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Sample records for adefovir dipivoxil entecavir

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of lamivudine, telbivudine, and entecavir in treatment of chronic hepatitis B with adefovir dipivoxil resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiliang; Liu, Yan; Qiu, Ping; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Xu, Linfang; Wen, Ping; Wen, Jianbo; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of lamivudine (LMV), telbivudine (LdT), and entecavir (ETV) in treatment of chronic hepatitis B with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) resistance. Two hundred and fifty-two patients were recruited and screened for resistance to ADV and randomly assigned into three groups: LMV + ADV, LdT + ADV, and ETV + ADV. The ratio of biochemical response, virological response, seroconversion of hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis Be antibody (HBeAb), viral breakthrough, and the cost and effectiveness of treatments were analyzed. A comparison of the results of the ratio of biochemical response, virological response and seroconversion of HBeAg/HBeAb, showed no statistical difference between the three groups, with the economic cost of LMV + ADV the lowest, LdT + ADV the middle, and ETV + ADV the highest. The side effects of the three plans are all rare and tolerable. LMV + ADV is the optimal rescue strategy, and LdT + ADV the alternative selection in the economically less developed regions, while ETV + ADV was used in the economically developed regions. PMID:26082614

  2. Optimized combination therapies with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and lamivudine, telbivudine, or entecavir may be effective for chronic hepatitis B patients with a suboptimal response to ADV monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyong; Jie, Yusheng; You, Xu; Shi, Hong; Zhang, Min; Wu, Yuankai; Lin, Guoli; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhiliang; Chong, Yutian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify high risk factors in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients for suboptimal response to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) monotherapy, and to assess the efficacy of optimized therapy combining ADV with lamivudine (LAM), telbivudine (LdT), or entecavir (ETV) in patients with a suboptimal response to ADV alone. Methods: Suboptimal response to ADV monotherapy was defined as having a decline in serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level of more than 1 log compared to baseline, but with viremia still detectable (HBV DNA ≥ 100 IU/mL), after 48 weeks of therapy. All patients who received ADV monotherapy in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for risk factor analysis. Patients who showed suboptimal response completed at least 12 months of optimized combination therapy consisting of ADV plus LAM, ADV plus LdT, ADV plus ETV, or continuous ADV monotherapy. The primary outcome measurement was complete viral suppression, indicated by a reduction of HBV DNA to undetectable levels (CVS, with HBV DNA < 100 IU/mL). Secondary outcome measures were HBeAg seroconversion for HBeAg-positive patients, HBsAg loss, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) normalization and virological breakthrough rates. Results: Of 521 patients who received ADV monotherapy, 170 showed a suboptimal response. These were grouped for continued therapy as follows: 34 in group A (continuous ADV monotherapy), 55 in group B (ADV plus LAM), 38 in group C (ADV plus LdT), and 43 in group D (ADV plus ETV). Using a logistic model, five conditions were identified as high risk factors for suboptimal response: presence of the tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) HBV DNA polymerase mutation; being HBeAg positive; having a high baseline level of HBV DNA; having a primary virological non-response to ADV; and [initial virological response] to ADV. After 48 weeks of ADV monotherapy, there were no withdrawn patients who had experienced side

  3. [Adefovir dipivoxil-induced Fanconi syndrome and hypophosphatemic osteomalacia associated with muscular weakness in a patient with chronic hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Dong, Guang-fu; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Yue-sheng

    2011-11-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil is commonly used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. The renal toxicity of adefovir dipivoxil is dose- and time-related, occurring often in patients with a daily dose over 30 mg and those with impaired renal function. We report a case of chronic hepatitis B with a history of taking adefovir dipivoxil at 10 mg/day for 4 years. The patient complained of lumbosacral and joint pain and had the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or spondyloarthropathy in several hospitals before admission in our hospital. A diagnosis of acquired Fanconi syndrome and hypophosphatemia osteomalacia associated with progressive muscular weakness was made eventually. We reviewed the literature and found reports of only fewer than 10 similar cases. Clinical attention should be given to kidney damage induced by adefovir dipivoxil.

  4. Coformer selection based on degradation pathway of drugs: a case study of adefovir dipivoxil-saccharin and adefovir dipivoxil-nicotinamide cocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Gao, Jing; Liu, Ziling; Kan, Hongliang; Zu, Hui; Sun, Wanjin; Zhang, Jianjun; Qian, Shuai

    2012-11-15

    Adefovir dipivoxil (AD) is a bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug of adefovir with chemical stability problem. It undergoes two degradation pathways including hydrolysis and dimerization during storage. Pharmaceutical cocrystallization exhibits a promising approach to enhance aqueous solubility as well as physicochemical stability. In this study we attempted to prepare and investigate the physiochemical properties of AD cocrystals, which were formed with two coformers having different acidity and alkalinity (weakly acidic saccharin (SAC) and weakly basic nicotinamide (NCT)). The presence of different coformer molecules along with AD resulted in altered physicochemical properties. AD-SAC cocrystal showed great improvement in solubility and chemical stability, while AD-NCT did not. Several potential factors giving rise to different solid-state properties were summarized. Different coformers resulted in different cocrystal formation, packing style and hydrogen bond formation. This study could provide the coformer selection strategy based on degradation pathways for some unstable drugs in pharmaceutical cocrystal design.

