Science.gov

Sample records for addressing needed improvements

  1. Coast Guard: Continued Improvements Needed to Address Potential Barriers to Equal Employment Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    2011 to help it assess the actions it has taken to improve its provision of EEO services, including counseling and training, to USCG personnel. The...organizational structure, and replacing part-time civil rights service providers or counseling staff with full-time staff, with the intent to improve its...civilian Civil Rights Service Providers (CRSPs) provide these services in the form of EO/EEO counseling , complaint investigation/processing, and EO

  2. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP). A Public-Private Partnership Addressing Wind Energy Forecast Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczak, James M.; Finley, Cathy; Freedman, Jeff; Cline, Joel; Bianco, L.; Olson, J.; Djalaova, I.; Sheridan, L.; Ahlstrom, M.; Manobianco, J.; Zack, J.; Carley, J.; Benjamin, S.; Coulter, R. L.; Berg, Larry K.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Clawson, K.; Natenberg, E.; Marquis, M.

    2015-10-30

    The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a public-private research program, the goals of which are to improve the accuracy of short-term (0-6 hr) wind power forecasts for the wind energy industry and then to quantify the economic savings that accrue from more efficient integration of wind energy into the electrical grid. WFIP was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with partners that include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), private forecasting companies (WindLogics and AWS Truepower), DOE national laboratories, grid operators, and universities. WFIP employed two avenues for improving wind power forecasts: first, through the collection of special observations to be assimilated into forecast models to improve model initial conditions; and second, by upgrading NWP forecast models and ensembles. The new observations were collected during concurrent year-long field campaigns in two high wind energy resource areas of the U.S. (the upper Great Plains, and Texas), and included 12 wind profiling radars, 12 sodars, 184 instrumented tall towers and over 400 nacelle anemometers (provided by private industry), lidar, and several surface flux stations. Results demonstrate that a substantial improvement of up to 14% relative reduction in power root mean square error (RMSE) was achieved from the combination of improved NOAA numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and assimilation of the new observations. Data denial experiments run over select periods of time demonstrate that up to a 6% relative improvement came from the new observations. The use of ensemble forecasts produced even larger forecast improvements. Based on the success of WFIP, DOE is planning follow-on field programs.

  3. Vexatious Litigants and the ADA: Strategies to Fairly Address the Need to Improve Access for Individuals with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hull, Helia Garrido

    2016-01-01

    This Article addresses the need to reform the ADA to prevent vexatious litigation and to promote the underlying goals of the Act. Part I of this Article introduces the topic of vexatious litigation and the importance of remedying the effects of exploitation of the ADA. Part II provides an overview of the ADA and its efforts to increase accessibility to individuals with disabilities, emphasizing the provisions of the Act that create incentives to engage in vexatious litigation. Part III examines and analyzes the judiciary's response to vexatious litigation under the ADA, and sanctions that have been issued to limit exploitation. Finally, Part IV provides recommendations to reform the ADA and state disability law counterparts, suggests corrective actions to address vexatious litigation, and identifies methods to promote equality for individuals with disabilities.

  4. Improving the implementation of an early literacy program by child health nurses through addressing local training and cultural needs.

    PubMed

    Hewer, Lee-anne; Whyatt, David

    2006-10-01

    This study evaluates the implementation of an early literacy program by child health nurses (CHNs) in Geraldton and the Midwest regions of Western Australia. Children's early preschool exposure to reading is an important step in developing literacy skills in later schooling. The program aims to improve early literacy development by supplying parents with an appropriate book and information on reading to children at the child's seven-to-nine months of age health check. This study highlights the potential role of CHNs in encouraging early literacy in regional communities. However, a barrier to the successful implementation of the program was found to be its dependence on attendance at a predetermined health check. This was especially so for the Aboriginal population, which had a significantly lower attendance rate. Dependence on personal and professional experience amongst CHNs also resulted in sub-optimal implementation of the program. Recommendations to broaden the scope of the intervention, in timing and location, and to develop appropriate training for CHNs are discussed. It is shown that the implementation of such evidence-based programs must address local community and service provider issues to reach their full potential.

  5. U.S. Transportation Command Needs Further Improvements to Address Performance Concerns Over the Global Privately Owned Vehicle Contract 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-03

    Transportation Financial Management System access to the contracting officer’s representatives to perform their responsibilities in the quality assurance... Management System access to contracting officer representatives to perform their responsibilities in the quality assurance surveillance plan. U.S...Distribution Command (SDDC) management personnel did not implement adequate controls to ensure proper contract oversight and address performance concerns

  6. Future prospects for prophylactic immune stimulation in crustacean aquaculture - the need for improved metadata to address immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Hauton, Chris; Hudspith, Meggie; Gunton, Laetitia

    2015-02-01

    Future expansion of the crustacean aquaculture industry will be required to ensure global food security. However, this expansion must ensure: (a) that natural resources (including habitat use and fish meal) are sustainably exploited, (b) that the socio-economic development of producing nations is safeguarded, and (c) that the challenge presented by crustacean diseases is adequately met. Conventionally, the problem of disease in crustacean aquaculture has been addressed through prophylactic administration of stimulants, additives or probiotics. However, these approaches have been questioned both experimentally and philosophically. In this review, we argue that real progress in the field of crustacean immune stimulants has now slowed, with only incremental advances now being made. We further contend that an overt focus on the immune effector response has been misguided. In light of the wealth of new data reporting immune system complexity, a more refined approach is necessary - one that must consider the important role played by pattern recognition proteins. In support of this more refined approach, there is now a much greater requirement for the reporting of essential metadata. We propose a broad series of recommendations regarding the 'Minimum Information required to support a Stimulant Assessment experiment' (MISA guidelines) to foster new progression within the field.

  7. Building technology services that address student needs.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Jeanne M; Lombardo, Nancy T; Wimmer, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A 16-question technology use survey was conducted to assess incoming health sciences students' knowledge of and interest in current technologies, and to identify student device and tool preferences. Survey questions were developed by colleagues at a peer institution and then edited to match this library's student population. Two years of student responses have been compiled, compared, and reviewed as a means for informing library decisions related to technology and resource purchases. Instruction and event programming have been revised to meet student preferences. Based on the number of students using Apple products, librarians are addressing the need to become more proficient with this platform.

  8. Addressing the Needs of Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews studies on the plight and needs of homeless students. Includes reports on family mobility and school attendance, dysfunctional families, and school intervention strategies. (Contains 11 references.) (PKP)

  9. Medical-Legal Partnerships: Addressing Competency Needs Through Lawyers

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Edward; Fullerton, Danya Fortess; Cohen, Ellen; Lawton, Ellen; Ryan, Anne; Sandel, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background Many low- and moderate-income individuals and families have at least one unmet legal need (for example, unsafe housing conditions, lack of access to food and/or income support, lack of access to health care), which, if left unaddressed, can have harmful consequences on health. Eighty unique medical-legal partnership programs, serving over 180 clinics and hospitals nationwide, seek to combine the strengths of medical and legal professionals to address patients' legal needs before they become crises. Each partnership is adapted to serve the specific needs of its own patient base. Intervention This article describes innovative, residency-based medical-legal partnership educational experiences in pediatrics, internal medicine, and family medicine at 3 different sites (Boston, Massachusetts; Newark, New Jersey; and Tucson, Arizona). This article addresses how these 3 programs have been designed to meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 competencies, along with suggested methods for evaluating the effectiveness of these programs. Training is a core component of medical-legal partnership, and most medical-legal partnerships have developed curricula for resident education in a variety of formats, including noon conferences, grand rounds, poverty simulations and day-long special sessions. Discussion Medical-legal partnerships combine the skill sets of medical professionals and lawyers to teach social determinants of health by training residents and attending physicians to identify and help address unmet legal needs. Medical-legal partnership doctors and lawyers treat health disparities and improve patient health and well-being by ensuring that public programs, regulations, and laws created to benefit health and improve access to health care are implemented and enforced. PMID:21975996

  10. Strategic Science to Address Current and Future Space Weather Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Schwadron, N.; Antiochos, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bisi, M. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kamalabadi, F.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Tobiska, W. K.; Weimer, D. R.; Withers, P.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) program has contributed a wealth of scientific knowledge that is relevant to space weather and user needs. A targeted approach to science questions has resulted in leveraging new scientific knowledge to improve not only our understanding of the Heliophysics domain, but also to develop predictive capabilities in key areas of LWS science. This fascinating interplay between science and applications promises to benefit both domains. Scientists providing feedback to the LWS program are now discussing an evolution of the targeted approach that explicitly considers how new science improves, or enables, predictive capability directly. Long-term program goals are termed "Strategic Science Areas" (SSAs) that address predictive capabilities in six specific areas: geomagnetically induced currents, satellite drag, solar energetic particles, ionospheric total electron content, radio frequency scintillation induced by the ionosphere, and the radiation environment. SSAs are organized around user needs and the impacts of space weather on society. Scientists involved in the LWS program identify targeted areas of research that reference (or bear upon) societal needs. Such targeted science leads to new discoveries and is one of the valid forms of exploration. In this talk we describe the benefits of targeted science, and how addressing societal impacts in an appropriate way maintains the strong science focus of LWS, while also leading to its broader impacts.

  11. Addressing the spiritual needs of American Indians: predictors of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R; Wolosin, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Spirituality is instrumental to health and wellness in many American Indian (AI) cultures. Although the Joint Commission requires spiritual assessments to identify and address clients' spiritual needs during hospitalization, little is known about the operationalization of this process for American Indians (AIs). To address this gap in the literature, the present study employed a national sample of AIs (N = 1,281) to identify predictors of satisfaction with the manner in which their spiritual needs were addressed. The results suggest the discharge process, physicians, room quality, and nurses play important roles in satisfactorily addressing AIs' spiritual needs. Of these, the discharge process had the largest effect on satisfaction, underscoring the salience of social workers in addressing the spiritual needs of hospitalized AIs.

  12. Addressing the Mathematics-Specific Needs of Beginning Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Beginning mathematics teachers at the secondary level (middle and high school grades) have mathematics-specific needs that induction programs should address more substantially. However, a number of issues in how programs can accomplish this are more complex than often framed in discussions occurring in the induction programs and the field of…

  13. Imulation of polymer forming processes - addressing industrial needs

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, F.; DiRaddo, R.

    2011-05-04

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of simulation and design optimization capabilities, for polymer forming processes, in the context of addressing industrial needs. Accomplishments generated from close to twenty years of research in this field, at the National Research Council (NRC), are presented. Polymer forming processes such as extrusion blow moulding, stretch blow moulding and thermoforming have been the focus of the work, yet the research is extendable to similar polymer forming operations such as micro-blow moulding, sheet blow moulding and composites stamping. The research considers material models, process sequence integration and design optimization, derivative processes and 3D finite elements with multi-body contact.

  14. Simulation of Polymer Forming PROCESSES—ADDRESSING Industrial Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, F.; DiRaddo, R.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of simulation and design optimization capabilities, for polymer forming processes, in the context of addressing industrial needs. Accomplishments generated from close to twenty years of research in this field, at the National Research Council (NRC), are presented. Polymer forming processes such as extrusion blow moulding, stretch blow moulding and thermoforming have been the focus of the work, yet the research is extendable to similar polymer forming operations such as micro-blow moulding, sheet blow moulding and composites stamping. The research considers material models, process sequence integration and design optimization, derivative processes and 3D finite elements with multi-body contact.

  15. Addressing the repressed needs of the Arabic client.

    PubMed

    Dwairy, M

    1997-01-01

    In comparison to families in Western society, the traditional Arabic family plays a relatively greater role in providing support for adult progeny. This serves to condition adult offspring to continue to comply with the will and values of the family. Therefore, in exchange for familial support, Arabic individuals learn to repress authentic needs and emotions, and within that process they relinquish the need for self-actualization. Arabic society discourages individualism and opposes self-actualization by means of simultaneous punishment and moralization. Thus, there is a relatively greater development of the social value system (or superego) and comparatively less development of the self (or ego). In comparison to Western society, Arabic individuals continue to experience greater oppression during adulthood. Given these cultural differences, the processes of reliving and activating repressed needs and emotions, which ultimately serves to promote self-actualization, will transform intrapsychic conflicts into interpersonal and social ones. Thus, personal actions typically encouraged during Western psychotherapy are likely to produce significant social oppression. Indeed, promoting awareness of repressed needs and emotions often leads the Arabic client to become more helpless, because such wishes will rarely be socially sanctioned or satisfactorily fulfilled. Therefore, when addressing repressed needs and emotions in psychotherapy, ego strength, cultural identity, and degree of strictness of the client's family of origin must be considered.

  16. Pandemic Influenza Planning: Addressing the Needs of Children

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Lisa; Cordell, Ralph; Delozier, David; Gorman, Susan; Koenig, Linda J.; Odom, Erica; Polder, Jacquelyn; Randolph, Jean; Shimabukuro, Tom; Singleton, Christa

    2009-01-01

    Children represent one quarter of the US population. Because of its enormous size and special needs, it is critically important to address this population group in pandemic influenza planning. Here we describe the ways in which children are vulnerable in a pandemic, provide an overview of existing plans, summarize the resources available, and, given our experience with influenza A(H1N1), outline the evolving lessons we have learned with respect to planning for a severe influenza pandemic. We focus on a number of issues affecting children—vaccinations, medication availability, hospital capacity, and mental health concerns—and emphasize strategies that will protect children from exposure to the influenza virus, including infection control practices and activities in schools and child care programs. PMID:19797738

  17. Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Lee; Southammakosane, Cathy; Lewin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent parenthood is associated with a range of adverse outcomes for young mothers, including mental health problems such as depression, substance abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Teen mothers are also more likely to be impoverished and reside in communities and families that are socially and economically disadvantaged. These circumstances can adversely affect maternal mental health, parenting, and behavior outcomes for their children. In this report, we provide an overview of the mental health challenges associated with teen parenthood, barriers that often prevent teen mothers from seeking mental health services, and interventions for this vulnerable population that can be integrated into primary care services. Pediatricians in the primary care setting are in a unique position to address the mental health needs of adolescent parents because teens often turn to them first for assistance with emotional and behavioral concerns. Consequently, pediatricians can play a pivotal role in facilitating and encouraging teen parents’ engagement in mental health treatment. PMID:24298010

  18. GRACEnet: addressing policy needs through coordinated cross-location research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jawson, Michael D.; Walthall, Charles W.; Shafer, Steven R.; Liebig, Mark; Franzluebbers, Alan J.; Follett, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    GRACEnet (Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network) was conceived to build upon ongoing USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) research to improve soil productivity, while addressing the challenges and opportunities of interest in C sequestration from a climate change perspective. The vision for GRACEnet was and remains: Knowledge and information used to implement scientifically based agricultural management practices from the field to national policy scales on C sequestration, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and environmental benefits. The national focus of GRACEnet uses a standardized approach by ARS laboratories and university and land manager (e.g. farmer and rancher) cooperators to assess C sequestration and GHG emission from different crop and grassland systems. Since 2002, GRACEnet has significantly expanded GHG mitigation science and delivered usable information to agricultural research and policy organizations. Recent developments suggest GRACEnet will have international impact by contributing leadership and technical guidance for the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases.

  19. Addressing the needs of people with disability in Nepal: The urgent need.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Yuba Raj; Dariang, Maureen; Keeling, Stephen J; Mehata, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    Health planners and policy makers often overlook the needs of people with disability (PWDs) in less developed countries such as Nepal. The aftermath of conflict and earthquake has further escalated the need of people with disability in Nepal. While the country is preparing for the implementation of a national health sector strategy for the next five years and when the health system is being restructured, we believe that this is the right time to address needs of people with disability by strengthening the health system and operationalizing community based rehabilitation. Furthermore, there is a need of a standard database and monitoring system to regularly assess social inclusion of people with disability.

  20. Understanding and Addressing the Global Need for Orthopaedic Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Harding, Kiran J; von Keudell, Arvind; Zirkle, Lewis G; Meara, John G; Dyer, George S M

    2016-11-02

    ➤The burden of musculoskeletal trauma is high worldwide, disproportionately affecting the poor, who have the least access to quality orthopaedic trauma care.➤Orthopaedic trauma care is essential, and must be a priority in the horizontal development of global health systems.➤The education of surgeons, nonphysician clinicians, and ancillary staff in low and middle income countries is central to improving access to and quality of care.➤Volunteer surgical missions from rich countries can sustainably expand and strengthen orthopaedic trauma care only when they serve a local need and build local capacity.➤Innovative business models may help to pay for care of the poor. Examples include reducing costs through process improvements and cross-subsidizing from profitable high-volume activities.➤Resource-poor settings may foster innovations in devices or systems with universal applicability in orthopaedics.

  1. Little Known, Much Needed: Addressing the Cocurricular Needs of LGBTQ Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivory, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the invisible nature of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) undergraduate population, it is difficult for student affairs professionals at community colleges to identify and address the needs of sexual minority students on campus. Given the lack of literature regarding LGBTQ students at community colleges, student…

  2. What resources? Addressing the needs of the epilepsy community.

    PubMed

    Brown, S W

    1995-09-01

    Epilepsy is a condition which spans several disciplines within medicine, as well as having an impact on many non-medical areas such as employment and education. Services for epilepsy in the UK have not been developed according to any coherent strategy and remain fragmented and unevenly distributed. Successive attempts to address these shortcomings by publishing recommendations, even with government assistance, have not led to major improvements. Recent changes in the organization of health care services might at least present an opportunity to effect change by educational initiatives directed towards purchasers and providers. However, the absence of epilepsy from The Health of the Nation objectives represents a failure to get the message through to those with the ability to direct policy. The plethora of new, effective and expensive pharmaceutical treatments should lead to a raising of epilepsy awareness among the medical profession as a consequence of marketing activity, but this is already causing conflict with Family Health Service Associations (FHSAs) and others with equivalent lack of vision. I would suggest that only by politicizing the consumer can the change we seek be brought about.

  3. Addressing the needs of traumatic brain injury with clinical proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurotrauma or injuries to the central nervous system (CNS) are a serious public health problem worldwide. Approximately 75% of all traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are concussions or other mild TBI (mTBI) forms. Evaluation of concussion injury today is limited to an assessment of behavioral symptoms, often with delay and subject to motivation. Hence, there is an urgent need for an accurate chemical measure in biofluids to serve as a diagnostic tool for invisible brain wounds, to monitor severe patient trajectories, and to predict survival chances. Although a number of neurotrauma marker candidates have been reported, the broad spectrum of TBI limits the significance of small cohort studies. Specificity and sensitivity issues compound the development of a conclusive diagnostic assay, especially for concussion patients. Thus, the neurotrauma field currently has no diagnostic biofluid test in clinical use. Content We discuss the challenges of discovering new and validating identified neurotrauma marker candidates using proteomics-based strategies, including targeting, selection strategies and the application of mass spectrometry (MS) technologies and their potential impact to the neurotrauma field. Summary Many studies use TBI marker candidates based on literature reports, yet progress in genomics and proteomics have started to provide neurotrauma protein profiles. Choosing meaningful marker candidates from such ‘long lists’ is still pending, as only few can be taken through the process of preclinical verification and large scale translational validation. Quantitative mass spectrometry targeting specific molecules rather than random sampling of the whole proteome, e.g., multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), offers an efficient and effective means to multiplex the measurement of several candidates in patient samples, thereby omitting the need for antibodies prior to clinical assay design. Sample preparation challenges specific to TBI are addressed. A

  4. Addressing the burden of epilepsy: Many unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Ettore

    2016-05-01

    the presence of comorbidity. Although in several countries the costs of epilepsy are met by the national health systems, out-of-pocket costs may be a relevant fraction of the overall costs, especially in countries where the public management of health care is suboptimal or non-existent. Epilepsy strongly affects patients' independence, psychological health and emotional adjustment. Epilepsy impairs all aspects of health-related quality of life. Awareness and attitudes of the public about epilepsy may significantly affect the burden of the disease. All these factors add to the burden of the disease. However, many of the factors implicated in the onset of epilepsy, its course and treatment can be favorably addressed with appropriate strategic plans. More research is needed to investigate and manage the medical and psychosocial implications of epilepsy.

  5. Assessing and Addressing Students' Scientific Literacy Needs in Physical Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell-Stone, E. A.; Myers, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    Exacting excellence equally from university students around the globe can be accomplished by providing all students with necessary background tools to achieve mastery of their courses, even if those tools are not part of normal content. As instructors we hope to see our students grasp the substance of our courses, make mental connections between course material and practical applications, and use this knowledge to make informed decisions as citizens. Yet many educators have found that students enter university-level introductory courses in mathematics, science and engineering without adequate academic preparation. As part of a FIPSE-funded project at the University of Wyoming, the instructors of the Physical Geology course have taken a new approach to tackling the problem of lack of scientific/mathematic skills in incoming students. Instead of assuming that students should already know or will learn these skills on their own, they assess students' needs and provide them the opportunity to master scientific literacies as they learn geologic content. In the introductory geology course, instructors identified two categories of literacies, or basic skills that are necessary for academic success and citizen participation. Fundamental literacies include performing simple quantitative calculations, making qualitative assessments, and reading and analyzing tables and graphs. Technical literacies are those specific to understanding geology, and comprise the ability to read maps, visualize changes through time, and conceptualize in three dimensions. Because these skills are most easily taught in lab, the in-house lab manual was rewritten to be both literacy- and content-based. Early labs include simple exercises addressing literacies in the context of geological science, and each subsequent lab repeats exposure to literacies, but at increasing levels of difficulty. Resources available to assist students with literacy mastery include individual instruction, a detailed

  6. Addressing the clinical needs of problem drug user patients

    PubMed Central

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I.; Graves, Meredith C.; Atkins, David C.; Maynard, Charles; Bumgardner, Kristin; Donovan, Dennis; Ries, Richard; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Illicit drug use is a serious public health problem associated with significant co-occurring medical disorders, mental disorders, and social problems. Yet most individuals with drug use disorders have never been treated, though they often seek medical treatment in primary care. The purpose of the present study was to examine baseline characteristics of persons presenting in primary care across a range of problem drug use severity to identify their clinical needs. Methods We examined socio-demographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, drug use severity, social and legal problems, and service utilization for 868 patients with drug problems recruited from primary care clinics in a safety-net medical setting. Based on Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) results, individuals were categorized as having low, intermediate, or substantial/severe drug use severity. Results Patients with substantial/severe drug use severity had serious drug use (opiates, stimulants, sedatives, intravenous drug use), high levels of homelessness (50%), psychiatric comorbidity (69%), arrests for serious crimes (24%), and frequent use of expensive emergency department and inpatient hospitals. Patients with low drug use severity were primarily users of marijuana with little reported use of other drugs, less psychiatric co-morbidity, and more stable lifestyles. Patients with intermediate drug use severity fell in-between the substantial/severe and low drug use severity subgroups on most variables. Conclusions Patients with highest drug use severity are likely to require specialized psychiatric and substance abuse care in addition to ongoing medical care that is equipped to address the consequences of severe/substantial drug use including intravenous drug use. Because of their milder symptoms, patients with low drug use severity may benefit from a collaborative care model that integrates psychiatric and substance abuse care in the primary care setting. Patients

  7. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  8. Designing Interactive Multimedia Instruction to Address Soldiers’ Learning Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    learners’ experiences , background knowledge, and job-specific requirements. Here, we describe the process used and rationale for our approach to...According to Clark and Mayer (2008), these critical design features address three goals: (a) reducing extrinsic cognitive processing , (b) managing...intrinsic cognitive processing , and (c) facilitating generative processing . Table 5 summarizes the features of well-designed IMI identified by Mayer

  9. Addressing the Need for Electronic Communication in Foreign Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeLoup, Jean W.; Ponterio, Robert

    Use of electronic communication options to access foreign language teaching resources is discussed, illustrated with examples from programs and applications found in New York State. The discussion is divided into four sections, each addressing an aspect of electronic communication for preparing for and teaching a foreign language: issues of access…

  10. Southwest Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002, authorized the Southwest Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), whose members represent the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, to identify and prioritize the region's educational needs and recommend how those needs can be met. The Southwest RAC conducted three public…

  11. Pacific Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report represents the deliberations of the Pacific Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), one of 10 RACs established under the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002 to assess the educational needs of the region. The committee's report outlines educational needs across the state, districts, and territories of Hawai'i, the Commonwealth of…

  12. Appalachian Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Appalachia Regional Advisory Committee (Appalachia RAC), one of 10 RACs established under the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002 (20 U.S.C. sections 9601 et. seq.) to assess the educational needs of the region. The Committee's report outlines the educational needs across the four states of…

  13. Pediatric medical devices: a look at significant US legislation to address unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Samuels-Reid, Joy H; Blake, Erica D

    2014-03-01

    There are many barriers to the availability of medical devices intended for the pediatric population causing healthcare providers to use creative measures to address pediatric unmet device needs. The USA has taken significant legislative measures to spur medical device development and address the unmet needs in all pediatric subpopulations. For example, the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002 amended the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act by adding new provisions intended to promote the development of safe and effective pediatric devices, and to protect the pediatric population during clinical trials. In 2004, the Medical Devices Technical Corrections Act was added to address potential difficulties in bringing pediatric devices to the market. Further, the Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act of 2007 and the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 provided the FDA significant new responsibilities and authorities regarding pediatric use.

  14. A Coordinated Effort to Address Space Weather and Environment Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joe; Spann, James F.; Edward, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Gallagher, Dennis; Xapos, Mike; DeGroh, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for coordination of the many aspects of space environments is directly related to our increasing dependence on space assets. An obvious result is that there is a need for a coordinated effort to organize and make accessible the increasing number of space environment products that include space environment models and observations, material testing, and forecasting tools. This paper outlines a concept to establish a NASA-level Applied Spaceflight Environments (ASE) office that will provide coordination and funding for sustained multi-program support in three technical areas; (1) natural environments characterization and modeling, (2) environmental effects on materials and systems, (3) and operational and forecasting space environments modeling. Additionally the ASE office will serve as an entry point of contact for external users who wish to take advantage of data and assets associated with space environments, including space weather.

  15. EnvironMentors: Addressing the need for STEM education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, John

    This study is an evaluation of the EnvironMentors program. A nationwide program, EnvironMentors seeks to boost participation in environmentally-related STEM fields through academic mentorship. Chapter one provides an overview of the issue and need for this research. In chapter two, survey data is analyzed in order to determine the importance of student demographics. In chapter three, an interpretive review of the mentor experience is explored. The final chapter provides synthesis and recommendations for EnvironMentors administrators.

  16. Western Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    During a four-week period (May 23, 2011-June 21, 2011), the Western Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) held a series of public meetings to solicit input and deliberate on key educational needs facing the four states in the region--Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. A two-day, face-to-face, public meeting was held May 23-24, 2011 in Arlington,…

  17. Addressing the Need for Independence in the CSE Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Ferragut, Erik M; Sheldon, Frederick T; Grimaila, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information system security risk, defined as the product of the monetary losses associated with security incidents and the probability that they occur, is a suitable decision criterion when considering different information system architectures. Risk assessment is the widely accepted process used to understand, quantify, and document the effects of undesirable events on organizational objectives so that risk management, continuity of operations planning, and contingency planning can be performed. One technique, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES), is a methodology for estimating security costs to stakeholders as a function of possible risk postures. In earlier works, we presented a computational infrastructure that allows an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the loss that each stakeholder stands to sustain, as a result of security breakdowns. Additional work has applied CSES to specific business cases. The current state-of-the-art of CSES addresses independent events. In typical usage, analysts create matrices that capture their expert opinion, and then use those matrices to quantify costs to stakeholders. This expansion generalizes CSES to the common real-world case where events may be dependent.

  18. Social Entrepreneurship in Religious Congregations’ Efforts to Address Health Needs

    PubMed Central

    Werber, Laura; Mendel, Peter J.; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Examine how religious congregations engage in social entrepreneurship as they strive to meet health-related needs in their communities. Design Multiple case studies. Setting Los Angeles County, California. Participants Purposive sample of 14 congregations representing diverse races-ethnicities (African American, Latino, and white) and faith traditions (Jewish and various Christian). Method Congregations were recruited based on screening data and consultation of a community advisory board. In each congregation, researchers conducted interviews with clergy and lay leaders (n=57); administered a congregational questionnaire; observed health activities, worship services, and neighborhood context; and reviewed archival information. Interviews were analyzed using a qualitative, code-based approach. Results Congregations’ health-related activities tended to be episodic, small in scale, and local in scope. Trust and social capital played important roles in congregations’ health initiatives, providing a safe, confidential environment and leveraging resources from – and for – faith-based and secular organizations in their community networks. Congregations also served as “incubators” for members to engage in social entrepreneurship. Conclusion Although the small scale of congregations’ health initiatives suggest they may not have the capacity to provide the main infrastructure for service provision, congregations can complement the efforts of health and social providers with their unique strengths. Specifically, congregations are distinctive in their ability to identify unmet local needs, and congregations’ position in their communities permit them to network in productive ways. PMID:23875986

  19. Addressing Science and Policy Needs with Community Emissions Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Middleton, P.; Granier, C.; Tarrasón, L.; Falke, S. R.; Keating, T. J.; Lamarque, J.; Melamed, M. L.; Mieville, A.; Petron, G.; Smith, S.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, complete emissions inventories are critical to the understanding and prediction of air quality and climate. Because emissions inventories are prepared for many purposes by a diverse set of institutions and individuals using a variety of methodologies, there is a need to aggregate inventories, disseminate information about emissions, and facilitate evaluations of emissions data. We present the current activities of two related community-driven emissions efforts, the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA- http://www.geiacenter.org/) and the Community Initiative for Emissions Research and Applications (CIERA- http://ciera-air.org/). GEIA aims to bring together people, analyses, data, and tools to quantify the anthropogenic emissions and natural exchanges of trace gases and aerosols that drive earth system changes and to facilitate the use of this information by the research, assessment and policy communities. The GEIA network currently includes over 1000 people around the globe. The GEIA Center hosts a comprehensive set of emissions related information. Through its data portals, GEIA delivers global and regional scale inventory data sets in a consistent format. GEIA plans to strengthen links with different key world regions through creation of regional centers in cooperation with other entities and individuals working in these regions. CIERA is building an international community to catalyze emissions research by facilitating 1) the consistent, timely, and transparent development of emissions inventories at all scales; 2) evaluations and analyses of emissions datasets; and 3) the exchange and communication of emissions information. We discuss the motivation and vision for CIERA and illustrate its connections with GEIA. We describe the developing CIERA distributed data system and demonstrate some examples of its applications.

  20. Addressing the Skills Gap in Saudi Arabia: Does Vocational Education Address the Needs of Private Sector Employers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baqadir, Abdullah; Patrick, Fiona; Burns, George

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of data drawn from doctoral research on the extent to which recent changes in vocational training have addressed a perceived skills gap between the needs of private sector employers and potential workers in Saudi Arabia. While the Saudi government has made efforts to enhance the quality of vocational education,…

  1. 44 CFR 206.119 - Financial assistance to address other needs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... address other needs. 206.119 Section 206.119 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Assistance to Individuals and Households § 206.119 Financial assistance to address other needs. (a) Purpose... disaster-related necessary expenses or serious needs. To qualify for assistance under this section,...

  2. Community engagement and education: addressing the needs of South Asian families with genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nasaim; Kerr, Gifford; Kingston, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Consanguineous marriage is common among the South Asian heritage community in the UK. While conferring social and cultural benefits, consanguinity is associated with an increased risk of autosomal recessive disorders and an increase in childhood death and disability. We have previously developed a genetic service to address the needs of this community. We report the extension of this service to include community-based initiatives aimed at promoting understanding of genetic issues related to consanguinity and improving access to genetic services. Our approach was to develop integrated clinical, educational and community engagement initiatives that would be sustainable on a long-term basis. The service provided for South Asian families by a specialist genetic counsellor was extended, and a series of genetics education and awareness sessions were provided for a diverse range of frontline healthcare workers. Two community genetic outreach worker posts were established to facilitate the engagement of the local South Asian population with genetics. The education and awareness sessions helped address the lack of genetic knowledge among primary health care professionals and community workers. Engagement initiatives by the genetic outreach worker raised awareness of genetic issues in the South Asian community and families affected by autosomal recessive disorders. All three elements of the extended service generated positive feedback. A three-stranded approach to addressing the needs of consanguineous families affected by autosomal recessive disorders as recommended by the World Health Organisation is suggested to be an acceptable, effective and sustainable approach to delivery of service in the UK.

  3. Addressing the Academic and Social Needs of Young Male Students through School-Based Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problem within the U.S. public school system to sustainably meet the academic and social needs of its African American male students. The administrative team of the elementary school in this study desired an evaluation of a school-based male mentoring program that was designed to address these needs. The program, Gentlemen…

  4. DOD Financial Management: Continued Actions Needed to Address Congressional Committee Panel Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Continued Actions Needed to Address Congressional Committee Panel Recommendations Report...2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Financial Managment : Continued Actions Needed to Address...Did This Study A congressional panel examined the capacity of DOD’s financial management system for providing timely, reliable, and useful

  5. Elections: DOD Needs More Comprehensive Planning to Address Military and Overseas Absentee Voting Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    ELECTIONS DOD Needs More Comprehensive Planning to Address Military and Overseas Absentee Voting Challenges...Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-378, a report to congressional addressees April 2016 ELECTIONS DOD Needs More Comprehensive Planning to...with its military and overseas voting assistance efforts and developed plans to address those challenges, and (2) implemented strategic planning

  6. An address geocoding method for improving rural spatial information infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuchun; Chen, Baisong; Lu, Zhou; Li, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhou, Yanbing

    2009-09-01

    The transition of rural and agricultural management from divisional to integrated mode has highlighted the importance of data integration and sharing. Current data are mostly collected by specific department to satisfy their own needs and lake of considering on wider potential uses. This led to great difference in data format, semantic, and precision even in same area, which is a significant barrier for constructing an integrated rural spatial information system to support integrated management and decision-making. Considering the rural cadastral management system and postal zones, the paper designs a rural address geocoding method based on rural cadastral parcel. It puts forward a geocoding standard which consists of absolute position code, relative position code and extended code. It designs a rural geocoding database model, and addresses collection and update model. Then, based on the rural address geocoding model, it proposed a data model for rural agricultural resources management. The results show that the address coding based on postal code is stable and easy to memorize, two-dimensional coding based on the direction and distance is easy to be located and memorized, while extended code can enhance the extensibility and flexibility of address geocoding.

  7. An address geocoding method for improving rural spatial information infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuchun; Chen, Baisong; Lu, Zhou; Li, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhou, YanBing

    2010-11-01

    The transition of rural and agricultural management from divisional to integrated mode has highlighted the importance of data integration and sharing. Current data are mostly collected by specific department to satisfy their own needs and lake of considering on wider potential uses. This led to great difference in data format, semantic, and precision even in same area, which is a significant barrier for constructing an integrated rural spatial information system to support integrated management and decision-making. Considering the rural cadastral management system and postal zones, the paper designs a rural address geocoding method based on rural cadastral parcel. It puts forward a geocoding standard which consists of absolute position code, relative position code and extended code. It designs a rural geocoding database model, and addresses collection and update model. Then, based on the rural address geocoding model, it proposed a data model for rural agricultural resources management. The results show that the address coding based on postal code is stable and easy to memorize, two-dimensional coding based on the direction and distance is easy to be located and memorized, while extended code can enhance the extensibility and flexibility of address geocoding.

  8. Classroom Management Strategies to Address the Needs of Sudanese Refugee Learners: Advice to Teachers. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Ursula; Hull, Oksana

    2007-01-01

    "Classroom Management Strategies to Address the Needs of Sudanese Refugee Learners" (ED499673) examined the extent to which English language, literacy and numeracy teachers used classroom management strategies to meet the needs of adult Sudanese refugee learners. The researchers found that while teachers met the needs of these learners…

  9. The Need for a Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Neville, Helen A.; Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Winterowd, Carrie L.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    The authors articulate the need for a "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth "Values Statement"). They discuss the historic unwillingness of the field to address values in a sophisticated or complex way and highlight the increasingly common training scenario in which trainees state that certain…

  10. Veterans Affairs: Sustained Management Attention Needed to Address Numerous IT Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-22

    VETERANS AFFAIRS Sustained Management Attention Needed to Address Numerous IT Challenges Statement of Valerie C. Melvin...Sustained Management Attention Needed to Address Numerous IT Challenges What GAO Found In February 2015, GAO designated Veterans Affairs (VA) health care...as a high- risk area based on its concerns about the department’s ability to ensure the quality and safety of veterans’ health care in five broad

  11. Addressing Point of Need in Interactive Multimedia Instruction: A Conceptual Review and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    conventions and standards, and instructional strategies required by the school , proponent, or supported instructional agency. The IMDP may also include a...research we focused on determining how to apply instructional design techniques and tailored training strategies to address different learners’ needs in...the relevance of various instructional designs and tailored training strategies to address point of need. Starting with a sample of N = 427 IMI

  12. Nutrition interventions need improved operational capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lancet's Child Survival Series was a galvanising manifesto: it focused action plans to improve the well-being of children worldwide. However, the authors did not address in detail the importance of nutrition in child survival, and thus the current Undernutrition Series was born. This welcome n...

  13. Filling gaps in a large reserve network to address freshwater conservation needs.

    PubMed

    Hermoso, Virgilio; Filipe, Ana Filipa; Segurado, Pedro; Beja, Pedro

    2015-09-15

    Freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity are among the most threatened at global scale, but efforts for their conservation have been mostly peripheral to terrestrial conservation. For example, Natura 2000, the world's largest network of protected areas, fails to cover adequately the distribution of rare and endangered aquatic species, and lacks of appropriate spatial design to make conservation for freshwater biodiversity effective. Here, we develop a framework to identify a complementary set of priority areas and enhance the conservation opportunities of Natura 2000 for freshwater biodiversity, using the Iberian Peninsula as a case study. We use a systematic planning approach to identify a minimum set of additional areas that would help i) adequately represent all freshwater fish, amphibians and aquatic reptiles at three different target levels, ii) account for key ecological processes derived from riverscape connectivity, and iii) minimize the impact of threats, both within protected areas and propagated from upstream unprotected areas. Addressing all these goals would need an increase in area between 7 and 46%, depending on the conservation target used and strength of connectivity required. These new priority areas correspond to subcatchments inhabited by endangered and range restricted species, as well as additional subcatchments required to improve connectivity among existing protected areas and to increase protection against upstream threats. Our study should help guide future revisions of the design of Natura 2000, while providing a framework to address deficiencies in reserve networks for adequately protecting freshwater biodiversity elsewhere.

  14. Do therapeutic homework assignments address areas of need for individuals with severe mental illness?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P

    2011-04-01

    The current study explores the types of homework assignments used in a recovery orientated case management approach. It also examines the relationship between the types of homework used and the clients' area of need as rated on the CANSAS. There were 129 client and mental health case manager dyads that participated in the study. Written copies of all homework assignments administered during the 12-month research period were collected (N = 1,054). The homework assignments were categorised according to the 'type' and the 'need domain addressed by the task'. The majority of these tasks were behavioural in nature. On a group level homework tended to broadly address areas of need for clients in the study. Only 2 of the 1,054 homework assignments administered directly addressed areas of Intimate Relationships or Sexual Expression. The importance of addressing Intimate Relationship and Sexual Expression within mental health case management is discussed.

  15. Need for Improvement of Rural School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, V. Pauline

    The Government Accounting Agency estimates that one third of the nation's schools are in need of extensive repairs or replacement of one or more buildings. The condition of America's rural schools are at a crisis stage and need to be improved to continue to educate rural youth. This paper profiles the state of rural schools' infrastructure, rural…

  16. Addressing Spiritual Needs and Overall Satisfaction With Service Provision Among Older Hospitalized Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Wolosin, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Little research has examined the relationship between addressing older adults' spiritual needs and overall satisfaction with service provision during hospitalization, despite the importance of spirituality and religion to most older adults. This study examined this relationship, in tandem with the effects of eight potential mediators. Toward this end, structural equation modeling was used with a sample of 4,112 adults age 65 and older who were consecutively discharged over a 12-month period from hospitals in California, Texas, and New England. As hypothesized, addressing spiritual needs was positively associated with overall satisfaction. The relationship between spiritual needs and satisfaction was fully mediated by seven variables: nursing staff, the discharge process, visitors, physicians, the admissions process, room quality, and the administration of tests and treatments. The diverse array of mediating pathways identified highlights the importance of health care practitioners working collaboratively to address older adults' spiritual needs.

  17. Action for Healthy Kids Suggests that Improvements Are Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Action for Healthy Kids (AFHK), a national non-profit group that addresses childhood obesity, released a special report warning that schools still need improvements to the quality of the foods they serve and the amount of physical activity opportunities they offer American children. The report also outlines a significant obstacle--most school…

  18. Reliably Addressing "What Matters" Through a Quality Improvement Process.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Patricia A

    2016-02-01

    Oncology nurses have a critical role in mitigating the intense vulnerability, loss of control, and fear of the unknown that characterizes the experiences of patients with cancer and their family members. Reliably inquiring about the issues that are at the forefront for patients and their loved ones can encourage a deeper dialogue-where nurses can understand and address the issues that are most important to them. A practical quality improvement approach can help to ensure that processes are in place to assist nurses in devoting time to reliably inquire about "what matters" to each patient at every encounter.

  19. A Comparison of Interactive Multimedia Instruction Designs Addressing Soldiers Learning Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    in selecting content to target their learning needs, similar to what more knowledgeable learners may already do. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Army...need it (TRADOC, 2011), with content and instructional design to address Soldiers’ learning needs. In addition, IMI provides a viable means to... content on breadth of information to help learners become familiar with a topic, and prepare them for additional learning . Core/refresher IMI

  20. Addressing poverty, education, and gender equality to improve the health of women worldwide.

    PubMed

    Tyer-Viola, Lynda A; Cesario, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDG) that target alleviating poverty, improving primary education, and fostering gender equity are important as a foundation to promote world health. Achieving these goals will create an environment for healthy lives for women and children. Poverty, education, and gender equality, although undeniably linked, need to be addressed individually. Nurses have the capacity and political will to address MDGs and to contribute to the health and well-being of the world population.

  1. Virtual reality applications for addressing the needs of those aging with disability.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert; Requejo, Phil; Winstein, Carolee J; Lange, Belinda; Ragusa, Gisele; Merians, Alma; Patton, James; Banerjee, Pat; Aisen, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    As persons with disabilities age, progressive declines in health and medical status can challenge the adaptive resources required to maintain functional independence and quality of life [1]. These challenges are further compounded by economic factors, medication side effects, loss of a spouse or caregiver, and psychosocial disorders [1-2]. With the gradual loss of functional independence and increased reliance on others for transportation, access to general medical and rehabilitation care can be jeopardized [2]. The combination of these factors when seen in the context of the average increase in lifespan in industrialized societies has lead to a growing crisis that is truly global in proportion. While research indicates that functional motor capacity can be improved, maintained, or recovered via consistent participation in a motor exercise and rehabilitation regimen [3], independent adherence to such preventative and/or rehabilitative programming outside the clinic setting is notoriously low [1]. This state of affairs has produced a compelling and ethical motivation to address the needs of individuals who are aging with disabilities by promoting home-based access to low-cost, interactive virtual reality (VR) systems designed to engage and motivate individuals to participate with "game"-driven physical activities and rehabilitation programming. The creation of such systems could serve to enhance, maintain and rehabilitate the sensorimotor processes that are needed to maximize independence and quality of life. This is the theme of the research to be presented at this MMVR workshop.

  2. Parent strategies for addressing the needs of their newly adopted child.

    PubMed

    Tirella, Linda G; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Miller, Laurie C; Bedell, Gary

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe reflections of nine American parents on the strengths, challenges, and strategies in parenting young children newly adopted from another country. Eight mothers and one father with an adopted child aged <3 years and home for <3 months completed standardized assessments measuring the child's social emotional development, sensory processing, and parental stress. Each parent participated in qualitative interview to discuss challenges and strategies helpful in addressing their children's needs. All parents reported challenges addressing their child's needs in the areas of sleep, feeding, attachment and self-regulation, and soothing. Parents reported similar strategies to address their child's behavioral concerns. Parents also reported on family factors and community resources that supported the success of the adoption. Although many families described their adoptive child as having challenges with multiple daily life activities, parents reported being able to create effective strategies to address many of these challenging behaviors.

  3. The GÉANT network: addressing current and future needs of the HEP community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Vincenzo; Usman, Mian

    2015-12-01

    The GÉANT infrastructure is the backbone that serves the scientific communities in Europe for their data movement needs and their access to international research and education networks. Using the extensive fibre footprint and infrastructure in Europe the GÉANT network delivers a portfolio of services aimed to best fit the specific needs of the users, including Authentication and Authorization Infrastructure, end-to-end performance monitoring, advanced network services (dynamic circuits, L2-L3VPN, MD-VPN). This talk will outline the factors that help the GÉANT network to respond to the needs of the High Energy Physics community, both in Europe and worldwide. The Pan-European network provides the connectivity between 40 European national research and education networks. In addition, GÉANT also connects the European NRENs to the R&E networks in other world region and has reach to over 110 NREN worldwide, making GÉANT the best connected Research and Education network, with its multiple intercontinental links to different continents e.g. North and South America, Africa and Asia-Pacific. The High Energy Physics computational needs have always had (and will keep having) a leading role among the scientific user groups of the GÉANT network: the LHCONE overlay network has been built, in collaboration with the other big world REN, specifically to address the peculiar needs of the LHC data movement. Recently, as a result of a series of coordinated efforts, the LHCONE network has been expanded to the Asia-Pacific area, and is going to include some of the main regional R&E network in the area. The LHC community is not the only one that is actively using a distributed computing model (hence the need for a high-performance network); new communities are arising, as BELLE II. GÉANT is deeply involved also with the BELLE II Experiment, to provide full support to their distributed computing model, along with a perfSONAR-based network monitoring system. GÉANT has also

  4. Addressing the needs of Latinos with type 2 diabetes through online patient education.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Sharon A; Gutierrez Ocampo, Alejandro; Blanco, Kenia Yazmin Reyna; Lewis, Virginia; Cupertino, A Paula; Ellerbeck, Edward F

    2014-09-01

    Patients with Type 2 diabetes are increasingly turning to the Web for information about diabetes and self-management. These sites, however, fail to address the cultural and linguistic needs of the growing community of Latinos with diabetes. The Juntos Controlamos la Diabetes Web site was designed as a low-cost patient education tool to be used by patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers to provide ongoing information about diabetes self-management tailored to the needs of the regional Latino community.

