provided with a strategic plan for the development of their health and physical fitness is also important to maximize physical activity participation rates, reduce the risk of sport- and activity-related injury, and to ensure long-term health and well-being. Critical reviews of independent models of long-term athletic development are already present within the literature; however, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive examination and review of the most prominent models does not exist. Additionally, considerations of modern day issues that may impact on the success of any long-term athletic development model are lacking, as are proposed solutions to address such issues. Therefore, within this 2-part commentary, Part 1 provides a critical review of existing models of practice for long-term athletic development and introduces a composite youth development model that includes the integration of talent, psychosocial and physical development across maturation. Part 2 identifies limiting factors that may restrict the success of such models and offers potential solutions.

  8. Long-term athletic development- part 1: a pathway for all youth.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The concept of developing talent and athleticism in youth is the goal of many coaches and sports systems. Consequently, an increasing number of sporting organizations have adopted long-term athletic development models in an attempt to provide a structured approach to the training of youth. It is clear that maximizing sporting talent is an important goal of long-term athletic development models. However, ensuring that youth of all ages and abilities are provided with a strategic plan for the development of their health and physical fitness is also important to maximize physical activity participation rates, reduce the risk of sport- and activity-related injury, and to ensure long-term health and well-being. Critical reviews of independent models of long-term athletic development are already present within the literature; however, to the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive examination and review of the most prominent models does not exist. Additionally, considerations of modern day issues that may impact on the success of any long-term athletic development model are lacking, as are proposed solutions to address such issues. Therefore, within this 2-part commentary, Part 1 provides a critical review of existing models of practice for long-term athletic development and introduces a composite youth development model that includes the integration of talent, psychosocial and physical development across maturation. Part 2 identifies limiting factors that may restrict the success of such models and offers potential solutions. PMID:25486295

  9. Long-term athletic development, part 2: barriers to success and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The first installment of this two-part commentary reviewed existing models of long-term athletic development. However, irrespective of the model that is adopted by practitioners, existing structures within competitive youth sports in addition to the prevalence of physical inactivity in a growing number of modern-day youth may serve as potential barriers to the success of any developmental pathway. The second part of this commentary will initially highlight common issues that are likely to impede the success of long-term athletic development programs and then propose solutions that will address the negative impact of such issues. PMID:25909962

  10. Long-term athletic development, part 2: barriers to success and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Howard, Rick; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Williams, Craig A; Best, Thomas M; Alvar, Brent A; Micheli, Lyle J; Thomas, D Phillip; Hatfield, Disa L; Cronin, John B; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-05-01

    The first installment of this two-part commentary reviewed existing models of long-term athletic development. However, irrespective of the model that is adopted by practitioners, existing structures within competitive youth sports in addition to the prevalence of physical inactivity in a growing number of modern-day youth may serve as potential barriers to the success of any developmental pathway. The second part of this commentary will initially highlight common issues that are likely to impede the success of long-term athletic development programs and then propose solutions that will address the negative impact of such issues.

  11. Sustainability of a long term professional development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Christine E.

    Currently, in most school districts, the main form of teacher education comes from professional development (PD) that claims to improve teaching and student achievement. School districts and teachers spend time and money trying to make sure that they are providing the best quality education for their students. Yet, educators are looking for what the most effective form of PD should look like. Utilizing the methodology of a descriptive case study a long-term PD grant, called Science Alliance was evaluated to add to the research on PD and grant program efficacy. Twelve teachers that participated in the Science Alliance grant were interviewed, observed, and given a survey to see how and to what degree they were implementing the inquiry methodology three years after the grant ended. The results were compared with previously existing data that were collected by a company that Science Alliance hired to complete external research on the effects of the PD. The findings suggest that the teachers that participated have sustained the utilization and implementation of the methodology learned during the training. School administrators and/or staff developers could utilize the findings from this study to see what effective PD may entail. Future researchers may use findings from this study when reporting about grant program evaluations and/or PD.

  12. [Coronary interventions : Current developments for improved long-term results].

    PubMed

    Seidler, T

    2016-09-01

    Based on solid scientific evidence, new generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have become established as the standard of care in interventional cardiology. With at least similar safety and superior efficacy over uncoated bare metal stents (BMS) in various scenarios and including patients with increased bleeding risk, there are probably no remaining indications favoring the use of BMS. Additional developments regarding the platform, drug elution characteristics and polymer design were aimed at optimizing DES with even better outcomes. Although there is no lack of new variations, none has proven to be superior and several non-inferiority trials lacked statistical power, which precludes the label third generation (over second generation or new generation DES). While it is recognized that potential long-term advantages of bioresorbable scaffolds cannot be expected at this stage from the current ABSORB III trial, the safety and efficacy are encouraging. Beyond procedural aspects, such as intracoronary imaging, variations in duration of antiplatelet therapy should help to improve outcomes but still require careful individual weighting of ischemic vs. bleeding risk. PMID:27506215

  13. Abrupt vegetation transitions characterise long-term Amazonian peatland development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucoux, K. H.; Baker, T. R.; Gosling, W. D.; Honorio Coronado, E.; Jones, T. D.; Lahteenoja, O.; Lawson, I. T.

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of wetlands in western Amazonia have revealed the presence of extensive peatlands with peat deposits of up to 8 m-thick developing under a variety of vegetation types (Lähteenoja et al. 2012). Estimated to cover 150,000 km2 (Schulman et al. 1999), these peatlands make a valuable contribution to landscape and biological diversity and represent globally important carbon stores. In order to understand the processes leading to peat formation, and the sensitivity of these environments to future climatic change, it is necessary to understand their long-term history. The extent to which peatland vegetation changes over time, the stability of particular communities, the controls on transitions between vegetation types and how these factors relate to the accumulation of organic matter are not yet known. We report the first attempt to establish the long-term (millennial scale) vegetation history of a recently-described peatland site: Quistococha, a palm swamp, or aguajal, close to Iquitos in northern Peru. The vegetation is dominated by Mauritia flexuosa and Mauritiella armata and occupies a basin which is thought to be an abandoned channel of the River Amazon. We obtained a 4 m-long peat sequence from the deepest part of the basin. AMS-radiocarbon dating yielded a maximum age of 2,212 cal yr BP for the base of the peat, giving an average accumulation rate of 18 cm per century. Below the peat are 2 m of uniform, largely inorganic pale grey clays of lacustrine origin, which are underlain by an unknown thickness of inorganic sandy-silty clay of fluvial origin. Pollen analysis, carried out at c. 88-year intervals, shows the last 2,212 years to be characterised by the development of at least four distinct vegetation communities, with peat accumulating throughout. The main phases were: (1) Formation of Cyperaceae (sedge) fen coincident with peat initiation; (2) A short-lived phase of local Mauritia/Mauritiella development; (3) Development of mixed wet

  14. Addressing the Chronic Sorrow of Long-Term Spousal Caregivers: A Primer for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossheim, Beth N.; McAdams, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic sorrow is described as a distinct grief reaction that occurs when loss is not final but continues to be present in the life of the griever. It is characteristic of a growing number of older individuals who are providing long-term care at home for a spouse or primary partner with progressive disability. The unique presentations of grief,…

  15. Addressing challenges in cross-site synthesis of long-term ecological data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term ecological datasets are becoming increasingly abundant on the internet, and are available both on websites hosted by the originating sites and/or in online repositories. While sites and networks are increasingly conforming to adopted metadata standards (which themselves continue to evolve ...

  16. Determinants of cardiomyocyte development in long-term primary culture.

    PubMed

    Piper, H M; Jacobson, S L; Schwartz, P

    1988-09-01

    The influence of cell attachment to substrates and of medium composition on development of cardiomyocytes from adult rats in cultures up to 9 days old was investigated. Cardiomyocytes prevented from attaching to a culture substratum deteriorated within 3 days in medium 199 (M199) with or without fetal calf serum (FCS). Rapid attachment during the first 4 h after plating could be attained equally well on FCS or laminin coated surfaces. In M199 without FCS, attached cardiomyocytes on FCS coated dishes were able to retain their overall elongated morphology, but the number of cells remaining attached constantly decreased during the first 9 days in serum free culture. Attached on laminin the rate of loss from serum free cultures was lower. In the presence of 20% FCS, attached cardiomyocytes spread extensively after day 3, both on FCS and on laminin coated dishes. In serum containing media many cells pass through a spherical intermediate state before spreading extensively. Almost all cardiomyocytes cultured with 20% FCS on untreated tissue culture plastic gradually become spherical before attaching. With 20% FCS in culture media, the number of cells remaining in culture after 9 days was similar whether cells were rapidly attached to FCS treated or laminin coated substrata, or were plated on culture plastic, i.e., 52, 63, and 45% of the maximal number attached on day 1. By day 9 in all three culture types cells were spread and were beating spontaneously. These results indicate that adult cardiomyocytes do not establish in a stable morphological state in long-term cultures, in other than a surface attached spread cell form. For this stability the presence of yet unidentified components of fetal calf serum is required. PMID:3230587

  17. Development of an Innovative Direct Push Sensor System for Long Term Monitoring of Environmental Waste Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy-Dilek, C. A.; Riha, B. D.; Bosze, S.; Rossabi, J.

    2001-12-01

    As the focus of environmental restoration in the federal complex moves from active characterization and remediation to long term monitoring, the costs of long-term monitoring will escalate and eventually dominate ongoing environmental restoration budgets. Most of the major DOE sites including the Savannah River Site have a documented need for some type of long term monitoring system that does not rely on the use of standard groundwater monitoring wells. We have developed and installed a prototype monitoring system that can be used to measure and/or sample multiple parameters appropriate for long term monitoring of environmental waste sites. This system is designed to function as a sentinel system that detects when a significant change in water quality parameters or contaminant concentration occurs in a well characterized system. The sensor drive configuration is flexible and the sensor system is installed using direct push methods. Site specific monitoring scenarios will be need to be developed to address the specific long term monitoring objectives at a given site. The drive point has a sample port (soil gas or groundwater) and windows/ports for additional sensors. A prototype system was installed and has been monitored at the D-area at the Savannah River Site since July. The probes are located in an area where multiple contaminant plumes dominated by volatile organic compounds, metals and tritium are currently monitored using standard groundwater wells. Currently, the prototype system measures temperature, resisitivity, ORP and pH on a continuous basis. In addition, concetrations of volatile organic compounds and tritium are measured periodically by laboratory analysis of diffusion bag samples deployed in the sample ports of the prototype system. Results will be reported from a three-month monitoring interval. The results will be compared with baseline analyses of samples collected from the adjacent groundwater well.

  18. Issues in the Development of Long Term Care Gerontology Centers: The Centers Concept. Selected Topics in Long Term Care. Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortenson, Lee E.; Berdes, Celia M.

    This document, one in a series developed to provide technical assistance to 22 Long-Term Care Gerontology Centers, describes the current administrative and structural phenomenon of these centers. Precedents useful in assessing both the current climate and actual prospects for development of long term care centers are cited. The first section…

  19. The Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire: conceptual framework and item development

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Michele; Potter, Caroline M; Kelly, Laura; Hunter, Cheryl; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Coulter, Angela; Forder, Julien; Towers, Ann-Marie; A’Court, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the main issues of importance when living with long-term conditions to refine a conceptual framework for informing the item development of a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions. Materials and methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with people living with at least one long-term condition. Participants were recruited through primary care. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis. The analysis served to refine the conceptual framework, based on reviews of the literature and stakeholder consultations, for developing candidate items for a new measure for long-term conditions. Results Three main organizing concepts were identified: impact of long-term conditions, experience of services and support, and self-care. The findings helped to refine a conceptual framework, leading to the development of 23 items that represent issues of importance in long-term conditions. The 23 candidate items formed the first draft of the measure, currently named the Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire. Conclusion The aim of this study was to refine the conceptual framework and develop items for a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions, including single and multiple morbidities and physical and mental health conditions. Qualitative interviews identified the key themes for assessing outcomes in long-term conditions, and these underpinned the development of the initial draft of the measure. These initial items will undergo cognitive testing to refine the items prior to further validation in a survey.

  20. The Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire: conceptual framework and item development

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Michele; Potter, Caroline M; Kelly, Laura; Hunter, Cheryl; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Coulter, Angela; Forder, Julien; Towers, Ann-Marie; A’Court, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the main issues of importance when living with long-term conditions to refine a conceptual framework for informing the item development of a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions. Materials and methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with people living with at least one long-term condition. Participants were recruited through primary care. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis. The analysis served to refine the conceptual framework, based on reviews of the literature and stakeholder consultations, for developing candidate items for a new measure for long-term conditions. Results Three main organizing concepts were identified: impact of long-term conditions, experience of services and support, and self-care. The findings helped to refine a conceptual framework, leading to the development of 23 items that represent issues of importance in long-term conditions. The 23 candidate items formed the first draft of the measure, currently named the Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire. Conclusion The aim of this study was to refine the conceptual framework and develop items for a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions, including single and multiple morbidities and physical and mental health conditions. Qualitative interviews identified the key themes for assessing outcomes in long-term conditions, and these underpinned the development of the initial draft of the measure. These initial items will undergo cognitive testing to refine the items prior to further validation in a survey. PMID:27621678

  1. Fostering Humane Care of Dying Persons in Long-Term Care. Guidebook for Staff Development Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sarah A.; Daley, Barbara

    This guide is intended for staff development instructors responsible for inservice education on the topic of fostering humane care for dying persons in long-term care. The introduction discusses the guide's development based on input from administrators, staff, and families of residents in long-term care facilities and focus group interviews in…

  2. Long-Term Cognitive Dynamics of Fluent Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaessen, Anniek; Blomert, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Most theories of reading development assume a shift from slow sequential subword decoding to automatic processing of orthographic word forms. We hypothesized that this shift should be reflected in a concomitant shift in reading-related cognitive functions. The current study investigated the cognitive dynamics underlying reading development in a…

  3. Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Marchesi, Julian R; Benson, Andrew; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2014-09-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome represents a very important environmental factor that influences the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that MyD88-deficient non-obese diabetic (MyD88-/-NOD) mice, that were protected from T1D development, had a different composition of gut microbiota compared to wild type NOD mice. The aim of our study was to investigate whether this protection could be transferred. We demonstrate that transfer of gut microbiota from diabetes-protected MyD88-deficient NOD mice, reduced insulitis and significantly delayed the onset of diabetes. Gut bacteria from MyD88-deficient mice, administered over a 3-week period, starting at 4 weeks of age, stably altered the family composition of the gut microbiome, with principally Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae increased and Lactobacillaceae decreased. The transferred mice had a higher concentration of IgA and TGFβ in the lumen that was accompanied by an increase in CD8(+)CD103(+) and CD8αβ T cells in the lamina propria of the large intestine. These data indicate not only that gut bacterial composition can be altered after the neonatal/weaning period, but that the composition of the microbiome affects the mucosal immune system and can delay the development of autoimmune diabetes. This result has important implications for the development of probiotic treatment for T1D.

  4. Accomplishments of Long-Term Research and Development

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jordy, George Y.

    1988-07-01

    Technological breakthroughs cannot be penciled on the calendar in advance. The rate of new technological discovery, while highly uncertain, depends on a base of knowledge acquired earlier. In the economic environment of 1980, progress in basic research, which builds the technology base that will underpin future energy development by Government and industry, was being slowed as cost increases due to inflation grew faster than funding increase.

  5. IT Strategic Planning Workshops Develop Long-Term Goals | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    As part of NCI’s Research IT Strategic Planning efforts, a workshop was held on the NIH main campus in June. The main purpose of the workshop was to discuss ways to better integrate IT and informatics throughout NCI, and develop specific, high-level goals and related objectives that will drive the direction of IT and informatics support over the next five years. The initiative to integrate NCI’s IT and informatics is a collaboration between the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT), Office of Scientific Operations, Data Management Services, and the IT Operations Group.

  6. Long-term care arrangements in rural China: review of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei; Mao, Zong-Fu; Zhong, Renyao

    2009-09-01

    Developing long-term care systems for the elderly has become an increasingly urgent policy issue in China, especially in rural areas. This article provides an overview of the current status of long-term care development in rural China and discussion on the future development of institutional care and its policy implications. Formal long-term care systems are emerging but remain in the preliminary stages of development. Several policy considerations and practical implications deserve further attention: increases in regional and national government funding, integration of long-term care with the acute health care system, and creating more multilevel and multifunctional LTC facilities with a well-trained and skilled workforce. PMID:19716063

  7. [The Development of Long-Term Care Policies and the Impact on Nursing].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiao-Chi; Tsai, Yin-Yin; Yeh, Shin-Ting

    2015-10-01

    The government must reform and enhance current medical and long-term care services in order to respond effectively to societal ageing and labor shortage trends and to ensure sustainable operations. The post-acute care system should be reoriented on the home and community instead of the hospital. The Long Term Care Service Act integrates long-term care services that were previously dispersed amongst different departments, sets up a long-term care development fund, and improves the quality and allocation of long-term care services. Moreover, the Long Term Care Insurance Act will implement a bundle payment system to assist disabled families. The integration of automation and information technology will make long-term care more efficient. Although nurses are more skilled at elderly care and counseling than other community care professionals, nurses generally lack training in business management. Home and community-based services thus require better-trained manpower, opportunities to set care agents, and opportunities to offer flexible caring jobs. Therefore, nurses should strengthen their capabilities in post-acute care, business management, cooperation, and coordination. PMID:26507622

  8. Addressing water resources risk in England and Wales: Long term infrastructure planning in a private, regulated industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Water resources planning is a complex and challenging discipline in which decision makers must deal with conflicting objectives, contested socio-economic values and vast uncertainties, including long term hydrological variability. The task is arguably more demanding in England and Wales, where private water companies must adhere to a rigid set of regulatory planning guidelines in order to justify new infrastructural investments. These guidelines prescribe a "capacity expansion" approach to planning: ensure that a deterministic measure of supply, known as "Deployable Output," meets projected demand over a 25-year planning horizon. Deployable Output is derived using a method akin to yield analysis and is commensurate with the maximum rate of supply that a water resources system can sustain without incurring failure under a simulation of historical recorded hydrological conditions. This study examines whether Deployable Output analysis is fit to serve an industry in which: water companies are seeking to invest in cross-company water transfer schemes to deal with loss of water availability brought about by European environmental legislation and an increase in demand driven by population growth; water companies are expected address potential climate change impacts through their planning activities; and regulators wish to benchmark water resource system performance across the separate companies. Of particular interest, then, is the adequacy of Deployable Output analysis as a means to measuring current and future water shortage risk and comparing across supply systems. Data from the UK National River Flow Archive are used to develop a series of hypothetical reservoir systems in two hydrologically contrasting regions -- northwest England/north Wales and Southeast England. The systems are varied by adjusting the draft ratio (ratio of target annual demand to mean annual inflow), the inflow diversity (covariance of streamflow sequences supplying the system), the strength of

  9. A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Burch, G.D.; Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies (DOE, 1996). The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun-Lab (the cooperative Sandia National Laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capacity by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

  10. A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Burch, G.; Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies. The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun{center_dot}Lab (the cooperative Sandia National laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capability by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to: support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

  11. Development of group climate in short- and long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bakali, Jan Vegard; Wilberg, Theresa; Klungsøyr, Ole; Lorentzen, Steinar

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the development of group climate using the Engaged, Conflict, and Avoiding subscales of the Group Climate Questionnaire-Short Version (GCQ-S) in a sample of 145 patients attending either short- (20 sessions) or long-term (80 sessions) psychodynamic group psychotherapy. Linear mixed models were used to compare changes in group climate over time. Engaged developed along similar lines in the two psychotherapy formats. During the first 18 sessions, conflict and avoidance decreased toward the termination of the short-term groups, in contrast to an increase in this still-early stage of the long-term groups. When compared according to the stages of therapy (early, middle, late), a low-high-low pattern for conflict and avoidance emerged in both psychotherapy formats, with a stronger decrease toward termination in long-term groups. This finding can be seen as reflecting an accelerated progress of development within the short-term groups, and a delayed but strengthened process in the long-term groups. Review of empirical studies indicated that most theories of group development have a relatively narrow range of validity, but the parallel pattern of group climate found in this study across early, middle, and late stages for short- and long-term groups suggests that the perspective of developmental stages is still important to both group process theory and clinical practice.

  12. Long-term prospects for developments in space: A scenario approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. M.; Kahn, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term plans for future NASA programs are reported, and some of the following topics are discussed in detail: (1) systematic formulation of space scenarios; (2) the basic international context; (3) potential 21st century space developments; (4) space vehicle developments; and (5) future exploration.

  13. Teacher Experience, Learning, and Change: An Investigation of the Effects of Long-Term Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffino, Kara Lee

    2012-01-01

    As US public schools become increasingly diverse and teachers are expected to teach across cultural differences, teacher educators must consider how different professional development models shape teacher learning and practice. This study explores how a cohort of 55 P-12 teachers experienced and perceived long-term professional development focused…

  14. Developing a Long-term Monitoring Program with Undergraduate Students in Marine Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, T. M.; Boryta, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    A goal of our growing marine geoscience program at Mt. San Antonio College is to involve our students in all stages of developing and running an undergraduate research project. During the initial planning phase, students develop and test their proposals. Instructor-set parameters were chosen carefully to help guide students toward manageable projects but to not limit their creativity. Projects should focus on long-term monitoring of a coastal area in southern California. During the second phase, incoming students will critique the initial proposals, modify as necessary and continue to develop the project. We intend for data collection opportunities to grow from geological and oceanographic bases to eventually include other STEM topics in biology, chemistry, math and GIS. Questions we will address include: What makes this a good research project for a community college? What are the costs and time commitments involved? How will the project benefit students and society? Additionally we will share our initial results, challenges, and unexpected pitfalls and benefits.

  15. Development of a Self-Assessment Tool to Facilitate Decision-Making in Choosing a Long Term Care Administration Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johs-Artisensi, Jennifer L.; Olson, Douglas M.; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long term care administrators need a broad base of knowledge, skills, and interests to provide leadership and be successful in managing a fiscally responsible, quality long term care organization. Researchers developed a tool to help students assess whether a long term care administration major is a compatible fit. With input from professionals in…

  16. Developing a Long-Term Vision: A Road Map for Students' Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadan, Hedda; Shelden, Debra L.; Appel, Kelli; DeGrazia, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    When considering developing educational programs for students with disabilities, one often thinks first of the annual goals and short-term objectives that are included in the individualized education program (IEP). It is important, though, to connect the short-term objectives (the "now") to long-term goals and dreams (the "future"). Making that…

  17. Long-Term Effects of the Seattle Social Development Intervention on School Bonding Trajectories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; Guo, Jie; Hill, Karl G.; Battin-Pearson, Sara; Abbott, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the effects of intervention during the elementary grades on changes in school bonding from middle school through high school, using hierarchical linear modeling. Findings suggest that social development interventions through elementary school can have positive long-term effects on school bonding and demonstrate the importance…

  18. An Evaluation of the Long-Term Effectiveness of a Women's Leadership Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericksen, Kirsten S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Women's Institute for Leadership Development (W.I.L.D.) program to determine the immediate and long-term impact as defined by the alumni program participants from three cohorts (2008, 2005, 2003). A secondary focus of the career transition decision-making of recent W.I.L.D. participants was also…

  19. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  20. Waging a Living: Career Development and Long-Term Employment Outcomes for Young Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lauren; Doren, Bonnie; Miesch, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Youth with disabilities face many barriers in making the transition from high school to stable long-term employment. Researchers used case study methodology to examine the career development process and postschool employment outcomes for a sample of individuals with disabilities who were working in living wage occupations 7 to 10 years after…

  1. The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Secondary Schools upon Students' Academic Success and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoniou, Panayiotis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the short- and long-term effects of secondary schools upon student academic success and development. A questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of 15% of Cypriot students who graduated in June 2004 and June 2005 from secondary schools. A good response rate (i.e., 66%) was…

  2. "System Leader" Consultancy Development in English Schools: A Long-Term Agenda for a Democratic Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Within the policy rationale of a "self-improving" school system, there are now several thousand National College designated "system leaders" working as consultants in English schools on aspects of school to school support. So far, there has been no systematic consideration of the long-term development of these consultants in…

  3. Effects of a Long-Term Participatory Action Research Project on Science Teachers' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Markic, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of long-term co-operation between science educators and science teachers concerning the teachers' continuous professional development, based on Participatory Action Research in science education. The discussion is based on a six-year case study observing a group of about ten German chemistry teachers by chemistry…

  4. Developing Best Practices for Sharing Long-term Marine Sediment Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulweiler, R. W.; Emery, H.; Maguire, T.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term data sets provide unique opportunities to examine temporal variability of key ecosystem processes. The need for such datasets is becoming increasingly important as we try to quantify the impact of human activities across various scales and in some cases, as we try to determine the success of management interventions. Unfortunately, long-term data sets for coastal ecosystems are rare and curating them is a real challenge. However, if we wish to make our data available for interested parties (e.g., students, managers, etc.) then we need to provide mechanisms that allow others to understand our methods, access the data, reproduce the results, and see updates as they become available. Here we use techniques, learned through the EarthCube Geosoft Geoscience Paper of the Future project, to develop best practices that will allow us to share a long-term data set of directly measured net sediment N2 fluxes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. By developing these data and software sharing tools we hope to help disseminate our data so that the community can better assess how this temperate estuary has changed overtime. We also hope to provide a model for others to follow so that long-term estuarine data is more easily shared and not lost overtime.

  5. Development of applicating probabilistic long-term forecasts into water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jin; Ryoo, Kyongsik; Suh, Aesook

    2016-04-01

    This research shows development of applicating probabilistic long-term forecasts into water management. Forecasted Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDFs) of monthly precipitation are plotted by combining the range of monthly precipitation based on proper Probability Density Function (PDF) in past data with probabilistic forecasts in each category. Ensembles of inflow are estimated by entering generated ensembles of precipitation based on the CDFs into the 'abcd' water budget model. The bias and RMSE between averages in past data and observed inflow are compared to them in forecasted ensembles. In our results, the bias and RMSE of average precipitation in the forecasted ensemble are bigger than in past data, whereas the average inflow in the forecasted ensemble is smaller than in past data. This result could be used for reference data to apply long-term forecasts to water management, because of the limit in the number of forecasted data for verification and differences between the Andong-dam basin and the forecasted regions. This research has significance by suggesting a method of applying probabilistic information in climate variables from long-term forecasts to water management in Korea. Original data of a climate model, which produces long-term probabilistic forecasts should be verified directly as input data of a water budget model in the future, so that a more scientific response in water management against uncertainty of climate change could be reached.

  6. Development of weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, R.; Martinez, D.A.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Ortega, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Romero, W.; Stewart, J.; Trujillo, V.L.

    1998-12-31

    Weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers have been designed, fabricated, and tested for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. ARIES is a processing system used for the dismantlement of the plutonium pits from nuclear weapons. ARIES prepares the extracted-plutonium in a form which is compatible with long-term storage and disposition options and meets international inspection requirements. The processed plutonium is delivered to the canning module of the ARIES line, where it is packaged in a stainless steel container. This container is then packaged in a secondary container for long-term storage. Each of the containers is hermetically sealed with a full penetration weld closure that meets the requirements of the ASME Section IX Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Welding is performed with a gas tungsten arc process in an inert atmosphere of helium. The encapsulated helium in the nested containers allows for leak testing the weld closure and container. The storage package was designed to meet packaging requirements of DOE Standard 3013-96 for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxides. Development of the process parameters, weld fixture, weld qualification, and the welding chambers is discussed in this paper.

  7. National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement on Long-Term Athletic Development.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Cronin, John B; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Haff, G Gregory; Howard, Rick; Kraemer, William J; Micheli, Lyle J; Myer, Gregory D; Oliver, Jon L

    2016-06-01

    Lloyd, RS, Cronin, JB, Faigenbaum, AD, Haff, GG, Howard, R, Kraemer, WJ, Micheli, LJ, Myer, GD, and Oliver, JL. National Strength and Conditioning Association position statement on long-term athletic development. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1491-1509, 2016-There has recently been a growing interest in long-term athletic development for youth. Because of their unique physical, psychological, and social differences, children and adolescents should engage in appropriately prescribed exercise programs that promote physical development to prevent injury and enhance fitness behaviors that can be retained later in life. Irrespective of whether a child is involved in organized sport or engages in recreational physical activity, there remains a need to adopt a structured, logical, and evidence-based approach to the long-term development of athleticism. This is of particular importance considering the alarmingly high number of youth who fail to meet global physical activity recommendations and consequently present with negative health profiles. However, appropriate exercise prescription is also crucial for those young athletes who are physically underprepared and at risk of overuse injury because of high volumes of competition and an absence of preparatory conditioning. Whether the child accumulates insufficient or excessive amounts of exercise, or falls somewhere between these opposing ends of the spectrum, it is generally accepted that the young bodies of modern day youth are often ill-prepared to tolerate the rigors of sports or physical activity. All youth should engage in regular physical activity and thus should be viewed as "athletes" and afforded the opportunity to enhance athleticism in an individualized, holistic, and child-centered manner. Because of emerging interest in long-term athletic development, an authorship team was tasked on behalf of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) to critically synthesize existing literature and current

  8. Development and Implementation of a Design Metric for Systems Containing Long-Term Fluid Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.

    2016-01-01

    John Steele, a chemist and technical fellow from United Technologies Corporation, provided a water quality module to assist engineers and scientists with a metric tool to evaluate risks associated with the design of space systems with fluid loops. This design metric is a methodical, quantitative, lessons-learned based means to evaluate the robustness of a long-term fluid loop system design. The tool was developed by a cross-section of engineering disciplines who had decades of experience and problem resolution.

  9. Response to Nadler's Commentary on Arch and Craske's (2011) "Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arch, Joanna J.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Nadler (this issue), in his commentary of our article, "Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes" (Arch & Craske, 2011), argues that we misrepresent the role of panic attacks within learning theory and overlook cognitive treatment targets. He presents several case…

  10. Growth and development after oesophageal atresia surgery: Need for long-term multidisciplinary follow-up.

    PubMed

    IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Gischler, Saskia J; Toussaint, Leontien; Spoel, Marjolein; Zijp, Monique H M van der Cammen-van; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-06-01

    Survival rates in oesophageal atresia patients have reached over 90%. In long-term follow-up studies the focus has shifted from purely surgical or gastrointestinal evaluation to a multidisciplinary approach. We reviewed the literature on the long-term morbidity of these patients and discuss mainly issues of physical growth and neurodevelopment. We conclude that growth problems - both stunting and wasting - are frequently seen, but that sufficient longitudinal data are lacking. Therefore, it is unclear whether catch-up growth into adolescence and adulthood occurs. Data on determinants of growth retardation are also lacking in current literature. Studies on neurodevelopment beyond preschool age are scarce but oesophageal atresia patients seem at risk for academic problems and motor function delay. Many factors contribute to the susceptibility to growth and development problems and we propose a multidisciplinary follow-up schedule into adulthood future care which may help improve quality of life.

  11. Developing a long-term ventilation service in a children's hospice: an illustrative case study.

    PubMed

    Cockett, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    Children who use long-term ventilation at home and their parents find it difficult to access suitable respite services for short breaks. This article describes, through the use of a case study, a project to develop a respite service for such children at a children's hospice in England. The service development was a response to local need, which included a requirement to develop bespoke assessment documentation and processes as well as a comprehensive staff development package. The article follows the journey of one family through the development and use of the new service.

  12. Effects of long-term hypergravity treatment on the development of inflorescence stems of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahara, Ichirou; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Shinohara, Hironori; Kume, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    Hypergravity experiments with plants have been mostly performed using a commercial centrifuge in the dark. In order to see longer-term effect of hypergravity on the development of plant shoots, however, it is necessary to carry out the experiments in the light. In the present study, we have set up a centrifuge equipped with lighting system, which supports long-term plant growth under hypergravity condition, in order to see long-term effects of hypergravity on the development of vascular tissues of inflorescence stems. Arabidopsis plants (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., Col-0), which were grown under 1 G conditions for 20-23 days and having the first visible flower bud, i.e., at Arabidopsis growth stage number 5 (according to Boys et al., 2001), were selected as the plant material. These plants were exposed to hypergravity stimulus at 10 G in a direction from the shoot to root for 10 days in the continuous light. Effects of hypergravity on growth of inflorescence stems, lignin content, and morphometrical parameters of the stem tissues were examined. As a result, the length of the inflorescence stem was decreased. Cross sectional area as well as cell number, and lignin content in the stem were increased under hypergravity. The length of basal internodes of the stem was decreased under hypergravity. In conclusion, the inflorescence stem was suggested to be strengthened through changes in its morphological characteristics as well as lignin deposition under long-term hypergravity conditions.

  13. What do near-term observations tell us about long-term developments in greenhouse gas emissions?

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vuuren, Detlef; Edmonds, James A.; Smith, Steven J.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Karas, Joseph F.; Kainuma, M.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; van Ruijven, Bas; Swart, Robert; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-10-26

    Long-term scenarios developed by integrated assessment models are used in climate research to provide an indication of plausible long-term developments in the global energy system and land-use patterns and the associated emissions. The phenomena that determine these longterm developments (several decades or even centuries) are very different than those that operate on a shorter time-scales (a few years). Nevertheless, in the literature, we still often find direct comparisons between short-term observations and long-term developments that do not take into account the differing dynamics over these time scales. In this letter, we discuss some of differences between the factors that operate on in the short and long term and use long-term historical emissions trends to show that short-term observations are very poor indicators of long-term future emissions developments. Based on this, we conclude that the performance of long-term scenarios should be evaluated against the appropriate, corresponding long-term variables and trends. The research community may facilitate this by developing appropriate data sets and protocols that can be used to test the performance of long-term scenarios and the models that produce them.

  14. Interlaminar shear test method development for long term durability testing of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    The high speed civil transport is a commercial aircraft that is expected to carry 300 passengers at Mach 2.4 over a range of more than 6000 nautical miles. With the existing commercial structural material technology (i.e., aluminum) the performance characteristics of the high speed civil transport would not be realized. Therefore there has been a concerted effort in the development of light weight materials capable of withstanding elevated temperatures for long duration. Thermoplastic composite materials are such candidate materials and the understanding of how these materials perform over the long term under harsh environments is essential to safe and effective design. The matrix dominated properties of thermoplastic composites are most affected by both time and temperature. There is currently an effort to perform short term testing to predict long term behavior of in-plane mechanical properties E22 (transverse modulus of elasticity) and G12 (shear modulus). Out-of-plane properties such as E33, G13, and G23 are inherently more difficult to characterize. This is especially true for the out-of-plane shear modulus G23 and hence there is no existing acceptable standard test method. Since G23 is the most matrix dominated property, it is essential that a test method be developed. A shear test methodology is developed to do just that. The test method, called the double notched specimen, along with the previously developed shear gage was tested at room temperature. Mechanical testing confirmed the attributes of the methodology. A finite element parametric study was conducted for specimen optimization. Moire interferometry, a high sensitivity laser optical method, was used for full-field analysis of the specimen. From this work, material parameters will be determined and thus enable the prediction of long term material behavior of laminates subjected to general loading states.

  15. The long-term climate change task of the Hanford permanent isolation barrier development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program is developing an in-place disposal capability for low-level nuclear waste for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Layered earthen and engineered barriers are being developed that will function in what is currently a semiarid environment (mean annual precipitation and temperature of 16 cm and 11.8{degrees}C, respectively) for at least 1,000 yr by limiting the infiltration of water through the waste. The Long-Term Climate Change Task has specific goals of (1) obtaining defensible probabilistic projections of the long-term climate variability in the Hanford Site region at many different time scales into the future; (2) developing several test-case climate scenarios that bracket the range of potential future climate, including both greenhouse warming and cycling into another ice age; and (3) using the climate scenarios both to test and to model protective barrier performance. Results from the Carp Lake Pollen Coring Project indicate that for the last approximately 100,000 yr the Columbia River Basin`s long-term range of mean annual precipitation ranged from 25%--50% below to 28% above modern levels, while temperature has ranged from 7{degrees}C--10{degrees}C below to 2{degrees}C above modern levels. This long record provides confidence that such a range should bracket potential natural climate change even if the earth cycles back into another Ice Age in the next few millennia.

  16. Space Resources Development: The Link Between Human Exploration and the Long-Term Commercialization of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2000-01-01

    In a letter to the NASA Administrator, Dan Goldin, in January of 1999, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) stated the following . OMB recommends that NASA consider commercialization in a broader context than the more focused efforts to date on space station and space shuttle commercialization. We suggest that NASA examine architectures that take advantage of a potentially robust future commercial infrastructure that could dramatically lower the cost of future human exploration." In response to this letter, the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise launched the BEDS Technology & Commercialization Initiative (HTCI) to link technology and system development for human exploration with the commercial development of space to emphasize the "D" (Development) in BEDS. The development of technologies and capabilities to utilize space resources is the first of six primary focus areas in this program. It is clear that Space Resources Development (SRD) is key for both long-term human exploration of our solar system and to the long-term commercialization of space since: a) it provides the technologies, products, and raw materials to support efficient space transportation and in-space construction and manufacturing, and b) it provides the capabilities and infrastructure to allow outpost growth, self-sufficiency, and commercial space service and utility industry activities.

  17. Mandibular third molar development after mantle radiation in long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Hopkins, K.P.; Thompson, E.I.; Hustu, H.O.

    1987-05-01

    Sequential panoramic radiographs were assessed for mandibular third molar development in 47 long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's disease after treatment with 37 Gy mantle field radiation. To make a comparison, panoramic radiographs of 149 healthy, nonirradiated children were reviewed for the presence of mandibular third molars. In children between the ages of 7 and 12 years, bilateral agenesis of mandibular third molars was more frequent in patients who had been treated with mantle radiation than in nonirradiated patients. Unilateral agenesis, crown hypoplasia, and root growth impairment of mandibular third molars were also found. Similar, apparent, radiation-induced developmental anomalies were noted in maxillary third molars of the irradiated patients.

  18. Experiences of Followers in the Development of the Leader-Follower Relationship in Long-Term Health Care: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucia, David

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive phenomenological study explored the perceptions and experiences of followers in the development of the leader-follower relationship, within a long-term health care environment. This study is also framed within the disciplinary context of human resource development (HRD). This study addressed the research question, "During your…

  19. Making memories: the development of long-term visual knowledge in children with visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Metitieri, Tiziana; Barba, Carmen; Pellacani, Simona; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports about the effects of perinatal acquired brain lesions on the development of visual perception. These studies demonstrate nonseverely impaired visual-spatial abilities and preserved visual memory. Longitudinal data analyzing the effects of compromised perceptions on long-term visual knowledge in agnosics are limited to lesions having occurred in adulthood. The study of children with focal lesions of the visual pathways provides a unique opportunity to assess the development of visual memory when perceptual input is degraded. We assessed visual recognition and visual memory in three children with lesions to the visual cortex having occurred in early infancy. We then explored the time course of visual memory impairment in two of them at 2  years and 3.7  years from the initial assessment. All children exhibited apperceptive visual agnosia and visual memory impairment. We observed a longitudinal improvement of visual memory modulated by the structural properties of objects. Our findings indicate that processing of degraded perceptions from birth results in impoverished memories. The dynamic interaction between perception and memory during development might modulate the long-term construction of visual representations, resulting in less severe impairment.

  20. Near term and long term materials issues and development needs for plasma interactive components

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma interactive components (PICs), including the first wall, limiter blades, divertor collector plates, halo scrapers, and RF launchers, are exposed to high particle fluxes that can result in high sputtering erosion rates and high heat fluxes. In addition, the materials in reactors are exposed to high neutron fluxes which will degrade the bulk properties. This severe environment will limit the materials and designs which can be used in fusion devices. In order to provide a reasonable degree of confidence that plasma interactive components will operate successfully, a comprehensive development program is needed. Materials research and development plays a key role in the successful development of PICs. The range of operating conditions along with a summary of the major issues for materials development is described. The areas covered include plasma/materials interactions, erosion/redeposition, baseline materials properties, fabrication, and irradiation damage effects. Candidate materials and materials development needs in the near term and long term are identified.

  1. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  2. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  3. Addressing ethical issues in geriatrics and long-term care: ethics education at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M; Turner, L; Bourret, E

    2000-01-01

    An innovative program in ethics education exists at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. This program can serve as a helpful model for long-term care and geriatric care facilities seeking to implement formal training programs in bioethics. Various aspects of the ethics education program are examined. In addition to describing the role of the ethics committee and research ethics board, consideration is given to case consultations, ethics rounds, the training of junior physicians and medical students, grand rounds and the planning of conferences and guest lectures. With regard to educational content in bioethics, health law, professional guidelines and the principlist approach of Beauchamp and Childress are used to explore the ethical dimensions of particular cases. Given the clinical context of the educational initiatives, the pedagogical approach is predominately case-based. While the bioethics literature emphasizes the patient-physician relationship, ethics education at Baycrest recognizes the importance of multiple professions. Physicians, nurses, social workers, speech pathologists, nutritionists and other health care providers are involved in ethical deliberation and education. PMID:11143884

  4. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time.

  5. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time. PMID:27406170

  6. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time. PMID:27406170

  7. Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: findings from focus group discussions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors. PMID:24606911

  8. Development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Theanh; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Thambiratnam, David P.; King, Les

    2015-12-01

    In the structural health monitoring (SHM) field, long-term continuous vibration-based monitoring is becoming increasingly popular as this could keep track of the health status of structures during their service lives. However, implementing such a system is not always feasible due to on-going conflicts between budget constraints and the need of sophisticated systems to monitor real-world structures under their demanding in-service conditions. To address this problem, this paper presents a comprehensive development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous SHM of a newly constructed institutional complex with a special focus on the main building. First, selections of sensor type and sensor positions are scrutinized to overcome adversities such as low-frequency and low-level vibration measurements. In order to economically tackle the sparse measurement problem, a cost-optimized Ethernet-based peripheral DAQ model is first adopted to form the system skeleton. A combination of a high-resolution timing coordination method based on the TCP/IP command communication medium and a periodic system resynchronization strategy is then proposed to synchronize data from multiple distributed DAQ units. The results of both experimental evaluations and experimental-numerical verifications show that the proposed DAQ system in general and the data synchronization solution in particular work well and they can provide a promising cost-effective and flexible alternative for use in real-world SHM projects. Finally, the paper demonstrates simple but effective ways to make use of the developed monitoring system for long-term continuous structural health evaluation as well as to use the instrumented building herein as a multi-purpose benchmark structure for studying not only practical SHM problems but also synchronization related issues.

  9. Zeitgeists and development trends in long-term care facility design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Nai-Wen

    2006-06-01

    Through literature analysis, in-depth interviews, and the application of the Delphi survey, this study explored long-term care resident priorities with regard to long-term care facility design in terms of both physical and psychological needs. This study further clarified changing trends in long-term care concepts; illustrated the impact that such changes are having on long-term care facility design; and summarized zeitgeists related to the architectural design of long-term care facilities. Results of our Delphi survey indicated the following top five priorities in long-term care facility design: (1) creating a home-like feeling; (2) adhering to Universal Design concepts; (3) providing well-defined private sleeping areas; (4) providing adequate social space; and (5) decentralizing residents' rooms into clusters. The three major zeitgeists related to long-term care facility design include: (1) modern long-term care facilities should abandon their traditional "hospital" image and gradually reposition facilities into homelike settings; (2) institution-based care for the elderly should be de-institutionalized under the concept of aging-in-place; and (3) living clusters, rather than traditional hospital-like wards, should be designed into long-term care facilities.

  10. Development of the Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) Network: Current Status and Future Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbridge, M. R.; Bestelmeyer, B.; Derner, J. D.; Harmel, D.; Heilman, P.; Huggins, D. R.; Kleinman, P. J. A.; Moorman, T.; Mccarty, G.; Pierson, F. B.; Rigby, J.; Robertson, G. P.; Sadler, J.; Sanderson, M.; Steiner, J. L.; Strickland, T.; Wienhold, B.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term research conducted at multiple scales is critical to assessing the effects of key long term drivers (e.g., global population growth; land-use change; increased competition for natural resources; climate variability and change) on our ability to sustain or enhance agricultural production to meet future global demand for agricultural products (e.g., food; feed; fiber; fuel). To address this need, the US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS), in collaboration with a broad group of partners, identified and reorganized existing long-term research infrastructure (i.e., benchmark watersheds; experimental ranges; research farms) into a Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) network, the only long-term research network focused specifically on US agro-ecosystems. In 2014, the initial network of 10 sites was expanded to 18 sites, including 3 sites led wholly or in part by non-USDA entities. Later this year, the LTAR network will make the first near real-time data sets from all 18 sites available on the web. This talk will focus briefly on LTAR establishment history, but primarily on LTAR's current status and next steps, including plans for a final network expansion to complete coverage of key farm resource regions in the continental US. In the broader context of this symposium, this talk will set the stage for discussions of complementary long-term research networks (e.g., LTER; NEON) and potential future collaborations to address questions of mutual interest.

  11. Development of resistance to chemical disinfection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchin, George L.

    1999-01-01

    Two long-term experiments have been conducted aboard the Mir Space Station to evaluate the development of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chemical disinfection by polyiodide quaternary ammonium strong base resin disinfectants. The first preliminary experiment was launched aboard STS 79 and a second more extensive experiment aboard STS 86. During both experiments, after two months in a microgravity environment, aqueous suspensions of P. aeruginosa contained viable bacteria after having the iodinated resin added to them. In the second experiment identical ground based controls did not exhibit a similar phenomenon. Also in the second experiment, individual colonies from the surviving bacteria were evaluated for resistance to aqueous iodine disinfection. Compared to individual colonies from the original inoculum no resistance was observed. The data are consistent with slow development of a resistant biofilm in the bacterial suspensions flown aboard the Mir Space Station.

  12. Exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial of shared care development for long-term mental illness.

    PubMed Central

    Byng, Richard; Jones, Roger; Leese, Morven; Hamilton, Blake; McCrone, Paul; Craig, Tom

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care clinicians have a considerable amount of contact with patients suffering from long-term mental illness. The United Kingdom's National Health Service now requires general practices to contribute more systematically to care for this group of patients. AIMS: To determine the effects of Mental Health Link, a facilitation-based quality improvement programme designed to improve communication between the teams and systems of care within general practice. Design of study: Exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-three urban general practices and associated community mental health teams. METHOD: Practices were randomised to service development as usual or to the Mental Health Link programme. Questionnaires and an audit of notes assessed 335 patients' satisfaction, unmet need, mental health status, processes of mental and physical care, and general practitioners' satisfaction with services and beliefs about service development. Service use and intervention costs were also measured. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in patients' perception of their unmet need, satisfaction or general health. Intervention patients had fewer psychiatric relapses than control patients (mean = 0.39 versus 0.71, respectively, P = 0.02) but there were no differences in documented processes of care. Intervention practitioners were more satisfied and services improved significantly for intervention practices. There was an additional mean direct cost of pound 63 per patient with long-term mental illness for the intervention compared with the control. CONCLUSION: Significant differences were seen in relapse rates and practitioner satisfaction. Improvements in service development did not translate into documented improvements in care. This could be explained by the intervention working via the improvements in informal shared care developed through better link working. This type of facilitated intervention tailored to context has the potential

  13. Geochemical constraints on sustainable development: Can an advanced global economy achieve long-term stability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, William F.

    2008-04-01

    The eighty-one stable chemical elements are examined individually with respect to (i) recent annual demand and (ii) worst case long-term availability in a distant future in which they must be extracted from the background sources of air, seawater, and ordinary rock. It is shown that, if a conventional use scenario is envisioned, the supplies of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, tellurium, rhenium, osmium, iridium, platinum, gold, and especially phosphorus will be questionable while the supplies of copper, zinc, molybdenum, silver, cadmium, tin, antimony, tungsten, mercury, lead, and bismuth will be inadequate. It is therefore concluded that, in the long run, only the promotion of massive recycling and substitution technologies will suffice to maintain the global industrial society now developing.

  14. Development of regenerated fiber Bragg grating sensors with long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Celikin, Mert; Barba, David; Bastola, Binod; Ruediger, Andreas; Rosei, Federico

    2016-09-19

    The effect of annealing cycle on regeneration efficiency was investigated through isothermal treatments between 700 and 1000°C. We determined an inverse relationship between the recovery rate of the peak reflectivity and temperature. A regeneration efficiency of 85.2% and long-term stability at 1000°C for 500 hours were achieved via a slow regeneration process. Thermal sensors developed by isothermal regeneration were determined to be reliable up to 1000°C (±2 °C). Experimental findings suggest the involvement of both diffusion related phenomena and stress variation through densification of the fiber core in type-I FBG during the thermal regeneration process. PMID:27661925

  15. Malnutrition as an enteric infectious disease with long-term effects on child development.

    PubMed

    Guerrant, Richard L; Oriá, Reinaldo B; Moore, Sean R; Oriá, Mônica O B; Lima, Aldo A M

    2008-09-01

    Malnutrition is a major contributor to mortality and is increasingly recognized as a cause of potentially lifelong functional disability. Yet, a rate-limiting step in achieving normal nutrition may be impaired absorptive function due to multiple repeated enteric infections. This is especially problematic in children whose diets are marginal. In malnourished individuals, the infections are even more devastating. This review documents the evidence that intestinal infections lead to malnutrition and that malnutrition worsens intestinal infections. The clinical data presented here derive largely from long-term cohort studies that are supported by controlled animal studies. Also reviewed are the mechanisms by which enteric infections lead to undernutrition and by which malnutrition worsens enteric infections, with implications for potential novel interventions. Further intervention studies are needed to document the relevance of these mechanisms and, most importantly, to interrupt the vicious diarrhea-malnutrition cycle so children may develop their full potential.

  16. Long-term follow-up of a dental faculty development program.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Maureen; Motwaly, Suzanne; Kamens, Tracy Ellen

    2013-06-01

    Many, if not most, dental faculty members have not received formal training to be educators. However, the importance of faculty development programs in improving teaching skills, fostering career development, and reinforcing relationships with colleagues and mentors has increasingly been acknowledged. In 2005, the Excellence in Clinical Teaching Program at New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD) was created to enhance the clinical teaching skills of NYUCD faculty members. As of spring 2009, fifty-nine faculty members had participated in eight separate cohorts. The program consists of five formal group sessions supplemented by readings, reflection papers, and a final project. This study examined the short- and long-term effectiveness of the program. Participants were asked to complete a short pre-program survey to self-assess their teaching abilities and, at the last session, a satisfaction survey. In fall 2011, forty-eight faculty members who completed the program from spring 2005 to fall 2009 and were actively teaching at least one session a week at NYUCD were asked to complete a follow-up survey asking about the long-term value of the program and their academic career progression since program completion. Thirty-three faculty members responded for a response rate of 69 percent. Ninety-seven percent of the respondents indicated they would recommend the program to their colleagues, 94 percent said program participation led to a greater likelihood of conferring with peers about teaching issues,79 percent had increased their teaching responsibilities, and 62 percent said that presenting the final project improved their presentation skills. In addition, the retention rate of those still teaching at the school (81 percent) exceeds national retention rate averages for dental faculty. This follow-up study suggests that participation in the Excellence in Clinical Teaching Program is associated with meaningful professional growth.

  17. Fertility treatment: long-term growth and mental development of the children.

    PubMed

    Bay, Bjørn

    2014-10-01

    Fertility treatment has been associated with obstetrical and perinatal complications. It is, however, uncertain whether fertility treatment or parental subfertility is associated with long-term development of the children. We aimed to assess the growth and mental health of children and adolescents conceived after fertility treatment compared to spontaneously conceived controls. First, we evaluated all previous studies comparing neurodevelopmental outcomes between children conceived after fertility treatment and spontaneous conceived controls. The systematic review clarified methodological limitations in the existing literature on the long-term development of children conceived after medical assisted reproduction. Although several studies had been published, large, well-controlled studies with long-term follow-up and thorough statistical adjustments were still few. Second, we evaluated the children's mental health by assessing the risk of mental disorders. We studied a population of 555,828 children conceived after spontaneous conception and 33,139 children conceived after fertility treatment with follow-up in 2012 when the children were 8-17 years old. The absolute risk and hazard ratio of overall and specific mental disorders were estimated while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Further, we estimated the association between subtypes of procedures, hormonal treatment, gamete types and cause of infertility on the one hand and the risk of mental disorders on the other. Children conceived after ovulation induction had a low, but significantly increased risks of autism spectrum disorders, hyperkinetic disorders, conduct, emotional, or social disorders, and tic disorders. Children conceived after IVF or ICSI showed no increased risk, except for a small risk of tic disorders. There was no risk systematically related to any specific type of hormone drug treatment. Thus, the increased risks may rely on residual confounding such as unknown parental factors

  18. The Platte River - High Plains Aquifer (PR-HPA) Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network - Data and Technological Resources to Address Current and Emerging Issues in Agroecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okalebo, J. A.; Wienhold, B.; Suyker, A.; Erickson, G.; Hayes, M. J.; Awada, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Platte River - High Plains Aquifer (PR-HPA) is one of 18 established Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) networks across the US. PR-HPA is a partnership between the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), the USDA-ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit (AMRU) in Lincoln, and the USDA-ARS Environmental Management Research Unit (EMRU) in Clay Center, NE. The PR-HPA network encompasses 27,750 ha of research sites with data going back to the early 1900s. A partial list of on-going research projects include those encompassing long-term manuring and continuous corn (Est. 1912), dryland tillage plots (Est. 1970), soil nutrients and tillage (Est. 1983), biofuel feedstock studies (Est. 2001), and carbon sequestration study (Est. 2000). Affiliated partners include the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) that develops measures to improve preparedness and adaptation to climate variability and drought; the High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) that coordinates data acquisition from over 170 automated weather stations and around 50 automated soil moisture network across NE and beyond; the AMERIFLUX and NEBFLUX networks that coordinate the water vapor and carbon dioxide flux measurements across NE with emphasis on rainfed and irrigated crop lands; the ARS Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network (GRACEnet) and the Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP) project; and the Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies (CALMIT) that assists with the use of geospatial technologies for agriculture and natural resource applications. Current emphases are on addressing present-day and emerging issues related to profitability and sustainability of agroecosystems. The poster will highlight some of the ongoing and planned efforts in research pertaining to climate variability and change, water sustainability, and ecological and agronomic challenges associated

  19. Effects of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy on long-term physical and cognitive parameters of child development.