  5. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2016-06-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  6. Structures and physical properties of the cocrystals of adefovir dipivoxil with dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungyup; Lee, Jonghwi; Kim, Il Won

    2013-06-01

    The cocrystallization of adefovir dipivoxil (AD) with suberic acid (SUB) or succinic acid (SUC) was examined. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the structures of AD/SUB and AD/SUC cocrystals. Both cocrystals were formed via multiple hydrogen bonds between the adenine part of AD and the carboxylic acid groups of SUB or SUC. Longer SUB effectively dispersed AD molecules, and AD hydrogen-bonded only to SUB. When shorter SUC was used, AD formed hydrogen bonding with both SUC and adjacent AD. As a result, the cocrystal compositions were AD/SUB=1:1 and AD/SUC=2:1. Both cocrystals displayed superior thermal stability and increased aqueous solubility. The present study demonstrated that the adenine and similar structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients could be used to produce cocrystals of improved physical properties.

  7. Pathological femoral fractures due to osteomalacia associated with adefovir dipivoxil treatment for hepatitis B: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old man who underwent total hip arthroplasty for treatment of pathologic femoral neck fracture associated with adefovir dipivoxil-induced osteomalacia. He had a 13-month history of bone pain involving his shoulders, hips, and knee. He received adefovir dipivoxil for treatment of lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus infection for 5 years before the occurrence of femoral neck fracture. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of osteomalacia and pathological hip fracture caused by drug-induced renal dysfunction, which results in Fanconi’s syndrome. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1600344696739249 PMID:22906214

  8. Th1 and Th2 immune response in chronic hepatitis B patients during a long-term treatment with adefovir dipivoxil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfang; Ma, Zhenhua; Xin, Guijie; Yan, Hongqing; Li, Wanyu; Xu, Huining; Hao, Chunhai; Niu, Junqi; Zhao, Pingwei

    2010-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil treatment has significantly improved the outcome of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, it remains largely unknown how immune system responds to the treatment. Chronic HBV patients were treated with adefovir dipivoxil and examined for serum HBV DNA loads, cytokines, and T helper (Th1) and 2 (Th2) cytokine producing T cells during 104 weeks of the treatment. Th1/Th2 cytokines producing T cells were significantly lower in chronic HBV patients as compared to normal individuals. Adefovir dipivoxil treatment led to the increase of Th1/Th2 cytokines producing T cells and serum cytokine levels in association with the decline of HVB DNA load. In contrast, Th1/Th2 cytokines producing T cells remained lower in one patient detected with adefovir dipivoxil resistant HBV A181T/V mutation. This study has established inverse correlation of the increase of Th1/Th2 immunity and the decline of HBV DNA load in chronic HBV patients during adefovir dipivoxil treatment. PMID:21127728

  9. Application of ionic liquid to polymorphic transformation of anti-viral/HIV drug adefovir dipivoxil.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Hun; Jin, Feng; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Hyung Chul; Kim, Jae Sun; Kim, Hyuk Min; Kiyonga, Alice Nguvoko; Min, Dong Sun; Youn, Wonno; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Kiwon

    2016-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are defined as salts with a melting point below 100 °C. ILs have received increasing attention as new alternative to organic solvents because of their unique physicochemical properties. Therefore, this study was conducted in the purpose to present the efficacy of ILs as new solvents capable to control the Polymorphic transformation phenomenon. Here, the polymorphic transformation phenomenon of adefovir dipivoxil, an efficient antiviral active pharmaceutical ingredient on human immunodeficiency virus, was investigated. The phase transformation phenomenon from the metastable polymorph, new form (NF) to the stable polymorph, Form-X in 1-allyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (AEImBF4) and 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BDMImBF4) ILs solutions was observed utilizing the solvent-mediated phase transformation method The thermodynamic factors, AEImBF4/BDMImBF4 solvent composition ratio of 3:7-6:4 and the temperature in range of 25-100 °C, as well as the dynamic factor, the rational speed in range of 300-1000 rpm were parameters studied in this experiment. The thermodynamic and dynamic equations involving nucleation and mass transfer were applied for the quantitative analysis. The result of the present study confirmed the use of ILs as substitute solvent for volatile organic solvents, and demonstrated the efficacy of ILs as potential solvent-media to control the polymorphic transformation.

  10. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  11. Effect of adefovir dipivoxil on T cell immune function in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and hepatocirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Liting; Fu, Qilin; Huang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the T cell immune function in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients at the compensated and decompensated stage following treatment with adefovir dipivoxil. A total of 104 patients diagnosed with hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis during the period from October 2013 to October 2014 were enrolled in the study. Among the cases, there were 56 cases at compensated stage, and another 48 at decompensated stage. Adefovir dipivoxil was administered for antiviral therapy (10 mg/time, 1 time/day, for a total of 24 weeks), and we compared the virus disappearance rate, liver function improvement and T cell immune function between the two groups before and after treatment. The difference between the virus disappearance rate in the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The decreased level of ALT decrease in the compensated group was significantly higher than that in the decompensated group, while the increased level of albumin in the compensated group was significantly higher as well. The differences showed statistical significance (P<0.05). After treatment, the level of CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio were higher than before treatment, while the level of CD8+ was lower after treatment than before treatment in the two groups. The differences all showed statistical significance (P<0.05). The CD4+CXCR5+ T follicular helper (TFH) cell level in the two groups was higher after treatment, as was interleukin-2 and interferon-γ. The differences all showed statistical significance (P<0.05). As for comparison between groups, the difference had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Adefovir dipivoxil treatment can improve T cell immune function at the compensated and decompensated stages in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients. This may be associated with virus disappearance and liver function improvement.