  5. Spirituality. 2: Exploring how to address patients' spiritual needs in practice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Penny

    Although meeting patients' spiritual needs is important, many nurses are uncertain about what spiritual care involves and lack confidence in this area. This second article in a two part series on spirituality considers ways of addressing spiritual needs and provides an overview of the principles of assessment and implementation. Part 1 explored definitions of spirituality, the difference between religion and spirituality, and finding meaning in illness.

  6. The current unmet need in type 2 diabetes mellitus: addressing glycemia and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Philip

    2009-05-01

    The treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires a multifaceted approach of both lifestyle modification (diet, exercise, weight control, smoking cessation) and pharmacological therapy. In addition to agents that improve hyperglycemia, patients often require treatments to address the additional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors of hypertension and dyslipidemia. Although the benefits of early, aggressive glycemic control are clearly established, treatment remains suboptimal. Many patients fail to achieve long-term glycemic control, with rates of patients with T2DM achieving target goals for hypertension and dyslipidemia also unsatisfactory. Several factors contribute to the failure to meet treatment goals. These include poor adherence by patients to lifestyle and pharmacological treatment, lack of understanding by patients of the long-term benefits of treatment, patient concerns about adverse effects leading to poor compliance, and failure of health care providers to initiate or intensify medications appropriately (termed clinical inertia). This article reviews the current state of T2DM treatment and the management of CV risk factors associated with T2DM, and identifies unmet treatment needs.

  7. Challenges Addressing Unmet Need for Contraception: Voices of Family Planning Service Providers in Rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Jitihada; Rusibamayila, Asinath; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Baynes, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Provider perspectives have been overlooked in efforts to address the challenges of unmet need for family planning (FP). This qualitative study was undertaken in Tanzania, using 22 key informant interviews and 4 focus group discussions. The research documents perceptions of healthcare managers and providers in a rural district on the barriers to meeting latent demand for contraception. Social-ecological theory is used to interpret the findings, illustrating how service capability is determined by the social, structural and organizational environment. Providers' efforts to address unmet need for FP services are constrained by unstable reproductive preferences, low educational attainment, and misconceptions about contraceptive side effects. Societal and organizational factors--such as gender dynamics, economic conditions, religious and cultural norms, and supply chain bottlenecks, respectively--also contribute to an adverse environment for meeting needs for care. Challenges that healthcare providers face interact and produce an effect which hinders efforts to address unmet need. Interventions to address this are not sufficient unless the supply of services is combined with systems strengthening and social engagement strategies in a way that reflects the multi-layered, social institutional problems.

  8. Information Needs of Women: Addressing Diverse Factors in the Indian Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasgupta, Kalpana

    This paper addresses the diverse facts that influence the information seeking behavior of women in India, including: (1) the type of information women need; (2) social factors (i.e., caste, class, urban/rural, literate/illiterate, educated/uneducated); (3) economic factors (i.e., employed, unemployed, employed in organized sector, employed in the…

  9. Addressing the Needs of English Language Learners in an English Education Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Luciana C.; Shoffner, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    This article explores one element of collaborative practice: the integration of English language learner-focused instruction and discussion in a secondary English methods course. Drawing on the authors' expertise, they examine revisions made to a secondary English methods course to better address the academic and individual needs of diverse…

  10. Addressing the Needs of Substance Abusing Adolescents: A Guide for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikes, April; Cole, Rebekah F.; McBride, Rebecca; Fusco, Angela; Lauka, Justin

    2009-01-01

    As individuals with multiple needs, substance abusing adolescents may seek the support and assistance of school counselors. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors with information they can use to assist students with substance abuse issues. Specifically, this article examines (a) complexity of addressing substance…

  11. Strong Start Wraparound: Addressing the Complex Needs of Mothers in Early Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teel, M. Kay

    2014-01-01

    The Strong Start Study tested an innovative, High-Fidelity Wraparound intervention with families in early recovery from substance use. The Strong Start Wraparound model addressed the complex needs of pregnant and parenting women who were in early recovery to increase the protective factors of parental resilience, social connections, concrete…

  12. Strategies for Addressing the University Library Users' Changing Needs and Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musoke, Maria G. N.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a Sub-Saharan African academic Librarian's experience in trying to address the changing needs and practices of university library users. Special reference is made to Makerere University Library. Most of the changes have been brought about by the various paradigm shifts in teaching, learning and research, as well as advances in…

  13. The Role of Nutrition-Related Initiatives in Addressing Community Health Needs Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Dillon, Judy; Snyder, Gail

    2017-01-01

    Academic Health Centers and nonprofit hospitals are exploring strategies to meet Affordable Care Act mandates requiring tax-exempt institutions to address community health needs, which commonly include major chronic illnesses. We explore the implications of this regulatory landscape, describing methods that nonprofit health care institutions are…

  14. V-22 Osprey Aircraft: Assessments Needed to Address Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-23

    GAO United States Government Accountability Office Testimony Before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House ...Investments Highlights of GAO-09-692T, a testimony before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives T Since the 1980s...of Representatives V-22 OSPREY AIRCRAFT Assessments Needed to Address Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments Statement of

  15. 44 CFR 206.119 - Financial assistance to address other needs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... households. (2) Personal property, transportation, and other expenses. (i) FEMA may provide financial... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Financial assistance to... Assistance to Individuals and Households § 206.119 Financial assistance to address other needs. (a)...

  16. Addressing the Challenges and Needs of English-Speaking Caribbean Immigrant Students: Guidelines for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Stephaney; Bryan, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Caribbean students are among the distinct immigrant groups in U.S. public schools with particular needs to be addressed by school counselors. This article discusses the challenges Caribbean immigrant students face that create obstacles to their academic and personal/social success. Guidelines for school counselors are outlined, which can be used…

  17. Training Social Workers and Human Service Professionals to Address the Complex Financial Needs of Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Hopkins, Karen; Osteen, Philip; Callahan, Christine; Hageman, Sally; Ko, Jungyai

    2017-01-01

    In social work and other community-based human services settings, clients often present with complex financial problems. As a need for more formal training is beginning to be addressed, evaluation of existing training is important, and this study evaluates outcomes from the Financial Stability Pathway (FSP) project. Designed to prepare…

  18. From office tools to community supports: The need for infrastructure to address the social determinants of health in paediatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Fazalullasha, Fatima; Taras, Jillian; Morinis, Julia; Levin, Leo; Karmali, Karima; Neilson, Barbara; Muskat, Barbara; Bloch, Gary; Chan, Kevin; McDonald, Maureen; Makin, Sue; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of addressing the social determinants of health to improve child health outcomes. However, significant barriers exist that limit the paediatrician’s ability to properly address these issues. Barriers include a lack of clinical time, resources, training and education with regard to the social determinants of health; awareness of community resources; and case-management capacity. General practice recommendations to help the health care provider link patients to the community are insufficient. The objective of the current article was to present options for improving the link between the office and the community, using screening questions incorporating physician-based tools that link community resources. Simple interventions, such as routine referral to early-year centres and selected referral to public health home-visiting programs, may help to address populations with the greatest needs. PMID:24855416

  19. From office tools to community supports: The need for infrastructure to address the social determinants of health in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fazalullasha, Fatima; Taras, Jillian; Morinis, Julia; Levin, Leo; Karmali, Karima; Neilson, Barbara; Muskat, Barbara; Bloch, Gary; Chan, Kevin; McDonald, Maureen; Makin, Sue; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2014-04-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of addressing the social determinants of health to improve child health outcomes. However, significant barriers exist that limit the paediatrician's ability to properly address these issues. Barriers include a lack of clinical time, resources, training and education with regard to the social determinants of health; awareness of community resources; and case-management capacity. General practice recommendations to help the health care provider link patients to the community are insufficient. The objective of the current article was to present options for improving the link between the office and the community, using screening questions incorporating physician-based tools that link community resources. Simple interventions, such as routine referral to early-year centres and selected referral to public health home-visiting programs, may help to address populations with the greatest needs.

  20. Design of comprehensive Alzheimer's disease centers to address unmet national needs.

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, John Q; Arnold, Steven E; Karlawish, Jason H; Brunden, Kurt; Cary, Mark; Davatzikos, Christos; Detre, John; Gaulton, Glen; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard; Jedrziewski, Kathryn; McCluskey, Leo; Naylor, Mary; Polsky, Daniel; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Siderowf, Andrew; Shaw, Leslie M; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Wang, Li-San; Werner, Rachel; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2010-03-01

    The problem of Alzheimer's disease (AD) exemplifies the challenges of dealing with a broad range of aging-related chronic disorders that require long-term, labor-intensive, and expensive care. As the baby boom generation ages and brain diseases become more prevalent, the need to confront the pending health care crisis is more urgent than ever before. Indeed, there is now a critical need to expand significantly the national effort to solve the problem of AD, with special focus on prevention. The Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by 2020 (PAD2020) aims to create a new paradigm for planning and supporting the organization of worldwide cooperative research networks to develop new technologies for early detection and treatments of aging-related memory and motor impairments. PAD 2020 is developing an implementation plan to justify (1) increasing the federal budget for research, (2) developing novel national resources to discover new interventions for memory and motor disorders, and (3) creating innovative and streamlined decision-making processes for selecting and supporting new ideas. Since 1978 the National Institute on Aging or National Institute of Health (NIH) established an extensive national network of AD research facilities at academic institutions including AD Centers (ADCs), Consortium to Establish a Registry for AD, AD Cooperative Study (ADCS), AD Drug Discovery Program, National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, National Cell Repository for AD, and AD Neuroimaging Initiative. However, despite the success of these programs and their critical contributions, they are no longer adequate to meet the challenges presented by AD. PAD 2020 is designed to address these changes by improving the efficiency and effectiveness of these programs. For example, the ADCs (P30s and P50s) can be enhanced by converting some into Comprehensive Alzheimer's Disease Centers (CADCs) to support not only research, but also by being demonstration projects on care/treatment, clinical

  1. Improvements needed in EPA's Inspector General operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1983-10-21

    At the request of the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment and the Subcommittee on Civil Service, House of Representatives, GAO reviewed the operations of the Office of Inspector General, Environmental Protection Agency, under the leadership of former Inspector General Matthew Novick. GAO found that although most investigations appear to have been handled properly, in some cases all relevant matters were not followed up and consistently addressed. GAO also noted the need to use investigative resources more effectively and to provide more balanced audit coverage. Acting Inspector General Charles Dempsey recognized and made a concerted effort to correct many problems during his tenure. GAO recommends further actions to strengthen inspector general operations at EPA.

  2. Military Personnel: Actions Needed to Address Sexual Assaults of Male Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    it would need to address the “unofficial” culture that is defined by exaggerated characteristics of stereotypical masculinity, among other things...Respondents’ Unit Have both Men and Women Assigned, by Rank Group 65 Table 8: Situations Presented to Respondent on Separate Cards for Question 6...DOD. At the same time, officials found that for fiscal year 2010, of those active-duty women estimated to have experienced unwanted sexual contact

  3. Making background work visible: opportunities to address patient information needs in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Logan; Mishra, Sonali R.; Pollack, Ari; Aaronson, Barry; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing use of patient-facing technologies such as patient portals to address information needs for outpatients, we understand little about how patients manage information and use information technologies in an inpatient context. Based on hospital observations and responses to an online questionnaire from previously hospitalized patients and caregivers, we describe information workspace that patients have available to them in the hospital and the information items that patients and caregivers rate as important and difficult to access or manage while hospitalized. We found that patients and caregivers desired information—such as the plan of care and the schedule of activities—that is difficult to access as needed in a hospital setting. Within this study, we describe the various tools and approaches that patients and caregivers use to help monitor their care as well as illuminate gaps in information needs not typically captured by traditional patient portals. PMID:26958295

  4. AACP Strategy for Addressing the Professional Development Needs of Department Chairs

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Tobias E.; Weinstein, George; Sorofman, Bernard A.; Bosso, John A.; Kerr, Robert A.; Haden, N. Karl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Characterize the skills and abilities required for department chairs, identify development needs, and then create AACP professional development programs for chairs. Methods. A 30-question electronic survey was sent to AACP member department chairs related to aspects of chairing an academic department. Results. The survey identified development needs in the leadership, management, and personal abilities required for effective performance as department chair. The information was used to prioritize topics for subsequent AACP development programs. Subsequent programs conducted at AACP Interim and Annual Meetings were well attended and generally received favorable reviews from participants. A list of development resources was placed on the AACP website. Conclusions. This ongoing initiative is part of an AACP strategy to identify and address the professional development needs of department chairs. Survey results may also inform faculty members and other academic leaders about the roles and responsibilities of department chairs. PMID:22919099

  5. The role of private foundations in addressing health care workforce needs.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E

    2013-12-01

    There is an increased awareness among policy makers, providers, and educators that the size, composition, geographic distribution, and skill mix of the health care workforce is of great importance in determining the likelihood of success in achieving our societal goals for health care reform. As academic and governmental institutions work to address these pressing questions, private foundations can and should play an important role in supporting the design, execution, and evaluation of innovative educational programs that will address these needs. Foundations also can and should play a role in generating information that will better inform health care workforce policies and in convening thought leaders to make recommendations that will advance the field of workforce studies.The author details current efforts by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and other private foundations to address health care workforce needs. Foundations can play important roles as catalysts for change in our educational processes, and they can serve as important links between education and health care delivery systems. Partnerships among foundations and between private foundations and federal agencies can be powerful forces in helping to better align the skills of future health professionals with changing patient demographics and a changing health care system.

  6. Shaping NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Workforce Development Initiative to Address Industry Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosage, David; Meeson, Blanche W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It has been well recognized that the commercial remote sensing industry will expand in new directions, resulting in new applications, thus requiring a larger, more skilled workforce to fill the new positions. In preparation for this change, NASA has initiated a Remote Sensing Professional Development Program to address the workforce needs of this emerging industry by partnering with the private sector, academia, relevant professional societies, and other R&D organizations. Workforce needs will in part include understanding current industry concerns, personnel competencies, current and future skills, growth rates, geographical distributions, certifications, and sources of pre-service and in-service personnel. Dave Rosage of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a panel of MAPPS members will lead a discussion to help NASA specifically address private firms' near and long-term personnel needs to be included in NASA's Remote Sensing Professional Development Program. In addition, Dave Rosage will present perspectives on how remote sensing technologies are evolving, new NASA instruments being developed, and what future workforce skills are expected to support these new developments.

  7. Using community-based participatory research to address Chinese older women's health needs: Toward sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-Shien; Simon, Melissa A; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Although community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been recognized as a useful approach for eliminating health disparities, less attention is given to how CBPR projects may address gender inequalities in health for immigrant older women. The goal of this article is to share culturally sensitive strategies and lessons learned from the PINE study-a population-based study of U.S. Chinese older adults that was strictly guided by the CBPR approach. Working with Chinese older women requires trust, respect, and understanding of their unique historical, social, and cultural positions. We also discuss implications for developing impact-driven research partnerships that meet the needs of this vulnerable population.

  8. Public hospital palliative social work: addressing patient cultural diversity and psychosocial needs.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Monique; Cárdenas, Yvette; Epperhart, Regina; Hernandez, Jose; Ruiz, Susana; Russell, Linda; Soriano, Karolina; Thornberry, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Through creative practice innovations and a wide range of professional competencies, social work has contributed substantively to the development of the palliative care field (Harper, 2011 ). As the field continues to grow and evolve, new opportunities are emerging to profile palliative social work in diverse health care settings. A statewide initiative to spread palliative care in California's public hospitals provided just such an opportunity. Palliative social workers from six public hospitals participating in the initiative formed a group to discuss palliative social work in this unique hospital setting. This article highlights the group's insights and experiences as they address the significant cultural diversity and psychosocial needs of public hospital patients receiving palliative care.

  9. Emerging Developments in Pharmacists' Scope of Practice to Address Unmet Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Burns, Anne L

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacists' comprehensive training is being leveraged in emerging patient care service opportunities that include prescriptive authority under collaborative practice agreements (CPAs) with prescribers or through state-based protocols. CPAs and state-based protocols expand pharmacists' scope of practice to allow the pharmacist to perform designated functions under the terms of the agreement or protocol. For patient-specific CPAs, this often includes initiating, modifying, or discontinuing therapy and ordering laboratory tests. For population-based CPAs and state-based protocols, pharmacists are often authorized to initiate medications to address a public health need. CPAs and state-based protocols are mechanisms to optimally use pharmacists' education and training.

  10. Supporting Adults to Address Their Literacy Needs Using E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Jo; Nicholas, Karen; Davis, Niki

    2011-01-01

    Many adults need help with literacy learning. This is extremely challenging for the tertiary education sector and workplace-situated learning organisations. E-learning may be an effective and efficient way to improve the delivery of teaching of basic skills to learners. Our research study included five embedded case studies within one tertiary…

  11. Practices Changes in the Child Protection System to Address the Needs of Parents With Cognitive Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Sandra T.; Maggi, Mirella C.; Proctor, Stephon Nathanial

    2016-01-01

    Parents with cognitive disabilities (PCD) are over-represented in the child protection system. However, the current state of the child protection system is not well prepared for working with them. Biases that exist against their parenting, the need for accommodations in assessment and intervention practices, and specific training in staff and cross systems barriers need to be addressed. This paper argues for changes that will ensure such parents are more effectively served and that child protection staff and contract providers are better equipped to work with them. Specific changes are discussed in assessment and intervention practices. These changes will require human capacity building and organizational restructuring. Although empirically based behavioral approaches with PCD will be emphasized, recent empirical work suggests that social information processing and neurocognitive problems occur in PCD. Approaches to working with such problems are emerging and must also be considered and integrated into a blueprint for change. PMID:27610050

  12. Addressing the spiritual needs of people infected with and affected by HIV and AIDS in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaard, Arnau

    2013-01-01

    Researchers seem to be in agreement that spirituality is an important component of the holistic care approach commonly found in palliative care. Shiselweni Home-Based Care (SHBC) is a faith-based organization in Swaziland working among people with HIV and AIDS in the poorest and most affected areas of the country. They endeavor to restore and build up each client's dignity through the way in which they are approached, not only when giving physical assistance, but also when they address their spiritual needs. This article emphasizes the need for spiritual care as part of the caregiving program and then also illustrates the positive feelings of both the SHBC caregivers as well as their clients as they share some of the experiences encountered during spiritual care.

  13. Addressing policy needs for prevention and control of type 2 diabetes in India.

    PubMed

    Atre, Sachin

    2015-09-01

    India carries nearly one-fifth of the global burden of diabetes cases, the majority of which are of type 2 diabetes. Recognising the need for controlling diabetes, the Government of India has initiated a national level programme for prevention and control of diabetes along with other non-communicable diseases in 2008. Despite being piloted and implemented, there is hardly any published literature about the national level situation of diabetes and its control efforts. The present article is written with the aim to fill this gap to some extent and to provide a situational analysis of the diabetes problem in India in a holistic way, addressing policy needs for the national programme. It focuses on three main areas, namely, awareness of diabetes, costs of drugs for its treatment and healthcare-system related issues. It argues that poor coverage and weak implementation of the national level programme are major forces that push patients to seek help in the weakly regulated private sector. Approaching the private sector is likely to increase the cost of care, which in turn can lead to an increased financial burden for patients and their families due to factors such as patients' lack of awareness about diabetes, poor drug price regulation and prescriptions including combinations and/or patented products of medicines used for treating diabetes by the private sector. This article addresses several needs such as strengthening the national programme and increasing its reach to unreached districts, exerting drug price regulation and implementing community-based participatory programmes for prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. It also underscores a need for piloting and implementing a robust national level electronic reporting system for diabetes programmes.

  14. Nuclear Decay Data: On-going Studies to Address and Improve Radionuclide Decay Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alan L.

    2005-05-01

    Representative decay data studies are described and reviewed, ranging from various measurement programmes to the maintenance of evaluated decay-data libraries. Gross beta-decay measurements are essential to address the decay-data requirements for short-lived fission products, well-defined half-lives are required in assessments of the storage of long-lived radionuclides in waste depositories, and improved decay data continue to be demanded in safeguards, to improve detector-calibration standards, and for medical and analytical applications. Such needs require the measurement of good quality decay data, along with multinational evaluations of decay schemes by means of agreed procedures.

  15. Using Primary Care to Address Violence against Women in Intimate Partner Relationships: Professional Training Needs.

    PubMed

    Torralbas-Fernández, Aida; Calcerrada-Gutiérrez, Marybexy

    2016-10-01

    Unified, prevention- and community-oriented, Cuba's National Health System is well positioned to address social problems such as gender violence against women. It is sometimes taken for granted that family doctors, family nurses and psychologists in the health system should be able to deal with such cases. However, some studies among these professionals have revealed misconceptions about intimate partner violence, an insufficient understanding of its causes, and greater tolerance of psychological violence than of physical and sexual violence. Cuba needs to train family doctors and clinical psychologists who are knowledgeable about the subject so that they can take part in the development and implementation of intersectoral education and prevention policies and programs, provide assistance to women who have been victims of violence, and work together with community members to create support networks that serve as monitoring mechanisms. Primary care is the ideal setting for raising awareness of the need for greater intersectoral action to systematically address violence against women. KEYWORDS Professional training, doctors, clinical psychologists, gender, spousal abuse, domestic violence, family violence, family relationships, Cuba.

  16. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

    2008-01-18

    activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and

  17. California Veterans Receive Inadequate Treatment to Address their Mental Health Needs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Linda Diem; Grant, David; Aydin, May

    2016-01-01

    Data from the 2011 to 2013 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were pooled to estimate prevalence of mental health need (serious psychological distress and impairment in one or more life domains), minimally adequate treatment (having four or more visits with a health professional in the past 12 months and use of prescription medication for mental health problems in the past 12 months), and suicide ideation among veterans living in California. Numbers and percentages were weighted to the CA population using a large sample size (N=6,952), and for comparison purposes, veterans and nonveterans were standardized to the age and gender distribution of veterans in the sample. Although differences in mental health need were similar between veterans and nonveterans after adjustment, over three-quarters of veterans did not receive minimally adequate treatment needed to address their mental health needs. Suicide ideation was significantly higher among veterans than nonveterans. Male veterans at all ages were more vulnerable to thinking about suicide compared to their nonveteran counterparts. PMID:27570802

  18. Identifying and Addressing the Unmet Health Care Needs of Drug Court Clients.

    PubMed

    Dugosh, Karen L; Festinger, David S; Lipkin, Jessica L

    2016-12-01

    Drug courts address issues such as employment and housing but largely miss the opportunity to address important health care issues. The current study examined the prevalence and correlates of chronic medical conditions among a sample of drug court clients who were participating in a clinical trial of an intervention to reduce HIV risk. A total of 256 clients completed a health survey at entry into the drug court program and 9 months post-entry. The baseline health survey included a comprehensive list of chronic medical conditions, and participants were asked to indicate which, if any, they had ever been diagnosed as having. They were also asked to indicate whether or not they were currently receiving treatment for each chronic condition that they endorsed. The follow-up survey was identical to the baseline survey, with the exception that it contained items reflecting (1) whether or not any member of the drug court team engaged in discussion with the client about each of the chronic conditions reported and (2) whether the client received a referral to medical care for endorsed conditions while in the drug court program. Results indicated that over 50% of clients reported at least one chronic condition and 21% reported more than one condition. Among those with chronic conditions, 71% reported having chronic conditions for which they were not currently receiving treatment. Unfortunately, drug court clients reported that the drug court team did little to address these unmet health needs. Findings from this study suggest that clients could benefit if drug court programs began to widen their focus to include addressing health-related issues.

  19. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: Addressing Needs of Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M.; Maddox, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Macneice, P.; Taktakishvili, A.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.

    2012-01-01

    Models are key elements of space weather forecasting. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) hosts a broad range of state-of-the-art space weather models and enables access to complex models through an unmatched automated web-based runs-on-request system. Model output comparisons with observational data carried out by a large number of CCMC users open an unprecedented mechanism for extensive model testing and broad community feedback on model performance. The CCMC also evaluates model's prediction ability as an unbiased broker and supports operational model selections. The CCMC is organizing and leading a series of community-wide projects aiming to evaluate the current state of space weather modeling, to address challenges of model-data comparisons, and to define metrics for various user s needs and requirements. Many of CCMC models are continuously running in real-time. Over the years the CCMC acquired the unique experience in developing and maintaining real-time systems. CCMC staff expertise and trusted relations with model owners enable to keep up to date with rapid advances in model development. The information gleaned from the real-time calculations is tailored to specific mission needs. Model forecasts combined with data streams from NASA and other missions are integrated into an innovative configurable data analysis and dissemination system (http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov) that is accessible world-wide. The talk will review the latest progress and discuss opportunities for addressing operational space weather needs in innovative and collaborative ways.

  20. Policy challenges in addressing racial disparities and improving population health.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2005-01-01

    Socioeconomic status fundamentally affects most health and disease outcomes, but black Americans are doubly disadvantaged by low status, discrimination, and residential segregation. Improving health and removing disparities are essential goals, but some efforts that improve the health of blacks in important ways also increase black-white disparity ratios. People with more information, influence, resources, and social networks may be better able to take advantage of new technologies and scientific developments, initially increasing disparities. Better health and reduced mortality should be the key policy criteria, but these criteria should be linked with consideration of careful targeting to level the playing field and close disparities.

  1. Building non-traditional collaborations to innovatively address climate-related scientific and management needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamzai, A.; Mcpherson, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The South Central Climate Science Center (SC-CSC) is one of eight regional centers formed by the U.S. Department of the Interior in order to provide decision makers with the science, tools, and information they need to address the impacts of climate variability and change on their areas of responsibility. The SC-CSC is operated through the U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with a consortium led by the University of Oklahoma that also includes Texas Tech University, Oklahoma State University, Louisiana State University, the Chickasaw Nation, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL). The SC-CSC is distinct from all other CSCs in that we have strategically included non-traditional collaborators directly within our governing consortium. The SC-CSC is the only CSC to include any Tribal nations amongst our consortium (the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) and to employ a full-time tribal liaison. As a result and in partnership with Tribes, we are able to identify the unique challenges that the almost 70 federally recognized Tribes within our region face. We also can develop culturally sensitive research projects or outreach efforts that bridge western science and traditional knowledge to address their needs. In addition, the SC-CSC is the only CSC to include another federal institution (GFDL) amongst our consortium membership. GFDL is a world-leader in climate modeling and model interpretation. Partnering GFDL's expertise in the evaluation of climate models and downscaling methods with the SC-CSC's stakeholder-driven approach allows for the generation and dissemination of guidance documents and training to accompany the high quality datasets already in development. This presentation will highlight the success stories and co-benefits of the SC-CSC's collaborations with Tribal nations and with GFDL, as well as include information on how other partners can connect to our ongoing efforts.

  2. The need to address poor numeracy skills in the emergency department environment.

    PubMed

    Eley, Robert; Sinnott, Michael; Steinle, Vicki; Trenning, Leeanne; Boyde, Mary; Dimeski, Goce

    2014-06-01

    Substantial evidence exists for lack of numerical skills among many health professionals. Although poor numeracy has long been recognised as a contributor to medication error, other activities for which numerical literacy are required, such as interpretation of diagnostic results, have been largely ignored. Poor self-awareness of lack of numerical literacy increases the risk, especially in the busy and hurried emergency environment. System changes, such as standardising units and improving number presentation, reduce the potential for misinterpretation; however system changes do not address the underlying deficiencies in mathematical skills. The training of doctors in numeracy has been largely ignored. In contrast, education for nurses frequently occurs during both pre- and post-registration programmes. Interventions have had mixed success, although additional emphasis in increasing conceptual understanding of numbers is encouraging. The consequences of poor numerical literacy should be addressed in all clinical staff, not only by practice change to remove the potential for errors to be made, but also complemented by self-awareness and education.

  3. Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Courtney D.; Degeneffe, Dennis; Davey, Cynthia; Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace; Reicks, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years) increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354) in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185) received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169) received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48). Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change. PMID:27231927

  4. Providing Palliative Care to Patients with Cancer: Addressing the Needs in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Pam; Boit, Juli; Tarus, Allison; Marete, Joyce; Ferrell, Betty; Ali, Zipporah

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the third highest cause of death in Kenya, preceded by infectious and cardiovascular diseases, and in most cases, diagnosed in later stages. Nurses are the primary caregivers, assessing and managing these patients in the clinic, in inpatient settings, and in rural and remote communities. While cancer rates remain high, the burden to the patient, the caregiver, and society as a whole continues to rise. Kenya's poverty complicates cancer even further. Many Kenyans are unaware of cancer's signs and symptoms, and limited diagnostic and treatment centers are available. Despite these barriers, there is still hope and help for those in Kenya, who suffer from cancer. The World Health Organization has stated that palliative care is a basic human right and nurses providing this care in Kenya are making efforts to support cancer patients’ ongoing needs, in order to promote compassionate palliative care and prevent suffering. The purpose of this paper is to address the palliative care needs of patients with cancer in Kenya by providing education to nurses and influencing health-care policy and education at micro and macro levels. A case study weaved throughout will highlight these issues. PMID:28217729

  5. Addressing substance abuse treatment needs of parents involved with the child welfare system.

    PubMed

    Oliveros, Arazais; Kaufman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to synthesize available data to help guide policy and programmatic initiatives for families with substance abuse problems who are involved with the child welfare system, and identify gaps in the research base preventing further refinement of practices in this area. To date, Family Treatment Drug Court and newly developed home-based substance abuse treatment interventions appear the most effective at improving substance abuse treatment initiation and completion in child welfare populations. Research is needed to compare the efficacy of these two approaches, and examine cost and child well-being indicators in addition to substance abuse treatment and child welfare outcomes.

  6. Improving diaper design to address incontinence associated dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammatory skin disease mainly triggered by prolonged skin contact with urine, feces but also liberal detergent use when cleansing the skin. To minimize the epidermal barrier challenge we optimized the design of adult incontinence briefs. In the fluid absorption area we interposed a special type of acidic, curled-type of cellulose between the top sheet in contact with the skin and the absorption core beneath containing the polyacrylate superabsorber. The intention was to minimize disturbance of the already weak acid mantle of aged skin. We also employed air-permeable side panels to minimize skin occlusion and swelling of the stratum corneum. Methods The surface pH of diapers was measured after repeated wetting with a urine substitute fluid at the level of the top sheet. Occlusive effects and hydration of the stratum corneum were measured after a 4 hour application of different side panel materials by corneometry on human volunteers. Finally, we evaluated skin symptoms in 12 patients with preexisting IAD for 21 days following the institutional switch to the optimized diaper design. Local skin care protocols remained in place unchanged. Results The improved design created a surface pH of 4.6 which was stable even after repeated wetting throughout a 5 hour period. The "standard design" briefs had values of 7.1, which is alkaline compared to the acidic surface of normal skin. Side panels made from non-woven material with an air-permeability of more than 1200 l/m2/s avoided excessive hydration of the stratum corneum when compared to the commonly employed air-impermeable plastic films. Resolution of pre-existing IAD skin lesions was noted in 8 out of 12 patients after the switch to the optimized brief design. Conclusions An improved design of adult-type briefs can create an acidic pH on the surface and breathable side panels avoid over-hydration of the stratum corneum and occlusion. This may support the

  7. Addressing Metrics and Validation Needs for Space Weather Models, Tools and Forecasting Techniques at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Systematic evaluation of space environment models and tools and confidence assessment of space weather forecasting techniques and procedures are critical for development and further improvements of operational space weather prediction capabilities. Quantifying the confidence and predictive accuracy of model calculations is a key information needed for making high-consequence decisions. The approach to the validation, uncertainty assessment and to the format of the metrics is strongly dependent on specific applications and end user needs. There is a need to understand which aspects of spatial and temporal characteristicsof space environment parameters are the most important for specific impacts on technological and biological systems. The presentation will review progress in on-going coordinated model validation activities and metrics studies organized and supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. We will focus on tasks associated with model-data comparisons, such as appropriate metrics selection for specific applications, preparation of observational data, sensitivity analysis of model outputs to input parameters, boundary conditions, modeling assumptions, adjustable parameters. We will discuss ideas for community-wide initiatives to build upon successes and to address challenges of metrics and validation activities, to develop guidelines and procedures to trace improvements over time and to pave a path forward.

  8. A vaccine manufacturer's approach to address medical needs related to seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Baras, Benoit; Bouveret, Nancy; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Fries, Louis; Gillard, Paul; Sänger, Roland; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    Vaccination is considered to be one of the most effective tools to decrease morbidity as well as mortality caused by influenza viruses. For the prevention of seasonal influenza, Fluarix and FluLaval have been marketed since 1987 and 1992, respectively. Both vaccines have consistently been shown to meet or exceed the regulatory criteria for immunogenicity against the three strains H1N1, H3N2 and B, have a good safety profile, and are recommended for vaccinating children and adults of all ages. For the prevention of pandemic influenza, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has obtained licensure of a pre-pandemic vaccine, Prepandrix. This split-virus H5N1 adjuvanted with AS03, a proprietary oil-in-water emulsion-based adjuvant system, has demonstrated broad immunity against drifted H5N1 strains and has been shown to be effective in preventing mortality and viral shedding in animal studies. The influenza vaccine portfolio of GSK addresses specific medical needs related to seasonal or pandemic influenza viruses, which remain an important public health threat worldwide.

  9. Measurement and monitoring needs, capabilities and potential for addressing reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation under REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Hansen, Matthew; Houghton, Richard A.; Walker, Wayne; Laporte, Nadine; Busch, Jonah

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the state of measurement and monitoring capabilities for forests in the context of REDD+ needs, with a focus on what is currently possible, where improvements are needed, and what capabilities will be advanced in the near-term with new technologies already under development. We summarize the role of remote sensing (both satellite and aircraft) for observational monitoring of forests, including measuring changes in their current and past extent for setting baselines, their carbon stock density for estimating emissions in areas that are deforested or degraded, and their regrowth dynamics following disturbance. We emphasize the synergistic role of integrating field inventory measurements with remote sensing for best practices in monitoring, reporting and verification. We also address the potential of remote sensing for enforcing safeguards on conservation of natural forests and biodiversity. We argue that capabilities exist now to meet operational needs for REDD+ measurement, reporting, and verification and reference levels. For some other areas of importance for REDD+, such as safeguards for natural forests and biodiversity, monitoring capabilities are approaching operational in the near term. For all REDD+ needs, measurement capabilities will rapidly advance in the next few years as a result of new technology as well as advances in capacity building both within and outside of the tropical forest nations on which REDD+ is primarily focused.

  10. Addressing the mental health needs of looked after children in foster care: the experiences of foster carers.

    PubMed

    York, W; Jones, J

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In the UK and internationally, the number of looked after children is increasing year on year. Mental health problems among looked after children are significantly higher than in the general population, and the uptake of mental health services for these children is low. There is a poor prognosis for children with untreated mental health problems; this is further compounded if the child is within the care system. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to our understanding of foster carers' experiences of the mental health needs of looked after children and demonstrates some of the challenges associated with accessing appropriate and timely mental health services. New knowledge derived from this research is that the barriers to accessing Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are not at the time of initial referral as previously reported, but later, once within the mental health system with long waiting times experienced particularly for specialist services. This study provides new insights into the experience of being a foster carer and the levels of support and resources needed that directly relate to the viability of the placement. The majority of the foster carers interviewed were from a Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) background, previously under-represented in this research area. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: A number of areas in current CAMHS provision need addressing with a focus on accessibility, consultation and support for foster carers. Waiting times need to be addressed, and improved communication with other agencies is also highlighted. CAMHS nurses are well placed to develop and deliver a comprehensive care package to foster carers, offering more tailored support to them whilst enabling the children and young people in their care to access and engage more effectively with mental health services.

  11. Failure to address African Americans' spiritual needs during hospitalization: identifying predictors of dissatisfaction across the arc of service provision.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R; Wolosin, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Using a national sample of recently hospitalized older African Americans (N = 2,227), this study identified predictors of dissatisfaction with the manner in which clients' spiritual needs were addressed during hospitalization. Of 8 major areas of service provision examined, 3 were significant predictors of dissatisfaction: nurses, physicians, and the discharge process. The findings underscore the importance of collaborative efforts to address elderly Black clients' spiritual needs. Social workers, who frequently oversee the discharge process, can play an important role in addressing African Americans' spiritual needs by developing discharge plans that incorporate clients' spiritual strengths and resources into the planning process.

  12. Addressing Facility Needs for Concrete Assessment Using Ultrasonic Testing: Mid-year Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Payan, Cedric; Roberts, Peter M.

    2012-03-28

    The UFD Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel (June 30, 2011) emphasizes the need for the development of monitoring techniques and technologies for dry storage cask materials. A high priority is given to the development of 'systems for early detection of confinement boundary degradation.' This requires both new techniques for monitoring and inspection, as well as new measurable parameters to quantify mechanical degradation. The use of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) has been shown to provide sensitive parameters correlating to mechanical degradation in a wide variety of materials. Herein we report upon recent research performed to address the high priority of concrete degradation using a selection of these techniques and compare to a ASTM standard ultrasonic technique. Also reported are the near term plans to continue this research in the remaining FY and into the coming years. This research was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the Acoustics Lab of the Geophysics group in the Earth and Environmental Sciences division, and in collaboration with the Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation at the University of the Mediterranean (Aix en Provence, France) and the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of using an NDE technique based on non-linear ultrasound for determining the depth and degree of microcracking in the near surface of concrete and to assess the degree of sensitivity of such technique. This objective is reached by the means of combining linear and nonlinear measurements, associated with numerical simulation. We first study the global effect of thermal damage on concrete's linear and nonlinear properties by resonance inspection techniques. We show that standard pulse wave speed techniques are not relevant to extract mechanical properties of concrete. The high sensitivity of measured nonlinearity is shown and serves as a

  13. Addressing students' social and emotional needs: the role of mental health teams in schools.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Norris M

    2002-01-01

    Children in today's society face many stresses from a variety of sources that have a major impact on thier psychosocial adjustment and academic performance in school. These stressful events and thier consequences on the quality of life and academic success are particularly significant among low-income and ethnic minority students in American society. Many schools have adopted strategies to help students who are impacted by stressful life events to deal affectively with their problems in an attempt to reduce school failure and school dropout rates among these students. Most notable among these strategies are school-based mental health programs including the establishment of school-based mental health teams which seek to proactively address individual student concerns while improving the general climate of schools. The evidence seems to support the claim that these school-based services have a positive impact on students' social and emotional well-being as well as on their academic achievements. However, with more careful monitoring and much more consistent support from administrators and policy makers, these school-based approaches can more fully realize their potential to enhance the quality of life and to positively impact the future of many poor and ethnic minority students.

  14. Water Information System Platforms Addressing Critical Societal Needs in the Mena Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Kfouri, Claire; Peters, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The MENA region includes 18 countries, the occupied Palestinian territories and Western Sahara. However, the region of interest for this study has a strategic interest in countries adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea, which includes, Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan. The 90% of the water in the MENA region is used for the agriculture use. By the end of this century. this region is projected to experience an increase of 3 C to 5 C in mean temperatures and a 20% decline in precipitation (lPCC, 2007). Due to lower precipitation, water run-off is projected to drop by 20% to 30% in most of MENA by 2050 Reduced stream flow and groundwater recharge might lead to a reduction in water supply of 10% or greater by 2050. Therefore, per IPCC projections in temperature rise and precipitation decline in the region, the scarcity of water will become more acute with population growth, and rising demand of food in the region. Additionally, the trans boundary water issues will continue to plague the region in terms of sharing data for better management of water resources. Such pressing issues have brought The World Bank, USAID and NASA to jointly collaborate for establishing integrated, modern, up to date NASA developed capabilities for countries in the MENA region for addressing water resource issues and adapting to climate change impacts for improved decision making and societal benefit. This initiative was launched in October 2011 and is schedule to be completed by the end of2015.

  15. Opportunities for nursing-dental collaboration: addressing oral health needs among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Providing quality oral health care for the growing elderly population is a major challenge, particularly for those residing in long-term care institutions. The Surgeon General's report on oral health in America (2000) noted that elders are at particularly high risk for oral health problems, and poor oral health in seniors has been linked to general systemic health risks such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, poor nutrition, and respiratory infection. This article outlines the need for greater attention to oral health care for the elderly in both nursing education and practice, and describes opportunities for effective inter-professional collaboration between nursing and oral health professionals. It also provides specific recommendations for fostering such collaboration. Working together, nurses and dental professionals can raise awareness of this issue, promote higher standards for oral care, and improve oral health and quality of life for elderly Americans.

  16. Improving Care for Children With Complex Needs

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Medically Complex Children; Care Coordination; Case Manager; Care Manager; Collaborative Care; Disease Management; Patient Care Team or Organization; Managed Care; Children With Chronic Conditions; Children With Special Health Care Needs; Shared Care Plan; Patient Care Plan; Health Care and Resource Utilization; Adherence to Care; Functional Status and Productivity; Health Related Quality of Life; Satisfaction With Care; Care Coordinator; Family Experience of Care; Quality Health Care

  17. Civil society organizations: capacity to address the needs of the urban poor in Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Ekirapa, Akaco; Mgomella, George S; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a needs assessment that describes the landscape of civil society organizations (CSOs) in three informal settlements around Nairobi, Kenya. The numbers of CSOs have rapidly increased in areas underserved by governments including poor urban neighbourhoods but little is known about CSOs capacity to meet the priority health needs of the urban poor. It is also unclear why, despite a proliferation of CSOs, residents still experience unimproved health outcomes. We collected data on core activities, financial management, and governance structures. Of the 952 CSOs assessed, 47 per cent reported HIV/AIDS counselling, prevention, and treatment as their core activity. Most CSOs reported good financial management systems and governance structures but responses were not validated. Representation in district health stakeholder fora was low; most CSOs did not have the capacity to effectively deliver services that would have impact. For CSOs to realize the desired goal to improve the well-being of low-income populations, programmes to build their management capacity are essential.

  18. Tailoring clinical services to address the unique needs of adolescents from the pregnancy test to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Moriarty Daley, Alison; Sadler, Lois S; Dawn Reynolds, Heather

    2013-04-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15-19-year-old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher-order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the healthcare system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood.

  19. Tailoring Clinical Services to Address the Unique Needs of Adolescents from the Pregnancy Test to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alison Moriarty; Sadler, Lois S.; Reynolds, Heather Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15–19 year old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the health care system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood. PMID:23522339

  20. Resources from the NASA SMD Astrophysics Forum: Addressing the needs of the higher education community (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Schultz, G. R.; Smith, D.; Bianchi, L.; Blair, W. P.; Fraknoi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Four NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums organize individual SMD-funded E/PO projects and their teams into a coordinated effort. The Forums assist scientists and educators with becoming involved in SMD E/PO and make SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. The Astrophysics Forum and the Astrophysics E/PO community have focused efforts to support and engage the higher education community on enhancing awareness of the resources available to them. To ensure Astrophysics higher education efforts are grounded in audience needs, we held informal conversations with instructors of introductory astronomy courses, convened sessions with higher education faculty and E/PO professionals at conferences, and examined existing literature and findings of the SMD Higher Education Working Group. This work indicates that most Astronomy 101 instructors are not specialists in areas of astrophysics where rapid progress is being made, older textbooks are out of date, and ideas are challenging for students. Instructors are seeking resources and training that support them in effectively teaching the latest science and are in need both basic material and information on new results. In this session, we will discuss our efforts to address these expressed needs, namely through Resource Guides and Slide Sets, and how these are applicable to topics in Heliophysics and Planetary Science. We have collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to create two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets. These fields are ripe with scientific developments that college instructors have told us they find challenging to stay current. Each guide includes a wide variety of sources of background information, links to animations/simulations, classroom activities, and references on teaching each topic. Feedback from Astronomy 101 instructors indicated that the

  1. 75 FR 51831 - Request for Measures of Health Plan Efforts To Address Health Plan Members' Health Literacy Needs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-20679] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Request for Measures of Health Plan Efforts To Address Health Plan Members' Health Literacy Needs... or items that measure how well health plans and health providers address health plan...

  2. The Need for Nursing and Midwifery Programmes of Education to Address the Health Care Needs of Minority Ethnic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Irena; Alleyne, Jo

    1995-01-01

    Nursing education should play an important role in developing culturally sensitive health care. Nurses and midwives should be trained in assessing health needs of different cultural groups and developing appropriate care. (SK)

  3. Ballistic Missile Defense: Actions Needed to Address Implementation Issues and Estimate Long-Term Costs for European Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE Actions Needed to Address Implementation Issues and Estimate Long-Term Costs for...and Estimate Long-Term Costs for European Capabilities 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...requesters April 2014 BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE Actions Needed to Address Implementation Issues and Estimate Long-Term Costs for European Capabilities

  4. Report: Some States Cannot Address Assessment Needs and Face Limitations in Meeting Future Superfund Cleanup Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00027, September 1, 2004. The five States have established hazardous waste site cleanup programs that address contaminated sites posing human health and environmental risks ranging from low to high.