    PubMed

    Lassen, K; Oei, T P

    1998-01-01

    The negative impact of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy on the growth and development of the foetus has been well documented. However, the long-term effects of the subsequent cognitive and physical development of the child are less clearly understood. This article presents a critical review of the literature on this topic. The review shows that the effects of prenatal exposure to smoking on children's physical development are mediated by a dose-response relationship. Although the observed effects are long term, they are small and may have no major functional importance. The evidence on the long-term consequences of intellectual function is still unclear. One reason is that very few studies have looked at the long-term consequences of maternal smoking on both physical and cognitive development. More effort is needed to investigate this important issue.

  20. Expansion of Biology Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) During a Long-Term Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenszajn, Ronit; Yarden, Anat

    2014-02-01

    Experienced teachers possess a unique teaching knowledge comprised of an inter-related set of knowledge and beliefs that gives direction and justification to a teacher's actions. This study examined the expansion of two components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of three in-service teachers in the course of a professional development program aimed at designing new teaching and learning materials suggested by the teachers themselves. The research presents an enlargement of previous PCK representations by focusing on a detailed representation of two main PCK domains: teaching and learning, including ten PCK components that emerged in the course of data analysis. This representation enabled revealing the unique PCK held by each teacher and to characterize the expansion of the two components of the participating teachers' PCK during the long-term professional development program. Retention of major parts of the expanded PCK a year after termination of the program implies that designing and implementing new teaching and learning materials based on the teachers' experiences, needs, and knowledge in a workshop format accompanied by biology and science education courses might provide a powerful means for PCK expansion. We recommend that designers of professional development programs be aware of the unique PCK held by each teacher in order to promote meaningful professional development of each teacher. Moreover, the PCK representations that were identified in the course of this study enabled clarifying the "orientation toward teaching science" category of PCK which appears to be unclear in current literature.

  1. Long-term in vivo study of vertebrate embryonic development using noninvasive harmonics optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsieh, C.-S.; Chu, S.-W.; Lin, Cheng-Yung; Ko, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.-C.; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Hu, C.-H.; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-03-01

    Harmonics optical microscopy (HOM) provides a truly "noninvasive" tool for in vivo and long-term study of vertebrate embryonic development. Based on the nonlinear natures, it provides sub-micrometer 3D spatial resolution and high 3D optical-sectioning power (~1μm axial resolution) without using invasive and toxic fluorophores. Since only virtual-level-transition is involved, HOM is known to leave no energy deposition and no photodamages. Combined with second harmonic generation, which is sensitive to specific structure such as nerve and muscle fibers, HOM can be used to do functional studies of early developmental dynamics of many vertebrate physiological systems. Recently, zebrafish has become a standard model for many biological and medical studies of vertebrates, due to the similarity between embryonic development of zebrafish and human being. Zebrafish embryos now have been used to study many vertebrate physiological systems. We have demonstrated an in vivo HOM study of developmental dynamics of several embryonic physiological systems in live zebrafish embryos, with focuses on the developments of brains, eyes, ears, and hearts. Based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser, which provides the deepest penetration (~1.5mm) and least photodamage in the zebrafish embryo, complete developing processes of different physiological systems within a period of time longer than 20 hours can be non-invasively observed inside the same embryo.

  2. Long-term electromagnetic exposure of developing neuronal networks: A flexible experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Oster, Stefan; Daus, Andreas W; Erbes, Christian; Goldhammer, Michael; Bochtler, Ulrich; Thielemann, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are considered one of the most promising targets of research to assess potential electromagnetic field induced effects on neuronal functionality. A few exposure studies revealed there is currently no evidence of any adverse health effects caused by weak electromagnetic fields. Nevertheless, some published results are inconsistent. Particularly, doubts have been raised regarding possible athermal biological effects in the young brain during neuronal development. Therefore, we developed and characterized a flexible experimental setup based on a transverse electromagnetic waveguide, allowing controlled, reproducible exposure of developing neuronal networks in vitro. Measurement of S-parameters confirmed very good performance of the Stripline in the band of 800-1000 MHz. Simulations suggested a flexible positioning of cell culture dishes throughout a large exposure area, as specific absorption rate values were quite independent of their position (361.7 ± 11.4 mW/kg) at 1 W, 900 MHz. During exposure, thermal drift inside cellular medium did not exceed 0.1 K. Embryonic rat cortical neurons were cultivated on microelectrode array chips to non-invasively assess electrophysiological properties of electrogenic networks. Measurements were taken for several weeks, which attest to the experimental setup being a reliable system for long-term studies on developing neuronal tissue.

  3. Development of a Curriculum for Long-Term Care Nurses to Improve Recognition of Depression in Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Christine L.; Molinari, Victor; Bond, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Hyer, Kathryn; Malphurs, Julie

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the severe consequences of depression in long-term care residents with dementia. Most health care providers are unprepared to recognize and to manage the complexity of depression in dementia. Targeted educational initiatives in nursing homes are needed to address this growing problem. This paper describes the…

  4. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  5. Long-term time-lapse microscopy of C. elegans post-embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Nicola; Kienle, Simone; Filina, Olga; van Zon, Jeroen Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    We present a microscopy technique that enables long-term time-lapse microscopy at single-cell resolution in moving and feeding Caenorhabditis elegans larvae. Time-lapse microscopy of C. elegans post-embryonic development is challenging, as larvae are highly motile. Moreover, immobilization generally leads to rapid developmental arrest. Instead, we confine larval movement to microchambers that contain bacteria as food, and use fast image acquisition and image analysis to follow the dynamics of cells inside individual larvae, as they move within each microchamber. This allows us to perform fluorescence microscopy of 10-20 animals in parallel with 20 min time resolution. We demonstrate the power of our approach by analysing the dynamics of cell division, cell migration and gene expression over the full ∼48 h of development from larva to adult. Our approach now makes it possible to study the behaviour of individual cells inside the body of a feeding and growing animal. PMID:27558523

  6. Strategic Program Planning Lessons Learned In Developing The Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, B.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Matthern, G.E.

    2003-04-24

    Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning method used by companies to identify and plan the development of technologies necessary for new products. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management has used this same method to refine requirements and identify knowledge and tools needed for completion of defined missions. This paper describes the process of applying roadmapping to clarify mission requirements and identify enhancing technologies for the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of polluted sites after site cleanup has been completed. The nature of some contamination problems is such that full cleanup is not achievable with current technologies and some residual hazards remain. LTS maintains engineered contaminant barriers and land use restriction controls, and monitors residual contaminants until they no longer pose a risk to the public or the environment. Roadmapping was used to clarify the breadth of the LTS mission, to identify capability enhancements needed to improve mission effectiveness and efficiency, and to chart out the research and development efforts to provide those enhancements. This paper is a case study of the application of roadmapping for program planning and technical risk management. Differences between the planned and actual application of the roadmapping process are presented along with lessons learned. Both the process used and lessons learned should be of interest for anyone contemplating a similar technology based planning effort.

  7. Development of a periodic health examination form for the frail elderly in long-term care

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Henry Yu-Hin; White, Joy; Sergeant, Myles; Moore, Ainsley Elizabeth; Patterson, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To create an evidence-based periodic health examination (PHE) form geared to long-term care (LTC) residents. Design Two-phase study: literature review to develop a quantitative, cross-sectional, self-administered survey, and administration of the survey followed by a focus group. A PHE form for LTC residents was developed based on participants’ recommendations. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants A total of 106 health care professionals completed the survey; 10 LTC physicians participated in the focus group. Main outcome measures The items deemed most important and most likely to be performed during a PHE; themes from focus group discussions. Results Respondents’ top 4 most important PHE items were also the top 4 items they thought were most likely to be performed during a PHE in LTC: reviewing active health status, reviewing pain control, reviewing medications, and screening for falls. Thematic analysis from the focus group discussion generated 3 main themes: current physician perspectives on the existing annual health examination in LTC, conceptual ideas for the new PHE form, and physician perspectives on the optimization of care in LTC settings. The findings from the survey, along with the themes from the focus group, were incorporated to create a PHE form for LTC residents. Conclusion The proposed PHE form emphasizes tracking a patient’s functional course over time and combines evidence-based preventive health interventions and health assessments with what is clinically important for LTC. PMID:27331227

  8. The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

  9. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Bieber, John W.; Clem, John M.; Duldig, Marc L.; Evenson, Paul; Humble, John E.; Pyle, Roger

    2005-10-01

    Solar modulation affects the secondary cosmic rays responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production the most at the high geomagnetic latitudes to which CN production rates are traditionally referenced. While this has long been recognized (e.g., D. Lal, B. Peters, Cosmic ray produced radioactivity on the Earth, in: K. Sitte (Ed.), Handbuch Der Physik XLVI/2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, pp. 551-612 and D. Lal, Theoretically expected variations in the terrestrial cosmic ray production rates of isotopes, in: G.C. Castagnoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics 95, Italian Physical Society, Varenna 1988, pp. 216-233), these variations can lead to potentially significant scaling model uncertainties that have not been addressed in detail. These uncertainties include the long-term (millennial-scale) average solar modulation level to which secondary cosmic rays should be referenced, and short-term fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity measurements used to derive published secondary cosmic ray scaling models. We have developed new scaling models for spallogenic nucleons, slow-muon capture and fast-muon interactions that specifically address these uncertainties. Our spallogenic nucleon scaling model, which includes data from portions of 5 solar cycles, explicitly incorporates a measure of solar modulation ( S), and our fast- and slow-muon scaling models (based on more limited data) account for solar modulation effects through increased uncertainties. These models improve on previously published models by better sampling the observed variability in measured cosmic ray intensities as a function of geomagnetic latitude, altitude, and solar activity. Furthermore, placing the spallogenic nucleon data in a consistent time-space framework allows for a more realistic assessment of uncertainties in our model than in earlier ones. We demonstrate here that our models reasonably account for the effects of solar modulation on measured

  10. OBS development for long term observation in the Marmara Sea, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Narumi; Shimizu, Satoshi; Maekawa, Takuya; Kalafat, Dogan; Pinar, Ali; Citak, Seckin; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    We have carried out a collaboration study between Japan and Turkey since 2013, which is one of SATREPS projects, "Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey". The main objective of this project is to reduce risk brought by earthquakes and tsunamis. In particular, the North Anatolian Fault system runs through the Marmara sea and it is expected that the seismic gap exists there according to past seismic studies. The details of seismicity distribution in the Marmara Sea is, however, still insufficient to construct fault model along the active faults. Therefore, we prepare ten ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to realize long term observation. We aim to identify size and depth of seismogenic zones using micro seismicity. In addition, we need to cover relative broad area from off-shore Istanbul city to the western end of the Marmara Sea. To clear these conditions, OBS specifications we need are high dynamic range and low instrument noise to observe micro seismicity, low electrical consumption to realize long term observation of over one year, high cost performance to cover the broad area for OBS installation, low cost implementation, and good operability to treat by relatively small number of persons. All items, which are three components velocity sensor, batteries, a recorder, a GPS receiver, a transponder and its transducer to control OBS retrieval, a flasher and a beacon, are installed in the 17 inches glass sphere. The natural frequency of the velocity sensor is 4.5 Hz and the frequency range of our OBS is from 4.5 Hz to 250 Hz. Data sampling is selectable among 100 Hz, 250 Hz and 500 Hz. Because our OBS is deployed by free fall, accuracy of the OBS clock is essentially one of important factors, and it is less than 0.1 ppm. And the resolution of A/D conversion performed on the recorder is 24 bit and we keep the dynamic range of over 135 dB. These data is stored on a semiconductor memory and the capacity is over

  11. Long-Term Implications of Welfare Reform for the Development of Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Cherlin, Andrew J.; Guttmannova, Katarina; Fomby, Paula; Ribar, David C.; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2011-01-01

    We draw upon the 3-wave longitudinal dataset called Welfare Children and Families: A Three-City Study to examine the long-term implications for adolescents and young adults (N=783) of mothers’ welfare receipt and labor force participation from 1999 to 2005. In general, changes in mothers’ work and welfare patterns were not associated with deterioration or improvement in youth development (ages 16 to 20 years at wave 3). The few significant associations suggested that youth whose mothers increased employment (net of welfare participation) were more likely to show declines in serious behavior problems and delinquency compared to youth whose mothers were unemployed or employed part-time during the study period. Welfare roll exits (controlling for employment experiences) were unrelated to adolescent and young adult outcomes. Mothers’ employment transitions were linked to improvements in household income and mothers’ self esteem in addition to reductions in financial strain and their own illegal activities. However, these associations did not explain the relation between maternal employment and youths’ improved behavior. These results do not support the predictions of either the supporters or the opponents of welfare reform, an outcome we discuss. PMID:21966077

  12. Long Term Time Series of Remote Sensing Observations for Development of Regulatory Water Quality Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Spiering, Bruce A.; Holekamp, Kara L.

    2010-01-01

    Water quality standards in the U.S. consist of: designated uses (the services that a water body provides; e.g., drinking water, aquatic life, harvestable species, recreation) . criteria that define the environmental conditions that must be maintained to support the uses For estuaries and coastal waters in the Gulf of Mexico, there are no numeric (quantitative) criteria to protect designated uses from effects of nutrients. This is largely due to the absence of adequate data that would quantitatively link biological conditions to nutrient concentrations. The Gulf of Mexico Alliance, an organization fostering collaboration between the Gulf States and U.S. Federal agencies, has identified the development of the numeric nutrient criteria as a major step leading to reduction in MODIS Products Figure 6. Map of the Mobile Bay with a yellow patch indicating the Bon Secour Bay area selected in this study for averaging water clarity parameters retrieved from MODIS datasets. nutrient inputs to coastal ecosystems. Nutrient enrichment in estuaries and coastal waters can be quantified based on response variables that measure phytoplankton biomass and water clarity. Long-term, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of chlorophyll a concentration, total concentration of suspended solids, and water clarity are needed to establish reference conditions and to quantify stressor-response relationships.

  13. WWTP dynamic disturbance modelling--an essential module for long-term benchmarking development.

    PubMed

    Gernaey, K V; Rosen, C; Jeppsson, U

    2006-01-01

    Intensive use of the benchmark simulation model No. 1 (BSM1), a protocol for objective comparison of the effectiveness of control strategies in biological nitrogen removal activated sludge plants, has also revealed a number of limitations. Preliminary definitions of the long-term benchmark simulation model No. 1 (BSM1_LT) and the benchmark simulation model No. 2 (BSM2) have been made to extend BSM1 for evaluation of process monitoring methods and plant-wide control strategies, respectively. Influent-related disturbances for BSM1_LT/BSM2 are to be generated with a model, and this paper provides a general overview of the modelling methods used. Typical influent dynamic phenomena generated with the BSM1_LT/BSM2 influent disturbance model, including diurnal, weekend, seasonal and holiday effects, as well as rainfall, are illustrated with simulation results. As a result of the work described in this paper, a proposed influent model/file has been released to the benchmark developers for evaluation purposes. Pending this evaluation, a final BSM1_LT/BSM2 influent disturbance model definition is foreseen. Preliminary simulations with dynamic influent data generated by the influent disturbance model indicate that default BSM1 activated sludge plant control strategies will need extensions for BSM1_LT/BSM2 to efficiently handle 1 year of influent dynamics.

  14. Development of an integrated method for long-term water quality prediction using seasonal climate forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaepil; Shin, Chang-Min; Choi, Hwan-Kyu; Kim, Kyong-Hyeon; Choi, Ji-Yong

    2016-10-01

    The APEC Climate Center (APCC) produces climate prediction information utilizing a multi-climate model ensemble (MME) technique. In this study, four different downscaling methods, in accordance with the degree of utilizing the seasonal climate prediction information, were developed in order to improve predictability and to refine the spatial scale. These methods include: (1) the Simple Bias Correction (SBC) method, which directly uses APCC's dynamic prediction data with a 3 to 6 month lead time; (2) the Moving Window Regression (MWR) method, which indirectly utilizes dynamic prediction data; (3) the Climate Index Regression (CIR) method, which predominantly uses observation-based climate indices; and (4) the Integrated Time Regression (ITR) method, which uses predictors selected from both CIR and MWR. Then, a sampling-based temporal downscaling was conducted using the Mahalanobis distance method in order to create daily weather inputs to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Long-term predictability of water quality within the Wecheon watershed of the Nakdong River Basin was evaluated. According to the Korean Ministry of Environment's Provisions of Water Quality Prediction and Response Measures, modeling-based predictability was evaluated by using 3-month lead prediction data issued in February, May, August, and November as model input of SWAT. Finally, an integrated approach, which takes into account various climate information and downscaling methods for water quality prediction, was presented. This integrated approach can be used to prevent potential problems caused by extreme climate in advance.

  15. Handling intensity and the short- and long-term survival of elephant seals: addressing and quantifying research effects on wild animals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Clive; van den Hoff, John; Burton, Harry

    2005-08-01

    This study addresses the consequences of repeated human handling on the survival of an endangered phocid, the southern elephant seal and the implications for wildlife research. Southern elephant seal pups were repeatedly handled during the first six weeks of their lives. The possibility that such anthropogenic research may have altered the very parameters that were being investigated is a topical and relevant study area that we address here. Our results show that there were no measurable effects on pups that were repeatedly handled and subjected to invasive research methods with respect to survivorship in the short term (the 24-day nursing period) nor in the long term (the first year of life and beyond) and hence fitness one year after handling. In support of this conclusion we were unable to detect any significant differences in the survival rates of the most intensively handled seals and the least intensively handled seals.

  16. Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-22

    The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

  17. Development and long-term in vivo evaluation of a biodegradable urethane-doped polyester elastomer.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jagannath; Tran, Richard T; Shen, Jinhui; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2011-12-12

    We have recently reported upon the development of crosslinked urethane-doped polyester (CUPE) network elastomers, which was motivated by the desire to overcome the drawbacks presented by crosslinked network polyesters and biodegradable polyurethanes for soft tissue engineering applications. Although the effect of the isocyanate content and post-polymerization conditions on the material structure-property relationship was examined in detail, the ability of the diol component to modulate the material properties was only studied briefly. Herein, we present a detailed report on the development of CUPE polymers synthesized using diols 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 methylene units in length in order to investigate what role the diol component plays on the resulting material's physical properties, and assess their long-term biological performance in vivo. An increase in the diol length was shown to affect the physical properties of the CUPE polymers primarily through lowered polymeric crosslinking densities and elevated material hydrophobicity. The use of longer chain diols resulted in CUPE polymers with increased molecular weights resulting in higher tensile strength and elasticity, while also increasing the material hydrophobicity to lower bulk swelling and prolong the polymer degradation rates. Although the number of methylene units largely affected the physical properties of CUPE, the choice of diol did not affect the overall polymer cell/tissue-compatibility both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we have established the diol component as an important parameter in controlling the structure-property relationship of the polymer in addition to diisocyanate concentration and post-polymerization conditions. Expanding the family of CUPE polymers increases the choices of biodegradable elastomers for tissue engineering applications.

  18. Curcumin protects the developing lung against long-term hyperoxic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, R.; Villarreal, P.; Husain, S.; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, T.; Tou, E.; Torday, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent, modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ signaling, a key molecule in the etiology of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We have previously shown curcumin's acute protection against neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury. However, its longer-term protection against BPD is not known. Hypothesizing that concurrent treatment with curcumin protects the developing lung against hyperoxia-induced lung injury long-term, we determined if curcumin protects against hyperoxic neonatal rat lung injury for the first 5 days of life, as determined at postnatal day (PND) 21. One-day-old rat pups were exposed to either 21 or 95% O2 for 5 days with or without curcumin treatment (5 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally one time daily, following which the pups grew up to PND21 in room air. At PND21 lung development was determined, including gross and cellular structural and functional effects, and molecular mediators of inflammatory injury. To gain mechanistic insights, embryonic day 19 fetal rat lung fibroblasts were examined for markers of apoptosis and MAP kinase activation following in vitro exposure to hyperoxia for 24 h in the presence or absence of curcumin (5 μM). Curcumin effectively blocked hyperoxia-induced lung injury based on systematic analysis of markers for lung injury (apoptosis, Bcl-2/Bax, collagen III, fibronectin, vimentin, calponin, and elastin-related genes) and lung morphology (radial alveolar count and alveolar septal thickness). Mechanistically, curcumin prevented the hyperoxia-induced increases in cleaved caspase-3 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Molecular effects of curcumin, both structural and cytoprotective, suggest that its actions against hyperoxia-induced lung injury are mediated via Erk1/2 activation and that it is a potential intervention against BPD. PMID:23812632

  19. Development and long-term in vivo evaluation of a biodegradable urethane-doped polyester elastomer

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jagannath; Tran, Richard T.; Shen, Jinhui; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    We have recently reported upon the development of crosslinked urethane-doped polyester (CUPE) network elastomers, which was motivated by the desire to overcome the drawbacks presented by crosslinked network polyesters and biodegradable polyurethanes for soft tissue engineering applications. Although the effect of the isocyanate content and post-polymerization conditions on the material structure-property relationship was examined in detail, the ability of the diol component to modulate the material properties was only studied briefly. Herein, we present a detailed report on the development of CUPE polymers synthesized using diols 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 methylene units in length in order to investigate what role the diol component plays on the resulting material’s physical properties, and assess their long-term biological performance in vivo. An increase in the diol length was shown to affect the physical properties of the CUPE polymers primarily through lowered polymeric crosslinking densities and elevated material hydrophobicity. The use of longer chain diols resulted in CUPE polymers with increased molecular weights resulting in higher tensile strength and elasticity, while also increasing the material hydrophobicity to lower bulk swelling and prolong the polymer degradation rates. Although the number of methylene units largely affected the physical properties of CUPE, the choice of diol did not affect the overall polymer cell/tissue-compatibility both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we have established the diol component as an important parameter in controlling the structure-property relationship of the polymer in addition to diisocyanate concentration and post-polymerization conditions. Expanding the family of CUPE polymers increases the choices of biodegradable elastomers for tissue engineering applications. PMID:22184499

  20. Development of life support requirements for long-term space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Life support system requirements for future long-term space flights are discussed. These requirements include overall reliability in the space environment, providing maintenance and component replacement in space; reduced supply mass of consumables and spares; the ability to utilize local resources for increased self-sufficiency on planetary surfaces; and minimized mass power and volume requirements necessary for all space flight systems.

  1. EPA'S OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVE ON THE LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT OF EXCESS MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agency is discussing the issues of the long-tem management and retirement of excess mercury. The concept of mercury "retirement" or the long-term management of excess mercury is in its infancy. Currently, the regulatory system supports all mercury recycling initiatives. There...

  2. Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Amy E.; Buckworth, Janet; Katz, Mira L.; Willis, Sharla K.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has…

  3. Long-Term Impacts of Pre-K Education on Childhood Educational, Social, and Behavioral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsobaie, Mohammed Fahad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to run a longitudinal, ten year experimental study studying the effects of preschool attendance on long-term academic performance throughout elementary school. This study will sample 500 students from the Kalamazoo, Michigan community and observe their standardized test scores as well as their behavioral and social…

  4. The Development of Long-Term Lexical Representations through Hebb Repetition Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmalec, Arnaud; Page, Mike P. A.; Duyck, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This study clarifies the involvement of short- and long-term memory in novel word-form learning, using the Hebb repetition paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants recalled sequences of visually presented syllables (e.g., "la"-"va"-"bu"-"sa"-"fa"-"ra"-"re"-"si"-"di"), with one particular (Hebb) sequence repeated on every third trial. Crucially,…

  5. The Impact of Teacher Quality Grants on Long-Term Professional Development of Physical Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, Mary L.; Bober, Kendra M.

    2006-02-01

    The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Teacher Quality Grants, supported through No Child Left Behind, are intended to ensure that secondary teachers of specific subjects are "highly qualified". Now in their third year, these grants have done much to shape long-term professional development for teachers in the physical sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD). The grants have also created a suite of challenges and benefits for the UTD Science Education M.A.T. program. Teacher Quality Grants are based on the No Child Left Behind framework that requires teachers to be "highly qualified" as defined by the state. Recruitment is required to be targeted at teachers who are uncertified or teach one or more classes out of their content area and who work in high needs local school districts. Many of the students brought into our program through these grants have incoming content knowledge in physics similar to that typical of undergraduate non-majors, and a large percentage are uncomfortable with basic mathematics as well. How and what we teach has been dramatically impacted by the Teacher Quality Grants, as have our assessments and evaluations. An ongoing challenge has been to implement a Physics Education Research (PER)-based course design while meeting the specific requirements of the Teacher Quality Grant program. The Teacher Quality Grants have also provided a great deal of opportunity to new and existing teachers in our program. A barrier to our teachers, rising tuition costs, has been removed and as a result a mandate has become a doorway of opportunity for physical science teachers.

  6. Beyond This Week's Lab: Integrating Long-Term Professional Development with Short-Term Preparation for Science Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishikawa, Catherine M.; Potter, Wendell H.; Davis, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes guidelines used in a teaching assistant development course for the University of California, Davis' physics department, and provides examples of activities that the guidelines inspired. The development course focused on meeting both short-term course preparation goals, and long-term professional development goals. (EV)

  7. Evaluating Long-Term Complex Professional Development: Using a Variation of the Cohort Control Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sample Mcmeeking, Laura B.; Cobb, R. Brian; Basile, Carole

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a variation on the post-test only cohort control design and addresses questions concerning both the methodological credibility and the practical utility of employing this design variation in evaluations of large-scale complex professional development programmes in mathematics education. The original design and design…

  8. A probabilistic assessment of large scale wind power development for long-term energy resource planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Scott Warren

    contribution by synthesizing information from research in power market economics, power system reliability, and environmental impact assessment, to develop a comprehensive methodology for analyzing wind power in the context of long-term energy planning.

  9. Long Term Development of Gut Microbiota Composition in Atopic Children: Impact of Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, N. B. M. M.; Gorissen, D. M. W.; Eck, A.; Niers, L. E. M.; Vlieger, A. M.; Besseling-van der Vaart, I.; Budding, A. E.; Savelkoul, P. H. M.; van der Ent, C. K.; Rijkers, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Imbalance of the human gut microbiota in early childhood is suggested as a risk factor for immune-mediated disorders such as allergies. With the objective to modulate the intestinal microbiota, probiotic supplementation during infancy has been used for prevention of allergic diseases in infants, with variable success. However, not much is known about the long-term consequences of neonatal use of probiotics on the microbiota composition. The aim of this study was to assess the composition and microbial diversity in stool samples of infants at high-risk for atopic disease, from birth onwards to six years of age, who were treated with probiotics or placebo during the first year of life. Methods In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, a probiotic mixture consisting of B. bifidum W23, B. lactis W52 and Lc. Lactis W58 (Ecologic® Panda) was administered to pregnant women during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy and to their offspring during the first year of life. During follow-up, faecal samples were collected from 99 children over a 6-year period with the following time points: first week, second week, first month, three months, first year, eighteen months, two years and six years. Bacterial profiling was performed by IS-pro. Differences in bacterial abundance and diversity were assessed by conventional statistics. Results The presence of the supplemented probiotic strains in faecal samples was confirmed, and the probiotic strains had a higher abundance and prevalence in the probiotic group during supplementation. Only minor and short term differences in composition of microbiota were found between the probiotic and placebo group and between children with or without atopy. The diversity of Bacteroidetes was significantly higher after two weeks in the placebo group, and at the age of two years atopic children had a significantly higher Proteobacteria diversity (p < 0.05). Gut microbiota development continued between two and six years, whereby

  10. Financial Policies for Education in the "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline (2010-20)"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liansheng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline (2010-20)" (hereafter abbreviated as the "Guideline"), formulated by the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee and the State Council, posits the basic completion of the modernization of China's education and other development targets by 2020. As measures to…

  11. The Soul Mates Model: A Seven-Stage Model for Couple's Long-Term Relationship Development and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Lama, Luisa Batthyany; De La Lama, Luis; Wittgenstein, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the integrative soul mates relationship development model, which provides the helping professionals with a conceptual map for couples' relationship development from dating, to intimacy, to soul mating, and long-term flourishing. This model is informed by a holistic, a developmental, and a positive psychology conceptualization…

  12. Long-term development of phosphorus and nitrogen loads through the subsurface and surface water systems of drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darracq, AméLie; Lindgren, Georg; Destouni, Georgia

    2008-09-01

    We analyze and compare simulations and controlling processes of the past 60 years and possible future short- and long-term development of phosphorus and nitrogen loading from the Swedish Norrström drainage basin to the Baltic Sea under different inland source management scenarios. Results indicate that both point and agricultural source inputs may need to be decreased by at least 40% in order to reach a long-term sustainable 30% reduction of anthropogenic coastal nitrogen loading, as required by national environmental goals. A corresponding 20% anthropogenic phosphorus load reduction goal may be reached in the short term by analogous combined 40% source input reduction, but appears impossible to maintain as a long-term achievement by inland source abatement only. In general, realistic quantification of the slow subsurface nutrient transport and accumulation-release dynamics may be essential for accurately predicting and managing nutrient loading to surface and coastal waters.

  13. The "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline (2010-20)": Expectations, Strategies, and Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiaobing, Sun

    2012-01-01

    This paper starts out by describing the research and drafting processes of the "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline" (2010-20) (hereafter abbreviated as the "Guideline") and analyzes a series of core concepts that ran through the entire process of researching and drafting the "Guideline". It expounds on the…

  14. 76 FR 68769 - Bridging the Idea Development Evaluation Assessment and Long-Term Initiative and Total Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...-Term Initiative and Total Product Life Cycle Approaches for Evidence Development for Surgical Medical... Evaluation Assessment and Long-Term (IDEAL) initiative and Total Product Life Cycle (TPLC) frameworks related... device life cycle; and Integrating innovation, evaluation, and dissemination pathways for medical...

  15. An Elementary School Environmental Education Field Trip: Long-Term Effects on Ecological and Environmental Knowledge and Attitude Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, James; Knapp, Doug; Benton, Gregory M.

    2007-01-01

    Using phenomenological analysis, the authors examined the long-term effects of an environmental education school field trip on fourth grade elementary students who visited Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The authors' findings suggest that one year after the experience, many students remembered what they had seen and heard and had developed a…

  16. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing; Niu, F.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yangang; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol has complex effects on clouds and precipitation that may augment or offset each other contingent upon a variety of variables. As a result, its long-term impact on climate is largely unknown. Using 10 years of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) measurements, strong aerosol effects of climatologically significance are detected. With increasing total aerosol number concentration (condensation nucleus, CN) measured near the ground, both cloud top height and precipitation change systematically for mix-phase clouds of warm-base (cloud base <1km) and cold-top (above the freezing level), but not for pure liquid and ice clouds. Cloud thickness can increase systematically with the CN concentration by up to a factor of 2. The response of precipitation to CN depends on cloud liquid water path (LWP). As CN increases, rain occurs more frequently for high LWP but less frequently for low LWP. Such strong signals of aerosol long-term impact on cloud and precipitation have not been reported and have significant implications for climate change studies, especially concerning regional and global climate change induced by pollution.

  17. Long-term development of the Czech landscape studied on the basis of old topographic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokanová, H.; Havlíček, M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper deals with long-term land use changes in the Czech Republic with the help of old topographic maps. Departments of Landscape Ecology and GIS Applications from the Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening, v.v.i. study these changes mainly in the research project MSM 6293359101 Research into sources and indicators of biodiversity in cultural landscape in the context of its fragmentation dynamics, the subpart Quantitative analysis of the dynamics of the Czech landscape development. In this paper, the authors concentrate mainly on map sources, which were acquired for the purpose of the project and also introduce partial results. Maps, which are the sources for the analyses, are following: maps from 2nd Austrian military survey in the scale 1:28 800 (created for the territory of the Czech Republic in the period 1836-1852), maps from 3rd Austrian military survey in the scale 1:25 000 (created for the Czech Republic in the period 1876-1880), Czechoslovak military topographic maps in the scale 1:25 000 from 1950s and 1990s, and Czech topographic base maps in the scale 1:10 000 from 2002-2006. It is necessary to complete maps of the 2nd and 3rd Austrian military survey thanks to their incompleteness, mainly along state borders. Also maps from 1nd Austrian military survey in the scale 1:28 800 (created for the Czech Republic in the period 1764-1783) are available; however, their usage for the accurate analyses in the GIS environment is restricted by their poor cartographic accuracy. Apart of the above mentioned maps, there has been progress in collecting maps from the interwar and war period (revised maps of the 3rd Austrian military survey maps, maps of the provisional military survey from 1923-1933, maps of definitive military survey from 1934-1938 and maps from survey of Moravian part of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, so called Messtischblätter from 1939-1945). Maps from five periods are manually vectorised in the GIS

  18. Development of 5-HT transporter density and long-term effects of methylphenidate in an animal model of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Roessner, Veit; Manzke, Till; Becker, Andreas; Rothenberger, Aribert; Bock, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Although stimulants as the treatment of choice are widely prescribed in ADHD, little is known about their long-term neurobiological effects. Hence, for the first time the present study examined the long-term effects of chronic methylphenidate (MPH) administration on striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) densities in an animal model of ADHD. First, it compared the normal development of striatal 5-HTT densities of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) as an animal model of ADHD and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats as controls; binding of the highly selective ligand of 5-HTT [(3)H]paroxetine was determined on membrane preparations of the striatum of SHR and WKY rats on postnatal days 25, 50, and 90, i.e. from the time of weaning until adulthood. Second, the long-term effect of chronic administration of 2 mg/kg per day MPH at two different developmental stages (days 25-39 or 50-64) on the striatal 5-HTT density was examined in both rat strains at day 90. Long-term effects of MPH treatment on striatal 5-HTT density in adulthood could be ruled out in both healthy (WKY) and "ADHD" rats (SHR). But a higher striatal 5-HTT density in older SHR versus WKY rats might indicate ADHD specific changes in the 5-HT system that needs further investigation not only in animals.

  19. Long-term development of parental knowledge about skin cancer risks in Germany: Has it changed for the better?

    PubMed

    Gefeller, Olaf; Uter, Wolfgang; Pfahlberg, Annette B

    2016-08-01

    Substantial public health efforts have been undertaken throughout the last 25years to increase awareness about skin cancer risks in the German population. An evaluation of long-term effects of these awareness campaigns and preventive activities on the population level and in specific subgroups is yet lacking. We address the temporal development of knowledge about skin cancer risk factors and agreement to the necessity of sun protection in different outdoor situations among parents of young children. We compiled data from four population-based surveys comprising data from 8184 parents of 3- to 6-year-old children in two regions of Germany performed over a nineteen-year period between 1993 and 2012. These individual cross-sectional studies used an identical methodology to recruit study subjects and to assess the principal outcome measures. Overall, parental knowledge about skin cancer risk factors and agreement to the necessity of sun protection improved significantly over the nineteen-year period. For instance, the recognition of fair skin/hair, sunburns during childhood and a high number of naevi, respectively, being risk factors for skin cancer increased by 20.0%, 19.9% and 19.2% from the first to the most recent survey. Two remaining knowledge gaps became evident: (i) the underrating of intermittent intensive sun exposure as a skin cancer risk factor and (ii) the erroneous belief that clouds provide sufficient sun protection at midday during summertime. The messages of future public health campaigns in Germany addressing skin cancer risks and informing about preventive measures for sun protection should thus be refined regarding these aspects. PMID:27211108

  20. Long-term development of parental knowledge about skin cancer risks in Germany: Has it changed for the better?

    PubMed

    Gefeller, Olaf; Uter, Wolfgang; Pfahlberg, Annette B

    2016-08-01

    Substantial public health efforts have been undertaken throughout the last 25years to increase awareness about skin cancer risks in the German population. An evaluation of long-term effects of these awareness campaigns and preventive activities on the population level and in specific subgroups is yet lacking. We address the temporal development of knowledge about skin cancer risk factors and agreement to the necessity of sun protection in different outdoor situations among parents of young children. We compiled data from four population-based surveys comprising data from 8184 parents of 3- to 6-year-old children in two regions of Germany performed over a nineteen-year period between 1993 and 2012. These individual cross-sectional studies used an identical methodology to recruit study subjects and to assess the principal outcome measures. Overall, parental knowledge about skin cancer risk factors and agreement to the necessity of sun protection improved significantly over the nineteen-year period. For instance, the recognition of fair skin/hair, sunburns during childhood and a high number of naevi, respectively, being risk factors for skin cancer increased by 20.0%, 19.9% and 19.2% from the first to the most recent survey. Two remaining knowledge gaps became evident: (i) the underrating of intermittent intensive sun exposure as a skin cancer risk factor and (ii) the erroneous belief that clouds provide sufficient sun protection at midday during summertime. The messages of future public health campaigns in Germany addressing skin cancer risks and informing about preventive measures for sun protection should thus be refined regarding these aspects.

  1. Plasma reduction of bronze corrosion developed under long-term artificial ageing.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Jelica; Papadopoulou, Olga; Vassiliou, Panayota; Filippaki, Eleni; Bassiakos, Yannis

    2009-12-01

    Reference Cu-based alloy with chemical composition and micro-chemical structure similar to that of ancient alloys has been used for carrying out the artificial long-term degradation test based on chloride enriched soil (chemical+soil) degradation. The results show that such degradation procedure produces natural like "patinas" as the ones grown on archaeological artefacts, from a chemical, structural and micro-morphological point of view. Glow discharge plasma technique has been employed for the treatment of the as-corroded bronze coupons. The gradual elimination of chloride-containing corrosion products in favour of the formation of more stable species and even the complete reduction back to copper has been observed. The chemical and metallurgical features have been determined by combined use of different analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy.

  2. The involvement of long-term serial-order memory in reading development: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, Louisa; Szmalec, Arnaud; De Maeyer, Marjolijn; Page, Mike P A; Duyck, Wouter

    2016-05-01

    Recent findings suggest that Hebb repetition learning-a paradigmatic example of long-term serial-order learning-is impaired in adults with dyslexia. The current study further investigated the link between serial-order learning and reading using a longitudinal developmental design. With this aim, verbal and visual Hebb repetition learning performance and reading skills were assessed in 96 Dutch-speaking children who we followed from first through second grade of primary school. We observed a positive association between order learning capacities and reading ability as well as weaker Hebb learning performance in early readers with poor reading skills even at the onset of reading instruction. Hebb learning further predicted individual differences in later (nonword) reading skills. Finally, Hebb learning was shown to explain a significant part of the variance in reading performance above and beyond phonological awareness. These findings highlight the role of serial-order memory in reading ability.

  3. The involvement of long-term serial-order memory in reading development: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, Louisa; Szmalec, Arnaud; De Maeyer, Marjolijn; Page, Mike P A; Duyck, Wouter

    2016-05-01

    Recent findings suggest that Hebb repetition learning-a paradigmatic example of long-term serial-order learning-is impaired in adults with dyslexia. The current study further investigated the link between serial-order learning and reading using a longitudinal developmental design. With this aim, verbal and visual Hebb repetition learning performance and reading skills were assessed in 96 Dutch-speaking children who we followed from first through second grade of primary school. We observed a positive association between order learning capacities and reading ability as well as weaker Hebb learning performance in early readers with poor reading skills even at the onset of reading instruction. Hebb learning further predicted individual differences in later (nonword) reading skills. Finally, Hebb learning was shown to explain a significant part of the variance in reading performance above and beyond phonological awareness. These findings highlight the role of serial-order memory in reading ability. PMID:26835842

  4. Development of a Long-Term Storm History for the Northwest Florida Coast Using Multiple Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Donoghue, J.; Wang, Y.; Das, O.; Kish, S.; Elsner, J.; Hu, X. B.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.

    2009-12-01

    The environmental effects of major storms result in significant damage to coastal systems. At any specific location hurricanes are rare events and the historic record of major storms is especially sparse. As a result, the historic record of major storms is relatively brief and not representative of the geologic record. A set of coastal dune lakes in NW Florida has provided a natural laboratory for investigating the longer-term history of paleostorms in the sedimentary record. Due to their unique hydrology, these lakes on the Florida panhandle coast are unusually long-lived and provide a nearly continuous record of storm events from the late Holocene to present. The Walton County coastal dune lakes lie directly behind barrier dunes, with surface elevations near present sea level. The lake water is normally fresh to brackish. During major storm events the dunes are breached, commonly forming a temporary inlet, and the lakes are impacted by marine water and sometimes overwash sediment. A collection of sediment cores from these lakes has revealed a record of climatic events that has extended the storm record for the NW Florida coast and northeastern Gulf of Mexico into prehistory. A combination of sediment grain-size analysis, x-radiography, percent moisture, percent organics, and stable isotope data (del-13C, del-15N) has been combined to identify paleostorm signatures. It has been found that no single proxy is a perfect determinant of storm occurrence, but the combination of isotopic and sedimentologic parameters combine to create a more realistic long-term storm history. Comparison of the paleostorm record with the historic storm records suggests that the historic record is not a reliable indicator for long-term storm frequency.

  5. [Concept of long-term social and economic development until 2020 ("Strategy 2020") and health preservation for workers in Russia].

    PubMed

    Izmerov, N F

    2012-01-01

    The article represents goals set in a Concept of long-term social and economic development of Russian Federation until 2020 ("Strategy 2020") on transfer to innovative socially oriented type of economic development and human potential advancement in Russia, analysis of contemporary state of work conditions and workers' safety, ways to solve problems on health care and protection for working population as a basis for competitiveness of Russian economy.

  6. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Most Care Provided at Home Long-term care is provided ...

  7. Standards for Psychological Services in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Smith, Michael; Frazer, Deborah; Molinari, Victor; Rosowsky, Erlene; Crose, Royda; Stillwell, Nick; Kramer, Nanette; Hartman-Stein, Paula; Qualls, Sara; Salamon, Michael; Duffy, Michael; Parr, Joyce; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of standards for psychological practice in long-term care facilities. The standards, which were developed by Psychologists in Long-Term Care, address provider characteristics, methods of referral, assessment practices, treatment, and ethical issues. Offers suggestions for use of the standards. (MKA)

  8. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females. II. Growth and development.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M B; Tonascia, J

    1981-09-01

    Experimental studies and studies of survivors of in-utero exposure to atomic bomb blasts have shown significant stunting of growth and mental retardation following these exposures. Central nervous system damage following very low doses of x-ray at around the time of birth has also been observed in experimental animals. This long term follow-up studies of 1458 human females exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays and of 1458 matched unexposed controls studied in Baltimore, Maryland, included measurements of height, weight and school achievement. Women who had been exposed to x-rays in utero were significantly shorter in their mid-twenties than were their matched, unexposed controls, even after adjustment for other social and economic factors. However, additional follow-up revealed that mothers of exposed women were also shorter than the control mothers. Short stature appeared to be a selective factor for x-ray during pregnancy (mostly pelvimetry, 1947-1952). Mothers' and daughters' heights were similarly correctly among exposed and control mother-daughter pairs, suggesting that the height differences between exposed daughters and their controls were due to these selective factor rather than to any direct effect of radiation on growth. Exposed women reported poorer school achievement than control women. However, except for a higher proportion of exposed women leaving school because of pregnancy, these measurements were no longer significantly different when rates were simultaneously adjusted for socioeconomic differences between exposed and control women.

  9. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females: growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.B.; Tonascia, J.

    1981-09-01

    Experimental studies and studies of survivors of in-utero exposure to atomic bomb blasts have shown significant stunting of growth and mental retardation following these exposures. Central nervous system damage following very low dosage of x-ray at around the time of birth has also been observed in experimental animals. This long term followup study of 1458 human females exposed in-utero to diagnostic x-rays and of 1458 matched unexposed controls studied in Baltimore, Maryland, included measurements of height, weight, and school achievement. Women who had been exposed to x-rays in-utero were significantly shorter in their mid-twenties than were their matched, unexposed controls, even after adjustment for other social and economic factors. However, additional followup revealed that mothers of exposed women were also shorter than the control mothers. Short stature appeared to be a selective factor for x-ray during pregnancy (mostly pelvimetry, 1947 to 1952). Mothers' and daughters' heights were similarly correlated among exposed and controlled mother-daughter pairs, suggesting that the height differences between exposed daughters and their controls were due to these selective factors rather than to any direct effect of radiation on growth. Exposed women reported poorer school achievement than control women. However, except for a higher proportion of exposed women leaving school because of pregnancy, these measurements were no longer significantly different when rates were simultaneously adjusted for socioeconomic differences between exposed and control women.

  10. The value of long-term monitoring in the development of ground-water-flow models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feinstein, Daniel T.; Hart, David J.; Krohelski, James T.

    2004-01-01

    As environmental issues have come to the forefront of public concern, so has the awareness of the importance of ground water in the overall water cycle and as a source of the Nation’s drinking water. Heightened interest has spawned a host of scientific enterprises (Taylor and Alley, 2001). Some activities are directed toward collection of water-level data and related information to monitor the physical and chemical state of the resource. Other activities are directed at interpretive studies undertaken, for example, to optimize the location of new water-supply wells or to protect rivers and lakes fed by ground water. An important type of interpretive study is the computer ground-water-flow model that inte- grates field data in a mathematical framework. Long-term, systematic collection of hydro- logic data is crucial to the construction and testing of ground-water models so that they can reproduce the evolution of flow systems and forecast future conditions. 

  11. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Don

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation’s electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI’s Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to “establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.” This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  12. Development of a Compound Distribution Markov Chain Model for Stochastic Generation of Rainfall with Long Term Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Chowdhury, AFM; Lockart, Natalie; Willgoose, Garry; Kuczera, George

    2015-04-01

    One of the overriding issues in the rainfall simulation is the underestimation of observed rainfall variability in longer timescales (e.g. monthly, annual and multi-year), which usually results into under-estimation of reservoir reliability in urban water planning. This study has developed a Compound Distribution Markov Chain (CDMC) model for stochastic generation of daily rainfall. We used two parameters of Markov Chain process (transition probabilities of wet-to-wet and dry-to-dry days) for simulating rainfall occurrence and two parameters of gamma distribution (calculated from mean and standard deviation of wet-day rainfall) for simulating wet-day rainfall amounts. While two models with deterministic parameters underestimated long term variability, our investigation found that the long term variability of rainfall in the model is predominantly governed by the long term variability of gamma parameters, rather than the variability of Markov Chain parameters. Therefore, in the third approach, we developed the CDMC model with deterministic parameters of Markov Chain process, but stochastic parameters of gamma distribution by sampling the mean and standard deviation of wet-day rainfall from their log-normal and bivariate-normal distribution. We have found that the CDMC is able to replicate both short term and long term rainfall variability, when we calibrated the model at two sites in east coast of Australia using three types of daily rainfall data - (1) dynamically downscaled, 10 km resolution gridded data produced by NSW/ACT Regional Climate Modelling project, (2) 5 km resolution gridded data by Australian Water Availability Project and (3) point scale raingauge stations data by Bureau of Meteorology, Australia. We also examined the spatial variability of parameters and their link with local orography at our field site. The suitability of the model in runoff generation and urban reservoir-water simulation will be discussed.

  13. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  14. Development, operation, and long-term performance of a full-scale biocurtain utilizing bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Dybas, Michael J; Hyndman, David W; Heine, Robert; Tiedje, James; Linning, Katrina; Wiggert, David; Voice, Thomas; Zhao, Xianda; Dybas, Leslie; Criddle, Craig S

    2002-08-15

    A full-scale field evaluation of bioaugmentation was conducted in a carbon tetrachloride (CT)- and nitrate-impacted aquifer at Schoolcraft, MI. The added organism was Pseudomonas stutzeri KC (strain KC), a denitrifying bacterium that cometabolically degrades CT without producing chloroform (CF). To introduce and maintain strain KC in the aquifer, a row of closely spaced (1-m) injection/extraction wells were installed normal to the direction of groundwater flow near the leading edge of the CT plume. The resulting system of wells was used to establish and maintain a "biocurtain" for CT degradation through the intermittent addition of base to create favorable pH conditions; inoculation; and weekly addition of acetate (electron donor), alkali, and phosphorus. Although half of the test zone was inoculated twice, the long-term performance of both sections was indistinguishable: both had high CT removal efficiencies (median of 98-99.9%) and similar levels of strain KC colonization (>10(5) strain KC/g). Sustained and efficient (98%) removal of CT has now been observed over 4 yr. Transient low levels of CF (<20 ppb) and H2S (<2 ppm) were observed, but both disappeared when the concentration of acetate in the weekly feed was reduced. Nitrate removal efficiencies ranged from 60% at low acetate concentrations to nearly 100% at high acetate concentrations. We conclude that closely spaced wells and intermittent substrate addition are effective means of delivering organisms and substrates to subsurface environments. At the Schoolcraft site, we achieved uniform removal efficiencies over a significant vertical depth (15 m), despite significant variability in hydraulic conductivity. This was accomplished by pumping 65% (v/v) of the natural gradient flow passing through the biocurtain during a given week in a single 6-h pumping event. Approximately 18,600 m3 of contaminated groundwater was treated during the project. PMID:12214659

  15. Psychosexual Development in Men with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism on Long-Term Treatment: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Quinton, Richard; Pitteloud, Nelly; Morin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare, genetic, reproductive endocrine disorder characterized by absent puberty and infertility. Limited information is available on the psychosocial impact of CHH and psychosexual development in these patients. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CHH on psychosexual development in men on long-term treatment. Methods A sequential mixed methods explanatory design was used. First, an online survey (quantitative) was used to quantify the frequency of psychosexual problems among CHH men. Second, patient focus groups (qualitative) were conducted to explore survey findings in detail and develop a working model to guide potential nursing and interdisciplinary interventions. Main Outcome Measures Patient characteristics, frequency of body shame, difficulty with intimate relationships, and never having been sexually active were assessed. Additionally, we collected subjective patient-reported outcomes regarding the impact of CHH on psychological/emotional well-being, intimate relationships, and sexual activity. Results A total of 101 CHH men on long-term treatment (>1 year) were included for the analysis of the online survey (mean age 37 ± 11 years, range 19–66, median 36). Half (52/101, 51%) of the men had been seen at a specialized academic center and 37/101 (37%) reported having had fertility-inducing treatment. A high percentage of CHH men experience psychosexual problems including difficulty with intimate relationships (70%) and body image concerns/body shame (94/101, 93%), and the percentage of men never having been sexually active is five times the rate in a reference group (26% vs. 5.4%, P < 0.001). Focus groups revealed persisting body shame and low self-esteem despite long-term treatment that has lasting impact on psychosexual functioning. Conclusions CHH men frequently experience psychosexual problems that pose barriers to intimate relationships and initiating sexual

  16. Development and application of a short- /long-term composited drought index in the upper Huaihe River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Li, Q.; Lu, G.; Wang, H.; Li, P.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate and reliable drought monitoring is of primary importance for drought mitigation and reduction of social-ecological vulnerability. The aim of the paper was to propose a short-term/long-term composited drought index (CDI) which could be widely used for drought monitoring and early warning in China. In the study, the upper Huaihe River basin above the Xixian gauge station, which has been hit by severe droughts frequently in recent decades, was selected as the case study site. The short-term CDI was developed by the Principle Component Analysis of the self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (sc-PDSI), the 1- and 3-month Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), Z Index (ZIND), the Soil Moisture Index (SMI) with the long-term CDI being formulated by use of the self-calibrating Palmer Hydrology Drought Index (sc-PHDI), the 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month SPEI, the Standardized Streamflow Index (SSI), the SMI. The sc-PDSI, the PHDI, the ZIND, the SPEI on a monthly time scale were calculated based on the monthly air temperature and precipitation, and the monthly SMI and SSI were computed based on the simulated soil moisture and runoff by the distributed Xinanjiang model. The thresholds of the short-term/long-term CDI were determined according to frequency statistics of different drought indices. Finally, the feasibility of the two CDIs was investigated against the scPDSI, the SPEI and the historical drought records. The results revealed that the short-term/long-term CDI could capture the onset, severity, persistence of drought events very well with the former being better at identifying the dynamic evolution of drought condition while the latter better at judging the changing trend of drought over a long time period.

  17. Predicting long-term outcomes for children affected by HIV and AIDS: perspectives from the scientific study of children's development.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alan; Desmond, Christopher; Garbarino, James; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Barbarin, Oscar; Black, Maureen M; Stein, Aryeh D; Hillis, Susan D; Kalichman, Seth C; Mercy, James A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Rapa, Elizabeth; Saul, Janet R; Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A; Richter, Linda M

    2014-07-01

    The immediate and short-term consequences of adult HIV for affected children are well documented. Little research has examined the long-term implications of childhood adversity stemming from caregiver HIV infection. Through overviews provided by experts in the field, together with an iterative process of consultation and refinement, we have extracted insights from the broader field of child development of relevance to predicting the long-term consequences to children affected by HIV and AIDS. We focus on what is known about the impact of adversities similar to those experienced by HIV-affected children, and for which there is longitudinal evidence. Cautioning that findings are not directly transferable across children or contexts, we examine findings from the study of parental death, divorce, poor parental mental health, institutionalization, undernutrition, and exposure to violence. Regardless of the type of adversity, the majority of children manifest resilience and do not experience any long-term negative consequences. However, a significant minority do and these children experience not one, but multiple problems, which frequently endure over time in the absence of support and opportunities for recovery. As a result, they are highly likely to suffer numerous and enduring impacts. These insights suggest a new strategic approach to interventions for children affected by HIV and AIDS, one that effectively combines a universal lattice of protection with intensive intervention targeted to selected children and families. PMID:24991899

  18. Development of a modelling methodology for simulation of long-term morphological evolution of the southern Baltic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Harff, Jan; Schneider, Ralf; Wu, Chaoyu

    2010-10-01

    The Darss-Zingst peninsula at the southern Baltic Sea is a typical wave-dominated barrier island system which includes an outer barrier island and an inner lagoon. The formation of the Darss-Zingst peninsula dates back to the Littorina Transgression onset about 8,000 cal BP. It originated from several discrete islands, has been reshaped by littoral currents, wind-induced waves during the last 8,000 years and evolved into a complex barrier island system as today; thus, it may serve as an example to study the coastal evolution under long-term climate change. A methodology for developing a long-term (decadal-to-centennial) process-based morphodynamic model for the southern Baltic coastal environment is presented here. The methodology consists of two main components: (1) a preliminary analysis of the key processes driving the morphological evolution of the study area based on statistical analysis of meteorological data and sensitivity studies; (2) a multi-scale high-resolution process-based model. The process-based model is structured into eight main modules. The two-dimensional vertically integrated circulation module, the wave module, the bottom boundary layer module, the sediment transport module, the cliff erosion module and the nearshore storm module are real-time calculation modules which aim at solving the short-term processes. A bathymetry update module and a long-term control function set, in which the ‘reduction’ concepts and technique for morphological update acceleration are implemented, are integrated to up-scale the effects of short-term processes to a decadal-to-centennial scale. A series of multi-scale modelling strategies are implemented in the application of the model to the research area. Successful hindcast of the coastline change of the Darss-Zingst peninsula for the last 300 years validates the modelling methodology. Model results indicate that the coastline change of the Darss-Zingst peninsula is dominated by mechanisms acting on different

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lunar ephemeris long-term development (Kudryavtsev, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, S. M.