  12. Effect of adefovir dipivoxil on T cell immune function in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and hepatocirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Liting; Fu, Qilin; Huang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the T cell immune function in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients at the compensated and decompensated stage following treatment with adefovir dipivoxil. A total of 104 patients diagnosed with hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis during the period from October 2013 to October 2014 were enrolled in the study. Among the cases, there were 56 cases at compensated stage, and another 48 at decompensated stage. Adefovir dipivoxil was administered for antiviral therapy (10 mg/time, 1 time/day, for a total of 24 weeks), and we compared the virus disappearance rate, liver function improvement and T cell immune function between the two groups before and after treatment. The difference between the virus disappearance rate in the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The decreased level of ALT decrease in the compensated group was significantly higher than that in the decompensated group, while the increased level of albumin in the compensated group was significantly higher as well. The differences showed statistical significance (P<0.05). After treatment, the level of CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio were higher than before treatment, while the level of CD8+ was lower after treatment than before treatment in the two groups. The differences all showed statistical significance (P<0.05). The CD4+CXCR5+ T follicular helper (TFH) cell level in the two groups was higher after treatment, as was interleukin-2 and interferon-γ. The differences all showed statistical significance (P<0.05). As for comparison between groups, the difference had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Adefovir dipivoxil treatment can improve T cell immune function at the compensated and decompensated stages in chronic hepatitis B hepatocirrhosis patients. This may be associated with virus disappearance and liver function improvement. PMID:27698751

  13. Mechanism study on stability enhancement of adefovir dipivoxil by cocrystallization: Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rui-Zhen; Sun, Peng-Jie; Tao, Qian; Yao, Jia; Chen, Jia-Mei; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which cocrystallization can enhance the stability of adefovir dipivoxil (AD), a diester prodrug of adefovir with known chemical stability problem. Three multi-component crystals of AD with biologically safe coformers, including gallic acid cocrystal hydrate (1:1:1), salicylate salt (1:1), and maleate salt (1:1) were prepared and characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. DVS measurements and stability tests were applied to evaluate the stability. The new crystalline phases exhibit improved stability compared to pure drug in the order AD gallic acid cocrystal>AD maleate>AD salicylate>AD form I. Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation studies demonstrate that the stability enhancement mechanism by cocrystallization involves (1) inhibition of hydrolysis of AD by replacement of drug-drug homosynthons by stronger drug-coformer heterosynthons at adenine fragments; (2) suppression of dimerization of AD by separation of adenine fragments by inserting coformers in crystal lattices; (3) further reducing rates of hydrolysis by forming hydrogen bonds with hydrate water at phosphoryl fragments. This study has important implications for use of cocrystallization approach to some easily degradable drugs in pharmaceutical. PMID:26462447

  14. Adefovir

    MedlinePlus

    Adefovir is used to treat chronic (long-term) hepatitis B infection (swelling of the liver caused by a ... analogs. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the body. Adefovir will not ...

  15. Entecavir

    MedlinePlus

    Entecavir is used to treat chronic (long-term) hepatitis B infection (swelling of the liver caused by a ... analogs. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the body. Entecavir does not ...

  16. Urinary β-2 Microglobulin Levels Sensitively Altered in an Osteomalacia Patient Receiving Add-on Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Junko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyoaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Hirase, Sho; Ito, Tatsuo; Morishima, Takkan; Otake, Kazuo; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, ADV may provoke renal injury resulting in osteomalacia, and this side effect is seldom recognized until bone fractures emerge. We herein present a 66-year-old woman with HBV infection who received ADV for 6 years. Although she exhibited no sign of bone fractures, her urinary β-2 microglobulin (β2MG) level increased to 83,837 μg/L and scintigraphy revealed minimal fractures of the third rib. ADV was subsequently reduced and her urinary β2MG rapidly fell to 3,637 μg/L. Conversely, her urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase levels did not respond. PMID:27301512

  17. Mechanism of Adefovir, Tenofovir and Entecavir Resistance: Molecular Modeling Studies of How A Novel Anti-HBV Agent (FMCA) Can Overcome the Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Konreddy, A K; Chu, C K