  5. Identifying Successful Strategies Implemented by Teachers in High Performing, High Poverty Schools to Address the Diverse Needs of Economically Disadvantaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor-Statom, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    This research study sought to identify the successful strategies used by teachers in high performing, high poverty schools to address the needs of economically disadvantaged students. The study examined teacher perceptions, motivation factors, and instructional strategies as they relate to the improvement of the academic progress of economically…

  6. Progress Addressing Safeguards Capability Development Needs through Educational Outreach and Knowledge Management

    SciTech Connect

    Leek, K. M.; Seward, Amy M.; Dickman, Deborah A.; Toomey, Charles J.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Mathews, Caroline E.; Fishbone, L.; Graham, T.; Rosenthal, Michael; Ward, B.

    2010-11-08

    This paper describes the NGSI Human Capital Development Program's domestic and international activities, and offers specific case studies to exemplify the outcomes and progress achieved in this area over the past several years. The paper highlights the importance of a sustained effort to address the human dimension of safeguards and nonproliferation and to address critical work force issues in the U.S. and abroad.

  7. Addressing Younger Workers’ Needs: The Promoting U through Safety and Health (PUSH) Trial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rohlman, Diane S.; Parish, Megan; Elliot, Diane L.; Hanson, Ginger; Perrin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Most younger workers, less than 25 years old, receive no training in worker safety. We report the feasibility and outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of an electronically delivered safety and health curriculum for younger workers entitled, PUSH (Promoting U through Safety and Health). All younger workers (14–24 years old) hired for summer work at a large parks and recreation organization were invited to participate in an evaluation of an online training and randomized into an intervention or control condition. Baseline and end-of-summer online instruments assessed acceptability, knowledge, and self-reported attitudes and behaviors. One-hundred and forty participants (mean age 17.9 years) completed the study. The innovative training was feasible and acceptable to participants and the organization. Durable increases in safety and health knowledge were achieved by intervention workers (p < 0.001, effect size (Cohen’s d) 0.4). However, self-reported safety and health attitudes did not improve with this one-time training. These results indicate the potential utility of online training for younger workers and underscore the limitations of a single training interaction to change behaviors. Interventions may need to be delivered over a longer period of time and/or include environmental components to effectively alter behavior. PMID:27517968

  8. Addressing cancer control needs of African-born immigrants in the US: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Song, Minna; Kigen, Ocla; Jennings, Yvonne; Nwabukwu, Ify; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2014-10-01

    Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African immigrants have worse cancer outcomes. However, there is little research about cancer behaviors and/or interventions in this growing population as they are generally grouped with populations from America or the Caribbean. This systematic review examines cancer-related studies that included African-born participants. We searched PsycINFO, Ovid Medline, Pubmed, CINHAL, and Web of Science for articles focusing on any type of cancer that included African-born immigrant participants. Twenty articles met study inclusion criteria; only two were interventions. Most articles focused on one type of cancer (n=11) (e.g., breast cancer) and were conducted in disease-free populations (n=15). Studies included African participants mostly from Nigeria (n=8) and Somalia (n=6). However, many papers (n=7) did not specify nationality or had small percentages (<5%) of African immigrants (n=5). Studies found lower screening rates in African immigrants compared to other subpopulations (e.g. US-born). Awareness of screening practices was limited. Higher acculturation levels were associated with higher screening rates. Barriers to screening included access (e.g. insurance), pragmatic (e.g. transportation), and psychosocial barriers (e.g. shame). Interventions to improve cancer outcomes in African immigrants are needed. Research that includes larger samples with diverse African subgroups including cancer survivors is necessary to inform future directions.

  9. Addressing Younger Workers' Needs: The Promoting U through Safety and Health (PUSH) Trial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rohlman, Diane S; Parish, Megan; Elliot, Diane L; Hanson, Ginger; Perrin, Nancy

    2016-08-10

    Most younger workers, less than 25 years old, receive no training in worker safety. We report the feasibility and outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of an electronically delivered safety and health curriculum for younger workers entitled, PUSH (Promoting U through Safety and Health). All younger workers (14-24 years old) hired for summer work at a large parks and recreation organization were invited to participate in an evaluation of an online training and randomized into an intervention or control condition. Baseline and end-of-summer online instruments assessed acceptability, knowledge, and self-reported attitudes and behaviors. One-hundred and forty participants (mean age 17.9 years) completed the study. The innovative training was feasible and acceptable to participants and the organization. Durable increases in safety and health knowledge were achieved by intervention workers (p < 0.001, effect size (Cohen's d) 0.4). However, self-reported safety and health attitudes did not improve with this one-time training. These results indicate the potential utility of online training for younger workers and underscore the limitations of a single training interaction to change behaviors. Interventions may need to be delivered over a longer period of time and/or include environmental components to effectively alter behavior.

  10. Classroom Management Strategies to Address the Needs of Sudanese Refugee Learners: Support Document--Methodology and Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Ursula; Hull, Oksana

    2007-01-01

    This document presents the methodology and literature review for the research report "Classroom Management Strategies to Address the Needs of Sudanese Refugee Learners" (ED499673), which examined the extent to which English language, literacy and numeracy teachers used classroom management strategies to meet the needs of adult Sudanese…

  11. Addressing Student Mental Health Needs by Providing Direct and Indirect Services and Building Alliances in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaffenberger, Carol J.; O'Rorke-Trigiani, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Given that 20% of students experience mental health issues that interfere with school performance and most of these students will turn first to their school for help, school counselors need to consider how they can best serve this population. This article describes how school counselors can address the mental health needs of students by providing…

  12. Addressing Mental Health Needs in Our Schools: Supporting the Role of School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Traci P.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors are a well-positioned resource to reach the significant number of children and adolescents with mental health problems. In this special school counseling issue of "The Professional Counselor," some articles focus on systemic, top-down advocacy efforts as the point of intervention for addressing child and adolescent…

  13. Managing Human Resources. Greater OPM Leadership Needed To Address Critical Challenges. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The General Accounting Office examined the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM's) leadership role in addressing critical human resource problems and preparing the government to meet future challenges. Federal managers, OPM employees, and federal personnel officials were surveyed to study federal government problems in hiring, managing, and…

  14. Invisible, Marginalized, and Stigmatized: Understanding and Addressing the Needs of Atheist Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kathleen M.; Mueller, John A.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors introduce the topic of atheist students to the field of student affairs. The authors provide definitions of relevant terms related to the perspectives and principles of atheists. Then, they briefly address the demographics of atheism and focus on atheist student experiences on college campuses. The authors conclude…

  15. Addressing the Needs of Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Considerations and Complexities for High School Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharczyk, Suzanne; Reutebuch, Colleen K.; Carter, Erik W.; Hedges, Susan; El Zein, Farah; Fan, Hannah; Gustafson, Jenny R.

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are driving the field to address how secondary education might be optimally designed and delivered. We conducted 28 focus groups across four states to explore the contexts, considerations, and complexities associated with delivering and combining evidence-based interventions to meet the…

  16. Mid-Atlantic Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), one of 10 RACs established under the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002 (20 U.S.C. sections 9601 et. seq.) to assess the educational needs of the region. The committee's report outlines the educational needs across the District of Columbia and…

  17. Addressing domestic violence in primary care: what the physician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Jinan; Taleb, Rim

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is quite prevalent and negatively impacts the health and mental wellbeing of those affected. Victims of DV are frequent users of health service, yet they are infrequently recognized. Physicians tend to treat the presenting complaints without addressing the root cause of the problem. Lack of knowledge on adequately managing cases of DV and on appropriate ways to help survivors is commonly presented as a barrier. This article presents the magnitude of the problem of DV in the Arab world, highlights the role of the primary care physician in addressing this problem, and provides practical steps that can guide the clinician in the Arab world in giving a comprehensive and culturally sensitive service to the survivors of DV. PMID:24647277

  18. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes.

  19. GPS: Actions Needed to Address Ground System Development Problems and User Equipment Production Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    review the status of OCX development and DOD’s efforts to field M- code signal capability. This report addresses (1) the extent to which DOD is...meeting cost, schedule, and performance requirements for OCX; (2) the progress DOD is making in delivering M- code capable MGUE by the end of fiscal year...2017; and (3) the challenges DOD faces in synchronizing the development of GPS III, OCX, and MGUE to deploy M- code . To conduct this work, GAO

  20. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  1. Are We Doing Enough to Address the Cancer Care Needs 
of the LGBT Community?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlton; Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-06-01

    The 2011 film titled Gen Silent (http://gensilent.com) focuses on the needs and issues of six aging lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, at least two of whom had cancer. One of the issues made apparent in the film was the lack of trust in the healthcare system and the discrimination these individuals faced at a time when their needs were growing and they were increasingly vulnerable. It was sad and caused us to reflect on what we, as oncology nurses, are doing to meet the needs of LGBT individuals faced with a cancer diagnosis.
.

  2. Limits to Economic Growth: Why Direct Investments Are Needed to Address Child Undernutrition in India.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, S V; Subramanyam, Malavika A

    2015-11-01

    About two of every five undernourished young children of the world live in India. These high levels of child undernutrition have persisted in India for several years, even in its relatively well-developed states. Moreover, this pattern was observed during a period of rapid economic growth. Evidence from India and other developing countries suggests that economic growth has little to no impact on reducing child undernutrition. We argue that a growth-mediated strategy is unlikely to be effective in tackling child undernutrition unless growth is pro-poor and leads to investment in programs addressing the root causes of this persistent challenge.

  3. To Build or Not to Build: Addressing Facilities Needs While Controlling Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadamus, James A.

    2015-01-01

    When trustees, presidents, and senior college administrators meet, one topic dominates the conversation: how to keep education quality high and costs down. To keep quality high, college leaders need to have strong faculties and state-of-the-art facilities for teaching and research. Quality counts but it also costs, and that is where the pressures…

  4. Student Support in China: Addressing the Perceived Needs of Undergraduate English Department Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schippers, Margriet

    2008-01-01

    As yet little research into the perspectives of Chinese students studying in mainland China's Higher Education Institutions has been undertaken. This paper explores the issue of students' support needs and presents the findings of a study carried out in 2005-2007 at a public university in North East China. The Action Research method used…

  5. Visitor or Inhabitant? Addressing the Needs of Undergraduate Transnational Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Jennifer; McCall, Louise; Abu-Arab, Adela

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify key issues for students in an undergraduate medical course with cross border delivery and the impact of these issues on the students' ability to learn. Data relating to the student experience and perceived student needs were collected from transnational students and teaching staff from Australia and Malaysia.…

  6. When Young Children Need Help: Understanding and Addressing Emotional, Behavioral, and Developmental Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschland, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    You know what it's like to spend time with youngsters who are particularly puzzling or hard to help. "When Young Children Need Help" helps early childhood educators make sense of what is going on for such children and use that understanding to promote growth and mastery. Written for child care center staff, family child care providers,…

  7. Promoting Health by Addressing Basic Needs: Effect of Problem Resolution on Contacting Health Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Tess; Kreuter, Matthew W.; Boyum, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Members of vulnerable populations have heightened needs for health services. One advantage of integrating health risk assessment and referrals into social service assistance systems such as 2-1-1 is that such systems help callers resolve problems in other areas (e.g., housing). Callers to 2-1-1 in Missouri (N = 1,090) with at least one behavioral…

  8. Resources Needed for Addressing Common Core Standards in Mathematics, Language Arts and Next Generation Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzens, Margaret B.

    2015-01-01

    There is a vital need in the mathematics and science teaching and learning community at the secondary school level for assistance for teachers in adapting curricular materials to meet the many district, state, and national demands and to facilitate high-quality learning of students and their ability to transfer this learning and apply it as they…

  9. Addressing the Need for School Age Child Care: A Guide for Philadelphia Elementary School Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzer, Janet L.

    The Delaware Valley Child Care Council (DVCCC) developed this booklet to help Philadelphia school principals plan and develop privately run after-school centers in their schools. First, an executive summary documents the need for school-age day care nationwide and in the Philadelphia area. Section I offers guidance on planning a school-age child…

  10. Northeast and Islands Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report discusses the deliberations of the Northeast and Islands (NEI) Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), one of 10 RACs established by the U.S. Department of Education to solicit information about the educational needs of state and local educators, school officials, business leaders, state education agencies, parents, local communities, and…

  11. Addressing Needs of Military Families during Deployment: Military Service Providers' Perceptions of Integrating Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Seth Christian Walter

    2011-01-01

    Service providers are increasingly recognizing the need to develop effective methods for delivering supporting services to military families during deployment. Research suggests that military families experience increased levels of stress during the cycle of deployment. Bronfenbrenner (1979) conceptualized the family operating within the context…

  12. Teaching to Address Diverse Learning Needs: Development and Validation of a Differentiated Instruction Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Amélie; Guay, Frédéric; Valois, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In the province of Quebec, Canada, a trend towards full inclusion has impelled teachers to adapt their instruction to meet the needs of both advanced and weaker learners in regular school settings. The main purpose of the present investigation was to develop and validate the Differentiated Instruction Scale (DIS), which assesses the use of…

  13. Technical Writing and International Students: Addressing Special Needs with Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, Stuart

    The selection and use of instructional materials to develop technical writing skills in limited-English-proficient foreign students are discussed. Focus is on the influence of cultural differences in second language learning and the need for instructional materials that accommodate these differences. The first section examines American…

  14. "But, We Don't Have a Library": Exploring Approaches to Addressing Branch Campuses' Library Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetler, Kirsten; DeSilva, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Librarians at Central Oregon Community College's Barber Library explored how to best serve the needs of three satellite campuses across a large geographic region. While initially intending to start an embedded librarianship program, a pair of surveys showed the relationships and awareness necessary for the foundation of such a program were…

  15. Translating Research Into E/PO That Addresses Real Needs in K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Wil E.; Belbruno, E. A.; Roelofsen Moody, T.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges in NASA ROSES E/PO is translating cutting edge research into products for which there is a demonstrated need. Rather than working from the premise that the "research is so cool’ that K-12 students or the public should learn about it, it is key to consult with the target audience to identify what their needs really are. The partnership between NJACE, Innovative Orbital Design, Inc., and Princeton offered a unique opportunity to translate intriguing but theoretical and mathematical research related to low energy orbits into a valuable education product. NJACE worked with educators to identify several needs with an intellectual link to this research: 1) Understanding of Gravity and Newton's Laws, 2) Understanding of Energy and Energy Transformations, 3) Integration of the sciences with math and technology, and 4) Knowledge of NASA's past accomplishments (such as the moon landings). Based on these identified needs, two science units were developed for students in grades 5-12 that integrate astronomy, physics, and the life sciences with math and technology. In addition an engaging public lecture was developed that tells a personal story of the quest for more economic space travel. In the past year, the workshops have been presented on three occasions, reaching over 75 teachers and demand exceeded available space with numerous teachers on waiting lists. The lecture has been presented numerous times at planetariums, museums, amateur astronomy and other clubs. We hope that our partnership will serve as a useful example of how to translate cutting edge research into valuable education products with an identified need. We will provide handouts with links to a website where the products and training can be downloaded in hope that others will help disseminate our product.

  16. Effectiveness of Primary Health Care Services in Addressing Mental Health Needs of Minority Refugee Population in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Shrestha-Ranjit, Jagamaya; Patterson, Elizabeth; Manias, Elizabeth; Payne, Deborah; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2017-04-01

    Many people are displaced from their country of origin and become refugees, mostly due to armed conflicts, political violence and human rights abuse. Refugees have complex mental, physical, and social health problems related to their traumatic background and the experiences they have endured during their refugee journey. The aim of this qualitative exploratory study was to examine the effectiveness of primary health care services in addressing mental health needs of Bhutanese refugee women resettled in New Zealand. This study included focus group discussion with Bhutanese women and men followed by interviews with health service providers. The findings of this study highlighted inadequacies and constraints in addressing Bhutanese refugee women's mental health needs in New Zealand and provided evidence for recommendations to address these inadequacies.

  17. Model Programs Addressing Perinatal Drug Exposure and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Integrating Women's and Children's Needs

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Vicki; Chavkin, Wendy; Layton, Christine; Wise, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Many of the efforts to address perinatal drug exposure and human immunodeficiency virus infection have been influenced by a perspective of conflict between the interests of mother and infant. This article highlights several programs that integrate women's and children's services while dealing with these health issues. It discusses the challenges encountered by these programs, such as funding restrictions, institutional barriers, professional attitudes, regulatory constraints, and local political issues. It presents strategies for overcoming these barriers including the creative coordination of funding streams, innovative relationships with child protective agencies, effective collaboration with other agencies, and advocacy on behalf of clients and programs, and makes recommendations for certain policy changes, which could foster the development of programs that serve women and children together. PMID:19313104

  18. NASA DEVELOP Program: Students Extending Earth Science Research to Address Community Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. L.; Ross, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    Eight years ago, several students at NASA Langley Research Center launched the DEVELOP Program. DEVELOP is now at six NASA centers and is a program element of the NASA Applied Sciences Human Capital Development Program that extends the use of Earth observation sources to address Earth science issues in local communities. Students in the program strengthen their leadership and academic skills by analyzing scientific data, experimenting with novel technology, and engaging in cooperative interactions. Graduate, undergraduate and high school students from across the United States collaborate to integrate NASA space-based Earth observation sources and partner agencies' science data, models and decision support tools. Information from these collaborations result in rapid prototype projects addressing local policy and environmental issues. Following a rigorous 10-week term, DEVELOP students present visual products demonstrating the application of NASA scientific information to community leaders at scientific and public policy forums such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the Southern Growth Policies Board (SGPB). Submission of written products to peer-reviewed scientific publications and other public databases is also done. Student experiences and interactions working with NASA data, advanced technological programs and community leaders have, and continue to prove, beneficial to student professional development. DEVELOP's human capital development focus affords students real world experience, making them a valuable asset to the scientific and global community and to the continuation of a scientifically aware society. NASA's DEVELOP Program is more than scientific exploration and valuable results; DEVELOP fosters human capital development by bridging the gap between NASA science research and federal, state, local and tribal resource managers.

  19. Implementing a Public Health Approach to Addressing Mental Health Needs in a University Setting: Lessons and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parcover, Jason; Mays, Sally; McCarthy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The mental health needs of college students are placing increasing demands on counseling center resources, and traditional outreach efforts may be outdated or incomplete. The public health model provides an approach for reaching more students, decreasing stigma, and addressing mental health concerns before they reach crisis levels. Implementing a…

  20. Case Studies on Using Strengths and Interests to Address the Needs of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanou, Aaron; Hough, Lauren; Powell, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Students on the autism spectrum present with difficulties in a variety of areas, including social understanding, emotional regulation, academics, and behavior. Professionals working in the field of autism must identify and address these areas of need given each individual child's specific cognitive profiles. In this article the authors highlight…

  1. Suicide Risk Protocols: Addressing the Needs of High Risk Youths Identified through Suicide Prevention Efforts and in Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbron, Nicole; Goldston, David; Walrath, Christine; Rodi, Michael; McKeon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several agencies have emphasized the importance of establishing clear protocols or procedures to address the needs of youths who are identified as suicidal through suicide prevention programs or in emergency department settings. What constitutes optimal guidelines for developing and implementing such protocols, however, is unclear. At the request…

  2. 78 FR 3005 - Creating an Alternative Approval Pathway for Certain Drugs Intended to Address Unmet Medical Need...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Creating an Alternative Approval Pathway for Certain Drugs Intended to Address Unmet Medical Need; Public Hearing; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public hearing; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  3. Defense Acquisitions. Assessments Needed to Address V-22 Aircraft Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Honorable Edolphus Towns Chairman Committee on Oversight and Government Reform House of Representatives The Honorable Bart Stupak Chairman...Report to Congressional Requesters United States Government Accountability Office GAO May 2009 DEFENSE ACQUISITIONS...Assessments Needed to Address V-22 Aircraft Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments GAO-09-482 Report Documentation Page

  4. Responding to rural health needs through community participation: addressing the concerns of children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Vivienne; Ervin, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    A small rural health service undertook a major needs analysis in 2008 to identify gaps in service delivery and duplication of services. This exercise was intended to inform strategic direction but the result was consumer and community consultation and outcomes that far exceeded everyone's expectations. Organisations often pay lip service to the concept of community participation and consultation and the importance of consumer involvement. Turning this rhetoric into action is challenging and requires dedicated staff, organisational support and momentum for it to occur. The project described resulted in targeted, purposeful action regarding community engagement, and the findings and outcomes are reflective of this. The unexpected findings required an organisational shift, which was embraced by the health service and resulted in collaborative partnerships with consumers and organisations that are proving beneficial to the entire community and outlying areas. Few organisations would demonstrate the willingness to accommodate such change, or undertake a needs analysis that is chiefly community driven.

  5. Joint Strike Fighter: DOD Actions Needed to Further Enhance Restructuring and Address Affordability Risks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...Software Growth 19 Figure 7: JSF Concurrency 23 Figure 8: JSF Design Changes Over Time 28 Figure 9: JSF Mean Times between Failure Demonstrated...Page 29 GAO-12-437 Joint Strike Fighter specified period of time without failure , degradation, or need of repair. During system

  6. Addressing current medical needs in invasive fungal infection prevention and treatment with new antifungal agents, strategies and formulations.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Stuart K; Drew, Richard H; Perfect, John R

    2011-09-01

    Introduction: Morbidity and mortality associated with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) remains unacceptably high. Such diseases represent a substantial burden to the healthcare system. New options are needed to address antifungal resistance in existing and emerging pathogens and improve treatment outcomes while minimizing drug-related toxicities and interactions. Awareness of new and potential future options is of great value for those healthcare professionals who care for patients with IFIs. Areas covered: A search of PubMed, infectious diseases conference abstracts and reference lists from relevant publications was conducted and relevant information abstracted. This review describes the limitations of existing systemic antifungal therapies (e.g., resistance, drug-drug interactions, drug-related toxicities) and summarizes data regarding several emerging antifungal compounds including (but not limited to) new triazoles (e.g. isavuconazole, ravuconazole), echinocandins (e.g., aminocandin) and nikkomycin Z. Agents in clinical trials such as (but not limited to) new triazoles (e.g., isavuconazole, ravuconazole), echinocandins (e.g., aminocandin) and nikkomycin are included. New formulations of existing drugs including reformulations of miconazole, posaconazole and amphotericin B are also reviewed. Finally, new or novel administration strategies for existing drugs such as combination antifungal therapy, antifungal dose escalation, adjunctive use of iron chelators and preemptive therapy are discussed. Expert opinion: All present antifungal agents have some deficiencies in antifungal spectra, toxicity, pharmacokinetics and/or drug-drug interactions, making them less than ideal for some fungal infections. Therefore, there remains an urgent need to find safe, effective, rapidly fungicidal, broad-spectrum antifungal agents with excellent pharmacodynamics to effectively eliminate the fungus from the body with short antifungal courses.

  7. Addressing the Needs of Speakers with Longstanding Dysarthria: Computerized and Traditional Therapy Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Hawley, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice, it is common for speech and language therapists to discontinue dysarthria treatment when a plateau in spontaneous recovery is reached. However, there is some evidence from single-case research studies that people with chronic dysarthria can improve their speech with intervention several years after the onset of…

  8. WISEWOMAN: addressing the needs of women at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Isam; Wigington, Charles; Borbely, Deborah; Ferry, Patricia; Manheim, Diane

    2011-07-01

    In the United States, the cardiovascular health of women is affected by the disparate impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) on many minority ethnic and racial groups. Women with low income also endure a disproportionate impact of the burden of CVD. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) Program was authorized by Congress in 1993 to extend the preventive health services offered to participants of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). These are low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women. The intent was to expand services of an existing federal program to address cardiovascular health concerns in this vulnerable, high-risk population. CDC funds 19 state health departments and 2 tribal organizations (both in Alaska) to implement WISEWOMAN. In the first 2 years of the current 5-year funding cycle, which began in June 2008, the WISEWOMAN grantees succeeded in providing almost 78,000 screenings, of which 46% were to women of minority racial and ethnic groups. The individual successes are important, and the WISEWOMAN Program also has achieved success in the broader arenas of healthcare and the communities in which WISEWOMAN is implemented. WISEWOMAN impacts clinical systems of care, provider education, physician extenders, and the broader community and will continue to play an important role in connecting low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women with clinical systems of care and other community resources that will result in the prevention, treatment, and management of their CVD risk.

  9. Microsurgery robots: addressing the needs of high-precision surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G; Peretti, Giorgio; Mora, Francesco; Guastini, Luca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Robotics has a significant potential to enhance the overall capacity and efficiency of healthcare systems. Robots can help surgeons perform better quality operations, leading to reductions in the hospitalisation time of patients and in the impact of surgery on their postoperative quality of life. In particular, robotics can have a significant impact on microsurgery, which presents stringent requirements for superhuman precision and control of the surgical tools. Microsurgery is, in fact, expected to gain importance in a growing range of surgical specialties as novel technologies progressively enable the detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases at earlier stages. Within such scenarios, robotic microsurgery emerges as one of the key components of future surgical interventions, and will be a vital technology for addressing major surgical challenges. Nonetheless, several issues have yet to be overcome in terms of mechatronics, perception and surgeon-robot interfaces before microsurgical robots can achieve their full potential in operating rooms. Research in this direction is progressing quickly and microsurgery robot prototypes are gradually demonstrating significant clinical benefits in challenging applications such as reconstructive plastic surgery, ophthalmology, otology and laryngology. These are reassuring results offering confidence in a brighter future for high-precision surgical interventions.

  10. Opportunities for Enhancing Seasonal Prediction in Ethiopia and Challenges in Addressing Sectoral Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taye, M. T.; Block, P.

    2015-12-01

    Ethiopia's National Meteorological Association (NMA) regularly issues season-ahead precipitation predictions nationally in support of sectoral applications including agriculture, reservoir management, and disaster risk management. Current NMA prediction techniques rely strongly on an analogue approach conditioned on the current El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) state. We explore simple to complex techniques for improving these ENSO-based predictions, building on current methods. We will also briefly discuss stated disconnects between NMA's predictions and adoption into sectoral decision-making.

  11. Addressing the unmet needs of patients with persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: emerging pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Pierre; Lalonde, Justine K

    2014-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent an impairment of normal emotional responses, thought processes and behaviors, and include blunting or flattening of affect, alogia/aprosody, avolition/apathy, anhedonia, and asociality. Negative symptoms contribute to a reduced quality of life, increased functional disability, increased burden of illness, and poorer long-term outcomes, to a greater degree than positive symptoms. Primary negative symptoms are prominent and persistent in up to 26% of patients with schizophrenia, and they are estimated to occur in up to 58% of outpatients at any given time. Negative symptoms respond less well to medications than positive symptoms, and to date treatment options for negative symptoms have been limited, with no accepted standard treatment. Modest benefits have been reported with a variety of different agents, including second-generation antipsychotics and add-on therapy with antidepressants and other pharmacological classes. Recent clinical research focusing on negative symptoms target novel biological systems, such as glutamatergic neurotransmission. Different approaches include: enhancing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function with agents that bind directly to the glycine ligand site or with glycine reuptake inhibitors; influencing the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) with positive allosteric modulators; and stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In conclusion, the lack of clearly efficacious pharmacological treatments for the management of negative symptoms represents a significant unmet need, especially considering the importance of these symptoms on patient outcomes. Hence, further research to identify and characterize novel pharmacological treatments for negative symptoms is greatly needed. PMID:24855363

  12. Precompetitive Data Sharing as a Catalyst to Address Unmet Needs in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Diane; Hu, Michele T; Romero, Klaus; Breen, Kieran; Burn, David; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bhattaram, Atul; Isaac, Maria; Venuto, Charles; Kubota, Ken; Little, Max A; Friend, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Morris, Huw R; Grosset, Donald; Sutherland, Margaret; Gallacher, John; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Bain, Lisa J; Avilés, Enrique; Marek, Ken; Toga, Arthur W; Stark, Yafit; Forrest Gordon, Mark; Ford, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex heterogeneous disorder with urgent need for disease-modifying therapies. Progress in successful therapeutic approaches for PD will require an unprecedented level of collaboration. At a workshop hosted by Parkinson's UK and co-organized by Critical Path Institute's (C-Path) Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD) Consortiums, investigators from industry, academia, government and regulatory agencies agreed on the need for sharing of data to enable future success. Government agencies included EMA, FDA, NINDS/NIH and IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative). Emerging discoveries in new biomarkers and genetic endophenotypes are contributing to our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of PD. In parallel there is growing recognition that early intervention will be key for successful treatments aimed at disease modification. At present, there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding of disease progression and the many factors that contribute to disease progression heterogeneity. Novel therapeutic targets and trial designs that incorporate existing and new biomarkers to evaluate drug effects independently and in combination are required. The integration of robust clinical data sets is viewed as a powerful approach to hasten medical discovery and therapies, as is being realized across diverse disease conditions employing big data analytics for healthcare. The application of lessons learned from parallel efforts is critical to identify barriers and enable a viable path forward. A roadmap is presented for a regulatory, academic, industry and advocacy driven integrated initiative that aims to facilitate and streamline new drug trials and registrations in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Addressing the Health Needs of High-Risk Filipino Americans in the Greater Philadelphia Region.

    PubMed

    Bhimla, Aisha; Yap, Lauren; Lee, Minsun; Seals, Brenda; Aczon, Hermie; Ma, Grace X

    2017-04-01

    Filipino Americans represent one of the largest and most diverse immigrant populations in the United States. It has been established that chronic diseases are a significant public health issue affecting this population. We conducted a health needs assessment of 200 Filipino Americans aged 18 years or older residing in the greater Philadelphia region. Study participants were recruited from eight Filipino community-based organizations in the region. Information about demographic and acculturative characteristics, health behaviors, self-reported chronic health conditions, and chronic disease perception were collected. Participants were older and highly acculturated. With regards to health behaviors, several did not meet dietary fruit and vegetables intake and physical activity guidelines. The top five health conditions were high blood pressure (67.5 %), high blood cholesterol (57.1 %), arthritis (28.9 %), diabetes (21.8 %), and cancer (14.7 %). Majority of participants perceived high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and diabetes to be a concern in their community, and had high awareness of the risk factors associated with these diseases. Reported rates of hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes suggest that lifestyle interventions targeting diet and physical activity, in addition to health education, are needed in this population.

  14. Vision Stations: Addressing Corrective Vision Needs With Low-cost Technologies.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen A; Frutiger, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-01

    Eyeglasses, required for functional vision by nearly half the world's population, are still needed by more than a billion people. There are a number of constraints on the provision of eyeglasses: product cost, durability, and appearance; traditional approaches to evaluating refraction; and sustainably scaling potential distribution methods. We offer our experience with an immigrant population in a US urban setting using a "Vision Station." The station allowed for immediate provision of adjustable glasses using self-refraction, ordering of custom lenses from a low-cost website, and referral to primary and eye care physicians for those with medical eye concerns. As with models in development by other groups, Vision Stations connect people with the life-changing provision of functional vision.

  15. Addressing Unmet Medical Needs in Type 2 Diabetes: A Narrative Review of Drugs under Development

    PubMed Central

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Caveney, Erica; Oliveira, Claudia De; Gourgiotis, Loukas; Puri, Mala; Tai, Li-Jung; J, Rick Turner

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and successful treatment of this disease needs constant provision of new drugs. Twelve classes of antidiabetic drugs are currently available, and many new drugs are under clinical development. These include compounds with known mechanisms of action but unique properties, such as once-weekly DPP4 inhibitors or oral insulin. They also include drugs with new mechanisms of action, the focus of this review. Most of these compounds are in Phase 1 and 2, with only a small number having made it to Phase 3 at this time. The new drug classes described include PPAR agonists/modulators, glucokinase activators, glucagon receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory compounds, G-protein coupled receptor agonists, gastrointestinal peptide agonists other than GLP-1, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitors, SGLT1 and dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors, and 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors. PMID:25537454

  16. Addressing unmet medical needs in type 2 diabetes: a narrative review of drugs under development.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Caveney, Erica; De Oliveira, Claudia; Gourgiotis, Loukas; Puri, Mala; Tai, Li-Jung; Turner, J Rick

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and successful treatment of this disease needs constant provision of new drugs. Twelve classes of antidiabetic drugs are currently available, and many new drugs are under clinical development. These include compounds with known mechanisms of action but unique properties, such as once-weekly DPP4 inhibitors or oral insulin. They also include drugs with new mechanisms of action, the focus of this review. Most of these compounds are in Phase 1 and 2, with only a small number having made it to Phase 3 at this time. The new drug classes described include PPAR agonists/modulators, glucokinase activators, glucagon receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory compounds, G-protein coupled receptor agonists, gastrointestinal peptide agonists other than GLP-1, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitors, SGLT1 and dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors, and 11beta- HSD1 inhibitors.

  17. Research Findings on Xylitol and the Development of Xylitol Vehicles to Address Public Health Needs

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, P.; Ly, K.A.; Rothen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Xylitol has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective tooth decay preventive agent when used habitually. Nevertheless, its application has been limited by absence of formulations that demand minimal adherence and are acceptable and safe in settings where chewing gum may not be allowed. A substantial literature suggests that a minimum of five to six grams and three exposures per day from chewing gum or candies are needed for a clinical effect. At the same time there is conflicting evidence in the literature from toothpaste studies suggesting that lower-doses and less frequent exposures might be effective. The growing use of xylitol as a sweetener in low amounts in foods and other consumables is, simultaneously, increasing the overall exposure of the public to xylitol and may have additive benefits. PMID:19710081

  18. Vision Stations: Addressing Corrective Vision Needs With Low-cost Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Frutiger, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeglasses, required for functional vision by nearly half the world's population, are still needed by more than a billion people. There are a number of constraints on the provision of eyeglasses: product cost, durability, and appearance; traditional approaches to evaluating refraction; and sustainably scaling potential distribution methods. We offer our experience with an immigrant population in a US urban setting using a “Vision Station.” The station allowed for immediate provision of adjustable glasses using self-refraction, ordering of custom lenses from a low-cost website, and referral to primary and eye care physicians for those with medical eye concerns. As with models in development by other groups, Vision Stations connect people with the life-changing provision of functional vision. PMID:25984406

  19. Earth Institute at Columbia University ADVANCE Program: Addressing Needs for Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M.; Mutter, J.; Miller, R.; Pfirman, S.; Laird, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth Institute has received a major NSF ADVANCE grant targeted at increasing the participation and advancement of women scientists and engineers in the Academy through institutional transformation. The Earth Institute at Columbia University includes 9 research institutes including Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), International Research Institute (IRI) for Climate Prediction, Earth Engineering Center, NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Risks and Hazards, Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development, and Center for Global Health and Economic Development and six academic departments including Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B, School of Arts and Sciences), Earth and Environmental Engineering (DEEE, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Department of Environmental Health (School of Public Health), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES, School of Arts and Sciences), Department of International and Public Affairs (School of International and Policy Affairs), and Barnard College Department of Environmental Science. The Earth Institute at Columbia University's ADVANCE program is based both on a study of the status of women at Columbia and research on the progression of women in science elsewhere. The five major targets of the Columbia ADVANCE program are to (1) change the demographics of the faculty through intelligent hiring practices, (2) provide support to women scientists through difficult life transitions including elder care and adoption or birth of a child, (3) enhance mentoring and networking opportunities, (4) implement transparent promotion procedures and policies, and (5) conduct an institutional self study. The Earth Institute ADVANCE program is unique in that it addresses issues that tend to manifest themselves in the earth and environmental fields, such as extended

  20. Addressing the Sexual and Reproductive Health Needs of Young People in Ethiopia: An Analysis of the Current Situation.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Nigina; Kereta, Worknesh; Mitchell, Kirstin R

    2015-09-01

    Young people in Ethiopia face a number of risks to their sexual and reproductive health, including adolescent pregnancy, sexual violence, and unmet need for family planning. This study explores the extent to which current service provision addresses the SRH needs of young Ethiopians . Methods included a comprehensive review of the academic and policy literature on young people's SRH and service provision in Ethiopia; and 14 semi-structured Key Informant Interviews. Factors affecting utilization of sexual and reproductive services by young people include: limited SRH knowledge, lack of open discussion of sexual matters, low status of women, cultural and logistical barriers, competing priorities among community health professionals, limited resources for health facilities, and negative attitudes of providers towards unmarried youth. While the antenatal needs of young married women are somewhat addressed, gaps exist in terms of services for unmarried youth, young men, rural youth and vulnerable groups. The national policy platform has created an enabling environment for addressing youth SRH needs but challenges to implementing these policies still persist. The way forward requires a focus on reducing barriers to utilization of services, and attention to underserved groups. It also requires resource mobilization, strong leadership and effective coordination between stakeholders and donors.

  1. Alternative therapies to address the unmet medical needs of patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Blau, Nenad; Longo, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Standard therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU), the most common inherited disorder in amino acid metabolism, is an onerous phenylalanine-restricted diet. Adherence to this stringent diet regimen decreases as patients get older, and this lack of adherence is directly associated with cognitive and executive dysfunction and psychiatric issues. These factors emphasize the need for alternative pharmacological therapies to help treat patients with PKU. Sapropterin dihydrochloride is a synthetic form of tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor of phenylalanine hydroxylase that in pharmacological doses can stabilize and increase residual enzyme activity in some patients with PKU. About one-third of all patients with PKU respond to oral sapropterin. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) is a prokaryotic enzyme that converts phenylalanine to ammonia and trans-cinnamic acid. Phase I and II trials have shown that injectable recombinant Anabaena variabilis PAL produced in Escherichia coli conjugated with PEG can reduce phenylalanine levels in subjects with PKU. The most frequently reported adverse events were injection-site reactions, dizziness and immune reactions. Additionally, oral administration of PAL and delivery of enzyme substitution therapies by encapsulation in erythrocytes are being investigated. Novel therapies for patients with PKU appear to be options to reduce phenylalanine levels, and may reduce the deleterious effects of this disorder.

  2. Addressing Unmet Medical Needs in Type 1 Diabetes: A Review of Drugs under Development.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Caveney, Erica; De Oliveira, Claudia; Alexander Fleming, G; Gourgiotis, Loukas; Puri, Mala; Tai, Li-Jung; Rick Turner, J

    2016-04-13

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing worldwide and there is a very large need for effective therapies. Besides pramlintide, there are essentially no pharmacologic therapies other than insulin currently approved for the treatment of T1D. Drugs already in use for type 2 diabetes and many new drugs are under clinical development for T1D, including compounds with both established and new mechanisms of action. Most of the new compounds in clinical development are currently in Phase 1 and Phase 2. Drug classes discussed in this review include new insulins, SGLT inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, immunomodulatory drugs including autoantigens and anti-cytokines, and agents that regenerate β-cells. In addition, considerations are provided with regard to the regulatory environment for the clinical development of drugs for T1D, with a focus on the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. Future opportunities, such as combination treatments of immunomodulatory and β-cell regenerating therapies, are also discussed.

  3. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    SciTech Connect

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  4. Management and control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB): Addressing policy needs for India.

    PubMed

    Atre, Sachin R; Murray, Megan B

    2016-05-06

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) challenges TB control efforts because of delays in diagnosis plus its long-term treatment which has toxic effects. Of TB high-incidence countries, India carries the highest burden of MDR-TB cases. We describe policy issues in India concerning MDR-TB diagnosis and management in a careful review of the literature including a systematic review of studies on the prevalence of MDR-TB. Of 995 articles published during 2001-2016 and retrieved from the PubMed, only 20 provided data on the population prevalence of MDR-TB. We further reviewed and describe diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms in use and endorsed by the Revised National TB Control Program of India. We discuss problems encountered in treating MDR-TB patients with standardized regimens. Finally, we provide realistic suggestions for policymakers and program planners to improve the management and control of MDR-TB in India.Journal of Public Health Policy advance online publication, 6 May 2016; doi:10.1057/jphp.2016.14.

  5. Addressing inequalities in oral health in India: need for skill mix in the dental workforce.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Manu Raj; Singh, Ankur; Watt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Dentistry has always been an under-resourced profession. There are three main issues that dentistry is facing in the modern era. Firstly, how to rectify the widely acknowledged geographical imbalance in the demand and supply of dental personnel, secondly, how to provide access to primary dental care to maximum number of people, and thirdly, how to achieve both of these aims within the financial restraints imposed by the central and state governments. The trends of oral diseases have changed significantly in the last 20 years. The two of the most common oral diseases that affect a majority of the population worldwide, namely dental caries and periodontitis, have been proved to be entirely preventable. Even for life-threatening oral diseases like oral cancer, the best possible available treatment is prevention. There is a growing consensus that appropriate skill mix can prove very beneficial in providing these preventive dental care services to the public and aid in achieving the goal of universal oral health coverage. Professions complementary to dentistry (PCD) have been found to be effective in reducing inequalities in oral health, improving access and spreading the messages of health promotion across entire spectrum of socio-economic hierarchy in various studies conducted globally. This commentary provides a review of the effectiveness of skill mix in dentistry and a reflection on how this can be beneficial in achieving universal oral health care in India.

  6. Social workers' roles in addressing the complex end-of-life care needs of elders with advanced chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Betty J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined social workers' roles in caring for low-income elders with advanced chronic disease in an innovative, community-based managed care program, from the perspective of elders, family, team members, and social workers. The results are drawn from a larger longitudinal, multimethod case study. Sources of data include survey reports of needs addressed by social workers for 120 deceased elders, five focus groups with interdisciplinary team members, and in-depth interviews with 14 elders and 10 of their family caregivers. A thematic conceptual matrix was developed to detail 32 distinctive social work roles that address divergent needs of elders, family, and team members. Distinctive perceptions of social workers' roles were identified for the different stakeholder groups (i.e., elders, family caregivers, team members, and social workers). Findings from this study may inform supervisors and educators regarding training needs of those preparing to enter the rapidly growing workforce of gerontological social workers who may be called upon to care for elders at the end of life. Training is particularly warranted to help social workers gain the skills needed to more successfully treat symptom management, depression, anxiety, agitation, grief, funeral planning, and spiritual needs that are common to the end of life.

  7. Research needed to improve solar flare and particle forecasting.

    PubMed

    Machado, M E

    1994-10-01

    We briefly review the status of our physical understanding of energy buildup and release in transient active phenomena on the Sun. Such understanding is necessary in order to improve our capabilities to predict such events and their effects in interplanetary space and near-Earth environment. We then discuss the research that we consider is needed for such improvement.

  8. 25 CFR 162.544 - How must a WSR lease address ownership of permanent improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How must a WSR lease address ownership of permanent improvements? 162.544 Section 162.544 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr Leases § 162.544 How must a WSR...

  9. 25 CFR 162.544 - How must a WSR lease address ownership of permanent improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How must a WSR lease address ownership of permanent improvements? 162.544 Section 162.544 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr Leases § 162.544 How must a WSR...

  10. 25 CFR 162.515 - How must a WEEL address ownership of permanent improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How must a WEEL address ownership of permanent improvements? 162.515 Section 162.515 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Weels § 162.515 How must a WEEL...

  11. 25 CFR 162.515 - How must a WEEL address ownership of permanent improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How must a WEEL address ownership of permanent improvements? 162.515 Section 162.515 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Weels § 162.515 How must a WEEL...

  12. Improving the assessment of instream flow needs for fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M.J. ); Otto, R.G. and Associates, Arlington, VA )

    1991-01-01

    Instream flow requirements are one of the most frequent and most costly environmental issues that must be addressed in developing hydroelectric projects. Existing assessment methods for determining instream flow requirements have been criticized for not including all the biological response mechanisms that regulate fishery resources. A new project has been initiated to study the biological responses of fish populations to altered stream flows and to develop improved ways of managing instream flows. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Missile Defense: Actions Needed to Improve Transparency and Accountability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Improve Transparency and Accountability March 2011 GAO-11-372 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...AND SUBTITLE Missile Defense: Actions Needed to Improve Transparency and Accountability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Transparency and Accountability Why GAO Did This Study Since 2002, Congress has directed GAO to assess the Missile Defense Agency’s (MDA) annual fiscal

  14. DOD Joint Bases: Management Improvements Needed to Achieve Greater Efficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Joint Bases Realign Fort Eustis, VA, by relocating the installation management functions to Langley AFB, VA. Realign Fort Story , VA, by...the installation management functions to L·mglcy AFB, VA. Realign Fort Story , VA, by relocating the installation management functions to Commander...DOD JOINT BASES Management Improvements Needed to Achieve Greater Efficiencies Report to Congressional Addressees

  15. Quality of tuberculosis care in high burden countries: the urgent need to address gaps in the care cascade.

    PubMed

    Cazabon, Danielle; Alsdurf, Hannah; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Daftary, Amrita; Pai, Madhukar

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high coverage of directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS), tuberculosis (TB) continues to affect 10.4 million people each year, and kills 1.8 million. High TB mortality, the large number of missing TB cases, the emergence of severe forms of drug resistance, and the slow decline in TB incidence indicate that merely expanding the coverage of TB services is insufficient to end the epidemic. In the era of the End TB Strategy, we need to think beyond coverage and start focusing on the quality of TB care that is routinely offered to patients in high burden countries, in both public and private sectors. In this review, current evidence on the quality of TB care in high burden countries, major gaps in the quality of care, and some novel efforts to measure and improve the quality of care are described. Based on systematic reviews on the quality of TB care or surrogates of quality (e.g., TB diagnostic delays), analyses of TB care cascades, and newer studies that directly measure quality of care, it is shown that the quality of care in both the public and private sector falls short of international standards and urgently needs improvement. National TB programs will therefore need to systematically measure and improve quality of TB care and invest in quality improvement programs.