    2007-06-01

    The files contain numerical coefficients of the Poisson series representing the geocentric ecliptic spherical coordinates of the Moon R, V and U where R is the geocentric distance, V is the spherical longitude, U is the spherical latitude. The series are obtained by spectral analysis of the long-term numerical ephemeris of the Moon LE-405/406 (Standish 1998: JPL IOM 312.F-98-048). There are two versions of the Poisson series for lunar coordinates R, V, U: - the complete series, LEA-406a, include 42270 terms of minimal amplitude equivalent to 1 cm and are valid over 1500-2500. - the simplified series, LEA-406b, include 7952 terms of minimal amplitude equivalent to 1 m and are valid over 3000BC-3000AD. The formulation of the series is: R = {SUM}[k=1,Records;i=0,2](Aki*ti*cos(Argki)) V = V0(t) + {SUM}[k=1,Records;i=0,2](Aki*ti*sin(Argki)) U = {SUM}[k=1,Records;i=0,2](Aki*ti*sin(Argki)) where t is the time (TDB) in thousands of Julian years from J2000: t=(JulianDate-2451545.0)/365250.0; V0(t) is the mean longitude of the Moon referred to the moving ecliptic and mean equinox of date as given by Simon et al. (1994A&A..282..663S) [or use Eq.(37) of the paper]; Aki is the amplitude of the "k"th Poisson term of the order i; Argki is the four-degree time polynomial argument defined as linear combination of integer multipliers of 14 variables (Argj, j=1,14): Delaunay variables l, l', F, D; mean longitude of the ascending node of the Moon {Omega}; mean longitudes of eight major planets {lambda}pl; and the general precession in longitude pA. So that Argki={SUM}[j=1,14](mkj*Argj+phiki), where mkj are the integer multiplies and phiki are the phases. The expressions for Argj are given by Simon et al. (1994A&A..282..663S) [or use Eq.(38)-(51) of the paper]. The lunar coordinates R, V and U given by the series are referred to the moving ecliptic and mean equinox of date. Transformation of the coordinates to the reference frame of the numerical ephemeris LE-405/406 (defined by the

  20. Development of a long-term post-closure radiation monitor: Phase 2, Topical report, March 1994--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.

    1995-07-01

    The long-term monitoring of a hazardous waste site for migration of radionuclides requires installation of radiation sensors at a large number of subsurface locations. The concept under development employs a passive in-ground measurement probe which contains a scintillator coupled to an optical lightguide. The overall goal of the Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitor System (LPRMS) development program is to configure a long-term radiation monitor using commercially available, demonstrated components to the largest extent possible. The development program is planned as a three phase program spanning a total time of 53 months. The problems to be solved during Phase 1 were primarily those associated with selection of the most appropriate components (scintillator, coupling optics, optical fiber, and opto-electronics) to maximize the signal reaching the detectors and thereby minimizing the integration time required to obtain a reliable measure of radiation. Phase 2 (the current Phase) encompassed the fabrication and testing of the prototype LPRMS probe at a contaminated DOE site, the Fernald Environmental Management Project, in southwestern Ohio. Uranium isotopes are the primary contaminants of concern at this site. The single probe and opto-electronic device were used to made measurements in-situ at relatively shallow subsurface depths. The end objective of Phase 2 was the design of a full-scale prototype system which incorporates all the features expected to be necessary on a commercial system, including 50 meter depth of measurement, multiplexing of multiple probes, and remote transmission of data. This full-scale prototype will be fabricated and field tested for 12 months during Phase 3, and a commercial design will be developed based upon the data gathered and experience gained during the entire program.

  1. Ethical considerations of the short-term and long-term health impacts, costs, and educational value of sustainable development projects.

    PubMed

    Striebig, Bradley A; Jantzen, Tyler; Rowden, Katherine

    2006-04-01

    There are over 800 seventh to tenth grade students at the College d'Enseignment Generale (CEG) School in Azové, Benin. Like most children in the developing world, these students lack access to clean water and basic sanitation facilities. These students suffer from parasitic infection and health ailments which could be directly offset with short term aid to supply water and medical aid. Promoting proper sanitation and providing the technology to implement water and wastewater treatment in the community will decrease childhood and maternal disease and mortality rates in Azové. However, these measures may take several years to implement and will require a significant investment in the infrastructure of the school. Is it ethical to spend 10,000 dollars towards the long-term goals of providing water and sanitation to the students of CEG Azové, compared to spending the same amount on short-term relief efforts? This paper addresses the ethical dilemma of dealing with immediate medical needs in developing countries while trying to implement sustainable technologies. The views and frustration of students working on the project are discussed, as they realize the monetary and short-term impacts on human health when implementing sustainable technologies. The opportunity costs associated with the education principles of sustainable development were also considered. The anticipated costs and health impacts in the short-term and long-term will be evaluated for a period of 1, 2, 5 and 10 years. Sustainable development requires a new way of thinking, and a long-term approach. These problems will require the dedication of a new generation of engineers, working hand-in-hand with local communities and governments, social scientists, economists, businesses, human rights organizations, other non-government organizations, and international development organizations. Design projects encourage the professional and ethical development of engineers through hands-on involvement in national

  2. Energy development and environment - What about solar energy in a long term perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessus, B.; Pharabod, F.

    The advantages and drawbacks of various solar technologies are compared. Emphasis is placed on the New Options for Energy (NOE) scenario, which attempts to mitigate the accumulation of atmospheric CO2 and of nuclear waste on earth. Supplies of various kinds of energy in the different regions of the world in the years 2020, 2060, and 2100 are predicted. The appropriate mix of solar technologies for different regions and the role of Solar Power Satellites (SPS) in the mix are addressed. An NOE scenario for a year 2100 solar mix is presented.

  3. Long-term care policy for the elderly in the Zaporozhye region of Ukraine: a case study of social development following the collapse of Communism.

    PubMed

    Palley, Howard A; Romanenkova, Lyudmyla A

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we review the status of social policy for the elderly in Ukraine since the fall of Communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union. We specifically address the problem of "rebuilding" an income and services policy for the at-risk elderly after the unraveling of the system that existed prior to the fall of Communism. Also, we address some existing problems faced by the elderly in the health care system. Within this context, we present a case study of the current status of long-term care policy for the elderly in one province of Ukraine, the eastern province of Zaporozhye, encompassing the industrial city of Zaporozhye on the Dnieper River. This case study particularly pays attention to current attempts to promote a social development process of long-term care services for the elderly. It examines recent developments with respect to public sector organizations and voluntary sector organizations that are trying to provide necessary services to the needy elderly. With respect to the voluntary sector, the paper pays particular attention to the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) model of a largely externally funded NGO that provides comprehensive and integrated social supports, while emphasizing local empowerment and the use of volunteers, for the needy Jewish population in the province of Zaporozhye. Based on our findings, we make some proposals regarding the improvement of income and services policy with respect to the elderly in Zaporozhye and Ukraine.

  4. Laser surgery of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos using femtosecond laser pulses: Optimal parameters for exogenous material delivery, and the laser's effect on short- and long-term development

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Vikram; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y

    2008-01-01

    Background Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have recently received wide interest as an alternative tool for manipulating living biological systems. In various model organisms the excision of cellular components and the intracellular delivery of foreign exogenous materials have been reported. However, the effect of the applied fs laser pulses on cell viability and development has yet to be determined. Using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as our animal model system, we address both the short- and long-term developmental changes following laser surgery on zebrafish embryonic cells. Results An exogenous fluorescent probe, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was successfully introduced into blastomere cells and found to diffuse throughout all developing cells. Using the reported manipulation tool, we addressed whether the applied fs laser pulses induced any short- or long-term developmental effects in embryos reared to 2 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy we compared key developmental features of laser-manipulated and control samples, including the olfactory pit, dorsal, ventral and pectoral fins, notochord, pectoral fin buds, otic capsule, otic vesicle, neuromast patterning, and kinocilia of the olfactory pit rim and cristae of the lateral wall of the ear. Conclusion In our study, no significant differences in hatching rates and developmental morphologies were observed in laser-manipulated samples relative to controls. This tool represents an effective non-destructive technique for potential medical and biological applications. PMID:18230185

  5. The impact of professional development on classroom teaching for science educators participating in a long term community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Aaron C.

    Efforts to modify and improve science education in the United States have seen minimal success (Crawford, 2000; Borko & Putman, 1996; Puntambekar, Stylianou & Goldstein, 2007; Lustick, 2011). One important reason for this is the professional development that teachers go through in order to learn about and apply these new ideas is generally of poor quality and structured incorrectly for long-term changes in the classroom (Little, 1993; Fullen, 1996; Porter, 2000; Jeanpierre, Oberhauser, & Freeman, 2005). This grounded theory study explores a science community of practice and how the professional development achieved through participation in that community has effected the instruction of the teachers involved, specifically the incorporation of researched based effective science teaching instructional strategies. This study uses personal reflection papers written by the participants, interviews, and classroom observations to understand the influence that the science community of practice has had on the participants. Results indicate that participation in this science community of practice has significant impact on the teachers involved. Participants gained greater understanding of science content knowledge, incorporated effective science instructional strategies into their classroom, and were able to practice both content knowledge and strategies in a non-threatening environment thus gaining a greater understanding of how to apply them in the classrooms. These findings motivate continued research in the role that communities of practice may play in teacher professional develop and the effectiveness of quality professional development in attaining long-term, sustained improvement in science education.

  6. Effective Staff Development in Cooperative Learning: Training, Transfer, and Long-Term Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David W.; Johnson, Roger T.

    Staff development in cooperative learning must focus on three stages of staff development (pre-training, training, and post-training) to achieve at least five purposes. The five purposes are: creating conditions for successful staff development prior to training; conducting high-quality training sessions that result in mastery of the conceptual…

  7. All Pennsylvanians Prospering (APP) Together: A Pennsylvania Economic Development Strategy for the Long Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzenberg, Stephen; McAuliff, John

    2015-01-01

    State efforts to boost the economy--economic development--first came to Pennsylvania in the 1950s with the establishment of the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) low interest loan program used to recruit manufacturers to Pennsylvania, including devastated coal regions. Since that time, economic development in Pennsylvania and…

  8. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long term missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a rugged portable dosimetry system, based on microdosimetry techniques, which will measure dose and evaluate dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field is described. Progress in the desired dosimetry system can be divided into three distinct areas: development of the radiation detector, and electron system are presented. The mathematical techniques required are investigated.

  9. Immediate and long-term consequences of vascular toxicity during zebrafish development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proper formation of the vascular system is necessary for embryogenesis, and chemical disruption of vascular development may be a key event driving developmental toxicity. In order to test the effect of environmental chemicals on this critical process, we developed a quantitative ...

  10. The Development of Externship Objectives for a Long Term Care Independent Consultation Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, James R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The development of specific educational objectives for and the experiences resulting from an externship in which a student studied with an independent consultant in nursing home pharmacy practice are described. (MSE)

  11. Role of histamine in short- and long-term effects of methamphetamine on the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Pfankuch, Timothy; van Meer, Peter; Raber, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    With the rise in methamphetamine use among women of childbearing age, the potential consequences of methamphetamine exposure to the developing brain for cognition in adulthood is a major concern. Histamine might mediate these methamphetamine effects. Following methamphetamine administration in neonatal mice, histamine levels in brain were elevated and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was activated. Co-administration of methamphetamine with the H3 receptor agonist immepip antagonized these effects. The effects of methamphetamine on histamine levels and on HPA axis activation at P20 were more pronounced in female than male mice. These sex differences could have contributed to the increased susceptibility of female mice to the detrimental long-term cognitive effects of methamphetamine and the H3/H4 antagonist thioperamide. Following behavioral testing, mice neonatally treated with methamphetamine or thioperamide showed reduced levels of the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and the enthorhinal cortex. This was not seen in mice neonatally treated with immepip and methamphetamine who did not show cognitive impairments, suggesting that these brain areas might be particularly important for the long-term effects of methamphetamine on cognitive function. These data support a role for histamine in the effects of methamphetamine on the developing brain. PMID:18786166

  12. Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Peng, Shu-Chen; Spencer, Linda J.; Lu, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience. Method: Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was…

  13. Long-term influence of normal variation in neonatal characteristics on human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, Kristine B.; Fjell, Anders M.; Brown, Timothy T.; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Chung, Yoonho; Hagler, Donald J.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Erhart, Matthew; McCabe, Connor; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Darst, Burcu F.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Murray, Sarah S.; van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; McCabe, Connor; Chang, Linda; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Dale, Anders M.; Ernst, Thomas; Dale, Anders M.; Van Zijl, Peter; Kuperman, Joshua; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Schork, Nicholas J.; Appelbaum, Mark; Gamst, Anthony; Thompson, Wesley; Bartsch, Hauke; Jernigan, Terry L.; Dale, Anders M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas; Keating, Brian; Amaral, David; Sowell, Elizabeth; Kaufmann, Walter; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Casey, B.J.; Ruberry, Erika J.; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Kenet, Tal; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Gruen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences. PMID:23169628

  14. Web-Based Intervention for Developing Long-Term Health Literacy of Individuals: Possibilities and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumina, Aira Aija; Lubenko, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Web-based interventions (WBI) are purposefully developed online programs designed for wide range of users (clients, patients, health care specialists, as well as medical practitioners) which allow obtaining and using information on various issues related to health maintenance and improvement. On the basis of the analysis of scientific literature,…

  15. Exploring Long-Term Productive Vocabulary Development in an EFL Context: The Role of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yongyan

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports on a longitudinal multiple-case study that probed into four advanced university-level Chinese EFL learners' situated vocabulary learning experiences and explored the role of L2 motivation in their productive vocabulary development. In the study, Lexical Frequency Profile analysis and semi-structured interviews were conducted with…

  16. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  17. Yale Child Study Center School Development Program: Developmental History and Long Term Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.; And Others

    Research findings indicate that the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program (SDP) has led to consistent progress in academic achievement and school attendance from 1969 to 1984 in the New Haven (Connecticut) schools in which it has been used. This report evaluates SDP, which attempts to strengthen student academic and social skills in…

  18. Sustainable development and next generation's health: a long-term perspective about the consequences of today's activities for food safety.

    PubMed

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Petrini, Carlo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Development is defined sustainable when it meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Pivoting on social, environmental and economic aspects of food chain sustainability, this paper presents the concept of sustainable food safety based on the prevention of risks and burden of poor health for generations to come. Under this respect, the assessment of long-term, transgenerational risks is still hampered by serious scientific uncertainties. Critical issues to the development of a sustainable food safety framework may include: endocrine disrupters as emerging contaminants that specifically target developing organisms; toxicological risks assessment in Countries at the turning point of development; translating knowledge into toxicity indexes to support risk management approaches, such as hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP); the interplay between chemical hazards and social determinants. Efforts towards the comprehensive knowledge and management of key factors of sustainable food safety appear critical to the effectiveness of the overall sustainability policies.

  19. Immediate and long-term consequences of vascular toxicity during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Tal, T L; McCollum, C W; Harris, P S; Olin, J; Kleinstreuer, N; Wood, C E; Hans, C; Shah, S; Merchant, F A; Bondesson, M; Knudsen, T B; Padilla, S; Hemmer, M J

    2014-09-01

    Proper formation of the vascular system is necessary for embryogenesis, and chemical disruption of vascular development may be a key event driving developmental toxicity. In order to test the effect of environmental chemicals on this critical process, we evaluated a quantitative assay in transgenic zebrafish using angiogenesis inhibitors that target VEGFR2 (PTK787) or EGFR (AG1478). Both PTK787 and AG1478 exposure impaired intersegmental vessel (ISV) sprouting, while AG1478 also produced caudal and pectoral fin defects at concentrations below those necessary to blunt ISV morphogenesis. The functional consequences of vessel toxicity during early development included decreased body length and survival in juvenile cohorts developmentally exposed to inhibitor concentrations sufficient to completely block ISV sprouting angiogenesis. These data show that concentration-dependent disruption of the presumed targets for these inhibitors produce adverse outcomes at advanced life stages. PMID:24907688

  20. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long term missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a rugged portable instrument to evaluate dose and dose equivalent is described. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter simulating a 2 micrometer spherical tissue volume was operated satisfactorily for over a year. The basic elements of the electronic system were designed and tested. And finally, the most suitable mathematical technique for evaluating dose equivalent with a portable instrument was selected. Design and fabrication of a portable prototype, based on the previously tested circuits, is underway.

  1. Short and long term effects of bioturbation on soil erosion and soil development in a rocky arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Short and long term effects of faunal activity on soil erosion and soil development had been largely overlooked by geomorphologists; especially in arid rocky area. A study of hillslope runoff and erosion processes in the Negev desert indicated systematic in sediment concentrations and erosion rates between rocky and colluvial surfaces. Erosion rates were always higher on the former than on the latter. Field observations drew attention to an intense burrowing and digging activity conducted by Isopods and Porcupines. The monitoring of this activity, based on a grid system,lasted ten years. Data obtained suggest a strong link between the spatial pattern of bioturbation and that of soil erosion. The study also examined the regulatory role of the spatial distribution of soil moisture on the biological activity and its long term effect on soil forming processes. TWo different environments have been recognized. The upper, rocky, hillslope areas are characterized by a positive feedback. High runoff and erosion rates remove salt from the soil, limiting salt accumulation. T the same time the colluvial slope section absorbs, at most rainstorms, all runoff generated over the upper rocky sections leading, over time, to soil salinization

  2. Development of a novel ultrasonic temperature probe for long-term monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Wang, K.; Elmer, T. W.; Koehl, E.; Raptis, A. C.

    2013-01-25

    With the recent cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository and the limited availability of wet storage utilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), more attention has been directed toward dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for long-term storage of SNF. Consequently, more stringent guidelines have been issued for the aging management of dry storage facilities that necessitate monitoring of the conditions of DCSSs. Continuous health monitoring of DCSSs based on temperature variations is one viable method for assessing the integrity of the system. In the present work, a novel ultrasonic temperature probe (UTP) is being tested for long-term online temperature monitoring of DCSSs. Its performance was evaluated and compared with type N thermocouple (NTC) and resistance temperature detector (RTD) using a small-scale dry storage canister mockup. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the UTP system developed at Argonne is able to achieve better than 0.8 Degree-Sign C accuracy, tested at temperatures of up to 400 Degree-Sign C. The temperature resolution is limited only by the sampling rate of the current system. The flexibility of the probe allows conforming to complex geometries thus making the sensor particularly suited to measurement scenarios where access is limited.

  3. Development of a novel ultrasonic temperature probe for long-term monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiari, S.; Wang, K.; Elmer, T. W.; Koehl, E.; Raptis, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository and the limited availability of wet storage utilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), more attention has been directed toward dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for long-term storage of SNF. Consequently, more stringent guidelines have been issued for the aging management of dry storage facilities that necessitate monitoring of the conditions of DCSSs. Continuous health monitoring of DCSSs based on temperature variations is one viable method for assessing the integrity of the system. In the present work, a novel ultrasonic temperature probe (UTP) is being tested for long-term online temperature monitoring of DCSSs. Its performance was evaluated and compared with type N thermocouple (NTC) and resistance temperature detector (RTD) using a small-scale dry storage canister mockup. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the UTP system developed at Argonne is able to achieve better than 0.8 °C accuracy, tested at temperatures of up to 400 °C. The temperature resolution is limited only by the sampling rate of the current system. The flexibility of the probe allows conforming to complex geometries thus making the sensor particularly suited to measurement scenarios where access is limited.

  4. The long-term effects of the herbicide atrazine on the dopaminergic system following exposure during pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanshu; Sun, Yan; Yang, Junwei; Wu, Yanping; Yu, Jia; Li, Baixiang

    2014-03-15

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) is used worldwide as a herbicide, and its presence in the environment has resulted in documented human exposure. Atrazine has been shown to cause dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The juvenile period is particularly vulnerable to environmental agents, but only few studies have investigated the long-term effects of atrazine following exposure during the pubertal development. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a 41-day exposure to atrazine on the dopaminergic system in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with atrazine at 25 or 50mg/kg bw, daily from postnatal day 22 to 62. The content of dopamine (DA) was examined in striatum samples by HPLC-FL, and the mRNA and protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), orphan nuclear hormone (Nurr1), dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoaminetransporter 2 (VMAT2) were examined in samples of the ventral mid-brain by use of fluorescence PCR and Western-blot analysis when the rats reached the age of one year. Exposure of juvenile rats to the high dose of atrazine led to reduced levels of DA and mRNA of Nurr1 in one-year-old animals. This study shows that the long-term adverse effects of atrazine on the dopaminergic system have a special relevance after juvenile exposure.

  5. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem.

    PubMed

    Smith, G M; Smith, K L; Kowe, R; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Thorne, M; Thiry, Y; Read, D; Molinero, J

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, www.bioprota.org.

  6. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem.

    PubMed

    Smith, G M; Smith, K L; Kowe, R; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Thorne, M; Thiry, Y; Read, D; Molinero, J

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, www.bioprota.org. PMID:24238917

  7. Development of Approach for Long-Term Management of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources - 13630

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, M.; Reber, E.; Mansoux, H.; Bruno, G.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive sources are used widely throughout the world in a variety of medical, industrial, research and military applications. When such radioactive sources are no longer used and are not intended to be used for the practice for which an authorization was granted, they are designated as 'disused sources'. Whether appropriate controls are in place during the useful life of a source or not, the end of this useful life is often a turning point after which it is more difficult to ensure the safety and security of the source over time. For various reasons, many disused sources cannot be returned to the manufacturer or the supplier for reuse or recycling. When these attempts fail, disused sources should be declared as radioactive waste and should be managed as such, in compliance with relevant international legal instruments and safety standards. However, disposal remains an unresolved issue in many counties, due to in part to limited public acceptance, insufficient funding, and a lack of practical examples of strategies for determining suitable disposal options. As a result, disused sources are often stored indefinitely at the facilities where they were once used. In order to prevent disused sources from becoming orphan sources, each country must develop and implement a comprehensive waste management strategy that includes disposal of disused sources. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fosters international cooperation between countries and encourages the development of a harmonized 'cradle to grave' approach to managing sources consistent with international legal instruments, IAEA safety standards, and international good practices. This 'cradle to grave' approach requires the development of a national policy and implementing strategy, an adequate legal and regulatory framework, and adequate resources and infrastructure that cover the entire life cycle, from production and use of radioactive sources to disposal. (authors)

  8. Libraries and Data: Short-Term Developments, Long-Term Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of emerging practices in libraries related to data curation and management since 1993, when the era of stable, centralized nodes of scientific information first began to give way to one characterized by networked webs of digital data, communications, and services. In the last decade, libraries have begun to articulate the roles they can play as partners in cyberinfrastructure. One factor shaping recent developments is the encouragement given by some research funding agencies to integrating library-archival perspectives into major initiatives for building cyberinfrastructure. As a result, a hierarchy of data roles for libraries is emerging today, in which a small number of research libraries are working as first-tier partners in distributed data infrastructure initiatives. Meanwhile, a second tier of research libraries is defining and providing local researchers with "data services." A third tier of university and college libraries is focusing on an educational role, promoting "data literacy" as an essential part of the information toolkit of 21st century students. The longer-term prospects for libraries playing sustained and significant roles in data management and curation remain under construction and subject to debate, given that the challenges of selecting, describing, and preserving data for reuse are complex, particularly given the compressed timescale over which these challenges have emerged. The vitality and diversity of these short-term developments suggest however that cyberinfrastructure could have as transformative an impact on the practices of libraries as on the practices of science. For example, data sets promise to become a far more dominant unit of scientific communication, and many data sets will be accompanied by a dynamically changing context of translations, annotations, analyses, visualizations, summaries, and linkages. For libraries, these developments are a reminder that "information" is not a fixed good but

  9. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development.

    PubMed

    Granacher, Urs; Lesinski, Melanie; Büsch, Dirk; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Prieske, Olaf; Puta, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Behm, David G

    2016-01-01

    During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD), resistance training (RT) is an important means for (i) stimulating athletic development, (ii) tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii) inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age. Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i) to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii) to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii) to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research. In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating) training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity, and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i) to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females), (ii) to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters), and (iii) to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes.

  10. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development

    PubMed Central

    Granacher, Urs; Lesinski, Melanie; Büsch, Dirk; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Prieske, Olaf; Puta, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Behm, David G.

    2016-01-01

    During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD), resistance training (RT) is an important means for (i) stimulating athletic development, (ii) tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii) inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age. Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i) to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii) to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii) to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research. In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating) training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity, and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i) to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females), (ii) to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters), and (iii) to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes. PMID:27242538

  11. Long-Term Oocyte-Like Cell Development in Cultures Derived from Neonatal Marmoset Monkey Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Fereydouni, Bentolhoda; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Heistermann, Michael; Dressel, Ralf; Lewerich, Lucia; Drummer, Charis; Behr, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    We use the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) as a preclinical nonhuman primate model to study reproductive and stem cell biology. The neonatal marmoset monkey ovary contains numerous primitive premeiotic germ cells (oogonia) expressing pluripotent stem cell markers including OCT4A (POU5F1). This is a peculiarity compared to neonatal human and rodent ovaries. Here, we aimed at culturing marmoset oogonia from neonatal ovaries. We established a culture system being stable for more than 20 passages and 5 months. Importantly, comparative transcriptome analysis of the cultured cells with neonatal ovary, embryonic stem cells, and fibroblasts revealed a lack of germ cell and pluripotency genes indicating the complete loss of oogonia upon initiation of the culture. From passage 4 onwards, however, the cultured cells produced large spherical, free-floating cells resembling oocyte-like cells (OLCs). OLCs strongly expressed several germ cell genes and may derive from the ovarian surface epithelium. In summary, our novel primate ovarian cell culture initially lacked detectable germ cells but then produced OLCs over a long period of time. This culture system may allow a deeper analysis of early phases of female primate germ cell development and—after significant refinement—possibly also the production of monkey oocytes. PMID:26664406

  12. Developments toward a Low-Cost Approach for Long-Term, Unattended Vapor Intrusion Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, William K.

    2014-01-01

    There are over 450,000 sites contaminated by chemicals in the US. This large number of contaminated sites and the speed of subsurface migration of chemicals pose considerable risk to nearby residences and commercial buildings. The high costs for monitoring around these site stem from the labor involved in placing and replacing the passive sorbent vapor samplers and the resultant laboratory analysis. This monitoring produces sparse data sets that do not track temporal changes well. To substantially reduce costs and better track exposures, less costly, unattended systems for monitoring soil gases and vapor intrusion into homes and businesses are desirable to aid in the remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes progress toward the development of an inexpensive system specifically for monitoring vapor intrusion; the system can operate repeatedly without user intervention with low detection limits (1 × 10−9, or 1 part-per-billion). Targeted analytes include chlorinated hydrocarbons (dichloroethylene, trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene) and benzene. The system consists of a trap-and-purge preconcentrator for vapor collection in conjunction with a compact gas chromatography instrument to separate individual compounds. Chemical detection is accomplished with an array of chemicapacitors and a metal-oxide semiconductor combustibles sensor. Both the preconcentrator and the chromatography column are resistively heated. All components are compatible with ambient air, which serves as the carrier gas for the gas chromatography and detectors. PMID:24903107

  13. Long-term management of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD).

    PubMed

    Hiort, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    Differences or disorders of sex development (DSD) describe a biological discrepancy between chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypical sex, often affecting the morphology of the genito-reproductive organs. DSD is most often due to genetic abnormalities affecting chromosomal composition or single genes. Most children with 46,XX karyotype and DSD have congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency and should be regarded as unchallenged females. For children with 46,XY DSD, the situation is even much more complicated since indeed an exact genetic diagnosis is still missing. Depending on the phenotype, this may be true for more than 80% of children with severe hypospadias, in contrast in post-pubertal patients with clinical evidence of complete androgen insensitivity, whom 95% show an underlying mutation within the androgen receptor gene. DSD and numerical aberrations of sex chromosomes, especially 45,X/46,XY mosaicism depends essentially on the assessment of the exact clinical morphology with a focus of the external and internal genital structures and of the endocrine and reproductive function of the gonads with the aim for a best prognosis of the child. This assessment should be done in a center of expertise.

  14. Differentiating climatic and successional influences on long-term development of a marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Darren K.; Jackson, Stephen T.; Madsen, Barbara J.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of long—term records of local wetland vegetation dynamics with regional, climate—forced terrestrial vegetation changes can be used to differentiate the rates and effects of autogenic successional processes and allogenic environmental change on wetland vegetation dynamics. We studied Holocene plant macrofossil and pollen sequences from Portage Marsh, a shallow, 18—ha marsh in northeastern Indiana. Between 10 000 and 5700 yr BP the basin was occupied by a shallow, open lake, while upland vegetation consisted of mesic forests of Pinus, Quercus, Ulmus, and Carya. At 5700 yr BP the open lake was replaced rapidly by a shallow marsh, while simultaneously Quercus savanna developed on the surrounding uplands. The marsh was characterized by periodic drawdowns, and the uplands by periodic fires. Species composition of the marsh underwent further changes between 3000 and 2000 yr BP. Upland pollen spectra at Portage Marsh and other sites in the region shifted towards more mesic vegetation during that period. The consistency and temporal correspondence between the changes in upland vegetation and marsh vegetation indicate that the major vegetational changes in the marsh during the Holocene resulted from hydrologic changes forced by regional climate change. Progressive shallowing of the basin by autogenic accumulation of organic sediment constrained vegetational responses to climate change but did not serve as the direct mechanism of change.

  15. Development of a new welfare assessment protocol for practical application in long-term dog shelters.

    PubMed

    Barnard, S; Pedernera, C; Candeloro, L; Ferri, N; Velarde, A; Dalla Villa, P

    2016-01-01

    In many European shelters, dogs may spend many years confined. A poor environment and inappropriate management may lead to a low quality of life. The absence of harmonised European regulatory frameworks defining the minimum requirements for shelter facilities makes the definition of welfare standards for kennelled dogs challenging. Here, a new protocol was developed and tested to help identify the main welfare issues for shelter dogs. Twenty-six indicators were identified including management, resource and animal based measures. Accuracy and interobserver reliability were checked between four assessors. The protocol was applied in 29 shelters (n=1308 dogs) in six European countries. Overall prevalence of poor health conditions was below 10%. Test-retest reliability and validity of the protocol were investigated with encouraging results. A logistic regression was carried out to assess the potential of the protocol as a tool to identify welfare hazards in shelter environments. Inappropriate space allowance, for example, was found to be a risk factor potentially affecting the animal's cleanliness, skin condition and body condition. The protocol was designed to be concise and easy to implement. Systematic data collection could help identify welfare problems that are likely to arise in certain shelter designs and thus determine improvement in animal care standards. PMID:26612859

  16. Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1999-05-01

    At Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and other DOE sites, field vadose zone observations have shown complex water seepage and mass transport behavior in a highly heterogeneous, thick vadose zone on a variety of scales. Recent investigation showed that severe contamination of soils and groundwater by organic contaminant and nuclear waste occurred because of water seepage and contaminant transport along localized, preferential, fast flow within the heterogeneous vadose zone. However, most of the existing characterization and monitoring methods are not able to locate these localized and persistent preferential pathways associated with specific heterogeneous geologic features, such as clastic dikes, caliche layers, or fractures. In addition, changes in the chemical composition of moving and indigenous solutes, particularly sodium concentration, redox conditions, biological transformation of organic materials, and high temperature, may significantly alter water, chemicals, and bio-transformation exchange between the zones of fast flow and the rest of the media. In this paper, using the data from Hanford and INEEL sites, we will (1) present evidence that central problems of the vadose zone investigations are associated with preferential, fast flow phenomena and accelerated migration of organic and radioactive elements, (2) identify gaps in current characterization and monitoring technologies, and (3) recommend actions for the development of advanced vadose zone characterization and monitoring methods using a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical techniques.

  17. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Limitation over Long-Term Ecosystem Development in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Menge, Duncan N. L.; Hedin, Lars O.; Pacala, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient limitation to net primary production (NPP) displays a diversity of patterns as ecosystems develop over a range of timescales. For example, some ecosystems transition from N limitation on young soils to P limitation on geologically old soils, whereas others appear to remain N limited. Under what conditions should N limitation and P limitation prevail? When do transitions between N and P limitation occur? We analyzed transient dynamics of multiple timescales in an ecosystem model to investigate these questions. Post-disturbance dynamics in our model are controlled by a cascade of rates, from plant uptake (very fast) to litter turnover (fast) to plant mortality (intermediate) to plant-unavailable nutrient loss (slow) to weathering (very slow). Young ecosystems are N limited when symbiotic N fixation (SNF) is constrained and P weathering inputs are high relative to atmospheric N deposition and plant N:P demand, but P limited under opposite conditions. In the absence of SNF, N limitation is likely to worsen through succession (decades to centuries) because P is mineralized faster than N. Over long timescales (centuries and longer) this preferential P mineralization increases the N:P ratio of soil organic matter, leading to greater losses of plant-unavailable N versus P relative to plant N:P demand. These loss dynamics favor N limitation on older soils despite the rising organic matter N:P ratio. However, weathering depletion favors P limitation on older soils when continual P inputs (e.g., dust deposition) are low, so nutrient limitation at the terminal equilibrium depends on the balance of these input and loss effects. If NPP switches from N to P limitation over long time periods, the transition time depends most strongly on the P weathering rate. At all timescales SNF has the capacity to overcome N limitation, so nutrient limitation depends critically on limits to SNF. PMID:22870281

  18. Nitrogen and phosphorus limitation over long-term ecosystem development in terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Hedin, Lars O; Pacala, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient limitation to net primary production (NPP) displays a diversity of patterns as ecosystems develop over a range of timescales. For example, some ecosystems transition from N limitation on young soils to P limitation on geologically old soils, whereas others appear to remain N limited. Under what conditions should N limitation and P limitation prevail? When do transitions between N and P limitation occur? We analyzed transient dynamics of multiple timescales in an ecosystem model to investigate these questions. Post-disturbance dynamics in our model are controlled by a cascade of rates, from plant uptake (very fast) to litter turnover (fast) to plant mortality (intermediate) to plant-unavailable nutrient loss (slow) to weathering (very slow). Young ecosystems are N limited when symbiotic N fixation (SNF) is constrained and P weathering inputs are high relative to atmospheric N deposition and plant N:P demand, but P limited under opposite conditions. In the absence of SNF, N limitation is likely to worsen through succession (decades to centuries) because P is mineralized faster than N. Over long timescales (centuries and longer) this preferential P mineralization increases the N:P ratio of soil organic matter, leading to greater losses of plant-unavailable N versus P relative to plant N:P demand. These loss dynamics favor N limitation on older soils despite the rising organic matter N:P ratio. However, weathering depletion favors P limitation on older soils when continual P inputs (e.g., dust deposition) are low, so nutrient limitation at the terminal equilibrium depends on the balance of these input and loss effects. If NPP switches from N to P limitation over long time periods, the transition time depends most strongly on the P weathering rate. At all timescales SNF has the capacity to overcome N limitation, so nutrient limitation depends critically on limits to SNF. PMID:22870281

  19. Development and Testing of a Simple Calibration Technique for Long-Term Hydrological Impact Assessment (L-THIA) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, S.; Harbor, J.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrological studies are significant part of every engineering, developmental project and geological studies done to assess and understand the interactions between the hydrology and the environment. Such studies are generally conducted before the beginning of the project as well as after the project is completed, such that a comprehensive analysis can be done on the impact of such projects on the local and regional hydrology of the area. A good understanding of the chain of relationships that form the hydro-eco-biological and environmental cycle can be of immense help in maintaining the natural balance as we work towards exploration and exploitation of the natural resources as well as urbanization of undeveloped land. Rainfall-Runoff modeling techniques have been of great use here for decades since they provide fast and efficient means of analyzing vast amount of data that is gathered. Though process based, detailed models are better than the simple models, the later ones are used more often due to their simplicity, ease of use, and easy availability of data needed to run them. The Curve Number (CN) method developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is one of the most widely used hydrologic modeling tools in the US, and has earned worldwide acceptance as a practical method for evaluating the effects of land use changes on the hydrology of an area. The Long-Term Hydrological Impact Assessment (L-THIA) model is a basic, CN-based, user-oriented model that has gained popularity amongst watershed planners because of its reliance on readily available data, and because the model is easy to use (http://www.ecn.purdue.edu/runoff) and produces results geared to the general information needs of planners. The L-THIA model was initially developed to study the relative long-term hydrologic impacts of different land use (past/current/future) scenarios, and it has been successful in meeting this goal. However, one of the weaknesses of L-THIA, as well as other

  20. Development of Download System for Waveform Data Observed at Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System installed in the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Seiji; Horikawa, Hiroki; Takaesu, Morifumi; Sueki, Kentaro; Araki, Eiichiro; Sonoda, Akira; Takahashi, Narumi

    2016-04-01

    The Nankai Trough in southwest Japan is one of most active subduction zone in the world. Great mega-thrust earthquakes repeatedly occurred every 100 to 150 years in this area, it's anticipated to occur in the not distant future. For the purpose of elucidation of the history of mega-splay fault activity, the physical properties of the geological strata and the internal structure of the accretionary prism, and monitoring of diastrophism in this area, we have a plan, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiments (NanTroSEIZE), as a part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). We have a plan to install the borehole observation system in a few locations by the NanTroSEIZE. This system is called Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System, it consists of various sensors in the borehole such as a broadband seismometer, a tiltmeter, a strainmeter, geophones and accelerometer, thermometer array as well as pressure ports for pore-fluid pressure monitoring. The signal from sensors is transmitted to DONET (Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis) in real time. During IODP Exp. 332 in December 2010, the first Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System was installed into the C0002 borehole site located 80 km off the Kii Peninsula, 1938 m water depth in the Nankai Trough. We have developed a web application system for data download, Long-Term Borehole Monitoring Data Site. Based on a term and sensors which user selected on this site, user can download monitoring waveform data (e.g. broadband seismometer data, accelerometer data, strainmeter data, tiltmeter data) in near real-time. This system can make the arbitrary data which user selected a term and sensors, and download it simply. Downloadable continuous data is provided in seed format, which includes sensor informations. In addition, before data download, user can check that data is abailable or not by data check function. In this presentation, we show our web application system and discuss our future plans for

  1. Speech and language development after cochlear implantation in children with bony labyrinth malformations: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Catli, Tolgahan; Uckan, Burcu; Olgun, Levent

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate speech and language development after long-term cochlear implantation in children with bony labyrinth malformations (BLMs) and to present the surgical findings in this group of patients. The auditory and linguistic skills of 21 children who had BLM were assessed in this study. They were implanted between 1998 and 2009. Twenty-two sex-matched and age-matched implantees without BLM were evaluated as the control group. To compare speech perception and speech intelligibility between the groups, the categories of auditory performance (CAP) test and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) test, respectively, were administered. The Turkish version of the Test of Early Language Development (TELD-3-T) was administered to evaluate and compare the linguistic skills of the groups. Surgical findings and complications were also analyzed. Implanted anomalies were common cavity in five patients, incomplete partition type 1 in 5 patients, and incomplete partition type 2 in 11 patients. The CAP and SIR scores were significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.05), but the TELD-3-T test scores were comparable among the groups (p > 0.05). Based on the specific type of malformation, the CAP and SIR scores were comparable between the subgroups (p > 0.05). No perioperative complications occurred in the control group. However, various perioperative complications (gusher, etc.) and surgical difficulty occurred in the anomaly group. The malformation group had unsatisfactory results with regard to speech perception skills; however, this group and the non-anomalous group exhibited comparable long-term results on linguistic development.

  2. Development of the Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) Network: Current status and future trends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term research conducted at multiple scales is critical to assessing the effects of key long term drivers (e.g., global population growth; land-use change; increased competition for natural resources; climate variability and change) on our ability to sustain or enhance agricultural production to...

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up Case of Multiple Retinal Arterial Macroaneurysms Developing Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion following Ruptured Macroaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Terubayashi, Yuya; Kida, Teruyo; Fukumoto, Masanori; Sugasawa, Jun; Morishita, Seita; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal arterial macroaneurysm (RAM) has been reported in association with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), and usually BRVO precedes RAM. We present a long-term follow-up case report of unilateral multiple RAMs that developed BRVO following ruptured RAM in the same retinal quadrant. Case Presentation An 80-year-old woman presented with floaters in her right eye in June 2012. Visual acuity (VA) was 20/25 in her right eye with posterior capsular opacity. Her fundus showed the first ruptured RAM at the superotemporal vascular arcade with subinternal limiting membrane and subretinal hemorrhages not involving the macula. These were absorbed gradually with a VA of 20/20. After 2 years, the second RAM at the proximal superotemporal vascular arcade developed and impending BRVO occurred with macular edema at the distal site of the RAM. With the RAM located close to the arteriovenous crossing, her VA was dropped to 20/60. Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab was performed and macular edema was resolved with improved vision of 20/30. Three months later, she realized a sudden vision loss of 2/200. Her posterior pole showed massive pre- and subretinal hemorrhages, and vitrectomy was performed. The source of bleeding was the third RAM's rupture in a different artery. Her vision improved to 20/30. The unaffected eye showed no RAMs. Conclusion We experienced a long-term follow-up case of multiple RAMs showing different courses. We should cautiously note that BRVO can occur following RAM at the arteriovenous crossing. PMID:27462250

  4. Development of an adaptive monitoring framework for long-term programs: An example using indicators of fish health.

    PubMed

    Arciszewski, Tim J; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2015-10-01

    Detecting unwanted changes associated with localized human activities in aquatic ecosystems requires defining the value of an indicator expected at a site in the absence of development. Ideally, adequate and comparable baseline data will be collected at an exposure location before that development, but this is rarely done. Instead, comparisons are made using various designs to overcome the inadequate or missing baseline data. Commonly these comparisons are done over short periods, using information from local reference sites to estimate variability expected at the exposed site. Results of these truncated designs are often evaluated using p values that may have little bearing on ecologically relevant changes. To remedy the reliance of studies on small datasets collected at reference sites, other designs emphasize regional analyses, but these may be insensitive to site-specific changes. Some designs also may forego discussing the consequences of detecting any differences. A new monitoring framework has been proposed to use existing solutions, simplify analysis, and focus on the detection of meaningful changes. It is illustrated here by using data on fish health from a large-scale, long-term program in the Moose River basin in northern Ontario. This framework advocates interpretation of data at multiple scales: within-site, locally, and regionally. The primary focus is on estimating a range from a probability distribution of historical data collected at a specific location where 95% of future observations are predicted to occur. Changes at the exposed site are also compared with historical and contemporary expectations from proximate and regional reference sites. Critical effect sizes also can be derived from regional reference data to evaluate the magnitude of differences observed between any 2 sites. Any unexpected changes inform future monitoring decisions provided by a priori guidance. Adoption of this framework extends the utility of monitoring programs in which

  5. Short and long-term lifestyle coaching approaches used to address diverse participant barriers to weight loss and physical activity adherence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual barriers to weight loss and physical activity goals in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized trial with 3.2 years average treatment duration, have not been previously reported. Evaluating barriers and the lifestyle coaching approaches used to improve adherence in a large, diverse participant cohort can inform dissemination efforts. Methods Lifestyle coaches documented barriers and approaches after each session (mean session attendance = 50.3 ± 21.8). Subjects were 1076 intensive lifestyle participants (mean age = 50.6 years; mean BMI = 33.9 kg/m2; 68% female, 48% non-Caucasian). Barriers and approaches used to improve adherence were ranked by the percentage of the cohort for whom they applied. Barrier groupings were also analyzed in relation to baseline demographic characteristics. Results Top weight loss barriers reported were problems with self-monitoring (58%); social cues (58%); holidays (54%); low activity (48%); and internal cues (thought/mood) (44%). Top activity barriers were holidays (51%); time management (50%); internal cues (30%); illness (29%), and motivation (26%). The percentage of the cohort having any type of barrier increased over the long-term intervention period. A majority of the weight loss barriers were significantly associated with younger age, greater obesity, and non-Caucasian race/ethnicity (p-values vary). Physical activity barriers, particularly thought and mood cues, social cues and time management, physical injury or illness and access/weather, were most significantly associated with being female and obese (p < 0.001 for all). Lifestyle coaches used problem-solving with most participants (≥75% short-term; > 90% long term) and regularly reviewed self-monitoring skills. More costly approaches were used infrequently during the first 16 sessions (≤10%) but increased over 3.2 years. Conclusion Behavioral problem solving approaches have short and long term dissemination potential

  6. Sex-related long-term behavioral and hippocampal cellular alterations after nociceptive stimulation throughout postnatal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Márcia; Malheiros, Jackeline; Negrigo, Aline; Tescarollo, Fabio; Medeiros, Magda; Suchecki, Deborah; Tannús, Alberto; Guinsburg, Ruth; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-02-01

    Early noxious stimuli may alter the neurogenesis rate in the dentate gyrus and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats. This study evaluated the long-term effects of noxious stimulation, imposed in different phases of development, on nociceptive and anxiety-like behaviors, hippocampal activation, cell proliferation, hippocampal BDNF and plasma corticosterone levels in 40 day-old male and female adolescents. Noxious stimulation was induced by intra-plantar injection of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), on postnatal days (P) 1 (group P1), 8 (P8) or 21 (P21). Control animals were not stimulated in any way. On P21 a subset of animals from each group received BrdU and was perfused on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Another subset of rats was subjected to behavioral testing on P40 and one week later, to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition. Noxious stimulation evoked hypoalgesia in adolescents, mainly in females (P < 0.02), reflected by greater latency to withdraw the paw and less paw lickings in the hot plate test than controls (P < 0.001). It also resulted in more time spent in the open arms, e.g., less anxiety-like behavior than controls (P < 0.01), especially in females (P < 0.01, compared with males). Proliferative cell rate in the dentate gyrus was the highest in P8 males and females (P < 0.001), with males exhibiting more proliferation than females on P1 and P8, which was directly related to the hippocampal levels of BDNF and inversely related to plasma corticosterone. Sex differences were also detected in manganese-enhanced MRI signal, which was more prominent in P1 females than males (P < 0.01). This study represents the first step of investigation on the cellular basis of the sex-dependent long-term consequences of nociceptive stimuli in newborns. PMID:24148811

  7. Predictors and long-term clinical outcomes of newly developed atrial fibrillation in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Sung; Chun, Kwang Jin; Hwang, Jin kyung; Park, Seung-Jung; Park, Kyoung-Min; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate predictors and long-term prognosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) following cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation in patients without history of AF. Methods: From May 1994 to April 2014, 1825 patients with CIED were enrolled in a retrospective, single-center registry. A total of 880 patients from the registry without prior documented AF history were included in the final analysis and were placed into either non-detected AF (NDAF) group or CIED-detected AF group according to development of AF over a follow-up period of 7 years. AF development was defined as any paroxysmal atrial tachyarrhythmia (atrial rate ≥ 180 beats/min) lasting at least 5 minutes according to CIED records. Results: Overall, 122 (13.8%) of the 880 patients experienced new development of AF during follow-up period. According to multivariate analysis, the independent predictors for development of AF were prior heart failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50–3.85; P < 0.001), prior sinus node dysfunction (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.62–3.55; P < 0.001), and left atrium volume index of 38.5 mL/m2 or more (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.23–3.30; P = 0.005). In CDAF group, the risk of heart failure readmission (adjusted HR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.99–7.22; P < 0.001) and stroke readmission (adjusted HR, 5.33; 95% CI, 1.58–17.97; P = 0.007) was higher than in nondetected AF group. Conclusion: In patients with CIED, prior history of heart failure, sinus node dysfunction, and LA volume index ≥38.5 mL/m2 were independent predictors of new AF cases. Newly developed AF was significantly associated with increased risk of HF and stroke readmission, according to long-term follow up. PMID:27428213

  8. Can a Robot Be Perceived as a Developing Creature? Effects of a Robot's Long-Term Cognitive Developments on Its Social Presence and People's Social Responses toward It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kwan Min; Park, Namkee; Song, Hayeon

    2005-01-01

    This study tests the effect of long-term artificial development of a robot on users' feelings of social presence and social responses toward the robot. The study is a 2 (developmental capability: developmental versus fully matured) x 2 (number of participants: individual versus group) between-subjects experiment (N = 40) in which participants…

  9. Long-term in vivo harmonics imaging of zebrafish embryonic development based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-Y.; Tsai, T.-H.; Hsieh, C.-S.; Tai, S.-P.; Lin, C.-Y.; Ko, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.-C.; Tsai, H.-J.; Hu, C.-H.; Sun, C.-K.

    2005-03-01

    Based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser, harmonics optical microscopy (HOM) provides a truly "noninvasive" tool for in vivo and long-term study of vertebrate embryonic development. Based on optical nonlinearity, HOM provides sub-micrometer 3D spatial resolution and high 3D optical-sectioning power without using invasive and toxic fluorophores. Since only virtual-level-transition is involved, HOM is known to leave no energy deposition and no photodamage. Combined with second harmonic generation, which is sensitive to specific structure such as nerve and muscle fibers, HOM can perform functional studies of early developmental dynamics of many vertebrate physiological systems. Recently, zebrafish has become a standard model for many biological and medical studies of vertebrates, due to the similarity between embryonic development of zebrafish and human being. Here we demonstrate in vivo HOM studies of developmental dynamics of several important embryonic physiological systems in live zebrafish embryos, with focuses on the developments of brains, eyes, ears, and hearts. Based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser, which provides the deepest penetration (~1.5mm) and least photodamage in the zebrafish embryo, complete developing processes of different physiological systems within a period of time longer than 20 hours can be non-invasively observed inside the same embryo.

  10. The design and development of a long-term fall detection system incorporated into a custom vest for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Alan K; van de Ven, Pepijn W J; Chaya, Amy E; OLaighin, Gearóid M; Nelson, John

    2008-01-01

    A fall detection system and algorithm, incorporated into a custom designed garment has been developed. The developed fall detection system uses a tri-axial accelerometer, microcontroller, battery and Bluetooth module. This sensor is attached to a custom designed vest, designed to be worn by the elderly person under clothing. The fall detection algorithm was developed and incorporates both impact and posture detection capability. The vest and fall algorithm was tested on young healthy subjects performing normal activities of daily living (ADL) and falls onto crash mats, while wearing the best and sensor. Results show that falls can de distinguished from normal activities with a sensitivity >90% and a specificity of >99%, from a total data set of 264 falls and 165 normal ADL. By incorporating the fall-detection sensor into a custom designed garment it is anticipated that greater compliance when wearing a fall-detection system can be achieved and will help reduce the incidence of the long-lie, when falls occur in the elderly population. However further long-term testing using elderly subjects is required to validate the systems performance.

  11. Developing Conceptual Models of Biodegradation: Lessons Learned From a Long-Term Study of a Crude-Oil Contaminant Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzarelli, I. M.; Esaid, H. I.; Bekins, B. A.; Eganhouse, R. P.; Baedecker, M.

    2002-05-01

    Assessment of natural attenuation as a remedial option requires understanding the long-term fate of contaminant compounds. The development of correct conceptual models of biodegradation requires observations at spatial and temporal scales appropriate for the reactions being measured. For example, the availability of electron acceptors such as solid-phase iron oxides may vary at the cm scale due to aquifer heterogeneities. Characterizing the distribution of these oxides may require small-scale measurements over time scales of tens of years in order to assess their impact on the fate of contaminants. The long-term study of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminant plume near Bemidji, MN provides insight into how natural attenuation of hydrocarbons evolves over time. The sandy glacial-outwash aquifer at this USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology research site was contaminated by crude oil in 1979. During the 16 years that data have been collected the shape and extent of the contaminant plume changed as redox reactions, most notably iron reduction, progressed over time. Investigation of the controlling microbial reactions in this system required a systematic and multi-scaled approach. Early indications of plume shrinkage were observed over a time scale of a few years, based on observation well data. These changes were associated with iron reduction near the crude-oil source. The depletion of Fe (III) oxides near the contaminant source caused the dissolved iron concentrations to increase and spread downgradient at a rate of approximately 3 m/year. The zone of maximum benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) concentrations has also spread within the anoxic plume. Subsequent analyses of sediment and water, collected at small-scale cm intervals from cores in the contaminant plume, provided insight into the evolution of redox zones at smaller scales. Contaminants, such as ortho-xylene, that appeared to be contained near the oil source based on the larger

  12. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  13. Observations From The Field: Further Developing Linkages Between Soil C models with Long-Term Bioenergy Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmer, M.; Jin, V.; Wienhold, B.