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of significant improvement in the area of anti-HBV therapy, resistance and cross-resistance against available therapeutic agents are the major consideration in drug discovery of new agents. The present study is to obtain the insight of the molecular basis of drug resistance conferred by the B and C domain mutations of HBV-polymerase on the binding affinity of four anti-HBV agents [Adefovir (ADV), Tenofovir (TNF), Entecavir (ETV) & 2'-Fluoro-6'-methylene-carbocyclic adenosine (FMCA)]. In this regard, homology modeled structure of HBV polymerase was used for minimization, conformational search and Glide XP docking followed by binding energy calculation on wild-type as well as on mutant HBV-polymerases (N236T, L180M+M204V+S202G & A194T). Our studies suggest a significant correlation between the fold resistances and the binding affinity of anti-HBV nucleosides. The domain B residue, L180 is indirectly associated with other active-site hydrophobic residues such as A87, F88 and M204, whereas the domain C residue, M204 is closely associated with sugar/pseudosugar ring positioning in the active site. These hydrophobic residues can directly influence the interaction of the incoming nucleoside triphosphates and change the binding efficacy. The carbohydrate ring part of natural substrate dATP, dGTP, FMCA and ETV, are occupied in similar passion in the grooves of HBV polymerase active site. The exocyclic double bond of Entecavir and FMCA occupies in the backside hydrophobic pocket (made by residues A87, F88, L180and M204), which enhances the overall binding affinity. Additional hydrogen bonding interaction of 2'-fluorine of FMCA with R41 residue of polymerase promotes a positive binding in wild-type as well as in ADVr, ETVr and TNFr with respect to that of entecavir. PMID:26336997

  18. Entecavir: a review of its use in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in patients with decompensated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2011-12-24

    The oral deoxyguanosine nucleoside analogue entecavir (Baraclude®) has potent activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and a high genetic barrier to resistance. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in patients with decompensated liver disease, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Entecavir 1 mg/day was more effective than adefovir dipivoxil 10 mg/day in the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B and decompensated liver disease, according to the results of a randomized, open-label, multicentre trial. Patients were either nucleos(t)ide naive or lamivudine experienced. The reduction from baseline in HBV DNA levels at week 24 (primary endpoint) was significantly greater with entecavir than with adefovir dipivoxil. The proportion of patients with HBV DNA levels of <300 copies/mL was also significantly greater with entecavir than with adefovir dipivoxil at weeks 24, 48 and 96, as was the proportion of patients with ALT normalization. Entecavir 0.5 or 1 mg/day, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate 300 mg/day and a fixed-dose combination of emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate 200 mg/300 mg per day were effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in patients with decompensated liver disease, according to the 48-week analysis of a randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial, primarily designed to examine tolerability endpoints. In this trial, over one-third of patients had received previous therapy with lamivudine for ≥6 months. The efficacy of entecavir in treatment-naive patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis did not significantly differ from that seen in patients with chronic hepatitis B or compensated cirrhosis (compensated group), according to the results of a prospective, nonrandomized study. After 6 or 12 months of entecavir treatment, there were no significant differences between the decompensated and compensated groups in virological

  19. Comparison of the clinical outcomes between antiviral-naïve patients treated with entecavir and lamivudine-resistant patients receiving adefovir add-on lamivudine combination treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Soo Kyung; Yang, Hyo Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To analyze the effects of preexisting lamivudine (LAM) resistance and applying antiviral treatment (adefovir [ADV] add-on LAM combination treatment) on long-term treatment outcomes, and comparing the clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients receiving entecavir (ETV) monotherapy. Methods This study enrolled 73 antiviral-naïve patients who received 0.5-mg ETV as an initial therapy and 54 patients who received ADV add-on LAM combination treatment as a rescue therapy from July 2006 to July 2010. Results During 24-month treatments, the decreases in serum log10HBV-DNA values (copies/mL) were significantly greater in the antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV than the patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment. The biochemical response rates for alanine aminotransferase normalization at 6 months (ETV) and 12 months (ADV add-on LAM) were 90.4% (66/73) and 77.8% (42/54), respectively (P=0.048). A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that the rates of serologic response, viral breakthrough, and emergence of genotypic resistance did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. There were also no significant intergroup differences in the rates of disease progression (PD) and new development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Conclusion The long-term clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV and LAM-resistant patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment were comparable in terms of the emergence of HCC and disease progression. PMID:27729626

  20. Lamivudine-resistant rtL180M and rtM204I/V are persistently dominant during combination rescue therapy with entecavir and adefovir for hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; LIU, SHUANG; CHEN, YU; ZHENG, SUJUN; ZHOU, LI; LU, FENGMIN; DUAN, ZHONGPING

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir (ADV) sequential monotherapy was included in the 2005 Asia-Pacific guidelines for the management of patients with lamivudine (LAM) resistance. However, following the development of ADV resistance, the proportion of resistant variants during combined rescue therapy with ADV and entecavir (ETV) were unknown. The present study characterized the dynamics of resistant variants in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and LAM-resistant variants during antiviral therapy consisting of ADV monotherapy followed by ADV-ETV combination therapy. A total of 3 patients were selected from a cohort of 55 patients with CHB due to developing ADV resistance. The patients had been previously treated with LAM (100 mg daily) for 21–24 months. At the initiation of sequential monotherapy with ADV, LAM-resistant variants (rtM204V/I and rtL180M) were detected in the three patients. These patients developed ADV resistance during 19–30 months of ADV sequential monotherapy, and then switched their antiviral regimen to ADV-ETV combination therapy. During ADV monotherapy and ADV-ETV combination therapy, the patients were monitored every 3 months for the first year of therapy, and then every 6 months thereafter. A total of 30 serum samples were collected from the patients throughout the monitoring period. In total, 10 mutants that were associated with commonly-used antiviral drugs were detected by pyrosequencing. During ADV sequential monotherapy, LAM-resistant variants were gradually decreased, whereas ADV-resistant rtA181V/T and rtN236T variants gradually increased in the viral population. During 30–41 months of ADV-ETV combination therapy, viral load reduction was 2.59–3.28 log10 copies/ml; ADV-resistant variants rtA181T/V and rtN236T were undetectable following 11–24 months of combination therapy; and rtL180M and rtM204I/V remained dominant in the viral population. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that, in patients with LAM and ADV