  16. Quality of tuberculosis care in high burden countries: the urgent need to address gaps in the care cascade

    PubMed Central

    Cazabon, Danielle; Alsdurf, Hannah; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Daftary, Amrita; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high coverage of DOTS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to affect 10.4 million people each year, and kills 1.8 million. High TB mortality, the large number of missing TB cases, the emergence of severe forms of drug-resistance, and the slow decline in TB incidence indicate that merely expanding the coverage of TB services is insufficient to end the epidemic. In the era of the End TB Strategy, we need to think beyond coverage and start focusing on the quality of TB care that is routinely offered to patients in high burden countries, in both public and private sectors. In this review, we describe current evidence on the quality of TB care in high burden countries, major gaps in the quality of care, and some novel efforts to measure and improve the quality of care. Based on systematic reviews on the quality of TB care or surrogates of quality (e.g. TB diagnostic delays), analyses of TB care cascades, and newer studies that directly measure quality of care, we show that the quality of care in both the public and private sectors falls short of international standards and urgently needs improvement. National TB programs will therefore need to systematically measure and improve quality of TB care, and invest in quality improvement programs. PMID:27794468

  17. Improving the Pharmacologic Management of Pain in Older Adults: Identifying the Research Gaps and Methods to Address Them

    PubMed Central

    Reid, M. C.; Bennett, David A.; Chen, Wen G.; Eldadah, Basil A.; Farrar, John T.; Ferrell, Bruce; Gallagher, Rollin M.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Herr, Keela; Horn, Susan D.; Inturrisi, Charles E.; Lemtouni, Salma; Lin, Yu Woody; Michaud, Kaleb; Morrison, R. Sean; Neogi, Tuhina; Porter, Linda L.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Von Korff, Michael; Weiss, Karen; Witter, James; Zacharoff, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There has been a growing recognition of the need for better pharmacologic management of chronic pain among older adults. To address this need, the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium sponsored an “Expert Panel Discussion on the Pharmacological Management of Chronic Pain in Older Adults” conference in September, 2010, to identify research gaps and strategies to address them. Specific emphasis was placed on ascertaining gaps regarding use of opioid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications because of continued uncertainties regarding their risks and benefits. Design Eighteen panel members provided oral presentations; each was followed by a multidisciplinary panel discussion. Meeting transcripts and panelists’ slide presentations were reviewed to identify the gaps, and the types of studies and research methods panelists suggested could best address them. Results Fifteen gaps were identified in the areas of treatment(e.g., uncertainty regarding the long-term safety and efficacy of commonly prescribed analgesics), epidemiology (e.g., lack of knowledge regarding the course of common pain syndromes), and implementation(e.g., limited understanding of optimal strategies to translate evidence-based pain treatments into practice). Analyses of data from electronic health care databases, observational cohort studies, and ongoing cohort studies (augmented with pain and other relevant outcomes measures) were felt to be practical methods for building an age-appropriate evidence base to improve the pharmacologic management of pain in later life. Conclusions Addressing the gaps presented in the current report was judged by the panel to have substantial potential to improve the health and well being of older adults with chronic pain. PMID:21834914

  18. Improving Catastrophe Modeling for Business Interruption Insurance Needs.

    PubMed

    Rose, Adam; Huyck, Charles K

    2016-10-01

    While catastrophe (CAT) modeling of property damage is well developed, modeling of business interruption (BI) lags far behind. One reason is the crude nature of functional relationships in CAT models that translate property damage into BI. Another is that estimating BI losses is more complicated because it depends greatly on public and private decisions during recovery with respect to resilience tactics that dampen losses by using remaining resources more efficiently to maintain business function and to recover more quickly. This article proposes a framework for improving hazard loss estimation for BI insurance needs. Improved data collection that allows for analysis at the level of individual facilities within a company can improve matching the facilities with the effectiveness of individual forms of resilience, such as accessing inventories, relocating operations, and accelerating repair, and can therefore improve estimation accuracy. We then illustrate the difference this can make in a case study example of losses from a hurricane.

  19. Using community-based participatory research to address Chinese older women’s health needs: Toward sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E-Shien; Simon, Melissa A.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been recognized as a useful approach for eliminating health disparities, less attention is given to how CBPR projects may address gender inequalities in health for immigrant older women. The goal of this article is to share culturally sensitive strategies and lessons learned from the PINE study—a population-based study of U.S. Chinese older adults that was strictly guided by the CBPR approach. Working with Chinese older women requires trust, respect, and understanding of their unique historical, social, and cultural positions. We also discuss implications for developing impact-driven research partnerships that meet the needs of this vulnerable population. PMID:27310870

  20. Controls Over Army Deployable Disbursing System Payments Need Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-17

    Controls Over Army Deployable Disbursing System Payments Need Improvement Report No. D-2011-101 August 17, 2011 Report...DRIVE ARLINGTON VIRGINIA 22202-4704 August 17, 20 ll MEMORANDUM FOR UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (COMPTROLLER)/ CHI EF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DOD...We appreciate the comtes ies extended to the staff. Please direct questions to me at (703) 60 1-5868 (DSN 664-5868). p~ Q . ;n~ Patricia A. Marsh

  1. Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs.

    PubMed

    Walker, M J; Burns, D T; Elliott, C T; Gowland, M H; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-07

    Food allergy is an increasing problem for those affected, their families or carers, the food industry and for regulators. The food supply chain is highly vulnerable to fraud involving food allergens, risking fatalities and severe reputational damage to the food industry. Many facets are being pursued to ameliorate the difficulties including better food labelling and the concept of thresholds of elicitation of allergy symptoms as risk management tools. These efforts depend to a high degree on the ability reliably to detect and quantify food allergens; yet all current analytical approaches exhibit severe deficiencies that jeopardise accurate results being produced particularly in terms of the risks of false positive and false negative reporting. If we fail to realise the promise of current risk assessment and risk management of food allergens through lack of the ability to measure food allergens reproducibly and with traceability to an international unit of measurement, the analytical community will have failed a significant societal challenge. Three distinct but interrelated areas of analytical work are urgently needed to address the substantial gaps identified: (a) a coordinated international programme for the production of properly characterised clinically relevant reference materials and calibrants for food allergen analysis; (b) an international programme to widen the scope of proteomics and genomics bioinformatics for the genera containing the major allergens to address problems in ELISA, MS and DNA methods; (c) the initiation of a coordinated international programme leading to reference methods for allergen proteins that provide results traceable to the SI. This article describes in more detail food allergy, the risks of inapplicable or flawed allergen analyses with examples and a proposed framework, including clinically relevant incurred allergen concentrations, to address the currently unmet and urgently required analytical requirements. Support for the

  2. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  3. Do we need to change the legislation to a system of presumed consent to address organ shortage?

    PubMed

    Simillis, Constantinos

    2010-04-01

    Organ transplantation significantly improves the health, quality of life and life-expectancy of people whose organs have failed. Most patients in the UK cannot enjoy the benefits of a transplant because of an extreme shortage of organs. This paper demonstrates the magnitude of the problem of organ shortage and identifies possible causes. The current UK legislation regarding consent to organ transplantation is analysed and compared with other jurisdictions. The hypothesis of changing the legislation to a system of presumed consent in order to address the organ shortage is explored. The main issues surrounding a change in the legislation are considered, and the effects on society and the individual are discussed. This paper argues that there is not enough convincing evidence to support a change in the legislation to a system of presumed consent at this time. Instead, an increase in organ donations could be achieved by improving the effectiveness of the current system of organ donation, and by improving the public's awareness and understanding of organ transplantation issues.

  4. Peer Navigators that Address the Integrated Healthcare Needs of African Americans With Serious Mental Illness who are Homeless

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Kraus, Dana; Pickett, Susan; Schmidt, Annie; Stellon, Edward; Hantke, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Impact of a peer navigator program (PNP) develop by a community based participatory research team was examined on African Americans with serious mental illness who were homeless. Methods Research participants were randomized to PNP or a treatment-as-usual control group for one year. Data on physical and mental health, recovery, and quality of life were collected at baseline, 4, 8 and 12 months. Results Findings from group by trial ANOVAs of omnibus measures of the four constructs showed significant impact over the one year for participants in PNP compared to control described by small to moderate effect sizes. These differences emerged even though both groups showed significant improvements in reduced homelessness and insurance coverage. Conclusions Implications for improving in-the-field health care for this population are discussed. Whether these results occurred because navigators were peers per se needs to be examined in future research. PMID:28093056

  5. Heroin users: the need for improved treatment for incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Horton, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of drugs, specifically heroin, by women. While women's rate of incarceration in the nation have dramatically increased, tripling in the last decade, prisons have not kept pace with the growth of the number of women in prison and the need for drug treatment and recovery for this population. This paper examines one programmatic effort to provide services to this most vulnerable population in the state of Illinois. The continuum of care model is considered in light of the challenges of high recidivism rates, particularly in the state of Illinois. It identifies a need for more effective evidence-based services at the state level for prison inmates before and after discharge. Effective program evaluation has not been a priority in some states, and perhaps Illinois correction is prototypical. More effective intervention may require more community involvement post-release for ex-offenders. Barriers to healthcare, employment and housing, are just as evident with female drug offenders as in the male population.

  6. Addressing dysfunctional relations among healthcare teams: improving team cooperation through applied organizational theories.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B; Barshes, Neal R

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that communication failure and interpersonal conflicts are significant impediments among health-care teams to assess complex information and engage in the meaningful collaboration necessary for optimizing patient care. Despite the prolific research on the role of effective teamwork in accomplishing complex tasks, such findings have been traditionally applied to business organizations and not medical contexts. This chapter, therefore, reviews and applies four theories from the fields of organizational behavior (OB) and organization development (OD) as potential means for improving team interaction in health-care contexts. This study is unique in its approach as it addresses the long-standing problems that exist in team communication and cooperation in health-care teams by applying well-established theories from the organizational literature. The utilization and application of the theoretical constructs discussed in this work offer valuable means by which the efficacy of team work can be greatly improved in health-care organizations.

  7. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Further Actions Needed to Address Challenges and Improve Accountability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Compliance and Requirements Traceability AF-IPPS Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System BPR business process reengineering BEA business...updated its BPR guidance in late September 2012 to include actions to be taken to review supporting documentation on selected investments

  8. Improved selectivity from a wavelength addressable device for wireless stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Elif Ç.; Freedman, David S.; Gökkavas, Mutlu; Özbay, Ekmel; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2014-01-01

    Electrical neural stimulation with micro electrodes is a promising technique for restoring lost functions in the central nervous system as a result of injury or disease. One of the problems related to current neural stimulators is the tissue response due to the connecting wires and the presence of a rigid electrode inside soft neural tissue. We have developed a novel, optically activated, microscale photovoltaic neurostimulator based on a custom layered compound semiconductor heterostructure that is both wireless and has a comparatively small volume (<0.01 mm3). Optical activation provides a wireless means of energy transfer to the neurostimulator, eliminating wires and the associated complications. This neurostimulator was shown to evoke action potentials and a functional motor response in the rat spinal cord. In this work, we extend our design to include wavelength selectivity and thus allowing independent activation of devices. As a proof of concept, we fabricated two different microscale devices with different spectral responsivities in the near-infrared region. We assessed the improved addressability of individual devices via wavelength selectivity as compared to spatial selectivity alone through on-bench optical measurements of the devices in combination with an in vivo light intensity profile in the rat cortex obtained in a previous study. We show that wavelength selectivity improves the individual addressability of the floating stimulators, thus increasing the number of devices that can be implanted in close proximity to each other. PMID:24600390

  9. Attitudes towards Addressing Medical Absenteeism of Students: A Qualitative Study among Principals and Special Education Needs Coordinators in Dutch Secondary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Frans; Rots – de Vries, Carin; van de Goor, Ien

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing school absenteeism benefits the health and educational opportunities of young people. The Dutch intervention Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students (abbreviated as MASS) was developed to address school absenteeism due to sickness reporting, also called medical absenteeism. This study is part of a research project on the effectiveness of MASS and explores factors that influence the implementation and dissemination of the intervention, from schools’ perspectives. The research questions include reasons schools have to implement MASS, their experiences in the implementation of MASS and their views on what is needed to ensure sustainable implementation. Methods A qualitative research method was used. Semi-structured interviews were held with nine principals and eight special education needs coordinators, working in nine secondary schools that apply MASS. Inductive content analysis was carried out. Findings The main reasons for schools to address medical absenteeism were their concerns about students’ well-being and future prospects and their wish to share these concerns with students’ parents. Participants also mentioned the wish to raise the threshold for reporting sick. According to the participants, MASS makes it easier for teachers to enter into conversation with students and their parents about medical absence. MASS prevents damage to the relationship with parents and medical problems being missed. In implementing MASS the main obstacles are teachers’ dialogue about medical absence with students and their parents, teachers’ follow-up of the feedback of the youth health care physicians (YHCPs), and correct registration. The participants were convinced that MASS also improves collaboration with parents regarding the optimization of care for students. Conclusions MASS allows schools to identify students at risk of dropout at an early stage and to optimise guidance of these students. The intervention matches schools’ need to address

  10. Balancing stakeholder needs in the evaluation of healthcare quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Laura C; Melichar, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts affect a broader range of people than we often assume. These are the potential stakeholders for QI and its evaluation, and they have valuable perspectives to offer when they are consulted in planning, conducting and interpreting evaluations. QI practitioners are accustomed to consulting stakeholders to assess unintended consequences or assess patient experiences of care, but in many cases there are additional benefits to a broad inclusion of stakeholders. These benefits are better adherence to ethical standards, to assure that all legitimate interests take part, more useful and relevant evaluation information and better political buy-in to improve impact. Balancing various stakeholder needs for information requires skill for both politics and research management. These challenges have few pat answers, but several preferred practices, which are illustrated with practical examples. PMID:26893512

  11. Need Finds Opportunity: 21st Century COTS Solution Promises to Improve the Student Experience and Address a Strategic Need

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    resources) into one accessible gateway. This single destination will serve as the central community resource that will enable the work- force, DAU...toward increasingly feature-rich and complex handsets —fea- ture-rich but less functional. Then came the iPhone. Function finally met form. It was...acquisition re- sources. Final Thoughts The intent is to field the Student Information System in 2012 in time for the 2013 registration cycle . Its success

  12. Care Management by Oncology Nurses To Address Palliative Care Needs: A Pilot Trial To Assess Feasibility, Acceptability, and Perceived Effectiveness of the CONNECT Intervention

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas; Rosenzweig, Margaret; Chu, Edward; Moore, Charity; Ellis, Peter; Nikolajski, Peggy; Ford, Colleen; Tiver, Greer; McCarthy, Lauren; Arnold, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Specialty palliative care is not accessible for many patients with advanced cancer. There is a need to find alternative palliative care strategies in oncology clinics. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and perceived effectiveness of an oncology nurse-led care management approach to improve primary palliative care. Methods: The study design was a single-arm pilot trial of the Care Management by Oncology Nurses (CONNECT) intervention, in which registered oncology nurses receive specialized training and work closely with oncologists to (1) address symptom needs; (2) engage patients and caregivers in advance care planning; (3) provide emotional support; and (4) coordinate care. The subjects were 23 patients with advanced cancer, 19 caregivers, and 5 oncologists from a community oncology clinic in western Pennsylvania. Feasibility was assessed through enrollment rates, outcome assessment rates, and visit checklists. Patients, caregivers, and oncologists completed three-month assessments of acceptability and perceived effectiveness. Results: The consent-to-approach rate was 86% and enrolled-to-consent rate, 77%. CONNECT was implemented according to protocol for all participants. No participants withdrew after enrollment. Four patients died during the study; three-month outcome assessments were completed with all remaining participants (83%). Patients and caregivers reported high satisfaction with CONNECT and perceived the intervention as helpful in addressing symptoms (85%), coping (91%), and planning for the future (82%). Oncologists unanimously agreed that CONNECT improved the quality of care provided for patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: An oncology nurse-led care management intervention is feasible, acceptable, and was perceived to be effective for improving provision of primary palliative care. A randomized trial of CONNECT is warranted. PMID:25517219

  13. Planning, implementing, and evaluating a program to address the oral health needs of aboriginal children in port augusta, australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, E J; Misan, G; Shearer, M; Richards, L; Russell, A; Mills, H; Jamieson, L M

    2012-01-01

    Aboriginal Australian children experience profound oral health disparities relative to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. In response to community concerns regarding Aboriginal child oral health in the regional town of Port Augusta, South Australia, a child dental health service was established within a Community Controlled Aboriginal Health Service. A partnership approach was employed with the key aims of (1) quantifying rates of dental service utilisation, (2) identifying factors influencing participation, and (3) planning and establishing a program for delivery of Aboriginal children's dental services that would increase participation and adapt to community needs. In planning the program, levels of participation were quantified and key issues identified through semistructured interviews. After 3.5 years, the participation rate for dental care among the target population increased from 53 to 70 percent. Key areas were identified to encourage further improvements and ensure sustainability in Aboriginal child oral health in this regional location.

  14. Improving results for nutrition: a commentary on an agenda and the need for implementation research.

    PubMed

    Garrett, James L

    2008-03-01

    Research and implementation often exist in separate worlds. To improve results for nutrition, the nutrition research community needs to go beyond "what" works to understand "how" it works. If they do not, nutrition research risks becoming irrelevant to the needs of those who actually make policies and implement programs. Researchers must prioritize research on effectiveness of policies and programs. They should incorporate knowledge and tools of social sciences, including economics, sociology, political science, and management into their work. They should pay greater attention to environmental and institutional variables and understand change strategies, knowledge utilization, and policy processes. Fundamentally, research on implementation should use a systematic approach to produce generalizable evidence and conceptual models, tools, and methods that are communicated effectively to policymakers and programmers. Nutrition researchers need not expand far beyond their disciplinary comfort zone to do this, but they do need to build bridges with other fields to have greater success in addressing nutritional challenges.

  15. Climate Change and Health on the U.S. Gulf Coast: Public Health Adaptation is Needed to Address Future Risks

    PubMed Central

    Petkova, Elisaveta P.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Culp, Derrin; Redlener, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of climate change on human health have been documented globally and in the United States. Numerous studies project greater morbidity and mortality as a result of extreme weather events and other climate-sensitive hazards. Public health impacts on the U.S. Gulf Coast may be severe as the region is expected to experience increases in extreme temperatures, sea level rise, and possibly fewer but more intense hurricanes. Through myriad pathways, climate change is likely to make the Gulf Coast less hospitable and more dangerous for its residents, and may prompt substantial migration from and into the region. Public health impacts may be further exacerbated by the concentration of people and infrastructure, as well as the region’s coastal geography. Vulnerable populations, including the very young, elderly, and socioeconomically disadvantaged may face particularly high threats to their health and well-being. This paper provides an overview of potential public health impacts of climate variability and change on the Gulf Coast, with a focus on the region’s unique vulnerabilities, and outlines recommendations for improving the region’s ability to minimize the impacts of climate-sensitive hazards. Public health adaptation aimed at improving individual, public health system, and infrastructure resilience is urgently needed to meet the challenges climate change may pose to the Gulf Coast in the coming decades. PMID:26270669

  16. Climate Change and Health on the U.S. Gulf Coast: Public Health Adaptation is Needed to Address Future Risks.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Elisaveta P; Ebi, Kristie L; Culp, Derrin; Redlener, Irwin

    2015-08-11

    The impacts of climate change on human health have been documented globally and in the United States. Numerous studies project greater morbidity and mortality as a result of extreme weather events and other climate-sensitive hazards. Public health impacts on the U.S. Gulf Coast may be severe as the region is expected to experience increases in extreme temperatures, sea level rise, and possibly fewer but more intense hurricanes. Through myriad pathways, climate change is likely to make the Gulf Coast less hospitable and more dangerous for its residents, and may prompt substantial migration from and into the region. Public health impacts may be further exacerbated by the concentration of people and infrastructure, as well as the region's coastal geography. Vulnerable populations, including the very young, elderly, and socioeconomically disadvantaged may face particularly high threats to their health and well-being. This paper provides an overview of potential public health impacts of climate variability and change on the Gulf Coast, with a focus on the region's unique vulnerabilities, and outlines recommendations for improving the region's ability to minimize the impacts of climate-sensitive hazards. Public health adaptation aimed at improving individual, public health system, and infrastructure resilience is urgently needed to meet the challenges climate change may pose to the Gulf Coast in the coming decades.

  17. What Educators in Catholic Schools Might Expect when Addressing Gay and Lesbian Issues: A Study of Needs and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michael J.; Sever, Linda M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicated that Catholic high schools in the United States were not addressing the topic of homosexuality in any significant and systematic way prior to the mid-1990s, though practitioners in Catholic high schools have begun to address the topic in recent years. This study, in sampling seven Catholic schools in the greater Chicago…

  18. Addressing Mental Health Disparities through Clinical Competence Not Just Cultural Competence: The Need for Assessment of Sociocultural Issues in the Delivery of Evidence-Based Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Brekke, John S

    2008-01-01

    Recognition of ethnic/racial disparities in mental health services has not directly resulted in the development of culturally responsive psychosocial interventions. There remains a fundamental need for assessment of sociocultural issues that have been linked with the expectations, needs, and goals of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. The authors posit that embedding the assessment of sociocultural issues into psychosocial rehabilitation practice is one step in designing culturally relevant empirically supported practices. It becomes a foundation on which practitioners can examine the relevance of their interventions to the diversity encountered in everyday practice. This paper provides an overview of the need for culturally and clinically relevant assessment practices and asserts that by improving the assessment of sociocultural issues the clinical competence of service providers is enhanced. The authors offer a conceptual framework for linking clinical assessment of sociocultural issues to consumer outcomes and introduce an assessment tool adapted to facilitate the process in psychosocial rehabilitation settings. Emphasizing competent clinical assessment skills will ultimately offer a strategy to address disparities in treatment outcomes for understudied populations of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. PMID:18778881

  19. DOD Financial Management: Actions Under Way Need to Be Successfully Completed to Address Long-standing Funds Control Weaknesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    general ledger, funds control, receipts and acceptance, accounts payable and disbursement, billing, and financial reporting for the general fund...Control Weaknesses Report to Congressional Requesters April 2014 GAO-14-94 United States Government Accountability Office Report Documentation...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Government Accountability Office,441 G Street NW

  20. A Social Media mHealth Solution to Address the Needs of Dengue Prevention and Management in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Rathnayake, Vajira Sampath; Lim, Gentatsu; Panchapakesan, Chitra; Foo, Schubert; Wijayamuni, Ruwan; Wimalaratne, Prasad; Fernando, Owen Noel Newton

    2016-01-01

    Background Sri Lanka has witnessed a series of dengue epidemics over the past five years, with the western province, home to the political capital of Colombo, bearing more than half of the dengue burden. Existing dengue monitoring prevention programs are exhausted as public health inspectors (PHIs) cope with increasing workloads and paper-based modes of surveillance and education, characterizing a reactive system unable to cope with the enormity of the problem. On the other hand, the unprecedented proliferation and affordability of mobile phones since 2009 and a supportive political climate have thus far remained unexploited for the use of mobile-based interventions for dengue management. Objective To conduct a needs assessment of PHIs in Colombo with respect to their dengue-related tasks and develop a new mobile-based system to address these needs while strengthening existing systems. Methods One-on-one in-depth interviews were conducted with 29 PHIs to a) gain a nuanced, in-depth understanding of the current state of surveillance practices, b) understand the logistical, technological and social challenges they confront, and c) identify opportunities for mobile-based interventions. Quantitative analysis included simple descriptive statistics while qualitative analysis comprised textual analysis of 209 pages of transcripts (or nearly 600 minutes of conversations) using grounded theory approaches. Results Current paper-based data collection practices for dengue surveillance involved a circuitous, time consuming process that could take between 7-10 days to officially report and record a single case. PHIs confronted challenges in terms of unreliable, standalone GIS devices, delays in registering mosquito breeding sites and lack of engagement from communities while delivering dengue education. These findings, in concert with a high motivation to use mobile-based systems, informed the development of Mo-Buzz, a mobile-based system that integrates three components

  1. Enabling Curricula: The Development of a Teaching Observation Protocol to Address Students' Diverse Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Diverse learning needs are students' learning needs in areas such as language, learning styles, background, disabilities, technology skills, motivation, engagement, and access. Teacher candidates must be aware of and plan to meet these needs. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides guidelines that can increase the level of student…

  2. Does addressing gender inequalities and empowering women and girls improve health and development programme outcomes?

    PubMed

    Taukobong, Hannah F G; Kincaid, Mary M; Levy, Jessica K; Bloom, Shelah S; Platt, Jennifer L; Henry, Sarah K; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2016-12-01

    This article presents evidence supporting the hypothesis that promoting gender equality and women's and girls' empowerment (GEWE) leads to better health and development outcomes. We reviewed the literature across six sectors-family planning (FP); maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH); nutrition; agriculture; water, sanitation and hygiene; and financial services for the poor-and found 76 studies from low and middle-income countries that met our inclusion criteria. Across these studies, we identified common GEWE variables that emerged repeatedly as significant predictors of sector outcomes. We grouped these variables into 10 thematic categories, which we termed 'gender-related levers'. These levers were then classified by the strength of evidence into Wedges, Foundations and Facilitators. Wedges are gender-related levers that had strong associations with improved outcomes across multiple sectors. They include: 'control over income/assets/resources', 'decision-making power' and 'education'. Elements of these levers overlap, but combined, they encapsulate agency. Increasing female agency promotes equality and broadly improves health and development for women, their families and their communities. The second classification, Foundations, displayed strong, positive associations across FP, MNCH and nutrition. Foundations have a more proximal relationship with sector outcomes and include: 'equitable interpersonal relationships', 'mobility' and 'personal safety'. Finally, the third group of levers, Facilitators, was associated with improved outcomes in two to three sectors and include: 'access to information', 'community groups', 'paid labour' and 'rights'. These levers make it easier for women and girls to achieve their goals and are more traditional elements of development programmes. Overall, gender-related levers were associated with improvements in a variety of health and development outcomes. Furthermore, these associations were cross-sectoral, suggesting that to

  3. Veterans Affairs Contracting: Improved Oversight Needed for Certain Contractual Arrangements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    States Government Accountability Office Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of... provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Government Accountability

  4. Addressing the Needs of St. Louis Children At Risk. A Report to the Community from Project Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Richard H.; And Others

    This document reports the findings of Project Respond, a program designed to develop a model for assessing and addressing risk to children in the St. Louis community. Section A concerns: (1) a definition of risk; (2) effects of profound sociological risk on children; (3) social and economic costs of sociological risk. In Section B, the Project…

  5. Seeing the Trees within the Forest: Addressing the Needs of Children without Parental Care in the Russian Federation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, we comment on the dominant practice in high-resource societies of placing children without biological parental care (CwoBPC) into substitution families, and the promotion of this solution as evidence-based and state of the art. As the Russian Federation has formulated and is now addressing in matching legislation, it possibly…

  6. Classroom Management Strategies to Address the Needs of Sudanese Refugee Learners. An Adult Literacy National Project Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Ursula; Hull, Oksana

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which English language, literacy and numeracy teachers used classroom management strategies to meet the needs of adult Sudanese refugee learners. While teachers met the needs of these learners insofar as they coincided with those of other refugee groups, the highly oral language culture of these learners appeared…

  7. Harnessing a Nation's Linguistic Competence: Identifying and Addressing Needs for LOTE in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Shirley; Hatoss, Aniko

    2003-01-01

    Reports research that aimed to identify the foreign language and cross-cultural skill needs of workers in the tourism and hospitality industry in Australia and to develop foreign language competencies for use in industry training packages. Provides evidence for the need for foreign language skills in the industry and gives an account of the…

  8. Using Student Co-Regulation to Address L2 Students' Language and Pedagogical Needs in University Support Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights student co-regulation of teaching practices as a way of exploring how L2 students' language and pedagogical needs can be met in university support classes. Integration rather than assimilation--or adapting to the needs of the students rather than leaving students to face the exigencies of the new learning environment…

  9. Young Children: Priority One. A Project Kit for Kiwanis Clubs--Addressing the Needs of Children, Prenatal through Age Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, C.; And Others

    This Kiwanis Club project kit contains ideas and instructions for implementing programs that meet local needs in the areas of maternal and infant health, child care and development, parenting, and safety and pediatric trauma. The kit begins with an overview that explains how to assess need and how to plan, implement, and evaluate a project. Tip…

  10. Performance improvements of MOEMS-based diffractive arrays: address isolation and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaman, Ganesh; Madison, Seth; Sano, Michael; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) have found a variety of applications in fields such as telecommunications, spectroscopy and display technology. MOEMS-based optical switching is currently under investigation for the increased flexibility that such devices provide for reconfiguration of the I/O network for inter-chip communication applications. This potential not only adds an additional degree of freedom for adjustment of transmitter/receiver links but also allows for fine alignment of individual channels in the network link. Further, this use of diffractive arrays for specific applications combines beam steering/adjustment capabilities with the inherent wavelength dependence of the diffractive approach for channel separation and de-multiplexing. Research and development has been concentrated on the progression from single MOEMS components to parallel arrays integrated with optical source arrays for a successful feasibility demonstration. Successful development of such an approach will have a major impact of the next generation communication protocols. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program for Free Space Optical inter-chip communication at the College of NanoScale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY (CNSE). New versions of diffractive arrays stemming from the basic MEMS Compound Grating (MCG; patent #5,999,319) have been produced through various fabrication methods including the MUMPs process1. Most MEMS components relying on electrostatic actuation tend to require high actuation voltages (>20V) compared to the typical 5V levels prevalent in conventional integrated circuits. The specific goal is to yield improved performance while minimizing the power consumption of the components. Structural modifications through the variation in the ruling/electrode spacing distance and array wiring layout through individually addressable gratings have been studied to understand effects on the actuation voltage and

  11. Human Capital: Additional Actions Needed to Enhance DOD’s Efforts to Address Mental Health Care Stigma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. Additionally, the Defense Suicide Prevention Office reports through the Executive Director of the Office of...Efforts to Address Mental Health Care Stigma Why GAO Did This Study A 2010 DOD task force on suicide prevention concluded that stigma—the negative...Representatives A 2010 Department of Defense (DOD) Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces concluded that

  12. Improving Test Preparation for Students with Special Needs: Web-Based Tutorial, Student Charting, and a Text Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2011-01-01

    Obstacles to the classroom implementation of the fourth grade Math component of Louisiana's web-based testing tutorial were addressed in this informal pilot. Technology integration improved standardized test preparation for students with special needs. Supplemental test preparation sessions give the benefits of (a) increased familiarity with…

  13. National Institute of Justice (NIJ): improving the effectiveness of law enforcement via homeland security technology improvements (Keynote Address)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, John S.

    2005-05-01

    Law enforcement agencies play a key role in protecting the nation from and responding to terrorist attacks. Preventing terrorism and promoting the nation"s security is the Department of Justice"s number one strategic priority. This is reflected in its technology development efforts, as well as its operational focus. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is the national focal point for the research, development, test and evaluation of technology for law enforcement. In addition to its responsibilities in supporting day-to-day criminal justice needs in areas such as less lethal weapons and forensic science, NIJ also provides critical support for counter-terrorism capacity improvements in state and local law enforcement in several areas. The most important of these areas are bomb response, concealed weapons detection, communications and information technology, which together offer the greatest potential benefit with respect to improving the ability to law enforcement agencies to respond to all types of crime including terrorist acts. NIJ coordinates its activities with several other key federal partners, including the Department of Homeland Security"s Science and Technology Directorate, the Technical Support Working Group, and the Department of Defense.

  14. What Is Improvement Science? Do We Need It in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The theory and tools of "improvement science" have produced performance improvements in many organizational sectors. This essay describes improvement science and explores its potential and challenges within education. Potential contributions include attention to the knowledge-building and motivational systems within schools, strategies…

  15. The curse of wealth – Middle Eastern countries need to address the rapidly rising burden of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Klautzer, Lisa; Becker, Joachim; Mattke, Soeren

    2014-01-01

    The energy boom of the last decade has led to rapidly increasing wealth in the Middle East, particularly in the oil and gas-rich Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. This exceptional growth in prosperity has brought with it rapid changes in lifestyles that have resulted in a significant rise in chronic disease. In particular the number of people diagnosed with diabetes has increased dramatically and health system capacity has not kept pace. In this article, we summarize the current literature to illustrate the magnitude of the problem, its causes and its impact on health and point to options how to address it. PMID:24757686

  16. Study objectives: Will commercial avionics do the job? Improvements needed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasr, Hatem

    1992-01-01

    Improvements in commercial avionics are covered in a viewgraph format. Topics include the following: computer architecture, user requirements, Boeing 777 aircraft, cost effectiveness, and implemention.

  17. Perceived success in addressing end-of-life care needs of low-income elders and their families: what has family conflict got to do with it?

    PubMed

    Kramer, Betty J; Yonker, James A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of perceived success in addressing the end-of-life care needs of low-income older adults and their family members. Perceived success is defined as the clinician's subjective assessment of the extent to which end-of-life care needs of the patient and family have been met by the interdisciplinary team. The results are drawn from a larger longitudinal multimethod case study designed to understand how end-of-life care is provided to a diverse group of frail elders in an innovative, fully "integrated," managed care program. Data were generated from 120 social work surveys detailing care experiences and outcomes particular to 120 elder deaths. Significant predictors of perceived success for addressing patient needs included patient care needs (β=0.17, P≤0.05), race (β=0.19, P≤0.05), patient preferences elicited (β=0.29, P≤0.01) and honored (β=0.20, P≤0.05), and family conflict (β=-0.24, P≤0.01). Significant predictors of perceived success for addressing family needs included family care needs (β=0.30, P≤0.001), team and administrative resources (β=0.19, P≤0.01), patient preferences honored (β=0.16, P≤0.05), quality of relationship with patient (β=0.27, P≤0.001) and family (β=0.23, P≤0.01), and family conflict (β=-0.31, P≤0.001). This study provides preliminary evidence of differential correlates and predictors of perceived success for addressing patient and family needs, highlighting the detrimental influence of family conflict. Future research is needed to better understand the kinds of assessment and intervention protocols that might prevent or ameliorate conflict and enhance structures and process-of-care variables to facilitate more successful outcomes.

  18. Fiscal Year 2015 U.S. Government Financial Statements: Need to Address the Governments Remaining Financial Management Challenges and Long Term Fiscal Path

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-06

    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Need to Address the Government’s Remaining Financial Management Challenges and Long- Term Fiscal Path Statement of Gene L. Dodaro... Management Challenges and Long-Term Fiscal Path Why GAO Did This Study Congress and the President need reliable, useful, and timely financial and...discusses the federal government’s remaining financial management challenges and long-term fiscal path, specifically in the context of GAO’s report on

  19. Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: An Organizational Approach to Identifying and Addressing Practices and Learning Needs of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Michael; Ferrier, Suzanne; Sargeant, Joan; Loney, Elaine; Bethune, Graeme; Murphy, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Caring for patients with dementia is complex and demanding. Since family physicians (FPs) provide much of this care, we examined their practices, learning needs, and barriers to care concerning Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. We surveyed 392 (approximately 50%) Nova Scotia FPs and conducted focus groups and interviews with: FPs; staff of…

  20. A Radio Model: A Community Strategy To Address the Problems and Needs of Mexican American Women Farmworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Trevino, Maria Elena

    Interviews with 60 Mexican-American female farmworkers in the Coachella Valley (California) identified their major problems, needs, and suggestions of topics to be presented in a community-based educational radio program. Two major problems identified by these women were low wages and occupational exposure to pesticides. Contrary to cultural…

  1. VA Health Care: Further Action Needed to Address Weaknesses in Management and Oversight of Non-VA Medical Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-18

    medical care when a VA facility is unable to provide certain specialty care services, such as cardiology or orthopedics, or when a veteran would have...needing treatment in several specialties—including audiology, cardiology , and ophthalmology—were referred to non-VA providers for this reason

  2. Implications for Addressing the Psychosocial Needs of Gifted Individuals: A Response to Subotnik, Olszewski-Kubilius, and Worrell (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Anne N.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the article, "Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science," by Subotnik, Olszewski-Kubilius, and Worrell (2011), several questions arise with regard to the psychosocial needs of gifted individuals: What are the most important psychosocial variables we should take into…

  3. A Call to Duty: Educational Policy and School Reform Addressing the Needs of Children from Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Monica Christina; Astor, Ron Avi; De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac

    2012-01-01

    More than 90% of the nation's 1.2 million military children attend civilian-operated public schools. Education researchers, however, often overlook the educational experiences and needs of military children attending civilian-operated public schools (i.e., schools that are administered by and under the purview of local education agencies). This…

  4. The Pink Lesson Plan: Addressing the Emotional Needs of Gay and Lesbian Students in Canadian Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The history of civil rights in Canada illustrates a growing trend by the government to support the physical, emotional, mental, legal, and financial needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. However, the education system presents a slightly different climate. Despite numerous policies and initiatives, gay and lesbian students…

  5. VA and DOD Health Care: First Federal Health Care Center Established, but Implementation Concerns Need to Be Addressed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    develop the automated orders portability capability. This interim process necessitated the hiring of five full-time pharmacists to conduct manual...planning, VA and DOD have not yet fully provided clinicians at the FHCC with the IT capabilities the Executive Agreement identified as needed upon opening

  6. Addressing the Needs of Overweight Students in Elementary Physical Education: Creating an Environment of Care and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingstrom, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity in society has resulted in an increased need for physical education teachers to create learning opportunities that promote physical activity among children. However, the presence of anti-fat attitudes and a limited understanding of the challenges associated with being overweight in a physical activity environment…

  7. Addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs: the need for a multiregion approach.

    PubMed

    Deren, Sherry; Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Albizu-García, Carmen E; González, Ángel; Des Jarlais, Don C; Santiago-Negrón, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    High levels of HIV risk behaviors and prevalence have been reported among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs (PRPWID) since early in the HIV epidemic. Advances in HIV prevention and treatment have reduced HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States. We examined HIV-related data for PRPWID in Puerto Rico and the US Northeast to assess whether disparities continue. Injection drug use as a risk for HIV is still overrepresented among Puerto Ricans. Lower availability of syringe exchanges, drug abuse treatment, and antiretroviral treatment for PWID in Puerto Rico contribute to higher HIV risk and incidence. These disparities should be addressed by the development of a federally supported Northeast-Puerto Rico collaboration to facilitate and coordinate efforts throughout both regions.

  8. Addressing the HIV/AIDS Epidemic Among Puerto Rican People Who Inject Drugs: The Need for a Multiregion Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gelpí-Acosta, Camila; Albizu-García, Carmen E.; González, Ángel; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Santiago-Negrón, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    High levels of HIV risk behaviors and prevalence have been reported among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs (PRPWID) since early in the HIV epidemic. Advances in HIV prevention and treatment have reduced HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the United States. We examined HIV-related data for PRPWID in Puerto Rico and the US Northeast to assess whether disparities continue. Injection drug use as a risk for HIV is still overrepresented among Puerto Ricans. Lower availability of syringe exchanges, drug abuse treatment, and antiretroviral treatment for PWID in Puerto Rico contribute to higher HIV risk and incidence. These disparities should be addressed by the development of a federally supported Northeast–Puerto Rico collaboration to facilitate and coordinate efforts throughout both regions. PMID:25211722

  9. Military Personnel. The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault, but Greater Federal Oversight is Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month Assists the senior commander to meet annual SAPR training requirements, including orientation for newly assigned...by providing sexual harassment and assault orientation briefings for new students and personnel. Each of the DOD academies employs different...Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault, but Greater Federal Oversight Is Needed January 2008 GAO-08-296 Report Documentation

  10. Waste Management: DOD Has Generally Addressed Legislative Requirements on the Use of Burn Pits but Needs to Fully Assess Health Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    WASTE MANAGEMENT DOD Has Generally Addressed Legislative Requirements on the Use of Burn Pits but Needs to Fully Assess...United States Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-781, a report to congressional committees September 2016 WASTE MANAGEMENT ...Did This Study Burn pits help base commanders manage waste generated by U.S. forces overseas, but they also produce harmful emissions that

  11. Improving women's health during internatal periods: developing an evidenced-based approach to addressing maternal depression in pediatric settings.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Emily; Smith, Megan V; Morales, Melody Johnson; Claussen, Angelika H; Smith, D Camille; Perou, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    The internatal period, the time between births of successive children, has become a focal point for risk assessment and health promotion in women's healthcare. This period represents a time when women are at high risk for a depressive disorder. The pediatric venue offers a unique opportunity for the identification and management of depression in the internatal period, as mothers who do not attend their own medical appointments are likely to accompany their child to pediatric visits. This paper discusses the role pediatric providers can undertake to improve women's health in the internatal period through the detection and management of maternal depression at well-child visits. Successful models of the management of depression in other primary care settings are explored for their potential for implementation in the pediatric venue. A specific model developed and implemented as part of a 3-year project is presented to highlight the feasibility of an evidenced-based approach to the management of maternal depression in the pediatric setting. We present evidence demonstrating that pediatric providers can successfully identify postpartum women with depression, monitor symptoms and treatment adherence, and communicate results to a woman's healthcare provider. Yet more investigation is needed to create preventive interventions for maternal depression that integrate evidenced-based practice standards for the treatment of depression in primary care venues into pediatric settings. Future programs and policies targeting maternal depression in the pediatric environment should address patient mental health literacy and stigma, the training and education of pediatric providers, and issues of privacy and reimbursement.

  12. Report: EPA's Financial Oversight of Superfund State Contracts Needs Improvement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0217, June 27, 2016. With improved financial oversight, the EPA may manage SSCs more effectively, report results more accurately, and increase the availability of funds for cleanups protecting public health.

  13. Ahead of the Curve: Why America's Leading Employers Are Addressing the Needs of New and Expectant Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima

    Increasing numbers of employed parents of young children, increasing work-family conflict experienced by these parents, and the importance of early experience for children's brain development combine to suggest opportunities for business organizations to improve their competitiveness and compassion. This report draws upon data from the National…

  14. Improving Early Numeracy of Young Children with Special Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Luit, Johannes E. H.; Schopman, Esther A.

    2000-01-01

    Sixty-two students from special needs kindergartens were given early mathematics intervention. The early numeracy program was developed for children with disabilities and early numeracy difficulties by basing instruction on perceptual gestalt theory. Children performed better at posttest than controls but failed to transfer their knowledge to…

  15. Need for Improvement of Teacher Education in the New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Zebun Nisa

    2013-01-01

    Drastic changes are required in the Teacher Education program in view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economical, and political environment so that teacher could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society. In the absence of the clarity of vision about the contemporary social environment, Teacher Education…

  16. Health visiting and its role in addressing the nutritional needs of children in the first world war.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Wayne; Lawton, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    The first known UK health visitor post was established in 1862, in response to the living conditions of the poor. Before the first world war, local government boards advised district councils generally to employ health visitors: breastfeeding and child nutrition needed particular attention. In 1910, Hucknall District Council in Nottinghamshire, England, appointed nurse Ellen Woodcock to advise mothers and caregivers on looking after their children and themselves. Focusing on the welfare of women and children, health visitors could not fail to reach everyone in the community. This historical perspective shows that many of the initiatives and policies of today mirror those of a century ago.

  17. Faculty development to improve teaching at a health sciences center: a needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Scarbecz, Mark; Russell, Cynthia K; Shreve, Robert G; Robinson, Melissa M; Scheid, Cheryl R

    2011-02-01

    There has been increasing interest at health science centers in improving the education of health professionals by offering faculty development activities. In 2007-08, as part of an effort to expand education-related faculty development offerings on campus, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center surveyed faculty members in an effort to identify faculty development activities that would be of interest. Factor analysis of survey data indicated that faculty interests in the areas of teaching and learning can be grouped into six dimensions: development of educational goals and objectives, the use of innovative teaching techniques, clinical teaching, improving traditional teaching skills, addressing teaching challenges, and facilitating participation. There were significant differences in the level of interest in education-related faculty development activities by academic rank and by the college of appointment. Full professors expressed somewhat less interest in faculty development activities than faculty members of lower ranks. Faculty members in the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry expressed somewhat greater interest in faculty development to improve traditional teaching skills. The policy implications of the survey results are discussed, including the need for faculty development activities that target the needs of specific faculty groups.

  18. U.S. Sentencing Commission: Changes Needed to Improve Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-07

    establishing a system to monitor sentences imposed under the guidelines and (2) evaluating the impacts of the guidelines. Monitoring and evaluation are...officials. DELAYS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MONITORING SYSTEM AND AN EVALUATION PLAN The Commission’s monitoring and evaluation activities are...step up congressional oversight over the Commission’s monitoring and evaluation activities, with particular attention to the need for a set of

  19. Employee Benefits: Improvements Needed in Enforcing Health Insurance Continuation Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Background Title X of COBRA amended the Employee Retirement Income Security Actof 1974 ( ERISA ) and the Internal Revenue Code to require continuing...for the coverage. The Secretary of Labor can take civil action to enforce the continuation requirements. ERISA pro- vides that plan administrators... ERISA , which is administered by Labor. Employees who need additional information are told to write Labor. Office of Chief Counsel officials said that

  20. A novel DDS using nonlinear ROM addressing with improved compression ratio and quantization noise.

    PubMed

    Chimakurthy, Lakshmi S Jyothi; Ghosh, Malinky; Dai, Fa Foster; Jaeger, Richard C

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a novel direct digital frequency synthesis (DDFS) ROM compression technique based on two properties of a sine function: (a) piecewise linear technique to approximate a sinusoid, and (b) variation in the slope of the sinusoid at different phase angles. In the proposed DDFS architecture the ROM stores a few of the sinusoidal values, and the interpolation points between the successive stored values are calculated using linear and nonlinear addressing schemes. The nonlinear addressing scheme is used to adaptively vary the number of interpolation points as the slope of the sinusoid changes, leading to a greatly reduced ROM size. The proposed architecture achieves a high compression ratio with a spurious response comparable to that of recent ROM compression techniques. To validate the proposed DDS architecture, the linear, nonlinear, and conventional DDS ROM architectures were implemented in a Xilinx Spartan II FPGA and their spurious performances were compared.

  1. Report: EPA’s Fleet Management Program Needs Improvement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #15-P-0001, October 6, 2014. If oversight of the EPA’s fleet is not improved, the $6 million-per-year program could be ineffective and inefficient in supporting the agency’s mission and reporting data to the federal system.