    2015-12-01

    Biofuel feedstocks are being developed and evaluated in the United States and Europe to partially offset petroleum transport fuels. Accurate accounting of upstream and downstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is necessary to measure the overall carbon intensity of new biofuel feedstocks. Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on estimating overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimating changes in SOC, when accounted for in a LCA, is largely derived from near-surface soil depths , typically to a depth of 30 cm or less. The majority of soil models do not model SOC changes below near-surface soil depths. Perennial herbaceous roots often extend much deeper than 30 cm and changes in cumulative SOC stocks may not be fully accounted for. Further, there is limited empirical data to validate SOC changes at soil depth from bioenergy crops with soil C models. Further calibration, validation, and intercomparisons of soil C models with long-term, field-based bioenergy studies are needed to accurately predict SOC stock changes at depth under variable soil types, climates, and cropping systems. From a LCA perspective, determining SOC stock changes at sub-surface depths would be a logical step to accurately quantify biofuel GHG emissions especially in bioenergy cropping systems with high potential for soil C storage. Presentation objectives will look at developing linkages and determining research needs from field-based SOC changes to modeling and looking at future landscapes with increased bioenergy feedstocks.

  14. Long-term cultured mesenchymal stem cells frequently develop genomic mutations but do not undergo malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Zhang, Z; Chi, Y; Zhang, Q; Xu, F; Yang, Z; Meng, L; Yang, S; Yan, S; Mao, A; Zhang, J; Yang, Y; Wang, S; Cui, J; Liang, L; Ji, Y; Han, Z-B; Fang, X; Han, Z C

    2013-01-01

    Cultured human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are being tested in several clinical trials and encouraging outcomes have been observed. To determine whether in vitro expansion influences the genomic stability of hUC-MSCs, we maintained nine hUC-MSC clones in long-term culture and comparatively analyzed them at early and late passages. All of the clones senesced in culture, exhibiting decreased telomerase activity and shortened telomeres. Two clones showed no DNA copy number variations (CNVs) at passage 30 (P30). Seven clones had ≥1 CNVs at P30 compared with P3, and one of these clones appeared trisomic chromosome 10 at the late passage. No tumor developed in immunodeficient mice injected with hUC-MSCs, regardless of whether the cells had CNVs at the late passage. mRNA-Seq analysis indicated that pathways of cell cycle control and DNA damage response were downregulated during in vitro culture in hUC-MSC clones that showed genomic instability, but the same pathways were upregulated in the clones with good genomic stability. These results demonstrated that hUC-MSCs can be cultured for many passages and attain a large number of cells, but most of the cultured hUC-MSCs develop genomic alterations. Although hUC-MSCs with genomic alterations do not undergo malignant transformation, periodic genomic monitoring and donor management focusing on genomic stability are recommended before these cells are used for clinical applications. PMID:24309937

  15. Initial development of patient-reported instrument assessing harm, efficacy, and misuse of long-term opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, William C; Fiellin, David A; Black, Anne C; Kostovich, Carol T; Kerns, Robert D; Fraenkel, Liana

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines on long-term opioid therapy recommend frequent reassessment of harm, efficacy, and misuse of these potentially harmful and sometimes ineffective medications. In primary care, there is a need for a brief, patient-reported instrument. This report details the initial steps in the development of such an instrument. An interdisciplinary team of clinician-scientists performed four discrete steps in this study: (1) conceptualization of the purpose and function of the instrument, (2) assembly of an item pool, (3) expert rating on which items were most important to include in the instrument, and (4) modification of expert-selected items based on a reading level check and cognitive interviews with patients. A diverse panel of 47 subject matter experts was presented with 69 items to rate on a 1-9 scale in terms of importance for inclusion in the instrument. The panel highly rated 37 items: 8 related to harm, 4 related to efficacy, and 25 related to misuse. These 37 items were then tested for patient comprehension and modified as needed. Next steps in development will include further item reduction, testing against a gold standard, and assessment of the instrument's effect on clinical outcomes.

  16. Long-term effects of offshore oil and gas development: an assessment and a research strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boesch, D.F.; Rabalais, N.N.

    1985-06-01

    The book includes technical assessments regarding the environmental implications of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development in thirteen topical areas ranging from Petroleum Industry Operations: Present and Future to A Review of Study Designs for the Detection of Long-term Environmental Effects of Offshore Activities. These technical assessments support an analysis which identifies the following future research needs: Chronic effects from the persistence of medium and high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclics and their degradation products in sediments and cold environments; Residual damage from oil spills to biogenically structured communities such as coastal wetlands, reefs and vegetation beds; Effects of channelization for pipeline routing and navigation on wetlands; Effects of fouling by oil of birds, mammals, and turtles, especially in species in which a large percentage of the population aggregates at certain times; Effects on benthos of drilling discharges accumulated through field development; Effects of produced water discharges generated offshore but discharged into nearshore environments; Effects of noise and other physical disturbances on populations of birds, mammals and turtles; Reduction of fishery stocks due to mortality of eggs and larvae as a result of oil spills; Effects of man-made, usually gravel, islands and causeways in the Arctic on benthos and anadromous fish species.

  17. Modelling cadmium contamination in paddy soils under long-term remediation measures: Model development and stochastic simulations.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chi; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2016-09-01

    A pollutant accumulation model (PAM) based on the mass balance theory was developed to simulate long-term changes of heavy metal concentrations in soil. When combined with Monte Carlo simulation, the model can predict the probability distributions of heavy metals in a soil-water-plant system with fluctuating environmental parameters and inputs from multiple pathways. The model was used for evaluating different remediation measures to deal with Cd contamination of paddy soils in Youxian county (Hunan province), China, under five scenarios, namely the default scenario (A), not returning paddy straw to the soil (B), reducing the deposition of Cd (C), liming (D), and integrating several remediation measures (E). The model predicted that the Cd contents of soil can lowered significantly by (B) and those of the plants by (D). However, in the long run, (D) will increase soil Cd. The concentrations of Cd in both soils and rice grains can be effectively reduced by (E), although it will take decades of effort. The history of Cd pollution and the major causes of Cd accumulation in soil were studied by means of sensitivity analysis and retrospective simulation. PMID:27257714

  18. Phenotypic plasticity in the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina): long-term physiological effects of chronic hypoxia during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Oliver H; Eme, John; Rhen, Turk; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-01-15

    Studies of embryonic and hatchling reptiles have revealed marked plasticity in morphology, metabolism, and cardiovascular function following chronic hypoxic incubation. However, the long-term effects of chronic hypoxia have not yet been investigated in these animals. The aim of this study was to determine growth and postprandial O2 consumption (V̇o2), heart rate (fH), and mean arterial pressure (Pm, in kPa) of common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) that were incubated as embryos in chronic hypoxia (10% O2, H10) or normoxia (21% O2, N21). We hypothesized that hypoxic development would modify posthatching body mass, metabolic rate, and cardiovascular physiology in juvenile snapping turtles. Yearling H10 turtles were significantly smaller than yearling N21 turtles, both of which were raised posthatching in normoxic, common garden conditions. Measurement of postprandial cardiovascular parameters and O2 consumption were conducted in size-matched three-year-old H10 and N21 turtles. Both before and 12 h after feeding, H10 turtles had a significantly lower fH compared with N21 turtles. In addition, V̇o2 was significantly elevated in H10 animals compared with N21 animals 12 h after feeding, and peak postprandial V̇o2 occurred earlier in H10 animals. Pm of three-year-old turtles was not affected by feeding or hypoxic embryonic incubation. Our findings demonstrate that physiological impacts of developmental hypoxia on embryonic reptiles continue into juvenile life.

  19. Short and long term effects of bioturbation on soil erosion, water resources and soil development in an arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, A.

    1995-09-01

    The importance of vegetal cover on soil erosion processes has been recognized for a long time. However, the short and long term effects of faunal activity on soil erosion and soil development had been largely overlooked by geomorphologists. The study of runoff and erosion processes in the Negev desert indicated pronounced systematic differences in sediment concentration and soil erosion rates between rocky and colluvial surfaces. Erosion rates were always higher on the former than on the latter. Field observations drew attention to an intense burrowing and digging activity conducted mainly by Isopods and Porcupines. The monitoring of this activity, based on a grid system, which consists of rows 5 m wide, lasted ten consecutive years. Data obtained suggest the existence of a strong link between the spatial pattern of bioturbation and that of soil erosion. The study also examines, through feedback processes, the regulatory role of bioturbation on the spatial distribution of water availability; soil moisture and soil forming processes. Due to bioturbation two distinct environments were recognised. The rocky environment which is characterized by a positive feedback with a high water availability and low soil salinity; and the soil covered areas where a negative feedback results in low water availability and a high soil salinity.

  20. Phenotypic plasticity in the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina): long-term physiological effects of chronic hypoxia during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Oliver H; Eme, John; Rhen, Turk; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-01-15

    Studies of embryonic and hatchling reptiles have revealed marked plasticity in morphology, metabolism, and cardiovascular function following chronic hypoxic incubation. However, the long-term effects of chronic hypoxia have not yet been investigated in these animals. The aim of this study was to determine growth and postprandial O2 consumption (V̇o2), heart rate (fH), and mean arterial pressure (Pm, in kPa) of common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) that were incubated as embryos in chronic hypoxia (10% O2, H10) or normoxia (21% O2, N21). We hypothesized that hypoxic development would modify posthatching body mass, metabolic rate, and cardiovascular physiology in juvenile snapping turtles. Yearling H10 turtles were significantly smaller than yearling N21 turtles, both of which were raised posthatching in normoxic, common garden conditions. Measurement of postprandial cardiovascular parameters and O2 consumption were conducted in size-matched three-year-old H10 and N21 turtles. Both before and 12 h after feeding, H10 turtles had a significantly lower fH compared with N21 turtles. In addition, V̇o2 was significantly elevated in H10 animals compared with N21 animals 12 h after feeding, and peak postprandial V̇o2 occurred earlier in H10 animals. Pm of three-year-old turtles was not affected by feeding or hypoxic embryonic incubation. Our findings demonstrate that physiological impacts of developmental hypoxia on embryonic reptiles continue into juvenile life. PMID:26608655

  1. Long-Term Climate Change Assessment Task for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program: Status through FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, K.L.; Chatters, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized (Adams and Wing 1986) to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The goals of the Barrier Development Program are to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 years; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-year design life. The performance and stability of natural barrier analogs that have existed for several millennia and the reconstruction of climate changes during the past 10,000 to 125,000 years also will provide insight into bounding conditions of possible future changes and increase confidence in the barriers design. In the following discussion the term {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} references periods of time up to 1000`s of years, distinguishing it from {open_quotes}short-term{close_quotes} weather patterns covering a decade or less. Specific activities focus on planning and conducting a series of studies and tests required to confirm key aspects of the barrier design. The effort is a collaborative one between scientists and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to design barriers to limit movement of radionuclides and other contaminants to the accessible environment for at least 1,000 years. These activities have been divided into 14 groups of tasks that aid in the complete development of protective barrier and warning marker system.

  2. General Anesthesia Causes Long-term Impairment of Mitochondrial Morphogenesis and Synaptic Transmission in Developing Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Victoria; Feinstein, Shawn D.; Lunardi, Nadia; Joksovic, Pavle M.; Boscolo, Annalisa; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinically used general anesthetics, alone or in combination, are damaging to the developing mammalian brain. In addition to causing widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration in vulnerable brain regions, exposure to general anesthesia at the peak of synaptogenesis causes learning and memory deficiencies later in life. Our in-vivo rodent studies have suggested that activation of the intrinsic (mitochondria-dependent) apoptotic pathway is the earliest warning sign of neuronal damage, suggesting that a disturbance in mitochondrial integrity and function could be the earliest triggering events. Methods Since proper and timely mitochondrial morphogenesis is critical for brain development, we examined the long-term effects of a commonly used anesthesia combination (isoflurane, nitrous oxide, and midazolam) on the regional distribution, ultrastructural properties, and electron transport chain function of mitochondria, as well as synaptic neurotransmission, in the subiculum of rat pups. Results This anesthesia, administered at the peak of synaptogenesis, causes protracted injury to mitochondria, including significant enlargement of mitochondria (over 30%, p < 0.05), impairment of their structural integrity, about 28% increase in their complex IV activity (p < 0.05) and two-fold decrease in their regional distribution in presynaptic neuronal profiles (p < 0.05) where their presence is crucially important for the normal development and functioning of synapses. Consequently, we showed that impaired mitochondrial morphogenesis is accompanied by heightened autophagic activity, decrease in mitochondrial density (about 27%, p < 0.05) and long-lasting disturbances in inhibitory synaptic neurotransmission. The interrelation of these phenomena remains to be established. Conclusion Developing mitochondria are exquisitely vulnerable to general anesthesia and may be important early target of anesthesia-induced developmental neurodegeneration. PMID:21909020

  3. Development and Analysis of a Long Term, Global, Terrestrial Land Surface Temperature Dataset Based on HIRS Satellite Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Eric; Siemann, Amanda; Coccia, Gabriele; Pan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a critical state variable for surface energy exchanges as it is one of the controls on emitted radiation at the Earth's surface. LST also exerts an important control on turbulent fluxes through the temperature gradient between LST and air temperature. Although observations of surface energy balance components are widely accessible from in-situ stations in most developed regions, these ground-based observations are not available in many underdeveloped regions. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide wider spatial coverage to derive LST over land, and are used in this study to form a high resolution, long term LST data product. Satellite measurements from the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) sensor has been selected by the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Project (GEWEX) Data and Analysis Project (GDAP) as the primary satellite observations for the development of GDAP's internally consistent datasets due to HIRS' multi-decadal data record length. Using a post-processing Bayesian statistical procedure, a HIRS-consistent LST data set is developed at a hourly, global land, 0.5 degree resolution for clear and cloudy conditions from 1979 to 2009 through merging the National Centers for Environmental Protection (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) LST estimates with the HIRS retrievals. The Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) observations are used to validate the HIRS retrievals, the CFSR LST estimates, as well as the final merged LST dataset. An intercomparison between the original retrievals and CFSR LST datasets, before and after merging, is also presented with an analysis of the datasets including an error assessment of the final LST dataset.

  4. Long-term cannabidiol treatment prevents the development of social recognition memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, David; Spiro, Adena S; Jenner, Andrew M; Garner, Brett; Karl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in cognitive ability and widespread pathophysiological changes caused by neurotoxicity, neuroinflammation, oxidative damage, and altered cholesterol homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to reverse cognitive deficits of AD transgenic mice and to exert neuroprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. Here we evaluate the preventative properties of long-term CBD treatment in male AβPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP × PS1) mice, a transgenic model of AD. Control and AD transgenic mice were treated orally from 2.5 months of age with CBD (20 mg/kg) daily for 8 months. Mice were then assessed in the social preference test, elevated plus maze, and fear conditioning paradigms, before cortical and hippocampal tissues were analyzed for amyloid load, oxidative damage, cholesterol, phytosterols, and inflammation. We found that AβPP × PS1 mice developed a social recognition deficit, which was prevented by CBD treatment. CBD had no impact on anxiety or associative learning. The prevention of the social recognition deficit was not associated with any changes in amyloid load or oxidative damage. However, the study revealed a subtle impact of CBD on neuroinflammation, cholesterol, and dietary phytosterol retention, which deserves further investigation. This study is the first to demonstrate CBD's ability to prevent the development of a social recognition deficit in AD transgenic mice. Our findings provide the first evidence that CBD may have potential as a preventative treatment for AD with a particular relevance for symptoms of social withdrawal and facial recognition.

  5. Development of testing and analysis methodology to assess the long term durability of polymeric composites at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven

    1990-01-01

    A workshop was held to help assess the state-of-the-art in evaluating the long term durability of polymeric matrix composites (PMCs) and to recommend future activities. Design and evaluation of PMCs at elevated temperatures were discussed. The workshop presentations, the findings of the workshop sessions are briefly summarized.

  6. A Model for the Development of Virtual Communities for People with Long-Term, Severe Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, C. M.; Bruce, C. S.; Hallam, G.; Hills, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results of an investigation into the needs of persons with disabilities wanting to participate in the use of virtual communities. The aim was to investigate "how virtual communities for persons with long-term, severe physical disabilities can best be facilitated"? Method: A Grounded Theory approach was…

  7. Measuring Adult Memory: The Development and Validation of a New Instrument To Measure Long-term Memory in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, Jeb

    2001-01-01

    An instrument measuring visual memory span in long-term memory was tested on 239 adults using pictures of common objects. Correlations were found between the number of images recalled and age, level of education, level of income, intelligence, sex, and social activity. (Contains 21 references.) (Author/JOW)

  8. The Long-Term Effects of Vocational Education: Earnings, Employment, Education, and Aspirations. Research and Development Series No. 246.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desy, Jeanne; And Others

    This national cross-sectional survey provides data on the long-term outcomes of vocational education. Chapter 1 offers background information and describes the sample--1,539 people between the ages of 20 and 34, one-half of whom had taken vocational education programs in high school. Chapter 2 describes the broad context within which the labor…

  9. Effect of variable long-term maternal feed allowance on the development of the ovine placenta and fetus.

    PubMed

    Quigley, S P; Kleemann, D O; Walker, S K; Speck, P A; Rudiger, S R; Nattrass, G S; DeBlasio, M J; Owens, J A

    2008-06-01

    Maternal feed allowance during pregnancy can affect the development of the ovine placenta and fetus. The impact of variations in feed allowance prior to as well as throughout pregnancy has received less attention. Ewes were offered 0.6 (R), 1.2 (C) or 1.8 (AL) maintenance requirements from 89 days before conception until day 133 of pregnancy. Ewes were euthanised on days 50, 92 and 133 of pregnancy. Ewe live weight and body condition score, maternal and fetal metabolic and hormonal profiles, fetal body dimensions and organ weights, and the number, weight and morphology of placentomes were measured. Maternal live weight and condition score were lower in R compared to AL ewes at all stages of pregnancy (P<0.05). Plasma glucose and albumin concentrations of R ewes were significantly reduced (P<0.05) at mid and late gestation, respectively. Placental components were generally unresponsive to long term variations in maternal feed allowance. However, placental weight was significantly (P<0.05) correlated with fetal weight at days 50 (r=0.59) and 133 (r=0.69) of gestation. By late gestation growth-retarded singleton fetuses from R ewes were 19% lighter (P<0.05), with reduced abdominal (9%) and thoracic (10%) girths (P<0.05) but of similar crown-rump length compared with fetuses from AL ewes. These differences were associated with significantly reduced IGF-I concentrations in fetal plasma (P<0.05). In conclusion, maternal, placental and fetal adaptations to long established planes of variable maternal feed allowance were able to maintain fetal growth during early and mid-pregnancy while fetal growth restriction, associated with reduced fetal IGF-I levels, became apparent in late pregnancy. PMID:18417210

  10. Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2012-03-01

    Measurement of blood analytes, such as pH and glucose, provide crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Red blood cells serve as an attractive alternative for carriers of analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, these carriers may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are also biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed carrier system takes advantage of the ability of the red blood cells to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before the membranes lyse, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. Analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution may then diffuse into the perforated red blood cells and become entrapped upon restoration of physiological temperature and osmolarity. Because the membranes contain various analyte transporters, intracellular analyte levels rapidly equilibrate to those of the extracellular solution. A fluorescent dye has been loaded inside of red blood cells using a preswelling technique. Alterations in preparation parameters have been shown to affect characteristics of the resulting dye-loaded red blood cells (e.g., intensity of fluorescence).

  11. Innovations and Lessons Learned Developing the USDA Long-Term Agroecosystem Research Network Common Observatory Data Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. D.; Heilman, P.; Goodrich, D. C.; Sadler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective for the USDA Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network Common Observatory Repository (CORe) is to provide data management services including archive, discovery, and access for consistently observed data across all 18 nodes. LTAR members have an average of 56 years of diverse historic data. Each LTAR has designated a representative 'permanent' site as the location's common meteorological observatory. CORe implementation is phased, starting with meteorology, then adding hydrology, eddy flux, soil, and biology data. A design goal was to adopt existing best practices while minimizing the additional data management duties for the researchers. LTAR is providing support for data management specialists at the locations and the National Agricultural Library is providing central data management services. Maintaining continuity with historical observations is essential, so observations from both the legacy and new common methods are included in CORe. International standards are used to store robust descriptive metadata (ISO 19115) for the observation station and surrounding locale (WMO), sensors (Sensor ML), and activity (e.g., re-calibration, locale changes) to provide sufficient detail for novel data re-use for the next 50 years. To facilitate data submission a simple text format was designed. Datasets in CORe will receive DOIs to encourage citations giving fair credit for data providers. Data and metadata access are designed to support multiple formats and naming conventions. An automated QC process is being developed to enhance comparability among LTAR locations and to generate QC process metadata. Data provenance is maintained with a permanent record of changes including those by local scientists reviewing the automated QC results. Lessons learned so far include increase in site acceptance of CORe with the decision to store data from both legacy and new common methods. A larger than anticipated variety of currently used methods with potentially

  12. Space Science for Middle School Teachers: Integrating CINDI E/PO into a Long-Term Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2005-12-01

    Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) targeting pre-college education can be focused on teachers or students, but is ultimately only effective if it impacts classrooms. A challenge in the teacher workshop model is tracking the impact we have actually made. Teachers may be excited by our offerings, and rate workshops highly, but is our E/PO actually making a difference with pre-college students? In June 2005 we ran our second four-day teacher workshop for the joint NASA/U.S. Air Force sponsored ionospheric instrument package, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) with a new twist. We experimented with the integration of our workshop into a long-term professional development program for 6th and 7th grade teachers at UT Dallas. Immediate direct benefits to the CINDI E/PO program included knowledge of teacher backgrounds prior to the workshop, a narrow target grade level range, and the elimination of the need for separate recruiting efforts. More importantly, by working within a year-long program supported by a Teacher Quality Grant we have been able to better assess teacher learning and the impact our outreach efforts is having on the middle school students of participants. The 20-contact hours our workshop contributed to the Teacher Quality Summer Institute were specifically designed to meet Texas standards for middle school science, and made connections between space weather, Earth systems, basic physics, technology, and communications. Participants were able to interact with members of the science team in formal settings and over casual lunches. We will present our motivations for this experiment, participant feedback, and lessons learned. In addition, we will give an update on our CINDI Educator Guide, and the newly completed Cindi in Space comic book. For the latest on CINDI E/PO, curriculum materials, and the comic book in pdf format, go to http://cindispace.utdallas.edu/education/.

  13. Development, Long-Term Operation and Portability of a Real-Environment Speech-Oriented Guidance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cincarek, Tobias; Kawanami, Hiromichi; Nisimura, Ryuichi; Lee, Akinobu; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro

    In this paper, the development, long-term operation and portability of a practical ASR application in a real environment is investigated. The target application is a speech-oriented guidance system installed at the local community center. The system has been exposed to ordinary people since November 2002. More than 300 hours or more than 700,000 inputs have been collected during four years. The outcome is a rare example of a large scale real-environment speech database. A simulation experiment is carried out with this database to investigate how the system's performance improves during the first two years of operation. The purpose is to determine empirically the amount of real-environment data which has to be prepared to build a system with reasonable speech recognition performance and response accuracy. Furthermore, the relative importance of developing the main system components, i. e. speech recognizer and the response generation module, is assessed. Although depending on the system's modeling capacities and domain complexity, experimental results show that overall performance stagnates after employing about 10-15k utterances for training the acoustic model, 40-50k utterances for training the language model and 40k-50k utterances for compiling the question and answer database. The Q & A database was most important for improving the system's response accuracy. Finally, the portability of the well-trained first system prototype for a different environment, a local subway station, is investigated. Since collection and preparation of large amounts of real data is impractical in general, only one month of data from the new environment is employed for system adaptation. While the speech recognition component of the first prototype has a high degree of portability, the response accuracy is lower than in the first environment. The main reason is a domain difference between the two systems, since they are installed in different environments. This implicates that it is

  14. Development of a bioartificial pancreas: II. Effects of oxygen on long-term entrapped betaTC3 cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Papas, K K; Long, R C; Sambanis, A; Constantinidis, I

    1999-01-01

    Tissue-engineered pancreatic constructs based on immunoisolated, insulin-secreting cells are promising in providing an effective, relatively inexpensive, long-term treatment for type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes. An in vitro characterization of construct function under conditions mimicking the in vivo environment is essential prior to any extensive animal experimentation. Encapsulated cells may experience hypoxic conditions postimplantation as a result of one or more of the following: the design of the construct; the environment at the implantation site; or the development of fibrosis around the construct. In this work, we studied the effects of 3- and 4-day-long hypoxic episodes on the metabolic and secretory activities and on the levels of intracellular metabolites detectable by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR) of alginate/poly-L-lysine/alginate entrapped betaTC3 mouse insulinomas continuously perfused with culture medium. Results show that, upon decreasing the oxygen concentration in the surrounding medium, the encapsulated cell system reached a new, lower metabolic and secretory state. Hypoxia drove the cells to a more anaerobic glycolytic metabolism, increased the rates of glucose consumption (GCR) and lactate production (LPR), and reduced the rates of oxygen consumption (OCR) and insulin secretion (ISR). Furthermore, hypoxia reduced the levels of intracellular nucleotide triphosphates (NTP) and phosphorylcholine (PC) and caused a rapid transient increase in inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Upon restoration of the oxygen concentration in the perfusion medium, all parameters returned to their prehypoxic levels within 2 to 3 days following either gradual unidirectional changes (ISR, NTP, PC) or more complicated dynamic patterns (OCR, GCR, LPR). A further increase in oxygen concentration in the perfusion medium drove OCR, ISR, NTP, PC, and P(i) to new, higher levels. It is concluded that (31)P NMR spectroscopy can be used for the prolonged

  15. [An interprofessional or an interdisciplinary problem? Distinctions to develop an analytical scheme of interdisciplinarity based on the case of a long-term care hospital].

    PubMed

    Couturier, Yves

    2009-06-01

    This communication distinguishes interdisciplinary problems from other neighbouring difficulties, such as difficulties related to work organization. The conceptual proximity between discipline and profession can in fact cause difficulties experienced in the interprofessionnal space to mistakenly incriminate interdisciplinarity. For the analyst, this proximity blurs his insight and, in effect, inhibits the development of adequate solutions to the encountered problem. Hence, this article, based on an ethnographic study of interdisciplinary relations in a small long-term care hospital, aims to alleviate the ambiguity surrounding this issue. In order to do so, this article will begin by recalling the parameters of the theoretical field of interdisciplinarity. Subsequently, the difficulties observed in the long-term care hospital's setting, as they were conceived in the light of interdisciplinarity theory, will be exposed. This article will notably highlight how the nursing staffs contribute to the maintenance of a philosophy of care favourable to the long term deployment of interdisciplinarity.

  16. [The Act of Promotion of Personal Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Reflections and recommendations for better development].

    PubMed

    López Casasnovas, Guillem

    2011-12-01

    The present article provides a critical analysis of the state of affairs of the care of dependent individuals and proposals for reform of social protection systems for dependency - especially the Act of Promotion of Personal Autonomy and Long-Term Care. The existing form of public coverage is linked to the theory of public finance. Against this background, a series of recommendations are made to achieve the goals of this important component of the welfare state. PMID:22047621

  17. Long-term regulation in the cardiovascular system - Cornerstone in the development of a composite physiological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The present work discusses a model of the cardiovascular system and related subsystems capable of long-term simulations of the type desired for in-space hypogravic human physiological performance prediction. The discussion centers around the model of Guyton and modifications of it. In order to draw attention to the fluid handling capabilities of the model, one of several transfusion simulations performed is presented, namely, the isotonic saline transfusion simulation.

  18. Child and Adolescent Mental Health in Haiti: Developing Long-Term Mental Health Services After the 2010 Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Legha, Rupinder K; Solages, Martine

    2015-10-01

    This article presents an overview of child and adolescent mental health in Haiti, emphasizing the role of structural violence and the factors shaping child protection. The 2010 Haiti earthquake is discussed as an acute on chronic event that highlighted the lack of pre-existing formal biomedical mental health services and worsened the impact of structural violence. Considerations for long-term, sustainable, culturally relevant child and adolescent mental health care in Haiti are also provided.

  19. Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1998-03-01

    Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

  20. Effects of proteinase inhibitor from Adenanthera pavonina seeds on short- and long term larval development of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daniele Yumi; Jacobowski, Ana Cristina; de Souza, Antônio Pancrácio; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2015-05-01

    Currently, one of the major global public health concerns is related to the transmission of dengue/yellow fever virus by the vector Aedes aegypti. The most abundant digestive enzymes in Ae. aegypti midgut larvae are trypsin and chymotrypsin. Since protease inhibitors have the capacity to bind to and inhibit the action of insect digestive proteinases, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of Adenanthera pavonina seed proteinase inhibitor (ApTI) on Ae. aegypti larvae, as well as a possible mechanism of adaptation. ApTI had a significant effect on Ae. aegypti larvae exposed to a non-lethal concentration of ApTI during short- and long-duration assays, decreasing survival, weight and proteinase activities of midgut extracts of larvae. The zymographic profile of ApTI demonstrated seven bands; three bands apparently have trypsin-like activity. Moreover, the peritrophic membrane was not disrupted. The enzymes of ApTI-fed larvae were found to be sensitive to ApTI and to have a normal feedback mechanism; also, the larval digestive enzymes were not able to degrade the inhibitor. In addition, ApTI delayed larval development time. Histological studies demonstrated a degeneration of the microvilli of the posterior midgut region epithelium cells, hypertrophy of the gastric caeca cells and an augmented ectoperitrophic space in larvae. Moreover, Ae. aegypti larvae were incapable of overcoming the negative effects of ApTI, indicating that this inhibitor might be used as a promising agent against Ae. aegypti. In addition, molecular modeling and molecular docking studies were also performed in order to construct three-dimensional theoretical models for ApTI, trypsin and chymotrypsin from Ae. aegypti, as well as to predict the possible interactions and affinity values for the complexes ApTI/trypsin and ApTI/chymotrypsin. In this context, this study broadens the base of our understanding about the modes of action of proteinase inhibitors in insects, as well as the way insects

  1. Effects of proteinase inhibitor from Adenanthera pavonina seeds on short- and long term larval development of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daniele Yumi; Jacobowski, Ana Cristina; de Souza, Antônio Pancrácio; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2015-05-01

    Currently, one of the major global public health concerns is related to the transmission of dengue/yellow fever virus by the vector Aedes aegypti. The most abundant digestive enzymes in Ae. aegypti midgut larvae are trypsin and chymotrypsin. Since protease inhibitors have the capacity to bind to and inhibit the action of insect digestive proteinases, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of Adenanthera pavonina seed proteinase inhibitor (ApTI) on Ae. aegypti larvae, as well as a possible mechanism of adaptation. ApTI had a significant effect on Ae. aegypti larvae exposed to a non-lethal concentration of ApTI during short- and long-duration assays, decreasing survival, weight and proteinase activities of midgut extracts of larvae. The zymographic profile of ApTI demonstrated seven bands; three bands apparently have trypsin-like activity. Moreover, the peritrophic membrane was not disrupted. The enzymes of ApTI-fed larvae were found to be sensitive to ApTI and to have a normal feedback mechanism; also, the larval digestive enzymes were not able to degrade the inhibitor. In addition, ApTI delayed larval development time. Histological studies demonstrated a degeneration of the microvilli of the posterior midgut region epithelium cells, hypertrophy of the gastric caeca cells and an augmented ectoperitrophic space in larvae. Moreover, Ae. aegypti larvae were incapable of overcoming the negative effects of ApTI, indicating that this inhibitor might be used as a promising agent against Ae. aegypti. In addition, molecular modeling and molecular docking studies were also performed in order to construct three-dimensional theoretical models for ApTI, trypsin and chymotrypsin from Ae. aegypti, as well as to predict the possible interactions and affinity values for the complexes ApTI/trypsin and ApTI/chymotrypsin. In this context, this study broadens the base of our understanding about the modes of action of proteinase inhibitors in insects, as well as the way insects

  2. Inundation downscaling for the development of a long-term and global inundation database compatible to SWOT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Filipe; Prigent, Catherine; Papa, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    The Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellite (GIEMS) provides multi-year monthly variations of the global surface water extent at about 25 kmx25 km resolution, from 1993 to 2007. It is derived from multiple satellite observations. Its spatial resolution is usually compatible with climate model outputs and with global land surface model grids but is clearly not adequate for local applications that require the characterization of small individual water bodies. There is today a strong demand for high-resolution inundation extent datasets, for a large variety of applications such as water management, regional hydrological modeling, or for the analysis of mosquitos-related diseases. Even for climate applications, the GIEMS resolution might be limited given recent results on the key importance of the smallest ponds in the emission of CH4, as compared to the largest ones. If the inundation extent is combined to altimetry measurements to obtain water volume changes, and finally river discharge to the ocean (Frappart et al. 2011), then a better resolved inundation extent will also improve the accuracy of these estimates. In the context of the SWOT mission, the downscaling of GIEMS has multiple applications uses but a major one will be to use the SWOT retrievals to develop a downscaling of GIEMS. This SWOT-compatible downscaling could then be used to built a SWOT-compatible high-resolution database back in time from 1993 to the SWOT launch date. This extension of SWOT record is necessary to perform climate studies related to climate change. This paper present three approaches to do downscale GIEMS. Two basins will be considered for illustrative purpose, Amazon, Niger and Mekhong. - Aires, F., F. Papa, C. Prigent, J.-F. Cretaux and M. Berge-Nguyen, Characterization and downscaling of the inundation extent over the Inner Niger delta using a multi-wavelength retrievals and Modis data, J. of Hydrometeorology, in press, 2014. - Aires, F., F. Papa and C. Prigent, A long-term

  3. Developing Long-Term Computing Skills among Low-Achieving Students via Web-Enabled Problem-Based Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Lee, Tsang-Hsiung; Shen, Pei-Di

    2013-01-01

    Many private vocational schools in Taiwan have taken to enrolling students with lower levels of academic achievement. The authors re-designed a course and conducted a series of quasi-experiments to develop students' long-term computing skills, and examined the longitudinal effects of web-enabled, problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  4. Changing systems to address elder abuse: examples from aging services, the courts, the long-term care ombudsman, and the faith community.

    PubMed

    Malks, Betty F; Strobel, Donna M; Leung, Yolanda; Court, Michelle Williams; Morris, Janet R; May, Gus; Reeves, Shawna; Davies, Molly; Cartan, Heidi; Philyaw, Meredith L

    2010-07-01

    The authors describe their use of systems change as a means of ameliorating elder abuse. After assessing the needs of their target audiences, projects developed a variety of strategies. These include disseminating promising practices in courts, creating Elder Law Clinics to assist with conservatorships, educating older adults about predatory mortgage lending, building a new response system for complaints of abuse and neglect in unlicensed care facilities, and convening clergy and lay leader groups to learn how faith communities can make a difference in elder abuse and neglect. The authors share tips on replicating their work, describing barriers to implementation and possible solutions.

  5. Commentary: The Broader Context of Long-Term Care Ethics.

    PubMed

    Lesandrini, Jason; O'Connell, Carol

    2016-07-01

    Ethical issues in long-term care settings, although having received attention in the literature, have not in our opinion received the appropriate level they require. Thus, we applaud the Cambridge Quarterly for publishing this case. We can attest to the significance of ethical issues arising in long-term care facilities, as Mr. Hope's case is all too familiar to those practicing in these settings. What is unique about this case is that an actual ethics consult was made in a long-term care setting. We have seen very little in the published literature on the use of ethics structures in long-term care populations. Our experience is that these healthcare settings are ripe for ethical concerns and that providers, patients, families, and staff need/desire ethics resources to actively and preventively address ethical concerns. The popular press has begun to recognize the ethical issues involved in long-term care settings and the need for ethics structures. Recently, in California a nurse refused to initiate CPR for an elderly patient in a senior residence. In that case, the nurse was quoted as saying that the facility had a policy that nurses were not to start CPR for elderly patients. 1 Although this case is not exactly the same as that of Mr. Hope, it highlights the need for developing robust ethics program infrastructures in long-term care settings that work toward addressing ethical issues through policy, education, and active consultation.

  6. Status of NASA Satellite, Field Observations, and Numerical Modeling Addressing the Impact of Urbanization on Short and Long Term Precipitation Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, Michael; Burian, Steve; Garza, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Howard (1833a) made the first documented observation of a temperature difference between an urban area and its rural environment. Manley (1958) termed this contrast the "urban heat island (UHI)". The UHI has now become a widely acknowledged, observed, and researched phenomenon because of its broad implications. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities (UNFP, 1999). In the United States, the current urban growth rate is approximately 12.5%, with 80% currently living in urban areas. As cities continue to grow, urban sprawl creates unique problems related to land use, transportation, agriculture, housing, pollution, and development for policymakers. Urban expansion and its associated urban heat islands also have measurable impacts on weather and climate processes.

  7. [Long-term survival after severe trauma].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W; Mutschler, M; Graw, M; Lefering, R

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival after severe trauma is rarely addressed in German trauma journals although knowledge of life expectancy and identification of factors contributing to increased mortality are important for lifetime care management, development of service models, and targeting health promotion and prevention interventions. As reliable data in Germany are lacking, we compiled data mainly from the USA and Australia to describe life expectancy, risk factors, and predictors of outcome in patients experiencing traumatic spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and polytrauma. Two years after trauma, life expectancy in all three categories was significantly lower than that of the general population. It depends strongly on severity of disability, age, and gender and is quantifiable. Whereas improvements in medical care have led to a marked decline in short-term mortality, surprisingly long-term survival in severe trauma has not changed over the past 30 years. Therefore, there is need to intensify long-term trauma patient care and to find new strategies to limit primary damage. PMID:27342106

  8. Long-Term Care Insurance: Coverage Varies Widely in a Developing Market. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care, Select Committeee on Aging, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    In response to a request by Congressman Claude Pepper, the General Accounting Office (GAO) conducted a study to examine the private long-term care insurance market. The GAO analyzed the premiums, benefits, and limitations of 33 policies offered by 25 insurers in 1986. The GAO assessed the potential for abuse in this market by surveying state…

  9. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web

  10. Long-term Autophagy and Nrf2 Signaling in the Hippocampi of Developing Mice after Carbon Ion Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xiongxiong; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Wang, Tieshan; Li, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    To explore charged particle radiation-induced long-term hippocampus damage, we investigated the expression of autophagy and antioxidant Nrf2 signaling-related proteins in the mouse hippocampus after carbon ion radiation. Heads of immature female Balb/c mice were irradiated with carbon ions of different LETs at various doses. Behavioral tests were performed on the mice after maturation. Acute and chronic expression of LC3-II, p62/SQSTM1, nuclear Nrf2, activated caspase-3 and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were measured in the hippocampi. Secondary X-ray insult was adopted to amplify potential damages. Long-term behavioral changes were observed in high-LET carbon ion-irradiated mice. There were no differences in the rates of LC3-II induction and p62/SQSTM1 degradation compared to the control group regardless of whether the mice received the secondary X-ray insult. A high nuclear Nrf2 content and low apoptosis level in hippocampal cells subjected to secondary X-rays were observed for the mice exposed to relatively low-LET carbon ions. Therefore, carbon ion exposure in the immature mouse led to an LET-dependent behavioral change after maturation. Although autophagy was intact, the persistently high nuclear Nrf2 content in the hippocampus might account for the unchanged behavioral pattern in mice exposed to the relatively low-LET carbon ions and the subsequent increased radioresistance of the hippocampus.

  11. Long-term Autophagy and Nrf2 Signaling in the Hippocampi of Developing Mice after Carbon Ion Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xiongxiong; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Wang, Tieshan; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To explore charged particle radiation-induced long-term hippocampus damage, we investigated the expression of autophagy and antioxidant Nrf2 signaling-related proteins in the mouse hippocampus after carbon ion radiation. Heads of immature female Balb/c mice were irradiated with carbon ions of different LETs at various doses. Behavioral tests were performed on the mice after maturation. Acute and chronic expression of LC3-II, p62/SQSTM1, nuclear Nrf2, activated caspase-3 and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were measured in the hippocampi. Secondary X-ray insult was adopted to amplify potential damages. Long-term behavioral changes were observed in high-LET carbon ion-irradiated mice. There were no differences in the rates of LC3-II induction and p62/SQSTM1 degradation compared to the control group regardless of whether the mice received the secondary X-ray insult. A high nuclear Nrf2 content and low apoptosis level in hippocampal cells subjected to secondary X-rays were observed for the mice exposed to relatively low-LET carbon ions. Therefore, carbon ion exposure in the immature mouse led to an LET-dependent behavioral change after maturation. Although autophagy was intact, the persistently high nuclear Nrf2 content in the hippocampus might account for the unchanged behavioral pattern in mice exposed to the relatively low-LET carbon ions and the subsequent increased radioresistance of the hippocampus. PMID:26689155

  12. A newly developed silicone-coated membrane oxygenator for long-term cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Iida, M; Shiono, M; Orime, Y; Nakata, K; Hata, M; Sezai, A; Yamada, H; Kashiwazaki, S; Nemoto, M; Kinoshita, J; Sezai, Y

    1997-07-01

    The surface of polypropylene hollow fiber was successfully coated with a very thin (0.2 micron) silicone layer. Experimental studies were performed in long-term (6 h) normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using 10 goats. A conventional membrane oxygenator (Mera Excelung HPO-15H, MERA, Tokyo, Japan) was used for 5 goats as a control (Group C) and a new silicone-coated membrane oxygenator, which is of the same construction as that of the one used for Group C, for 5 (Group S). The O2 transfer and CO2 removal functions showed the same ranges. In the other parameters, there were no differences between the 2 groups. As for hemolysis, however, the plasma free hemoglobin of Group S was lower than that of Group C. Currently, 3 chronic percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) experimental models have been conducted, and there has been no evidence of thromboembolism or deterioration of the oxygenator. In conclusion, this new oxygenator is suitable not only for CPB, but also for long-term cardiac support.

  13. Whither Postgraduate Professional Development? Towards a Theoretical Framework to Guide Long-Term Teacher Development in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Steven; Sorensen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of government-funded Postgraduate Professional Development in England has raised many questions about the true political purpose and agenda of such accredited continuing professional development (CPD). There are conflicting aspirations for a master's-level teaching profession between educators and the government, albeit agreement…

  14. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-07-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

  15. Web-based survey of resources for treatment and long-term follow-up for children with brain tumors in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    QADDOUMI, Ibrahim; UNAL, Ekrem; DIEZ, Blanca; KEBUDI, Rejin; QUINTANA, Yuri; BOUFFET, Eric; CHANTADA, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Information about pediatric survivors of brain tumors in developing countries is scant. Purpose In this study we aimed to investigate the availability of resources for treatment and long-term follow up of children with central nervous system tumors in developing countries Material methods A web-based questionnaire on available services and follow-up of brain tumor survivors was posted at www.cure4kids.org and registered users were invited to participate. Results A total of 140 evaluable responses from developing countries (n=103) and high-income countries (n=37) were obtained. There was a significant correlation between gross national income and the availability of services for treatment and follow-up and between patient load and the availability of some services. Conclusion The resources for treatment and long-term follow-up of children with brain tumors need to be improved in developing countries. PMID:21584746

  16. Effects of long-term in vitro exposure to phosphodiesterase type-3 inhibitors on follicle and oocyte development.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, D; Cortvrindt, R; Everaerdt, B; Smitz, J

    2005-08-01

    Germinal vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes retrieved from antral follicles undergo nuclear maturation in vitro, which typically occurs prior to cytoplasmic maturation. Short-term culture with meiotic inhibitors has been applied to arrest oocytes at the GV stage aiming to synchronize nuclear and ooplasmic maturity. However, the results obtained are still far from the in vivo situation. In order to acquire competence, immature oocytes may require meiotic arrest in vitro for a more extended period. The phosphodiesterase type 3-inhibitor (PDE3-I) is a potent meiotic arrester. The effects of a prolonged culture with PDE3-I on oocyte quality prior to and after reversal from the inhibition are not known. This study tested the impact of long-term in vitro exposure of two PDE3-Is, org9935 and cilostamide, on oocytes using a mouse follicle culture model. The results showed that PDE3-I (maximum of 10 microM) during a 12-day culture of follicle-enclosed oocytes did not alter somatic cell proliferation, differentiation or follicle survival. In addition, the steroid production profile was not significantly modified by a 12-day exposure to PDE3-I. The recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin/recombinant human epidermal growth factor stimulus induced a characteristic normal progesterone peak of luteinization and normal mucification of the cumulus cells, while the enclosed oocyte remained blocked at the GV stage. In vitro maturation of denuded or cumulus-enclosed oocytes derived from org9935- or cilostamide-exposed follicles progressed through meiosis and formed morphologically normal meiotic spindles with chromosomes properly aligned at the equator. In conclusion, long-term culture with PDE3-I was harmless to somatic cell function, differentiation, oocyte growth and maturation. Our results suggested that PDE3-I can be applied when extended oocyte culture is required to improve ooplasmic maturation.

  17. Feasibility study on transmission system and substation development project, third state (i-shaped area). Volume 2. Long term report (1994-2013). Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-11

    The study, conducted by Black & Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of Thailand`s Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA). The purpose of the report is to identify both system impact and physical requirements to meet the anticipated increase in demand for PEA furnished electric energy in Thailand`s Southern Region. Presented is a technical, financial, and economic feasibility study resulting in planning reports of the 115 kV Electric Power Supply, and distribution Systems required to accommodate short and long term growth projections. This is the second of two volumes and it includes the Long Term Master Plan Feasibility Study. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Summary and Conclusions; (2) Introduction and Background; (3) Existing Study Area and Development; (4) Load Forecast; (5) Alternative Plans; (6) Technical Analysis; (7) General Economic Analysis; (8) Financial Analysis; (9) Appendices.

  18. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  19. Long-term preservation of Anammox bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass w...

  20. The Importance of Long-Term Social Research in Enabling Participation and Developing Engagement Strategies for New Dengue Control Technologies

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, new strategies aimed at reducing the capacity of mosquito vectors to transmit dengue fever have emerged. As with earlier control methods, they will have to be employed in a diverse range of communities across the globe and into the main settings for disease transmission, the homes, businesses and public buildings of residents in dengue-affected areas. However, these strategies are notably different from previous methods and draw on technologies that are not without controversy. Public engagement and authorization are critical to the future success of these programs. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper reports on an Australian case study where long-term social research was used to enable participation and the design of an engagement strategy tailored specifically to the sociopolitical setting of a potential trial release site of Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegytpi mosquitoes. Central themes of the social research, methods used and conclusions drawn are briefly described. Results indicate that different communities are likely to have divergent expectations, concerns and cultural sensibilities with regard to participation, engagement and authorization. Conclusions/Significance The findings show that a range of issues need to be understood and taken into account to enable sensitive, ethical and effective engagement when seeking public support for new dengue control methods. PMID:22953011

  1. Clinical characterization and long-term prognosis of neurological development in preterm infants with late-onset circulatory collapse

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, H; Yamanaka, S; Koriyama, T; Shishida, N; Miyagi, N; Kim, T-J; Kusuda, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the risk factors for late-onset circulatory collapse (LCC) in preterm infants responsive to corticosteroid therapy and evaluate the long-term neurological prognosis. Study Design: A retrospective case–control study for preterm infants (⩽32 weeks' gestation) admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit from 1994 through 2002. Result: Sixty-five infants (11%) were diagnosed with LCC. Infants with a shorter gestation and lower birth weight had a higher incidence of LCC. LCC infants had a significantly lower 1-min Apgar score, significantly higher incidence of severe intraventricular hemorrhage, chronic lung disease, and postnatal periventricular leukomalacia, and significantly longer duration of ventilation use, oxygen use, and hospital stay. Somatic growth at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age was poorer in infants with LCC than without LCC (controls). LCC infants were significantly more likely than controls to have cerebral palsy at 3 years. Conclusion: LCC is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Prevention of LCC can lead to improved neurological prognoses. PMID:20357811

  2. Long-term landscape development: a perspective from the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoulin, A.; Zarate, M.; Rabassa, J.

    2005-06-01

    Traditionally, the long-term landscape evolution of the southern Buenos Aires ranges of east central Argentina has been related to the influence of the Andean orogeny. We describe the large-scale morphological units and associated weathering products in the Tandilia and Ventania ranges. Two main planation surfaces are encountered at varying altitudes in different sectors of these ranges. The lower surface is characterized by roots of kaolinized weathering profiles in the Tandil area and silicified conglomerates around Sierra de La Ventana. In an interpretative model linking the range morphogenesis to the tectonosedimentary evolution of the bordering Salado and Colorado Basins, we suggest that the main morphogenetic stages are related to the late Jurassic-early Cretaceous south Atlantic rifting and Miocene tectonic reactivation induced by the Andean orogeny. Thus, the uplifted surfaces appear much older than commonly believed: pre-Cretaceous and Paleogene. Although they contradict recent results of apatite fission-track studies along the South America and South Africa passive margins, the implied low denudation rates (˜4 m/My) can be explained by the limited Meso-Cenozoic uplift suffered by the southern Buenos Aires ranges. The discussion also shows the limits of the comparison that can be made with the South African planation surfaces.

  3. Elderly and long-term care trends and policy in Taiwan: challenges and opportunities for health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Tsay, Shwn-Feng

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to address the trends and policy of elderly and long-term care in Taiwan. In response to the increasing demand of an aging society, healthcare professionals play crucial roles in elderly and long-term care and quality assurance of services. This article focuses on the current situation of elderly health care, demands of long-term care, long-term care policy in Taiwan, draft of the Long-term Care Services Act, and draft of the Long-term Care Insurance Act. After the 10-year long-term care project was proposed by the Taiwan government, the supply of health care services and demand for long-term care have created many challenges and opportunities for innovative health professional development. Challenges consist of low old dependency ratio caused by low birth rate, lack of elderly and long-term care related manpower, services and education reform related to long-term care for the future society, and interprofessional collaboration and team work of long-term care. Opportunities include expanding the roles and the career pathways of healthcare professionals, promoting the concepts of active aging and good quality of life, and developing industrial cooperation related to long-term care services. Under these circumstances, healthcare professonals are actively involved in practice, education and research of long-term care services that ensure elderly and disabled people can live a healthier and better life.

  4. Adolescent political activism and long-term happiness: a 21-year longitudinal study on the development of micro- and macrosocial worries.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, Klaus; Wong, Becky

    2011-03-01

    Utilizing latent growth modeling, the long-term development of worries among peace movement supporters is examined. Data originate from a seven-wave German longitudinal study started in 1985 with on average 14-year-olds. Waves were interspersed 3 and a half years each. Activists are assumed to have lower (self-related) microworries (Hypothesis 1) and higher macroworries (concerned with larger entities; Hypothesis 2) than nonactivists at the onset of the study. Nonactivists who appraised the threat of nuclear war as high in 1985 are assumed to report worse mental health than their activist age-mates 21 years later (Hypothesis 3). Activists are assumed to express relatively more macroworries than nonactivists in midadulthood (Hypothesis 4). All four hypotheses were confirmed. Results are interpreted in a stress-coping (Lazarus) and resource (Elder) framework, suggesting that refraining from acting out against a perceived sociopolitical threat is a long-term risk for a positive mental health trajectory.

  5. Effects of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on the development of long-term complications in diabetic animals: pathophysiological and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Creutzfeldt, W

    1999-01-01

    Short-term studies with acarbose have demonstrated its efficacy in reducing postprandial blood glucose levels and glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels. These effects would be expected to translate into improvements in long-term complications of diabetes, but such data are not yet available due to the long follow-up times required. Animal models of diabetes have, however, demonstrated the efficacy of acarbose in combating the long-term complications of the disease. The 18 animal studies reviewed here showed that acarbose treatment reduced postprandial blood glucose concentrations and decreased protein glycation. Through these actions, acarbose delayed or prevented the onset of renal, retinal, lens and neurological changes and the development of ischaemic myocardial lesions. Acarbose treatment can therefore be expected to benefit patients with Type 2 and, in combination with insulin, Type 1 diabetes. This is being investigated in ongoing clinical studies in patients with Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). PMID:10495478

  6. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  7. Long Term Outcomes after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long term outcomes after liver transplantation are major determinants of quality of life and of the value of this heroic treatment. As short term outcomes are excellent, our community is turning to take a harder look at long term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review these outcomes, and highlight proposed treatments, as well as pressing topics needing to be studied. A systemic review of the English literature was carried in PubMed, covering all papers addressing long term outcomes in pediatric liver transplant from 2000-2013. Late outcomes after pediatric liver transplant affect the liver graft in the form of chronic liver dysfunction. The causes include rejection particularly humoral rejection, but also de novo autoimmune hepatitis, and recurrent disease. The metabolic syndrome is a major factor in long term cardiovascular complication risk. Secondary infections, kidney dysfunction and malignancy remain a reality of those patients. There is growing evidence of late cognitive and executive function delays affecting daily life productivity as well as likely adherence. Finally, despite a good health status, quality of life measures are comparable to those of children with chronic diseases. Long term outcomes are the new frontier in pediatric liver transplantation. Much is needed to improve graft survival, but also to avoid systemic morbidities from long term immunosuppression. Quality of life is a new inclusive measure that will require interventions and innovative approaches respectful not only on the patients but also of their social circle. PMID:24511516

  8. Multiple myeloma developing during long-term clinical course of refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Han; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lidan; Chen, Guo; Wu, Sha; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an acquired, immune-mediated disease that is characterized by increased destruction of platelets by autoantibodies. Although the onset of the disease and clinical course are highly variable, the disease typically has a benign course. ITP associated with multiple myeloma (MM) has been rarely reported; it is even rarer for MM to develop during a long-term ITP (almost 20 years). Here, we first report on a case with a 20-year long clinical course of refractory ITP followed by newly diagnosed MM. PMID:26823908

  9. Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Long-term development and effectiveness of private flood mitigation measures: an analysis for the German part of the river Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubeck, P.; Botzen, W. J. W.; Kreibich, H.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2012-11-01

    Flood mitigation measures implemented by private households have become an important component of contemporary integrated flood risk management in Germany and many other countries. Despite the growing responsibility of private households to contribute to flood damage reduction by means of private flood mitigation measures, knowledge on the long-term development of such measures, which indicates changes in vulnerability over time, and their effectiveness, is still scarce. To gain further insights into the long-term development, current implementation level and effectiveness of private flood mitigation measures, empirical data from 752 flood-prone households along the German part of the Rhine are presented. It is found that four types of flood mitigation measures developed gradually over time among flood-prone households, with severe floods being important triggers for an accelerated implementation. At present, still a large share of respondents has not implemented a single flood mitigation measure, despite the high exposure of the surveyed households to floods. The records of household's flood damage to contents and structure during two consecutive flood events with similar hazard characteristics in 1993 and 1995 show that an improved preparedness of the population led to substantially reduced damage during the latter event. Regarding the efficiency of contemporary integrated flood risk management, it is concluded that additional policies are required in order to further increase the level of preparedness of the flood-prone population. This especially concerns households in areas that are less frequently affected by flood events.