  1. The Discovery and Development of a Potent Antiviral Drug, Entecavir, for the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Jamie; Innaimo, Steven; Lehman-Mckeeman, Lois; Llamoso, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Since the first approval of interferon for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 1992, six additional antivirals have been developed: pegylated interferon-alfa2a, and the oral antivirals lamivudine, adefovir, telbivudine, entecavir and tenofovir. The availability of animal models for HBV infection and hepatocyte cell culture led to the discovery and development of oral antivirals targeted at HBV polymerase and reverse transcriptase, which inhibit viral replication. The discovery and development of entecavir, the first oral anti-HBV drug with both potent antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to resistance, took more than 10 years before it was first approved in the USA. Since then, multiple real-life studies have provided data consistent with the findings of the registration trials and the long-term rollover study in terms of efficacy, resistance, and safety. Data from the long-term follow-up of patients enrolled in the registration studies showed that treatment with entecavir can lead to significant improvements in liver histopathology, and recent cohort studies have demonstrated that treatment with entecavir may reduce disease progression and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis B. In addition, real-life studies suggest that entecavir may reduce HCC recurrence and increase survival rates in patients with HBV-related HCC post-surgical resection. PMID:26357607

  2. Adefovir added to lamivudine for hepatitis B recurrent infection in refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia on prolonged therapy with Campath-1H.

    PubMed

    Cortelezzi, Agostino; Viganò, Mauro; Zilioli, Vittorio R; Fantini, Norma N; Pasquini, Maria C; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Colombo, Massimo; Lampertico, Pietro

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of severe reactivation of occult hepatitis B virus infection in a 49-year-old man, who was treated with high doses of chlorambucil for a Binet stage A B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). The patient was initially treated with lamivudine and subsequently with lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil combination therapy to control viral replication and allow for long-term anti-cancer chemotherapy with alemtuzumab (Campath-1H), which was introduced to rescue for a B-CLL relapse. During 20 months of anti-HBV therapy, ALT and HBV-DNA levels progressively declined and B-CLL was successfully kept under control by long-term alemtuzumab administration.

  3. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  4. A novel baseline hepatitis B virus sequencing-based strategy for predicting adefovir antiviral response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Shan, Xuefeng; Huang, Yao; Deng, Haijun; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Chen, Juan; Tang, Ni; Shan, You-Lan; Guo, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ailong

    2015-07-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is used as first-line monotherapy or rescue therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. In this study, we sought to identify nucleotide changes in the reverse transcriptase (RT) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) at baseline and explore their predictive value for ADV antiviral response. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) was utilized to determine HBV genetic variability within the RT region at baseline and during a 48-week ADV therapy. According to the viral load at the end of ADV treatment, all patients were classified into responders (HBV DNA level reduction of ⩾ 3 log 10 IU/mL) and suboptimal responders (HBV DNA level reduction of <3 log 10 IU/mL). Based on UDPS data at baseline, we identified 11 nucleotide substitutions whose combination frequency was significantly associated with the antiviral response among 36 CHB patients in the study group. However, the baseline distribution and frequency of rt181 and rt236 substitutions known to confer ADV resistance was a poor predictor for the antiviral response. Compared with baseline serum HBeAg, HBV-DNA and ALT levels, the baseline HBV sequence-based model showed higher predictive accuracy for ADV response. In an independent cohort of 31 validation patients with CHB, the sequence-based model provided greater predictive potency than the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT and the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT/sequence combinations. Taken together, we confirm the presence of ADV resistance variants in treatment-naïve patients and firstly unravel the predictive value of the baseline mutations in the HBV RT region for ADV antiviral response.

  5. A five years study of antiviral effect of entecavir in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kehui; Xiang, Xiaogang; Bao, Rebecca; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yunye; Xie, Jingdong; Guo, Qing; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a potent viral replication inhibitor for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. To investigate the efficacy of ETV in Chinese nucleos(t)ide(NA)-experienced CHB patients. Among 89 CHB patients with ETV monotherapy for ≥6 months, 33/89 (37%) or 56/89 (73%) were NA-naïve or NA-experienced. During a median follow-up of 5.75 years, all NA-naïve CHB patients achieved VR without genotypic ETV-resistance. However, VR was observed in 50/56 (~90%) of NA-experienced CHB patients during a median follow-up of 4.75 years. Antiviral efficacy was not reduced in patients with previous lamivudine (LAM) with/without LAM-resistance (HR 0.465; 95% CI 0.196–1.100; p > 0.05) (HR 0.472; 95% CI 0.205–1.091; p > 0.05). Patients with a primary treatment failure to adefovir (ADV) had a reduced probability of achieving VR compared to NA-naïve (HR 0.496; 95% CI 0.287–0.857; p < 0.01). Previous ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR (HR 1.253; 95% CI 0.429–3.665; p > 0.05) did not influence antiviral response to ETV. The antiviral efficacy of ETV is not influenced by previous treatment LAM with/without LAM-resistance. ETV may still be an option in ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR, but not advised in patients with a primary treatment failure to ADV. PMID:27364728