  2. Addressing the Irreducible Needs of Interprofessional Education: Creating and Sustaining an Institutional Commons for Health Professions Training.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Mark A; Pfeifle, Andrea L

    2016-06-01

    Leaders in health professions education schools and programs are under pressure to respond to new accreditation requirements for interprofessional education (IPE). The work of creating and sustaining an IPE program at an academic health center is in many ways analogous to the challenge of creating and sustaining a "commons"-a set of resources shared by many, but owned by none. In this Commentary, the authors borrow from the work of Nobel Laureate Elinor Ostrum to describe the "design principles" necessary to build and maintain the set of common resources needed to successfully implement and sustain an IPE program. They interpret these principles in the context of their own experiences implementing IPE programs and recommend three institutional structural elements necessary to build and sustain an IPE program: (1) a representative governance body, (2) an accountable director or leader, and (3) a structure supporting vertical and horizontal communication and authority.

  3. Pilot evaluation of the Making Employment Needs [MEN] count intervention: addressing behavioral and structural HIV risks in heterosexual black men.

    PubMed

    Raj, Anita; Dasgupta, Anindita; Goldson, Irvienne; Lafontant, Dumas; Freeman, Elmer; Silverman, Jay G

    2014-02-01

    Few community-based HIV interventions exist for Black men at heterosexual risk for HIV. None focus on structural HIV risks such as unemployment and unstable housing. This study involved a pilot evaluation of the MEN (Making Employment Needs) Count HIV intervention, a three session peer counselor-delivered program of HIV risk reduction and gender-equity counseling, and employment and housing case management. A single-arm intervention trial of MEN Count was conducted with Black men recruited from a community men's clinic and social services program. Eligible men were those who reported two or more sex partners in the past six months and current unemployment and/or recent homelessness. Most participants (68%) had a history of incarceration. Participants (N = 50) were surveyed on outcomes at baseline (Time 1), posttest (Time 2; 60-90 days after baseline), and two-month follow-up (Time 3). The majority of participants were retained in the program (86%) and the final follow-up survey (76%). McNemar tests revealed significant reductions in the past 30-day unprotected sex from Time 1 (74%) to Time 2 (47%) and to Time 3 (47%), and in homelessness from Time 1 (58%) to Time 3 (32%). Significant increases in employment from Time 1 (8%) to Time 2 (29%) and Time 3 (32%) were also seen. Participants completed a brief participant satisfaction survey at posttest. Most (n=28, 65%) rated the program as excellent, and an additional 10 (23%) rated it as good. Although there was no significant reduction in multiple sex partners, a trend was observed from Time 1 (56%) to Time 2 (44%) and Time 3 (42%). Findings suggest that the MEN Count model is a feasible and promising HIV prevention program for Black men at heterosexual risk for HIV. Larger scale implementation and more rigorous evaluation of MEN Count are needed to confirm the study findings.

  4. Precompetitive Data Sharing as a Catalyst to Address Unmet Needs in Parkinson’s Disease 1

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Diane; Hu, Michele T.; Romero, Klaus; Breen, Kieran; Burn, David; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bhattaram, Atul; Isaac, Maria; Venuto, Charles; Kubota, Ken; Little, Max A.; Friend, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Morris, Huw R.; Grosset, Donald; Sutherland, Margaret; Gallacher, John; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Bain, Lisa J.; Avilés, Enrique; Marek, Ken; Toga, Arthur W.; Stark, Yafit; Forrest Gordon, Mark; Ford, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease is a complex heterogeneous disorder with urgent need for disease-modifying therapies. Progress in successful therapeutic approaches for PD will require an unprecedented level of collaboration. At a workshop hosted by Parkinson’s UK and co-organized by Critical Path Institute’s (C-Path) Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD) Consortiums, investigators from industry, academia, government and regulatory agencies agreed on the need for sharing of data to enable future success. Government agencies included EMA, FDA, NINDS/NIH and IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative). Emerging discoveries in new biomarkers and genetic endophenotypes are contributing to our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of PD. In parallel there is growing recognition that early intervention will be key for successful treatments aimed at disease modification. At present, there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding of disease progression and the many factors that contribute to disease progression heterogeneity. Novel therapeutic targets and trial designs that incorporate existing and new biomarkers to evaluate drug effects independently and in combination are required. The integration of robust clinical data sets is viewed as a powerful approach to hasten medical discovery and therapies, as is being realized across diverse disease conditions employing big data analytics for healthcare. The application of lessons learned from parallel efforts is critical to identify barriers and enable a viable path forward. A roadmap is presented for a regulatory, academic, industry and advocacy driven integrated initiative that aims to facilitate and streamline new drug trials and registrations in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26406139

  5. The Math You Need at Baylor University: Improving Quantitative Skills in an Introductory Geology Lab Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Math You Need (TMYN) modules were introduced at Baylor University in fall 2012 to address issues of math anxiety common among freshmen non-majors completing their lab science requirement, and to reduce lab time spent reviewing basic math concepts. Modules and associated assessment questions commonly use geoscience examples to illustrate the mathematical principles involved, reinforcing topics addressed in lab. Large enrollments in the course selected for these modules necessitate multiple graduate teaching assistants in the lab, making the online nature of the modules and minimal required involvement of the teaching assistants even more valuable. Students completed three selected modules before encountering associated topics in lab, as well as a pre and post-test to gauge improvement. This presentation will review lessons learned and changes made in the first two years of TMYN at Baylor. Results indicate continued increases in mean pre to post test scores (e.g. 3.2% in fall 2012 to 11.9% in spring 2014), percentage of student pre to post- test improvement (59% in fall 2012 to 72% in spring 2014) and student participation (95 in fall 2012 to 186 in spring 2014). Continued use of these modules is anticipated.

  6. Student nurses need more than maths to improve their drug calculating skills.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2007-05-01

    Nurses need to be able to calculate accurate drug calculations in order to safely administer drugs to their patients (NMC, 2002). Studies have shown however that nurses do not always have the necessary skills to calculate accurate drug dosages and are potentially administering incorrect dosages of drugs to their patients (Hutton, M. 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application. Nursing Standard 13(11), 35-38; Kapborg, I. 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, Student Nurses and Physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4), 389-395; O'Shea, E. 1999. Factors contributing to medication errors: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 8, 496-504; Wilson, A. 2003. Nurses maths: researching a practical approach. Nursing Standard 17(47), 33-36). The literature indicates that in order to improve drug calculations strategies need to focus on both the mathematical skills and conceptual skills of student nurses so they can interpret clinical data into drug calculations to be solved. A study was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of implementing several strategies which focussed on developing the mathematical and conceptual skills of student nurses to improve their drug calculation skills. The study found that implementing a range of strategies which addressed these two developmental areas significantly improved the drug calculation skills of nurses. The study also indicates that a range of strategies has the potential ensuring that the skills taught are retained by the student nurses. Although the strategies significantly improved the drug calculation skills of student nurses, the fact that only 2 students were able to achieve 100% in their drug calculation test indicates a need for further research into this area.

  7. DoD Freedom of Information Act Policies Need Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    Liaisons, and • Review the agency’s FOIA administration, draft an improvement plan, and report to the Department of Justice and the Office of Management...information that pertained to the White House and Department of Justice . The FOIA request was sent to the White House for its review. The noncareer...Also, the noncareer official suggested to the DoD Transparency Office official that he send the FOIA request to the Department of Justice for its

  8. Stories From the Field: The Use of Information and Communication Technologies to Address the Health Needs of Underserved Populations in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Faba, Gladys; Julian, Soroya; Mejía, Felipe; Cabieses, Báltica; D'Agostino, Marcelo; Cortinois, Andrea A

    2015-01-01

    Background As their availability grew exponentially in the last 20 years, the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health has been widely espoused, with many emphasizing their potential to decrease health inequities. Nonetheless, there is scarce availability of information regarding ICT as tools to further equity in health, specifically in Latin American and Caribbean settings. Objective Our aim was to identify initiatives that used ICT to address the health needs of underserved populations in Latin America and Caribbean. Among these projects, explore the rationale behind the selection of ICT as a key component, probe perceptions regarding contributions to health equity, and describe the challenges faced during implementation. Methods We conducted an exploratory qualitative study. Interviews were completed via Skype or face-to-face meetings using a semistructured interview guide. Following participant consent, interviews were audio recorded and verbatim transcriptions were developed. All transcriptions were coded using ATLASti7 software. The text was analyzed for patterns, shared themes, and diverging opinions. Emerging findings were reviewed by all interviewers and shared with participants for feedback. Results We interviewed representatives from eight organizations in six Latin American and Caribbean countries that prominently employed ICT in health communication, advocacy, or surveillance projects. ICT expanded project's geographic coverage, increased their reach into marginalized or hard-to-reach groups, and allowed real-time data collection. Perceptions of contributions to health equity resided mainly in the provision of health information and linkage to health services to members of groups experiencing greater morbidity because of poverty, remote place of residence, lack of relevant public programs, and/or stigma and discrimination, and in more timely responses by authorities to the health needs of these groups as a result of the

  9. Addressing the needs of sexual partners of people who inject drugs through peer prevention programs in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karamouzian, Mohammad; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Sharifi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that HIV epidemic is mainly driven by injection drug use in Iran, partners of People Who Inject Drugs (PWID) have been seriously neglected in terms of effective preventive interventions. Currently, sexual partners of PWID might have access to some harm reduction services at Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) centers; however, their needs have not been effectively targeted and met. Unfortunately, the current programs implemented by the Ministry of Health have overlooked the importance of this population in the course of the HIV epidemic throughout the country. In this policy brief, we are trying to draw the health policy-makers’ attention to this overlooked population and while reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of some of the readily available options on the table, come up with a recommended action to tackle this problem. Our recommended action that seems to have had promising results elsewhere in Asia would try to implement preventive interventions targeting this particular population through peer prevention programs. PMID:24639982

  10. Moving from theory to practice: A participatory social network mapping approach to address unmet need for family planning in Benin.

    PubMed

    Igras, Susan; Diakité, Mariam; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2016-03-07

    In West Africa, social factors influence whether couples with unmet need for family planning act on birth-spacing desires. Tékponon Jikuagou is testing a social network-based intervention to reduce social barriers by diffusing new ideas. Individuals and groups judged socially influential by their communities provide entrée to networks. A participatory social network mapping methodology was designed to identify these diffusion actors. Analysis of monitoring data, in-depth interviews, and evaluation reports assessed the methodology's acceptability to communities and staff and whether it produced valid, reliable data to identify influential individuals and groups who diffuse new ideas through their networks. Results indicated the methodology's acceptability. Communities were actively and equitably engaged. Staff appreciated its ability to yield timely, actionable information. The mapping methodology also provided valid and reliable information by enabling communities to identify highly connected and influential network actors. Consistent with social network theory, this methodology resulted in the selection of informal groups and individuals in both informal and formal positions. In-depth interview data suggest these actors were diffusing new ideas, further confirming their influence/connectivity. The participatory methodology generated insider knowledge of who has social influence, challenging commonly held assumptions. Collecting and displaying information fostered staff and community learning, laying groundwork for social change.

  11. The need to improve health care in prisons

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luiz Henrique; Alvarenga, Carlos Willie; dos Santos, Luciane Loures; Pazin, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze physical structure, working conditions of health professionals and outline of the procedures established in prisons. METHODS We analyzed 34 provisional detention centers and 69 male and six female prison units in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A self-applied instrument was developed to collect quantitative data on the characteristics of health care structure, equipment and personnel in prisons. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) or equivalent non-parametric tests and Chi-square or Fisher’s tests were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively, between the groups. RESULTS The main problems were delays in the results of laboratory tests and imaging. With respect to the teams, it was observed that a large majority were in conditions close to those proposed by the Bipartite Commission 2013 but without improvement being reflected in the indicators. With respect to the process, more than 60.0% of prisons located in small towns do not have the structural conditions to ensure secondary or tertiary health care for the continuity of treatment. CONCLUSIONS This profile of prisons in the country can be used for planning and monitoring future actions for the continuous improvement of healthcare processes. PMID:24897049

  12. Breaking through barriers: using technology to address executive function weaknesses and improve student achievement.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Assistive technologies provide significant capabilities for improving student achievement. Improved accessibility, cost, and diversity of applications make integration of technology a powerful tool to compensate for executive function weaknesses and deficits and their impact on student performance, learning, and achievement. These tools can be used to compensate for decreased working memory, poor time management, poor planning and organization, poor initiation, and decreased memory. Assistive technology provides mechanisms to assist students with diverse strengths and weaknesses in mastering core curricular concepts.

  13. Return to Sender: the need to re-address patient antibiotic allergy labels in Australia and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Trubiano, JA; Worth, LJ; Urbancic, K; Brown, TM; Paterson, DL; Lucas, M; Phillips, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic allergies are frequently reported and have significant impacts upon appropriate prescribing and clinical outcomes. We surveyed infectious diseases physicians, allergists, clinical immunologists and hospital pharmacists to evaluate antibiotic allergy knowledge and service delivery in Australia and New Zealand. Methods An online multi-choice questionnaire was developed and endorsed by representatives of the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA), Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases (ASID) and Society of Hospital Pharmacists Australia (SHPA). The 37-item survey was distributed in April 2015 to members of ASCIA, ASID, SHPA and Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Results Of 277 respondents, 94% currently use or would utilise antibiotic allergy testing (AAT) and reported seeing up to 10 patients/week labelled as antibiotic-allergic. Forty-two per cent were not aware of or did not have AAT available. Most felt that AAT would aid antibiotic selection, antibiotic appropriateness and antimicrobial stewardship (79%, 69% and 61%, respectively). Patients with histories of immediate hypersensitivity were more likely to be referred than those with delayed hypersensitivities (76% vs. 41%, p=0.0001). Lack of specialist physicians (20%) and personal experience (17%) were barriers to service delivery. A multidisciplinary approach was the preferred AAT model (53%). Knowledge gaps were identified, with the majority over-estimating rates of penicillin/cephalosporin (78%), penicillin/carbapenem (57%) and penicillin/monobactam (39%) cross-reactivity. Conclusions A high burden of antibiotic allergy labelling and demand for AAT is complicated by a relative lack availability or awareness of AAT services in Australia and New Zealand. Antibiotic allergy education and deployment of AAT, accessible to community and hospital-based clinicians, may improve clinical decisions and reduce antibiotic allergy impacts. A collaborative approach

  14. The Evidence Base for Improving School Outcomes by Addressing the Whole Child and by Addressing Skills and Attitudes, Not Just Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Adele

    2010-01-01

    If we want the best academic outcomes, the most efficient and cost-effective route to achieve that is, counterintuitively, "not" to narrowly focus on academics, but to also address children's social, emotional, and physical development. Similarly, the best and most efficient route to physical health is through also addressing emotional, social,…

  15. Capturing User Needs to Improve Processes at EOSDIS Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinowski, E. J.; Boquist, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004 the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has conducted an annual comprehensive survey of user satisfaction using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Customer satisfaction ratings for EOSDIS consistently rate better than the overall government ratings. As part of the survey users are asked to submit comments concerning their experiences and interests. These user comments provide valuable insight into the effect of data center processes on users' experiences. Although user satisfaction has remained high, their preferences have changed with the rapid advances in web-based services. This analysis investigates the correlation between user comments, process changes or capability improvements at the individual data centers, and whether the changes at the data centers and web sites show a corresponding increase in user satisfaction. We will evaluate the comments in the areas of Product Search, Product Selection and Order, Delivery, Product Quality and Customer Support.

  16. Afghan Air Force University: Contract Requirements Were Generally Met, but Instances of Non Compliance, Poor Workmanship, and Inadequate Maintenance Need to Be Addressed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Afghanistan, including at the Afghan Air Force University, from December 2014 through March 2016, in accordance with the Quality Standards for...Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction SIGAR 16-26 Inspection Report Afghan Air Force University: Contract Requirements...Were Generally Met, but Instances of Non-Compliance, Poor Workmanship, and Inadequate Maintenance Need to Be Addressed SIGAR 16-26-IP/Afghan Air

  17. Arctic Planning: DOD Expects to Play a Supporting Role to Other Federal Agencies and Has Efforts Under Way to Address Capability Needs and Update Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ARCTIC PLANNING DOD Expects to Play a Supporting Role to Other Federal Agencies and Has Efforts Under Way to...to Other Federal Agencies and Has Efforts Under Way to Address Capability Needs and Update Plans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Government Accountability Office,441 G Street NW,Washington, DC ,20548 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S

  18. Vaccination for tomorrow: the need to improve immunisation rates.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, George

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1998 health scare about measles mumps and rubella (MMR) immunisation, vaccination rates for measles have suffered. Although these recovered for a brief period in 2004-05, they have stalled again and latest figures suggest that only 85% of children are now immunised against this disease. The UK has become one of the five countries in the European Union with the highest measles rates. Meanwhile the wider picture indicates that other vaccination rates, including for seasonal influenza, are not meeting targets. This is a potential sign that the MMR scare and myths around immunisation are setting a worrying trend of some people losing confidence in the practice of vaccination. The UK has expanded its childhood immunisation programme to include the human papilloma virus vaccine (HPV) which protects against some types of cervical cancer. New life-saving vaccines for diseases, including meningococcal B meningitis (a strain of meningitis not yet covered by the existing vaccination programme), shingles and hepatitis C will soon become available. It is therefore important that information is available to the general public about the excellent safety record and benefits of vaccination to ensure that as many people as possible can take advantage of these new vaccines. This article explores the current uptake of, and attitudes towards, vaccination programmes and discusses some myths about immunisation. It suggests that community health care teams with access to adults, including parents of children and young people who need vaccination, are well placed to help challenge some of these myths and promote the benefits of immunisation. Practical suggestions are included on how this can be achieved.

  19. Improving knowledge translation in Uganda: more needs to be done

    PubMed Central

    Orem, Juliet Nabyonga; Mafigiri, David Kaawa; Nabudere, Harriet; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Meeting the health-related Millennium Development Goals in Africa calls for better access to and higher utilisation of quality evidence. The mechanisms through which research evidence can effectively guide public health policy and implementation of health programmes are not fully understood. Challenges to the use of evidence to inform policy and practice include the lack of a common understanding of what constitutes evidence and limited insight on the effectiveness of different research uptake activities. Available Knowledge Translation (KT) models have mainly been developed in high income countries and may not be directly applicable in resource-limited settings. In this study we examine the uptake of evidence in public health policy making in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional qualitative study consisting of in-depth interviews with 17 purposively-selected health policy makers and researchers. The study explored respondents’ perceptions of the role of evidence in public health policy development, their understanding of KT and their views on the appropriateness of different KT activities that are currently implemented in Uganda. Results Although all respondents stated that evidence should inform health policies and programmes, they noted that this occurred infrequently. We noted a lack of conceptual clarity about KT and what precisely constitutes evidence. Respondents reported having been involved in different KT activities, including partnerships and platforms created for knowledge sharing between researchers and end users, but with very mixed results. Conclusion There is need for conceptual clarity on the notion of KT and an understanding of the most appropriate KT strategies in low-income settings. PMID:24624247

  20. An urgent need to improve life conditions of seniors.

    PubMed

    Hebert, R

    2010-10-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Government of Quebec set up a Public Consultation on Living Conditions of Seniors. Fifty sessions were held in 26 cities across all 17 regions of the province. More than 4000 seniors attended the sessions and 275 briefs were received from scientists and associations. Three themes were identified in the report published in 2008: supporting seniors and their caregivers, reinforcing the place of seniors in society, and preventing problems associated with aging (suicide, abuse, addictions). The main actions that I recommended included: Increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement to prevent poverty; Modifying pension plans and working conditions to allow for progressive retirement; Making a major investment in home care to provide access to services regardless of place of residence; Introducing an Autonomy Support Benefit and autonomy insurance program for financing services to support people with disabilities; Generalizing an Integrated Service Delivery Network providing services to frail older people; Better training for professionals in gerontology. I also recommended setting up a National Policy on Seniors to align all government departments and agencies, municipalities and the private sector around a vision, objectives and a set of actions for improving the integration of seniors in an aging society. This would contribute to a more equitable, interdependent and wiser society. Unfortunately, the Government did not support these recommendations. It is now time for scientists to get involved in leading policy on seniors and in the political arena.

  1. Expanding School Improvement Policy to Better Address Barriers to Learning and Integrate Public Health Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Howard S.; Taylor, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article stresses that current school improvement policy in the USA marginalizes development of the type of system of student support necessary for enabling student success and well-being at school. Then we discuss how education policy can be expanded and operationalized to correct this deficiency. Finally, we explore the implications of the…

  2. Addressing Viral Hepatitis in People with Substance Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) are developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best-practice guidelines for the prevention and…

  3. The Urgent Need for Improved Climate Models and Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Lisa; Baethgen, Walter; Kirtman, Ben; Meehl, Gerald

    2009-09-01

    An investment over the next 10 years of the order of US$2 billion for developing improved climate models was recommended in a report (http://wcrp.wmo.int/documents/WCRP_WorldModellingSummit_Jan2009.pdf) from the May 2008 World Modelling Summit for Climate Prediction, held in Reading, United Kingdom, and presented by the World Climate Research Programme. The report indicated that “climate models will, as in the past, play an important, and perhaps central, role in guiding the trillion dollar decisions that the peoples, governments and industries of the world will be making to cope with the consequences of changing climate.” If trillions of dollars are going to be invested in making decisions related to climate impacts, an investment of $2 billion, which is less than 0.1% of that amount, to provide better climate information seems prudent. One example of investment in adaptation is the World Bank's Climate Investment Fund, which has drawn contributions of more than $6 billion for work on clean technologies and adaptation efforts in nine pilot countries and two pilot regions. This is just the beginning of expenditures on adaptation efforts by the World Bank and other mechanisms, focusing on only a small fraction of the nations of the world and primarily aimed at anticipated anthropogenic climate change. Moreover, decisions are being made now, all around the world—by individuals, companies, and governments—that affect people and their livelihoods today, not just 50 or more years in the future. Climate risk management, whether related to projects of the scope of the World Bank's or to the planning and decisions of municipalities, will be best guided by meaningful climate information derived from observations of the past and model predictions of the future.

  4. The Evidence Base for Improving School Outcomes by Addressing the Whole Child and by Addressing Skills and Attitudes, Not Just Content

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2010-01-01

    If we want the best academic outcomes, the most efficient and cost-effective route to achieve that is, counterintuitively, not to narrowly focus on academics, but to also address children’s social, emotional, and physical development. Similarly, the best and most efficient route to physical health is through also addressing emotional, social, and cognitive wellness. Emotional wellness, similarly, depends critically on social, cognitive, and physical wellness. PMID:21274420

  5. Job satisfaction and career commitment among Alzheimer's care providers: addressing turnover and improving staff empowerment.

    PubMed

    Coogle, Constance L; Parham, Iris A; Rachel, Colleen A

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the relation between job satisfaction and career commitment among 262 Alzheimer's care staff working in long-term and community-based care settings. It was anticipated that the results would suggest whether career commitment could be enhanced to positively influence job satisfaction, and conversely, if improvements in job satisfaction might contribute to a deepened sense of vocational empowerment. Participants attended dementia-specific training and completed 2 short work-related questionnaires that measured job satisfaction and career commitment. The results of stepwise regression revealed interrelations between the 2 constructs. Congruence appeared to be reciprocal with respect to the overall scale scores and the intrinsic job satisfaction measure. Unexpected relations appeared in analyses of the extrinsic job satisfaction measure and the career planning subscale. Results are indicative of the fundamental distinction between job satisfaction and career commitment. Implications for efforts to reduce turnover and improve staff empowerment are also considered.

  6. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  7. Addressing the Process Improvement Science Knowledge and Skills of Program Directors and Associate Program Directors

    PubMed Central

    Gravdal, Judith A.; Hyziak, Pamela; Belmonte, Frank; Clemens, Mary Ann; Sulo, Suela

    2015-01-01

    Background Process improvement (PI) science is relatively new to healthcare and has only recently been introduced to medical education. Most residency faculty lack training or experience in PI science activities. We assessed the impact of PI science education on the knowledge and attitudes of a group of residency and fellowship program directors and associate program directors using their respective Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education annual program evaluations (APEs) as an experiential object. Methods For this pre/post study, 16 program directors and 7 associate program directors were surveyed before and after 4 didactic modules. The APEs for the 2 years prior to the intervention and in the fall after the intervention were analyzed. Mentoring in the use of these skills in the preparation of the APEs was provided. Results The participants demonstrated improved knowledge in some areas and increased awareness of deficits in other areas. APE quality did not show consistent improvement following the intervention. Conclusion The PI science knowledge and skill gaps of program directors and associate program directors are likely to impact the content and success of residency curricula. The designed PI science curriculum was slightly effective. Using the APE as the experiential object was convenient, but the APE was not the best project for a PI exercise. New, effective strategies and interventions to develop expertise in PI science are important as programs grapple with meeting new requirements, ensuring quality programs, and preparing residents and fellows for practice. PMID:25829878

  8. Addressing Inter-set Write-Variation for Improving Lifetime of Non-Volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    We propose a technique which minimizes inter-set write variation in NVM caches for improving its lifetime. Our technique uses cache coloring scheme to add a software-controlled mapping layer between groups of physical pages (called memory regions) and cache sets. Periodically, the number of writes to different colors of the cache is computed and based on this result, the mapping of a few colors is changed to channel the write traffic to least utilized cache colors. This change helps to achieve wear-leveling.

  9. SaludABLEOmaha: Improving Readiness to Address Obesity Through Healthy Lifestyle in a Midwestern Latino Community, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Robbins, Regina; Steenson, Sharalyn; Stewart, Catherine; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background A community’s readiness for change is a precursor to the effective application of evidence-based practices for health promotion. Research is lacking regarding potential strategies to improve readiness to address obesity-related health issues in underserved communities. Community Context This case study describes SaludABLEOmaha, an initiative to increase readiness of residents in a Midwestern Latino community to address obesity and adopt healthy lifestyles. Methods SaludABLEOmaha emphasized 2 core approaches, youth activism and collaboration among public and private institutions, which we applied to planning and implementing tactics in support of 3 interconnected strategies: 1) social marketing and social media, 2) service learning in schools (ie, curricula that integrate hands-on community service with instruction and reflection), and 3) community and business engagement. Following the Community Readiness Model protocol (http://triethniccenter.colostate.edu/communityReadiness.htm), structured interviews were conducted with community leaders and analyzed before and 2.5 years after launch of the program. Outcome The community increased in readiness from stage 3 of the Community Readiness Model, “vague awareness,” at baseline to stage 5, “preparation,” at follow-up. Interpretation SaludABLEOmaha improved community readiness (eg, community knowledge, community climate), which probably contributed to the observed increase in readiness to address obesity through healthy lifestyle. Community mobilization approaches such as youth activism integrated with social marketing and social media tactics can improve community responsiveness to obesity prevention and diminish health disparities. PMID:25674679

  10. DOD Financial Management: Improvements Needed in the Navys Audit Readiness Efforts for Fund Balance with Treasury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Improvements Needed in the Navy’s Audit Readiness Efforts for Fund Balance with Treasury...Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-47, a report to congressional committees August 2016 DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Improvements Needed...Guidance to provide a standard methodology for DOD components to follow to improve financial management and achieve audit readiness, and designated

  11. Improvements to address issues leading to cancellation of the July 2014 Plutonium shot

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, John F.

    2015-02-01

    Overview: A Pu shot scheduled for July 17 on the Z machine at SNL was cancelled this past summer. The LiF windows on the Pu targets were cracked during assembly because of configuration changes. Sandia management concluded that continuing with this experiment would present an unacceptable level of risk to the facility and possibly to the workers. In this report, we document the events that occurred which led to this decision and also present some lessons learned and plans and procedures put in place to reduce the likelihood of another such occurrence. The changes and this memorandum reflect the thinking of subject matter experts at both LANL and SNL. These changes represent significant improvements in both communication protocols and quality of the hardware assemblies.

  12. Can addressing death anxiety reduce health care workers' burnout and improve patient care?

    PubMed

    Melo, Carol Gouveia; Oliver, David

    2011-01-01

    Death anxiety may interfere with health care workers' (HCWs) relationships with patients and patients' families and increase HCWs' levels of burnout. This study shows the impact of a six-day course for HCWs that provided training in communication, in offering emotional and spiritual support to patients, and in personal introspection on death anxiety. The HCWs were given questionnaires to evaluate their level of burnout, personal well-being, and death anxiety as well as the quality of their relationships with patients before the course and four months after it. There were 150 study participants, all HCWs involved in caring for dying patients (85 in palliative care units and 65 in other settings). There was a control group of 26 HCWs who cared for the dying in settings other than palliative care units. The results show that the course appeared to lead to a significant reduction in levels of burnout and death anxiety; they also indicated an increase in personal well-being and professional fulfillment, and participants perceived an improvement in the quality of their relationships with patients and patients' families.

  13. Returning to the Alder Hey report and its reporting: addressing confusions and improving inquiries.

    PubMed

    Dewar, S; Boddington, P

    2004-10-01

    The Royal Liverpool Children's Inquiry investigated the circumstances leading to the removal, retention, and disposal of human tissue, including children's organs, at the Royal Liverpool Children's NHS Trust (the Alder Hey Hospital). It recommended changes to procedures for obtaining consent for postmortems and retaining organs and tissues for research or education. However, the report contains five areas of confusion. Firstly, it allowed the cultural and historical traditions of horror over the use and misuse of body parts to suffuse the logical analysis of past wrongs and future rights. Secondly, it makes an inappropriate conflation between seeking redress for past wrongs and shaping future policy. Thirdly, the report takes a muddled stance over the value of bodily integrity at burial. Fourthly, the report is inconsistent over the justification for future organ and tissue collections. Fifthly, the notion of "respect" is used with troublesome looseness. The extent to which subsequent policy work has furthered the search for greater ethical clarity over these difficult issues is discussed, together with reflection on three particular improvements that could be made to the process of such an inquiry.

  14. Shrinking Sea Ice, Thawing Permafrost, Bigger Storms, and Extremely Limited Data - Addressing Information Needs of Stakeholders in Western Alaska Through Participatory Decisions and Collaborative Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. A.; Reynolds, J.

    2015-12-01

    Communities, Tribes, and decision makers in coastal western Alaska are being impacted by declining sea ice, sea level rise, changing storm patterns and intensities, and increased rates of coastal erosion. Relative to their counterparts in the contiguous USA, their ability to plan for and respond to these changes is constrained by the region's generally meager or non-existent information base. Further, the information needs and logistic challenges are of a scale that perhaps can be addressed only through strong, strategic collaboration. Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are fundamentally about applied science and collaboration, especially collaborative decision making. The Western Alaska LCC has established a process of participatory decision making that brings together researchers, agency managers, local experts from Tribes and field specialists to identify and prioritize shared information needs; develop a course of action to address them by using the LCC's limited resources to catalyze engagement, overcome barriers to progress, and build momentum; then ensure products are delivered in a manner that meets decision makers' needs. We briefly review the LCC's activities & outcomes from the stages of (i) collaborative needs assessment (joint with the Alaska Climate Science Center and the Alaska Ocean Observing System), (ii) strategic science activities, and (iii) product refinement and delivery. We discuss lessons learned, in the context of our recent program focused on 'Changes in Coastal Storms and Their Impacts' and current collaborative efforts focused on delivery of Coastal Resiliency planning tools and results from applied science projects. Emphasis is given to the various key interactions between scientists and decision makers / managers that have been promoted by this process to ensure alignment of final products to decision maker needs.

  15. Improvements Needed in the Army's Program for Developing Extension Training Materials for Use by Soldiers in Field Units. Report to the Secretary of the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report addresses three major issues concerning the Army's program for developing extension training materials: (1) indications of low usage of Army Training Extension Course lessons by soldiers in the field; (2) improvements needed in the process for developing extension training materials; and (3) the need for further evaluation before the…

  16. Building Capacity of Occupational Therapy Practitioners to Address the Mental Health Needs of Children and Youth: A Mixed-Methods Study of Knowledge Translation

    PubMed Central

    Demirjian, Louise; LaGuardia, Teri; Thompson-Repas, Karen; Conway, Carol; Michaud, Paula

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE. We explored the meaning and outcomes of a 6-mo building capacity process designed to promote knowledge translation of a public health approach to mental health among pediatric occupational therapy practitioners participating in a Community of Practice. METHOD. A one-group (N = 117) mixed-methods design using a pretest–posttest survey and qualitative analysis of written reflections was used to explore the meaning and outcomes of the building capacity process. RESULTS. Statistically significant improvements (p < .02) in pretest–posttest scores of knowledge, beliefs, and actions related to a public health approach to mental health were found. Qualitative findings suggest that participation resulted in a renewed commitment to addressing children’s mental health. CONCLUSION. The building capacity process expanded practitioner knowledge, renewed energy, and promoted confidence, resulting in change leaders empowered to articulate, advocate for, and implement practice changes reflecting occupational therapy’s role in addressing children’s mental health. PMID:26565099

  17. Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Additional Actions Needed to Improve Management and Integration of DOD Efforts to Support Warfighter Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Services, House of Representatives UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Additional Actions Needed to Improve Management and Integration of DOD Efforts to...Armed Services, House of Representatives The Department of Defense’s (DOD) use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) continues to increase. In 2000...unmanned aircraft systems This is a work of the U.S. government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. It may be reproduced

  18. Air Force Training: Further Analysis and Planning Needed to Improve Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    explained that Red Flag exercises require a significant adversary air presence to provide high quality training for the participants. As discussed... AIR FORCE TRAINING Further Analysis and Planning Needed to Improve Effectiveness Report to Congressional Committees...GAO-16-864, a report to congressional committees September 2016 AIR FORCE TRAINING Further Analysis and Planning Needed to Improve

  19. Improved method for roadside barrier length of need modeling using real-world trajectories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas S; Thomson, Robert; Gabler, Hampton C

    2015-07-01

    The 2011 AASHTO Roadside Design Guide (RDG) contains perhaps the most widely used procedure for choosing an appropriate length of need (LON) for roadside barriers. However, this procedure has several limitations. The procedure uses a highly simplified model of vehicle departure, and the procedure does not allow designers to specify an explicit level of protection. A new procedure for choosing LON that addresses these limitations is presented in this paper. This new procedure is based on recent, real-world road departure trajectories and uses this departure data in a more realistic way. The new procedure also allows LON to be specified for a precisely known level of protection - a level which can be based on number of crashes, injury outcomes or even estimated crash cost - while still remaining straightforward and quick to use like the 2011 RDG procedure. In this analysis, the improved procedure was used to explore the effects of the RDG procedure's assumptions. LON recommendations given by the 2011 RDG procedure were compared with recommendations given by this improved procedure. For 55 mph roads, the 2011 RDG procedure appears to lead to a LON sufficient to intercept between 80% and 90% of right-side departures that would otherwise strike a hazard located 10 m from the roadway. For hazards closer than 10 m, the 2011 RDG procedure intercepts progressively higher percentages of real-world departures. This suggests the protection level provided by the 2011 RDG procedure varies with the hazard offset, becoming more conservative as the hazard moves closer to the roadway. The improved procedure, by comparison, gives a consistent protection level regardless of hazard location.

  20. The development and implementation of theory-driven programs capable of addressing poverty-impacted children's health, mental health, and prevention needs: CHAMP and CHAMP+, evidence-informed, family-based interventions to address HIV risk and care.

    PubMed

    McKernan McKay, Mary; Alicea, Stacey; Elwyn, Laura; McClain, Zachary R B; Parker, Gary; Small, Latoya A; Mellins, Claude Ann

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a program of prevention and intervention research conducted by the CHAMP (Collaborative HIV prevention and Adolescent Mental health Project; McKay & Paikoff, 2007 ) investigative team. CHAMP refers to a set of theory-driven, evidence-informed, collaboratively designed, family-based approaches meant to address the prevention, health, and mental health needs of poverty-impacted African American and Latino urban youth who are either at risk for HIV exposure or perinatally infected and at high risk for reinfection and possible transmission. CHAMP approaches are informed by theoretical frameworks that incorporate an understanding of the critical influences of multilevel contextual factors on youth risk taking and engagement in protective health behaviors. Highly influential theories include the triadic theory of influence, social action theory, and ecological developmental perspectives. CHAMP program delivery strategies were developed via a highly collaborative process drawing upon community-based participatory research methods in order to enhance cultural and contextual sensitivity of program content and format. The development and preliminary outcomes associated with a family-based intervention for a new population, perinatally HIV-infected youth and their adult caregivers, referred to as CHAMP+, is described to illustrate the integration of theory, existing evidence, and intensive input from consumers and healthcare providers.

  1. Achievement for All: Improving Psychosocial Outcomes for Students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA)…

  2. Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: New Facilities Management Information System Promising, but Improved Data Accuracy Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A General Accounting Office (GAO) study evaluated the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) new facilities management information system (FMIS). Specifically, the study examined whether the new FMIS addresses the old system's weaknesses and meets BIA's management needs, whether BIA has finished validating the accuracy of data transferred from the old…

  3. Assessing, Analyzing, and Adapting: Improving a Graduate Student Instruction Program through Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roszkowski, Beth; Reynolds, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights an assessment of library instruction needs among graduate students in the social sciences. The article addresses the development and implementation of the assessment and the application of assessment results to an established set of library instruction workshops. The article provides a detailed summary of assessment…

  4. Report: EPA Improved Its National Security Information Program, but Some Improvements Still Needed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0196, June 2, 2016. The EPA will continue to improve its national security information program by completing information classification guides that can be used uniformly and consistently throughout the agency.

  5. Improving Access to Needed Health Care Improves Low-Income Children's Quality of Life: Research Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seid, Michael. Varni, James W.; Cummings, Leslie; Schonlau, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    This research brief describes an examination of the effect of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) on children's access to needed health services and on their quality of life. The analysis focused on a sample of California families who had recently enrolled in that state's SCHIP. The study found that, after enrollment, children…

  6. Addressing the conundrum of multimorbidity in heart failure: Do we need a more strategic approach to improve health outcomes?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Simon; Riegel, Barbara; Thompson, David R

    2016-02-01

    There is clear evidence across the globe that the clinical complexity of patients presenting to hospital with the syndrome of heart failure is increasing - not only in terms of the presence of concurrent disease states, but with additional socio-demographic risk factors that complicate treatment. Management strategies that treat heart failure as the main determinant of health outcomes ignores the multiple and complex issues that will inevitably erode the efficacy and efficiency of current heart failure management programmes. This complex problem (or conundrum) requires a different way of thinking around the complex interactions that underpin poor outcomes in heart failure. In this context, we present the COordinated NUrse-led inteNsified Disease management for continuity of caRe for mUltiMorbidity in Heart Failure (CONUNDRUM-HF) matrix that may well inform future research and models of care to achieve better health outcomes in this rapidly increasing patient population.

  7. Report: Office of Research and Development Needs to Improve Its Method of Measuring Administrative Savings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-P-0333, July 14, 2011. ORD’s efforts to reduce its administrative costs are noteworthy, but ORD needs to improve its measurement mechanism for assessing the effectiveness of its initiatives to reduce administrative costs.

  8. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Management Practices to Ensure a Successful Customer Technology Solutions Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0194, August 23, 2010. Although EPA indicated it could avoid spending more than $115.4 million over 8.5 years by consolidating the desktop computing environment, improved management practices are needed.

  9. Report: Improved Management Practices Needed to Increase Use of Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2007-P-00030, August 20, 2007. EPA established a partnership with the Exchange Network’s governance bodies to assist them with accomplishing Network initiatives, more improvements are needed to ensure Network partners fully utilize the Network.

  10. Report: Improved Contract Administration Needed for the Customer Technology Solutions Contract

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #13-P-0398, September 16, 2013. Based on our review of the WCF contract EPW08034, which ended September 2012, the EPA needs to improve its contract administration to assist in managing other similar type contracts.

  11. Implementation pearls from a new guidebook on improving medication use and outcomes with clinical decision support. Effective CDS is essential for addressing healthcare performance improvement imperatives.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Anwar M; Osheroff, Jerome A; Sittig, Dean F; Chuo, John; Velasco, Ferdinand; Collins, David A

    2009-01-01

    Effective clinical decision support (CDS) is essential for addressing healthcare performance improvement imperatives, but care delivery organizations (CDO) typically struggle with CDS deployment. Ensuring safe and effective medication delivery to patients is a central focus of CDO performance improvement efforts, and this article provides an overview of best-practice strategies for applying CDS to these goals. The strategies discussed are drawn from a new guidebook, co-published and co-sponsored by more than a dozen leading organizations. Developed by scores of CDS implementers and experts, the guidebook outlines key steps and success factors for applying CDS to medication management. A central thesis is that improving outcomes with CDS interventions requires that the CDS five rights be addressed successfully. That is, the interventions must deliver the right information, to the right person, in the right format, through the right channel, at the right point in workflow. This paper provides further details about these CDS five rights, and highlights other important strategies for successful CDS programs.

  12. Air Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-04

    Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement M A Y 4 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-087 Mission...Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective Our objective was to determine whether the Air...Force is effectively managing energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). This report is the second in a series of audits on ESPCs. Finding The Air

  13. Army’s Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement (REDACTED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-29

    No. DODIG-2016-080 A P R I L 2 9 , 2 0 1 6 Army’s Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE... Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement Objective The objective of the audit was to determine whether the Department of the Army (Army...effectively managed MQ-1C Gray Eagle (Gray Eagle) spare parts. Specifically, we determined whether the Army effectively managed its spare-parts

  14. Defense Acquisition Workforce: Actions Needed to Guide Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE Actions Needed to Guide Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability Report... Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability Why GAO Did This Study GAO and others have found that DOD needs to take steps to ensure DOD...develop an acquisition workforce plan every 2 years. DOD issued a plan in 2010, in which it called for the department to increase the size of the

  15. Recommendations for implementing policy, systems, and environmental improvements to address chronic diseases in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Ed; Kwon, Simona; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Chung, Marianne; Bautista, Roxanna; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ko-Chin, Kathy

    2014-11-20

    Emphasis has increased recently on disseminating high-impact, population-wide strategies for the prevention of chronic diseases. However, such strategies are typically not effective at reaching Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, or other underserved communities. The objectives of this article were to 1) present the methods of the Strategies to Reach and Implement the Vision of Health Equity program in which 15 community-based organizations in the United States and the Pacific region implemented evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental improvements in their local communities and 2) provide recommendations for using these tailored approaches in other communities and geographic locations. Further support is needed for organizations in tailoring these types of population-wide strategies. Implementing population health improvements should be adapted to maximize effectiveness to decrease chronic diseases in these populations and ultimately eliminate racial/ethnic health disparities.

  16. Recommendations for Implementing Policy, Systems, and Environmental Improvements to Address Chronic Diseases in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders

    PubMed Central

    Tepporn, Ed; Kwon, Simona; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Chung, Marianne; Bautista, Roxanna; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ko-Chin, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Emphasis has increased recently on disseminating high-impact, population-wide strategies for the prevention of chronic diseases. However, such strategies are typically not effective at reaching Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, or other underserved communities. The objectives of this article were to 1) present the methods of the Strategies to Reach and Implement the Vision of Health Equity program in which 15 community-based organizations in the United States and the Pacific region implemented evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental improvements in their local communities and 2) provide recommendations for using these tailored approaches in other communities and geographic locations. Further support is needed for organizations in tailoring these types of population-wide strategies. Implementing population health improvements should be adapted to maximize effectiveness to decrease chronic diseases in these populations and ultimately eliminate racial/ethnic health disparities. PMID:25412025

  17. Addressing gender inequalities to improve the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Avni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally, women constitute 50% of all persons living with HIV. Gender inequalities are a key driver of women's vulnerabilities to HIV. This paper looks at how these structural factors shape specific behaviours and outcomes related to the sexual and reproductive health of women living with HIV. Discussion There are several pathways by which gender inequalities shape the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV. First, gender norms that privilege men's control over women and violence against women inhibit women's ability to practice safer sex, make reproductive decisions based on their own fertility preferences and disclose their HIV status. Second, women's lack of property and inheritance rights and limited access to formal employment makes them disproportionately vulnerable to food insecurity and its consequences. This includes compromising their adherence to antiretroviral therapy and increasing their vulnerability to transactional sex. Third, with respect to stigma and discrimination, women are more likely to be blamed for bringing HIV into the family, as they are often tested before men. In several settings, healthcare providers violate the reproductive rights of women living with HIV in relation to family planning and in denying them care. Lastly, a number of countries have laws that criminalize HIV transmission, which specifically impact women living with HIV who may be reluctant to disclose because of fears of violence and other negative consequences. Conclusions Addressing gender inequalities is central to improving the sexual and reproductive health outcomes and more broadly the wellbeing of women living with HIV. Programmes that go beyond a narrow biomedical/clinical approach and address the social and structural context of women's lives can also maximize the benefits of HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. PMID:26643464

  18. Are the testing needs of key European populations affected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C being addressed? A scoping review of testing studies in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Spina, Alexander; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether or not key populations affected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C are being tested sufficiently for these diseases throughout the European region. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies on HBV and HCV testing in the 53 Member States of the World Health Organization European Region following PRISMA criteria. Results 136 English-language studies from 24 countries published between January 2007 and June 2013 were found. Most studies took place in 6 countries: France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. 37 studies (27%) addressed HBV, 46 (34%) HCV, and 53 (39%) both diseases. The largest categories of study populations were people who use drugs (18%) and health care patient populations (17%). Far fewer studies focused on migrants, prison inmates, or men who have sex with men. Conclusions The overall evidence base on HBV and HCV testing has considerable gaps in terms of the countries and populations represented and validity of testing uptake data. More research is needed throughout Europe to guide efforts to provide testing to certain key populations. PMID:27815935

  19. Chronic Neglect and Services Without Borders: A Guiding Model for Social Service Enhancement to Address the Needs of Parents With Intellectual Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Azar, Sandra; Robinson, Lara; Proctor, Stephon

    Child neglect has negative effects throughout the lifespan. Although an argument for a link between intellectual disabilities and neglectful parenting can be made, this paper argues for a more fine grained view of the cognitive problems that underlie child neglect perpetration and provides evidence for a social information processing model of etiology. Based on this model and what is known about the efficacy of behaviorally-based interventions, implications for enhancements to the social service system to adapt to the needs of parents with intellectual disabilities are presented. The areas covered include improvements to screening and assessment of parents; provision of adapted services; and changes in selection processes and training of staff. Future directions for integrating social information processing elements into interventions are discussed with examples from empirically tested prevention programs.