  11. Influence of long-term exposure to simulated acid rain on development, reproduction and acaricide susceptibility of the carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Ping; He, Lin; Zhao, Zhi-Mo

    2006-01-01

    Development, reproduction and acaricide susceptibility of Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduvals) (Acari: Tetranychidae) were investigated after long-term (about 40 generations) exposure to various levels of acid rain; pH 2.5, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.6. Deionized water (pH 6.8) served as a control. The mites were reared on eggplant leaves at 28 degrees C, 80%RH and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) in the laboratory. The results showed that the duration of the immature stage was significantly affected by acid rain exposure. The shortest duration (8.90 days) was recorded for populations exposed to pH 5.6 acid rain, while the longest duration (9.37 days) occurred after exposure to pH 2.5 acid rain. Compared with the control population, adult longevity was shortened with an increase in acidity. Similarly, the oviposition duration was also shortened by an increase in acidity. Statistically, female fecundity did not differ significantly between pH 5.6, pH 4.0 and control populations, but did differ significantly between the control population and those exposed to pH 2.5 and pH 3.0 acid rain. This suggested that the mite suffered reproductive defects after long-term exposure to acid rain with higher acidity (pH 2.5 and 3.0). The intrinsic rate of increase among different populations was not significantly affected, but the net reproductive rate of populations exposed to pH 2.5 and 3.0 acid rain was significantly less than pH 4.0, 5.6, and control populations. Bioassay results showed that after long-term exposure to acid rain, susceptibility of the mites to two acaricides, dichlorvos and fenpropathrin, did not change significantly.

  12. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long-term missions. Technical progress, February 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a rugged portable dosimetry system, based on microdosimetry techniques, which will measure dose and evaluate dose equivalent in a mixed radiation field. Development of the desired dosimetry system can be divided into three distinct areas: development of 1) radiation detector, 2) electronic system, and 3) mathematical techniques. Work has proceeded satisfactorily in all three of these areas during the first year of this effort.

  13. Why Restructuring Must Focus on Thinking and Caring: A Model for Deep, Long-Term Change through Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Marilyn; And Others

    This paper contains four articles that describe the philosophy and outcomes of the Child Development Project (CDP), developed by the Developmental Studies Center in Oakland, California. The first article--"Giving Content to Restructuring: A Social, Ethical, and Intellectual Agenda for Elementary Education," by Marilyn Watson--describes the CDP and…

  14. 76 FR 72423 - Bridging the Idea Development Evaluation Assessment and Long-Term Initiative and Total Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...-Term Initiative and Total Product Life Cycle Approaches for Evidence Development for Surgical Medical... Initiative and Total Product Life Cycle Approaches for Evidence Development for Surgical Medical Devices and... notice that appeared in the Federal Register of Monday, November 7, 2011 (76 FR 68769). The...

  15. Long-term climate change assessment study plan for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, K.L.; Chatters, J.C.; Waugh, W.J.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for low-level nuclear waste for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. The goal of the Barrier Development Program is to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 yr; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-yr design life.

  16. Navigating spatial and temporal complexity in developing a long-term land use database for an agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No comprehensive protocols exist for the collection, standardization, and storage of agronomic management information into a database that preserves privacy, maintains data uncertainty, and translates everyday decisions into quantitative values. This manuscript describes the development of a databas...

  17. Designation and development of biomedical Ti alloys with finer biomechanical compatibility in long-term surgical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Tian, Yu-Xing; Cheng, Jun; Ma, Xi-Qun; Liu, Han-Yuan; Wang, Chang

    2014-09-01

    Developing the new titanium alloys with excellent biomechanical compatibility has been an important research direction of surgical implants materials. Present paper summarizes the international researches and developments of biomedical titanium alloys. Aiming at increasing the biomechanical compatibility, it also introduces the exploration and improvement of alloy designing, mechanical processing, microstructure and phase transformation, and finally outlines the directions for scientific research on the biomedical titanium alloys in the future.

  18. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and Co{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted for China, India, Indonesia and South Korea in Asia.

  19. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  20. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  1. Development of a Large Animal Long-Term Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture Model That Includes the Bony Vertebrae for Ex Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael; Epure, Laura M; Salem, Omar; AlGarni, Nizar; Ciobanu, Ovidiu; Alaqeel, Motaz; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2016-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of low back pain. Testing potential therapeutics in the regeneration of the disc requires the use of model systems. Although several animal models have been developed to investigate IVD degeneration, they are technically challenging to prepare, expensive, present with limitations when performing biomechanical studies on the disc, and are impractical in large-scale screening of novel anabolic and scaffolding agents. An IVD organ culture system offers an inexpensive alternative. In the current paradigm, the bony endplates are removed to allow for nutrient diffusion and maintenance of disc cell viability. Although this is an excellent system for testing biologics, it results in concave cartilage endplates and, as such, requires special platens for loading purposes in a bioreactor as flat ones can overload the annular disc region leading to improper loading. Furthermore, the absence of bone makes it unsuitable for applying complex cyclic loading, a topic of interest in the study of chronic progressive degeneration, as multiaxial loading is more representative of daily forces encountered by the IVD. We have developed and validated a novel long-term IVD organ culture model that retains vertebral bone and is easy to prepare. Our model is ideal for testing potential drugs and alternate-based therapies, in addition to investigating the long-term effects of loading paradigms on disc degeneration and repair. PMID:27216856

  2. Resilience at the Transition to Agriculture: The Long-Term Landscape and Resource Development at the Aceramic Neolithic Tell Site of Chogha Golan (Iran).

    PubMed

    Riehl, S; Asouti, E; Karakaya, D; Starkovich, B M; Zeidi, M; Conard, N J

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the slow development from gathering and cultivation of wild species to the use of domesticates in the Near East, deriving from a number of Epipalaeolithic and aceramic Neolithic sites with short occupational stratigraphies, cannot explain the reasons for the protracted development of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent. The botanical and faunal remains from the long stratigraphic sequence of Chogha Golan, indicate local changes in environmental conditions and subsistence practices that characterize a site-specific pathway into emerging agriculture. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates a long-term subsistence strategy of several hundred years on wild cereals and pulses as well as on hunting a variety of faunal species that were based on relatively favorable and stable environmental conditions. Fluctuations in the availability of resources after around 10.200 cal BP may have been caused by small-scale climatic fluctuations. The temporary depletion of resources was managed through a shift to other species which required minor technological changes to make these resources accessible and by intensification of barley cultivation which approached its domestication. After roughly 200 years, emmer domestication is apparent, accompanied by higher contribution of cattle in the diet, suggesting long-term intensification of resource management. PMID:26345115

  3. Long-term functionality of rural water services in developing countries: a system dynamics approach to understanding the dynamic interaction of factors.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jeffrey P; Javernick-Will, Amy N

    2015-04-21

    Research has shown that sustainability of rural water infrastructure in developing countries is largely affected by the dynamic and systemic interactions of technical, social, financial, institutional, and environmental factors that can lead to premature water system failure. This research employs system dynamics modeling, which uses feedback mechanisms to understand how these factors interact dynamically to influence long-term rural water system functionality. To do this, the research first identified and aggregated key factors from the literature, then asked water sector experts to indicate the polarity and strength between factors through Delphi and cross impact survey questionnaires, and finally used system dynamics modeling to identify and prioritize feedback mechanisms. The resulting model identified 101 feedback mechanisms that were dominated primarily by three- and four-factor mechanisms that contained some combination of the factors: Water System Functionality, Community, Financial, Government, Management, and Technology, implying these factors were the most influential on long-term functionality. These feedback mechanisms were then scored and prioritized, with the most dominant feedback mechanism identified as Water System Functionality-Community-Finance-Management. This study showcases a way for practitioners to better understand the complexities inherent in rural water development using expert opinion and indicates the need for future research in rural water service sustainability that investigates the dynamic interaction of factors in different contexts.

  4. Resilience at the Transition to Agriculture: The Long-Term Landscape and Resource Development at the Aceramic Neolithic Tell Site of Chogha Golan (Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, S.; Asouti, E.; Karakaya, D.; Starkovich, B. M.; Zeidi, M.; Conard, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the slow development from gathering and cultivation of wild species to the use of domesticates in the Near East, deriving from a number of Epipalaeolithic and aceramic Neolithic sites with short occupational stratigraphies, cannot explain the reasons for the protracted development of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent. The botanical and faunal remains from the long stratigraphic sequence of Chogha Golan, indicate local changes in environmental conditions and subsistence practices that characterize a site-specific pathway into emerging agriculture. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates a long-term subsistence strategy of several hundred years on wild cereals and pulses as well as on hunting a variety of faunal species that were based on relatively favorable and stable environmental conditions. Fluctuations in the availability of resources after around 10.200 cal BP may have been caused by small-scale climatic fluctuations. The temporary depletion of resources was managed through a shift to other species which required minor technological changes to make these resources accessible and by intensification of barley cultivation which approached its domestication. After roughly 200 years, emmer domestication is apparent, accompanied by higher contribution of cattle in the diet, suggesting long-term intensification of resource management. PMID:26345115

  5. Resilience at the Transition to Agriculture: The Long-Term Landscape and Resource Development at the Aceramic Neolithic Tell Site of Chogha Golan (Iran).

    PubMed

    Riehl, S; Asouti, E; Karakaya, D; Starkovich, B M; Zeidi, M; Conard, N J

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the slow development from gathering and cultivation of wild species to the use of domesticates in the Near East, deriving from a number of Epipalaeolithic and aceramic Neolithic sites with short occupational stratigraphies, cannot explain the reasons for the protracted development of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent. The botanical and faunal remains from the long stratigraphic sequence of Chogha Golan, indicate local changes in environmental conditions and subsistence practices that characterize a site-specific pathway into emerging agriculture. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates a long-term subsistence strategy of several hundred years on wild cereals and pulses as well as on hunting a variety of faunal species that were based on relatively favorable and stable environmental conditions. Fluctuations in the availability of resources after around 10.200 cal BP may have been caused by small-scale climatic fluctuations. The temporary depletion of resources was managed through a shift to other species which required minor technological changes to make these resources accessible and by intensification of barley cultivation which approached its domestication. After roughly 200 years, emmer domestication is apparent, accompanied by higher contribution of cattle in the diet, suggesting long-term intensification of resource management.

  6. Long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael David

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this Supplemental Information Source Document is to effectively describe Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). More specifically, this document describes the LTES and Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Programs, distinguishes between the LTES and LTS Programs, and summarizes the current status of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project.

  7. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  8. Dentofacial development in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A comparison of three treatment modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Sonis, A.L.; Tarbell, N.; Valachovic, R.W.; Gelber, R.; Schwenn, M.; Sallan, S. )

    1990-12-15

    Ninety-seven children who were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before 10 years of age and treated with chemotherapy alone, chemotherapy plus 1800-cGy cranial irradiation (RT), or chemotherapy plus 2400-cGy RT were evaluated for effects of therapy on dentofacial development. All patients were seen at least 5 years postdiagnosis. Dental abnormalities were determined from panoramic radiographs, and craniofacial evaluations were made from lateral cephalometric radiographs. Ninety-one (94%) of all patients and 41 (100%) of patients younger than 5 years of age at diagnosis had abnormal dental development. The severity of these abnormalities was greater in children who received treatment before 5 years of age and in those who received RT. Observed dental abnormalities included tooth agenesis, arrested root development, microdontia, and enamel dysplasias. Craniofacial abnormalities occurred in 18 of 20 (90%) of those patients who received chemotherapy plus 2400-cGy RT before 5 years of age. Mean cephalometric values of this group showed significant deficient mandibular development. The results of this study suggest that the severity of dentofacial-developmental abnormalities secondary to antileukemia therapy are related to the age of the patient at the initiation of treatment and the use of cranial RT.

  9. Long-Term Effects of Individual Development Accounts on Postsecondary Education: Follow-Up Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G.; Rohe, William M.; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a randomized field experiment testing the impact of a 3-year matched savings program on educational outcomes 10 years after the start of the experiment. We examine the effect of an Individual Development Account (IDA) program on (1) educational enrollment, (2) degree completion, and (3) increased education level.…

  10. Psychosocial Factors in Disorders of Sex Development in a Long-Term Perspective: What Clinical Opportunities are there to Intervene?

    PubMed

    Nordenström, A

    2015-05-01

    Disorders or differences in sex development (DSD) comprise a wide spectrum of severity. The overall goal for the treatment and care is good quality of life but current knowledge concerning the psychosocial situation and health related quality of life for patients with different forms of DSD is limited. Follow-up studies have often focused on surgical results, sexual function, and psychosexual outcome and indicated unsatisfactory results in many cases. Epidemiological studies show less than optimal psychosocial situation for some of the diagnostic groups. Studies indicate that access to psychological support and understandable information is important for the outcome. Hormonal and surgical treatments are improving and new and better ways to strengthen the patient's ability to cope with the situation are needed. In a well-functioning multidisciplinary team, the patient's and family's needs should be identified. Tools to accomplish this can be developed. The care and our knowledge about disorders of sex development have developed considerably during the last decade. These are small patient groups with rare conditions that require specialized, highly qualified care in all aspects: medical, surgical, and psychological. It is important that changes in treatment practice are continuously evaluated.

  11. Policy and Management Issues Surrounding the Development of an Alzheimer's Unit in a Long Term Care Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Felicia

    A special unit within a nursing home for serving residents with dementia was developed and implemented at the Cape Cod Nursing Home in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. The purpose of the special unit is to create a structured and protective environment which holistically supports the residents with dementia in achieving their maximum potential. A…

  12. Short-Term Interventions for Long-Term Needs: The Challenge of Bridging Youth and Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Garry; Morford, Shawn; Berry, Holly

    2002-01-01

    The Mill City/Gates Youth Development Project operated as a youth-at-risk program in a timber-dependent community during the timber crisis of the early 1990s. Evaluations indicate the youth activities were effective. Community support structures created by the project continue to operate 5 years after the end of funding, indicating a successful…

  13. Observations from the field: further developing linkages between soil C models with long-term bioenergy studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofuel feedstocks are being developed and evaluated in the United States and Europe to partially offset petroleum transport fuels. Accurate accounting of upstream and downstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is necessary to measure the overall carbon intensity of new biofuel feedstocks. Changes in...

  14. The long-term dynamics of mortality benefits from improved water and sanitation in less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Jeuland, Marc A; Fuente, David E; Ozdemir, Semra; Allaire, Maura C; Whittington, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The problem of inadequate access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in less-developed nations has received much attention over the last several decades (most recently in the Millennium Development Goals), largely because diseases associated with such conditions contribute substantially to mortality in poor countries. We present country-level projections for WASH coverage and for WASH-related mortality in developing regions over a long time horizon (1975-2050) and provide dynamic estimates of the economic value of potential reductions in this WASH-related mortality, which go beyond the static results found in previous work. Over the historical period leading up to the present, our analysis shows steady and substantial improvements in WASH coverage and declining mortality rates across many developing regions, namely East Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. The economic value of potential health gains from eliminating mortality attributable to poor water and sanitation has decreased substantially, and in the future will therefore be modest in these regions. Where WASH-related deaths remain high (in parts of South Asia and much of Sub-Saharan Africa), if current trends continue, it will be several decades before economic development and investments in improved water and sanitation will result in the capture of these economic benefits. The fact that health losses will likely remain high in these two regions over the medium term suggests that accelerated efforts are needed to improve access to water and sanitation, though the costs and benefits of such efforts in specific locations should be carefully assessed.

  15. Long-term changes of meteorological conditions of urban heat island development in the region of Debrecen, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Elemér; Bottyán, Zsolt; Szegedi, Sándor

    2016-04-01

    Meteorological conditions have a remarkable impact on urban climate similarly to other local and microscale climates. Clear skies and calm weather are advantageous for the development of the urban heat island (UHI). There are numerous studies on the spatial and temporal features of the phenomenon. Much less attention is paid, however, to the meteorological conditions of UHI development. The aim of the present paper is to reveal the characteristics of the changes in the frequencies of advantageous and disadvantageous meteorological conditions for UHI development on the basis of a 50-year-long time series. Meteorological condition categories of UHI development have been established on the basis of wind speed values, cloudiness, and precipitation ranging from advantageous to disadvantageous conditions. Frequencies of occurrence of condition categories of UHI development were determined first. Advantageous and moderately advantageous conditions were found to be dominant in the time series. Linear trend analysis revealed a significant increasing trend in the time series of advantageous conditions. Increase of the frequencies of advantageous conditions was analyzed for the years, seasons, and months of the study period as well. Spring and summer (April and June) produced significant increasing trends of frequencies of advantageous conditions, while winter (with the exception of February) and autumn did not show significant increase of those frequencies. Change-point analyses detected a significant increase in the frequency of advantageous conditions in the time series at the turn of 1981/1982 especially in the summer and spring months. Detected tendencies have negative effects on urban energy consumption: they contribute to the increase of air conditioning energy demand in the summer and do not decrease the energy demand of heating in the winter significantly.

  16. The Long-Term Dynamics of Mortality Benefits from Improved Water and Sanitation in Less Developed Countries

    PubMed Central

    Jeuland, Marc A.; Fuente, David E.; Ozdemir, Semra; Allaire, Maura C.; Whittington, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The problem of inadequate access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in less-developed nations has received much attention over the last several decades (most recently in the Millennium Development Goals), largely because diseases associated with such conditions contribute substantially to mortality in poor countries. We present country-level projections for WASH coverage and for WASH-related mortality in developing regions over a long time horizon (1975–2050) and provide dynamic estimates of the economic value of potential reductions in this WASH-related mortality, which go beyond the static results found in previous work. Over the historical period leading up to the present, our analysis shows steady and substantial improvements in WASH coverage and declining mortality rates across many developing regions, namely East Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. The economic value of potential health gains from eliminating mortality attributable to poor water and sanitation has decreased substantially, and in the future will therefore be modest in these regions. Where WASH-related deaths remain high (in parts of South Asia and much of Sub-Saharan Africa), if current trends continue, it will be several decades before economic development and investments in improved water and sanitation will result in the capture of these economic benefits. The fact that health losses will likely remain high in these two regions over the medium term suggests that accelerated efforts are needed to improve access to water and sanitation, though the costs and benefits of such efforts in specific locations should be carefully assessed. PMID:24116011

  17. Prognostic factors for the long-term development of ocular lesions in 327 children with congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Binquet, C.; Wallon, M.; Quantin, C.; Kodjikian, L.; Garweg, J.; Fleury, J.; Peyron, F.; Abrahamowicz, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the high-risk factors associated with the development of ocular lesions in a large cohort of children with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT), irrespective of their gestational age at the time of maternal infection. Children were managed according to a standardized protocol and monitored for up to 14 years at the Croix-Rousse Hospital, Lyon, France. Cox model and a flexible regression, spline-based method were used for the analysis. During a median follow-up time of 6 years, 79 of the 327 children (24%) had at least one retinochoroidal lesion. No bilateral impairment of visual acuity was observed. The risk of a child developing ocular disease was higher not only when mothers were infected early during pregnancy, which was expected, but also when CT was diagnosed prior to or at the time of birth, when non-ocular manifestations were present at baseline and when birth was premature. PMID:14959784

  18. Predicting the effects of human developments on individual dolphins to understand potential long-term population consequences.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Harwood, John; Thompson, Paul M; New, Leslie; Cheney, Barbara; Arso, Monica; Hammond, Philip S; Donovan, Carl; Lusseau, David

    2015-11-01

    Human activities that impact wildlife do not necessarily remove individuals from populations. They may also change individual behaviour in ways that have sublethal effects. This has driven interest in developing analytical tools that predict the population consequences of short-term behavioural responses. In this study, we incorporate empirical information on the ecology of a population of bottlenose dolphins into an individual-based model that predicts how individuals' behavioural dynamics arise from their underlying motivational states, as well as their interaction with boat traffic and dredging activities. We simulate the potential effects of proposed coastal developments on this population and predict that the operational phase may affect animals' motivational states. For such results to be relevant for management, the effects on individuals' vital rates also need to be quantified. We investigate whether the relationship between an individual's exposure and the survival of its calves can be directly estimated using a Bayesian multi-stage model for calf survival. The results suggest that any effect on calf survival is probably small and that a significant relationship could only be detected in large, closely studied populations. Our work can be used to guide management decisions, accelerate the consenting process for coastal and offshore developments and design targeted monitoring. PMID:26511044

  19. Long-term effects of chronic oral Ritalin administration on cognitive and neural development in adolescent wistar kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Pardey, Margery C; Kumar, Natasha N; Goodchild, Ann K; Clemens, Kelly J; Homewood, Judi; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2012-09-12

    The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often results in chronic treatment with psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin®). With increases in misdiagnosis of ADHD, children may be inappropriately exposed to chronic psychostimulant treatment during development. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chronic Ritalin treatment on cognitive and neural development in misdiagnosed "normal" (Wistar Kyoto, WKY) rats and in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR), a model of ADHD. Adolescent male animals were treated for four weeks with oral Ritalin® (2 × 2 mg/kg/day) or distilled water (dH2O). The effect of chronic treatment on delayed reinforcement tasks (DRT) and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir) in the prefrontal cortex was assessed. Two weeks following chronic treatment, WKY rats previously exposed to MPH chose the delayed reinforcer significantly less than the dH2O treated controls in both the DRT and extinction task. MPH treatment did not significantly alter cognitive performance in the SHR. TH-ir in the infralimbic cortex was significantly altered by age and behavioural experience in WKY and SHR, however this effect was not evident in WKY rats treated with MPH. These results suggest that chronic treatment with MPH throughout adolescence in "normal" WKY rats increased impulsive choice and altered catecholamine development when compared to vehicle controls.

  20. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Ketoff, A.

    1991-02-01

    This study examines energy use and carbon emissions in the developing world. Based on analyses of present energy-use patterns in 17 developing nations, this study presents high emissions and low emissions scenarios for these nations in the year 2025. These nations combined account for two thirds of the energy-related carbon emissions presently generated in the developing world. The analysis reveals that energy demand expands dramatically by 2025 and grows increasingly carbon intensive. In the high emissions scenario, carbon emissions from these countries increase four-fold. The greatest share of carbon stems from the industrial sector in 2025, followed by the transport and residential sectors. With the implementation of policies aimed at reducing CO{sub 2} emissions, the low emissions scenario reduces the level of carbon in 2025 by 20 percent relative to the high emissions scenario figure. These nations achieve 80 percent of the carbon reductions by improving the efficiency of energy production and use and the remaining 20 percent by implementing fuel-switching measures. Of all the sectors examined, the industrial sector offers the greatest opportunity for absolute carbon savings (39 percent of the total). This summary is volume one of five volumes.

  1. Development of a flow controller for long-term sampling of gases and vapors using evacuated canisters.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alan; Farant, Jean Pierre; Simon, Philippe; Wick, David P

    2002-11-15

    Anthropogenic activities contribute to the release of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOC) into microenvironments. Developing and implementing new air sampling technologies that allow for the characterization of exposures to VOC can be useful for evaluating environmental and health concerns arising from such occurrences. A novel air sampler based on the use of a capillary flow controller connected to evacuated canisters (300 mL, 1 and 6 L) was designed and tested. The capillary tube, used to control the flow of air, is a variation on a sharp-edge orifice flow controller. It essentially controls the velocity of the fluid (air) as a function of the properties of the fluid, tube diameter and length. A model to predict flow rate in this dynamic system was developed. The mathematical model presented here was developed using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the ideal gas law to predict flow into the canisters used to sample for long periods of time. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation shows the relationship between flow rate, pressure gradient, capillary resistance, fluid viscosity, capillary length and diameter. The flow rates evaluated were extremely low, ranging from 0.05 to 1 mL min(-1). The model was compared with experimental results and was shown to overestimate the flow rate. Empirical equations were developed to more accurately predict flow for the 300 mL, 1 and 6 L canisters used for sampling periods ranging from several hours to one month. The theoretical and observed flow rates for different capillary geometries were evaluated. Each capillary flow controller geometry that was tested was found to generate very reproducible results, RSD < 2%. Also, the empirical formulas developed to predict flow rate given a specified diameter and capillary length were found to predict flow rate within 6% of the experimental data. The samplers were exposed to a variety of airborne vapors that allowed for comparison of the effectiveness of capillary flow controllers to

  2. Protective effects of methylxanthines on hypoxia-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration and long-term cognitive functions in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kumral, Abdullah; Yesilirmak, Didem Cemile; Aykan, Simge; Genc, Sermin; Tugyan, Kazim; Cilaker, Serap; Akhisaroglu, Mustafa; Aksu, Ilkay; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Yilmaz, Osman; Duman, Nuray; Ozkan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Aminophylline is widely used in the management of premature apnea. The methylxanthines aminophylline, theophylline and caffeine are nonspecific inhibitors of adenosine receptors. There are no proven effects of methylxanthines on acute brain injury and long-term cognitive functions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of methylxanthines on brain injury and cognitive functions. Newborn rats were allocated to form four groups, which contained at least 21 pups: two groups were exposed to room air and two groups were exposed to intermittent hypoxia. Intraperitoneal aminophylline was administered to treatment groups during postnatal day 1 through postnatal day 7. All rats were sacrificed on postnatal day 8 via intraperitoneal pentobarbital and the effects of the administered drug on brain injury and adenosine receptor expression were determined. Cognitive functions of rats were evaluated via water maze test. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated that aminophylline significantly diminished the number of 'apoptotic cells' in the hippocampal CA1, CA2, CA3 and gyrus dentatus regions in the brain. Aminophylline treatment immediately after hypoxic insult significantly improved long-term neurobehavioral achievements. In conclusion, aminophylline administration immediately after neonatal hypoxic insult provides benefit over a prolonged period in the developing rat brain.

  3. Development and application of a procedure for evaluating the long-term integrity of membranes for the anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR).

    PubMed

    Shin, Chungheon; Kim, Kihyun; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale short-term test, developed to predict the long-term integrity of membranes with potential for use in anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors, was used to evaluate several commercial hollow-fiber membranes. It was found that membrane performance varied widely, some membranes failing much more rapidly than others. Also found was that larger sizes of the fluidized media, in this case granular activated carbon (GAC), severely affected membrane structural integrity more than did smaller sizes, as did the method used for membrane attachment. Within the limits studied, the GAC packing ratio had only a minor impact. A decrease in membrane permeability that sometimes resulted during the testing and was caused by the deposition of fine GAC particles could be eliminated without membrane damage through simultaneous chemical cleaning and sonication. This new testing procedure should be useful for selecting membranes and reactor operating conditions to better ensure long-term operating performance of anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors. PMID:27438251

  4. Teratogenic Effects of Long Term Consumption of Potassium Benzoate on Eye Development in Balb/c Fetal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Khayatzadeh, Jina; Shahsavan, Marziyeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Potassium benzoate (PB) is used as a substitute preservative for sodium benzoate primarily in dietetic foods where the sodium content is minimized. There are few reports about the teratogenic effects of PB. The purpose of this study is to investigate the teratogenic effects of PB on eye development in balb/c mice fetuses. Materials and Methods: Thirty female mice were divided to two experimental and one control groups (N=10/grp). Experimental groups I and II received daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections of 280 and 560 mg/kg of PB, respectively; while the control group received normal saline. Injections were done for 10 days before mating and from gestation days (GD) 6 through 15. Dams were Caesarean sectioned on GD 18. Eye development was externally examined. After measuring weight and crown-rump length of the fetuses, the tissue sections of the eyes were prepared and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Histopathologic and morphologic changes were recorded. The data was analyzed by ANOVA and Mann Whitney statistical tests using SPSS (version 15). Results: Fetuses with eye malformations observed in both experimental groups of I and II. The incidence of these malformations was significantly increased in fetuses of experimental group II as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Histopathological evaluations of the malformed eyes showed deformed lens, retinal folds with undeveloped layers associated with hemorrhage. Conclusion: Our results suggest that PB can induce teratogenic effects on the eye development of mice fetuses. Therefore, more concise studies are needed regarding its specific and general effects conducted. PMID:24250932

  5. Teratogenic Effects of Long Term Consumption of Potassium Benzoate on Eye Development in Balb/c Fetal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Khayatzadeh, Jina; Shahsavan, Marziyeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Potassium benzoate (PB) is used as a substitute preservative for sodium benzoate primarily in dietetic foods where the sodium content is minimized. There are few reports about the teratogenic effects of PB. The purpose of this study is to investigate the teratogenic effects of PB on eye development in balb/c mice fetuses. Materials and Methods: Thirty female mice were divided to two experimental and one control groups (N=10/grp). Experimental groups I and II received daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections of 280 and 560 mg/kg of PB, respectively; while the control group received normal saline. Injections were done for 10 days before mating and from gestation days (GD) 6 through 15. Dams were Caesarean sectioned on GD 18. Eye development was externally examined. After measuring weight and crown-rump length of the fetuses, the tissue sections of the eyes were prepared and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Histopathologic and morphologic changes were recorded. The data was analyzed by ANOVA and Mann Whitney statistical tests using SPSS (version 15). Results: Fetuses with eye malformations observed in both experimental groups of I and II. The incidence of these malformations was significantly increased in fetuses of experimental group II as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Histopathological evaluations of the malformed eyes showed deformed lens, retinal folds with undeveloped layers associated with hemorrhage. Conclusion: Our results suggest that PB can induce teratogenic effects on the eye development of mice fetuses. Therefore, more concise studies are needed regarding its specific and general effects conducted. PMID:24250934

  6. Exposure–response model for sibutramine and placebo: suggestion for application to long-term weight-control drug development

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seunghoon; Jeon, Sangil; Hong, Taegon; Lee, Jongtae; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-su; Park, Gab-jin; Youn, Sunil; Jang, Doo Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    No wholly successful weight-control drugs have been developed to date, despite the tremendous demand. We present an exposure–response model of sibutramine mesylate that can be applied during clinical development of other weight-control drugs. Additionally, we provide a model-based evaluation of sibutramine efficacy. Data from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter study were used (N=120). Subjects in the treatment arm were initially given 8.37 mg sibutramine base daily, and those who lost <2 kg after 4 weeks’ treatment were escalated to 12.55 mg. The duration of treatment was 24 weeks. Drug concentration and body weight were measured predose and at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 24 weeks after treatment initiation. Exposure and response to sibutramine, including the placebo effect, were modeled using NONMEM 7.2. An asymptotic model approaching the final body weight was chosen to describe the time course of weight loss. Extent of weight loss was described successfully using a sigmoidal exposure–response relationship of the drug with a constant placebo effect in each individual. The placebo effect was influenced by subjects’ sex and baseline body mass index. Maximal weight loss was predicted to occur around 1 year after treatment initiation. The difference in mean weight loss between the sibutramine (daily 12.55 mg) and placebo groups was predicted to be 4.5% in a simulation of 1 year of treatment, with considerable overlap of prediction intervals. Our exposure–response model, which included the placebo effect, is the first example of a quantitative model that can be used to predict the efficacy of weight-control drugs. Similar approaches can help decision-making during clinical development of novel weight-loss drugs. PMID:26392753

  7. Development of a fully automated network system for long-term health-care monitoring at home.

    PubMed

    Motoi, K; Kubota, S; Ikarashi, A; Nogawa, M; Tanaka, S; Nemoto, T; Yamakoshi, K

    2007-01-01

    Daily monitoring of health condition at home is very important not only as an effective scheme for early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases, but also for prevention and control of such diseases. From this point of view, we have developed a prototype room for fully automated monitoring of various vital signs. From the results of preliminary experiments using this room, it was confirmed that (1) ECG and respiration during bathing, (2) excretion weight and blood pressure, and (3) respiration and cardiac beat during sleep could be monitored with reasonable accuracy by the sensor system installed in bathtub, toilet and bed, respectively.

  8. Fat and cholesterol in the diet of infants and young children: implications for growth, development, and long-term health.

    PubMed

    Hardy, S C; Kleinman, R E

    1994-11-01

    Fat is necessary in the diets of infants and young children because of their extraordinary energy needs and limited dietary capacity. In addition, essential fatty acids provide the substrates for arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and their metabolites. Deficiencies in the amounts of these long-chain fatty acids in the diet during infancy may affect the maturation of the central nervous system, including visual development and intelligence. Efforts to link the diet in infancy and early childhood to the development of chronic diseases in adulthood are hampered by a lack of supportive epidemiologic and clinical data. Serum cholesterol and lipid levels during childhood correlate only weakly with their levels at maturity. Studies in twins suggest that there is a large genetic component to serum lipid levels. Similarly, the correlation between obesity in early childhood and in adulthood is weak. Young children who receive fat-restricted diets in which fat accounts for 30% or less of their intake appear to grow normally but are more likely not to consume the recommended dietary allowances of many nutrients. Therefore fat should not be restricted in the diets of infants and young children. Restricting fat to approximately 30% of the calories consumed is reasonable after the age of 2 years, but the benefits of this recommendation remain to be proved.

  9. Porosity and permeability development in compacting chalks during flooding of nonequilibrium brines: Insights from long-term experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar I.; Hiorth, Aksel; Madland, Merete V.

    2015-05-01

    We report the complete chemical alteration of a Liège outcrop chalk core resulting from a 1072 flow-through experiment performed during mechanical compaction at 130°C. Chemical rock-fluid interactions alter the volumetric strain, porosity, and permeability in a nontrivial way. The porosity reduced only from 41.32% to 40.14%, even though the plug compacted more than 25%. We present a novel analysis of the experimental data, which demonstrates that the geochemical alteration does not conserve the volume of the solids, and therefore, the strain is partitioned additively into a pore volume and solid volume component. At stresses beyond yield, the observed deformation can be explained by grain reorganization reducing the pore space between grains and solid volume changes from the rock-fluid interactions. The mechanical and chemical effects are discussed in relation to the observed permeability development.

  10. Critical thinking: Reported enhancers and barriers by nurses in long-term care: implications for staff development.

    PubMed

    Raterink, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    Nursing acknowledges critical thinking as an important guide to clinical decision making. Agreement on how to define, teach, and evaluate this skill is lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate critical thinking in practice using a survey that asked nurses to evaluate work-related factors that enhance or pose barriers to the use of critical thinking in practice. Results indicated that enhancers and barriers to practice included teamwork, staffing patterns, and staff and administrator support. A relationship with patients was the most satisfying factor, whereas paperwork was the least. Staff development educators must consider the work environment aspects that affect performance and create the life long learning needed for increased competency in practice. PMID:21602631

  11. The Family-Couple-Parenting Questionnaire: Development of a Measure for Long-Term Couples and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Carli, Lucia Leonilde; Anzelmo, Elena; Gatti, Elisa; Santona, Alessandra; Pozzi, Stefania; Gallucci, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    This work describes the construction of family-couple-parenting (FCP) questionnaire, a new measure of three aspects related to the developmental path toward parenting choices, within the perspective of the family life cycle and attachment theory. Two studies are reported. Study 1 reports the development of the FCP questionnaire and its psychometric properties. Study 2 assesses the FCP's nomological validity by investigating group differences on FCP factors and links between FCP factors and romantic attachment (experience in close relationships-revised) and recalled parental bonding (parental bonding instrument). Participants were 791 Italian participants: 405 young adults (203 students, 202 workers) and 193 couples (91 childless-by-choice, 102 parents-to-be). The results suggest that the FCP's stable psychometric structure and strong theoretical basis make FCP a useful instrument for research related to the path to parenthood.

  12. Developing a Long-term Hazard Mitigation Plan for Consequent Volcanic Sedimentation Hazards at Santiaguito Dome Complex, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunzendahl, E.; Bluth, G. J.; Rose, W. I.; Reif, S. L.; Matias, O.

    2001-12-01

    Continuous volcanic activity at Santiaguito, accompanied by seasonal monsoons, results in sediment inputs downslope into the Río Ixpatz and Río Samalá river channels. This threatens the lives and economic stability in populated downstream areas of Guatemala's coastal slope, a region responsible for major contributions to Guatemala's foreign exchange earnings. The changing riverbeds are host to sediment and water quality problems; subsequent flooding threatens villages, nearby cropland, infrastructure, and transportation. Current research suggests that the volcanic activity results in costs equal to millions of US dollars per year. Mitigation efforts are needed to protect lives, fertile land, and valuable crops located along the river valleys and plains in the down-slope region of the volcano. The goal of this work is to build a GIS database for the areas affected by Santiaguito to facilitate the development of a long-range (several decades) plan for hazard mitigation and infrastructure development. The GIS will include multiple TM images which have been used to quantify activity and downslope aggradation patterns (Matias et al, this meeting), digital topography obtained from IGN and USGS/VDAP, land use maps and infrastructure overlays from IGN, Guatemala, and volcanic hazard zonation maps from INSIVUMEH, Guatemala. We expect to also use LAHARZ (Iverson, R.M., Schilling, S.S., Vallance, J.W., GSA Bulletin, 1998) to supplement GIS analysis. Additionally, we plan to work with local agencies within Guatemala to improve the current mitigation strategy which mainly involves extensive annual river and near-bridge dredging and is reactive on short time scales.

  13. Long-term effects of penicillin resistance and fitness cost on pneumococcal transmission dynamics in a developed setting

    PubMed Central

    Tilevik, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci (PNSP) throughout the world threatens successful treatment of infections caused by this important bacterial pathogen. The rate at which PNSP clones spread in the community is thought to mainly be determined by two key determinants; the volume of penicillin use and the magnitude of the fitness cost in the absence of treatment. The aim of the study was to determine the impacts of penicillin consumption and fitness cost on pneumococcal transmission dynamics in a developed country setting. Methods An individual-based network model based on real-life demographic data was constructed and applied in a developed country setting (Sweden). A population structure with transmission of carriage taking place within relevant mixing groups, i.e. families, day care groups, school classes, and other close contacts, was considered to properly assess the transmission dynamics for susceptible and PNSP clones. Several scenarios were simulated and model outcomes were statistically analysed. Results Model simulations predicted that with an outpatient penicillin use corresponding to the sales in Sweden 2010 (118 recipes per 1,000 inhabitants per year), the magnitude of a fitness cost for resistance must be at least 5% to offset the advantage of penicillin resistance. Moreover, even if there is a fitness cost associated with penicillin resistance, a considerable reduction of penicillin usage appears to be required to significantly decrease the incidence of PNSP in a community. Conclusion The frequency of PNSP clones is hard to reverse by simply reducing the penicillin consumption even if there is a biological cost associated with resistance. However, because penicillin usage does promote further spread of PNSP clones, it is important to keep down penicillin consumption considering future resistance problems. PMID:27206408

  14. Lung Inflammatory Effects, Tumorigenesis, and Emphysema Development in a Long-Term Inhalation Study with Cigarette Mainstream Smoke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stabbert, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, yet there is little mechanistic information available in the literature. To improve this, laboratory models for cigarette mainstream smoke (MS) inhalation–induced chronic disease development are needed. The current study investigated the effects of exposing male A/J mice to MS (6h/day, 5 days/week at 150 and 300mg total particulate matter per cubic meter) for 2.5, 5, 10, and 18 months in selected combinations with postinhalation periods of 0, 4, 8, and 13 months. Histopathological examination of step-serial sections of the lungs revealed nodular hyperplasia of the alveolar epithelium and bronchioloalveolar adenoma and adenocarcinoma. At 18 months, lung tumors were found to be enhanced concentration dependently (up to threefold beyond sham exposure), irrespective of whether MS inhalation had been performed for the complete study duration or was interrupted after 5 or 10 months and followed by postinhalation periods. Morphometric analysis revealed an increase in the extent of emphysematous changes after 5 months of MS inhalation, which did not significantly change over the following 13 months of study duration, irrespective of whether MS exposure was continued or not. These changes were found to be accompanied by a complex pattern of transient and sustained pulmonary inflammatory changes that may contribute to the observed pathogeneses. Data from this study suggest that the A/J mouse model holds considerable promise as a relevant model for investigating smoking-related emphysema and adenocarcinoma development. PMID:23104432

  15. Test Methodology Development for Experimental Structural Assessment of ASC Planar Spring Material for Long-Term Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Gunjin; Abdullah, A. B. M.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2014-01-01

    A vibration-based testing methodology has been developed that will assess fatigue behavior of the metallic material of construction for the Advanced Stirling Convertor displacer (planar) spring component. To minimize the testing duration, the test setup is designed for base-excitation of a multiplespecimen arrangement, driven in a high-frequency resonant mode; this allows completion of fatigue testing in an accelerated period. A high performance electro-dynamic exciter (shaker) is used to generate harmonic oscillation of cantilever beam specimens, which are clasped on the shaker armature with specially-designed clamp fixtures. The shaker operates in closed-loop control with dynamic specimen response feedback provided by a scanning laser vibrometer. A test coordinator function synchronizes the shaker controller and the laser vibrometer to complete the closed-loop scheme. The test coordinator also monitors structural health of the test specimens throughout the test period, recognizing any change in specimen dynamic behavior. As this may be due to fatigue crack initiation, the test coordinator terminates test progression and then acquires test data in an orderly manner. Design of the specimen and fixture geometry was completed by finite element analysis such that peak stress does not occur at the clamping fixture attachment points. Experimental stress evaluation was conducted to verify the specimen stress predictions. A successful application of the experimental methodology was demonstrated by validation tests with carbon steel specimens subjected to fully-reversed bending stress; high-cycle fatigue failures were induced in such specimens using higher-than-prototypical stresses

  16. Effects of Long-Term Flutamide Treatment During Development on Sexual Behaviour and Hormone Responsiveness in Rams.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E; Meaker, M; Stormshak, F; Estill, C T

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone exposure during midgestation differentiates neural circuits controlling sex-specific behaviours and patterns of gonadotrophin secretion in male sheep. Testosterone acts through androgen receptors (AR) and/or after aromatisation to oestradiol and binding to oestrogen receptors. The present study assessed the role of AR activation in male sexual differentiation. We compared rams that were exposed to the AR antagonist flutamide (Flu) throughout the critical period (i.e. days 30-90 of gestation) to control rams and ewes that received no prenatal treatments. The external genitalia of all Flu rams were phenotypically female. Testes were positioned s.c. in the inguinal region of the abdomen, exhibited seasonally impaired androgen secretion and were azospermic. Flu rams displayed male-typical precopulatory and mounting behaviours but could not intromit or ejaculate because they lacked a penis. Flu rams exhibited greater mounting behaviour than control rams and, similar to controls, showed sexual partner preferences for oestrous ewes. Neither control, nor Flu rams responded to oestradiol treatments with displays of female-typical receptive behaviour or LH surge responses, whereas all control ewes responded as expected. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus in Flu rams was intermediate in volume between control rams and ewes and significantly different from both. These results indicate that prenatal anti-androgen exposure is not able to block male sexual differentiation in sheep and suggest that compensatory mechanisms intervene to maintain sufficient androgen stimulation during development.

  17. Effects of Long-Term Flutamide Treatment During Development on Sexual Behaviour and Hormone Responsiveness in Rams.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E; Meaker, M; Stormshak, F; Estill, C T

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone exposure during midgestation differentiates neural circuits controlling sex-specific behaviours and patterns of gonadotrophin secretion in male sheep. Testosterone acts through androgen receptors (AR) and/or after aromatisation to oestradiol and binding to oestrogen receptors. The present study assessed the role of AR activation in male sexual differentiation. We compared rams that were exposed to the AR antagonist flutamide (Flu) throughout the critical period (i.e. days 30-90 of gestation) to control rams and ewes that received no prenatal treatments. The external genitalia of all Flu rams were phenotypically female. Testes were positioned s.c. in the inguinal region of the abdomen, exhibited seasonally impaired androgen secretion and were azospermic. Flu rams displayed male-typical precopulatory and mounting behaviours but could not intromit or ejaculate because they lacked a penis. Flu rams exhibited greater mounting behaviour than control rams and, similar to controls, showed sexual partner preferences for oestrous ewes. Neither control, nor Flu rams responded to oestradiol treatments with displays of female-typical receptive behaviour or LH surge responses, whereas all control ewes responded as expected. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus in Flu rams was intermediate in volume between control rams and ewes and significantly different from both. These results indicate that prenatal anti-androgen exposure is not able to block male sexual differentiation in sheep and suggest that compensatory mechanisms intervene to maintain sufficient androgen stimulation during development. PMID:27005749

  18. The long-term effectiveness of the International Child Development Programme (ICDP) implemented as a community-wide parenting programme

    PubMed Central

    Skar, Ane-Marthe Solheim; von Tetzchner, Stephen; Clucas, Claudine; Sherr, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Short-term effectiveness of the International Child Development Programme (ICDP) for parents in the general population has been studied. The aim of this paper was to investigate the longer term impact of the ICDP programme on parents looking for sustained changes 6–12 months after the programme. For this, a non-clinical caregiver group attending the ICDP programme (N = 79) and a non-attending comparison group (N = 62) completed questionnaires on parenting, psychosocial functioning, and child difficulties before, on completion and 6–12 months after the ICDP programme. Analyses compare changes in scores over time. The results revealed that the ICDP group showed significantly improved scores on parenting measures, less loneliness, and trends towards improved self-efficacy compared to the comparison group 6–12 months after programme completion. The ICDP group also reported that their children spent significantly less time on television and computer games and a trend towards fewer child difficulties. Key positive effects sustained over time but at a somewhat lower level, supporting community-wide implementation of ICDP as a general parenting programme. It is concluded that more intensive training with follow-up sessions should be considered to sustain and boost initial gains. PMID:25431603

  19. Long Term Effect on Professionals’ Knowledge, Practice and Attitudes towards User Involvement Four Years after Implementing an Organisational Development Plan: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Marit By; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2016-01-01

    Background Health service organisations are increasingly implementing user involvement initiatives according to requirements from governments, such as user representation in administrational boards, better information to users, and more involvement of the users during treatment. Professionals are vital in all initiatives to enhance user involvement, and initiatives to increase involvement should influence the professionals’ practice and attitudes. The implementation of a development plan intending to enhance user involvement in a mental health hospital in Central Norway had no effect on the professionals after 16 months. The objective was therefore to investigate the long term effect on the professionals’ knowledge, practice and attitudes towards user involvement after four years. Methods This was a non-randomized controlled study including professionals from three mental health hospitals in Central Norway. A development plan intended to enhance user participation was implemented in one of the hospitals, including establishing a patient education centre and a user office, purchasing of user expertise, appointing contact professionals for next of kin, and improving of the centre’s information and the professional culture. The professionals at two other hospitals constituted the control group. All professionals were invited to answer the Consumer Participation Questionnaire (CPQ) and additional questions, at a four year interval. Results A total of 399 professionals participated (43% response rate). Comparing the changes in the intervention group with the changes in the control group, the results showed that the plan had improved some aspects of the professionals’ knowledge about the user involvement taking place in the hospital. In addition, some parts of the professionals’ practice of providing information to the service users was improved, and the development plan might have raised their awareness about insufficient involvement of next of kin

  20. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long term complications of diabetes To use the sharing ... sores and infections. If it goes on too long, your toes, foot, or leg may need to ...

  1. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  2. Long-term biomass research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Some of DOE's long term R and D programs for biomass are summarized in this article. These include research efforts in the fields of anaerobic digestion, energy farming, short rotation cultivation and aquatic farming. (DMC)

  3. Samish Indian Nation Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Christine Woodward; B. Beckley; K. Hagen

    2005-06-30

    The Tribes strategic energy planning effort is divided into three phases: (1) Completing an Energy Resource Assessment; (2) Developing a Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan; and (3) Preparing a Strategic Energy Implementation Plan for the Samish Homelands. The Samish Indian Nation developed a comprehensive Strategic Energy plan to set policy for future development on tribal land that consists of a long-term, integrated, systems approach to providing a framework under which the Samish Community can use resources efficiently, create energy-efficient infrastructures, and protect and enhance quality of life. Development of the Strategic Energy plan will help the Samish Nation create a healthy community that will sustain current and future generations by addressing economic, environmental, and social issues while respecting the Samish Indian Nation culture and traditions.

  4. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Development, Zinc Metabolism and Biodistribution of Minerals (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Jianjun; Zhou, Le; Li, Jun; Xu, Jiaman; Li, Weijian; Zhang, Lili; Zhong, Xiang; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnOs) are widely used and possess great potentials in agriculture and biomedicine. It is inevitable for human exposure to these nanoparticles. However, no study had been conducted to investigate the long term effects of nano-ZnOs. This study aimed at investigating effects of nano-ZnOs on development, zinc metabolism and biodistribution of minerals (Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) in mice from week 3 to 35. After the characteristics of nano-ZnOs were determined, they were added into the basal diet at 0, 50, 500 and 5000 mg/kg. Results indicated that added 50 and 500 mg/kg nano-ZnOs showed minimal toxicity. However, 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnOs significantly decreased body weight (from week 4 to 16) and increased the relative weights of the pancreas, brain and lung. Added 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnOs significantly increased the serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity and zinc content, and significantly enhanced mRNA expression of zinc metabolism-related genes, including metallothionein 1(32.66 folds), metallothionein 2 (31.42 folds), ZIP8 (2.21folds), ZIP14 (2.45 folds), ZnT1 (4.76 folds), ZnT2 (6.19 folds) and ZnT4 (1.82 folds). The biodistribution determination showed that there was a significant accumulation of zinc in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and bones (tibia and fibula) after receiving 5000 mg/kg nano-ZnO diet, while no significant effects on Cu, Fe, and Mn levels, except for liver Fe content and pancreas Mn level. Our results demonstrated that long term exposure to 50 and 500 mg/kg nano-ZnO diets showed minimal toxicity. However, high dose of nano-ZnOs (5000 mg/kg) caused toxicity on development, and altered the zinc metabolism and biodistribution in mice. PMID:27732669

  5. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  6. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  7. Long-term home care research.

    PubMed

    Green, J H

    1989-11-01

    The population of seniors is growing and health service reimbursement is shrinking. Long-term home health care services were developed with an assumption that the services would decrease costs. This assumption has not been validated. What has been recognized is that long-term home health care targets a new and growing population of frail seniors who need services but are probably not at risk for institutionalization. The impact of long-term home care services on the health status and quality of life of seniors and caregivers has been limited by outcome measurement problems. There are indications that the services improved life satisfaction and reduced services needs, but further evaluations need to replicate the outcomes. In effect, long-term outcomes have not been sufficiently explored. Further research also needs to assist us in identifying outcomes for certain services with precise target populations. Public policy questions are ahead. Should a program that can increase costs, has demonstrated some but not dramatic impacts on quality of life and health status, and has the possibility of expansion, be funded? The question is obviously debatable. From a nursing perspective of health promotion and prevention, the answer is "yes." Funding should be continued in conjunction with increased research on the program impacts. In Kane's (1988) analysis of the Channeling experiments, she summarized the situation effectively: Knowing these facts, we are now in a position to reformulate public policies to design a system of long-term care that satisfies the preferences of consumers and protects them from catastrophic long-term expenses, while promoting the triple virtues of acceptable, quality, equitable access, and defensible costs. . . Nothing in the Channeling results should prevent us from going ahead and trying to develop both community based and institutionally based long-term services in which this country can take pride.

  8. Development of a Long-term Sampling Network to Monitor Restoration Success in the Southwest Coastal Everglades: Vegetation, Hydrology, and Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction and History Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm, crossed the southern Florida peninsula on the morning of August 24, 1992 (Fig. 1). Following the storm, the National Park Service conducted an environmental damage assessment to gauge the storm's impacts on the natural resources of south Florida Park Service holdings (Pimm et al., 1994). Although hurricanes have impacted Park Service lands such as the Everglades in the past (Houston and Powell, 2003), no systematic, permanent sampling scheme has been established to monitor long-term recovery (or lack thereof) following disturbance. In October 1992, vegetation monitoring plots were established in heavily damaged areas of mangrove forest on the southwest coast of the Everlgades, along the Lostmans and Broad Rivers (Smith et al., 1994, see Fig. 2). As the permanent plot network was being established, funding was awarded for the South Florida Global Climate Change project (SOFL-GCC). This led to the establishment of a network of hydrological monitoring stations (Anderson and Smith, 2004). Finally, sediment elevation tables (SETs) were installed at many locations. SETs provide the means to measure very small changes (2 mm) in the sediment surface elevation accurately over time (Cahoon et al., 2002). We also set up marker horizons to measure accretion of sediment at each site (Smith and Cahoon, 2003). Sampling sites were located along three transects extending from upstream freshwater wetlands to downstream saltwater wetlands along the Shark, Lostmans and Chatham Rivers in Everglades National Park (Fig. 2). While we were developing our sampling network for basic scientific research needs, concern mounted over the health of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and in particular over the influence of decreased freshwater flows (Smith et al., 1989). Ecosystem restoration planning was begun, resulting in the multi-agency, $8 billion Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). Our co-located sampling networks

  9. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  10. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  11. 22 CFR 228.18 - Long-term leases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Long-term leases. 228.18 Section 228.18 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RULES FOR PROCUREMENT OF COMMODITIES AND SERVICES FINANCED BY... USAID Financing § 228.18 Long-term leases. Any commodity obtained under a long-term lease agreement...