  6. A five years study of antiviral effect of entecavir in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehui; Xiang, Xiaogang; Bao, Rebecca; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yunye; Xie, Jingdong; Guo, Qing; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a potent viral replication inhibitor for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. To investigate the efficacy of ETV in Chinese nucleos(t)ide(NA)-experienced CHB patients. Among 89 CHB patients with ETV monotherapy for ≥6 months, 33/89 (37%) or 56/89 (73%) were NA-naïve or NA-experienced. During a median follow-up of 5.75 years, all NA-naïve CHB patients achieved VR without genotypic ETV-resistance. However, VR was observed in 50/56 (~90%) of NA-experienced CHB patients during a median follow-up of 4.75 years. Antiviral efficacy was not reduced in patients with previous lamivudine (LAM) with/without LAM-resistance (HR 0.465; 95% CI 0.196-1.100; p > 0.05) (HR 0.472; 95% CI 0.205-1.091; p > 0.05). Patients with a primary treatment failure to adefovir (ADV) had a reduced probability of achieving VR compared to NA-naïve (HR 0.496; 95% CI 0.287-0.857; p < 0.01). Previous ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR (HR 1.253; 95% CI 0.429-3.665; p > 0.05) did not influence antiviral response to ETV. The antiviral efficacy of ETV is not influenced by previous treatment LAM with/without LAM-resistance. ETV may still be an option in ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR, but not advised in patients with a primary treatment failure to ADV. PMID:27364728

  7. An injectable liquid crystal system for sustained delivery of entecavir.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Lae; Ki, Min-Hyo; Joo, Min Kyung; An, Sung-Won; Hwang, Kyu-Mok; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-07-25

    Liquid crystal (LC) technology has attracted much interest for new injectable sustained-release (SR) formulations. In this study, an injectable liquid crystal-forming system (LCFS) including entecavir was prepared for the treatment of hepatitis B. In particular, an anchoring effect was introduced because LCFSs are relatively hydrophobic while entecavir is a slightly charged drug. The physicochemical properties of LCFSs were investigated by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), polarized optical microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), showing typical characteristics of the liquid crystalline phase, which was classified as the hexagonal phase. A pharmacokinetic study in rats showed sustained release of entecavir for 3-5 days with a basic LCFS formulation composed of sorbitan monooleate (SMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC), and tocopherol acetate (TA) as the main LC components. 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid (DPPA), an anionic phospholipid, was added to increase the anchoring effect between the cationic entecavir and the anionic DPPA, which resulted in a 1.5-times increase in half-life in rats. In addition, anchoring was strengthened by optimizing the pH to 2.5-4.5, increasing the half-life in the rat and dog. Also, due to the increasing terminal half-life from rat to dog resulting from species differences, LCFS produced one week delivery of entecavir in rat and two weeks delivery in dog. Therefore, LCFS injection using the anchoring effect for entecavir can potentially be used to deliver the drug over more than 2 weeks or even 1 month for the treatment of hepatitis B.

  8. Adefovir is effective to promote development of immunity to donor origin hepatitis B virus in an allogeneic transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yaşar, D G; Suyanı, E; Özenirler, S; Sucak, G T

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection is a serious health problem in endemic areas particularly among immunocompromised patients. The more profound immunosuppression in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HCT) can lead to more complicated hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related events. Despite the high risk of recipient infection allogeneic HCT donors with HBV infection are not excluded in the absence of an alternative donor. A 25 year-old man with severe aplastic anemia underwent allogeneic HCT from his HLA-identical sibling. The patient was hepatitis B naive and had normal liver function tests. However the donor had hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) positivity, and collected stem cells were positive for HBV DNA (1 × 10(4) copies/mL). Lamivudine was initiated to treat the patient prior to transplantation. Forty days after the HCT, the patient displayed hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), with HBV-DNA negativity. Cyclosporine was tapered and finally stopped at day + 256. On day +368, 112 days after the cessation of cyclosporine HBV reactivation was detected with an HBV-DNA level of 10 × 10(4) copies/mL despite lamivudine. After demonstration of the YMDD mutation, adefovir dipivoxil was combined with lamivudine. The HBV-DNA became negative; AST ALT levels decreased to normal levels after a month of combination therapy. In conclusion adefovir was effective to treat lamivudine-resistant HBV infection in an allogeneic HCT recipient. PMID:23498831

  9. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB) repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity. PMID:26800464

  10. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua; He, Fang; Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB) repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity. PMID:26800464