  20. Local Expansion of Donation After Circulatory Death Kidney Transplant Activity Improves Waitlisted Outcomes and Addresses Inequities of Access to Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mirshekar-Syahkal, B; Summers, D; Bradbury, L L; Aly, M; Bardsley, V; Berry, M; Norris, J M; Torpey, N; Clatworthy, M R; Bradley, J A; Pettigrew, G J

    2017-02-01

    In the United Kingdom, donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidney transplant activity has increased rapidly, but marked regional variation persists. We report how increased DCD kidney transplant activity influenced waitlisted outcomes for a single center. Between 2002-2003 and 2011-2012, 430 (54%) DCD and 361 (46%) donation after brain death (DBD) kidney-only transplants were performed at the Cambridge Transplant Centre, with a higher proportion of DCD donors fulfilling expanded criteria status (41% DCD vs. 32% DBD; p = 0.01). Compared with U.K. outcomes, for which the proportion of DCD:DBD kidney transplants performed is lower (25%; p < 0.0001), listed patients at our center waited less time for transplantation (645 vs. 1045 days; p < 0.0001), and our center had higher transplantation rates and lower numbers of waiting list deaths. This was most apparent for older patients (aged >65 years; waiting time 730 vs. 1357 days nationally; p < 0.001), who received predominantly DCD kidneys from older donors (mean donor age 64 years), whereas younger recipients received equal proportions of living donor, DBD and DCD kidney transplants. Death-censored kidney graft survival was nevertheless comparable for younger and older recipients, although transplantation conferred a survival benefit from listing for only younger recipients. Local expansion in DCD kidney transplant activity improves survival outcomes for younger patients and addresses inequity of access to transplantation for older recipients.

  1. Engaging Scientists in Meaningful E/PO: How the NASA SMD E/PO Community Addresses the Needs of the Higher Ed Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, James; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Schultz, Gregory R.; Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, Brandon L.; Gurton, Suzanne; NASA Astrophysics E/PO Community

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) coordinates the work of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics EPO projects and their teams to bring cutting-edge discoveries of NASA missions to the introductory astronomy college classroom. The Astrophysics Forum assists scientist and educator involvement in SMD E/PO (uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise) and makes SMD E/PO resources and expertise accessible to the science and education communities. We present three new opportunities for college instructors to bring the latest NASA discoveries in Astrophysics into their classrooms.To address the expressed needs of the higher education community, the Astrophysics Forum collaborated with the Astrophysics E/PO community, researchers, and Astronomy 101 instructors to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for higher education audiences. Among these resources are two Resource Guides on the topics of cosmology and exoplanets, each including a variety of accessible sources.The Astrophysics Forum also coordinates the development of the Astro 101 slide set series--5 to 7-slide presentations on new discoveries from NASA Astrophysics missions relevant to topics in introductory astronomy courses. These sets enable Astronomy 101 instructors to include new discoveries not yet in their textbooks into the broader context of the course: http://www.astrosociety.org/education/astronomy-resource-guides/.The Astrophysics Forum also coordinated the development of 12 monthly Universe Discovery Guides, each featuring a theme and a representative object well-placed for viewing, with an accompanying interpretive story, strategies for conveying the topics, and supporting NASA-approved education activities and background information from a spectrum of NASA missions and programs: http://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/news-display.cfm?News_ID=611

  2. Progress in Space Weather Modeling and Observations Needed to Improve the Operational NAIRAS Model Aircraft Radiation Exposure Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Tobiska, W.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. Addressing these science questions require improvements in both space weather modeling and observations. The focus of this talk is to present these science questions, the proposed methodologies for addressing these science questions, and the anticipated improvements to the operational predictions of atmospheric radiation exposure. The overarching goal of this work is to provide a decision support tool for the aviation industry that will enable an optimal balance to be achieved between minimizing health risks to passengers and aircrew while simultaneously minimizing costs to the airline companies.

  3. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    No. DODIG-2015-141 J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 5 Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration Mission Our...r a u d , W a s t e & A b u s e DODIG-2015-141 (Project No. D2014-D000RA-0116.000) │ i Results in Brief Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs...to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective Our objective was to determine whether Naval Facilities

  4. Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-28

    No. DODIG-2015-075 J A N U A R Y 2 8 , 2 0 1 5 Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement Report...2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program...Controls Over the Air Force Contract Augmentation Program Payment Process Need Improvement Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective To determine whether DoD was

  5. Research strategies for addressing uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, David E.; Brekke, Levi D.; Averyt, Kristen; Jardine, Angela; Welling, Leigh; Garfin, Gregg; Jardine, Angela; Merideth, Robert; Black, Mary; LeRoy, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Research Strategies for Addressing Uncertainties builds on descriptions of research needs presented elsewhere in the book; describes current research efforts and the challenges and opportunities to reduce the uncertainties of climate change; explores ways to improve the understanding of changes in climate and hydrology; and emphasizes the use of research to inform decision making.

  6. Convocation address.

    PubMed

    Kakodkar, A

    1999-07-01

    This convocation addressed by Dr. Anil Kakodkar focuses on the challenges faced by graduating students. In his speech, he emphasized the high level of excellence achieved by the industrial sector; however, he noted that there has been a loss of initiative in maximizing value addition, which was worsened by an increasing population pressure. In facing a stiff competition in the external and domestic markets, it is imperative to maximize value addition within the country in a competitive manner and capture the highest possible market share. To achieve this, high-quality human resources are central. Likewise, family planning programs should become more effective and direct available resources toward national advantage. To boost the domestic market, he suggests the need to search for strengths to achieve leadership position in those areas. First, an insight into the relationship between the lifestyles and the needs of our people and the natural resource endowment must be gained. Second, remodeling of the education system must be undertaken to prepare the people for adding the necessary innovative content in our value addition activities. Lastly, Dr. Kakodkar emphasizes the significance of developing a strong bond between parents and children to provide a sound foundation and allow the education system to grow upon it.

  7. ESSA, Equity of Opportunity, and Addressing Barriers to Learning. Research for School Improvement and Transformation. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "Every Student Succeeds Act" (ESSA) recognizes that significant numbers of students require supports to successfully meet challenging state academic standards. This brief (1) analyzes the act to assess how it addresses the nature and scope of supports to address barriers to learning and re-engage disconnected students and (2)…

  8. Improving photosynthetic efficiency to address food security in the 21st century: Strategies for a more efficient crop canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLoocke, A. D.; Slattery, R.; Bernacchi, C.; Zhu, X.; Ort, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Global food production will need to increase by approximately 70% by mid-century to meet the caloric and nutritional demand of population and economic growth. Achieving this goal will require successfully implementing a wide range of strategies, spanning the social and physical sciences. Here we will present opportunities for improving crop production through increasing photosynthetic rates for a crop canopy that do not require additional agronomic inputs. We will focus on a specific strategy related optimizing the distribution of light within a crop canopy because it is a possible way to improve canopy photosynthesis in crops that form dense canopies, such as soybean, by increasing the transmission of light within a canopy via reduced chlorophyll content. We hypothesized that if decreasing chlorophyll content in soybean leaves will result in greater light penetration into the canopy then this will enhance canopy photosynthesis and improve yields. In addition, if current chlorophyll content in soybean results in excess light absorption, then decreasing chlorophyll content will result in decreased photoprotection that results in the suppression of upper canopy photosynthesis associated with super-optimal light. These hypotheses were tested in 2012 and 2013 in the field on the soybean cultivar 'Clark' (WT) and a nearly isogenic chlorophyll-b deficient mutant (Y11y11). Throughout the season, profiles of light sensors measured incident and reflected light intensity at the canopy surface as well as light levels at ten heights within the canopy. Analyses of these data indicated greater reflectivity, transmissivity and within-canopy light levels for the Y11y11 canopy relative to WT especially in the top half of the canopy. A Gas exchange method was used to determine photosynthetic capacity and suppression high light levels. Daily integrals of leaf-level photosynthesis in sun leaves were greater in Y11y11 compared to WT at several times during the growing season and

  9. Transformation in Higher Education: A Learner-Needs Segmentation Leads to Improved Learner Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Gayla; Finley, Donna S.; Patterson, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Segmentation is a marketing concept that can be applied in a post-secondary context. This article delineates the outcome of applying a learner-needs segmentation that resulted in significantly improved learner satisfaction scores in a professional faculty at a large public university. Our original work described the purpose and value of…

  10. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Physical Security at Its Offices in Las Vegas, Nevada

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0059, February 3, 2010. EPA needs to improve physical security at its Las Vegas facilities. The Las Vegas Finance Center’s (LVFC’s) server room and other key areas are susceptible to unauthorized access by personnel not a part of LVFC.

  11. Perceptions of the need for improvements in healthcare after implementation of the Chronic Care Model.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Older people with depression constitute a vulnerable group, and evidence from different parts of the world has demonstrated the need for healthcare improvements at the community level. In this study, we described team members' perceptions of improvements in the care of older people with depression living in the community after the implementation of the Chronic Care Model, with a focus on delivery-system design, self-management support, and teamwork. This follow-up study was based on focus-group interviews with healthcare team members. The data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Four themes emerged: (i) ensuring a pathway to the top level of the organization; (ii) the need for leadership from senior managers; (iii) the need to formalize collaboration; and (iv) increasing self-management. Senior managers should cooperate with specialist care givers and administrators in the community. They must also redesign the delivery system to facilitate teamwork and the self-management ability of older people with depression.

  12. Addressing potential role of magnesium dyshomeostasis to improve treatment efficacy for epilepsy: A reexamination of the literature.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Katie E; Shytle, R Douglas; Frontera, Alfred T; Soble, Jason R; Schoenberg, Mike R

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg(2+) ) is an abundant mineral in the body serving many biochemical functions. Magnesium supplementation has been shown to raise seizure threshold in animal and human studies, but the etiological contribution of magnesium deficiency to the onset and maintenance of epilepsy, as well as the degree to which it impacts antiepileptic drug efficacy, remains poorly understood. This may be due, at least in part, to the inherent limitations of commonly used serum levels as a measure of functional magnesium status, as well as insufficient data regarding relative bioavailabilities of various magnesium salts and chelates for use with humans. To date, 1 randomized clinical trial has been conducted assessing Mg(2+) supplementation in epilepsy, and findings yielded promising results. Yet a notable dearth in the literature remains, and more studies are needed. To better understand the potential role of magnesium deficiency as a causal factor in epilepsy, more convenient and accurate measurement methods should to be developed and employed in randomized, controlled trials of oral magnesium supplementation in epilepsy. Findings from such studies have the potential to facilitate far-reaching clinical and economic improvements in epilepsy treatment standards.

  13. Designing AAC Research and Intervention to Improve Outcomes for Individuals with Complex Communication Needs.

    PubMed

    Light, Janice; Mcnaughton, David

    2015-06-01

    There is a rapidly growing body of research that demonstrates the positive effects of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention on the communication of children and adults with complex communication needs. Despite the positive impact of many AAC interventions, however, many individuals with complex communication needs continue to experience serious challenges participating in educational, vocational, healthcare, and community environments. In this paper, we apply the framework proposed by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to illustrate the need to re-think AAC intervention to improve outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs, and to foster a new generation of intervention research that will provide a solid foundation for improved services. Specifically, the paper emphasizes the need to take a more holistic view of communication intervention and highlights the following key principles to guide AAC intervention and research: (a) build on the individual's strengths and focus on the integration of skills to maximize communication, (b) focus on the individual's participation in real-world contexts,

  14. Addressing Inequities in Urban Health: Do Decision-Makers Have the Data They Need? Report from the Urban Health Data Special Session at International Conference on Urban Health Dhaka 2015.

    PubMed

    Elsey, H; Thomson, D R; Lin, R Y; Maharjan, U; Agarwal, S; Newell, J

    2016-06-01

    Rapid and uncontrolled urbanisation across low and middle-income countries is leading to ever expanding numbers of urban poor, defined here as slum dwellers and the homeless. It is estimated that 828 million people are currently living in slum conditions. If governments, donors and NGOs are to respond to these growing inequities they need data that adequately represents the needs of the urban poorest as well as others across the socio-economic spectrum.We report on the findings of a special session held at the International Conference on Urban Health, Dhaka 2015. We present an overview of the need for data on urban health for planning and allocating resources to address urban inequities. Such data needs to provide information on differences between urban and rural areas nationally, between and within urban communities. We discuss the limitations of data most commonly available to national and municipality level government, donor and NGO staff. In particular we assess, with reference to the WHO's Urban HEART tool, the challenges in the design of household surveys in understanding urban health inequities.We then present two novel approaches aimed at improving the information on the health of the urban poorest. The first uses gridded population sampling techniques within the design and implementation of household surveys and the second adapts Urban HEART into a participatory approach which enables slum residents to assess indicators whilst simultaneously planning the response. We argue that if progress is to be made towards inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities, as articulated in Sustainable Development Goal 11, then understanding urban health inequities is a vital pre-requisite to an effective response by governments, donors, NGOs and communities.

  15. Working with Local, State and Federal Partners to Address Health Education Needs of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees in Houston: A CDC Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, D. Michele; Dopson, Stephanie; Drehobl, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    For health educators to successfully meet the challenges of responding to public health emergencies, it is important to establish and understand the role of collaborations with local, state and federal partners in identifying potential public health issues and to develop theory-based models or strategies to address these issues before, during and…

  16. Army Corps of Engineers: Actions Needed to Further Improve Management of Hopper Dredging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Representatives April 2014 ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS Actions Needed to Further Improve Management of Hopper Dredging Why GAO Did This Study The Corps...solicitations and develop a written plan for a study to obtain and periodically update certain hopper dredging cost data for its cost estimates. The...official stated that a study could be conducted to update the data, but the Corps has no plans to conduct such a study . Having a plan for obtaining

  17. Actions Needed to Improve the Reliability of Afghan Security Force Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-29

    Assessment Tool VTT Validation Transition Team SIGAR Audit-10-11 Security/ANSF Capability Ratings Page 1 Actions Needed to Improve the...the part of Afghan units. In addition, IJC’s Validation Transition Team ( VTT ), which provides independent validation of CM1 capabilities for the...personnel were present for duty in ANA-fielded combat units. The ANA’s manning shortage was confirmed in statements by VTT officials who reported

  18. Homeland Defense: Continued Actions Needed to Improve Management of Air Sovereignty Alert Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Better Outcomes, GAO-10-374T (Washington, D.C.: May 20, 2009); Aviation Security : DHS and TSA Have Researched, Developed and Begun Deploying Passenger... Security : TSA Has Made Progress, but Additional Efforts Are Needed to Improve Security. GAO-11-938T. Washington, D.C.: September 16, 2011. Aviation ...Washington, D.C.: October 23, 2009. Related GAO Products Homeland Defense DOD Tactical Aircraft Aviation Security Risk Management Related GAO

  19. The American Competitiveness Initiative: Addressing the STEM Teacher Shortage and Improving Student Academic Readiness. BHEF Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    America's leaders are increasingly concerned about U.S. competitiveness in a rapidly globalizing world. In response, during the 2006 State of the Union Address, President Bush introduced the American Competitiveness Initiative (ACI) to promote policy that bolsters student achievement in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and…

  20. Core Issues that Must be Addressed in Order to Improve Vocational Education and Training in Indonesia. An Institutional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cully, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Indonesia, like many other countries has to come to terms with the challenges of a rapidly advancing economic globalization. In order to address the major issues involved the government must take some very essential steps that are practical, attainable and sustainable. With global economies evolving from a traditional resource structure to that of…

  1. Challenges of Using Quality Improvement Methods in Nursing Homes that “Need Improvement”

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Flesner, Marcia; Hicks, Lanis; Mehr, David; Russell, Teresa; Minner, Donna

    2012-01-01

    A randomized, two-group, repeated-measures design was used to test a two year intervention for improving quality of care and resident outcomes in facilities in “need of improvement”. Intervention group (n=29) received an experimental multilevel intervention designed to help them (1) use quality-improvement methods, (2) use team and group process for direct-care decision-making, (3) focus on accomplishing the basics of care, and (4) maintain more consistent nursing and administrative leadership committed to communication and active participation of staff in decision-making. A qualitative analysis revealed a subgroup of homes likely to continue quality improvement activities and readiness indicators of homes likely to improve 1) leadership team (NHA, DON) who are interested in learning to use their federal Quality Indicator/Quality Measure (QI/QM) reports to improve resident care and outcomes; 2) one leader who will be the “change champion” and others make sure that current QI/QM reports are consistently shared on each nursing unit; 3) willingness to involve all staff in educational activities to learn about the QI/QM process and federal reports that compare the home with others in the state and nation; 4) plan and continuously educate new staff about the QI/QM process and how to do quality improvement; 5) continuously involve all staff in quality improvement committee and team activities so they “own” the process and are responsible for change. PMID:22926322

  2. Improvement of Patient- and Family-Specific Care for Children With Special Behavioral Needs in the Emergency Setting: A Behavioral Needs Education.

    PubMed

    Brynes, Nicole; Lee, Heeyoung; Ren, Dianxu; Beach, Michael

    2016-09-03

    Improvements in staff training, identification, and treatment planning for children with special health care needs who have behavioral issues are routinely recommended, but a literature review revealed no coherent plans targeted specifically toward pediatric ED staff.

  3. Presidential address.

    PubMed

    Vohra, U

    1993-07-01

    The Secretary of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare serves as Chair of the Executive Council of the International Institute for Population Sciences in Bombay. She addressed its 35th convocation in 1993. Global population stands at 5.43 billion and increases by about 90 million people each year. 84 million of these new people are born in developing countries. India contributes 17 million new people annually. The annual population growth rate in India is about 2%. Its population size will probably surpass 1 billion by the 2000. High population growth rates are a leading obstacle to socioeconomic development in developing countries. Governments of many developing countries recognize this problem and have expanded their family planning programs to stabilize population growth. Asian countries that have done so and have completed the fertility transition include China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand. Burma, Malaysia, North Korea, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam have not yet completed the transition. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Nepal, and Pakistan are half-way through the transition. High population growth rates put pressure on land by fragmenting finite land resources, increasing the number of landless laborers and unemployment, and by causing considerable rural-urban migration. All these factors bring about social stress and burden civic services. India has reduced its total fertility rate from 5.2 to 3.9 between 1971 and 1991. Some Indian states have already achieved replacement fertility. Considerable disparity in socioeconomic development exists among states and districts. For example, the states of Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh have female literacy rates lower than 27%, while that for Kerala is 87%. Overall, infant mortality has fallen from 110 to 80 between 1981 and 1990. In Uttar Pradesh, it has fallen from 150 to 98, while it is at 17 in Kerala. India needs innovative approaches to increase contraceptive prevalence rates

  4. A Minority Report for Social Work? The Predictive Risk Model (PRM) and the Tuituia Assessment Framework in addressing the needs of New Zealand's Vulnerable Children.

    PubMed

    Oak, Eileen

    2016-07-01

    This article examines the viability of the Risk Predictor Model (RPM) and its counterpart the actuarial risk assessment (ARA) tool in the form of the Tuituia Assessment Framework to address child vulnerability in New Zealand. In doing so, it suggests that these types of risk-assessment tools fail to address issues of contingency and complexity at the heart of the relationship-based nature of social work practice. Such developments have considerable implications for the capacity to enhance critical reflexive practice skills, whilst the introduction of these risk tools is occurring at a time when the reflexive space is being eroded as a result of the increased regulation of practice and supervision. It is further asserted that the primary aim of such instruments is not so much to detect risk, but rather to foster professional conformity with these managerialist risk-management systems so prevalent in contemporary Western societies.

  5. A Minority Report for Social Work? The Predictive Risk Model (PRM) and the Tuituia Assessment Framework in addressing the needs of New Zealand's Vulnerable Children

    PubMed Central

    Oak, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the viability of the Risk Predictor Model (RPM) and its counterpart the actuarial risk assessment (ARA) tool in the form of the Tuituia Assessment Framework to address child vulnerability in New Zealand. In doing so, it suggests that these types of risk-assessment tools fail to address issues of contingency and complexity at the heart of the relationship-based nature of social work practice. Such developments have considerable implications for the capacity to enhance critical reflexive practice skills, whilst the introduction of these risk tools is occurring at a time when the reflexive space is being eroded as a result of the increased regulation of practice and supervision. It is further asserted that the primary aim of such instruments is not so much to detect risk, but rather to foster professional conformity with these managerialist risk-management systems so prevalent in contemporary Western societies. PMID:27559223

  6. Prepositioned Stocks: DOD has Addressed Required Reporting Elements but Needs to Develop a Department-Wide Policy and Joint Service Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    secure supplemental funding to address a shortfall for equipment and sustainment of approximately $350 million over the fiscal years 2016- 2020 ...reconstitution and sustainment of Army prepositioned stock capabilities through fiscal year 2020 , and these data identified a $928 million...Defense Program19 fiscal years 2016- 2020 . In the fiscal year 2013 report the Air Force had projected shortfalls approaching $600 million over the

  7. Addressing the silence in the noise: how abortion support talklines meet some women's needs for non-political discussion of their experiences.

    PubMed

    Kimport, Katrina; Perrucci, Alissa; Weitz, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Abortion is a frequent topic in political discourse, but few opportunities are available for women to discuss their complex emotions and experiences concerning abortion. Popular belief holds that many women need "counseling" about their decision to have an abortion, but little systematic after-abortion emotional care is available. The authors of this study conducted semi-structured interviews (N = 7) and focus groups (N = 2; 13 participants) with staff members and volunteer counselors at four abortion support talklines between February 2009 and March 2010 for their insights into the post-abortion needs of callers. The authors found evidence that some women needed a space devoid of politics for processing their experience and emotions over time. Talklines begin to meet these needs, especially the episodic processing needs of women experiencing emotional difficulty at any time after an abortion. However, some mental health needs are still unmet, including those among women experiencing emotional difficulty due to preexisting conditions co-occurring with, but not caused by, the abortion. The authors of this study call for integrating after-abortion emotional support more fully into the work of abortion provision and women's mental health advocates. The authors warn against using these findings to support legal mandates for post-abortion support, highlighting the negative consequences of such mandates in the pre-abortion arena.

  8. Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Children in Grandparent Care. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies. Series B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarcella, Cynthia Andrews; Ehrle, Jennifer; Geen, Rob

    This paper examines the needs of children in grandparent care, using data from the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Information on the children was obtained from the adult in the household most knowledgeable about the child's education and health care. Most children in grandparent care live with much older caregivers and caregivers with…

  9. Addressing the Needs of Racially/Culturally Diverse Student Populations in Higher Education: An Analysis of Educational Practices for Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Matea

    2010-01-01

    The recent growth in the racial and cultural heterogeneity of college students in the United States has increased the demand for higher educational policies that will accommodate the needs of an increasingly diverse collective student body (Kao & Thompson, 2003). Traditionally, underrepresented minority students (i.e., African American,…

  10. Defense Acquisitions: Joint Action Needed by DOD and Congress to Improve Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-27

    Needed by DOD and Congress to Improve Outcomes Why GAO Did This Study DOD’s acquisition of major weapon systems has been on GAO’s high risk list...problems today that it did over 20 years ago. This testimony discusses (1) the performance of the current acquisition system; (2) the role of a sound...on the same kinds of problems today that we did over 20 years ago. Today, I will discuss (1) the performance of the current acquisition system; (2

  11. DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit ...Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities Why GAO Did This Study DOD continues to work

  12. Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

  13. Young Children Living in Risky Circumstances. Addressing the Needs of At Risk Students during the Early Learning Years. Technical Team Report. Submitted to the Commission for Students At Risk of School Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This report addresses the conditions of at-risk children and builds a case for changing the odds so that they favor such children. The introduction summarizes nearly a decade of education reform efforts related to disadvantaged youth. It underscores the need to intervene early. Four subsequent sections: (1) describe the developmental…

  14. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Behavioral Disorders. Fourth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Addressing the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders--Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Gwendolyn; Tam, Kai Yung; Loe, Scott A.; Miranda, Antoinette H.; Lambert, Michael Charles; Kea, Cathy D.; Simmons-Reed, Evette

    This monograph examines the special educational needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children and youth who are also diagnosed as having behavior disorders (BD). Following an introductory chapter, chapters 2 and 3 address the specific populations of Asian Americans (usually underrepresented in the BD population) and African…

  15. Addressing the Training and Employment Needs of Youth with Mental Health Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System. Conference Proceedings with Recommendations to the Presidential Task Force on Employment of Adults with Disabilities (March 3-4, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagungun, Hazel

    This document contains information about and from a conference on addressing the training and employment needs of youth with mental health disabilities in the juvenile justice system that was held by the National Mental Health Association (NMHA). The document begins with an executive summary and nine recommendations for the Youth Subcommittee of…

  16. Effectively addressing the mid- and long-term needs of young people affected by the tsunami in Aceh: an on-site assessment.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Within two months of the Asian tsunami, a team of four individuals conducted an assessment on the post-disaster needs of young people in Aceh Province. In addition to assessing current needs, the team examined the extent to which young people (aged 14-24) were involved in the planning and implementation of ongoing rebuilding and relief efforts. Finally, the team assessed the degree to which young people could be involved in such efforts as the recovery process moves forward. The team: reviewed all existing documents developed and/or compiled by the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (UNOCHA) from the inception of the disaster relief response to the present; met with approximately 20 organizations including UN agencies as well as international and local programs presently working in Banda Aceh and Maulaboh; and conducted direct discussions with young people in a variety of settings.

  17. Local and gay: addressing the health needs of Asian and Pacific Islander American (A/PIA) lesbians and gay men in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Kanuha, V K

    1999-09-01

    Asian and Pacific Islander American lesbians and gay men, who are "local" born and raised in Hawaii face conflicting personal and social expectations due to factors including prejudicial attitudes about homosexuality, A/PIA racial/ethnic traditions, and the unique cultural milieu of Hawaii. Based on anecdotal and research reports of this Hawaii population, health and social needs are discussed with implications for professional health practice.

  18. Addressing the challenges of improving primary care quality in Uzbekistan: a qualitative study of chronic heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Green, Judith; Azimov, Ravshan; Avezova, Guloyim; Inakov, Sherzod; Mamatkulov, Bahrom

    2013-08-01

    Uzbekistan has a well-developed primary care system, with universal access to care, but faces challenges in improving the quality of clinical care provided. This study aimed to identify barriers to quality improvement by focusing on one common condition, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF), for which there are evidence-based international guidelines for management. To identify the challenges to improving the quality of care for CHF in line with such guidelines we took a qualitative approach, interviewing 15 physicians and 30 patients in detail about their experiences of CHF management. Despite recent improvements to the training of primary care physicians, their access to up-to-date information was limited, and they were disproportionately reliant on information from pharmaceutical companies. The main barriers to implementing international standards of care were: reluctance of physicians (and patients) to abandon ineffective interventions; enduring, system-wide incentives for clinically unnecessary hospitalization; and the lack of structural support for evidence-based health services improvement. Patients were in general positive about adherence to medications, but faced some problems in affording drugs and hospital care. Future interventions to strengthen primary care should be implemented with evaluations of their impact on the processes and outcomes of care for chronic conditions.

  19. New and improved proteomics technologies for understanding complex biological systems: Addressing a grand challenge in the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Leroy E.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Moritz, Robert L.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Yamamoto, Keith R.; Amos, Michael; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Locascio, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper sets out a Life Sciences Grand Challenge for Proteomics Technologies to enhance our understanding of complex biological systems, link genomes with phenotypes, and bring broad benefits to the biosciences and the US economy. The paper is based on a workshop hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD, 14–15 February 2011, with participants from many federal R&D agencies and research communities, under the aegis of the US National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). Opportunities are identified for a coordinated R&D effort to achieve major technology-based goals and address societal challenges in health, agriculture, nutrition, energy, environment, national security, and economic development. PMID:22807061

  20. New and improved proteomics technologies for understanding complex biological systems: addressing a grand challenge in the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy E; Omenn, Gilbert S; Moritz, Robert L; Aebersold, Ruedi; Yamamoto, Keith R; Amos, Michael; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Locascio, Laurie

    2012-09-01

    This White Paper sets out a Life Sciences Grand Challenge for Proteomics Technologies to enhance our understanding of complex biological systems, link genomes with phenotypes, and bring broad benefits to the biosciences and the US economy. The paper is based on a workshop hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD, 14-15 February 2011, with participants from many federal R&D agencies and research communities, under the aegis of the US National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). Opportunities are identified for a coordinated R&D effort to achieve major technology-based goals and address societal challenges in health, agriculture, nutrition, energy, environment, national security, and economic development.

  1. Juggling Priorities: Balancing Economic and Social Drivers to Address the Language, Literacy and Numeracy Needs of Students in the VET Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Mary; Gwinner, Karleen; Mallan, Kerry; Livock, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Economic success and commitment to the social benefits of inclusive training opportunities are important goals for public Vocational Education and Training (VET). Currently in Australia, VET policy is a shared responsibility between the Commonwealth and the States and Territories. Priorities for investment are juggled between improving efficiency…

  2. Physics and biophysics experiments needed for improved risk assessment in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, L.

    To improve the risk assessment of radiation carcinogenesis, late degenerative tissue effects, acute syndromes, synergistic effects of radiation and microgravity or other spacecraft factors, and hereditary effects, on future LEO and interplanetary space missions, the radiobiological effects of cosmic radiation before and after shielding must be well understood. However, cosmic radiation is very complex and includes low and high LET components of many different neutral and charged particles. The understanding of the radiobiology of the heavy ions, from GCRs and SPEs, is still a subject of great concern due to the complicated dependence of their biological effects on the type of ion and energy, and its interaction with various targets both outside and within the spacecraft and the human body. In order to estimate the biological effects of cosmic radiation, accurate knowledge of the physics of the interactions of both charged and non-charged high-LET particles is necessary. Since it is practically impossible to measure all primary and secondary particles from all projectile-target-energy combinations needed for a correct risk assessment in space, accurate particle and heavy ion transport codes might be a helpful instrument to overcome those difficulties. These codes have to be carefully validated to make sure they fulfill preset accuracy criteria, e.g. to be able to predict particle fluence and energy distributions within a certain accuracy. When validating the accuracy of the transport codes, both space and ground-based accelerator experiments are needed. In this paper current and future physics and biophysics experiments needed for improved risk assessment in space will be discussed. The cyclotron HIRFL (heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou) and the new synchrotron CSR (cooling storage ring), which can be used to provide ion beams for space related experiments at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP-CAS), will be presented together with

  3. Incorporating evidence review into quality improvement: meeting the needs of innovators

    PubMed Central

    Danz, Margie Sherwood; Hempel, Susanne; Lim, Yee-Wei; Shanman, Roberta; Motala, Aneesa; Stockdale, Susan; Shekelle, Paul; Rubenstein, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Achieving quality improvement (QI) aims often requires local innovation. Without objective evidence review, innovators may miss previously tested approaches, rely on biased information, or use personal preferences in designing and implementing local QI programmes. Aim To develop a practical, responsive approach to evidence review for QI innovations aimed at both achieving the goals of the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and developing an evidence-based QI culture. Design Descriptive organisational case report. Methods As part of a QI initiative to develop and spread innovations for achieving the Veterans Affairs (VA) PCMH (termed Patient Aligned Care Team, or PACT), we involved a professional evidence review team (consisting of review experts, an experienced librarian, and administrative support) in responding to the evidence needs of front-line primary care innovators. The review team developed a systematic approach to responsive innovation evidence review (RIER) that focused on innovator needs in terms of time frame, type of evidence and method of communicating results. To assess uptake and usefulness of the RIERs, and to learn how the content and process could be improved, we surveyed innovation leaders. Results In the first 16 months of the QI initiative, we produced 13 RIERs on a variety of topics. These were presented as 6–15-page summaries and as slides at a QI collaborative. The RIERs focused on innovator needs (eg, topic overviews, how innovations are carried out, or contextual factors relevant to implementation). All 17 innovators who responded to the survey had read at least one RIER; 50% rated the reviews as very useful and 31%, as probably useful. Conclusions These responsive evidence reviews appear to be a promising approach to integrating evidence review into QI processes. PMID:23832925

  4. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  5. WARFIGHTER SUPPORT: Improvements to DOD’s Urgent Needs Processes Would Enhance Oversight and Expedite Efforts to Meet Critical Warfighter Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Armor (1 case study) 61 Figure 11: Helping Marines Use Biometrics to Identify Individuals (1 case study) 62 Figure 12: Improving Tactical Radio...instruction for joint urgent needs. The draft revision failed to obtain DOD-wide approval and was canceled —in part due to disagreement over the feedback... recognition of an urgent need was inconsistent and often unavailable. For further details and the results of our case studies see appendix II. We

  6. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system.

  7. Pesticide regulations and farm worker safety: the need to improve pesticide regulations in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung Tri; Connell, Des; Miller, Greg; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2012-06-01

    Agricultural pesticide use in Viet Nam has more than tripled since 1990. However, pesticide legislation and regulations have not been developed in response to this large increase in usage, as a result of which pesticides pose a serious threat to human health and the environment. This paper identifies the need to improve pesticide regulations in Viet Nam through a comparative analysis of pesticide regulations in Viet Nam and the United States of America, where the rate of acute poisoning among agricultural workers is much lower than in Viet Nam and where information pertaining to pesticide regulations is made accessible to the public. The analysis identified several measures that would help to improve Viet Nam's pesticide regulations. These include enhancing pesticide legislation, clarifying the specific roles and active involvement of both the environmental and health sectors; performing a comprehensive risk-benefit evaluation of pesticide registration and management practices; improving regulations on pesticide suspension and cancellation, transport, storage and disposal; developing import and export policies and enhancing pesticide-related occupational safety programmes.

  8. Addressing the need for rapid treatment of agitation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on inhaled loxapine as an alternative to injectable agents

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Agitation (excessive motor or verbal activity) can be associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, and can further escalate into aggressive behavior and potentially lead to injuries in patients and staff. Medications used to treat agitation include antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, usually administered intramuscularly when rapid action is desired. Loxapine, a first-generation antipsychotic, has recently been reformulated into an inhaled powder that allows for direct administration to the lungs, resulting in rapid absorption into the systemic circulation. Administered via a single-use device, inhaled loxapine was tested in randomized controlled trials in agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania; doses of 5 mg and 10 mg were found to be efficacious, with an apparent dose response. In the Phase III studies, number needed to treat versus placebo for a ≥40% reduction from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC) at 2 hours was three for patients with bipolar disorder, and five for 5 mg and four for 10 mg for patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes comparable to what has been observed in analogous studies of intramuscular injection of antipsychotics or lorazepam. Separation from placebo on the PANSS-EC was as early as 10 minutes postinhalation, the first time point where this was measured. Dysgeusia was the most commonly encountered spontaneously reported adverse event. Adverse events related to extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were relatively rare. Spirometry studies identified the potential for bronchospasm particularly in persons with asthma. Because of concerns over pulmonary safety, inhaled loxapine is restricted to use in hospitals and patients need to be prescreened for the presence of pulmonary disease, as well as monitored for signs and symptoms of bronchospasm for 1 hour postdose administration, as per a Food and Drug Administration-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy

  9. Advances in Atmospheric Radiation Measurements and Modeling Needed to Improve Air Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Atwell, William; Beck, Peter; Benton, Eric; Copeland, Kyle; Dyer, Clive; Gersey, Brad; Getley, Ian; Hands, Alex; Holland, Michael; Hong, Sunhak; Hwang, Junga; Jones, Bryn; Malone, Kathleen; Meier, Matthias M.; Mertens, Chris; Phillips, Tony; Ryden, Keith; Schwadron, Nathan; Wender, Stephen A.; Wilkins, Richard; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2015-04-01

    Air safety is tied to the phenomenon of ionizing radiation from space weather, primarily from galactic cosmic rays but also from solar energetic particles. A global framework for addressing radiation issues in this environment has been constructed, but more must be done at international and national levels. Health consequences from atmospheric radiation exposure are likely to exist. In addition, severe solar radiation events may cause economic consequences in the international aviation community due to exposure limits being reached by some crew members. Impacts from a radiation environment upon avionics from high-energy particles and low-energy, thermalized neutrons are now recognized as an area of active interest. A broad community recognizes that there are a number of mitigation paths that can be taken relative to the human tissue and avionics exposure risks. These include developing active monitoring and measurement programs as well as improving scientific modeling capabilities that can eventually be turned into operations. A number of roadblocks to risk mitigation still exist, such as effective pilot training programs as well as monitoring, measuring, and regulatory measures. An active international effort toward observing the weather of atmospheric radiation must occur to make progress in mitigating radiation exposure risks. Stakeholders in this process include standard-making bodies, scientific organizations, regulatory organizations, air traffic management systems, aircraft owners and operators, pilots and crew, and even the public.

  10. The Challenge of Child Day Care Needs and Improved Federal and State Approaches to Day Care Standard Setting and Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costin, Lela B.; And Others

    This paper examines child day care needs and ways that federal and state approaches to day care standard setting and enforcement might be improved. Chapter I documents the magnitude of child day care needs, citing Department of Labor, Census, and other survey statistics on the numbers of children needing day care and the number of day care centers…

  11. Army Financial Improvement Plans Generally Managed Effectively, but Better Contract Management Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-08

    I N T E G R I T Y  E F F I C I E N C Y  A C C O U N TA B I L I T Y  E XC E L L E N C E Inspector General U.S. Department of Defense Report...No. DODIG-2014-056 A P R I L 8 , 2 0 1 4 Army Financial Improvement Plans Generally Managed Effectively, but Better Contract Management Needed...protection, please see the inside back cover. I N T E G R I T Y  E F F I C I E N C Y  A C C O U N TA B I L I T Y  E XC E L L E N

  12. The European Donor Hospital Education Programme (EDHEP): addressing the training needs of doctors and nurses who break bad news, care for the bereaved, and request donation.

    PubMed

    Blok, G A; van Dalen, J; Jager, K J; Ryan, M; Wijnen, R M; Wight, C; Morton, J M; Morley, M; Cohen, B

    1999-01-01

    The competence of critical care staff when it comes to death and organ donation can make the difference between a family's agreeing to or refusing the latter. Doctors and nurses often feel uncomfortable approaching relatives about donation and attribute this to a lack of training. Bereaved relatives express dissatisfaction with inappropriate communication and support when brain death is announced and thereafter when a request for donation is made. The European Donor Hospital Education Programme (EDHEP) was designed to meet the training needs of critical care staff in breaking bad news, caring for the bereaved, and requesting donation. EDHEP is a two-part educational package consisting of a presentation about the donor shortage followed by a one-day workshop. The implementation of EDHEP throughout the world has been facilitated through effective national working groups and standardised "train the trainer" courses. Several countries anecdotally report increases in donation following implementation. Controlled evaluation of the effect(s) of EDHEP, which started at the end of 1995, focuses on the satisfaction of the participants with EDHEP, on the competence of the participants in breaking bad news and requesting donation, on the teamwork regarding death and donation, on the satisfaction of bereaved relatives, and on organ donation rates.

  13. Depot Maintenance: Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    of Representatives DEPOT MAINTENANCE Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future...Depot Maintenance. Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements 5a... Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements Highlights of GAO-09-865, a report to

  14. Educational Needs for Improving Self-care in Heart Failure Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF-DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self- management education. Method A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12 week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and co-morbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. Results HF-DM patients were older, heavier, had more co- morbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients, but clinically higher levels of sodium. Conclusions Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage two chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs which incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients. PMID:22722611

  15. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication.

  16. Changing Population Health Policy: A Model for Identifying Health Needs and Recommendations to Improve Health Status.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Shawnda M

    2016-06-01

    In the spring of 2014, the North Dakota Center for Rural Health (CRH) was tasked with completing an objective assessment of the state oral health environment. This included an assessment of oral health status, review of workforce needs, evaluation of current oral health programs, and policy recommendations to ameliorate identified oral health needs. The report was prepared for the North Dakota Legislative Health Services Interim Committee. This article highlights a research method developed and employed to identify current population health status and policy recommendations through statewide collaboration, transparent process, and objective analyses, regardless of the health specialty of focus. Evidenced-based decision making in health policy requires more than presentation of data. It requires input from the population or community utilizing or struggling to gain access to the given health service. It is now understood that health services researchers must employ a variety of research methods, include end users in the research process, tailor presentation of the findings for the appropriate audience, and include the population of study in the research, allowing them to provide recommended solutions when possible. Although the effort to be described focused specifically on oral health in North Dakota, the methodologies used to answer the research questions could, and are encouraged to, be employed in other states with regard to other specialty health disciplines and population health studies. The study sought to answer 3 questions: (1) What is the population health need?; (2) What is already being done?; and (3) What are the recommendations to improve population health? (Population Health Management 2016;19:216-223).

  17. Developing a university-workforce partnership to address rural and frontier MCH training needs: the Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium (RMPHEC).

    PubMed

    Taren, Douglas L; Varela, Frances; Dotson, Jo Ann W; Eden, Joan; Egger, Marlene; Harper, John; Johnson, Rhonda; Kennedy, Kathy; Kent, Helene; Muramoto, Myra; Peacock, Jane C; Roberts, Richard; Sjolander, Sheila; Streeter, Nan; Velarde, Lily; Hill, Anne

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the article is to provide the socio-cultural, political, economic, and geographic conditions that justified a regional effort for training maternal and child health (MCH) professionals in the Rocky Mountain region, describe a historical account of factors that led to the development of the Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium (RMPHEC), and present RMPHEC as a replicable model developed to enhance practice/academic partnerships among state, tribal, and public health agencies and universities to enhance public health capacity and MCH outcomes. This article provides a description of the development of the RMPHEC, the impetus that drove the Consortium's development, the process used to create it, and its management and programs. Beginning in 1997, local, regional, and federal efforts encouraged stronger MCH training and continuing education in the Rocky Mountain Region. By 1998, the RMPHEC was established to respond to the growing needs of MCH professionals in the region by enhancing workforce development through various programs, including the MCH Certificate Program, MCH Institutes, and distance learning products as well as establishing a place for professionals and MCH agencies to discuss new ideas and opportunities for the region. Finally over the last decade local, state, regional, and federal efforts have encouraged a synergy of MCH resources, opportunities, and training within the region because of the health disparities among MCH populations in the region. The RMPHEC was founded to provide training and continuing education to MCH professionals in the region and as a venue to bring regional MCH organizations together to discuss current opportunities and challenges. RMPHEC is a consortium model that can be replicated in other underserved regions, looking to strengthen MCH training and continuing education.

  18. The need for innovative strategies to improve immunisation services in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chadambuka, Addmore; Chimusoro, Anderson; Apollo, Tsitsilina; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Namusisi, Olivia; Luman, Elizabeth T

    2012-01-01

    Gokwe South, a rural district in Midlands Province, Zimbabwe, reported the lowest rate of immunisation coverage in the country in 2005: 55 per cent of children vaccinated with three doses of diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus vaccine (DPT3) and 35 per cent dropout between the first and third dose of DPT. In January 2007, the authors assessed local barriers to immunisation and proposed strategies to improve immunisation rates in the district, in the face of nationwide economic and political challenges. A situational analysis was performed to assess barriers to immunisation using focus-group discussions with health workers, key informant interviews with health management and community leaders, and desk reviews of records. Responses were categorised and solutions proposed. Health workers and key informants reported that immunisation service delivery was hampered by insufficient availability of gas for cold-chain equipment, limited transport and fuel to conduct basic activities, and inadequate staff and supervision. Improving coverage will require prioritising gas for vaccine cold-chain equipment, identifying reliable transportation or alternative transportation solutions, and increased staff, training and supervision. Local assessment is critical to pinpointing site-specific barriers, and innovative strategies are needed to overcome existing contextual challenges.

  19. Haptic Guidance Needs to Be Intuitive Not Just Informative to Improve Human Motor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Mugge, Winfred; Kuling, Irene A.; Brenner, Eli; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Humans make both random and systematic errors when reproducing learned movements. Intuitive haptic guidance that assists one to make the movements reduces such errors. Our study examined whether any additional haptic information about the location of the target reduces errors in a position reproduction task, or whether the haptic guidance needs to be assistive to do so. Holding a haptic device, subjects made reaches to visible targets without time constraints. They did so in a no-guidance condition, and in guidance conditions in which the direction of the force with respect to the target differed, but the force scaled with the distance to the target in the same way. We examined whether guidance forces directed towards the target would reduce subjects’ errors in reproducing a prior position to the same extent as do forces rotated by 90 degrees or 180 degrees, as it might because the forces provide the same information in all three cases. Without vision of the arm, both the accuracy and precision were significantly better with guidance directed towards the target than in all other conditions. The errors with rotated guidance did not differ from those without guidance. Not surprisingly, the movements tended to be faster when guidance forces directed the reaches to the target. This study shows that haptic guidance significantly improved motor performance when using it was intuitive, while non-intuitively presented information did not lead to any improvements and seemed to be ignored even in our simple paradigm with static targets and no time constraints. PMID:26982481

  20. Haptic Guidance Needs to Be Intuitive Not Just Informative to Improve Human Motor Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Kuling, Irene A; Brenner, Eli; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2016-01-01

    Humans make both random and systematic errors when reproducing learned movements. Intuitive haptic guidance that assists one to make the movements reduces such errors. Our study examined whether any additional haptic information about the location of the target reduces errors in a position reproduction task, or whether the haptic guidance needs to be assistive to do so. Holding a haptic device, subjects made reaches to visible targets without time constraints. They did so in a no-guidance condition, and in guidance conditions in which the direction of the force with respect to the target differed, but the force scaled with the distance to the target in the same way. We examined whether guidance forces directed towards the target would reduce subjects' errors in reproducing a prior position to the same extent as do forces rotated by 90 degrees or 180 degrees, as it might because the forces provide the same information in all three cases. Without vision of the arm, both the accuracy and precision were significantly better with guidance directed towards the target than in all other conditions. The errors with rotated guidance did not differ from those without guidance. Not surprisingly, the movements tended to be faster when guidance forces directed the reaches to the target. This study shows that haptic guidance significantly improved motor performance when using it was intuitive, while non-intuitively presented information did not lead to any improvements and seemed to be ignored even in our simple paradigm with static targets and no time constraints.