  12. First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care?

    PubMed

    Hyrkäs, Kristiina; Appelqvist-Schmidlechner, Kaija; Kivimäki, Kirsti

    2005-05-01

    There have recently been several organizational changes that have challenged nursing managers in the Finnish health care system. First-line managers need support in their work because of organizational changes and scarce economic resources. One of these supportive measures is clinical supervision. A group of first-line managers in a Finnish University hospital participated in a 2-year clinical supervision intervention in 1999-2000. The managers' perceptions of the clinical supervision were followed up twice during the intervention and 1 year after (2001). The aim of this study is to describe how the first-line managers saw the future effects of the clinical supervision intervention 1 year after its termination. At the beginning of the intervention, the number of participating nursing managers was 32. The number of respondents in this study 1 year (2001) after the clinical supervision was 11. Data was collected using empathy-based stories, which involved writing short essays. The respondents received orientation and a script to assist them in the writing of essays. The stories were analysed qualitatively by categorizing the responses by themes. The managers deemed that clinical supervision had, in the 3-year time frame, positive long-term effects on their leadership and communication skills, the desire for self-development, self-knowledge and coping. Managers believed that in the long run, clinical supervision would provide them with a broader perspective on work and would enhance the use of clinical supervision as a supportive measure among co-workers. First-line managers expect clinical supervision to have long-term positive effects on their work and coping. Empathy-based stories, as a method, were found suited to studies, which aim to obtaining future-oriented knowledge. PMID:15819833

  13. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-09-14

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  14. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  15. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed.

  16. The effectiveness of a long-term professional development program on teachers' self-efficacy, attitudes, skills, and knowledge using a thematic learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnin, Richard Kinna

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the effectiveness of a long-term professional development program on self-efficacy beliefs, science attitudes, skills, and knowledge of elementary teachers. The target school was located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Major elements of the study included the use of thematic science strands, use of the 5E constructivist-oriented instructional model, a focus on the interdisciplinary nature of the science process skills, and guided, inquiry-based learning experiences. These elements mirror the principles identified as being essential components of effective professional development for mathematics, and science education (Fullan, 1985; Sparks & Loucks-Horsley, 1990; Loucks-Horsley, 1997). The research team was actively involved with the participants for a total of 30 days at their school over the 24 months of the study. During each training, the research team modeled the 5E constructivist-oriented instructional strategy, and the interdisciplinary nature of the science process skills, set up a wide variety of activity centers, and provided the teachers with opportunities to improve their attitudes, skills, and knowledge of the science content, and teaching strategies. The 15 participants completed pre-, post-, and post-post-Leadership Team Surreys. Quantitative data analyses of gain scores measuring level of confidence to teach Marine and Earth Science, content knowledge, and teaching strategies were significant, p < .001. The participants' efficacy-beliefs and outcome expectancy were assessed with a pre- and posttest Science Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs Instrument that measures both elements. Self-efficacy beliefs were significant at p < .001. Outcome expectancies were not significant, p > .05. Qualitative analysis of reflective journal comments, classroom observations, and the participants understanding, and use of science process skills across the curriculum supported the quantitative data results. The

  17. Mini-CORK observatories using the MeBo seafloor drill rig - a new development for long-term data acquisition and sampling in shallow boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Renken, J.; Zabel, M.; Wefer, G.

    2011-12-01

    State of the art technology for long-term monitoring of fluid migration within the sea floor is the sealing of a borehole with a Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) after sensor installation and/or fluid sampling devices within the drill string. However, the combined used of a drilling vessels and a remotely operated drilling (ROV) required for a CORK installation in the deep sea is a costly exercise that limits the number of monitoring stations installed. Robotic sea floor drill rigs are a cost effective alternative for shallow drillings down to 50-100 m below sea floor. Here we present a Mini-CORK system that is developed for installation with the sea floor drill rig MeBo. This rig was developed at MARUM Research Centre, University of Bremen in 2005 and can sample the sea floor in water depths up to 2000 m. The MeBo is deployed on the seabed and remotely controlled from the vessel. All required drill tools for wire-line core drilling down to 70 m below sea floor are stored on two rotating magazines and can be loaded below the top drive drill head for assembling the drill string. For one of the upcoming cruises with RV Sonne offshore Japan (Nankai Trough accretionary prism), MeBo will be used for the first time to place observatories. Two different designs have been developed. The first, relatively simple long-term device resembles a MeBo drill rod in its geometry, and contains a pressure and temperature transducer in the borehole plus an identical pair of transducers for seafloor reference. The device also contains a data logger, battery unit, and an acoustic modem so that data can be downloaded at any time from a ship of opportunity. The key element at the base of the observatory rod is a seal at the conical thread to separate the borehole hydraulically from the overlying water body. It is realized by an adapter, which also contains a hotstab hydraulic connection and an electrical connection. The second observatory device is a seafloor unit, which replaces

  18. Evaluation of larvicides in developing management guidelines for long-term control of pest blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) along the Orange River, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R W; Rivers-Moore, N A

    2008-12-01

    In 2000 and 2001 Orange River levels were higher than normal: associated serious outbreaks of blackfly had a substantial detrimental impact on the local economy. The poor control was attributed to the suspected development of larval resistance to temephos. A long-term solution to blackfly control, through the identification of a suitable replacement to temephos for use during high flow conditions, was proposed. This study, however, failed to identify or register a suitable larvicide for use during high flow conditions. Although permethrin was highly effective against blackfly larvae, it was rejected because of its detrimental impacts on non-target fauna. Various formulations of locally produced dry Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (B.t.i.) were tested, but these were ineffective against blackflies. The study also confirmed that resistance to temephos has developed among Simulium chutteri in the middle and lower Orange River. The feasibility of "reversing" the resistance to temephos through the use of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) was investigated, but the results were not favourable. Furthermore, PBO was highly toxic to blackflies and non-target organisms, and was not recommended for further testing. This means that B.t.i. currently remains the only symptomatic measure of treatment currently applied. Although resistance to B.t.i. has not been reported for blackflies elsewhere in South Africa, there is a need to remain vigilant and to implement an operational strategy that minimizes the risks of resistance developing.

  19. Long-term protective effect of lactation on the development of type 2 diabetes in women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anette-G; Wallner, Maike; Kaiser, Imme; Rossbauer, Michaela; Harsunen, Minna H; Lachmann, Lorenz; Maier, Jörg; Winkler, Christiane; Hummel, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing postpartum type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent postpartum type 2 diabetes are important to reduce the epidemic of diabetes and its societal impact. Breastfeeding was reported to improve early postpartum glucose tolerance and reduce the subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. To investigate whether breastfeeding influences short- and long-term postpartum diabetes outcomes, women with GDM (n = 304) participating in the prospective German GDM study were followed from delivery for up to 19 years postpartum for diabetes development. All participants were recruited between 1989 and 1999. Postpartum diabetes developed in 147 women and was dependent on the treatment received during pregnancy (insulin vs. diet), BMI, and presence/absence of islet autoantibodies. Among islet autoantibody-negative women, breastfeeding was associated with median time to diabetes of 12.3 years compared with 2.3 years in women who did not breastfeed. The lowest postpartum diabetes risk was observed in women who breastfed for >3 months. On the basis of these results, we recommend that breastfeeding should be encouraged among these women because it offers a safe and feasible low-cost intervention to reduce the risk of subsequent diabetes in this high-risk population.

  20. Long-term changes in food availability mediate the effects of temperature on growth, development and survival in striped marsh frog larvae: implications for captive breeding programmes

    PubMed Central

    Courtney Jones, Stephanie K.; Munn, Adam J.; Penman, Trent D.; Byrne, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Food availability and temperature are known to trigger phenotypic change, but the interactive effects between these factors are only beginning to be considered. The aim of this study was to examine the independent and interactive effects of long-term stochastic food availability and water temperature on larval survivorship, growth and development of the striped marsh frog, Limnodynastes peronii. Larval L. peronii were reared in conditions of either constant or stochastic food availability and in water at three different temperatures (18, 22 and 26°C), and effects on survival, growth and development were quantified. Over the experimental period, larval growth rate was highest and survivorship lowest at the warmest temperature. However, changes in food availability mediated the effects of temperature, with slower larval growth and higher survivorship in stochastic food availability treatments. Tadpoles in the stochastic food availability treatments did not reach metamorphosis during the experimental period, suggesting that developmental stasis may have been induced by food restriction. Overall, these results demonstrate that changes in food availability alter the effects of water temperature on survival, growth and development. From an applied perspective, understanding how environmental factors interact to cause phenotypic change may assist with amphibian conservation by improving the number of tadpoles generated in captive breeding programmes. PMID:27293714

  1. [Taiwan long-term care insurance and the evolution of long-term care in Japan].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Wen; Liu, Shu-Hui; Pai, Yu-Chu

    2010-08-01

    The proportion of elderly (65 years of age and older) in Taiwan has exceeded 10% since 2008. With more elderly, the number of patients suffering from dementia and disabilities has also been rapidly increasing. Japan also has been facing increasing demand for long-term care due to an aging society. Prior to 2000, social welfare programs in Japan, working to cope with changing needs, typically provided insufficient services, and geriatric patients were hospitalized unnecessarily, wasting medical resources and causing undue patient hardship. In response, Japan launched its long-term care insurance program in April 2000. Under the program, city, town and village-based organizations should take responsibility for providing care to the elderly in their place of residence. The program significantly improved previous financial shortfalls and long-term care supply and demand has been met by existing social welfare organization resources. In Taiwan, the provision of long-term care by county / city authorities has proven inconsistent, with performance deemed poor after its first decade of long-term care operations. Service was found to be affected by differences in available resources and insufficient long-term care administration. The cultures of Taiwan and Japan are similar. The authors visited the Japan Long-Term Care Insurance Institute in August 2009. Main issues involved in the implementation and evolution of the Japan long-term Care Insurance are reported on in this paper. We hope such may be useful information to those working to develop long-term care programs in Taiwan. PMID:20661859

  2. Development of a separate tank with an electrolysis-dependent bacteria controlling system for the long term storage of potable water.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Akinori; Tanji, Masataka; Hayashi, Nobuatsu; Wakabayashi, Akihiro; Tatsumoto, Hideki; Hotta, Kunimoto

    2006-12-01

    For the long term storage of tap water, we developed a separate type of tank (5 m3) equipped with an electrolysis system to control bacterial growth. The electrolysis conditions using 20A direct current and a water flow rate of 10 L/min were capable of producing available chlorine (AC) at the rate of 5-8mg/min and raising the AC level of the stored tap water by about 0.2 mg/kg within 20-30 min The electrolyzed tap water with 0.2 mg/kg AC showed a capability per ml of killing 10(5)-10(6) cfu of bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 15 sec. A 6-month trial operation of the storage system with an automatic electrolysis control to keep AC level ranging 0.2-0.4 mg/kg demonstrated that the system worked well for the stored tap water in suppressing bacterial growth as well as in keeping good potable quality with reference to the 46 parameters specified for Japanese tap water. Actually, the electrolysis treatment was administered intermittently with an interval of about two weeks. Thus we believe the developed system has good potential to secure a potable water supply not only in the occasion of emergencies but also in countries having problems in the supply of safe drinking water.

  3. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  4. Long-term parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Karin; Jarnum, Stig

    1978-01-01

    Nineteen patients (11 women and eight men) aged 20-68 received long-term parenteral nutrition, mostly at home, for six to 63 months (mean 19 months). Indications for LTPN were extensive, active Crohn's disease in three patients, intestinocutaneous fistulas in three, and short-bowel syndrome in the remaining 13 patients. Subclavian or intra-atrial (Broviac) catheters were most commonly used, for which the average life was four and seven months respectively. Complications of long-term parenteral nutrition included pneumothorax in four out of 48 subclavian vein punctures. Catheter-induced thrombosis of central veins was shown by phlebography 17 times in nine patients, and eight episodes of total occlusion occurred. Two of these patients had pulmonary infarction. Nineteen episodes of catheter sepsis occurred in 11 patients, but only one was fatal. Complications related to intestinal disease included intra-abdominal abscesses and intestinal fistulas, and disturbances of liver function. Five patients died, though in only two was death related to long-term parenteral nutrition. One of these patients died from catheter sepsis, the other had subdural haematoma possibly caused by anticoagulant treatment. Eight of the 14 surviving patients still needed parenteral nutrition. All received a disability pension, but six had an acceptable quality of life with almost normal social activities. Despite problems such as difficulties in maintaining standardised infusion programmes, it was concluded that long-term parenteral nutrition at home is practicable and consistent with an acceptable quality of life. ImagesFIG 2 PMID:98199

  5. Related Studies in Long Term Lithium Battery Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horning, R. J.; Chua, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The continuing growth of the use of lithium electrochemical systems in a wide variety of both military and industrial applications is primarily a result of the significant benefits associated with the technology such as high energy density, wide temperature operation and long term stability. The stability or long term storage capability of a battery is a function of several factors, each important to the overall storage life and, therefore, each potentially a problem area if not addressed during the design, development and evaluation phases of the product cycle. Design (e.g., reserve vs active), inherent material thermal stability, material compatibility and self-discharge characteristics are examples of factors key to the storability of a power source.

  6. Comparison between lab- and full-scale applications of in situ aeration of an old landfill and assessment of long-term emission development after completion.

    PubMed

    Hrad, Marlies; Gamperling, Oliver; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2013-10-01

    Sustainable landfilling has become a fundamental objective in many modern waste management concepts. In this context, the in situ aeration of landfills has been recognised for its potential to convert conventional anaerobic landfills into biological stabilised state, whereby both current and potential (long-term) emissions of the landfilled waste are mitigated. In recent years, different in situ aeration concepts have been successfully applied in Europe, North America and Asia, all pursuing different objectives and strategies. In Austria, the first full-scale application of in situ landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection and simultaneous off-gas collection and treatment was implemented on an old, small municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill (2.6ha) in autumn 2007. Complementary laboratory investigations were conducted with waste samples taken from the landfill site in order to provide more information on the transferability of the results from lab- to full-scale aeration measures. In addition, long-term emission development of the stabilised waste after aeration completion was assessed in an ongoing laboratory experiment. Although the initial waste material was described as mostly stable in terms of the biological parameters gas generation potential over 21days (GP21) and respiration activity over 4days (RA4), the lab-scale experiments indicated that aeration, which led to a significant improvement of leachate quality, was accompanied by further measurable changes in the solid waste material under optimised conditions. Even 75weeks after aeration completion the leachate, as well as gaseous emissions from the stabilised waste material, remained low and stayed below the authorised Austrian discharge limits. However, the application of in situ aeration at the investigated landfill is a factor 10 behind the lab-based predictions after 3years of operation, mainly due to technical limitations in the full-scale operation (e.g. high air flow resistivity due

  7. Comparison between lab- and full-scale applications of in situ aeration of an old landfill and assessment of long-term emission development after completion

    SciTech Connect

    Hrad, Marlies; Gamperling, Oliver; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Current data on in situ aeration effects from the first Austrian full-scale case study. ► Data on lasting waste stabilisation after aeration completion. ► Information on the transferability of results from lab- to full-scale aeration. - Abstract: Sustainable landfilling has become a fundamental objective in many modern waste management concepts. In this context, the in situ aeration of landfills has been recognised for its potential to convert conventional anaerobic landfills into biological stabilised state, whereby both current and potential (long-term) emissions of the landfilled waste are mitigated. In recent years, different in situ aeration concepts have been successfully applied in Europe, North America and Asia, all pursuing different objectives and strategies. In Austria, the first full-scale application of in situ landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection and simultaneous off-gas collection and treatment was implemented on an old, small municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill (2.6 ha) in autumn 2007. Complementary laboratory investigations were conducted with waste samples taken from the landfill site in order to provide more information on the transferability of the results from lab- to full-scale aeration measures. In addition, long-term emission development of the stabilised waste after aeration completion was assessed in an ongoing laboratory experiment. Although the initial waste material was described as mostly stable in terms of the biological parameters gas generation potential over 21 days (GP{sub 21}) and respiration activity over 4 days (RA{sub 4}), the lab-scale experiments indicated that aeration, which led to a significant improvement of leachate quality, was accompanied by further measurable changes in the solid waste material under optimised conditions. Even 75 weeks after aeration completion the leachate, as well as gaseous emissions from the stabilised waste material, remained low and stayed below the

  8. Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer; Ringland, Margaret; Wilson, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention. PMID:20463447

  9. Long-Term Sequelae of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to the long-term consequences and complications resulting from a stroke. Many stroke survivors go on to develop a variety of medical, musculoskeletal, and psychosocial complications, years after the acute stroke. The family physician is regularly called upon to deal with these problems, but is often hampered by a lack of resources. PMID:21221264

  10. Long-Term Environmental Research Programs - Evolving Capacity for Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    Long-term forestry, watershed, and ecological research sites have become critical, productive nodes for environmental science research and in some cases for work in the social sciences and humanities. The Forest Service's century-old Experimental Forests and Ranges and the National Science Foundation's 28- year-old Long-Term Ecological Research program have been remarkably productive in both basic and applied sciences, including characterization of acid rain and old-growth ecosystems and development of forest, watershed, and range management systems for commercial and other land use objectives. A review of recent developments suggests steps to enhance the function of collections of long-term research sites as interactive science networks. The programs at these sites have evolved greatly, especially over the past few decades, as the questions addressed, disciplines engaged, and degree of science integration have grown. This is well displayed by small, experimental watershed studies, which first were used for applied hydrology studies then more fundamental biogeochemical studies and now examination of complex ecosystem processes; all capitalizing on the legacy of intensive studies and environmental monitoring spanning decades. In very modest ways these collections of initially independent sites have functioned increasingly as integrated research networks addressing inter-site questions by using common experimental designs, being part of a single experiment, and examining long-term data in a common analytical framework. The network aspects include data sharing via publicly-accessible data-harvester systems for climate and streamflow data. The layering of one research or environmental monitoring network upon another facilitates synergies. Changing climate and atmospheric chemistry highlight a need to use these networks as continental-scale observatory systems for assessing the impacts of environmental change on ecological services. To better capitalize on long-term

  11. Long-term, six-dimensional live-cell imaging for the mouse preimplantation embryo that does not affect full-term development.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Suetsugu, Rinako; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-06-01

    Mammalian preimplantation embryonic development is achieved by tightly coordinated regulation of a great variety of temporal and spatial changes. Therefore, it would be valuable to analyze these events three-dimensionally and dynamically. We have previously developed a live-cell imaging method based on the expression of fluorescent proteins, using mRNA injection and time-lapse florescence microscopy. However, with conventional fluorescent microscopy, three-dimensional images could not be obtained due to the thickness of the embryos and the optical problem in which ;out-of focus blur' cannot be eliminated. Moreover, as the repeated exposure of intense excitation light to the cell yields phototoxicity, long-term observation was detrimental to embryonic development. Here, we improved our imaging system to enable six-dimensional live-cell imaging of mouse preimplantation embryos (x, y and z axes, time-lapse, multicolor and multisample). Importantly, by improving the imaging devices and optimizing the conditions for imaging, such as intensity of excitation and time intervals for image acquisition, the procedure itself was not detrimental to full-term development, although it is a prolonged imaging process. For example, live pups were obtained from embryos to which two different wavelengths of excitation (488 and 561 nm) were applied at 7.5-min intervals for about 70 h, and 51 images were acquired in the z axis at each time point; thus, a total of 56,814 fluorescent images were taken. All the pups were healthy, reproductively normal and not transgenic. Thus, this live-cell imaging technology is safe for full-term mouse development. This offers a novel approach for developmental and reproductive research in that it enables both retrospective and prospective analyses of development. It might also be applicable to assessment of embryo quality in fields such as human reproductive technology and production animal research.

  12. Assessing the performances of low impact development alternatives by long-term simulation for a semi-arid area in Tianjin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhui Jeanne; Li, Yu; Niu, Shuai; Zhou, Shu H

    2014-01-01

    For areas that are urbanized rapidly, the practice of low impact development (LID) has gained an important place in stormwater management and urban planning due to its capability and beneficial effects in restoring the original hydrological cycle. The performances of LID alternatives can vary substantially due to different climate conditions. This study investigated the performances of five LID alternatives under a semi-arid climate in northern China on water balance and flood control. A numerical model, Storm Water Management Model version 5 (US Environmental Protection Agency), was employed to run 10 years' rainfall events for these objectives. Two evaluation methods were proposed in this study: the efficiency index for water balance and a performance radar chart. The investigation of the five LID alternatives revealed that these LID alternatives functioned differently in flood control and water balance, and porous pavement performed best in all indices except the lag time. The two evaluation methods, in conjunction with the long-term numerical simulation, can facilitate design and decision making by providing a clear picture of the performance and functions for these LID alternatives.

  13. Use of thermogravimetric analysis to develop accelerated test methods to investigate long-term environmental effects on fiber-reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Prian, L.; Pollard, R.; Shan, R.; Mastropietro, C.W.; Barkatt, A.; Gentry, T.R.; Bank, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    The development of accelerated test methods to characterize long-term environmental effects on fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) requires the use of physicochemical methods, as well as macromechanical measurements, in order to investigate the degradation processes and predict their course over long periods of time. Thermochemical and mechanical measurements were performed on a large number of FRPs exposed to neutral, basic, and acidic media between 23 and 80 C over periods of 7 to 224 days. The resin matrices used in the present study included vinylester, polyester, and epoxy, and the fiber materials were silicate glass, aramid, and carbon. TGA was used to study the effects of aqueous media on FRPs. In particular, the relative weight loss upon heating the previously exposed material from 150 to 300 C was found to be indicative of the extent of matrix depolymerization. Indications were obtained for correlation between this weight loss and the extent of degradation of various measures of mechanical strength. The measured weight change of the tested materials during exposure was found to reflect the extent of water absorption and could be related to the extent of the weight loss between 150 and 300 C. In basic environments, weight loss, rather than gain, took place as a result of fiber dissolution.

  14. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash. Part 2: Influence of curing conditions on long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Freidin, C.

    1999-11-01

    The distinguishing feature of high-calcium oil shale fly ash (HCOSFA) used in experiments is the high amount of free CaO and SO{sub 3} in form of lime and anhydrite. Strength development as well as the microstructure and composition of the new formations of fly ash binder (FAB) based on HCOSFA and low-calcium coal fly ash after curing in different conditions and long-term exposure in various environments were studied. It was determined that moist air and water are the most favorable conditions for aging processes of FAB. In atmospheric air three stages in strength change of cured FAB are observed: increase of compressive strength over 1 month; sharp drop after 1 month up to the 3 to months; stabilization or slowdown of loss in strength after 3 to 6 months of exposure. The duration of the second and third stages depends on HCOSFA content and does not depend on curing conditions. One of the hydration products of FAB is ettringite. Its instability in air could be a reason for the decrease in strength of FAB and some disintegration of the hardened system. In the presence of low-calcium coal fly ash, additional amounts of stable calcium silicate hydrates are formed during FAB curing especially during steam curing. This has a positive effect on compressive strength and stability of FAB in atmospheric air.

  15. Technical and Organizational Considerations for the Long-Term Maintenance and Development of Digital Brain Atlases and Web-Based Databases

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Digital brain atlas is a kind of image database that specifically provide information about neurons and glial cells in the brain. It has various advantages that are unmatched by conventional paper-based atlases. Such advantages, however, may become disadvantages if appropriate cares are not taken. Because digital atlases can provide unlimited amount of data, they should be designed to minimize redundancy and keep consistency of the records that may be added incrementally by different staffs. The fact that digital atlases can easily be revised necessitates a system to assure that users can access previous versions that might have been cited in papers at a particular period. To inherit our knowledge to our descendants, such databases should be maintained for a very long period, well over 100 years, like printed books and papers. Technical and organizational measures to enable long-term archive should be considered seriously. Compared to the initial development of the database, subsequent efforts to increase the quality and quantity of its contents are not regarded highly, because such tasks do not materialize in the form of publications. This fact strongly discourages continuous expansion of, and external contributions to, the digital atlases after its initial launch. To solve these problems, the role of the biocurators is vital. Appreciation of the scientific achievements of the people who do not write papers, and establishment of the secure academic career path for them, are indispensable for recruiting talents for this very important job. PMID:20661458

  16. Long-term efficiency and stability of wetlands for treating wastewater of a lead/zinc mine and the concurrent ecosystem development.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Lan, C Y; Yang, C S; Liao, W B; Chang, H; Shu, W S

    2006-10-01

    A constructed wetland system in Guangdong Province, South of China has been used for treating Pb/Zn mine discharge since 1985. The performance in the purification of the mine discharge and the concurrent ecosystem development within the system during the period of 1985-2000 has been studied. The untreated wastewater contained rather high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) (0.05 mg L(-1)), lead (Pb) (11.5 mg L(-1)), and zinc (Zn) (14.5 mg L(-1)), which greatly exceed the upper limits for industrial wastewater discharge in China. The constructed wetland system effectively removed Cd by 94.00%, Pb by 99.04%, Zn by 97.30%, and total suspended solids (TSS) by 98.95% from the mine discharge over a long period (over 16 years) leading to significant improvement in water quality; it was also found that there were no significantly annual or monthly variations in pH values, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Zn concentrations in water collected from the outlet of the wetland. Moreover, diversity and abundance of living organisms, including protozoan, higher plants, terrestrial animals, and birds, increased gradually. The 16-year monitoring results showed a reciprocal relationship, at a certain extent, between restoration of the wetland ecosystem, in other words, the maturity of the wetland, and the long-term efficiency and stability on purifying heavy metal-contaminated wastewater. PMID:16469422

  17. Technical and organizational considerations for the long-term maintenance and development of digital brain atlases and web-based databases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Digital brain atlas is a kind of image database that specifically provide information about neurons and glial cells in the brain. It has various advantages that are unmatched by conventional paper-based atlases. Such advantages, however, may become disadvantages if appropriate cares are not taken. Because digital atlases can provide unlimited amount of data, they should be designed to minimize redundancy and keep consistency of the records that may be added incrementally by different staffs. The fact that digital atlases can easily be revised necessitates a system to assure that users can access previous versions that might have been cited in papers at a particular period. To inherit our knowledge to our descendants, such databases should be maintained for a very long period, well over 100 years, like printed books and papers. Technical and organizational measures to enable long-term archive should be considered seriously. Compared to the initial development of the database, subsequent efforts to increase the quality and quantity of its contents are not regarded highly, because such tasks do not materialize in the form of publications. This fact strongly discourages continuous expansion of, and external contributions to, the digital atlases after its initial launch. To solve these problems, the role of the biocurators is vital. Appreciation of the scientific achievements of the people who do not write papers, and establishment of the secure academic career path for them, are indispensable for recruiting talents for this very important job.

  18. Development of an approach to estimating mid- to long-term critical loads for radiocaesium contamination of cow milk in western Europe.

    PubMed

    Wright, S M; Howard, B J; Barnett, C L; Stevens, P; Absalom, J P

    1998-09-29

    This paper describes the application of the critical load methodology, developed to set emission targets for atmospheric pollutants, to radioecology. The critical load can be redefined within radioecology as the radionuclide deposition at which radionuclide activity concentrations in a specified food product will exceed the maximum permitted level. An empirically based approach is described which provides estimates of critical load values for cow milk in the mid- to long-term after an accident when soil-to-plant transfer of radiocaesium is largely responsible for plant radiocaesium contamination. The areas identified as being most potentially vulnerable to radiocaesium deposition using this approach are those with extensive areas of organic soils such as western Scotland, parts of Ireland, The Netherlands and Denmark. The classification of European soil types into soil groups with significantly different soil-to-plant transfer of radiocaesium, and the allocation of a transfer value to each soil group provide the greatest uncertainties within this approach. Potential problems and deficiencies affecting the estimation of parameter values are discussed.

  19. Long-term efficiency and stability of wetlands for treating wastewater of a lead/zinc mine and the concurrent ecosystem development.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Lan, C Y; Yang, C S; Liao, W B; Chang, H; Shu, W S

    2006-10-01

    A constructed wetland system in Guangdong Province, South of China has been used for treating Pb/Zn mine discharge since 1985. The performance in the purification of the mine discharge and the concurrent ecosystem development within the system during the period of 1985-2000 has been studied. The untreated wastewater contained rather high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) (0.05 mg L(-1)), lead (Pb) (11.5 mg L(-1)), and zinc (Zn) (14.5 mg L(-1)), which greatly exceed the upper limits for industrial wastewater discharge in China. The constructed wetland system effectively removed Cd by 94.00%, Pb by 99.04%, Zn by 97.30%, and total suspended solids (TSS) by 98.95% from the mine discharge over a long period (over 16 years) leading to significant improvement in water quality; it was also found that there were no significantly annual or monthly variations in pH values, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Zn concentrations in water collected from the outlet of the wetland. Moreover, diversity and abundance of living organisms, including protozoan, higher plants, terrestrial animals, and birds, increased gradually. The 16-year monitoring results showed a reciprocal relationship, at a certain extent, between restoration of the wetland ecosystem, in other words, the maturity of the wetland, and the long-term efficiency and stability on purifying heavy metal-contaminated wastewater.

  20. Brief embryonic cadmium exposure induces a stress response and cell death in the developing olfactory system followed by long-term olfactory deficits in juvenile zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Blechinger, Scott R.; Kusch, Robin C.; Haugo, Kristine; Matz, Carlyn; Chivers, Douglas P.; Krone, Patrick H.

    2007-10-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium and other metals have been well established. A primary target of these metals is known to be the olfactory system, and fish exposed to a number of different waterborne metals display deficiencies in olfaction. Importantly, exposure over embryonic/larval development periods can cause deficits in chemosensory function in juvenile fish, but the specific cell types affected are unknown. We have previously characterized a transgenic zebrafish strain expressing the green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene linked to the hsp70 gene promoter, and shown it to be a useful tool for examining cell-specific toxicity in living embryos and larvae. Here we show that the hsp70/eGFP transgene is strongly and specifically upregulated within the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of transgenic zebrafish larvae following a brief 3-h exposure to water-borne cadmium. This molecular response was closely correlated to an endpoint for tissue damage within the olfactory placode, namely cell death. Furthermore, cadmium-induced olfactory cytotoxicity in zebrafish larvae gives rise to more permanent effects. Juvenile zebrafish briefly exposed to cadmium during early larval development display deficits in olfactory-dependent predator avoidance behaviors 4-6 weeks after a return to clean water. Lateral line neuromasts of exposed zebrafish larvae also activate both the endogenous hsp70 gene and the hsp70/eGFP transgene. The data reveal that even a very brief exposure period that gives rise to cell death within the developing olfactory placode results in long-term deficits in olfaction, and that hsp70/eGFP may serve as an effective indicator of sublethal cadmium exposure in sensory cells.

  1. A qualitative investigation of the long-term effects of a staff development project on two middle school science teachers' literacy practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lisa Patel

    The focus of this study was to explore the changes in literacy practice that occurred after two middle school science teachers completed their participation in a long-term staff development project on content area literacy. There were two participants in this study, were a sixth-grade life science teacher in her 22nd year of teaching, and an eighth grade physical science teacher in her 4th year of teaching. Multiple data sources were collected, including field notes from the staff development meetings, interviews of participants and other school personnel, classroom observations, descriptive surveys, lesson plans, exit slips and evaluation forms. Qualitative methodologies were used to guide analysis, classification and interpretation of the data collected. The data were read and reread to construct domains and themes (Spradley, 1980) found in each teacher's literacy practices and beliefs. Additionally, the methods of critical discourse analysis were used to analyze the data for issues pertaining to the influential social and political structures of secondary schools (Fairclough, 1989). This second type of analysis afforded opportunities to regard the teachers' literacy practices as social in nature and assumes asymmetrical power distributions within and among three different social contexts---an immediate local context (e.g., the science classroom), a wider institutional context (e.g., teaching, middle school), and the larger social contexts (e.g., Discourses of literacy, adolescents, and schooling). The results showed that the teachers' epistemological stances toward teaching and learning had profound impacts on the strategies they continued to use after the staff development. Findings also indicated that the larger societal Discourses about adolescents, high stakes assessment, and teachers as individuals were reflected in the teachers' decisions to use particular instructional approaches.

  2. Three innovative curricula for addressing medical students' career development.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Anita M; Taylor, Anita D; Pokorny, Anita P

    2011-01-01

    Medical students make specialty decisions that are critically important to their long-term career satisfaction and overall well-being. The dynamic of larger class sizes set against stagnant numbers of residency positions creates an imperative for students to make and test specialty decisions earlier in medical school. Ideally, formal career advising begins in medical school. Medical schools typically offer career development programs as extracurricular offerings. The authors describe three curricular approaches and the innovative courses developed to address medical students' career development needs. The models differ in complexity and cost, but they share the goals of assisting students to form career identities and to use resources effectively in their specialty decision processes. The first model is a student-organized specialties elective. To earn course credit, students must complete questionnaires for the sessions, submit results from two self-assessments, and report on two physician informational interviews. The second model comprises two second-year career development courses that have evolved into a longitudinal career development program. The third model integrates career topics through a doctoring course and advising teams. The authors discuss challenges and lessons learned from implementing each of the programs, including marshaling resources, achieving student buy-in, and obtaining time in the curriculum. Invoking a curricular approach seems to normalize the tasks associated with career development and puts them on par in importance with other medical school endeavors.

  3. Long-term hyperphagia and caloric restriction caused by low- or high-density husbandry have differential effects on zebrafish postembryonic development, somatic growth, fat accumulation and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Sandra; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an alternative vertebrate model for energy homeostasis and metabolic diseases, including obesity and anorexia. It has been shown that diet-induced obesity (DIO) in zebrafish shares multiple pathophysiological features with obesity in mammals. However, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the different pathways of energy expenditure in obese and starved fish had been missing thus far. Here, we carry out long-term ad libitum feeding (hyperphagia) and caloric restriction studies induced by low- or high-density husbandry, respectively, to investigate the impact of caloric intake on the timing of scale formation, a crucial step of postembryonic development and metamorphosis, and on somatic growth, body weight, fat storage and female reproduction. We show that all of them are positively affected by increased caloric intake, that middle-aged fish develop severe DIO, and that the body mass index (BMI) displays a strict linear correlation with whole-body triglyceride levels in adult zebrafish. Interestingly, juvenile fish are largely resistant to DIO, while BMI and triglyceride values drop in aged fish, pointing to aging-associated anorexic effects. Histological analyses further indicate that increased fat storage in white adipose tissue involves both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes. Furthermore, in ovaries, caloric intake primarily affects the rate of oocyte growth, rather than total oocyte numbers. Finally, comparing the different pathways of energy expenditure with each other, we demonstrate that they are differentially affected by caloric restriction / high-density husbandry. In juvenile fish, scale formation is prioritized over somatic growth, while in sexually mature adults, female reproduction is prioritized over somatic growth, and somatic growth over fat storage. Our data will serve as a template for future functional studies to dissect the neuroendocrine regulators of energy homeostasis

  4. Long-Term Hyperphagia and Caloric Restriction Caused by Low- or High-Density Husbandry Have Differential Effects on Zebrafish Postembryonic Development, Somatic Growth, Fat Accumulation and Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Leibold, Sandra; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an alternative vertebrate model for energy homeostasis and metabolic diseases, including obesity and anorexia. It has been shown that diet-induced obesity (DIO) in zebrafish shares multiple pathophysiological features with obesity in mammals. However, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the different pathways of energy expenditure in obese and starved fish had been missing thus far. Here, we carry out long-term ad libitum feeding (hyperphagia) and caloric restriction studies induced by low- or high-density husbandry, respectively, to investigate the impact of caloric intake on the timing of scale formation, a crucial step of postembryonic development and metamorphosis, and on somatic growth, body weight, fat storage and female reproduction. We show that all of them are positively affected by increased caloric intake, that middle-aged fish develop severe DIO, and that the body mass index (BMI) displays a strict linear correlation with whole-body triglyceride levels in adult zebrafish. Interestingly, juvenile fish are largely resistant to DIO, while BMI and triglyceride values drop in aged fish, pointing to aging-associated anorexic effects. Histological analyses further indicate that increased fat storage in white adipose tissue involves both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes. Furthermore, in ovaries, caloric intake primarily affects the rate of oocyte growth, rather than total oocyte numbers. Finally, comparing the different pathways of energy expenditure with each other, we demonstrate that they are differentially affected by caloric restriction / high-density husbandry. In juvenile fish, scale formation is prioritized over somatic growth, while in sexually mature adults, female reproduction is prioritized over somatic growth, and somatic growth over fat storage. Our data will serve as a template for future functional studies to dissect the neuroendocrine regulators of energy homeostasis

  5. Long-Term Monitoring Research Needs: A DOE Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is responsible for dealing with the nation's legacy of Cold War radioactive and hazardous waste and contamination. Major efforts are underway to deal with this legacy; these are expected to last up to decades and cost up to billions of dollars at some sites. At all sites, however, active remediation must eventually cease; if hazards then remain, the site must enter into a long-term stewardship mode. In this talk we discuss aspects of long-term monitoring pertinent to DOE sites, focusing on challenges to be faced, specific goals or targets to be met, and research needs to be addressed in order to enable DOE to meet its long-term stewardship obligations. DOE LTM research needs fall into three major categories: doing what we can do now much more efficiently; doing things we cannot do now; and proving the validity of our monitoring programs. Given the enormity of the DOE obligations, it will be highly desirable to develop much more efficient monitoring paradigms. Doing so will demand developing autonomous, remote monitoring networks of in situ sensors capable of replacing (or at least supplementing to a large extent) conventional groundwater and soil gas sampling and analysis programs. The challenges involved range from basic science (e.g., inventing in situ sensors for TCE that do not demand routine maintenance) to engineering (attaining superior reliability in data reporting in remote networks) to ergonomics (developing decent ways of selecting and presenting the "right" information from the monitoring network) to regulatory affairs (presenting convincing evidence that the more efficient systems actually provide superior monitoring). We explore these challenges in some detail, focusing on the "long" in long-term monitoring as it applies to DOE sites. Monitoring system performance validation and, ultimately, regulator and stakeholder acceptance of site closure and long-term stewardship plans depend

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATE PERFORMANCE STANDARD FOR RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION BASED ON SHORT-TERM/LONG- TERM INDOOR RADON CONCENTRATIONS - VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of short- and long-term variations in radon concentration in about 80 houses in Florida. The study involves comparative sampling using the most common radon measurement technologies during the past year. he study, providing the most detailed da...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATE PERFORMANCE STANDARD FOR RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION BASED ON SHORT-TERM/LONG- TERM INDOOR RADON CONCENTRATIONS - VOLUME 2: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of short- and long-term variations in radon concentration in about 80 houses in Florida. The study involves comparative sampling using the most common radon measurement technologies during the past year. he study, providing the most detailed da...

  8. Long-term exposure to oral methylphenidate or dl-amphetamine mixture in peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys: effects on physiology, behavior, and dopamine system development.

    PubMed

    Soto, Paul L; Wilcox, Kristin M; Zhou, Yun; Kumar, Anil; Ator, Nancy A; Riddle, Mark A; Wong, Dean F; Weed, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The stimulants methylphenidate and amphetamine are used to treat children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder over important developmental periods, prompting concerns regarding possible long-term health impact. This study assessed the effects of such a regimen in male, peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys on a variety of cognitive/behavioral, physiological, and in vivo neurochemical imaging parameters. Twice daily (0900 and 1200 hours), for a total of 18 months, juvenile male monkeys (8 per group) consumed either an unadulterated orange-flavored solution, a methylphenidate solution, or a dl-amphetamine mixture. Doses were titrated to reach blood/plasma levels comparable to therapeutic levels in children. [¹¹C]MPH and [¹¹C]raclopride dynamic PET scans were performed to image dopamine transporter and D₂-like receptors, respectively. Binding potential (BP(ND)), an index of tracer-specific binding, and amphetamine-induced changes in BP(ND) of [¹¹C]raclopride were estimated by kinetic modeling. There were no consistent differences among groups on the vast majority of measures, including cognitive (psychomotor speed, timing, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility), general activity, physiological (body weight, head circumference, crown-to-rump length), and neurochemical (ie, developmental changes in dopamine transporter, dopamine D₂ receptor density, and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release were as expected). Cytogenetic studies indicated that neither drug was a clastogen in rhesus monkeys. Thus, methylphenidate and amphetamine at therapeutic blood/plasma levels during peri-adolescence in non-human primates have little effect on physiological or behavioral/cognitive development.

  9. Relational sustainability: environments for long-term critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Jens; Laude, Cum; Costello, Brenna

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing bone marrow transplant, using spinal cord services, and with traumatic brain injury represent a relatively new patient type, requiring both intense care and long-term care in the same facility. As medical advances allow these patients the opportunity to recover from their critical illnesses or injuries, designers and caregivers must give increased attention to the long-term critical care environment. Designing for this type of care requires an understanding of new technologies and the potential for the built environment to address the wide range of physical, sensory, and psychological issues long-term inpatients face. Recent work by SmithGroupJJR has provided valuable insights into the ways in which lighting, patient room and unit layouts, spatial volumes, and other design elements can contribute to the recovery of patients who must spend weeks or months in a critical care environment. This knowledge was gained through an approach that allows design professionals to immerse themselves in a health care institution's values, culture, and work processes. By mapping both operational flow and patients' experiences, project teams can develop design solutions that sustain the well-being of higher-acuity patients and their family members and caregivers.

  10. Reforming long-term care financing through insurance

    PubMed Central

    Meiners, Mark R.

    1988-01-01

    Until recently, insurance for long-term care was not viewed as feasible. This perception has changed dramatically in the past few years. Several models of long-term care insurance have begun to be tested. Although the application of insurance principles to long-term care is still new, the emergence of private market interest in developing long-term care insurance has been a catalyst to renewed public-policy support for reforming the way we pay for long-term care. States, in particular, have become interested in developing public-private partnerships to support the emergence of long-term care insurance that could help relieve the mounting pressure on Medicaid budgets. PMID:10312962

  11. Strategic Planning for Deepening the All-Around Structural Reform of Education: Issues of Structural Reform in the "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline (2010-20)"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Songhua, Tan; Wang, Catherine Yan

    2012-01-01

    The "National Medium- and Long-Term Educational Reform and Development Guideline (2010-20)" (hereafter abbreviated as the "Guideline") posits that the development of education must be driven by reform and innovation. It devotes six chapters to mapping out the targets, tasks, and major policy measures for reforming the educational system. Focusing…

  12. IrLaW an OGC compliant infrared thermography measurement system developed on mini PC with real time computing capabilities for long term monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.; Averty, R.

    2012-04-01

    real site for long term monitoring. It can be remotely controlled in wire or wireless communication mode depending on what is the context of measurement and the degree of accessibility to the system when it is running on real site. To complete and conclude, thanks to the development of a high level library, but also to the deployment of a daemon, our developed measurement system was tuned to be compatible with OGC standards. Complementary functionalities were also developed to allow the system to self declare to 52North. For that, a specific plugin was developed to be inserted previously at 52North level. Finally, data are also accessible by tasking the system when required, fort instance by using the web portal developed in the ISTIMES Framework. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT - The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n° 225663.

  13. Cutaneous oxalosis after long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Schwartz, S T; Reginato, A J

    1992-07-01

    A 27-year-old woman undergoing long-term hemodialysis developed cutaneous calcifications on her fingers. A skin biopsy specimen showed that the deposits were calcium oxalate. To our knowledge, only one previous article has reported pathologic and crystallographic studies on calcifications of the skin resulting from dialysis oxalosis. We speculate that vitamin C supplements, liberal tea consumption, an increased serum ionized calcium concentration, and the long duration of hemodialysis contributed to the production of these deposits.

  14. Consequences of long-term hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Graal, M B; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    1998-07-01

    We describe a young woman with long-term untreated hyperparathyroidism with a superimposed vitamin D deficiency and an extremely decreased bone mineral density that was complicated by a vertebral fracture. Despite pretreatment with intravenous pamidronate and short-term vitamin D supplementation, severe and long-standing hypocalcaemia ('hungry bone syndrome') developed after parathyroidectomy. We discuss the consequences of hyperparathyroidism, especially the effects on bone, the complications of parathyroidectomy and the possibilities of preoperative treatment with bisphosphonates.

  15. Results from a Long-term Litter Decomposition Experiment in Canadian Forests and Their Use in Soil Carbon Model Verification and Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smyth, C.; Moore, T.; Prescott, C.; Titus, B.; Siltanen, M.; Visser, S.; Preston, C.; Nault, J.; Camire', C.; Fyles, J.; Kozak, L.; Kranabetter, M.; Kutny, L.; Morrison, I.; Smith, S.; Wein, R.; White, D.

    2007-12-01

    Climate and substrate quality have been shown to be key determinants of rates of litter decomposition, though other site factors can be important under certain conditions. The Canadian Intersite Decomposition Experiment (CIDET) was established in 1992 with the objective of providing data on the long-term rates of litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization for a range of forested ecoclimatic regions in Canada. Such data were needed to help verify the Carbon Budget Model - Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS) used for national C accounting, as well as aid in the development of other soil C models. CIDET examined the annual decay, over a 12-year period from 1993 to 2004, of 10 standard foliar litters and 2 wood substrates at 18 forested upland and 3 wetland sites ranging from the cool temperate to subarctic regions. On a subset of sites and litter types, changes in litter C chemistry over time were also determined. Over the first 6 years, C/N ratio and iron increased, NMR showed an overall decline in O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) and increase in alkyl, aromatic, phenolic, and carboxyl C. Proximate analysis showed the acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) increases, but true lignin does not accumulate, in contrast to the conceptual ligno-cellulose model of decomposition. Overall litter decay during first phase of decomposition was related to initial litter quality (AUR and water soluble extract), winter precipitation, but not temperature. Decay rate "k" during second phase was related to temperature, initial litter quality (AUR and AUR/N), summer precipitation, but not soil N. In most cases decay had approached an asymptote before end of experiment, although decay rates during this semistable phase were low and difficult to quantify. However, the asymptotes were related to temperature suggesting decay in this phase is temperature dependant. Asymptotes were also related to summer precipitation and forest floor pH and C/N ratio. Comparisons of CIDET 12 year C mass remaining

  16. Development and in vitro characterization of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres loaded with an antibacterial natural drug for the treatment of long-term bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Reinbold, Jochen; Hierlemann, Teresa; Hinkel, Helena; Müller, Ingrid; Maier, Martin E; Weindl, Tobias; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Krajewski, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    a novel drug delivery system, which may be highly beneficial for the long-term therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:27660414

  17. Development of photoacoustic water vapor and total water measuring instrument with a long term objective of becoming part of the IAGOS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatrai, David; Bors, Noemi; Gulyas, Gabor; Szabo, Gabor; Smit, Herman G. J.; Petzold, Andreas; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Airborne hygrometry is one of the key topics in atmospheric and climate research that is why airborne hygrometers are almost always included in aircraft based measurement campaigns (see e.g. MOZAIC and CARIBIC). However for its successful application an airborne hygrometer has to be able to measure humidity in a wide range (1 60000 ppmV) at various total pressures with high accuracy and short response time. In addition, an instrument capable of measuring water vapor and condensed water selectively has considerable added value as the water content of clouds seems to be a very uncertain parameter in climate models. At the University of Szeged, a dual channel, photoacoustic spectroscopy based hygrometer system had been developed, that measures water vapor concentration and total water content simultaneously from the ground level up to cruising altitude [1, 2]. An early version of this system is the core hygrometer of the CARIBIC project. In the past few years efforts were made to improve further the performance and long term reliability of the system [3] while also reducing its size and weight. Most important of the recent achievements is a new data acquisition and control system with more precise control performance [4]. Many of these results have been proved by various laboratory (AquaVIT2a-b) and in-flight (DANCHAR-IFCC, AIRTOSS I-II) measurement campaigns. Based on these results the system received invitation into the IAGOS ESFRI project to become one of its core instruments. The presented work was funded by EUFAR contract no. 227159, by the Hungarian Research and Technology Innovation Fund (OTKA), project no. NN109679 and by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 312311. [1] Szakáll, M et.al: Infrared Physics & Technology. 2006. 48, (3) 192-201 [2] Szakáll, M. et.al: Infrared Physics & Technology, 2007. 51, (2) 113-121 [3] Tátrai, D. et.al: Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 33-42, 2015 [4] Tátrai, D. et

  18. Development and in vitro characterization of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres loaded with an antibacterial natural drug for the treatment of long-term bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Reinbold, Jochen; Hierlemann, Teresa; Hinkel, Helena; Müller, Ingrid; Maier, Martin E; Weindl, Tobias; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Krajewski, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    a novel drug delivery system, which may be highly beneficial for the long-term therapy of bacterial infections.

  19. Long-term reinforced fixed provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, D; Soltys, J L; Graser, G N

    1998-06-01

    Extensive prosthodontic treatment often requires fabrication of long-term provisional restorations. Numerous materials and techniques have been described for prolonged insertion of interim restorations. This article describes a procedure for fabrication of long-term reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations based on a diagnostic wax-up. Reinforced heat-processed provisional restorations reduced flexure, which minimizes progressive loss of cement and diminished the possibility of recurrent decay. Occlusal stability and vertical dimension were maintained because of greater wear resistance. Occlusion, tooth contours, and pontic design developed in the provisional restoration were duplicated in the definitive restoration. The use of a matrix from a diagnostic wax-up facilitated fabrication of the prosthesis, and made the procedure less time-consuming and more predictable.

  20. Long-term EEG in children.

    PubMed

    Montavont, A; Kaminska, A; Soufflet, C; Taussig, D

    2015-03-01

    Long-term video-EEG corresponds to a recording ranging from 1 to 24 h or even longer. It is indicated in the following situations: diagnosis of epileptic syndromes or unclassified epilepsy, pre-surgical evaluation for drug-resistant epilepsy, follow-up of epilepsy or in cases of paroxysmal symptoms whose etiology remains uncertain. There are some specificities related to paediatric care: a dedicated pediatric unit; continuous monitoring covering at least a full 24-hour period, especially in the context of pre-surgical evaluation; the requirement of presence by the parents, technician or nurse; and stronger attachment of electrodes (cup electrodes), the number of which is adapted to the age of the child. The chosen duration of the monitoring also depends on the frequency of seizures or paroxysmal events. The polygraphy must be adapted to the type and topography of movements. It is essential to have at least an electrocardiography (ECG) channel, respiratory sensor and electromyography (EMG) on both deltoids. There is no age limit for performing long-term video-EEG even in newborns and infants; nevertheless because of scalp fragility, strict surveillance of the baby's skin condition is required. In the specific context of pre-surgical evaluation, long-term video-EEG must record all types of seizures observed in the child. This monitoring is essential in order to develop hypotheses regarding the seizure onset zone, based on electroclinical correlations, which should be adapted to the child's age and the psychomotor development.

  1. Focusing on Short-Term Achievement Gains Fails to Produce Long-Term Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissmer, David W.; Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The short-term emphasis engendered by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has focused research predominantly on unraveling the complexities and uncertainties in assessing short-term results, rather than developing methods and assessing results over the longer term. In this paper we focus on estimating long-term gains and address questions important to…

  2. Sustainability of Teacher Expectation Bias Effects on Long-Term Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boer, Hester; Bosker, Roel J.; van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we address the relationship between teacher expectation bias and student characteristics, its effect on long-term student performance, and the development of this effect over time. Expectation bias was defined as the difference between observed and predicted teacher expectation. These predicted expectations were estimated from a…

  3. Determining eligibility for long-term care—lessons from Germany

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, Andreas; Wingenfeld, Klaus; Schaeffer, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This paper addresses recent steps for reforming the eligibility criteria of the German long-term care insurance that have been initiated to overcome shortcomings in the current system. Methods Based on findings of a survey of international long-term care systems, assessment tools and the relevant literature on care needs a new tool for determining eligibility in the German long-term care insurance was developed. Results The new tool for determining long-term care eligibility broadens the understanding of what ‘dependency on nursing care’ implies for the person affected. The assessment results in a degree of dependency from personal help provided by formal or informal caregivers. This degree of dependency can be used for determining eligibility for and the amount of long-term care benefits. Discussion The broader understanding of ‘dependency on nursing care’ and the new tool are important steps to adapt the German long-term care insurance to the challenges of the demographic and societal changes in the future. PMID:21949486

  4. Day Care as a Long-Term Care Service Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Gamel; Zaki, Sylvia

    Day care is a growing service in the field of long-term care, increasing the options available to the impaired elderly. To study the development of adult day care centers in southeastern New England, and to identify the relationship of day care centers to the long term care network of services, the 11 day care centers in the catchment area of the…

  5. Financing Long Term Care. Selected Topics in Long Term Care. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jay; Doth, David

    This document, one in a series developed to provide technical assistance to 22 Long-Term Care Gerontology Centers, is designed to be a financial resource guide. Current major funding sources are detailed, followed by an examination of the issues and problems associated with current financing systems. Programmatic issues associated with Medicare…

  6. Physical and psychological long-term and late effects of cancer.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kevin D; Syrjala, Karen L; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2008-06-01

    The number of long-term cancer survivors (> or =5 years after diagnosis) in the U.S. continues to rise, with more than 10 million Americans now living with a history of cancer. Along with such growth has come increasing attention to the continued health problems and needs of this population. Many cancer survivors return to normal functioning after the completion of treatment and are able to live relatively symptom-free lives. However, cancer and its treatment can also result in a wide range of physical and psychological problems that do not recede with time. Some of these problems emerge during or after cancer treatment and persist in a chronic, long-term manner. Other problems may not appear until months or even years later. Regardless of when they present, long-term and late effects of cancer can have a negative effect on cancer survivors' quality of life. This article describes the physical and psychological long-term and late effects among adult survivors of pediatric and adult cancers. The focus is on the prevalence and correlates of long-term and late effects as well as the associated deficits in physical and emotional functioning. In addition, the emergence of public health initiatives and large-scale research activities that address the issues of long-term cancer survivorship are discussed. Although additional research is needed to fully understand and document the long-term and late effects of cancer, important lessons can be learned from existing knowledge. Increased awareness of these issues is a key component in the development of follow-up care plans that may allow for adequate surveillance, prevention, and the management of long-term and late effects of cancer.