  11. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  12. Performance evaluation of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit for detection of entecavir resistance mutations in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hoon; Chun, Ji-Yong; Shin, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Molecular diagnostic methods have enabled the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant mutations in hepatitis B virus (HBV) and have reduced both unnecessary therapeutic interventions and medical costs. In this study we evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit (GeneMatrix, Korea) in detecting entecavir-resistance-associated mutations. Methods The HepB Typer-Entecavir kit was evaluated for its limit of detection, interference, cross-reactivity, and precision using HBV reference standards made by diluting high-titer viral stocks in HBV-negative human serum. The performance of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit for detecting mutations related to entecavir resistance was compared with direct sequencing for 396 clinical samples from 108 patients. Results Using the reference standards, the detection limit of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit was found to be as low as 500 copies/mL. No cross-reactivity was observed, and elevated levels of various interfering substances did not adversely affect its analytical performance. The precision test conducted by repetitive analysis of 2,400 replicates with reference standards at various concentrations showed 99.9% agreement (2398/2400). The overall concordance rate between the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit and direct sequencing assays in 396 clinical samples was 99.5%. Conclusions The HepB Typer-Entecavir kit showed high reliability and precision, and comparable sensitivity and specificity for detecting mutant virus populations in reference and clinical samples in comparison with direct sequencing. Therefore, this assay would be clinically useful in the diagnosis of entecavir-resistance-associated mutations in chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24459645

  13. Label-free silver nanoparticles for the naked eye detection of entecavir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mengmeng; Lin, Rui; Li, Lili; Jiang, Li; Ye, Baofen; He, Hua; Qiu, Lanlan

    A simple, rapid, field-portable colorimetric method for the detection of entecavir was proposed based on the color change caused by the aggregation of silver nanoparticles. Neutralization of the electrostatic repulsion from each silver nanoparticle resulted in the aggregation of AgNPs and a consequent color change of AgNPs from yellow to wine-red, which provided a platform for rapid and field-portable colorimetric detection of entecavir. The concentration of entecavir could be determined with naked eye or UV-vis spectrometer. The proposed method can be used to detect entecavir in human urine with a detection limit of 1.51 μg mL-1, within 25 min by naked eye observation without the aid of any advanced instrument or complex pretreatment. Results from UV-vis spectra showed that the absorption ratio was linear with the concentration of entecavir in the range of 5.04-25.2 μg mL-1 and 1.01-5.04 μg mL-1 with linear coefficients of 0.9907 and 0.9955, respectively. The selectivity of AgNPs detection system for entecavir is excellent comparing with other ions and analytes. Due to its rapid, visible color changes, and excellent selectivity, the AgNPs synthesized in this study are suitable to be applied to on-site screening of entecavir in human urine.

  14. The Effect of Prophylactic Lamivudine plus Adefovir Therapy Compared with Lamivudine Alone in Preventing Hepatitis B Reactivation in Lymphoma Patients with High Baseline HBV DNA during Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaoxu; Geng, Qirong; Huang, Huiqiang; Lin, Tongyu; Jiang, Wenqi; Xia, Zhongjun; Duan, Huaxin; Rao, Huilan; Yao, Mengfei; Hu, Liyang

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic antiviral therapy is essential for lymphoma patients with high baseline HBV DNA who undergo cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, there are limited data on the optimal options. The present study was designed to compare the efficacy of prophylactic lamivudine (LAM) with lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil (LAM+ADV) in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in lymphoma with, pre-chemotherapy HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 86 lymphoma patients with baseline HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml during chemotherapy and received LAM or LAM+ADV as prophylaxis between January 1, 2008 and November 30, 2014 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, China. Sixty-five patients received LAM and 21 received LAM+ADV. The rate was significantly lower in the LAM+ADV group compared with the LAM group for HBV reactivation (23.8% vs 55.4%; p = 0.012), while no difference was observed between the two groups in patients for HBV-related hepatitis (21.3% vs 33.3%; p   =  0.349), and chemotherapy disruption (10.9% vs 19.0%; p = 0.337). In a multivariate analysis of factors associated with HBV reactivation in these patients, LAM+ADV treatment and HBeAg negative were the independent protective factors. Therefore, LAM+ADV should be considered for antiviral prophylaxis in lymphoma patients with pre-chemotherapy HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml. Further study is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:27711135

  15. The combination of tacrolimus and entecavir improves the remission of HBV-associated glomerulonephritis without enhancing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Huaban; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Liu, Shuangxin; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus inhibits hepatitis B virus entry into hepatocytes through targeting the HBV receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus combined with entecavir antiviral therapy for HBV-associated glomerulonephritis patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Method: A cohort of 42 patients was enrolled in this retrospective study. Twenty-three patients received Tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) in combination entecavir over 24 weeks, whereas the other 19 patients only received entecavir monotherapy. Results: The probability of proteinuria remission in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group was 69 and 87% after 12 and 24 weeks, whereas was only 26 and 42%, respectively, in the entecavir group. The mean time to partial or complete remission was 18.6 weeks in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group and 34.3 weeks in the entecavir group (P<0.001). A decrease in the HBV DNA titer was observed in all patients with active HBV replication. None of the HBV carriers in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group showed evidence of HBV reactivation. The serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels remained stable in both groups. The Tacrolimus target trough concentration was 5-10 ng/mL. Conclusion: Tacrolimus combined with entecavir rapidly and effectively induced remission of HBV-GN in Chinese adults. Furthermore, Tacrolimus may have a synergistic antiviral effect with entecavir. PMID:27186284