  1. Improving prehospital trauma management for skiers and snowboarders - need for on-slope triage?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injuries from skiing and snowboarding became a major challenge for emergency care providers in Switzerland. In the alpine setting, early assessment of injury and health status is essential for the initiation of adequate means of care and transport. Nevertheless, validated standardized protocols for on-slope triage are missing. This article can assist in understanding the characteristics of injured winter sportsmen and exigencies for future on-slope triage protocols. Methods Six-year review of trauma cases in a tertiary trauma centre. Consecutive inclusion of all injured skiers and snowboarders aged >15 (total sample) years with predefined, severe injury to the head, spine, chest, pelvis or abdomen (study sample) presenting at or being transferred to the study hospital. Descriptive analysis of age, gender and injury pattern. Results Amongst 729 subjects (total sample) injured from skiing or snowboarding, 401 (55%, 54% of skiers and 58% of snowboarders) suffered from isolated limb injury. Amongst the remaining 328 subjects (study sample), the majority (78%) presented with monotrauma. In the study sample, injury to the head (52%) and spine (43%) was more frequent than injury to the chest (21%), pelvis (8%), and abdomen (5%). The three most frequent injury combinations were head/spine (10% of study sample), head/thorax (9%), and spine/thorax (6%). Fisher's exact test demonstrated an association for injury combinations of head/thorax (p < 0.001), head/abdomen (p = 0.019), and thorax/abdomen (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data presented and the findings from previous investigations indicate the need for development of dedicated on-slope triage protocols. Future research must address the validity and practicality of diagnostic on-slope tests for rapid decision making by both professional and lay first responders. Thus, large-scale and detailed injury surveillance is the future research priority. PMID:21521524

  2. Pulmonary specialty training to improve respiratory health in low- and middle-income countries. Needs and challenges.

    PubMed

    Chakaya, Jeremiah M; Carter, E Jane; Hopewell, Philip C

    2015-04-01

    It is estimated that 85% of the world's population lives in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although economic conditions are improving in these countries, health expenditures have not kept pace with the overall economic growth, and health systems remain weak. These already inadequate systems are being further stressed by the epidemiologic transition that is taking place, characterized by a slow decrease in communicable diseases and an increase in noninfectious chronic diseases, resulting in a "double burden" of infectious and noninfectious diseases. Respiratory diseases comprise the largest category of illness within this combined burden of disease. Although there are chronic respiratory disease programs of proven effectiveness appropriate for LMICs, implementation has been greatly hampered by the lack of physicians who have special knowledge and skills in addressing the full spectrum of lung diseases. Thus, there is an urgent need to create training programs for specialists in respiratory diseases. Such programs should be developed and conducted by institutions in LMICs and tailored to fit the prevailing circumstances of the country. Existing curriculum blueprints may be used to guide training program development with appropriate modifications. Academic institutions and professional societies in high-income countries may be called upon to provide technical assistance in developing and implementing training programs. In order to better define the burden of respiratory diseases and identify effective interventions, research, moved forward by persons committed and specialized in this area of health, will be essential.

  3. "Not Another Team!" School Improvement Infrastructure Viewed through the Lens of Addressing Barriers to Learning and Teaching. A Center Policy & Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief underscores the need to rethink the proliferation of school teams, work groups, and committees. While such mechanisms are essential to enhancing school improvement, they must be designed in a delimited way to carry out fundamental functions and must be fully integrated with each other. From a functional perspective, because of current…

  4. Report: Measuring and Reporting Performance Results for the Pollution Prevention Program Need Improvement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #09-P-0088, January 28, 2009. The P2 Program’s data provided in response to the OMB PART assessment generally addressed the PART questions and supported the moderately effective rating received.

  5. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Tracking of National Petroleum Refinery Compliance Program Progress and Impacts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00021, June 22, 2004. EPA and the U.S. Department of Justice have developed and implemented an integrated refinery compliance strategy that addresses the most important noncompliance problems.

  6. Improvements to Controls Over Cash Are Needed at Army Disbursing Stations in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-09

    TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Department of Defense Inspector General,4800 Mark Center Drive ...Financial Management and Reporting INSPECTOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 4800 MARK CENTER DRIVE ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 22350-1500 iv │ Report No...The funds, $3,500 in total, were monies that the Military Police had confiscated in Iraq and given to an Army disbursing station for safekeeping

  7. Needs and opportunities for improving the health, safety, and productivity of medical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, M; Brodt, W; Henderson, D; Loftness, V; Rosenfeld, A; Woods, J; Wright, R

    2000-01-01

    Medical research facilities, indeed all the nation's constructed facilities, must be designed, operated, and maintained in a manner that supports the health, safety, and productivity of the occupants. The National Construction Goals, established by the National Science and Technology Council, envision substantial improvements in occupant health and worker productivity. The existing research and best practices case studies support this conclusion, but too frequently building industry professionals lack the knowledge to design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities at these optimum levels. There is a need for more research and more collaborative efforts between medical and facilities engineering researchers and practitioners in order to attain the National Construction Goals. Such collaborative efforts will simultaneously support attainment of the National Health Goals. This article is the summary report of the Healthy Buildings Committee for the Leadership Conference: Biomedical Facilities and the Environment sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Association of Physicians for the Environment, and the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers on 1--2 November 1999 in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. PMID:11124125

  8. Addressing the nutritional needs of university students

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Delta Obesity Prevention Research Project seeks to identify and evaluate dietary and physical activity patterns in African American students to develop an educational intervention that is nutritionally adequate and culturally relevant for 18- to 24-year-old African-American university stude...

  9. Addressing the Needs of Diverse Distributed Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimoni, Rena; Barrington, Gail; Wilde, Russ; Henwood, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Two interrelated studies were undertaken to assist Alberta post-secondary institutions with meeting challenges associated with providing services to diverse distributed students that are of similar quality to services provided to traditional classroom students. The first study identified and assessed best practices in distributed learning; the…

  10. Addressing the Communication Needs of Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoggatt, Jack

    2003-01-01

    In a survey of 664 University of Wisconsin Eau Clair business graduates, 81% identified communication skills as essential, resulted corroborated by a survey of 138 employers. A model program now requires all college of business students to take core communication courses and a business communication certificate is offered. (Contains 10…

  11. Inaugural address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    From jets to cosmos to cosmic censorship P S Joshi Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005, India E-mail: psj@tifr.res.in 1. Introduction At the outset, I should like to acknowledge that part of the title above, which tries to capture the main flavour of this meeting, and has been borrowed from one of the plenary talks at the conference. When we set out to make the programme for the conference, we thought of beginning with observations on the Universe, but then we certainly wanted to go further and address deeper questions, which were at the very foundations of our inquiry, and understanding on the nature and structure of the Universe. I believe, we succeeded to a good extent, and it is all here for you in the form of these Conference Proceedings, which have been aptly titled as 'Vishwa Mimansa', which could be possibly translated as 'Analysis of the Universe'! It is my great pleasure and privilege to welcome you all to the ICGC-2011 meeting at Goa. The International Conference on Gravitation and Cosmology (ICGC) series of meetings are being organized by the Indian Association for General Relativity and Gravitation (IAGRG), and the first such meeting was planned and conducted in Goa in 1987, with subsequent meetings taking place at a duration of about four years at various locations in India. So, it was thought appropriate to return to Goa to celebrate the 25 years of the ICGC meetings. The recollections from that first meeting have been recorded elsewhere here in these Proceedings. The research and teaching on gravitation and cosmology was initiated quite early in India, by V V Narlikar at the Banares Hindu University, and by N R Sen in Kolkata in the 1930s. In course of time, this activity grew and gained momentum, and in early 1969, at the felicitation held for the 60 years of V V Narlikar at a conference in Ahmedabad, P C Vaidya proposed the formation of the IAGRG society, with V V Narlikar being the first President. This

  12. Innovative Resources Based on ICTs and Authentic Materials to Improve EFL Students' Communicative Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Otero, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Our global society and our current communication needs have put a strain on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching, since common resources such as textbooks may fail to adapt to the needs and interests of our students. The present action research study aims at identifying EFL students' communicative needs and developing their oral skills…

  13. DOD Financial Management: Improved Documentation Needed to Support the Air Force’s Military Payroll and Meet Audit Readiness Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Improved Documentation Needed to Support the Air Force’s Military Payroll and Meet Audit ...Improved Documentation Needed to Support the Air Force’s Military Payroll and Meet Audit Readiness Goals Why GAO Did This Study As part of DOD’s...efforts to achieve auditability of its financial statements, the Air Force in July 2014 asserted audit readiness for its Schedule of Budgetary

  14. VA Health Care: Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing Accuracy of Suicide Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    VA HEALTH CARE Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing...00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VA Health Care: Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing...Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing Accuracy of Suicide Data Why GAO Did This Study In 2013, VA estimated that about 1.5 million

  15. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  16. Surgical stapling device–tissue interactions: what surgeons need to know to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chekan, Edward; Whelan, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of both new surgical devices and reengineered existing devices leads to modifications in the way traditional tasks are carried out and allows for the development of new surgical techniques. Each new device has benefits and limitations in regards to tissue interactions that, if known, allow for optimal use. However, most surgeons are unaware of these attributes and, therefore, new device introduction creates a “knowledge gap” that is potentially dangerous. The goal of this review is to present a framework for the study of device– tissue interactions and to initiate the process of “filling in” the knowledge gap via the available literature. Surgical staplers, which are continually being developed, are the focus of this piece. The integrity of the staple line, which depends on adequate tissue compression, is the primary factor in creating a stable anastomosis. This review focuses on published studies that evaluated the creation of stable anastomoses in bariatric, thoracic, and colorectal procedures. Understanding how staplers interact with target tissues is key to improving patient outcomes. It is clear from this review that each tissue type presents unique challenges. The thickness of each tissue varies as do the intrinsic biomechanical properties that determine the ideal compressive force and prefiring compression time for each tissue type. The correct staple height will vary depending on these tissue-specific properties and the tissue pathology. These studies reinforce the universal theme that compression, staple height, tissue thickness, tissue compressibility, and tissue type must all be considered by the surgeon prior to choosing a stapler and cartridge. The surgeon’s experience, therefore, is a critical factor. Educational programs need to be established to inform and update surgeons on the characteristics of each stapler. It is hoped that the framework presented in this review will facilitate this process. PMID:25246812

  17. Educational needs, practice patterns and quality indicators to improve geriatric pharmacy care

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background: As the population ages and pressure increases to reduce adverse drug reactions and drug-related hospitalizations in the elderly, there will be a growing demand for pharmacists to competently take on shared responsibility for effective and safe prescribing in older adults. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey was distributed to 3927 hospital and community pharmacists across Québec about their educational needs and practice patterns in geriatric care. Perceptions of different quality performance indicators were sought. Modifiable factors associated with higher performance were determined using univariate logistic regression. Results: Seven hundred six pharmacists (18%) completed the survey. Less than 50% were aware of the prevalence of polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, drug-related hospitalizations or falls in the geriatric population. Forty-one percent of community pharmacists and 74% of hospital pharmacists acknowledged familiarity with the Beers criteria of drugs to avoid in the elderly. The likelihood of screening for inappropriate prescriptions was 2.96 (95% confidence interval = 1.97-4.47) among pharmacists familiar with the Beers criteria and 2.24 (95% confidence interval = 1.50-3.34) among those who received continuing geriatric education in the workplace. On average, pharmacists reported having time to conduct detailed medication reviews in 30% of their older patients. The 2 quality indicators of geriatric care that were ranked most pertinent were being able to track the number of patients requiring hospitalization for drug-related problems and monitoring rates of inappropriate prescriptions. Ninety-six percent of respondents desired continuing education about geriatric care. Conclusion: Exposure to continuing education in geriatric pharmacotherapy in the workplace is the most consistent determinant of professional performance to improve drug outcomes in the elderly. PMID:24660011

  18. The need for improved brain lesion segmentation techniques for children with cerebral palsy: A review.

    PubMed

    Pagnozzi, Alex M; Gal, Yaniv; Boyd, Roslyn N; Fiori, Simona; Fripp, Jurgen; Rose, Stephen; Dowson, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of permanent disorders of posture and movement caused by disturbances in the developing brain. Accurate diagnosis and prognosis, in terms of motor type and severity, is difficult to obtain due to the heterogeneous appearance of brain injury and large anatomical distortions commonly observed in children with CP. There is a need to optimise treatment strategies for individual patients in order to lead to lifelong improvements in function and capabilities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical to non-invasively visualizing brain lesions, and is currently used to assist the diagnosis and qualitative classification in CP patients. Although such qualitative approaches under-utilise available data, the quantification of MRIs is not automated and therefore not widely performed in clinical assessment. Automated brain lesion segmentation techniques are necessary to provide valid and reproducible quantifications of injury. Such techniques have been used to study other neurological disorders, however the technical challenges unique to CP mean that existing algorithms require modification to be sufficiently reliable, and therefore have not been widely applied to MRIs of children with CP. In this paper, we present a review of a subset of available brain injury segmentation approaches that could be applied to CP, including the detection of cortical malformations, white and grey matter lesions and ventricular enlargement. Following a discussion of strengths and weaknesses, we suggest areas of future research in applying segmentation techniques to the MRI of children with CP. Specifically, we identify atlas-based priors to be ineffective in regions of substantial malformations, instead propose relying on adaptive, spatially consistent algorithms, with fast initialisation mechanisms to provide additional robustness to injury. We also identify several cortical shape parameters that could be used to identify cortical injury, and shape

  19. Making a Good Match: How Schools and External Service Providers Negotiate Needs and Services in Support of School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vixie Sandy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated a problem facing policy makers, education leaders, and external providers of service that support or facilitate school-based change designed to improve teaching and learning: How to match school needs with providers' services in ways that maximize school improvement. A growing number of organizations provide service to…

  20. Improving induction of labour - a quality improvement project addressing Caesarean section rates and length of process in women undergoing induction of labour

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Raniolo, Caterina; Roper, Janice; Gupta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Induction of labour (IOL) in maternity care is often not an area of priority in maternity services, which often results in protracted delays, a poor patient experience, and patient complaints. Caesarean section (CS) rates among women undergoing IOL at this inner city district general hospital were noted to be higher than other units nationwide. We collected pre and post-intervention data of the following outcome measures: time taken to administer prostaglandin after arrival, time taken to achieve established labour, mode of delivery, and user satisfaction scores. Our introduction of a dedicated IOL Suite, promotion of out-patient IOL, use of a single administration prostaglandin (as opposed to traditional six hourly prostaglandin), widespread staff engagement and rolling audit has resulted in positive change in the maternity unit. CS rates for women undergoing IOL have been reduced from 29% to 22% (p=0.05), time taken to administer the induction medication has decreased from 6.3h to 2.7h (p=0.0001), and out-patient induction rates have increased from 3% to 33% (p=0.001). We have achieved a reduction in the overall length of in-patient stay. We have also received positive feedback from both staff and patients. We used a bottom-up approach, engaging frontline staff in problem identification and pathway design. Our staff engagement questionnaire showed other benefits such as increased staff morale as a result. Collection of simple performance data and sharing of this in real time with staff acts as a valuable tool for acceptance of change and continuous improvement. Communicating plans to a large body of people is important in ensuring the success of an intervention. Staff showing disengagement may require specific detailed information to allay their concerns. Following initial successes, ongoing vigilance, and collection of audit data is key to sustaining any improvement. PMID:26734422

  1. Welcome Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiku, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, It is an honor for me to present my welcome address in the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3), as the president of Kanto Gakuin University. Particularly to those from abroad more than 17 countries, I am very grateful for your participation after long long trips from your home to Yokohama. On the behalf of the Kanto Gakuin University, we certainly welcome your visit to our university and stay in Yokohama. First I would like to introduce Kanto Gakuin University briefly. Kanto Gakuin University, which is called KGU, traces its roots back to the Yokohama Baptist Seminary founded in 1884 in Yamate, Yokohama. The seminary's founder was Albert Arnold Bennett, alumnus of Brown University, who came to Japan from the United States to establish a theological seminary for cultivating and training Japanese missionaries. Now KGU is a major member of the Kanto Gakuin School Corporation, which is composed of two kindergartens, two primary schools, two junior high schools, two senior high schools as well as KGU. In this university, we have eight faculties with graduate school including Humanities, Economics, Law, Sciences and Engineering, Architecture and Environmental Design, Human and Environmental Studies, Nursing, and Law School. Over eleven thousands students are currently learning in our university. By the way, my major is the geotechnical engineering, and I belong to the faculty of Sciences and Engineering in my university. Prof. T. Yamada, here, is my colleague in the same faculty. I know that the nuclear physics is one of the most active academic fields in the world. In fact, about half of the participants, namely, more than 50 scientists, come from abroad in this conference. Moreover, I know that the nuclear physics is related to not only the other fundamental physics such as the elementary particle physics and astrophysics but also chemistry, medical sciences, medical cares, and radiation metrology

  2. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Its Efforts to Reduce Air Emissions at U.S. Ports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #09-P-0125, March 23, 2009. While EPA has issued air emissions regulations for most port sources, EPA’s actions to address air emissions from large oceangoing vessels in U.S. ports have not yet achieved the goals for protecting human health.

  3. Report: EPA Oversight and Policy for High Priority Violations of Clean Air Act Need Improvement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0007, Oct 14, 2009. HPVs were not being addressed in a timely manner as regions and States did not follow the HPV policy, EPA Headquarters did not oversee regional and State HPV performance, and regions did not oversee State HPV performance.

  4. Report: Border 2012 Program Needs to Improve Program Management to Ensure Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #08-P-0245, September 3, 2008. The current organizational structure of the Border 2012 Program allows it to achieve a collaborative relationship at the U.S.- Mexico border and address enviro and public health issues unique to the border region.

  5. Strengthening the Paediatricians Project 1: The need, content and process of a workshop to address the Priority Mental Health Disorders of adolescence in countries with low human resource for health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective World Health Organization has identified Priority Mental Health Disorders (PMHD) of adolescence. To effectively address these disorders at the primary care level paediatricians have to be trained in the low-income countries, which often have paucity of mental health resources. We studied: (1) the need of psychiatric training required among paediatricians; (2) if the content and process of the model workshop suits them to identify and treat these disorders. Methods Forty-eight paediatricians completed evaluation questionnaire at the end of a 3-day workshop on adolescent psychiatry. They participated in a focused group discussion addressing the areas in psychiatry that needs to be strengthened in these workshops, the changes in the content and process of the workshop to bolster their learning. Qualitative and descriptive analyses were appropriately used. Results Training in adolescent psychiatry was considered necessary among the paediatricians at zonal level frequently to develop their private practice, treat psychiatric disorders confidently, make correct referrals, and learn about counselling. Prioritizing training from under and postgraduate training, integrate psychiatry training with conference, conducting special workshops or Continuing Medical Education were suggested as ways of inculcating adolescent psychiatry proficiency. Mental status examination, psychopathology and management of the PMHD were considered by the respondents as important content that need to be addressed in the program but aspects of behavioural problems and developmental disabilities were also identified as areas of focus to gain knowledge and skill. Appropriate group size, flexibility in management decisions to fit the diverse clinical practice- settings was appreciated. Lack of skills in giving clinical reasoning in relation to PMHD, time management and feedback to individuals were identified as required components in the collaborative effort of this manner. Providing

  6. Defense Management: Actions Needed to Improve Management of Air Force’s Food Transformation Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    nutritional standards. 7. Improve efficiency Improve food service delivery approaches to improve efficiency. 8. Decrease costs Maintain or decrease the cost...more efficient customer flow, adding more seating capacity, and making general cosmetic upgrades. Table 4 lists the projected costs of renovations at

  7. Career Development Needs of Thirteen-Year Olds: How to Improve Career Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrey, Roger F.

    Suggesting implications for career education program development and revision, this document is one in a series of five publications reporting results of a career development needs study of four different age levels. In this document, the assessment of career development needs of thirteen-year-olds is presented in three major sections. Section 1…

  8. Career Development Needs of Adults: How to Improve Career Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.

    Suggesting implications for career education program development and revision, this document is one in a series of five publications reporting results of a career development needs study of four different age levels. In this document, the assessment of career development needs of adults (ages 26-35) is presented in three major sections. Section 1…

  9. Career Development Needs of Seventeen Year Olds: How to Improve Career Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anita M.

    Suggesting implications for career education program development and revision, this document is one in a series of five publications reporting results of a career development needs study of four different age levels. In this document, the assessment of career development needs of seventeen-year-olds is presented in three major sections. Section 1…

  10. Career Development Needs of Nine-Year Olds: How to Improve Career Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Juliet V.

    Suggesting implications for career education program development and revision, this document is one in a series of five publications reporting results of a career development needs study of four different age levels. In this document, the assessment of career development needs of nine-year olds is presented in three major sections. Section 1…

  11. Getting beyond Talk: State Leadership Needed To Improve Teacher Quality. Educational Benchmarks 2000 Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Lynn M.

    This report restates selected Southern Regional Education Board policy recommendations on teacher quality since the early 1980s, outlines key policy areas that need attention, and provides examples of state actions to make needed changes. Regarding teacher preparation, the report discusses university responsibility, partnerships with schools, and…

  12. Addressing the Social, Academic, and Behavioral Needs of Students with Challenging Behavior in Inclusive and Alternative Settings. Highlights from the Forum on Comprehensive Programming for a Diverse Population of Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior: Addressing Social, Academic, and Behavioral Needs within Inclusive and Alternative Settings (Las Vegas, Nevada, February 9-10, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M., Ed.; Gable, Robert A., Ed.

    This document presents the texts of 11 major presentations and conference highlights from a February 2001 conference on the social, academic, and behavioral needs of students with challenging behavior in inclusive and alternative settings as required under the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The presentations…

  13. Superfund: Interagency Agreements and Improved Project Management Needed to Achieve Cleanup Progress at Key Defense Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    endangerment to health and the environment may exist under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or under the authority of the Safe...hazardous wastes that may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health or the environment. 31The Safe Drinking Water Act provides EPA...Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) authority to address solid and hazardous wastes that may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to

  14. Opening address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnoli, C.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen My cordial thanks to you for participating in our workshop and to all those who have sponsored it. When in 1957 I attended the International Congress on Fundamental Constants held in Turin on the occasion of the first centenary of the death of Amedeo Avogadro, I did not expect that about thirty-five years later a small but representative number of distinguished scientists would meet here again, to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal figure of the Avogadro constant. At that time, the uncertainty of the value of this constant was linked to the fourth decimal figure, as reported in the book by DuMond and Cohen. The progress made in the meantime is universally acknowledged to be due to the discovery of x-ray interferometry. We are honoured that one of the two founding fathers, Prof. Ulrich Bonse, is here with us, but we regret that the other, Prof. Michael Hart, is not present. After Bonse and Hart's discovery, the x-ray crystal density method triggered, as in a chain reaction, the investigation of two other quantities related to the Avogadro constant—density and molar mass. Scientists became, so to speak, resonant and since then have directed their efforts, just to mention a few examples, to producing near-perfect silicon spheres and determining their density, to calibrating, with increasing accuracy, mass spectrometers, and to studying the degree of homogeneity of silicon specimens. Obviously, I do not need to explain to you why the Avogadro constant is important. I wish, however, to underline that it is not only because of its position among fundamental constants, as we all know very well its direct links with the fine structure constant, the Boltzmann and Faraday constants, the h/e ratio, but also because when a new value of NA is obtained, the whole structure of the fundamental constants is shaken to a lesser or greater extent. Let me also remind you that the second part of the title of this workshop concerns the silicon

  15. Defense Logistics: Improvements Needed to Accurately Assess the Performance of DOD’s Materiel Distribution Pipeline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Guidance, and Training Needed for National Guard’s Efforts with Foreign Partners, GAO-12-548 (Washington, D.C.: May 15, 2012); Preventing Sexual Harassment ...Partners, GAO-12-548 (Washington, D.C.: May 15, 2012); Preventing Sexual Harassment : DOD Needs Greater Leadership Commitment and an Oversight...a complex, multibillion- dollar distribution system for delivering supplies and equipment to U.S. forces globally . DOD’s goal in operating this

  16. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  17. Impact of genomic collaboration and the need to continually improve methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapidly expanding field of dairy genomics requires collaboration with other countries and new ways to continually improve methods of genomic prediction. Genomics began for North American dairy cattle in 2008, and the accuracy of genomic predictions improved when foreign reference bull genotypes...

  18. The Urban and Community Impact Analysis Program, if Retained, will need Major Improvements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-23

    aled ing dle address sti be prepai mon; ey op ais. ofeckdi d ber ou to h S~~ ’o ouet " 7acession For UNITED STATES GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICEwrIS -GR&I...budget examiners, the key intended users. (See p . 19.) --The program’ s 1978 startup may have been too hasty. (See pp. 20 to 21.) BROADENING PROGRAM...confidentiality, maintaining that it damages the program’ s credibility. (See p . 29.) Most officials and staff persons questioned in 0MB and other agencies

  19. Needs Assessment for Performance Improvement of Personnel in Charge of Epidemiological Surveillance in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Priotto, Gerardo; Rguig, Ahmed; Ziani, Moncef; Berger, Anouk; Nabeth, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background In line with the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005), the Morocco health surveillance system has been reinforced via infrastructure strengthening and decentralization in its regions. To plan for personnel capacity reinforcement actions, a national workforce needs assessment was conducted by the National Epidemiological Surveillance Service and the World Health Organization. Methods The assessment used an ad-hoc method comprising two stages: (1) A survey via a standardized electronic questionnaire, administered to all staff in regional and provincial surveillance teams. Data collected included demographics, basic qualification, complementary training, perceived training needs, and preferred training modalities. Individuals were asked to grade, on a nine-point scale, their perception of importance of a given list of tasks and of their capacity to perform them. The gap between perceptions was quantified and described. (2) Field visits to national, regional and provincial sites for direct observation and opinion gathering on broader issues such as motivators, barriers, and training needs from the local perspective. Results Questionnaire respondents were 122/158 agents at 78 surveillance units countrywide. Mean age was 43.6 years and job longevity 5.7 years. Only 53% (65/122) had epidemiology training, posted in 62% (48/78) of the structures. Self-assessed capacity varied by basic qualification and by structure level (regional vs. provincial). The gap between the importance granted to a task and the perceived capacity to perform it was sizable, showing an uneven distribution across competency domains, regions, surveillance level and staff's basic qualification. From the opinions gathered, a problem of staff demotivation and high turnover emerged clearly. Conclusions Our method was successful in revealing specific details of the training needs countrywide. A national strategy is needed to ensure rational planning of training, personnel motivation and

  20. Report: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve EPA’s Oversight of Assistance Agreements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2002-P-00018, September 30, 2002. Although EPA developed corrective actions to improve oversight controls for assistance agreements, a number of EPA OIG, Agency, and GAO reviews determined that oversight continued to be a weakness.

  1. Report: EPA’s Method for Calculating Air Toxics Emissions for Reporting Results Needs Improvement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00012, March 31, 2004. Although the methods by which air toxics emissions are estimated have improved substantially, unvalidated assumptions and other limitations underlying the NTI continue to impact its use as a GPRA performance measure.

  2. Improving Perception of and Response to Natural Hazards: The Need for Local Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitek, John D.; Berta, Susan M.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence gathered by student surveys in Flint, Michigan, indicates that residents are deficient in their knowledge of local natural hazards and not familiar enough with the K-12 curriculum to have an opinion on the adequacy of hazard education in the city's schools. Needed are adult and K-12 hazard educational programs. (RM)

  3. "I Like Science but It's Not for Me": The Need to Improve STEM Careers Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Louise; Tomei, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that more needs to be done to increase and diversify post-16 participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Here we discuss recent research evidence on what influences participation in science. We introduce a proposal for integrating awareness of STEM careers into the science curriculum for…

  4. FAA Training. Continued Improvements Needed in FAA's Controller Field Training Program. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    Having examined the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) current program for providing field training to developmental and full-performance-level air traffic controllers, the General Accounting Office (GAO) recommends ensuring that FAA and contractor personnel are providing training consistently and uniformly. Further changes needed to ensure…

  5. Improving Literacy Skills in Students with Complex Communication Needs Who Use Augmentative/Alternative Communication Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Angell, Maureen E.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2011-01-01

    A structured intervention package including direct, scaffolded, instructional lessons was implemented using an error correction learning system and a picture book-based phonological and phonemic awareness activity for four participants with complex communication needs, ranging from 12 to 15 years, in a junior high school setting. Although…

  6. Mining the gap: Assessing leadership needs to improve 21st century plant pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists and plant pathologists are trained in scientific knowledge and critical thinking as part of their career preparation process. However, the extensive training in science-related skills comes at a cost to “soft skills”, the competencies needed for interpersonal skills, communication, manage...

  7. Need to Improve Efficiency of Reserve Training. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The report discusses the need to vary the training of Reserve and Guard units by skill and readiness requirements and to make more efficient use of training time. It contains recommendations to the Secretaries of Defense, Transportation, Army, Navy, and Air Force. The review was based on questionnaires mailed to 2,209 randomly selected reservists…

  8. Hearing in Athletes with Intellectual Disabilities: The Need for Improved Ear Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, W.; Lumm, J.; Laoide-Kemp, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Special Olympics offer the opportunity for athletes with intellectual disabilities to participate in a range of sports at regional, national and international level. A parallel Healthy Athletes programme was introduced to ensure safety at the games but also to collect data on the health needs of those with intellectual disabilities…

  9. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Air Emissions Data for the Oil and Natural Gas Production Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #13-P-0161, February 20, 2013. High levels of growth in the oil and natural gas (gas) production sector have underscored the need for EPA to gain a better understanding of emissions and potential risks from the production of oil and gas.

  10. DOD Service Acquisition: Improved Use of Available Data Needed to Better Manage and Forecast Service Contract Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    Definitions Object Class Code Description 25.1 Advisory and assistance services 25.2 Other services from non-federal sources 25.3 Other federal...DOD SERVICE ACQUISITION Improved Use of Available Data Needed to Better Manage and Forecast Service Contract...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-119, a report to congressional committees February 2016 DOD SERVICE ACQUISITION Improved

  11. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Repair Project at Camp Pendleton, California, Needed Improvements in Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    building 52609 deteriorated to the point that systems and materials were failing— plumbing leaks were the source of most maintenance requests. The...including the laundry room, bathrooms , and bedrooms in building 52609) to illustrate the deterioration. However, the pictures did not always clearly...needed for the Repair Project. Those repairs included electrical, plumbing , structural, and mechanical repairs. However, the RFP did not cite or

  12. Defense Commissaries: DOD Needs to Improve Business Processes to Ensure Patron Benefits and Achieve Operational Efficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    cost of business operations, competition in their market , and the need to generate a profit. In addition, different product distribution options... market conditions such as local labor costs as would be true for a commercial grocery store. Figure 1 shows how DeCA allocated $1.3 billion in...savings rate is calculated as a weighted average based on the market shares from sales in the previous fiscal year

  13. Improving Systematic Response in the Face of Homicide: Family and Friends of Homicide Victims Service Needs.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jed; Mastrocinque, Jeanna M; Navratil, Peter; Cerulli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Homicide is a pressing issue in America. This study used qualitative data obtained from focus groups of family and friends of homicide victims (FFHV) to assess and better meet the needs of victims post homicide. The study results posit myriad changes to the systematic response to homicide. The article concludes with recommendations for training and resources, with specific attention to legal, law enforcement, medical, and behavioral health providers.

  14. Department of Defense: Additional Actions Needed to Improve Financial Management of Military Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Internal Controls Over the U.S. Special Operations Command Military Equipment Baseline Valuation Effort, D-2008- 103 (Arlington, Va.: June 13, 2008...Support System-Army (GCSS- Army), and Logistics Modernization Program ( LMP )—thus resulting in the need for manual reconciliations and reduced...risk. Further, as stated above, the Army’s ERPs—GFEBS, GCSS- Army, and LMP —may experience interoperability problems because of the lack of common

  15. Improving Community Health While Satisfying a Critical Community Need: A Case Study for Nonprofit Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kephart, Donna K.; Dillon, Judith F.; McCullough, Jody R.; Blatt, Barbara J.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background School-based student health screenings identify issues that may affect physical and intellectual development and are an important way to maintain student health. Nonprofit hospitals can provide a unique resource to school districts by assisting in the timely completion of school-based screenings and meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act. This case study describes the collaboration between an academic medical center and a local school district to conduct school-based health screenings. Community Context Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center collaborated with Lebanon School District to facilitate student health screenings, a need identified in part by a community health needs assessment. Methods From June 2012 through February 2013, district-wide student health screenings were planned and implemented by teams of hospital nursing leadership, school district leadership, and school nurses. In fall 2013, students were screened through standardized procedures for height, weight, scoliosis, vision, and hearing. Outcomes In 2 days, 3,105 students (67% of all students in the district) were screened. Letters explaining screening results were mailed to parents of all students screened. Debriefing meetings and follow-up surveys for the participating nurses provided feedback for future screenings. Interpretation The 2-day collaborative screening event decreased the amount of time spent by school nurses in screening students throughout the year and allowed them more time in their role as school wellness champion. Additionally, parents found out early in the school year whether their child needed physician follow-up. Partnerships between school districts and hospitals to conduct student health screenings are a practical option for increasing outreach while satisfying community needs. PMID:26513441

  16. The School Improvement Model: Tailoring a Teacher and Administrator Performance Evaluation System to Meet the Needs of the School Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Retia Scott

    Described here are the planning and development stages of the Teacher Performance Evaluation (TPE) system and the Administrator Performance Evaluation (APE) system that are components of the School Improvement Model project undertaken by schools in Iowa and Minnesota. One goal is an evaluation system tailored to fit the needs of the school…

  17. The Role of Need for Contraception in the Evaluation of Interventions to Improve Access to Family-Planning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Federico R.; Lundgren, Rebecka; Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A nonrandomized experiment carried out in Jharkhand, India, shows how the effects of interventions designed to improve access to family-planning methods can be erroneously regarded as trivial when contraceptive use is utilized as dependent variable, ignoring women's need for contraception. Significant effects of the intervention were observed on…

  18. A Quality Function Deployment Analysis of Customer Needs for Meeting School Improvement Goals: The Voice of the School Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Susan N.; And Others

    In providing leadership for school improvement teams, principals must employ group communication and decision-making skills. In this study, a planning procedure called Quality Function Deployment (QFD) was modified for use with school-based administrators. Teams of school leaders used QFD to generate the top priority needs of school customers…

  19. Photosynthesis: ancient, essential, complex, diverse .. and in need of improvement in a changing world

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A challenge to crop improvement is the fact that the photosynthetic process has been fine tuned by billions of years of natural selection, and is subject to deeply rooted genetic controls shaped in the native environments of the crop ancestors. These may be difficult to change and may not be optima...

  20. Child Care Quality: Does It Matter and Does It Need To Be Improved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Wolfe, Barbara

    This report aims to provide an answer to the question of whether there is an economic justification for public intervention to improve the quality of nonparental child care, especially for lower income families. Evidence from large- and small-scale studies of the effects of child care on children's development is presented, and the economic…

  1. The Need for the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood: Background Research and Evaluation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In FY 2009, the Children's Bureau funded the Center for the Study of Social Policy, in partnership with ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, and the National Alliance of Children's Trust and Prevention Funds, to create a National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood (QIC-EC) focused on child maltreatment…

  2. Education's Library. Actions Needed To Improve Its Usefulness. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) Amendments of 1990 required the General Accounting Office (GAO) to conduct a review of the Department of Education's Research Library, which is a component of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI). Data were gathered by interviewing one researcher and four librarians familiar…

  3. F-22 Modernization: Cost and Schedule Transparency Is Improved, Further Visibility into Reliability Efforts Is Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Abbreviations DOD Department of Defense ID/ IQ indefinite delivery / indefinite quantity NDAA National...Structuring F-22 Modernization Should Improve Oversight and Transparency Page 7 GAO-14-425 F-22 Modernization (ID/ IQ ).7 The Air Force...plans to use individual contractual agreements, known as delivery orders, which are issued under the ID/ IQ contract, for each modernization effort

  4. Improvements Needed in Management of Training Under the Government Employees Training Act. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed the Department of Defense (DOD) management of its employee training program at 14 installations to see what had been done in response to the recommendations for improvements and to determine the current status of the program. The findings and conclusions are contained in four chapters: (1)…

  5. AVIATION SECURITY: Terrorist Acts Demonstrate Urgent Need to Improve Security at the Nation’s Airports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    what actually occurred or what all the weaknesses in the nation’s aviation security apparatus are that contributed to the horrendous events of last week...it is clear that serious weaknesses exist in our aviation security system and that their impact can be far more devastating than previously imagined...offer some observations about improving aviation security in these various areas.

  6. Inorganic arsenic: a need and an opportunity to improve risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Chappell, W R; Beck, B D; Brown, K G; Chaney, R; Cothern, R; Cothern, C R; Irgolic, K J; North, D W; Thornton, I; Tsongas, T A

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents views on the current status of (inorganic) arsenic risk assessment in the United States and recommends research needed to set standards for drinking water. The opinions are those of the Arsenic Task Force of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, which has met periodically since 1991 to study issues related to arsenic risk assessment and has held workshops and international conferences on arsenic. The topic of this paper is made timely by current scientific interest in exposure to and adverse health effects of arsenic in the United States and passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1996, which has provisions for a research program on arsenic and a schedule mandating the EPA to revise the maximum contaminant level of arsenic in drinking water by the year 2001. Our central premise and recommendations are straightforward: the risk of adverse health effects associated with arsenic in drinking water is unknown for low arsenic concentrations found in the United States, such as at the current interim maximum contaminant level of 50 microg/l and below. Arsenic-related research should be directed at answering that question. New epidemiological studies are needed to provide data for reliable dose-response assessments of arsenic and for skin cancer, bladder cancer, or other endpoints to be used by the EPA for regulation. Further toxicological research, along with the observational data from epidemiology, is needed to determine if the dose-response relationship at low levels is more consistent with the current assumption of low-dose linearity or the existence of a practical threshold. Other recommendations include adding foodborne arsenic to the calculation of total arsenic intake, calculation of total arsenic intake, and encouraging cooperative research within the United States and between the United States and affected countries.

  7. Inorganic arsenic: a need and an opportunity to improve risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, W R; Beck, B D; Brown, K G; Chaney, R; Cothern, R; Cothern, C R; Irgolic, K J; North, D W; Thornton, I; Tsongas, T A

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents views on the current status of (inorganic) arsenic risk assessment in the United States and recommends research needed to set standards for drinking water. The opinions are those of the Arsenic Task Force of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, which has met periodically since 1991 to study issues related to arsenic risk assessment and has held workshops and international conferences on arsenic.The topic of this paper is made timely by current scientific interest in exposure to and adverse health effects of arsenic in the United States and passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1996, which has provisions for a research program on arsenic and a schedule mandating the EPA to revise the maximum contaminant level of arsenic in drinking water by the year 2001. Our central premise and recommendations are straightforward: the risk of adverse health effects associated with arsenic in drinking water is unknown for low arsenic concentrations found in the United States, such as at the current interim maximum contaminant level of 50 microg/l and below. Arsenic-related research should be directed at answering that question. New epidemiological studies are needed to provide data for reliable dose-response assessments of arsenic and for skin cancer, bladder cancer, or other endpoints to be used by the EPA for regulation. Further toxicological research, along with the observational data from epidemiology, is needed to determine if the dose-response relationship at low levels is more consistent with the current assumption of low-dose linearity or the existence of a practical threshold. Other recommendations include adding foodborne arsenic to the calculation of total arsenic intake, calculation of total arsenic intake, and encouraging cooperative research within the United States and between the United States and affected countries. Images p1060-a Figure 1. PMID:9349827

  8. VA Health Care: Actions Needed to Improve Newly Enrolled Veterans Access to Primary Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    medical centers provide veterans with timely access to outpatient primary and specialty care, as well as mental health care. (See app. I for the...D.C.: Oct. 8, 2015); and GAO, VA Mental Health: Clearer Guidance on Access Policies and Wait- Time Data Needed, GAO-16-24 (Washington, D.C.: Oct. 28...21We recently reported that VA similarly focuses on only a portion of the overall time veterans wait to see mental health providers. See GAO-16-24

  9. Manic Monday to fabulous Friday: partnering to improve behavioral and mental health needs of students.

    PubMed

    Schwind, Karen S; Freeman, Sally Ann; Garcia, Molly; Roberts, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    School nurses across the United States continue to see an increase in the number of children and families with behavioral and mental health issues that affect many aspects of overall health and education. When referral to a mental health professional is indicated, there are often few available community mental health providers, long waits for appointments, or both. This article describes how school nurses can leverage school district and community resources and increase their capacity to meet the behavioral and mental health needs of children in the school setting.

  10. Improving effectiveness of clinical medicine: the need for better translation of science into practice.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Glasziou, Paul P

    2012-10-01

    Published research evidence does not automatically diffuse into clinical practice but requires active processes of translation that start with clinicians' awareness of the science and end with patient adherence to the recommended care. Many barriers thwart the uptake of valid and clinically important research into practice, with cognitive, motivational and sociological factors on the part of health professionals being among the most important. Encouraging clinicians to question the level of scientific certainty underpinning clinical practice and to actively seek evidence that may better inform clinical decisions is a priority for improving health care effectiveness. Although there are effective strategies for improving translation of research into practice, implementing them requires agreement between and buy-in from professional and managerial stakeholders.

  11. Wholesale Accountability Procedures Need Improvement for Redistribution Property Assistance Team Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-26

    Assistance Team TACOM TACOM Life Cycle Management Command TPE Theater Provided Equipment INSPECTOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 4800...forces from Iraq. The overall mission of the RPAT was to facilitate the turn-in of all excess major end item Theater Provided Equipment ( TPE ), improve...book cleared by the appropriate authority to provide immediate relief of accountability and turn-in of TPE . Camp Virginia RPAT Operations The mission

  12. Improved Oversight Needed for State Department Grant to the International Republican Institute

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-29

    monitoring and evaluation of future grants. Without comprehensive assessments, it is difficult for decision makers to determine what changes are necessary...goals are being met. DRL also noted it has recently taken steps to improve monitoring and evaluation of future grants. Without comprehensive...IRI, May 7, 2010. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Not Structured To Measure Impact The request for proposals that resulted in the awarding of grant

  13. Contract Oversight for Redistribution Property Assistance Team Operations in Afghanistan Needs Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-18

    in conflicting interpretations of the contractor’s requirements. In addition, 401st AFSB personnel did not follow applicable Army regulations to...investigations within the timeframes required by Army Regulation 735-5. The Commander, 401st Army Field Support Brigade, improved the new PWS and...with performance work statement requirements. In addition, 401st Army Field Support Brigade personnel did not follow applicable Army regulations to

  14. Improving the performance of interorganizational networks for preventing chronic disease: identifying and acting on research needs.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Taylor, Martin; Best, Allan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the role of interorganizational networks in chronic disease prevention and an action research agenda for promoting understanding and improvement. Through a model of engaged scholarship, leaders with expertise and experience in chronic disease prevention networks helped shape research directions focused on network value, governance, and evolution. The guiding principles for facilitating this research include applying existing knowledge, developing network-appropriate methods and measures, creating structural change, promoting an impact orientation, and fostering cultural change.

  15. The Need to Improve Population and Resource Control in Thailand’s Counterinsurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    factors that gave advantage to the government:134 first, long experience of the British in Malaya – knowledge of the country, control of influence over...modifications. By improving population and resource control measures, the military will be able to reduce the insurgents’ influence , establish civil... influence , establish civil security, and finally control areas. vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION

  16. Innovation Need Survey: Implementing a Technology Tool to Improve Early Data-Based Decisions to Address and Prevent Learning Disabilities. Technical Report #1602

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, P. Shawn; Pilger, Marissa; Sáez, Leilani; Alonzo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and measuring indicators of learning difficulties among young children and implementing effective instructional approaches are complicated, particularly during the transition to kindergarten. Purposeful school-based transition policies and practices support teacher and school decision-making and, thus, can ease the…

  17. Defense Health Care. Improvements Needed in Occupational and Environmental Health Surveillance during Deployments to Address Immediate and Long-term Health Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Navy preventive medicine units generally have included a preventive medicine physician, an industrial hygienist , a microbiologist, and an entomologist...medical/ dental x -ray and OSI operations, and low-level radioactive materials present in equipment such as chemical ag ent monitors and alar ms. No

  18. Digital divide and information needs for improving family support among the poor and underserved.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah A; Yoon, Sunmoo; Rockoff, Maxine L; Nocenti, David; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-03-01

    Despite of its emotional benefits, communication with family members who live abroad can present a large financial burden for low-income foreign-born individuals. The aims of this study were (1) to explore the current technologies available for low-cost communication with family living abroad and (2) to assess the level of awareness and use of low-cost technologies for family communication as well as related information needs among low-income foreign-born individuals. This mixed-methods study included an environmental scan, survey, and focus groups with low-income foreign-born individuals living in East Harlem in New York City. Low-income individuals who have family members living abroad face financial stress with complicated technology choices for communication with family living abroad and they have many information needs. They would welcome interactive and convenient educational tools that (1) build skills for utilization of various technologies and (2) provide decision support to simplify choosing among the vast array of available communication options.