  7. Preparation of LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) spent fuel for shipment to ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) for long term storage (LWBR Development Program). [Shippingport Atomic Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, B.W.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport facility. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to prepare and to ship all LWBR nuclear fuel to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for long-term storage. Preparation processes included the underwater loading of LWBR fuel into storage liners, the sealing, dewatering and drying of the storage liners, and the final pressurization of the storage liners with inert neon gas. Shipping operations included the underwater installation of the fuel loaded storage liner into the Peach Bottom shipping cask, cask removal from the waterpit, cask preparations for shipping, and cask shipment by tractor trailer to the ICPP facility for long-term storage. The ICPP facility preparations for LWBR fuel storage and the ICPP process for discharge of the fuel into underground silos are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs.

  8. Why is adolescence a key period of alcohol initiation and who is prone to develop long-term problem use?: A review of current available data

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Géraldine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Cimochowska, Agnieska; Campanella, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Background Early adolescence is a key developmental period for the initiation of alcohol use, and consumption among adolescents is characterized by drinking in high quantities. At the same time, adolescence is characterized by rapid biological transformations including dramatic changes in the brain, particularly in the prefrontal cortex and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Methods This article begins with an overview of the unique neural and behavioural characteristics of adolescent development that predispose these individuals to seek rewards and take risks such as initiation of drinking and high levels of alcohol intake. The authors then outline important factors associated with an increased risk for developing alcohol problems in later adolescence and young adulthood. Thereafter they address causality and the complex interplay of risk factors that lead to the development of alcohol use problems in late adolescence and young adults. Conclusions A few recommendations for the prevention of underage drinking are presented. PMID:24693359

  9. Long-term equilibrium tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, John A.; Cerveny, Randall S.

    1998-08-01

    Extreme equilibrium tides, or ``hypertides,'' are computed in a new equilibrium tidal model combining algorithms of a version of the Chapront ELP-2000/82 Lunar Theory with the BER78 Milankovitch astronomical expansions. For the recent past, a high correspondence exists between computed semidiurnal tide levels and a record of coastal flooding demonstrating that astronomical alignment is a potential influence on such flooding. For the Holocene and near future, maximum tides demonstrate cyclic variations with peaks at near 5000 B.P. and 4000 A.P. On the late Quaternary timescale, variations in maximum equilibrium tide level display oscillations with periods of approximately 10,000, 100,000 and 400,000 years, because of precessional shifts in tidal maxima between vernal and autumnal equinoxes. While flooding occurs under the combined effects of tides and storms via ``storm surges,'' the most extensive flooding will occur with the coincidence of storms and the rarer hypertides and is thus primarily influenced by hypertides. Therefore we suggest that astronomical alignment's relationship to coastal flooding is probabilistic rather than deterministic. Data derived from this model are applicable to (1) archaeological and paleoclimatic coastal reconstructions, (2) long-term planning, for example, radioactive waste site selection, (3) sealevel change and paleoestuarine studies or (4) ocean-meteorological interactions.

  10. Long-Term Planning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This report presents the concepts and issues discussed at a Regional Symposium on Long-term Planning in Higher Education held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, September 21-30, 1986. Chapter 1 explores some fundamental issues about the rationale for the objectives of long-term planning. It defines long-term planning in higher education, considers its…

  11. The effect of nutritional status, body composition, inflammation and serum iron on the developement of insulin resistance among patients on long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rasić-Milutinović, Zorica; Perunicić, Gordana; Pljesa, Steva; Gluvić, Zoran; Ilić, Mirka; Stokić, Edita

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of body composition, nutrition, inflammation and iron status on insulin resistance in patients with long-term hemodialysis. We selected 43 stable end-stage chronic renal failure patients, on maintenance hemodialysis. We evaluated the nutritional status, body composition by subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements (BMI and waist circumference), bioelectrical impedance analysis and biochemical parameters measurements [serum albumin, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, hematocrit, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, calcium, phosphorus, intact parathormone (i-PTH), TNF-alpha, IL-6 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein]. All parameters were evaluated by comparisons between HOMA-IR tertiles, and after simple regression analysis, by backward multivariate regression analysis we identified independent variables for IR. As the tertile of HOMA-IR increased, serum level of glucose, insulin, and waist increascd, whereas HDL-cholesterol level decreased, or the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased across the tertiles of HOMA-IR. After adjustment for gender, age, hemodialysis duration, ferritin, phosphorus, waist and total fat percentages, multivariate regression analysis was performed and the association with HOMA-IR was still strong only for serum levels of iron and TNF-alpha. That explains 16% of the total variation in HOMA-IR. Our results suggest that the increase of IR in end-stage chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis could be related to anemia and particularly to iron overload. Moreover, chronic inflammatory status with over-production of adipokine TNF-alpha participate in the pathogenesis of IR too. The present study demonstrated that adipokine TNF-alpha and serum iron participated as independent predictors in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance on long-term hemodialysis patients.

  12. Long-term Agroecosystem Research in the Northern Great Plains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmer, M.; Sanderson, M.; Liebig, M. A.; Wienhold, B.; Awada, T.; Papiernik, S.; Osborne, S.; Kemp, W.; Okalebo, J. A.; Riedall, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Great Plains is the bread basket of the United States, accounting for a substantial portion of U.S. agricultural production. This region faces critical challenges regarding balancing food needs, resource conservation (e.g Ogallala aquifer), environmental concerns, and rural economy development. Developing transformative, multifunctional systems will require equally imaginative and efficient tools to help farmers manage complex agroecosystems in a rapidly changing climate. The Northern Plains long-term agroecosystem research (LTAR) site at Mandan, ND and the Platte River High Plains LTAR (ARS/University of Nebraska-Lincoln) at Lincoln, NE in collaboration with USDA-ARS research units in Brookings, SD and Fargo, ND are collaborating to address the grand challenge of providing and sustaining multiple service provisions from Northern Great Plains agroecosystems. We propose to attain these goals through sustainable intensification based on the adoption of conservation agriculture principles including reduced soil disturbance, livestock integration, and greater complexity and diversity in the cropping system. Here, we summarize new concepts these locations have pioneered in dynamic cropping systems, resource use efficiency, and agricultural management technologies. As part of the LTAR network, we will conduct long-term cross-site research to design and assess new agricultural practices and systems aimed at improving our understanding of decision making processes and outcomes across an array of agricultural systems.

  13. Effect of long-term application of manure and fertilizer on biological and biochemical activities in soil during crop development stages.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asit; Patra, Ashok K; Singh, Dhyan; Swarup, Anand; Ebhin Masto, R

    2007-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of six long-term (34-year) fertilizer and farmyard manure (FYM) treatments (Control, N, NP, NPK, NPK+S, NPK+FYM) and three physiological stages of wheat growth on the microbial biomass carbon (MBC), nitrogen (MBN) and dehydrogenase, mineralizable N and phosphatase activities in soil. It was found that a balanced application of NPK+FYM gave the highest values for the measured parameters and lowest at the control. Values were generally highest at tillering, followed by the flowering and dough stages. A significant positive interaction between fertilizer treatments and physiological stages of wheat growth was observed, being highest at maximum tillering due to application of NPK+FYM. Stepwise regressions have revealed that grain yield of wheat was significantly associated with mineralizable N at tillering (R(2)=0.80), MBC at flowering (R(2)=0.90) and alkaline phosphatase activity (R(2)=0.70) at dough stages of wheat growth. PMID:17207997

  14. Organic and mineral fertilization, respectively, increase and decrease the development of external mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a long-term field experiment.

    PubMed

    Gryndler, M; Larsen, J; Hrselová, H; Rezácová, V; Gryndlerová, H; Kubát, J

    2006-05-01

    Effects of long-term mineral fertilization and manuring on the biomass of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were studied in a field experiment. Mineral fertilization reduced the growth of AMF, as estimated using both measurements of hyphal length and the signature fatty acid 16:1omega5, whereas manuring alone increased the growth of AMF. The results of AMF root colonization followed the same pattern as AMF hyphal length in soil samples, but not AMF spore densities, which increased with increasing mineral and organic fertilization. AMF spore counts and concentration of 16:1omega5 in soil did not correlate positively, suggesting that a significant portion of spores found in soil samples was dead. AMF hyphal length was not correlated with whole cell fatty acid (WCFA) 18:2omega6,9 levels, a biomarker of saprotrophic fungi, indicating that visual measurements of the AMF mycelium were not distorted by erroneous involvement of hyphae of saprotrophs. Our observations indicate that the measurement of WCFAs in soil is a useful research tool for providing information in the characterization of soil microflora.

  15. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  16. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  17. Multi Sensor Approach to Address Sustainable Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid

    2007-01-01

    The main objectives of Earth Science research are many folds: to understand how does this planet operates, can we model her operation and eventually develop the capability to predict such changes. However, the underlying goals of this work are to eventually serve the humanity in providing societal benefits. This requires continuous, and detailed observations from many sources in situ, airborne and space. By and large, the space observations are the way to comprehend the global phenomena across continental boundaries and provide credible boundary conditions for the mesoscale studies. This requires a multiple sensors, look angles and measurements over the same spot in accurately solving many problems that may be related to air quality, multi hazard disasters, public health, hydrology and more. Therefore, there are many ways to address these issues and develop joint implementation, data sharing and operating strategies for the benefit of the world community. This is because for large geographical areas or regions and a diverse population, some sound observations, scientific facts and analytical models must support the decision making. This is crucial for the sustainability of vital resources of the world and at the same time to protect the inhabitants, endangered species and the ecology. Needless to say, there is no single sensor, which can answer all such questions effectively. Due to multi sensor approach, it puts a tremendous burden on any single implementing entity in terms of information, knowledge, budget, technology readiness and computational power. And, more importantly, the health of planet Earth and its ability to sustain life is not governed by a single country, but in reality, is everyone's business on this planet. Therefore, with this notion, it is becoming an impractical problem by any single organization/country to bear this colossal responsibility. So far, each developed country within their means has proceeded along satisfactorily in implementing

  18. Multiobjective long-term planning of biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, K; Savery, J; Papageorgiou, L G; Farid, S S

    2007-01-01

    Biopharmaceutical companies with large portfolios of clinical and commercial products typically need to allocate production across several multiproduct facilities, including third party contract manufacturers. This poses several capacity planning challenges which are further complicated by the need to satisfy different stakeholders often with conflicting objectives. This work addresses the question of how a biopharmaceutical manufacturer can make better long-term capacity planning decisions given multiple strategic criteria such as cost, risk, customer service level, and capacity utilization targets. A long-term planning model that allows for multiple facilities and accounts for multiple objectives via goal programming is developed. An industrial case study based on a large scale biopharmaceutical manufacturer is used to illustrate the functionality of the model. A single objective model is used to identify how best to use existing capacity so as to maximize profits for different demand scenarios. Mitigating risk due to unforeseen circumstances by including a dual facility constraint is shown to be a reasonable strategy at base case demand levels but unacceptable if demands are 150% higher than expected. The capacity analysis identifies where existing capacity fails to meet demands given the constraints. A multiobjective model is used to demonstrate how key performance measures change given different decision making policies where different weights are assigned to cost, customer service level, and utilization targets. The analysis demonstrates that a high profit can still be achieved while meeting key targets more closely. The sensitivity of the optimal solution to different limits on the targets is illustrated.

  19. Long Term Data Preservation for CDF at INFN-CNAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Chiarelli, L.; dell'Agnello, L.; De Girolamo, D.; Gregori, D.; Pezzi, M.; Prosperini, A.; Ricci, P.; Rosso, F.; Zani, S.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term preservation of experimental data (intended as both raw and derived formats) is one of the emerging requirements coming from scientific collaborations. Within the High Energy Physics community the Data Preservation in High Energy Physics (DPHEP) group coordinates this effort. CNAF is not only one of the Tier-1s for the LHC experiments, it is also a computing center providing computing and storage resources to many other HEP and non-HEP scientific collaborations, including the CDF experiment. After the end of data taking in 2011, CDF is now facing the challenge to both preserve the large amount of data produced during several years of data taking and to retain the ability to access and reuse it in the future. CNAF is heavily involved in the CDF Data Preservation activities, in collaboration with the Fermilab National Laboratory (FNAL) computing sector. At the moment about 4 PB of data (raw data and analysis-level ntuples) are starting to be copied from FNAL to the CNAF tape library and the framework to subsequently access the data is being set up. In parallel to the data access system, a data analysis framework is being developed which allows to run the complete CDF analysis chain in the long term future, from raw data reprocessing to analysis-level ntuple production. In this contribution we illustrate the technical solutions we put in place to address the issues encountered as we proceeded in this activity.

  20. Long-Term Care Policy: Singapore's Experience.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Wei Winston; Phua, Kai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Singapore, like many developed countries, is facing the challenge of a rapidly aging population and the increasing need to provide long-term care (LTC) services for elderly in the community. The Singapore government's philosophy on care for the elderly is that the family should be the first line of support, and it has relied on voluntary welfare organizations (VWOs) or charities for the bulk of LTC service provision. For LTC financing, it has emphasized the principles of co-payment and targeting of state support to the low-income population through means-tested government subsidies. It has also instituted ElderShield, a national severe disability insurance scheme. This paper discusses some of the challenges facing LTC policy in Singapore, particularly the presence of perverse financial incentives for hospitalization, the pitfalls of over-reliance on VWOs, and the challenges facing informal family caregivers. It discusses the role of private LTC insurance in LTC financing, bearing in mind demand- and supply-side failures that have plagued the private LTC insurance market. It suggests the need for more standardized needs assessment and portable LTC benefits, with reference to the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance program, and also discusses the need to provide more support to informal family caregivers. PMID:26808468

  1. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  2. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  3. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  4. Problems of monitoring and long-term risk assessment for groundwater from high-volume solid waste sites in industrialized and developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowska, Irena; Singh, Gulab; Tripathi, Prem S. M.

    1999-12-01

    Despite considerable research effort put into characterizing environmental aspects of disposal and construction with high- volume 'non-hazardous' waste materials, there is still lack of satisfactory knowledge of their life cycle leaching behavior in the actual field conditions. This often results in false- negative errors in the long-term environment impact assessment (EIA) and severe damage to the renewable ground water resources in the area of the disposal sites either in the operational or post-closure period. This statement has been exemplified in two case studies: (1) Powerplant ash pond under operation sited in the Erai River basin (Maharastra, India), with open water circuit; (2) Reclaimed fly ash (FA) pond in a post-closure period at the dewatering stage sited in a sand quarry (Silesia, Poland). In the first case, EIA on the basis of the monitoring of entirely excess water discharged into the river, caused serious failure in preventing deterioration of usable ground water resources in several communities within and down-gradient of the FA pond. The second case study based on screening pore solution along the vertical profiles of the FA pond displayed deep transformation of FA properties in the post-closure period. At this stage, FA acidification and massive heavy metal release from its matrix due to the change of the saturation zone conditions into the vadose zone occurred. These examples clearly show a need of properly designed and operated life cycle screening/monitoring of the large-volume waste sites to provide an early alert to prevent degradation of recoverable ground water resources. Some concepts of cost-effective monitoring/screening for an early alert have been proposed.

  5. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  6. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  7. Strong Coupling Between Winter Climatic Fluctuations and Development of Phytoplankton in the Deep Lakes South of the Alps Assessed Using Long-Term in Situ and Satellite Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, N.; Pareeth, S.; Cerasino, L.; Neteler, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent investigations showed that the winter climate in the lake district south of the Alps was strongly affected by specific prominent modes of low-frequency atmospheric variability relevant for the Mediterranean area (namely the East Atlantic pattern, EA, and the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern, EMP). In Lake Garda, the winter interannual fluctuations of EA and EMP triggered a long-chain of causally-linked effects on the physical structure of the lake and biological communities. Since 1991, and contrary to the summer months, the long-term increase of the mean winter water temperatures in the mixolimnion (0-50 m, ca. 0.01 °C yr-1) was statistically not-significant, coinciding, as confirmed by longer annual 1971-2014 series, with a period of relatively winter stable temperatures. Superimposed to the long-term trend, the deep hypolimnion showed different periods of warming caused by a downward transport of heat by turbulent diffusion during stratification. These phases were terminated by sudden cooling and overturn during harsh winters associated with negative EA and positive EMP values. The long term saw tooth temperature dynamics had a strong impact on the transport of hypolimnetic nutrients towards the surface, fuelling the development of eutrophic species, namely toxic cyanobacteria during the summer months. Other changes in the trophic webs included modifications in the phenology of the dominant zooplankton cladocerans. In the subalpine lake district, changes were documented not only at the level of species, but also genotypes, with a positive selection of cyanobacterial strains with strong gas-vesicles (i.e. best adapted to higher hydrostatic pressures) in lakes experiencing deep mixing. The study of the effects of climatic fluctuations and long-term changes was based on monthly field data. In this work, the evaluation will be further investigated also using high resolution satellite temperature data recorded using Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

  8. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    SciTech Connect

    McCullum, Rod; Brookmire, Tom; Kessler, John; Leblang, Suzanne; Levin, Adam; Martin, Zita; Nesbit, Steve; Nichol, Marc; Pickens, Terry

    2013-07-01

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  9. Developing a Validated Long-Term Satellite-Based Albedo Record in the Central Alaska Range to Improve Regional Hydroclimate Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutz, K. J.; Godaire, T. P.; Burakowski, E. A.; Winski, D.; Campbell, S. W.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Q.; Hamilton, G. S.; Birkel, S. D.; Wake, C. P.; Osterberg, E. C.; Schaaf, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain glaciers around the world, particularly in Alaska, are experiencing significant surface mass loss from rapid climatic shifts and constitute a large proportion of the cryosphere's contribution to sea level rise. Surface albedo acts as a primary control on a glacier's mass balance, yet it is difficult to measure and quantify spatially and temporally in steep, mountainous settings. During our 2013 field campaign in Denali National Park to recover two surface to bedrock ice cores, we used an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) FieldSpec4 Standard Resolution spectroradiometer to measure incoming solar radiation, outgoing surface reflectance and optical grain size on the Kahiltna Glacier and at the Kahiltna Base Camp. A Campbell Scientific automatic weather station was installed on Mount Hunter (3900m) in June 2013, complementing a longer-term (2008-present) station installed at Kahiltna Base Camp (2100m). Use of our in situ data aids in the validation of surface albedo values derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat satellite imagery. Comparisons are made between ASD FieldSpec4 ground measurements and 500m MODIS imagery to assess the ability of MODIS to capture the variability of surface albedo across the glacier surface. The MODIS MCD43A3 BRDF/Albedo Product performs well at Kahiltna Base Camp (<5% difference from ASD shortwave broadband data), but low biases in MODIS albedo (10-28% relative to ASD data) appear to occur along the Kahiltna Glacier due to the snow-free valley walls being captured in the 500m MODIS footprint. Incorporating Landsat imagery will strengthen our interpretations and has the potential to produce a long-term (1982-present) validated satellite albedo record for steep and mountainous terrain. Once validation is complete, we will compare the satellite-derived albedo record to the Denali ice core accumulation rate, aerosol records (i.e. volcanics and biomass burning), and glacier mass balance data. This

  10. Development and use of long-term, global data records of forest, water, and urban change for terrestrial ecology and carbon cycle science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's human population has risen over the last century from less than 2 billion to over 7 billion people. The current "Anthropocene Era" has brought changes in Earth's landforms, climate, biodiversity, atmosphere, and hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles, as well as the expansion and intensification of human land use. As the emerging nexus of the physical, biological, and social sciences, measurements of Earth's natural and anthropogenic land cover are needed to understand and manage the coupled dynamics of human and natural systems. In recent years, NASA-sponsored efforts have produced global, time-serial estimates of tree cover using the MOderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the world's first global, Landsat-based datasets representing tree and forest cover change from 1990 to 2010. These data are fueling global and national estimates of the rate and acceleration of deforestation as well as international commitments to conserve forest ecosystems. Likewise, Landsat-based datasets documenting Earth's inland surface waters are enabling the world's first global, high-resolution estimates of water cover based on repeatable satellite measurements. Meanwhile, long-term, time-serial estimates of impervious surface cover are being used to model the effect of urbanization on storm-water runoff, watershed health, and stream biodiversity. MODIS-based records of plant phenology are depicting the vulnerability and resilience of ecosystems to drought and are informing land managers of the sensitivity of wildlife to climate and plant phenology. Natural ecosystems are complex and potentially chaotic even in the absence of anthropogenic influence, and so understanding these interactions between physical, biological, and social systems is increasingly crucial under escalating human impacts. Globally consistent, locally accurate, and publicly available records spanning multiple decades at high frequency are the living legacy of the NASA Earth Science Programs

  11. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  12. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b

  13. Long-term performance of filtration layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radfar, A.; Rockaway, T. D.

    2013-12-01

    the age of permeable pavement. These data were utilized to develop a model that more appropriately considered changes in gallery porosity. By better understanding the progression of the runoff water through the storage gallery a better assessment of the long-term performance of the entire system can be developed. Future storage gallery designs can be appropriately modified to account for changes within the storage gallery so that volume and flow requirements are maintained throughout the life of the structure.

  14. Managing soils for long-term productivity

    PubMed Central

    Syers, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Meeting the goal of long-term agricultural productivity requires that soil degradation be halted and reversed. Soil fertility decline is a key factor in soil degradation and is probably the major cause of declining crop yields. There is evidence that the contribution of declining soil fertility to soil degradation has been underestimated.
    Sensitivity to soil degradation is implicit in the assessment of the sustainability of land management practices, with wide recognition of the fact that soils vary in their ability to resist change and recover subsequent to stress. The concept of resilience in relation to sustainability requires further elaboration and evaluation.
    In the context of soil degradation, a decline in soil fertility is primarily interpreted as the depletion of organic matter and plant nutrients. Despite a higher turnover rate of organic matter in the tropics there is no intrinsic difference between the organic matter content of soils from tropical and temperate regions. The level of organic matter in a soil is closely related to the above and below ground inputs. In the absence of adequate organic material inputs and where cultivation is continuous, soil organic matter declines progressively. Maintaining the quantity and quality of soil organic matter should be a guiding principle in developing management practices.
    Soil microbial biomass serves as an important reservoir of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S), and regulates the cycling of organic matter and nutrients. Because of its high turnover rate, microbial biomass reacts quickly to changes in management and is a sensitive indicator for monitoring and predicting changes in soil organic matter. Modelling techniques have been reasonably successful in predicting changes in soil organic matter with different organic material inputs, but there is little information from the tropics.
    Nutrient depletion through harvested crop components and residue removal, and by leaching and soil

  15. Long-term care offers opportunity for revenue.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R D

    1991-06-01

    Hospital administrators already know that diversification will be a key to success in the future. Applying that philosophy to long-term care of the elderly is just one way to capture a growing consumer market. In the following article, the author addresses three potential variations for delivering such care by the hospital to this group. PMID:10113608

  16. Security basics for long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The need for Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities is growing, the author reports, and along with it the need for programs to address the major security concerns of such facilities. In this article he explains how to apply the IAHSS Healthcare Security Industry Guidelines and the Design Guidelines to achieve a safer LTC facility. PMID:26647503

  17. Security basics for long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The need for Long-Term Care (LTC) facilities is growing, the author reports, and along with it the need for programs to address the major security concerns of such facilities. In this article he explains how to apply the IAHSS Healthcare Security Industry Guidelines and the Design Guidelines to achieve a safer LTC facility.

  18. Financing long-term care in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Mills, C; Hollander, M

    1997-06-01

    Financial policies relating to long-term care in Canada are changing rapidly in response to demands for health care reform. This chapter focuses on the financial structure of institutional care, primarily nursing homes, in the western provinces of Alberta and British Columbia. Community-based long-term care is discussed briefly.

  19. Long-term monitoring for closed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Veluri, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented for planning and implementing a long-term environmental monitoring program for closed low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The initial task in this procedure is to collect the available information on the legal/regulatory requirements, site and area characteristics, source term, pathway analysis, and prior monitoring results. This information is coupled with parameters such as half-life and retardation factors to develop a monitoring program. As examples, programs are presented for a site that has had little or no waste migration, and for sites where waste has been moved by suface water, by ground water, and by air. Sampling techniques and practices are discussed relative to how a current program would be structured and projections are made on techniques and practices expected to be available in the future. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Brodie's abscess. A long-term review.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M M; MacAuley, P

    1988-09-01

    In 20 patients with 21 Brodie's abscesses, a long-term review revealed that 13 occurred in the second decade of life. All had local symptoms for six weeks or more. The tibia was involved in 11 cases and seven of these were in the proximal metaphysis. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was elevated in only six cases. When the ESR was more than 40 mm per hour, recurrence was more likely. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from 11 abscesses. Curettage and antibiotics for six weeks were adequate for treatment in most cases. However, lesions larger than 3 cm in diameter should be grafted, and patients with an elevated ESR require more aggressive decompression and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Lesions within the neck of the femur pose particular anatomic problems and should not be approached laterally. All cases were followed to full bone maturity. No significant leg length inequality was clinically or roentgenologically apparent. If an abscess was juxtaphyseal, deformity of the epiphysis could develop.

  1. Paying for long-term care.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, C L; Bodenheimer, T

    1994-01-01

    Everyone agrees that insurance for long-term care is inadequate in the United States. Disagreement exists, however, on whether such insurance should be provided through the private or public sector. Private insurance generally uses the experience-rating principle that persons with higher risk of illness are charged higher premiums. For private insurance for long-term care, this principle creates a dilemma. Most policies will be purchased by the elderly; yet, because the elderly have a high risk of needing long-term care, only about 20% of them can afford the cost of premiums. A public-private partnership by which the government partially subsidizes private long-term-care insurance is unlikely to resolve this dilemma. Only a social insurance program for long-term care can provide universal, affordable, and equitable coverage. PMID:8128712

  2. The Long-term Management of Used Nuclear Fuel in Canada: A Geoscientific Prespective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfadhel, B.

    2009-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel waste generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. In support of this objective, NWMO is pursuing an active technical research and development program in areas such as repository engineering, repository geoscience and repository safety. The geoscience work program is designed to develop a geoscientific basis for understanding long-term geosphere barrier performance, as well as building confidence in deep geological repository safety in both sedimentary and crystalline settings. This is achieved through a multidisciplinary approach involving the coordinated effort of research groups drawn from universities, consultants, and international nuclear waste management organizations. The main objectives of the program are to: develop tools and methods to improve NWMO's geosphere characterization capabilities and develop readiness for evaluating potential candidate sites in willing host communities; advance the understanding of long-term physical and geochemical evolution of the geosphere at time scales relevant to repository safety; and improve numerical methods to assess the geosphere evolution and its response to long-term perturbations. The paper provides an overview of the geoscience issues and challenges associated with the development of deep geological repositories and key activities that the NWMO is pursuing to address them.

  3. Long-term Outcomes of Childhood Onset Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hjorten, Rebecca; Anwar, Zohra; Reidy, Kimberly Jean

    2016-01-01

    There are limited studies on long-term outcomes of childhood onset nephrotic syndrome (NS). A majority of children with NS have steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS). Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is associated with a high risk of developing end-stage renal disease. Biomarkers and analysis of genetic mutations may provide new information for prognosis in SRNS. Frequently relapsing and steroid-dependent NS is associated with long-term complications, including dyslipidemia, cataracts, osteoporosis and fractures, obesity, impaired growth, and infertility. Long-term complications of SSNS are likely to be under-recognized. There remain many gaps in our knowledge of long-term outcomes of childhood NS, and further study is indicated. PMID:27252935

  4. Long-Term Quiescent Fibroblast Cells Transit into Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Hemmerich, Peter; Klement, Karolin; Diekmann, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is described to be a consequence of telomere erosion during the replicative life span of primary human cells. Quiescence should therefore not contribute to cellular aging but rather extend lifespan. Here we tested this hypothesis and demonstrate that cultured long-term quiescent human fibroblasts transit into senescence due to similar cellular mechanisms with similar dynamics and with a similar maximum life span as proliferating controls, even under physiological oxygen conditions. Both, long-term quiescent and senescent fibroblasts almost completely fail to undergo apoptosis. The transition of long-term quiescent fibroblasts into senescence is also independent of HES1 which protects short-term quiescent cells from becoming senescent. Most significantly, DNA damage accumulates during senescence as well as during long-term quiescence at physiological oxygen levels. We suggest that telomere-independent, potentially maintenance driven gradual induction of cellular senescence during quiescence is a counterbalance to tumor development. PMID:25531649

  5. Long-term socioeconomic impacts of flooding in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jina, A.

    2013-05-01

    Natural disasters lead to myriad negative impacts upon society, causing loss of life, property, and income. Among disasters, floods annually affect the most people, and lead to widespread negative outcomes, particularly in developing countries. While immediate effects of disasters are readily observed, long-term socioeconomic effects have received little attention. Recent work in development economics finds that environmental exposure in early life can have negative impacts upon later outcomes in health, education, and labor markets. Such research is problematic for disasters, however, as objective measurements of hazard exposure are difficult to obtain. This study develops a remote sensing method to detect flooding in Bangladesh, one of the most flood-prone countries, using MODIS 8-day composite data. This approach addresses one of the main problems in the literature on the social impacts of disasters by deriving an objective measure rather than using self-reported damages. Flood data from 2000-2012 is matched to geolocated social surveys conducted by the Bangladesh government to identify impacts of exposure to floods at critical periods of life. While flooding is noted to be a natural and important part of ecosystem functioning in Bangladesh, we aim to understand the impacts of a flood of greater than normal magnitude or abnormal timing to identify the effects on human capital formation. We find that an increase in flooding of one standard deviation (SD) above the mean in the birth month leads to a 3% increase in stunting (2 SD below cohort height). This has implications for physical and cognitive development, shown elsewhere to persist to adulthood. We find that children from households that are exposed to floods while in elementary school are more likely to drop out. Other impacts will be identified in the course of this research. The stated impacts suggest that the long-term health and economic fortunes of the rural poor in Bangladesh are significantly

  6. Long-term effects of dynamic aortomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chachques, J C; Haab, F; Cron, C; Fischer, E C; Grandjean, P; Bruneval, P; Acar, C; Jebara, V A; Fontaliran, F; Carpentier, A F

    1994-07-01

    Aortomyoplasty consists of wrapping the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) around the ascending aorta and electrostimulating it during diastole. The ascending aorta will act as an ectopic neo-ventricle compressed during diastole, thus reproducing the effects of long-term diastolic counterpulsation. In 5 goats, the right LDM was transferred to the thoracic cavity after removal of the second rib. The ascending aorta was enlarged by a pericardial patch and wrapped with the LDM. Postoperative electrostimulation was delivered in a counterpulsating manner. Hemodynamic studies were performed at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Percent increase in the subendocardial viability index (diastolic pressure-time index/systolic tension-time index) was calculated using unassisted and assisted cardiac cycles with the stimulator off versus the stimulator on at a 1:1 ratio in the basal state and after acute heart failure was induced by the administration of high doses of propranolol hydrochloride. Diastolic counterpulsation of the ascending aorta resulted in significant improvement in the subendocardial viability index long term, both in basal state conditions and after induced cardiac failure. During heart failure, aortomyoplasty increased the cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular resistance. Histopathologic studies up to 24 months showed preservation of the histologic structure of the aortic wall and no evidence of thromboembolism. Tight adhesions developed between the aortic wall (including the pericardial patch) and the LDM. The diameters of the enlarged aortas showed no significant differences compared with diameters immediately postoperatively. In conclusion, aortomyoplasty produces chronic diastolic augmentation with preservation of aortic structure. After induction of heart failure, aortomyoplasty offers efficient circulatory support.

  7. Long-term behavior of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Ramesh, K.S.

    1992-02-19

    This topical report has been prepared in response to the need to address the question of long term durability of high-strength structural ceramic materials. In a new project to demonstrate the use of such materials as replacements for metals in the hot gas path of industrial gas turbines, the longest projected test bed run will be 1000 hours. Creep in ceramic materials seldom exceeds one percent strain before failure, but the strain takes place almost entirely in the intergranular regions, which can be severely weakened by accumulated damage as creep occurs. In this report, we discuss the nature of creep in silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramic materials, the method of evaluating creep, and the interpretation of data obtained under various creep test conditions. A review of creep data illustrates the importance of intergranular phases and of the history of the material. Also, in most cases, the histories applying to laboratory investigations are different from those that will apply to engineering situations in which measurable creep will be generally unacceptable. Fatigue in ceramic materials usually is assessed in static fatigue tests, which are dependent on the same types of grain boundary damage as those occurring in creep, but over shorter time periods. Corrosion of silicon-based ceramics by oxygen and water vapor results in the formation of protective SiO{sub 2} under gas turbine operating conditions.

  8. Perinatal nutrition programs neuroimmune function long-term: mechanisms and implications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Our early life nutritional environment can influence several aspects of physiology, including our propensity to become obese. There is now evidence to suggest perinatal diet can also independently influence development of our innate immune system. This review will address three not-necessarily-exclusive mechanisms by which perinatal nutrition can program neuroimmune function long-term: by predisposing the individual to obesity, by altering the gut microbiota, and by inducing epigenetic modifications that alter gene transcription throughout life. PMID:23964195

  9. Designing a Staff Development Program and Subsequent Handbook for Use at Woburn Nursing Center: A Long-Term Care Facility of Salter Healthcare Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Cole; Capone, Martha

    Woburn Nursing Center (WNC), a private nursing home owned and operated by Salter Healthcare Services (SHS), developed an integrated, comprehensive staff development program and handbook. A literature review focused on staff needs, responsible agent, and handbook development. The following activities were undertaken: a review of ERIC documents,…

  10. [Autoimmune processes after long-term low-level exposure to electromagnetic fields (the results of an experiment). Part 2. General scheme and conditions of the experiment. Development of RF exposure conditions complying with experimental tasks. Animal's status during the long-term exposure].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, O A; Merkulov, A V; Shafirkin, A V; Vorob'ev, A A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the conditions for handling and exposure of experimental animals (Wistar rats) and methods used in the study of immunological effects of long-term low-level (500 microW/cm2) exposure to radiofrequency (2450 MHz) electromagnetic fields, performed under auspices of the World Health Organization.

  11. Flower Development under Drought Stress: Morphological and Transcriptomic Analyses Reveal Acute Responses and Long-Term Acclimation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhao; Ma, Xuan; Guo, Huihong; Sukiran, Noor Liyana; Guo, Bin; Assmann, Sarah M.; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Drought dramatically affects plant growth and crop yield, but previous studies primarily examined responses to drought during vegetative development. Here, to study responses to drought during reproductive development, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana plants with limited water, under conditions that allowed the plants to initiate and complete reproduction. Drought treatment from just after the onset of flowering to seed maturation caused an early arrest of floral development and sterility. After acclimation, plants showed reduced fertility that persisted throughout reproductive development. Floral defects included abnormal anther development, lower pollen viability, reduced filament elongation, ovule abortion, and failure of flowers to open. Drought also caused differential expression of 4153 genes, including flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS T, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1, and LEAFY, genes regulating anther and pistil development, and stress-related transcription factors. Mutant phenotypes of hypersensitivity to drought and fewer differentially expressed genes suggest that DEHYDRATION RESPONSE ELEMENT B1A may have an important function in drought response in flowers. A more severe filament elongation defect under drought in myb21 plants demonstrated that appropriate stamen development requires MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 21 under drought conditions. Our study reveals a regulatory cascade in reproductive responses and acclimation under drought. PMID:24179129

  12. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic ... and sprinkle forms are available for young children. Long-Acting Beta2-Agonists Medications in the beta 2 - ...

  13. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF ADVERSE ENVIRONMENTS DURING DEVELOPMENT: EFFECTS ON ADULTHOOD IN RATS EXPOSED TO TOXICANTS OR UNDERNUTRITION IN UTERO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown correlations between in utero and early life environments and diseases later in life, including hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes, obesity, schizophrenia, early onset chronic renal failure, cancer and compromised repro-duction. Current development...

  14. [Mental and physical development of children living in the area of monitoring pollution from a plant for processing and long-term storage of radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Kirillov, V F; Popova, O L; Mikhaĭlov, A I; Bobrishcheva-Pushkina, N D; Kuznetsova, L Iu; Silaev, A A

    2010-01-01

    Environmental conditions in the area hosting a plant for processing and long storage of low- to moderately-active radioactive waste are described as reasonably safe. Residence in the area does not exert negative influence on the physical and mental development of children. Several indicators of physical development give better estimates than at the control territory. The difference can be accounted for by a better social situation in the study area (housing conditions, financial standing, food patterns, general lifestyle). PMID:21395055

  15. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 3, China, India, Indonesia, and South Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and Co{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted for China, India, Indonesia and South Korea in Asia.

  16. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  17. Evaluating Indicator-Based Methods of "Measuring Long-Term Impacts of a Science Center on Its Community"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Eric Allen

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses some of the challenges faced when attempting to evaluate the long-term impact of informal science learning interventions. To contribute to the methodological development of informal science learning research, we critically examine (Falk and Needham (2011) "Journal of Research in Science Teaching," 48: 1-12.) study…

  18. The Long and the Short of it: Gene and Environment Interactions During Early Cortical Development and Consequences for Long-Term Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Helen; Neuhaus, Ain; Sundramoorthi, Rohan; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Cortical development is a complex amalgamation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and circuit formation. These processes follow defined timescales and are controlled by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. It is currently unclear how robust and flexible these processes are and whether the developing brain has the capacity to recover from disruptions. What is clear is that there are a number of cognitive disorders or conditions that are elicited as a result of disrupted cortical development, although it may take a long time for the full pathophysiology of the conditions to be realized clinically. The critical window for the manifestation of a neurodevelopmental disorder is prolonged, and there is the potential for a complex interplay between genes and environment. While there have been extended investigations into the genetic basis of a number of neurological and mental disorders, limited definitive associations have been discovered. Many environmental factors, including inflammation and stress, have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, and it may be that a better understanding of the interplay between genes and environment will speed progress in this field. In particular, the development of the brain needs to be considered in the context of the whole materno-fetal unit as the degree of the metabolic, endocrine, or inflammatory responses, for example, will greatly influence the environment in which the brain develops. This review will emphasize the importance of extending neurodevelopmental studies to the contribution of the placenta, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid, and to maternal and fetal immune response. These combined investigations are more likely to reveal genetic and environmental factors that influence the different stages of neuronal development and potentially lead to the better understanding of the etiology of neurological and mental disorders such as autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and schizophrenia.

  19. The Long and the Short of it: Gene and Environment Interactions During Early Cortical Development and Consequences for Long-Term Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stolp, Helen; Neuhaus, Ain; Sundramoorthi, Rohan; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Cortical development is a complex amalgamation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and circuit formation. These processes follow defined timescales and are controlled by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. It is currently unclear how robust and flexible these processes are and whether the developing brain has the capacity to recover from disruptions. What is clear is that there are a number of cognitive disorders or conditions that are elicited as a result of disrupted cortical development, although it may take a long time for the full pathophysiology of the conditions to be realized clinically. The critical window for the manifestation of a neurodevelopmental disorder is prolonged, and there is the potential for a complex interplay between genes and environment. While there have been extended investigations into the genetic basis of a number of neurological and mental disorders, limited definitive associations have been discovered. Many environmental factors, including inflammation and stress, have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, and it may be that a better understanding of the interplay between genes and environment will speed progress in this field. In particular, the development of the brain needs to be considered in the context of the whole materno-fetal unit as the degree of the metabolic, endocrine, or inflammatory responses, for example, will greatly influence the environment in which the brain develops. This review will emphasize the importance of extending neurodevelopmental studies to the contribution of the placenta, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid, and to maternal and fetal immune response. These combined investigations are more likely to reveal genetic and environmental factors that influence the different stages of neuronal development and potentially lead to the better understanding of the etiology of neurological and mental disorders such as autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and schizophrenia. PMID:22701439

  20. Providing a Set of Research-Based Practices to Support Preservice Teachers' Long-Term Professional Development as Learners of Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Sevgi; Demirdogen, Betul; Tarkin, Aysegul; Kutucu, Selcan; Ekiz, Betul; Akin, Fatma Nur; Tuysuz, Mustafa; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was twofold. The first was to investigate the development of preservice teachers' knowledge base for science teaching on the rate of reaction topic within the 14-week content representation (CoRe)-based mentoring-enriched practicum course. In this course, CoRe design was used as a form of lesson planning and…

  1. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  2. Assessing the short- and long-term effects of land development on watershed erosion and sediment delivery to marine ecosystems of the U.S. Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; Gray, S. C.; Sears, W.; Brooks, G.; Larson, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout history, significant portions of the native vegetation of many Caribbean islands were replaced by cropland. Even though most islands eventually underwent reforestation, sediment yields and deposition rates appear to be higher now than throughout the past millennia, and this suggests that coral reef systems are experiencing an unprecedented level of sediment-related stress. Given the present-day emphasis on erosion control projects to restore coral reefs of the US Caribbean, it is of utmost importance to develop a quantitative understanding of the effects of both land development and watershed restoration activities on sediment delivery at various spatio-temporal scales. Efforts to measure contemporary erosion, sediment delivery and deposition rates have been conducted on the island of St. John-USVI since 2009. Sediment yields under natural conditions from the small (<10 km2) watersheds in this dry sub-tropical setting are between 1 and 10 Mg km-2 yr-1. Current sediment yields are 2 - 50 times higher than background depending on unpaved road network abundance and characteristics. Our efforts indicate that a watershed restoration program implemented in 2010-2011 within the 13-km2 Coral Bay watershed resulted in the reduction of annual sediment delivery rates from 445 Mg yr-1 to 327 Mg yr-1. Marine sedimentation rates of terrigenous materials based on sediment trap data were 6 - 24 times greater below developed watersheds relative to undeveloped catchments and were consistent with spatial comparisons of modeled sediment yields. At sites located within reef systems, total and silt deposition rates during sampling periods with major storms exceeded rates shown to harm corals more frequently in developed areas. Terrigenous sedimentation rates during periods with equivalent storms were reduced following watershed restoration. These results suggest that targeted watershed restoration may be effective in reducing sedimentation where land development and sediments

  3. Long-term seafloor monitoring at an open ocean aquaculture site in the western Gulf of Maine, USA: development of an adaptive protocol.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, R E; Ward, L G; Fredriksson, D W; Irish, J D; Langan, R; Heinig, C S; Greene, J K; Abeels, H A; Peter, C R; Eberhardt, A L

    2014-11-15

    The seafloor at an open ocean finfish aquaculture facility in the western Gulf of Maine, USA was monitored from 1999 to 2008 by sampling sites inside a predicted impact area modeled by oceanographic conditions and fecal and food settling characteristics, and nearby reference sites. Univariate and multivariate analyses of benthic community measures from box core samples indicated minimal or no significant differences between impact and reference areas. These findings resulted in development of an adaptive monitoring protocol involving initial low-cost methods that required more intensive and costly efforts only when negative impacts were initially indicated. The continued growth of marine aquaculture is dependent on further development of farming methods that minimize negative environmental impacts, as well as effective monitoring protocols. Adaptive monitoring protocols, such as the one described herein, coupled with mathematical modeling approaches, have the potential to provide effective protection of the environment while minimize monitoring effort and costs. PMID:25287226

  4. Long-term seafloor monitoring at an open ocean aquaculture site in the western Gulf of Maine, USA: development of an adaptive protocol.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, R E; Ward, L G; Fredriksson, D W; Irish, J D; Langan, R; Heinig, C S; Greene, J K; Abeels, H A; Peter, C R; Eberhardt, A L

    2014-11-15

    The seafloor at an open ocean finfish aquaculture facility in the western Gulf of Maine, USA was monitored from 1999 to 2008 by sampling sites inside a predicted impact area modeled by oceanographic conditions and fecal and food settling characteristics, and nearby reference sites. Univariate and multivariate analyses of benthic community measures from box core samples indicated minimal or no significant differences between impact and reference areas. These findings resulted in development of an adaptive monitoring protocol involving initial low-cost methods that required more intensive and costly efforts only when negative impacts were initially indicated. The continued growth of marine aquaculture is dependent on further development of farming methods that minimize negative environmental impacts, as well as effective monitoring protocols. Adaptive monitoring protocols, such as the one described herein, coupled with mathematical modeling approaches, have the potential to provide effective protection of the environment while minimize monitoring effort and costs.

  5. Development of a Short-Duration Drive Cycle to Represent Long-Term Measured Drive Cycle Data: Evaluation of Truck Efficiency Technologies in Class 8 Tractor Trailers

    SciTech Connect

    LaClair, Tim; Gao, Zhiming; Fu, Joshua; Calcagno, Jimmy; Yun, Jeongran

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the fuel savings and emissions reductions that can be achieved from truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet's specific usage allows the fleet to select a combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. An accurate characterization of usage for the fleet is critical for such an evaluation; however, short-term measured drive cycle data do not generally reflect overall usage very effectively. This study presents a detailed analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and demonstrates the development of a short-duration synthetic drive cycle with measured drive cycle data collected over an extended period of time. The approach matched statistical measures of the vehicle speed with acceleration history and integrated measured grade data to develop a compressed drive cycle that accurately represents total usage. Drive cycle measurements obtained during a full year from six tractor trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload carrier were analyzed to develop a synthetic drive cycle. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. These drive cycle and mass data were analyzed with a tractive energy analysis to quantify the benefits in terms of fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions that can be achieved on Class 8 tractor trailers by using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist between Class 8 tractor trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application. Finally, the methodology employed for generating the synthetic drive cycle serves as a rigorous approach to develop an accurate usage characterization that can be used to effectively compress large quantities of drive cycle data.

  6. Development of a Short-Duration Drive Cycle to Represent Long-Term Measured Drive Cycle Data: Evaluation of Truck Efficiency Technologies in Class 8 Tractor Trailers

    DOE PAGES

    LaClair, Tim; Gao, Zhiming; Fu, Joshua; Calcagno, Jimmy; Yun, Jeongran

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the fuel savings and emissions reductions that can be achieved from truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet's specific usage allows the fleet to select a combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. An accurate characterization of usage for the fleet is critical for such an evaluation; however, short-term measured drive cycle data do not generally reflect overall usage very effectively. This study presents a detailed analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and demonstrates the development of a short-duration synthetic drive cycle with measured drive cycle data collected over an extendedmore » period of time. The approach matched statistical measures of the vehicle speed with acceleration history and integrated measured grade data to develop a compressed drive cycle that accurately represents total usage. Drive cycle measurements obtained during a full year from six tractor trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload carrier were analyzed to develop a synthetic drive cycle. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. These drive cycle and mass data were analyzed with a tractive energy analysis to quantify the benefits in terms of fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions that can be achieved on Class 8 tractor trailers by using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist between Class 8 tractor trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application. Finally, the methodology employed for generating the synthetic drive cycle serves as a rigorous approach to develop an accurate usage characterization that can be used to effectively compress large quantities of drive cycle data.« less

  7. Long-term live-cell imaging of mammalian preimplantation development and derivation process of pluripotent stem cells from the embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Ueda, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a process in which two highly specialized haploid gametes unite and endow totipotency to the resulting diploid zygote. This is followed by cell proliferation and the onset of differentiation during the brief period leading up to implantation. In these processes, a number of cellular components and structures are regulated spatially and temporally, as seen in repeated cell division, cell cycle progression, and epigenetic reprogramming. In mammals, the numbers of oocytes and embryos that can be collected are very limited. Therefore, analyses of molecular mechanisms are hampered because of difficulties in conducting biochemical analyses on such limited material. Furthermore, immunostaining methods require cell fixation and are insufficient for understanding ontogeny, because the processes observed in fertilization and early embryonic development progress in time-dependent manners and each phenomenon is connected with others by cause-and-effect relationships. Consequently, it is important to develop an experimental system that enables molecular imaging without affecting embryonic development. To achieve the above advantages, especially retrospective and prospective analyses, we have established a live-cell imaging system that enables observations under minimally invasive conditions. Using this approach, we have succeeded in visualizing and predicting the developmental potential of embryos after various perturbations. We also succeeded in imaging embryonic stem (ES) cell derivation in natural conditions. In this review, we describe a brief history of embryonic imaging and detailed protocols. We also discuss promising aspects of imaging in the fields of developmental and stem cell biology.

  8. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 1, Summary: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Ketoff, A.

    1991-02-01

    This study examines energy use and carbon emissions in the developing world. Based on analyses of present energy-use patterns in 17 developing nations, this study presents high emissions and low emissions scenarios for these nations in the year 2025. These nations combined account for two thirds of the energy-related carbon emissions presently generated in the developing world. The analysis reveals that energy demand expands dramatically by 2025 and grows increasingly carbon intensive. In the high emissions scenario, carbon emissions from these countries increase four-fold. The greatest share of carbon stems from the industrial sector in 2025, followed by the transport and residential sectors. With the implementation of policies aimed at reducing CO{sub 2} emissions, the low emissions scenario reduces the level of carbon in 2025 by 20 percent relative to the high emissions scenario figure. These nations achieve 80 percent of the carbon reductions by improving the efficiency of energy production and use and the remaining 20 percent by implementing fuel-switching measures. Of all the sectors examined, the industrial sector offers the greatest opportunity for absolute carbon savings (39 percent of the total). This summary is volume one of five volumes.

  9. LONG-TERM MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; John W. Haas; Neal Van Wyck

    2003-10-16

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) associated with subsurface contamination sites is a key element of Long Term Stewardship and Legacy Management across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, both within the DOE and elsewhere, LTM is an expensive endeavor, often exceeding the costs of the remediation phase of a clean-up project. The primary contributors to LTM costs are associated with labor. Sample collection, storage, preparation, analysis, and reporting can add a significant financial burden to project expense when extended over many years. Development of unattended, in situ monitoring networks capable of providing quantitative data satisfactory to regulatory concerns has the potential to significantly reduce LTM costs. But survival and dependable operation in a difficult environment is a common obstacle to widespread use across the DOE complex or elsewhere. Deploying almost any sensor in the subsurface for extended periods of time will expose it to chemical and microbial degradation. Over the time-scales required for in situ LTM, even the most advanced sensor systems may be rendered useless. Frequent replacement or servicing (cleaning) of sensors is expensive and labor intensive, offsetting most, if not all, of the cost savings realized with unattended, in situ sensors. To enable facile, remote monitoring of contaminants and other subsurface parameters over prolonged periods, Applied Research Associates, Inc has been working to develop an advanced LTM sensor network consisting of three key elements: (1) an anti-fouling sensor chamber that can accommodate a variety of chemical and physical measurement devices based on electrochemical, optical and other techniques; (2) two rapid, cost effective, and gentle means of emplacing sensor packages either at precise locations directly in the subsurface or in pre-existing monitoring wells; and (3) a web browser-based data acquisition and control system (WebDACS) utilizing field-networked microprocessor-controlled smart

  10. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology

  11. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology.

  12. Developing a Long-Term Forest Gap Model to Predict the Behavior of California Pines, Oaks, and Cedars Under Climate Change and Other Disturbance Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. L.; Moran, E.

    2015-12-01

    Many predictions about how trees will respond to climate change have been made, but these often rely on extrapolating into the future one of two extremes: purely correlative factors like climate, or purely physiological factors unique to a particular species or plant functional group. We are working towards a model that combines both phenotypic and genotypic traits to better predict responses of trees to climate change. We have worked to parameterize a neighborhood dynamics, individual tree forest-gap model called SORTIE-ND, using open data from both the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory & Analysis (FIA) datasets in California and 30-yr old permanent plots established by the USGS. We generated individual species factors including stage-specific mortality and growth rates, and species-specific allometric equations for ten species, including Abies concolor, A. magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus contorta, P. jeffreyi, P. lambertiana, P. monticola, P. ponderosa, and the two hardwoods Quercus chrysolepis and Q. kelloggii. During this process, we also developed two R packages to aid in parameter development for SORTIE-ND in other ecological systems. MakeMyForests is an R package that parses FIA datasets and calculates parameters based on the state averages of growth, light, and allometric parameters. disperseR is an R package that uses extensive plot data, with individual tree, sapling, and seedling measurements, to calculate finely tuned mortality and growth parameters for SORTIE-ND. Both are freely available on GitHub, and future updates will be available on CRAN. To validate the model, we withheld several plots from the 30-yr USGS data while calculating parameters. We tested for differences between the actual withheld data and the simulated forest data, in basal area, seedling density, seed dispersal, and species composition. The similarity of our model to the real system suggests that the model parameters we generated with our R packages accurately represent

  13. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long-term missions. Technical progress report, February 1981 to February 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.

    1982-05-01

    Major objectives in the process of developing a rugged portable instrument to evaluate dose and dose equivalent have been achieved. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter simulating a 2 micrometer spherical tissue volume has operated satisfactorily for over a year. The basic elements of the electronic system have been designed and tested. And finally, the most suitable mathematical technique for evaluating dose equivalent with a portable instrument has been selected. Design and fabrication of a portable prototype, based on the previously tested circuits, is underway.

  14. Management of long-term persistent air leakage developed after bullectomy for giant bullous lung disease associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Wook; Kim, Dohun

    2016-01-01

    Persistent air leakage is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of bullous lung disease surgery. A 32-year-old man with lung involvement of neurofibromatosis type I underwent bullectomy for huge bullae and recurrent pneumothorax. Persistent postoperative air leakage developed and the lung was totally collapsed. The initial surgery failed, but a second trial employing a novel suture technique on half-absorbed polyglycolic acid (PGA) felt successfully resolved the massive air leakage. Pneumothorax did not recur and the patient remained stable without dyspnea. Thus, a suture technique employing half-absorbed PGA felt was an effective option for managing persistent air leakage.