  19. Monitoring of biodiversity indicators in boreal forests: a need for improved focus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ian D

    2006-10-01

    The general principles of scale and coarse and fine filters have been widely accepted, but management agencies and industry are still grappling with the question of what to monitor to detect changes in forest biodiversity following forest management. Part of this problem can be attributed to the lack of focused questions for monitoring including absence of null models and predicted effects, a certain level of disconnect between research and management, and recognition that monitoring can be designed as a research question. Considerable research from the past decade has not been adequately synthesized to answer important questions, such as which species or forest attributes might be the best indicators of change. A disproportionate research emphasis has been placed on community ecology, and mostly on a few groups of organisms including arthropods, amphibians, migratory songbirds, and small mammals, while other species, including soil organisms, lichens, bats, raptors, some carnivores, and larger mammals remain less well-known. In most studies of community ecology, the question of what is the importance, if any, of the regularly observed subtle changes in community structures, and causes of observed changes is usually not answered. Hence, our ability to deal with questions of persistence is limited, and demographic research on regionally-defined key species (such as species linked to processes, species whose persistence may be affected, species with large home ranges, species already selected as indicators, and rare and threatened species) is urgently needed. Monitoring programs need to be designed to enable managers to respond to unexpected changes caused by forest management. To do this, management agencies need to articulate null models for monitoring that predict effects, focus fine-scale monitoring on key species (defined by local and regional research) in key habitats (rare, declining, important) across landscapes, and have a protocol in place to adapt

  20. Research needs to improve agricultural productivity and food quality, with emphasis on biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jennifer A

    2002-11-01

    Research into agricultural productivity, especially for crops in the developing world, should include resistance to plant viruses, fungi and the parasitic weed Striga. It must also include research into the development of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin-expressing crops. Drought- and heat-tolerant crops, and those that can combat the problems of soil deficiencies, are required, and vaccine production in plants should be a high priority. Research into food quality should include the equivalent of "golden rice" in maize, the enhancement of the production of phytosterols and improved qualities of vegetable oils.

  1. Low dimensional magnetic solids and single crystal elpasolites: Need for improved crystal growing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, M. L.; Watkins, S.; Schwartz, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The need for extensive crystal growing experiments to develop techniques for preparing crystals suitable for magnetic anisotropy measurements and detailed X-ray and neutron diffraction studies is rationalized on the basis of the unique magnetic properties of the materials and their hydrogen bonded structures which have many features in common with metalloenzyme and metalloprotein active sites. Single crystals of the single and mixed lanthanide species are prepared by the Bridgeman technique of gradient solidification of molten samples. The effects of crystal imperfections on the optical properties of these materials are an important part of the projected research. A series of a-amido acid complexes of first row transition metals were prepared which crystallize as infinite linear chains and exhibit low dimensional magnetic ordering (one or two) at temperature below 40 K.

  2. Indoor Air Pollution in Developing Countries: Research and Implementation Needs for Improvements in Global Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Elliott T.; Carter, Ellison M.; Matt Earnest, C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the burning of solid fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting accounts for a significant portion of the global burden of death and disease, and disproportionately affects women and children in developing regions. Clean cookstove campaigns recently received more attention and investment, but their successes might hinge on greater integration of the public health community with a variety of other disciplines. To help guide public health research in alleviating this important global environmental health burden, we synthesized previous research on IAP in developing countries, summarized successes and challenges of previous cookstove implementation programs, and provided key research and implementation needs from structured discussions at a recent symposium. PMID:23409891

  3. Unmet Need: Improving mHealth Evaluation Rigor to Build the Evidence Base.

    PubMed

    Mookherji, Sangeeta; Mehl, Garrett; Kaonga, Nadi; Mechael, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    mHealth-the use of mobile technologies for health-is a growing element of health system activity globally, but evaluation of those activities remains quite scant, and remains an important knowledge gap for advancing mHealth activities. In 2010, the World Health Organization and Columbia University implemented a small-scale survey to generate preliminary data on evaluation activities used by mHealth initiatives. The authors describe self-reported data from 69 projects in 29 countries. The majority (74%) reported some sort of evaluation activity, primarily nonexperimental in design (62%). The authors developed a 6-point scale of evaluation rigor comprising information on use of comparison groups, sample size calculation, data collection timing, and randomization. The mean score was low (2.4); half (47%) were conducting evaluations with a minimum threshold (4+) of rigor, indicating use of a comparison group, while less than 20% had randomized the mHealth intervention. The authors were unable to assess whether the rigor score was appropriate for the type of mHealth activity being evaluated. What was clear was that although most data came from mHealth projects pilots aimed for scale-up, few had designed evaluations that would support crucial decisions on whether to scale up and how. Whether the mHealth activity is a strategy to improve health or a tool for achieving intermediate outcomes that should lead to better health, mHealth evaluations must be improved to generate robust evidence for cost-effectiveness assessment and to allow for accurate identification of the contribution of mHealth initiatives to health systems strengthening and the impact on actual health outcomes.

  4. Space Projects: Improvements Needed in Selecting Future Projects for Private Financing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and NASA jointly selected seven projects for commercialization to reduce NASA's fiscal year 1990 budget request and to help achieve the goal of increasing private sector involvement in space. However, the efforts to privately finance these seven projects did not increase the commercial sector's involvement in space to the extent desired. The General Accounting Office (GAO) determined that the projects selected were not a fair test of the potential of increasing commercial investment in space at an acceptable cost to the government, primarily because the projects were not properly screened. That is, neither their suitability for commercialization nor the economic consequences of seeking private financing for them were adequately evaluated before selection. Evaluations and market tests done after selection showed that most of the projects were not viable candidates for private financing. GAO concluded that projects should not be removed from NASA's budget for commercial development until after careful screening has been done to determine whether adequate commercial demand exists, development risks are commercially acceptable and private financing is found or judged to be highly likely, and the cost effectiveness of such a decision is acceptable. Premature removal of projects from NASA's budget ultimately can cause project delays and increased costs when unsuccessful commercialization candidates must be returned to the budget. NASA also needs to ensure appropriate comparisons of government and private financing options for future commercialization projects.

  5. Need for Better Blood Pressure Measurement in Developing Countries to Improve Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Perruolo, Eleonora; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is now the foremost cause of disability and is responsible for the highest percentage of attributable death among risk factors. These global changes are mainly due to the increase in the prevalence of hypertension in most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as a consequence of relevant socioeconomic changes occurring during the last decades. Implementation of global prevention efforts urgently needs to be accelerated because of the increasing incidence of haemorrhagic stroke, renal failure, and hypertensive heart disease in developing countries. Blood pressure (BP) measurement has different implications in epidemiological studies performed in low-resource settings. First, the frequency of blood pressure measurement is a simple but reliable indicator of access to healthcare in epidemiological studies, which may disclose the favourable effects of urbanization; the opportunity to have BP measured increases hypertension awareness, facilitates drug treatment, and leads to better achievement of BP control. Second, BP measurement is a key element in cardiovascular risk stratification, focusing solely on the preferred strategy in low-resource settings where costs of biochemical tests might be less sustainable. Third, the issue of obtaining reliable estimation of BP values is crucial to achieve sound data on the burden of hypertension in LMICs, and some aspects of BP measurement, such as the use of reliable automated devices, the number of measurements/visits to achieve a consistent diagnosis of hypertension, and the possible confounding effect of environmental factors, must be closely considered. PMID:25420484

  6. Improving irrigation efficiency : the need for a relevant sequence of the management tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Y.

    2009-04-01

    With 70 % of worldwide withdrawals, irrigation efficiency is a key issue in the overall problem of water resources. Management of water dedicated to agriculture should be improved to secure food production and save water to deal with increasing domestic and industrial demands. This paper is based on the results of a collaborative research project conducted in India with a local NGO (the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme, AKRSP(I)) during which GIS were tested. It is aimed at analyzing the efficiency of water usage in a water development programme conducted by the partner NGO in the semi-arid margins of Gujarat state. The analysis raises the question of the articulation of legal, institutional, economical, and technical tools to improve water efficiency. The NGO supervises the construction of surface water harvesting structures for irrigation purposes. Following a participatory approach, it creates and trains user groups to which the management of dams would then be devolved. User group membership depends on financial contribution to the building costs. A legal vacuum regarding surface water management combined with unequal investment capacities favor the concentration of water resources in the hands of a limited number of farmers. This causes low water use efficiency, irrigation choices being mostly oriented to high water consumptive crops and recipient farmers showing no interest in investing in water saving techniques. Our observations favor equality of access and paying more attention to the sequence in which management tools are articulated. On a national scale, as a prerequisite, water user rights as well as NGO's intervention legal framework should be clarified. On a project scale, before construction, information systems could help to identify all potential beneficiaries and optimize equality of access. It aims at reducing the volume of water per farmer to encourage them to irrigate low water consumptive crops and invest in water saving techniques. Depending

  7. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations

    PubMed Central

    Loring, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the most common teratogenic drugs prescribed to women of childbearing age. AEDs can induce both anatomical (malformations) and behavioral (cognitive/behavioral deficits) teratogenicity. Only in the last decade have we begun to truly discriminate differential AED developmental effects. Fetal valproate exposure carries a special risk for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenic abnormalities, but the mechanisms and reasons for individual variability are unknown. Intermediate anatomical risks exist for phenobarbital and topiramate. Several AEDs (e.g., lamotrigine and levetiracetam) appear to possess low risks for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. Despite advances in the past decade, our knowledge of the teratogenic risks for most AEDs and the underlying mechanisms remain inadequate. Further, the long-term effects of AEDs in neonates and older children remain uncertain. The pace of progress is slow given the lifelong consequences of diminished developmental outcomes, exposing children unnecessarily to potential adverse effects. It is imperative that new approaches be employed to determine risks more expediently. Our recommendations include a national reporting system for congenital malformations, federal funding of the North American AED Pregnancy Registry, routine meta-analyses of cohort studies to detect teratogenic signals, monitoring of AED prescription practices for women, routine preclinical testing of all new AEDs for neurodevelopmental effects, more specific Food and Drug Administration requirements to establish differential AED cognitive effects in children, and improved funding of basic and clinical research to fully delineate risks and underlying mechanisms for AED-induced anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. PMID:26519545

  8. Improving pediatric cardiac surgical care in developing countries: matching resources to needs.

    PubMed

    Dearani, Joseph A; Neirotti, Rodolfo; Kohnke, Emily J; Sinha, Kingshuk K; Cabalka, Allison K; Barnes, Roxann D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Cushing, John C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a systematic approach to the design and support of pediatric cardiac surgery programs in the developing world with the guidance and strategies of Children's HeartLink, an experienced non-government organization for more than 40 years. An algorithm with criteria for the selection of a partner site is outlined. A comprehensive education strategy from the physician to the allied health care provider is the mainstay for successful program development. In a partner program, the road to successful advancement and change depends on many factors, such as government support, hospital administration support, medical staff leadership, and a committed and motivated faculty with requisite skills, incentives, and resources. In addition to these factors, it is essential that the development effort includes considerations of environment (eg, governmental support, regulatory environment, and social structure) and health system (elements related to affordability, access, and awareness of care) that impact success. Partner programs should be willing to initiate a clinical database with the intent to analyze and critique their results to optimize quality assurance and improve outcomes.

  9. Sexual Assault: Actions Needed to Improve DOD’s Prevention Strategy and to Help Ensure It Is Effectively Implemented

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    SEXUAL ASSAULT Actions Needed to Improve DOD’s Prevention Strategy and to Help Ensure It Is Effectively...to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3...Ensure It Is Effectively Implemented 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  10. Survey of historical incidences with Controls-Structures Interaction and recommended technology improvements needed to put hardware in space

    SciTech Connect

    Ketner, G.L.

    1989-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey for the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center. The purpose of the survey was to collect information documenting past incidences of problems with CSI during design, analysis, ground development, test and/or flight operation of space systems in industry. The survey was conducted to also compile recommended improvements in technology to support future needs for putting hardware into space. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Classifying Menopausal Stage by Menstrual Calendars and Annual Interviews: Need for Improved Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Paramsothy, Pangaja; Harlow, Siobán D; Elliott, Michael R.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Crawford, Sybil L.; Randolph, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess agreement between menopausal transition stages defined by annual interview or annual follicle-stimulating hormone measures and menopausal transition stages defined by the monthly menstrual calendar, as well as factors associated with discordance. Methods These analyses used daily self-recorded menstrual calendar data from 1996–2006, annual interviews, and annual follicle-stimulating hormone measures. Participants were from 4 study sites of the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation Boston, southeastern Michigan, Oakland, and Los Angles, and four racial/ethnic groups: African-American, Caucasian, Chinese, and Japanese. Women who had a defined final menstrual period (FMP) and who never went on hormones were included (n=379). Cohen’s Kappa for 2 by 2 tables were calculated for two definitions of agreement. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with discordance. Results Poor agreement between annual interview and menstrual calendar data was found for early menopausal transition (Kappa= −0.13, 95%CI: −0.25, −0.02) and late menopausal transition (Kappa= −0.18, 95%CI: −0.26, −0.11). For late stage, Chinese women (OR=2.16, 95%CI= 1.08, 4.30), African-American women (OR=2.39, 95%CI= 1.00, 5.71), and women with a high school education or less (OR=2.16, 95%CI= 1.08, 4.30) were more likely to be discordant. Poor agreement between annual follicle-stimulating hormone measures and menstrual calendars was also found for early menopausal transition (Kappa= −0.44, 95%CI: −0.57, −0.30) and late menopausal transition (Kappa= −0.32, 95%CI: −0.42, −0.23) Conclusions New questions need to be developed to accurately identify the start of the menopausal transition and should be evaluated in a multi-ethnic population with varying educational backgrounds. PMID:23481122

  12. Commercial coral-reef fisheries across Micronesia: A need for improving management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houk, P.; Rhodes, K.; Cuetos-Bueno, J.; Lindfield, S.; Fread, V.; McIlwain, J. L.

    2012-03-01

    A dearth of scientific data surrounding Micronesia's coral-reef fisheries has limited their formal assessment and continues to hinder local and regional management efforts. We approach this problem by comparing catch-based datasets from market landings across Micronesia to evaluate fishery status in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Guam, Yap, and Pohnpei. Initial examinations found that calm weather and low lunar illumination predicted between 6% (Yap) and 30% (CNMI) of the variances in daily commercial landings. Both environmentally driven catch success and daily catch variability increased in accordance with reef-fish demand indices. Subsequent insight from species composition and size-at-capture data supported these findings, highlighting reduced trophic levels and capture sizes where higher human-population-per-reef-area existed. Among the 12-15 target species and/or species complexes that accounted for 70% of the harvest biomass, capture sizes were consistently smallest for CNMI and Guam, often below the reported mean reproductive sizes. Comparatively, Pohnpei has the greatest potential for reef fisheries, with a large reef area (303 km2) and a moderate human population (34,000 people). However, the estimated harvest volume of 476 mt year-1 was 8-9 times higher than other jurisdictions. Even on Yap where the reef-fish demand index was lowest (67.7 people km-2 reef habitat), many target fish were harvested below their mean reproductive sizes, including the iconic green bumphead parrotfish and humphead wrasse, as well as several other herbivores. We discuss our results with respect to the contemporary doctrine surrounding size-spectra, catch composition, and catch frequencies that afford insight into fishery pressure and status. We posit that regional catch-based policies (initially) instituted at the market level, combined with area and gear-based restrictions, represent plausible vectors for improving Micronesian fisheries.

  13. Emergency department management of syncope: need for standardization and improved risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Taljaard, Monica; Stiell, Ian G; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Murray, Heather; Vaidyanathan, Aparna; Rowe, Brian H; Calder, Lisa A; Lang, Eddy; McRae, Andrew; Sheldon, Robert; Wells, George A

    2015-08-01

    Variations in emergency department (ED) syncope management have not been well studied. The goals of this study were to assess variations in management, and emergency physicians' risk perception and disposition decision making. We conducted a prospective study of adults with syncope in six EDs in four cities over 32 months. We collected patient characteristics, ED management, disposition, physicians' prediction probabilities at index presentation and followed patients for 30 days for serious outcomes: death, myocardial infarction (MI), arrhythmia, structural heart disease, pulmonary embolism, significant hemorrhage, or procedural interventions. We used descriptive statistics, ROC curves, and regression analyses. We enrolled 3662 patients: mean age 54.3 years, and 12.9 % were hospitalized. Follow-up data were available for 3365 patients (91.9 %) and 345 patients (10.3 %) suffered serious outcomes: 120 (3.6 %) after ED disposition including 48 patients outside the hospital. After accounting for differences in patient case mix, the rates of ED investigations and disposition were significantly different (p < 0.0001) across the four study cities; as were the rates of 30-day serious outcomes (p < 0.0001) and serious outcomes after ED disposition (p = 0.0227). There was poor agreement between physician risk perception and both observed event rates and referral patterns (p < 0.0001). Only 76.7 % (95 % CI 68.1-83.6) of patients with serious outcomes were appropriately referred. There are large and unexplained differences in ED syncope management. Moreover, there is poor agreement between physician risk perception, disposition decision making, and serious outcomes after ED disposition. A valid risk-stratification tool might help standardize ED management and improve disposition decision making.

  14. Bedding on geotextile mattresses: how much is needed to improve cow comfort?

    PubMed

    Tucker, C B; Weary, D M

    2004-09-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate how the amount of sawdust bedding on mattresses affects dairy cattle behavior and preferences. Eleven nonlactating, multiparous cows were housed individually in pens with access to 3 free stalls. Each stall was fitted with a geotextile mattress covered with either 0, 1, or 7.5 kg of kiln-dried sawdust. The experiment began with 7 d of acclimatization to all 3 stalls. Cows were then allowed access to only 1 of the 3 stalls at a time, each for 3 d (restriction phase). At the end of this restriction phase, cows were allowed free access to all 3 stalls for 3 d (free-choice phase). Time spent lying and the number of lying bouts increased significantly with the amount of bedding, from 12.3 +/- 0.53 h lying and 8.5 +/- 0.62 bouts per 24 h on bare mattresses to 13.8 +/- 0.53 h lying and 10.0 +/- 0.62 bouts per 24 h on mattresses with 7.5 kg of sawdust. In addition, the animals spent less time standing with only the front hooves in the stalls when more sawdust was present. When allowed free access to all 3 options, all 11 animals spent a majority of their time lying and standing in the 7.5-kg option. In conclusion, cows preferred mattresses bedded with 7.5 kg of sawdust, on which they spent more time lying down and less time standing with only the front hooves in stalls. These results indicate that more sawdust bedding improves cow comfort in stalls with geotextile mattresses.

  15. Termination of Pregnancy in Curaçao: Need for Improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Adriana A.; Alberts, Jantina F.; de Bruijn, Jeanne; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Kleiverda, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    contraception. Improvement of sex education is necessary in order to bring down the number of TOP, as well as realizing accessible and affordable contraception, including sterilization. The number of complications around TOPs was equal to other countries where TOP is illegal. PMID:22980230

  16. Japanese Encephalitis in Assam, India: Need to Increase Healthcare Workers’ Understanding to Improve Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Gogoi, Lakhya Jyoti; Kalita, Manabendra; Sikdar, Atul Prasad; Pandey, Sureshwar; Dhingra, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a major cause of high morbidity and mortality in several states across India. However, in 2014, a sharp rise was observed in the number of cases of JE in north-eastern Assam state, and 51% of the total cases of JE in India were reported from the Assam in the same year. In this regard, a study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers in Darrang, a district of Assam highly affected by JE. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for 2 months among HCWs in the major district hospital of Darrang, Assam. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants. Convenience sampling approach was used to collect data from different departments of the hospitals. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to express the results. Results The knowledge of HCWs regarding JE was poor with a mean knowledge score of 11.02±2.39 (out of 17), while their attitudes were positive with a mean attitudes score of 43.16± 2.47 (ranging from 13 to 52). Overall, 40.4% and 74.3% of participants demonstrated good knowledge and positive attitudes respectively. Cut-off score for good knowledge and positive attitudes toward JE was set as ≥12 and >40 respectively. Older participants (40–49 years) and experienced workers (>10 years) were significantly associated with good knowledge as compared to their referent group (p<0.05), while knowledge of nurses and other orderlies were significantly lower than physicians (p<0.01). Similar factors were associated with the positive attitudes of the participants with the exception of experience. Television was the major source of information regarding JE reported by HCWs (79%). Conclusion Although the knowledge was not optimized, HCWs exhibited positive attitudes towards JE. Future research is required to design, implement and evaluate interventions to improve the knowledge of JE among HCWs. PMID:26296212

  17. Developing a More "Citizen-Centered" Coral Reef Information System: Engaging the Coral Reef Community To Assess User Needs and Improve Coral Reef Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, K.; McCaffrey, M.

    2005-05-01

    With 35 million web pages and 22,000 websites, the U.S. Federal Government through the E-Government Act 2002 directs those who develop and maintain these websites to become more "citizen-centered." One required activity of the act is to "sponsor ongoing dialogue with interested parties (including state, local, and tribal governments, private and non-profit sectors, and the general public) to find innovative ways to use IT to improve the delivery of Government information and services" (Sec 101, 3602). One of the websites that has begun to engage such parties is the NOAA Coral Reef Information System (CoRIS), which is designed to provide the public with access to NOAA's coral reef data and information from a single location. CoRIS has, through two usability workshops conducted by staff from the Coastal Services Center, and a series of stakeholder meetings held in the Fall of 2003 in American Samoa and Hawai'i and the Fall of 2004 in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, sought to address the needs of users, both internal and external to NOAA. The goal was to select a set of test participants that represented the CoRIS project's targeted users (researchers, managers, general public) and provide an overview of the web site to demonstrate its resources and capabilities. The findings of the workshops and meetings are being used by the CoRIS development team to respond to user needs as part of an iterative process to improve utility and usability of the website and better understand how to present often complex scientific information to address a variety of user needs and local issues. Based on recommendations from the feedback of current and potential users of the CoRIS website from meetings held in the Fall of 2004, the development team has adopted a series of usability requirements to be implemented in the coming year. Participants of the meetings have suggested that CoRIS engage with user communities, including Local Action Strategy (LAS) efforts, to assess user

  18. Public social monitoring reports and their effect on a policy programme aimed at addressing the social determinants of health to improve health equity in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Pega, Frank; Valentine, Nicole B; Matheson, Don; Rasanathan, Kumanan

    2014-01-01

    The important role that monitoring plays in advancing global health is well established. However, the role of social monitoring as a tool for addressing social determinants of health (SDH) and health equity-focused policies remains under-researched. This paper assesses the extent and ways in which New Zealand's (NZ) Social Reports (SRs) supported a SDH- and health equity-oriented policy programme nationally over the 2000-2008 period by documenting the SRs' history and assessing its impact on policies across sectors in government and civil society. We conducted key-informant interviews with five senior policy-makers and an e-mail survey with 24 government and civil society representatives on SRs' history and policy impact. We identified common themes across these data and classified them accordingly to assess the intensity of the reports' use and their impact on SDH- and health equity-focused policies. Bibliometric analyses of government publications and media items were undertaken to empirically assess SRs' impact on government and civil society. SRs in NZ arose out of the role played by government as the "benevolent social welfare planner" and an understanding of the necessity of economic and social security for "progress". The SRs were linked to establishing a government-wide programme aimed at reducing inequalities. They have been used moderately to highly in central and local government and in civil society, both within and outside the health sector, but have neither entered public treasury and economic development departments nor the commercial sector. The SRs have not reached the more universal status of economic indicators. However, they have had some success at raising awareness of, and have stimulated isolated action on, SDH. The NZ case suggests that national-level social monitoring provides a valuable tool for raising awareness of SDH across government and civil society. A number of strategies could improve social reports' effectiveness in stimulating

  19. Equipment management guide. Improving the drug distribution process--do you need an automated decentralized pharmacy dispensing system?

    PubMed

    1996-12-01

    In this Equipment Management Guide, we provide guidance to help hospitals determine whether implementing an automated decentralized pharmacy dispensing system (ADPDS) will be an effective way to improve their drug distribution process. We describe the ADPDSs themselves and then discuss factors that hospitals should consider before deciding on such a system. Specifically, we identify several areas that many pharmacies target for improvement and discuss whether and how an ADPDS can help the facility make the desired improvements. We also provide guidance for determining the cost-effectiveness of such a system, as well as for selecting a system that will most appropriately meet the hospital's needs. In the Evaluation that follows this Guide, we present our criteria for evaluating ADPDSs and the results of our testing of three such systems.

  20. A collaborative clinical and population-based curriculum for medical students to address primary care needs of the homeless in New York City shelters : Teaching homeless healthcare to medical students.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Gaughran, Margaret; Sckell, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    Background Millions of Americans experience homelessness annually. Medical providers do not receive adequate training in primary care of the homeless.Methods Starting in 2012, a comprehensive curriculum was offered to medical students during their family medicine or ambulatory clerkship, covering clinical, social and advocacy, population-based, and policy aspects. Students were taught to: elicit specific social history, explore health expectations, and assess barriers to healthcare; evaluate clinical conditions specific to the homeless and develop plans for care tailored toward patients' medical and social needs; collaborate with shelter staff and community organizations to improve disease management and engage in advocacy efforts. A mixed methods design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills including pre- and post-curriculum surveys, debriefing sessions, and observed clinical skills.Results The mean age of the students (n = 30) was 26.5 years; 55 % were female. The overall scores improved significantly in knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy domains using paired t‑test (p < 0.01). Specific skills in evaluating mental health, substance abuse, and risky behaviours improved significantly (p < 0.05). In evaluation of communication skills, the majority were rated as having 'outstanding rapport with patients.'Conclusions Comprehensive and ongoing clinical component in shelter clinics, complementary teaching, experienced faculty, and working relationship and collaboration with community organizations were key elements.

  1. A Need for Improved Training Interventions for the Remediation of Impairments in Social Functioning following Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, David M.; Dal Monte, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social functioning deficits are a prominent feature of many neurological and psychiatric conditions, and may include disruption in the acquisition or application of basic or complex social skills. Such disturbances are often resistant to treatment, and individuals with such conditions are often faced with lifelong difficulties in maintaining personal relationships, employment, and independent living. In recent years, a number of psychosocial treatments have been developed to address this growing problem. In this article, we review studies investigating the use of psychosocial training interventions in individuals with acquired brain injuries, which frequently require intervention for impairments in cognitive and social functioning. We then discuss limitations of these studies and highlight specific areas in which such treatments might be improved in the future. PMID:21121768

  2. Establishing a culture of care, conscience, and responsibility: addressing the improvement of scientific discovery and animal welfare through science-based performance standards.

    PubMed

    Klein, H J; Bayne, K A

    2007-01-01

    Science-based performance standards offer a viable means of reducing regulatory burden while ensuring that research animal welfare and high-quality research data are realized. Unlike rigid regulations, science-based performance standards evolve as new information becomes available, thereby allowing new discoveries to be implemented in a timely manner and in a way that more effectively benefits the animals and the science. The implementation of performance standards requires a well-coordinated institutional team composed of the administration, research staff, the institutional animal care and use committee, professional and technical animal care personnel, occupational health and safety staff, and physical plant staff. This animal program team is best supported in an institutional environment that reflects a culture of care, compliance, and responsibility. In such a culture, the professional judgment exercised by the team is well grounded in meeting the diverse needs of the program's customers, who include the animals, the researchers, and research stakeholders such as the public. The institutional culture of care, compliance, and responsibility fosters workplace integrity, an ethics-based decision-making paradigm, sound understanding of institutional expectations through good communication and clear lines of authority, the hiring and retention of trained and well-qualified individuals, and a system for continuous development and improvement of the program.

  3. Societal need for improved understanding of climate change, anthropogenic impacts, and geo-hazard warning drive development of ocean observatories in European Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Henry A.; André, Michel; Beranzoli, Laura; Çağatay, M. Namik; Colaço, Ana; Cannat, Mathilde; Dañobeitia, Juanjo J.; Favali, Paolo; Géli, Louis; Gillooly, Michael; Greinert, Jens; Hall, Per O. J.; Huber, Robert; Karstensen, Johannes; Lampitt, Richard S.; Larkin, Kate E.; Lykousis, Vasilios; Mienert, Jürgen; Miguel Miranda, J.; Person, Roland; Priede, Imants G.; Puillat, Ingrid; Thomsen, Laurenz; Waldmann, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    Society’s needs for a network of in situ ocean observing systems cross many areas of earth and marine science. Here we review the science themes that benefit from data supplied from ocean observatories. Understanding from existing studies is fragmented to the extent that it lacks the coherent long-term monitoring needed to address questions at the scales essential to understand climate change and improve geo-hazard early warning. Data sets from the deep sea are particularly rare with long-term data available from only a few locations worldwide. These science areas have impacts on societal health and well-being and our awareness of ocean function in a shifting climate. Substantial efforts are underway to realise a network of open-ocean observatories around European Seas that will operate over multiple decades. Some systems are already collecting high-resolution data from surface, water column, seafloor, and sub-seafloor sensors linked to shore by satellite or cable connection in real or near-real time, along with samples and other data collected in a delayed mode. We expect that such observatories will contribute to answering major ocean science questions including: How can monitoring of factors such as seismic activity, pore fluid chemistry and pressure, and gas hydrate stability improve seismic, slope failure, and tsunami warning? What aspects of physical oceanography, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystems will be most sensitive to climatic and anthropogenic change? What are natural versus anthropogenic changes? Most fundamentally, how are marine processes that occur at differing scales related? The development of ocean observatories provides a substantial opportunity for ocean science to evolve in Europe. Here we also describe some basic attributes of network design. Observatory networks provide the means to coordinate and integrate the collection of standardised data capable of bridging measurement scales across a dispersed area in European Seas adding needed

  4. Executive function needs to be targeted to improve social functioning with Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Penadés, Rafael; Catalán, Rosa; Puig, Olga; Masana, Guillem; Pujol, Núria; Navarro, Víctor; Guarch, Joana; Gastó, Cristóbal

    2010-05-15

    While the role of impaired cognition in accounting for functional outcome in schizophrenia is generally established, the relationship between cognitive and functional change in the context of treatments is far from clear. The current paper tries to identify which cognitive changes lead to improvements in daily functioning among persons with chronic schizophrenia who had current negative symptoms and evidenced neuropsychological impairments. In a previous work, Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) was compared with a control therapy, involving similar length of therapist contact but different targets. At the end of treatment, CRT conferred a benefit to people with schizophrenia in cognition and functioning [Schizophrenia Research, 87 (2006) 323-331]. Subsequently, analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were conducted with baseline and cognitive change scores as covariates to test whether cognitive change predicted change in functioning. Additionally, statistical tests to establish the mediation path with significant variables were performed. Although verbal memory, but not executive functioning, was associated with functioning at baseline, it was the improvement in executive functioning that predicted improved daily functioning. Verbal memory played a mediator role in the change process. Consequently, in order to improve daily functioning with CRT, executive function still needs to be targeted in despite of multiple cognitive impairments being present.

  5. An LCA researcher's wish list--data and emission models needed to improve LCA studies of animal production.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, C; Henriksson, M; Berglund, M

    2013-06-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in environmental systems analysis of livestock production, resulting in a significant number of studies with a holistic approach often based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The growing public interest in global warming has added to this development; guidelines for carbon footprint (CF) accounting have been developed, including for greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting of animal products. Here we give an overview of methods for estimating GHG emissions, with emphasis on nitrous oxide, methane and carbon from land use change, presently used in LCA/CF studies of animal products. We discuss where methods and data availability for GHGs and nitrogen (N) compounds most urgently need to be improved in order to produce more accurate environmental assessments of livestock production. We conclude that the top priority is to improve models for N fluxes and emissions from soils and to implement soil carbon change models in LCA/CF studies of animal products. We also point at the need for more farm data and studies measuring emissions from soils, manure and livestock in developing countries.

  6. Quantifying accessibility and use of improved sanitation: towards a comprehensive indicator of the need for sanitation interventions

    PubMed Central

    Park, M. J.; Clements, A. C. A.; Gray, D. J.; Sadler, R.; Laksono, B.; Stewart, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent diseases associated with inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene, people needing latrines and behavioural interventions must be identified. We compared two indicators that could be used to identify those people. Indicator 1 of household latrine coverage was a simple Yes/No response to the question “Does your household have a latrine?” Indicator 2 was more comprehensive, combining questions about defecation behaviour with observations of latrine conditions. Using a standardized procedure and questionnaire, trained research assistants collected data from 6,599 residents of 16 rural villages in Indonesia. Indicator 1 identified 30.3% as not having a household latrine, while Indicator 2 identified 56.0% as using unimproved sanitation. Indicator 2 thus identified an additional 1,710 people who were missed by Indicator 1. Those 1,710 people were of lower socioeconomic status (p < 0.001), and a smaller percentage practiced appropriate hand-washing (p < 0.02). These results show how a good indicator of need for sanitation and hygiene interventions can combine evidences of both access and use, from self-reports and objective observation. Such an indicator can inform decisions about sanitation-related interventions and about scaling deworming programmes up or down. Further, a comprehensive and locally relevant indicator allows improved targeting to those most in need of a hygiene-behaviour intervention. PMID:27452598

  7. Digital Versatile Rewritable Disc (DVD-RAM) Complementary Allocated Pit Address (CAPA) Signal and Tracking Error Signal Detection Method; Improving Objective Lens Radial Shift Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Takashi; Satoh, Hiroharu; Ohsawa, Hideki

    1998-04-01

    The complementary allocated pit address (CAPA) signal in a digital versatile rewritable disc (DVD-RAM) is susceptible to an objective lens radial shift; the reduction of its signal amplitude occurs and the S/N ratio decreases. To alleviate this situation, we propose a new readout signal processing scheme, the center separate detection method (CSD) of discarding a large amount of the 0-th diffracted light beam from the disc. We confirmed the expected results by numerical simulation.

  8. Non-adherence in children with asthma reviewed: The need for improvement of asthma care and medical education.

    PubMed

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-05-01

    Adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy is a key determinant of asthma control. Therefore, improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids is the most effective method through which healthcare providers can help children with uncontrolled asthma. However, identifying non-adherent patients is difficult, and electronic monitoring is the only reliable method to assess adherence. (Non-)adherence is a complex behavioural process influenced by many interacting factors. Intentional barriers to adherence are common; driven by illness perceptions and medication beliefs, patients and parents deliberately choose not to follow the doctor's recommendations. Common non-intentional barriers are related to family routines, child-raising issues, and to social issues such as poverty. Effective interventions improving adherence are complex, because they take intentional and non-intentional barriers to adherence into account. There is evidence that comprehensive, guideline-based asthma self-management programmes can be successful, with excellent adherence and good asthma control. Patient-centred care focused on healthcare provider-patient/parent collaboration is the key factor determining the success of guided self-management programmes. Such care should focus on shared decision-making as this has been shown to improve adherence and healthcare outcomes. Current asthma care falls short because many physicians fail to adhere to asthma guidelines in their diagnostic approach and therapeutic prescriptions, and because of the lack of application of patient-centred health care. Increased awareness of the importance of patient-centred communication and increased training in patient-centred communication skills of undergraduates and experienced attending physicians are needed to improve adherence to daily controller therapy and asthma control in children with asthma.

  9. Improving Care in Pediatric Neuro-oncology Patients:An Overview of the Unique Needs of Children with Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Cheryl; Petriccione, Mary; Donzelli, Maria; Pottenger, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumors in childhood, accounting for almost 25% of all childhood cancer, second only to leukemia. Childhood CNS tumors encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Any brain tumor can be associated with significant morbidity, even when low grade, and mortality from childhood CNS tumors is disproportionately high compared to other childhood malignancies. Management of children with CNS tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population, beyond general oncology care. Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs during treatment, as cancer survivors, and at end of life. A multidisciplinary team approach, including advanced practice nurses with a specialty in neuro-oncology, allows for better supportive care. Knowledge of the unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors, and the appropriate interventions required, allows for improved quality of life. PMID:26245798

  10. Improving Care in Pediatric Neuro-oncology Patients: An Overview of the Unique Needs of Children With Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cheryl; Petriccione, Mary; Donzelli, Maria; Pottenger, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumors in childhood, accounting for almost 25% of all childhood cancer, second only to leukemia. Pediatric central nervous system tumors encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Any brain tumor can be associated with significant morbidity, even when low grade, and mortality from pediatric central nervous system tumors is disproportionately high compared to other childhood malignancies. Management of children with central nervous system tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population, beyond general oncology care. Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs during treatment, as cancer survivors, and at end of life. A multidisciplinary team approach, including advanced practice nurses with a specialty in neuro-oncology, allows for better supportive care. Knowledge of the unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors, and the appropriate interventions required, allows for improved quality of life.

  11. Staff Preparation, Reward, and Support: Are Quality Rating and Improvement Systems Addressing All of the Key Ingredients Necessary for Change? Policy Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Lea J. E.; Whitebook, Marcy; Connors, Maia; Darrah, Rory

    2011-01-01

    Reflecting the growing momentum in support of quality rating and improvement systems (QRISs) as a key strategy to improve early care and education quality, significant amounts of public dollars have been devoted to their development and implementation. In this brief, the authors report on their investigation of both quality rating and improvement…

  12. Ontario's primary care reforms have transformed the local care landscape, but a plan is needed for ongoing improvement.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Brian; Glazier, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Primary care in Ontario, Canada, has undergone a series of reforms designed to improve access to care, patient and provider satisfaction, care quality, and health system efficiency and sustainability. We highlight key features of the reforms, which included patient enrollment with a primary care provider; funding for interprofessional primary care organizations; and physician reimbursement based on varying blends of fee-for-service, capitation, and pay-for-performance. With nearly 75 percent of Ontario's population now enrolled in these new models, total payments to primary care physicians increased by 32 percent between 2006 and 2010, and the proportion of Ontario primary care physicians who reported overall satisfaction with the practice of medicine rose from 76 percent in 2009 to 84 percent in 2012. However, primary care in Ontario also faces challenges. There is no meaningful performance measurement system that tracks the impact of these innovations, for example. A better system of risk adjustment is also needed in capitated plans so that groups have the incentive to take on high-need patients. Ongoing investment in these models is required despite fiscal constraints. We recommend a clearly articulated policy road map to continue the transformation.

  13. Changing Crohn's disease management: need for new goals and indices to prevent disability and improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hommes, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Emery, Paul; Greco, Marco; Sandborn, William J

    2012-02-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive, inflammatory condition. The recent IMPACT survey showed that it has a major impact on quality of life including fatigue, relationships and employment. Although patients are generally satisfied with healthcare services, improvements are needed in the timeliness of diagnosis and in communication between patients and healthcare professionals. Evidence is lacking about what constitutes quality of care and value to patients. Moving forward, value should become the primary goal of healthcare delivery, which is likely to require new treatment goals. Indeed, goals are already evolving beyond symptom control towards deep remission, which encompasses clinical remission together with mucosal healing. The ultimate goals are to prevent bowel damage, reduce long-term disability and maintain normal quality of life. A new treat-to-target approach, with increased monitoring and tighter control of symptoms and inflammation, will be needed. This approach will be enabled by use of biomarkers and new indices such as the Lémann score, which assesses the extent and severity of bowel damage at a specific time-point and over time, and a new disability index for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. These principles have been adopted for managing rheumatoid arthritis where there is now a focus on treat-to-target to achieve early remission. Lessons from rheumatoid arthritis can be translated to Crohn's disease.

  14. ["What you will": Results of an Empirical Analysis of the Need to Improve Work-life Balance for Physicians].

    PubMed

    Jerg-Bretzke, L; Krüsmann, P; Traue, H C; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, K

    2016-02-15

    Study Aims: This study assessed the perceived need for clinics to improve work-life balance of physicians. Hospitals are increasingly facing demands to offer physicians working conditions that allow greater balance between family life and pursuit of career. Simultaneously, hospitals could consider this an opportunity to stand out as attractive employers. Methods: N=120 doctors of the medical faculty and N=679 medical students in their premedical and clinical training participated online. Results: The results of the Work-Family/Family-Work Conflict Scale (WFC/FWC) showed physicians to have a decreased work/life balance when starting to work professionally, especially with a child. Ninety percent of the respondents considered the following arrangements to be especially helpful: temporary work interruptions in an emergency, part-time positions or emergency childcare. The doctors also expressed their wish to be actively supported by their supervisors on the topic of work/life balance. Conclusion: This analysis on work-family balance shows the need for change in the studied samples. Based on the measures that were determined to be helpful, hospitals can make conclusions about what concrete steps of action can be taken. Additionally, WFC/FWC could be used as a standardized analysis measure to assess the load imposed on physicians by family on work place and vice versa.

  15. Commentary: Urgently needed: a safe place for self-assessment on the path to maintaining competence and improving performance.

    PubMed

    Bellande, Bruce J; Winicur, Zev M; Cox, Kathleen M

    2010-01-01

    Traditional continuing medical education (CME), necessary for keeping physicians current and competent, is insufficient in translating physician practice into better patient outcomes. CME, then, must be transformed from a system of episodic interventions to a more personalized, contextual, flexible, and targeted process within a continuing professional development framework. The core of this transformation must be a formal process of physician self-assessment. Unfortunately, health care providers tend toward inaccurate self-assessment, regardless of training, specialty, or manner of self-assessment. Therefore, the development of an external validation system conducted by credible, informal peer review in a safe environment is essential. Clinicians must be able to access practice and patient data without concerns about accuracy, timeliness, confidentiality, attribution, or unintended consequences. New analytical tools are also needed to illuminate the data compilations and present them in compelling, individualized, and comparative formats. However, such developmental work will not be possible without strong community leadership coordinating a collaboration of resources and a sharing of data. Ensuring physician competence has long been an issue for medical societies, state licensing boards, and others invested in improving patient care. Now it's time to get serious. Current efforts at massive health care reform provide the perfect opportunity to fully integrate physician self-assessment and performance improvement into the larger health care system through a continuing professional development model. Practitioners in CME have been far too complacent with the current practices. A shift to a focused and dedicated sense of urgency must occur to ensure physicians' continuous learning and change.

  16. The Fukushima nuclear crisis reemphasizes the need for improved risk communication and better use of social media.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Lean, Mei-Li

    2012-09-01

    The potential of social media has expanded far beyond the initial function of social communication among a network of friends. It has become an increasingly important tool in risk communication to allow the dissemination of timely and accurate information to global citizens to make more informed choices regarding a particular crisis. The Fukushima nuclear crisis is an example where the potential of social media was not fully tapped. This caused undue stress and distrust of authorities. While the use of social media in this crisis could have altered significantly the level of trust in authorities and others, two additional points should be considered. One point is the use of plain language versus scientific language in order to reach a wider audience. The other is an urgent need to improve public information especially in the event of a nuclear emergency and to enhance educational efforts and action by improving radiological protection communication from regulatory bodies and international agencies. These are points that also play a large role in the use of social media.

  17. Albinism: Improving Teacher and Caregiver Strategies for Meeting the Special Needs of Children with the Visual Disability of Ocular Albinism or Oculocutaneous Albinism (Birth to Age 14).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Julia Robertson

    This practicum report addresses the educational needs of students with the visual disability of ocular or oculocutaneous albinism. Two booklets were developed, published, and distributed--one for regular education teachers of children with albinism and one specifically about the very young child with albinism. The booklets discuss the special…

  18. Military Personnel: Joint Officer Development Has Improved, But a Strategic Approach Is Needed. Report to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to the need of military leaders to be better prepared to plan, support, and conduct joint (multi-service and multi-national) operations, Congress enacted the Goldwater- Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Positive steps were taken to implement provisions in the Act that address the education, assignment, and…

  19. Defense Logistics: Greater Awareness of Recommendations and Improvements in Data Quality Needed to Resolve Container-Management Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    carrier shipping containers to transport supplies worldwide. Container management has been a long-standing challenge. DOD has paid detention fees ...Afghanistan, where fees continue to accrue. GAO was asked to review DOD’s efforts to address container- management challenges and the accumulation...of detention fees . This report assesses the extent to which (1) DOD policy and guidance incorporate recommendations addressing container

  20. Malnutrition in older adults - urgent need for action: a plea for improving the nutritional situation of older adults.

    PubMed

    Volkert, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades, malnutrition has attracted increasing scientific attention and is by now regarded as a true geriatric syndrome characterized by multifactorial causality, identified by symptoms and accompanied by frailty, disability and poor outcome. This viewpoint summarizes our present knowledge and the usual current handling of malnutrition in older people and highlights the urgent need for action in this field. Age-related changes in the complex system of appetite regulation, resulting in the so-called anorexia of aging, predispose older adults to a decrease in food intake which may lead to malnutrition, if additional risk factors like health or social problems occur. Consequently, malnutrition is widespread in the older population, notably in those who are institutionalized. Despite the fact that effective interventions are available, prevention and treatment of malnutrition do not currently receive appropriate attention. As an important first step towards better awareness, screening for malnutrition should become a mandatory integral part of the comprehensive geriatric assessment. Furthermore, practical local guidelines should be implemented in all geriatric hospital wards and nursing homes in order to improve nutritional care in the daily routine. Important to note is that reasonable nutritional management is not possible without qualified staff in adequate numbers allowing appropriate individual nutritional care. Regarding future research, studies at the cellular, metabolic and clinical levels and the linking of information from different research approaches are required to better understand the transition from good nutritional health and independence of old people to malnutrition, functional impairment and poor health. In parallel to well-designed observational and intervention studies, standardized documentation of nutritional information in daily routine would enable the uniform collection of data for research as well as for political decisions