  15. Management of long-term persistent air leakage developed after bullectomy for giant bullous lung disease associated with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Persistent air leakage is a serious and sometimes fatal complication of bullous lung disease surgery. A 32-year-old man with lung involvement of neurofibromatosis type I underwent bullectomy for huge bullae and recurrent pneumothorax. Persistent postoperative air leakage developed and the lung was totally collapsed. The initial surgery failed, but a second trial employing a novel suture technique on half-absorbed polyglycolic acid (PGA) felt successfully resolved the massive air leakage. Pneumothorax did not recur and the patient remained stable without dyspnea. Thus, a suture technique employing half-absorbed PGA felt was an effective option for managing persistent air leakage. PMID:26904244

  16. A prospective randomized study to assess the efficacy of rate and site of atrial pacing on long-term development of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chu-Pak; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Ngarmukos, Tachapong; Kim, You-Ho; Kong, Chi-Woon; Omar, Razali; Sriratanasathavorn, Charn; Munawar, Muhammad; Kam, Ruth; Lee, Kathy Lf; Lau, Elizabeth Oi-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2009-09-01

    The Septal Pacing for Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Evaluation (SAFE) study is a single-blinded, parallel randomized designed multicenter study in pacemaker indicated patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective is to evaluate whether the site of atrial pacing--conventional right atrial appendage versus low atrial septal--with or without atrial overdrive pacing will influence the development of persistent AF. The study will provide a definitive answer to whether a different atrial pacing site or the use of AF suppression pacing or both can give incremental antiarrhythmic benefit when one is implanting a device for a patient with a history of paroxysmal AF. PMID:19460078

  17. Effects of long-term flooding on biogeochemistry and vegetation development in floodplains; a mesocosm experiment to study interacting effects of land use and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banach, A. M.; Banach, K.; Peters, R. C. J. H.; Jansen, R. H. M.; Visser, E. J. W.; Stepniewska, Z.; Roelofs, J. G. M.; Lamers, L. P. M.

    2009-07-01

    Raising safety levees and reinforcing dykes is not a sufficient and sustainable solution to the intense winter and summer floods occurring with increasing frequency in Eastern Europe. An alternative, creating permanently flooded floodplain wetlands, requires improved understanding of ecological consequences. A 9 month mesocosm study (starting in January), under natural light and temperature conditions, was initiated to understand the role of previous land use (fertility intensity) and flooding water quality on soil biogeochemistry and vegetation development. Flooding resulted in severe eutrophication of both sediment pore water and surface water, particularly for more fertilized soil and sulphate pollution. Vegetation development was mainly determined by soil quality, resulting in a strong decline of most species from the highly fertilized location, especially in combination with higher nitrate and sulphate concentrations. Soils from the less fertilized location showed, in contrast, luxurious growth of target Carex species regardless water quality. The observed interacting effects of water quality and agricultural use are important in assessing the consequences of planned measures for ecosystem functioning and biodiversity in river floodplains.

  18. Effects of long-term flooding on biogeochemistry and vegetation development in floodplains - a mesocosm experiment to study interacting effects of land use and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banach, A. M.; Banach, K.; Peters, R. C. J. H.; Jansen, R. H. M.; Visser, E. J. W.; Stepniewska, Z.; Roelofs, J. G. M.; Lamers, L. P. M.

    2009-03-01

    The frequent occurrence of summer floods in Eastern Europe, possibly related to climate change, urges the need to understand the consequences of combined water storage and nature rehabilitation as an alternative safety measure instead of raising and reinforcing dykes, for floodplain biogeochemistry and vegetation development. We used a mesocosm design to investigate the possibilities for the creation of permanently flooded wetlands along rivers, in relation to water quality (nitrate, sulphate) and land use (fertilization). Flooding resulted in severe eutrophication of both sediment pore water and surface water, particularly for more fertilized soil and sulphate pollution. Vegetation development was mainly determined by soil quality, resulting in a strong decline of most species from the highly fertilized location, especially in combination with higher nitrate and sulphate concentrations. Soils from the less fertilized location showed, in contrast, luxurious growth of target Carex species regardless water quality. The observed interacting effects of water quality and agricultural use are important in assessing the consequences of planned measures for ecosystem functioning (including peat formation) and biodiversity in river floodplains.

  19. Long-Term Evaluation of Patients Undergoing Genitoplasty due to Disorders of Sex Development: Results from a 14-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Pan, Jinhong; Ji, Huixiang; Wang, Yongquan; Shen, Wenhao; Liu, Limei; Lu, Gensheng; Zhou, Zhansong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To summarize the experience in treating patients with genitoplasty due to disorders of sex development in China. Methods. The operative procedures, gender of rearing, surgical outcome, and psychosocial and family adjustments of 262 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results. At initial diagnosis, the mean age was 14.3 ± 2.8 years (range: 2–38 years). There were 96 children, 133 adolescents, and 33 adults. Follow-up was done every 6 months. Patients with female sex assignment had no urinary incontinence or voiding difficulty. Five patients underwent the second surgery (3%); vaginal dilation was performed in 35 patients with postoperative vaginal stenosis; 12 patients (7.4%) were unsatisfactory with the outcome. For patients with male sex assignment, the median length of penis was 2.2 cm in prepubertal patients, 4.2 cm in pubertal patients, and 5.0 cm in adults; 39 patients developed postvoid dribbling (39%); 21 patients underwent a second surgery (21%); urethral dilation was done in 28 patients (28%) due to urethral stricture; 38 patients were unsatisfactory with the outcome (38%). In addition, 136 patients (83%) with female sex assignment and 54 (54%) with male sex assignment had favorable psychosocial adjustment. Conclusions. Patients with male sex assignment have more surgical complications and difficulties in psychosocial adjustment as compared to those with female sex assignment. PMID:24376381

  20. Telemetry and Telestimulation via Implanted Devices Necessary in Long-Term Experiments Using Conscious Untethered Animals for the Development of New Medical Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Kawada, Toru; Uemura, Kazunori

    Effective countermeasures against explosive increase in healthcare expenditures are urgently needed. A paradigm shift in healthcare is called for, and academics and governments worldwide are working hard on the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) as a feasible and effective measure for reducing medical cost. The more prevalent the disease and the easier disease outcome can be improved, the more efficient is medical ICT in reducing healthcare cost. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are such examples. Chronic heart failure is another disease in which patients may benefit from ICT-based medical practice. It is conceivable that daily monitoring of hemodynamics together with appropriate treatments may obviate the expensive hospitalization. ICT potentially permit continuous monitoring with wearable or implantable medical devices. ICT may also help accelerate the development of new therapeutic devices. Traditionally effectiveness of treatments is sequentially examined by sacrificing a number of animals at a given time point. These inefficient and inaccurate methods can be replaced by applying ICT to the devices used in chronic animal experiments. These devices allow researchers to obtain biosignals and images from live animals without killing them. They include implantable telemetric devices, implantable telestimulation devices, and imaging devices. Implanted rather than wired monitoring and stimulation devices permit experiments to be conducted under even more physiological conditions, i.e., untethered, free-moving states. Wireless communication and ICT are indispensible technologies for the development of such telemetric and telestimulation devices.

  1. Development of autoimmune disease in SCID mice populated with long-term "in vitro" proliferating (NZB x NZW)F1 pre-B cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Pre-B cell lines proliferating for several months on stromal cells in the presence of interleukin 7 (IL-7) were established from fetal liver of (NZB x NZW)F1 mice. They express the B lineage-specific markers PB76, B220, and VpreB, but do not express surface immunoglobulin (sIg). Upon removal of IL-7 from the culture, they differentiate to sIg+ B cells that can then be stimulated by lipopolysaccharide to become IgM- secreting cells. Transfer of these pre-B cell lines into SCID mice leads to hypergammaglobulinemia of IgM (600-900 micrograms/ml), IgG2a (1-3 mg/ml), and IgG3 (300-500 micrograms/ml) for the next 3-5 mo. The spleen appears populated with (NZB x NZW)F1-derived pre-B cells, few B cells, and many IgM and/or IgG-producing plasma cells. In contrast, SCID mice populated with pre-B cell lines of normal (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 mouse fetal liver develop normal levels of serum IgM (approximately 100- 300 micrograms/ml), almost no detectable levels of IgG, and no plasma cell hyperplasia. The (NZB x NZW)F1 pre-B cell-populated SCID mice contain elevated serum titers of IgG antinuclear autoantibodies, but no retroviral gp70-specific nor erythrocyte-specific autoantibodies. Up to 20% of the SCID mice develop proteinuria as a consequence of IgG deposits in the kidney glomeruli during a 7-mo period of observation. All signs of autoimmune disease seen in these mice are independent of the sex of the SCID host. This experimental system provides a distinction between the disease-determining (NZB x NZW)F1 genes, which are expressed in the B lymphocyte lineage and cause the development of the disease, from those expressed in other cell lineages which only modulate its progression. PMID:1402680

  2. The impact of focused, long-term, and collaborative professional development in math and science participants' self-efficacy, classroom practice, and student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottingham, Mary E.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a 2-year professional development model in math and science on the self-efficacy of the teacher and its effects on teacher practice and student outcomes. Further, this study sought to incorporate the instructional use of Inquiry-Based Learning methods of Problem-Based Learning, Japanese Lesson Study, and Action Research. Additionally, this study examined the impacts of these interventions on teacher efficacy and student outcomes. Thirty-eight collaborating participants were purposefully selected by the Math and Science Teacher Academy (MASTA) project grant co-directors because of their content-focused classrooms of mathematics and science. This quasi-experimental study included mathematics and science in-service teachers working on their masters in education. The 2-year, bi-monthly professional development model included collaborating Inquiry-Based Learning communities with in-depth focus on Japanese Lesson Study, Problem-Based Learning instruction, and Action Research. A chi-square analysis was conducted by grade on the difference in passing rate from the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills mathematics and science tests between the MASTA participants and the state passing average. In mathematics there were significant v differences only at grades 3 and 7 where the state passing average was significantly higher than the MASTA students' passing rate. Only at grade 5 was the MASTA students' passing rate higher than the state, but the difference was not significantly different. The science passing rate received from three grade 5 MASTA participants was compared to the state average and a chi-squared was conducted. Although the passing rate for the grade 5 science test was 6% higher for MASTA student that the state, the difference was not statistically significant. However, after analyzing the qualitative participant responses from data gathered during the 2-year MASTA grant the data clearly reflected that

  3. The effects of long-term exposure to a 2450 MHz electromagnetic field on growth and pubertal development in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sangun, Ozlem; Dundar, Bumin; Darici, Hakan; Comlekci, Selcuk; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Celik, Suheyla

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 2450 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) (wireless internet frequency) on the growth and development of female Wistar rats. The study was conducted on three groups of rats. The prenatal and postnatal groups were exposed to EMF 1 h/day beginning from intrauterine and postnatal periods, respectively. The third group was the sham-exposed group. Growth, nutrition and vaginal opening (VO) were regularly monitored. Serum and tissue specimens were collected at puberty. Histological examinations, total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and oxidative stress index (OSI) measurements in ovary and brain tissues and also immunohistochemical staining of the hypothalamus were performed besides the determination of serum FSH, LH, E2 and IGF-1 values. Birth masses of the groups were similar (p > 0.05). Mass gain per day was significantly lower and the puberty was significantly later in the prenatal group. Brain and ovary TOS and OSI values in the prenatal group were significantly increased (p < 0.05) compared to the control group. Serum LH levels of the prenatal and postnatal groups were increased, although serum FSH, and E2 values did not differ among the groups (p > 0.05). Histological examinations of the specimens revealed no statistically significant difference between the groups (p > 0.05). Exposure to 2450 MHz EMF, particularly in the prenatal period, resulted in postnatal growth restriction and delayed puberty in female Wistar rats. Increased TOS and OSI values in the brain and ovary tissues can be interpreted as a sign of chronic stress induced by EMF. This is the first longitudinal study which investigates the effects of EMF induced by wireless internet on pubertal development beside growth.

  4. Getting a Bigger Bang for Your Buck: A Collaborative Approach to Enhancing Dementia Education Planning in Long-Term Care Homes

    PubMed Central

    McAiney, Carrie A.; Hillier, Loretta M.; Ringland, Margaret; Cooper, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    A collaborative of Ontario-based long-term care associations, researchers, clinicians and educators representing various education initiatives related to dementia care and challenging behaviours used existing research evidence on adult learning principles, knowledge transfer and performance improvement to develop an evidence-based approach to support practice change and improvement in long-term care. The collaborative was led by the two provincial long-term care associations with no external funds to support its activities. This effort illustrates how people with common challenges, visions and goals can work together to share their intellectual and physical resources to address pervasive problems. PMID:21037817

  5. Getting a bigger bang for your buck: a collaborative approach to enhancing dementia education planning in long-term care homes.

    PubMed

    McAiney, Carrie A; Hillier, Loretta M; Ringland, Margaret; Cooper, Nancy

    2009-11-01

    A collaborative of Ontario-based long-term care associations, researchers, clinicians and educators representing various education initiatives related to dementia care and challenging behaviours used existing research evidence on adult learning principles, knowledge transfer and performance improvement to develop an evidence-based approach to support practice change and improvement in long-term care. The collaborative was led by the two provincial long-term care associations with no external funds to support its activities. This effort illustrates how people with common challenges, visions and goals can work together to share their intellectual and physical resources to address pervasive problems.

  6. Comprehensive and differential long-term characterization of the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease focusing on the sensory system and pain development

    PubMed Central

    Biko, Lydia; Hose, Dorothea; Hofmann, Lukas; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to impaired activity of alpha-galactosidase A with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. Associated small fiber pathology leads to characteristic pain in Fabry disease. We systematically assessed sensory system, physical activity, metabolic parameters, and morphology of male and female mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency (Fabry ko) from 2 to 27 months of age and compared results with those of age- and gender-matched wild-type littermates of C57Bl/6J background. Results From the age of two months, male and female Fabry mice showed mechanical hypersensitivity (p < 0.001 each) compared to wild-type littermates. Young Fabry ko mice of both genders were hypersensitive to heat stimulation (p < 0.01) and developed heat hyposensitivity with aging (p < 0.05), while cold hyposensitivity was present constantly in young (p < 0.01) and old (p < 0.05) Fabry ko mice compared to wild-type littermates. Stride angle increased only in male Fabry ko mice with aging (p < 0.01) in comparison to wild-type littermates. Except for young female mice, male (p < 0.05) and female (p < 0.01) Fabry ko mice had a higher body weight than wild-type littermates. Old male Fabry ko mice were physically less active than their wild-type littermates (p < 0.05), had lower chow intake (p < 0.001), and lost more weight (p < 0.001) in a one-week treadmill experiment than wild-type littermates. Also, Fabry ko mice showed spontaneous pain protective behavior and developed orofacial dysmorphism resembling patients with Fabry disease. Conclusions Mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency show age-dependent and distinct deficits of the sensory system. alpha-galactosidase A-deficient mice seem to model human Fabry disease and may be helpful when studying the pathophysiology of Fabry-associated pain. PMID:27145802

  7. The long-term effect of cadmium exposure through food on the postnatal development of the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus Schreber, 1780).

    PubMed

    Białońska, Dobrosława; Zakrzewska, Marta; Sawicka-Kapusta, Katarzyna; Konior, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Cadmium is well known for its toxicity to the animal body. However, its effect on pregnancy and the development of young animals is still not well understood. This study examined such effects, using bank voles captured from the wild to make the results closer to those which could be expected in the natural environment. One group of animals was fed 7 microg g(-1) cadmium in the food, a second 35 microg g(-1), and a third no cadmium, as a control. The concentrations of cadmium in the whole bodies of young bank voles were determined on the 3rd, 5th, or 10th day of life. The cadmium level in the bodies of animals exposed to 35 microg g(-1) of cadmium was significantly higher than in those from either the control group or the group receiving 7 microg g(-1) of cadmium, which did not differ from each other. The cadmium level did not change with animal age in any of the study groups. Concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Fe were also determined in the whole body of young animals, as cadmium is known to disturb the metabolism of these essential metals through antagonistic activity. Both Cu and Fe levels were negatively correlated with cadmium concentrations, while a positive correlation was found between zinc and cadmium in the young animal bodies. Also found was higher offspring mortality in the group receiving 35 microg g(-1) of cadmium in food. There was no difference in young animal body weight between the study groups.

  8. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; MacGibbon, Alastair; Fong, Bertram; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Karen; Rowan, Angela; McJarrow, Paul

    2015-06-05

    We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark-light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  9. Influence of long-term altered gravity on the swimming performance of developing cichlid fish: including results from the 2nd German Spacelab Mission D-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmann, H.; Hilbig, R.; Flemming, J.; Slenzka, K.

    This study presents qualitative and quantitative data concerning gravity-dependent changes in the swimming behaviour of developing cichlid fish larvae (Oreochromis mossambicus) after a 9 resp. 10 days exposure to increased acceleration (centrifuge experiments), to reduced gravity (fast-rotating clinostat), changed accelerations (parabolic air craft flights) and to near weightlessness (2nd German Spacelab Mission D-2). Changes of gravity initially cause disturbances of the swimming performance of the fish larvae. With prolonged stay in orbit a step by step normalisation of the swimming behaviour took place in the fish. After return to 1g earth conditions no somersaulting or looping could be detected concerning the fish, but still slow and disorientated movements as compared to controls occurred. The fish larvae adapted to earth gravity within 3-5 days. Fish seem to be in a distinct early developmental stages extreme sensitive and adaptable to altered gravity. However, elder fish either do not react or show compensatory behaviour e.g. escape reactions.

  10. A longitudinal study of the long-term consequences of drinking during pregnancy: heavy in utero alcohol exposure disrupts the normal processes of brain development.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Catherine; Mattson, Sarah N; Riley, Edward P; Jones, Kenneth L; Adnams, Colleen M; May, Philip A; Bookheimer, Susan Y; O'Connor, Mary J; Narr, Katherine L; Kan, Eric; Abaryan, Zvart; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2012-10-31

    Exposure to alcohol in utero can cause birth defects, including face and brain abnormalities, and is the most common preventable cause of intellectual disabilities. Here we use structural magnetic resonance imaging to measure cortical volume change longitudinally in a cohort of human children and youth with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and a group of unexposed control subjects, demonstrating that the normal processes of brain maturation are disrupted in individuals whose mothers drank heavily during pregnancy. Trajectories of cortical volume change within children and youth with PAE differed from those of unexposed control subjects in posterior brain regions, particularly in the parietal cortex. In these areas, control children appear to show a particularly plastic cortex with a prolonged pattern of cortical volume increases followed by equally vigorous volume loss during adolescence, while the alcohol-exposed participants showed primarily volume loss, demonstrating decreased plasticity. Furthermore, smaller volume changes between scans were associated with lower intelligence and worse facial morphology in both groups, and were related to the amount of PAE during each trimester of pregnancy in the exposed group. This demonstrates that measures of IQ and facial dysmorphology predict, to some degree, the structural brain development that occurs in subsequent years. These results are encouraging in that interventions aimed at altering "experience" over time may improve brain trajectories in individuals with heavy PAE and possibly other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23115162

  11. Robotics for Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, Sarkis; Duran, Celso

    2002-07-01

    While long-term monitoring and stewardship means many things to many people, DOE has defined it as The physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, and facility stabilization). Across the United States, there are thousands of contaminated sites with multiple contaminants released from multiple sources where contaminants have transported and commingled. The U.S. government and U.S. industry are responsible for most of the contamination and are landowners of many of these contaminated properties. These sites must be surveyed periodically for various criteria including structural deterioration, water intrusion, integrity of storage containers, atmospheric conditions, and hazardous substance release. The surveys, however, are intrusive, time-consuming, and expensive and expose survey personnel to radioactive contamination. In long-term monitoring, there's a need for an automated system that will gather and report data from sensors without costly human labor. In most cases, a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) unit is used to collect and report data from a remote location. A SCADA unit consists of an embedded computer with data acquisition capabilities. The unit can be configured with various sensors placed in different areas of the site to be monitored. A system of this type is static, i.e., the sensors, once placed, cannot be moved to other locations within the site. For those applications where the number of sampling locations would require too many sensors, or where exact location of future problems is unknown, a mobile sensing platform is an ideal solution. In many facilities that undergo regular inspections, the number of video cameras and air monitors required to eliminate the need for human inspections is very large and far too costly. HCET's remote harsh

  12. Wastewater treatment by soil infiltration: Long-term phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Eveborn, David; Kong, Deguo; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2012-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from on-site wastewater treatment systems may contribute to eutrophication. In developed countries the most common on-site treatment technique is septic systems with soil infiltration. However, the current knowledge about long term P removal in soil treatment systems is not well developed and the data used for estimation of P losses from such systems are unreliable. In this study we sampled four filter beds from community-scale soil treatment systems with an age of between 14 and 22years to determine the long-term P removal and to investigate the chemical mechanisms behind the observed removal. For one site the long-term P removal was calculated using a mass balance approach. After analysis of the accumulated P, it was estimated that on average 12% of the long-term P load had been removed by the bed material. This indicates a low overall capacity of soil treatment systems to remove phosphorus. Batch experiments and chemical speciation modelling indicated that calcium phosphate precipitation was not an important long-term P removal mechanism, with the possible exception of one of the sites. More likely, the P removal was induced by AlPO(4) precipitation and/or sorption to poorly ordered aluminium compounds, as evidenced by strong relationships between oxalate-extractable Al and P. PMID:22982614

  13. Long-Term Stewardship Program Science and Technology Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Joan McDonald

    2002-09-01

    Many of the United States’ hazardous and radioactively contaminated waste sites will not be sufficiently remediated to allow unrestricted land use because funding and technology limitations preclude cleanup to pristine conditions. This means that after cleanup is completed, the Department of Energy will have long-term stewardship responsibilities to monitor and safeguard more than 100 sites that still contain residual contamination. Long-term stewardship encompasses all physical and institutional controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms required to protect human health and the environment from the hazards remaining. The Department of Energy Long-Term Stewardship National Program is in the early stages of development, so considerable planning is still required to identify all the specific roles and responsibilities, policies, and activities needed over the next few years to support the program’s mission. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked with leading the development of Science and Technology within the Long-Term Stewardship National Program. As part of that role, a task was undertaken to identify the existing science and technology related requirements, identify gaps and conflicts that exist, and make recommendations to the Department of Energy for future requirements related to science and technology requirements for long-term stewardship. This work is summarized in this document.

  14. Wastewater treatment by soil infiltration: Long-term phosphorus removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveborn, David; Kong, Deguo; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2012-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from on-site wastewater treatment systems may contribute to eutrophication. In developed countries the most common on-site treatment technique is septic systems with soil infiltration. However, the current knowledge about long term P removal in soil treatment systems is not well developed and the data used for estimation of P losses from such systems are unreliable. In this study we sampled four filter beds from community-scale soil treatment systems with an age of between 14 and 22 years to determine the long-term P removal and to investigate the chemical mechanisms behind the observed removal. For one site the long-term P removal was calculated using a mass balance approach. After analysis of the accumulated P, it was estimated that on average 12% of the long-term P load had been removed by the bed material. This indicates a low overall capacity of soil treatment systems to remove phosphorus. Batch experiments and chemical speciation modelling indicated that calcium phosphate precipitation was not an important long-term P removal mechanism, with the possible exception of one of the sites. More likely, the P removal was induced by AlPO4 precipitation and/or sorption to poorly ordered aluminium compounds, as evidenced by strong relationships between oxalate-extractable Al and P.

  15. Epinephrine: a short- and long-term regulator of stress and development of illness : a potential new role for epinephrine in stress.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dona Lee; Tai, T C; Wong-Faull, David C; Claycomb, Robert; Meloni, Edward G; Myers, Karyn M; Carlezon, William A; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Epinephrine (Epi), which initiates short-term responses to cope with stress, is, in part, stress-regulated via genetic control of its biosynthetic enzyme, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). In rats, immobilization (IMMO) stress activates the PNMT gene in the adrenal medulla via Egr-1 and Sp1 induction. Yet, elevated Epi induced by acute and chronic stress is associated with stress induced, chronic illnesses of cardiovascular, immune, cancerous, and behavioral etiologies. Major sources of Epi include the adrenal medulla and brainstem. Although catecholamines do not cross the blood-brain barrier, circulating Epi from the adrenal medulla may communicate with the central nervous system and stress circuitry by activating vagal nerve β-adrenergic receptors to release norepinephrine, which could then stimulate release of the same from the nucleus tractus solitarius and locus coeruleus. In turn, the basal lateral amygdala (BLA) may activate to stimulate afferents to the hypothalamus, neocortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, and other brain regions sequentially. Recently, we have shown that repeated IMMO or force swim stress may evoke stress resiliency, as suggested by changes in expression and extinction of fear memory in the fear-potentiated startle paradigm. However, concomitant adrenergic changes seem stressor dependent. Present studies aim to identify stressful conditions that elicit stress resiliency versus stress sensitivity, with the goal of developing a model to investigate the potential role of Epi in stress-associated illness. If chronic Epi over expression does elicit illness, possibilities for alternative therapeutics exist through regulating stress-induced Epi expression, adrenergic receptor function and/or corticosteroid effects on Epi, adrenergic receptors and the stress axis.

  16. Design and development of intraocular polymeric implant systems for long-term controlled-release of clindamycin phosphate for toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tamaddon, Lana; Mostafavi, S Abolfazl; Karkhane, Reza; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The release of the anti-toxoplasmosis drug, clindamycin phosphate, from intraocular implants of the biodegradable polymers poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) has been studied in vitro. Materials and Methods: The preparation of the implants was performed by a melt-extrusion method. The developed extrudates were characterized and compared in in-vitro release profiles for elucidating the drug release mechanism. The formulations containing up to 40% w/w of drug were prepared. Release data in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The release kinetics were fitted to the zero-order, Higuchi's square-root, first order and the Korsmeyer-Peppas empirical equations for the estimation of various parameters of the drug release curves. Degradation of implants was also investigated morphologically with time (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Results: It was observed that, the release profiles for the formulations exhibit a typical biphasic profile for bulk-eroding systems, characterized by a first phase of burst release (in first 24 hrs), followed by a phase of slower release. The duration of the secondary phase was found to be proportional to the molecular weight and monomer ratio of copolymers and also polymer-to-drug ratios. It was confirmed that Higuchi and first-order kinetics were the predominant release mechanisms than zero order kinetic. The Korsmeyer-Peppas exponent (n) ranged between 0.10 and 0.96. This value, confirmed fickian as the dominant mechanism for PLA formulations (n ≤ 0.45) and the anomalous mechanism, for PLGAs (0.45 < n < 0.90). Conclusion: The implant of PLA (I.V. 0.2) containing 20% w/w of clindamycin, was identified as the optimum formulation in providing continuous efficient in-vitro release of clindamycin for about 5 weeks. PMID:25709997

  17. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

  18. Fully coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling at regional and long-term scales: Development, application, and analysis of WRF-HMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sven; Fersch, Benjamin; Yuan, Fei; Yu, Zhongbo; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    A closed description of the regional water balance requires hydro-meteorological modeling systems which represent the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. We developed such a mesoscale modeling system, extending the atmospheric model WRF with the distributed hydrological model HMS in a fully coupled way. It includes explicit lateral groundwater and land surface flow parameterization schemes and two-way groundwater-unsaturated zone interaction by replacing the free drainage bottom boundary of WRF's Noah-LSM with a Fixed-head or Darcy-flux boundary condition. The system is exemplarily applied for the Poyang Lake basin (160,000 km2) and the period 1979-1986 using a two-nest approach covering East Asia (30 km) and the Poyang Lake basin (10 km) driven by ERA Interim. Stand-alone WRF effectively simulates temperature (bias 0.5°C) and precipitation (bias 21-26%). Stand-alone HMS simulations provide reasonable streamflow estimates. A significant impact on the regional water balance was found if groundwater-unsaturated zone interaction is considered. But the differences between the two groundwater coupling approaches are minor. For the fully coupled model system, streamflow results strongly depend on the simulation quality for precipitation. Two-way interaction results in net upward water fluxes in up to 25% of the basin area after the rainy season. In total, two-way interaction increases basin averaged recharge amounts. The evaluation with CPC and GLEAM indicates a better performance of the fully coupled simulation. The impact of groundwater coupling on LSM and atmospheric variables differs. Largest differences occur for the variable recharge (26%), whereas for atmospheric variables, the basin-averaged impact is minor (<1%). But locally, a spatial redistribution up to ±5% occurs for precipitation.

  19. Development of antibiotic resistance genes in microbial communities during long-term operation of anaerobic reactors in the treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2015-10-15

    Biological treatment processes offer the ideal conditions in which a high diversity of microorganisms can grow and develop. The wastewater produced during these processes is contaminated with antibiotics and, as such, they provide the ideal setting for the acquisition and proliferation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This research investigated the occurrence and variation in the ARGs found during the one-year operation of the anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) used to treat pharmaceutical wastewater that contained combinations of sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline-erythromycin (STE) and sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (ST). The existence of eighteen ARGs encoding resistance to sulfamethoxazole (sul1, sul2, sul3), erythromycin (ermA, ermF, ermB, msrA, ereA), tetracycline (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD, tetE, tetM, tetS, tetQ, tetW, tetX) and class Ι integron gene (intΙ 1) in the STE and ST reactors was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Due to the limited availability of primers to detect ARGs, Illumina sequencing was also performed on the sludge and effluent of the STE and ST reactors. Although there was good reactor performance in the SBRs, which corresponds to min 80% COD removal efficiency, tetA, tetB, sul1, sul2 and ermB genes were among those ARGs detected in the effluent from STE and ST reactors. A comparison of the ARGs acquired from the STE and ST reactors revealed that the effluent from the STE reactor had a higher number of ARGs than that from the ST reactor; this could be due to the synergistic effects of erythromycin. According to the expression of genes results, microorganisms achieve tetracycline and erythromycin resistance through a combination of three mechanisms: efflux pumping protein, modification of the antibiotic target and modifying enzymes. There was also a significant association between the presence of the class 1 integron and sulfamethoxazole resistance genes.

  20. Divergent selection for shape of the growth curve in Japanese quail. 8. Effect of long-term selection on embryonic development and growth.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Novotná, B; Starosta, F

    2015-04-01

    1. Changes in embryonic development and growth were analysed in relation to direct changes in postnatal growth and correlated responses in egg parameters using Japanese quail lines selected for more than 30 generations for high (HG) and low (LG) relative gain of body weight (BW) between 11 and 28 d of age, and constant BW at 49 d of age. 2. During the first 42 h as well as at the end of incubation, LG embryos were developmentally accelerated in comparison with their HG counterparts. An expected increase of line divergence across generations was observed only in traits analysed at the end of incubation. 3. In contrast to early generations, LG embryos continuously exhibited a higher BW than HG embryos and this difference temporarily disappeared only around incubation d 8. Analogous to early generations, the HG compared with LG embryos showed two periods of transient growth retardation compensated subsequently by a higher growth rate (incubation d 3-8 and 8-16). 4. More pronounced growth retardation of HG versus LG embryos in late versus early generations corresponded to more distinct decrease of HG versus LG growth rate during the first post-hatch days. Likewise, a disappearance of line BW differences on incubation d 8 characterising the late generations corresponded to the elimination of line differences in adult BW. 5. Alterations of growth pattern were associated with changes of egg size. While HG quail maintained a relatively constant adult BW and egg size across generations, the gradually increasing incidence of large eggs in the LG line allowed selection of birds with higher growth potential, which in turn amplified the line differences in the embryonic BW and eliminated the line differences in adult BW. Line differences in egg composition (larger albumen with lower density in LG compared with HG eggs) apparently contributed to the strengthening of line developmental divergence during incubation. 6. Transient lack of nutrient supply to HG embryos due to their

  1. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  2. Long-term plutonium storage: Design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, D.D.; Wood, W.T.; Guenther, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    An important part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is the development of facilities for long-term storage of plutonium. The WCR design goals are to provide storage for metals, oxides, pits, and fuel-grade plutonium, including material being held as part of the Strategic Reserve and excess material. Major activities associated with plutonium storage are sorting the plutonium inventory, material handling and storage support, shipping and receiving, and surveillance of material in storage for both safety evaluations and safeguards and security. A variety of methods for plutonium storage have been used, both within the DOE weapons complex and by external organizations. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of proposed storage concepts based upon functional criteria. The concepts discussed include floor wells, vertical and horizontal sleeves, warehouse storage on vertical racks, and modular storage units. Issues/factors considered in determining a preferred design include operational efficiency, maintenance and repair, environmental impact, radiation and criticality safety, safeguards and security, heat removal, waste minimization, international inspection requirements, and construction and operational costs.

  3. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  4. Long-Term Consequences of Neonatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of the central nervous system’s (CNS’s) sensory connectivity is driven by modality-specific sensory input in early life. For the somatosensory system, this input is the physical, tactile interaction with the environment. Nociceptive circuitry is functioning at the time of birth; however, there is still considerable organization and refinement of this circuitry that occurs postnatally, before full discrimination of tactile and noxious input is possible. This fine-tuning involves separation of tactile and nociceptive afferent input to the spinal cord’s dorsal horn and the maturation of local and descending inhibitory circuitry. Disruption of that input in early postnatal life (for example, by tissue injury or other noxious stimulus), can have a profound influence on subsequent development, and consequently the mature functioning of pain systems. In this review, the impact of neonatal surgical incision on nociceptive circuitry is discussed in terms of the underlying developmental neurobiology. The changes are complex, occurring at multiple anatomical sites within the CNS, and including both neuronal and glial cell populations. The altered sensory input from neonatal injury selectively modulates neuronal excitability within the spinal cord, disrupts inhibitory control, and primes the immune system, all of which contribute to the adverse long-term consequences of early pain exposure. PMID:26174217

  5. Long-term outcome in aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Villani, R; Tomei, G; Gaini, S M; Grimoldi, N; Spagnoli, D; Bello, L

    1995-03-01

    In this study, 78 patients with aqueductal stenosis were submitted to detailed neurodevelopmental assessment with a follow-up of 5-25 years. Sixty-eight percent of patients were categorized as normal; they either attended normal school courses or had regular jobs. Among these, 34% had some motor abnormalities (ataxia, mild hemiparesis, visual disturbances). Twenty-four percent (19 cases) were moderately disabled (trainable retardation) and 8% (6 cases) were severely handicapped. Epilepsy was observed in 13% of the cases. Incidence of recurrent and generalized seizures paralleled neurodevelopmental outcome (5% in normal, 16% in moderately disabled and 50% in severely disabled patients). Endocrine dysfunctions were evident in 28% of the cases and were characterized by precocious or delayed puberty, amenorrhea and somatic underdevelopment. No patient with ventricular enlargement and a cortical mantle width below 20 mm showed a good outcome. Large ventricles were compatible with normal mental development when compensated with a corresponding cranial vault enlargement. In patients with normal mental status and motor abnormalities, long-term CT scan findings revealed the presence of focal brain abnormalities (poroencephaly, brain atrophy, calcifications, extracerebral collections). PMID:7773981

  6. Long-term treatment outcome in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, I M; Rajasoorya, C R; Gamble, G D; Stewart, A W

    2003-08-01

    A number of groups have developed guidelines to indicate whether an individual with acromegaly has been cured by treatment. However, studies to date do not provide a robust definition of biochemical remission of the disorder based on correlation with long-term outcome. Available data suggest that those with a random serum growth hormone (GH) level of <2.5 microg/l, or a glucose-suppressed GH level of <1 microg/l following treatment have mortality figures indistinguishable from the general population. However, the confidence limits for these mortality estimates are quite wide. It remains possible that growth hormone levels lower than 1 microg/l for random samples, or even lower when using ultrasensitive GH assays, may indicate superior outcome, but this remains to be confirmed. There are limited data relating serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels to outcome, although normalisation of serum IGF-I clearly improves outcome compared with continued elevation of measurements after treatment. Current evidence suggests that a post-treatment random serum GH <2.5 microg/l and a normal serum IGF-I value defines biochemical cure. Available data suggest that achieving similar growth hormone levels after treatment also reduces the prevalence of chronic complications of the disorder, which is subsequently reflected in improved mortality. PMID:12914751

  7. Rural long-term care work, gender, and restructuring.

    PubMed

    Leach, Belinda; Joseph, Gillian

    2011-06-01

    Restructuring--the introduction of changes that alter the way health care is delivered for maximum efficiency and least cost--layered with rurality and with rural gender ideologies and practices, results in rural long-term care settings that have particular consequences for the women working in them, and for the residents and communities that they serve. This research investigated how rurality affects the implementation of patient classification in Ontario long-term care homes. Methods involved interviews and focus groups with front-line long-term care workers, administrators, and key participants. The findings revealed that rural long-term care delivery takes place when a restructured work environment intersects with gender ideologies and practices that take on particular characteristics when developed and sustained in a rural context. These factors shape the labor market and working conditions for rural women. We argue that this produces a uniquely rural experience for long-term care workers and conclude that those implementing classification systems must consider contextual factors as well as practical and financial exigencies. PMID:24650670

  8. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  9. Developing Continuity through Long-Term Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Michelle

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a project that set out to explore teachers' engagement with the issue of continuity in teaching, learning, and assessment as a central dimension of transition. The project revealed that teachers are deeply concerned with questions such as what progress students are making and how to maximise students' learning in the short and…

  10. Resilience and Robustness in Long-Term Planning of the National Energy and Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, Eduardo; Lavrenz, Steven; Gkritza, Konstantina; Mejia-Giraldo, Diego A.; Krishnan, Venkat; McCalley, James D.; Somani, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    The most significant energy consuming infrastructures and the greatest contributors to greenhouse gases for any developed nation today are electric and freight/passenger transportation systems. Technological alternatives for producing, transporting and converting energy for electric and transportation systems are numerous. Addressing costs, sustainability and resilience of electric and transportation needs requires long-term assessment since these capital-intensive infrastructures take years to build with lifetimes approaching a century. Yet, the advent of electrically driven transportation, including cars, trucks and trains, creates potential interdependencies between the two infrastructures that may be both problematic and beneficial. We are developing modelling capability to perform long-term electric and transportation infrastructure design at a national level, accounting for their interdependencies. The approach combines network flow modelling with a multi-objective solution method. We describe and compare it to the state of the art in energy planning models. An example is presented to illustrate important features of this new approach.

  11. 26 CFR 1.460-1 - Long-term contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... architectural, design, engineering, and construction management services, and the development or implementation... to design and manufacture a satellite and to develop computer software enabling B to operate the..., building, installation, or construction of property is a long-term contract under section 460 and...

  12. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and how to select appropriate candidates. PMID:21229127

  13. Long-term outcomes after severe shock.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Cristina M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Lanspa, Michael J; Wilson, Emily L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Brown, Samuel M

    2015-02-01

    Severe shock is a life-threatening condition with very high short-term mortality. Whether the long-term outcomes among survivors of severe shock are similar to long-term outcomes of other critical illness survivors is unknown. We therefore sought to assess long-term survival and functional outcomes among 90-day survivors of severe shock and determine whether clinical predictors were associated with outcomes. Seventy-six patients who were alive 90 days after severe shock (received ≥1 μg/kg per minute of norepinephrine equivalent) were eligible for the study. We measured 3-year survival and long-term functional outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the EuroQOL 5-D-3L, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and an employment instrument. We also assessed the relationship between in-hospital predictors and long-term outcomes. The mean long-term survival was 5.1 years; 82% (62 of 76) of patients survived, of whom 49 were eligible for follow-up. Patients who died were older than patients who survived. Thirty-six patients completed a telephone interview a mean of 5 years after hospital admission. The patients' Physical Functioning scores were below U.S. population norms (P < 0.001), whereas mental health scores were similar to population norms. Nineteen percent of the patients had symptoms of depression, 39% had symptoms of anxiety, and 8% had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Thirty-six percent were disabled, and 17% were working full-time. Early survivors of severe shock had a high 3-year survival rate. Patients' long-term physical and psychological outcomes were similar to those reported for cohorts of less severely ill intensive care unit survivors. Anxiety and depression were relatively common, but only a few patients had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This study supports the observation that acute illness severity does not determine long-term outcomes. Even extremely

  14. Scenarios for long-term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments data is described and summarized in this talk. The summary covers information presented at the First Workshop on Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis. Experiments representing e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions (LEP, B Factories and CLEO), ep collisions (H1 and ZEUS), p{bar p} collisions (CDF and D0) and others presented interesting information related to utilizing the large datasets collected over many years at these HEP facilities. Many questions and issues remain to be explored.

  15. Long-term Synoptic Observations of the Sun.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei

    2015-08-01

    Does the solar activity vary with time, or it remains constant? How systematic or intermittent solar cycles are? Long-term observations of the Sun are the reason we know answers to these questions. Ultimately, the development of a better understanding of stellar cycles will require similar long-term observations of other sun-like stars. To facilitate international collaboration on synoptic long-term solar observations, IAU created a working group on “Coordination of Synoptic Observations of the Sun.” The working group provides a forum for discussion of all issues relevant to past, current, and future synoptic programs, preservation, calibration, and access to synoptic solar data products. This talk will provide a summary of recent activity by this IAU WG. It will also present a brief overview of recent research on sun-as-a-star conducted at the US National Solar Observatory.

  16. Winning market positioning strategies for long term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L F; Weinstein, K; Arndt, K

    1997-01-01

    The decision to develop an aggressive marketing strategy for its long term care facility has become a priority for the management of a one-hundred bed facility in the Rocky Mountain West. Financial success and lasting competitiveness require that the facility in question (Deer Haven) establish itself as the preferred provider of long term care for its target market. By performing a marketing communications audit, Deer Haven evaluated its present market position and created a strategy for solidifying and dramatizing this position. After an overview of present conditions in the industry, we offer a seven step process that provides practical guidance for positioning a long term care facility. We conclude by providing an example application. PMID:10179063

  17. Long-term RNA persistence in postmortem contexts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNA) are generally considered fragile molecules that are readily degraded. However, there is growing documentation of long-term (from days to centuries) RNA persistence in a variety of contexts and tissue types, and as such a number of academic disciplines are beginning to exploit degraded RNA. While the reasons for its survival are not fully understood, there are several plausible mechanisms that would safeguard this molecule against degradation. However, after examining the literature available on the postmortem instability and decay mechanisms of RNA, it has become clear that limited experimental studies and no reviews offer an overview of these mechanisms. Hence in this review we outline molecular reasons for RNA surviving long-term postmortem, and provide specific examples of RNA survival in forensic, archival and archaeological contexts. A better understanding of the mechanisms of RNA decay will be crucial for developing expectations on its long-term survival. PMID:23618361

  18. Long-term Internship through Cooperative Education with Regional Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kenzo; Hase, Hiroyuki

    The long term internship is one of special educational programs for graduate students of Graduate School of Engineering in University of Fukui. This is a collaborative program between university and industries where selected post-graduate students are dispatched to companies for a long term and educated in real business environments. It is the final goal of the program to develop sophisticated specialists who would be able to catch the business strategy in industries and solve any problems by themselves. The program is managed in a semester (6 months) and contains 1.5 month prior education of preliminary special knowledge, ethics and secrecy, about 3 month dispatch with long-term internship, and 1.5 month post-education for complementary education and presentation. This paper presents the effect of this program which has been evolving since 2005.

  19. 18. Uniform cost accounting in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, J E

    1976-05-01

    Uniform cost data are essential for managing health services, establishing billing and reimbursement rates, and measuring effectiveness and impact. Although it is especially difficult in the case of long-term health care to develop standard cost accounting procedures because of the varied configurations of inpatient, intermediate, and ambulatory services, the overall approaches to cost accounting and its content can be made more uniform. With this purpose in mind, a general model of cost accounting is presented for a multilevel program of long-term services, together with a special method for ambulatory services using "hours accounted for" as the basic measure.

  20. Long-term results after intentional tooth reimplantation in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Caffesse, R G; Nasjleti, C E; Castelli, W A

    1977-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate histologically the long-term response to intentional tooth reimplantation in six rhesus monkeys. The study revealed that cervical and apical root resorption is a universal complication after tooth reimplantation and that arrested areas of resorption will show repair by deposition of cementum. A highly cellular periodontal membrane usually will develop. Periodontal fibers will reattach to reparative bone and cementum but seldom regain functional orientation. Partial or complete ankylosis may result. A further complication is progressive undermining resorption of the ankylosed teeth. Long-term studies are mandatory to evaluate the response to intentional tooth reimplantation.

  1. Neurohumoral reactions to long-term vestibular stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Nichiporuk, I A; Rapotkov, A N; Orlov, O I; Grigoriev, A I

    1993-02-01

    The main purposes of present work were: 1) to examine neurohumoral reactions to long-term vestibular stimulation provocative for MS symptoms in man; 2) to compare the peculiarities of neuroendocrine reactions to short-term and to long-term vestibular stimulation; 3) to analyze the received results from the position of neuroendocrine adaptive reactions biological conformity to natural laws, and its physiological importance for human organisms; 4) to make some prognostic points of neurohumoral reaction changes on health and capacity for work in subjects influenced by professional conditions, provocative for MS manifestation development.

  2. Thermospheric density long-term trend at high latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel technique that has been recently developed to estimate the thermospheric oxygen density using ionospheric measurements from EISCAT radars. The technique is based on an ion momentum equation, which takes into account the collisional interaction between neutrals and ions. We apply the technique to a 30-year long data set from the Tromso UHF radar, which for the first time allows us to evaluate the thermospheric density long-term trend at high latitude. The results are compared with the trend derived from satellite drag, which represents the long-term trend at lower latitudes.

  3. 18. Uniform cost accounting in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, J E

    1976-05-01

    Uniform cost data are essential for managing health services, establishing billing and reimbursement rates, and measuring effectiveness and impact. Although it is especially difficult in the case of long-term health care to develop standard cost accounting procedures because of the varied configurations of inpatient, intermediate, and ambulatory services, the overall approaches to cost accounting and its content can be made more uniform. With this purpose in mind, a general model of cost accounting is presented for a multilevel program of long-term services, together with a special method for ambulatory services using "hours accounted for" as the basic measure. PMID:819732

  4. Elder rights and the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Huber, R; Paton, R N; Kautz, J R

    1995-05-01

    Since 1975 the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program has grown and developed under the Older Americans Act (OAA) of 1965. With the passage of the Older Americans Act Amendments of 1992, this program was combined with other advocacy functions and placed in Title VII--Vulnerable Elder Rights Protection Activities. This article provides a historical overview of the policy, programmatic, and research issues that surround OAA and explains the activities of ombudsmen in their local communities and the roles many social workers perform under the auspices of long-term care ombudsman programs.

  5. Suppressive effects of long-term exposure to P-nitrophenol on gonadal development, hormonal profile with disruption of tissue integrity, and activation of caspase-3 in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Fayez, Mostafa; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Samir, Haney; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-07-01

    P-Nitrophenol (PNP) is considered to be one of nitrophenol derivatives of diesel exhaust particles. PNP is a major metabolite of some organophosphorus compounds. PNP is a persistent organic pollutant as well as one of endocrine-disrupting compounds. Consequently, bioaccumulation of PNP potentiates toxicity. The objectives of the current study were to assess in vivo adverse effects of long-term low doses of PNP exposure on reproductive system during development stage. Twenty-eight-day-old male Japanese quails were orally administered different doses of PNP (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1 mg/kg body weight) daily for 2.5 months. Testicular histopathology, hormones, caspase-3 (CASP3), and claudin-1 (CLDN1) tight junction protein, as well as plasma hormones were analyzed. The results revealed that long-term PNP exposure caused testicular histopathological changes such as vacuolation of spermatogenic cell and spermatocyte with significant testicular and cloacal gland atrophy. PNP activated CASP3 enzyme that is an apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase. Besides, it disrupted the expression of CLDN1. Furthermore, a substantial decrease in plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone was observed after 2 and 2.5 months in the PNP-treated groups. Meanwhile, the pituitary LH did not significantly change. Site of action of PNP may be peripheral on testicular development and/or centrally on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through reduction of pulsatile secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone. Consequently, it may reduce the sensitivity of the anterior pituitary gland to secrete LH. In conclusion, PNP induced profound endocrine disruption in the form of hormonal imbalance, induction of CASP3, and disruption of CLDN1 expression in the testis. Hence, it may hinder the reproductive processes.

  6. Indium-111-monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies after the first year of heart transplantation. Identification of risk groups for developing rejection during long-term follow-up and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, M.; Obrador, D.; Carrio, I.; Auge, J.M.; Moya, C.; Pons-Llado, G.; Caralps-Riera, J.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The long-term clinical course and results of biopsies in 21 patients studied with monoclonal antimyosin antibodies more than 12 months after heart transplantation according to the presence and degree of antimyosin-antibody uptake is described. Eighteen men and three women aged 20-52 years (39 +/- 9 years) were studied with antimyosin antibodies 12-40 months (mean, 22 +/- 9 months) after heart transplantation, and followed for a mean of 18 months (10-28 months). The number of biopsies performed during follow-up was 102. Results showed normal antimyosin-antibody studies in nine patients and abnormal studies in 12 patients. Myocyte damage was identified in 18 of the 102 biopsies (17.6%), one in the normal antimyosin-antibody group of patients and 17 in those patients with myocardial antimyosin-antibody uptake. Patients who developed rejection comprised 11% and 67% of each respective group; the mean number of rejection episodes per patient was 0.11 +/- 0.33 and 1.41 +/- 1.41, respectively (p less than 0.01). A trend was noted by which higher heart-to-lung ratios were associated with greater probability of rejection. Conclusively, (1) antimyosin-antibody studies performed after more than 1 year after heart transplantation indicate the presence and level of rejection activity, (2) groups of patients at risk for developing rejection at biopsy during long-term follow-up may be detected by antimyosin-antibody study, and (3) surveillance for rejection and the degree of immunosuppression should be tailored to meet individual patient needs.

  7. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light

  8. Characteristics of Long-Term First Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenell, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated characteristics of long-term first marriages (over 20 years). Findings from 147 couples revealed: lifetime commitment to marriage, loyalty to spouse, strong moral values, respect for spouse as best friend, commitment to sexual fidelity, desire to be good parent, faith in God, desire to please and support spouse, good companion to…

  9. Long Term Transfer Effect of Metaphoric Allusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David A.; Mateja, John A.

    A study was conducted to investigate the long term transfer effect of metaphoric allusion used to clarify unfamiliar subject matter. Forty-nine high school students were given unfamiliar prose materials variously augmented by metaphoric allusion. The subjects' immediate performance on a transfer task was compared to their performance on an…

  10. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  11. Evaluating Long-Term Disability Insurance Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jan

    1992-01-01

    This report analyzes the factors involved in reviewing benefits and services of employer-sponsored group long-term disability plans for higher education institutions. Opening sections describe the evolution of disability insurance and its shape today. Further sections looks at the complex nature of "value" within a plan, relationship between plan…

  12. The long term characteristics of greenschist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The greenschist in the Jinping II Hydropower Station in southwest China exhibits continuous creep behaviour because of the geological conditions in the region. This phenomenon illustrates the time-dependent deformation and progressive damage that occurs after excavation. In this study, the responses of greenschist to stress over time were determined in a series of laboratory tests on samples collected from the access tunnel walls at the construction site. The results showed that the greenschist presented time-dependent behaviour under long-term loading. The samples generally experienced two stages: transient creep and steady creep, but no accelerating creep. The periods of transient creep and steady creep increased with increasing stress levels. The long-term strength of the greenschist was identified based on the variation of creep strain and creep rate. The ratio of long-term strength to conventional strength was around 80% and did not vary much with confining pressures. A quantitative method for predicting the failure period of greenschist, based on analysis of the stress-strain curve, is presented and implemented. At a confining pressure of 40 MPa, greenschist was predicted to fail in 5000 days under a stress of 290 MPa and to fail in 85 days under the stress of 320 MPa, indicating that the long-term strength identified by the creep rate and creep strain is a reliable estimate.

  13. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  14. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  15. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  16. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  17. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  18. Plutonium packaging and long-term storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jane A.; Wedman, Douglas E.

    2000-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) packaging line at Los Alamos National Laboratory can successfully package plutonium to meet DOE requirements for safe long-term storage. The ARIES system has just completed the disassembly and conversion of its first cores ("pits") for nuclear weapons.

  19. Bipolar implantable stimulator for long-term denervated-muscle experiments.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R G

    1998-03-01

    A micropower bipolar implantable stimulator has been developed and tested for long-term (four weeks-six months) use in experiments involving the stimulation of denervated skeletal muscle. Implantable stimulators are typically operated from a single lithium battery at 3 V. After the first week of denervation, stimulation of denervated muscles of rats requires voltages in the range of 6-12 V. The stimulator described can deliver voltages up to 15 V, with variable pulsewidth, frequency and duty cycle. All stimulation parameters are set prior to implantation by selection of appropriate resistors and capacitors. Each primary failure mode for implantable stimulators is addressed. Long-term reliability rates in excess of 95% are achievable if the construction details are followed closely. Methods for battery power management, circuit component selection, electrode construction and encapsulation are described in detail. This device is not intended for use in humans. PMID:9684464

  20. Session 6: Infant nutrition: future research developments in Europe EARNEST, the early nutrition programming project: EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, M S

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence from lifetime experimental studies in animals and observational and experimental studies in human subjects suggests that pre- and postnatal nutrition programme long-term health. However, key unanswered questions remain on the extent of early-life programming in contemporary European populations, relevant nutritional exposures, critical time periods, mechanisms and the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or reverse programming effects. The EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research (EARNEST) consortium brings together a multi-disciplinary team of scientists from European research institutions in an integrated programme of work that includes experimental studies in human subjects, modern prospective observational studies and mechanistic animal work including physiological studies, cell-culture models and molecular techniques. Theme 1 tests early nutritional programming of disease in human subjects, measuring disease markers in childhood and early adulthood in nineteen randomised controlled trials of nutritional interventions in pregnancy and infancy. Theme 2 examines associations between early nutrition and later outcomes in large modern European population-based prospective studies, with detailed measures of diet in pregnancy and early life. Theme 3 uses animal, cellular and molecular techniques to study lifetime effects of early nutrition. Biomedical studies are complemented by studies of the social and economic importance of programming (themes 4 and 5), and themes encouraging integration, communication, training and wealth creation. The project aims to: help formulate policies on the composition and testing of infant foods; improve the nutritional value of infant formulas; identify interventions to prevent and reverse adverse early nutritional programming. In addition, it has the potential to develop new products through industrial