  16. Lamivudine versus Entecavir for Newly Diagnosed Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Kim, Kyunga; Kim, Hyeseung; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Antiviral therapy is a key component in the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. However, whether the potent drug entecavir is more effective than a less potent drug, such as lamivudine, in HBV-related HCC is not clear. Methods A retrospective cohort of 451 newly diagnosed, HBV-related HCC patients without antiviral therapy at diagnosis, who started antiviral therapy with either entecavir (n=249) or lamivudine (n=202), were enrolled. Results The median survival was longer for the entecavir group than for the lamivudine group, and lamivudine use (vs entecavir) was an independent factor for mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.49; p=0.002). Lamivudine use (vs entecavir) was an independent risk factor for new-onset hepatic decompensation (HR, 1.67; p=0.010) in 318 patients without previous hepatic decompensation, and it was also an independent risk factor for recurrence after curative therapy (HR, 1.84; p=0.002) in 117 patients who received curative therapy. The findings were similar in a propensity score-matched cohort. Conclusions Overall survival, decompensation-free survival, and recurrence-free survival were better in the entecavir-treated patients than in the lamivudine treated-patients, indicating that the potent antiviral drug should be the preferred choice in HBV-related HCC patients. PMID:27282264

  17. Entecavir-Associated Thrombocytopenia in a Decompensated Cirrhotic Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoli; Chen, Liyu; Yang, Jingyu; Feng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drug-associated thrombocytopenia is common and curable, but there were few reports about entecavir-associated thrombocytopenia. We report here a case of a 65-year-old female patient with decompensated cirrhosis. The patient developed a fatal thrombocytopenia while under entecavir treatment. After she received entecavir treatment for 4 days, the patient's platelet count dropped significantly to 1 × 109/L, accompanied with a manifestation of mild sclera bleeding. All diagnostic data suggested an entecavir-induced immunological thrombocytopenia. The patient eventually fully recovered after treated with daily intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Actually, there were only a handful of reports that children or adults with chronic hepatitis B developed a thrombocytopenia due to nucleoside analogue medication. Timeliness of intravenous immunoglobulin infusion could stop the fatal bleeding for patients with entecavir-associated immunological thrombocytopenia. Hence, early diagnosis and treatment are recommended. Our case suggested that the platelet count should be monitored regularly in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with underline immunological disease while treated with ETV. PMID:27015182

  18. Three pharmaceuticals cocrystals of adefovir: Syntheses, structures and dissolution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Sun, Fuxing; Zhang, Tingting; Jia, Jiangtao; Su, Hongmin; Wang, Chenhui; Zhu, Guangshan

    2015-11-01

    We report here three novel cocrystals, which are composed of adefovir as the API (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient) with p-aminobenzoic acid (1, 2C8H12N5O4P·C7H6NO2·3H2O), 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2, C8H12N5O4P·C7H6O4·H2O) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxlic acid (3, C8H12N5O4P·C7H5NO4) as CCFs (cocrystal formers) respectively by crystal engineering strategy. Their structures were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), elemental analysis (EA) and infrared spectral analysis (IR). The analysis of single crystal X-ray diffraction demonstrate that cocrystal 1 and 2 form a strong hydrogen-bonded assembly through the phosphoric acids of API with water in the lattice and carboxylic acids of CCF respectively. Cocrystal 3 is formed in which the phosphoric acid groups of API are also held by the carboxylic acid groups of CCF. The PXRD results indicate their high purity of as-synthesized samples. The TGA, EA, IR and dissolution study of API and the cocrystals were also measured and discussed.

  19. An alternative and robust synthesis of [(13) C4 ]Baraclude® (entecavir).

    PubMed

    Easter, John A; Burrell, Richard C; Bonacorsi, Samuel J

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope-labeled [(13) C4 ]entecavir (1) was prepared in 11 steps. Commercially available [(13) C]guanidine hydrochloride and diethyl[1,2,3-(13) C3 ]malonate were condensed to yield 2-amino[2,4,5,6-(13) C4 ]pyrimidine-4,6-diol (8). This was converted to the desired purine (7) in five steps. Introduction of the chiral epoxide was followed by subsequent deprotection to give [(13) C4 ]entecavir (1), in an overall yield of 5.7% from labeled precursors. The chemical purity of the title compound was determined to be >99% by HPLC. The isotopic distribution was determined by mass spectrometry to be 282[M + 4], 98.4%; 281[M + 3], 1.6%; and 278[M + 0], <0.1%.

  20. Effect of weekly adefovir (PMEA) infusions on HIV-1 virus load: results of a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Kamp, W; Schokker, J; Cambridge, E; De Jong, S; Schuurman, R; De Groot, T; Boucher, C A

    1999-01-01

    The compound 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (adefovir; PMEA) is a potent inhibitor of a number of viruses in vitro, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2, human papillomavirus virus (HBV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Adefovir also proved to be effective in vivo against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in cats and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rhesus monkeys. In an open, non-placebo-controlled trial the antiviral activity of weekly doses of adefovir in nine patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex was studied for a period of 11 weeks. CD4 cell counts at baseline were between 10 and 450 cells/mm3, HIV-1 RNA levels at baseline were between 24,210 copies/ml and 406,197 copies/ml. The drug was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 mg every week and plasma viral load was assessed at multiple points during the study. Administration of adefovir was tolerated well and no severe side effects were seen. The response to adefovir treatment differed widely between patients. The increase in CD4 cell count at end point ranged from -40 to 120 cell/mm3. The lowest HIV RNA levels were measured after 3-5 days, showing an increase thereafter. The nadir in viral load was achieved after 2 weeks, with a mean viral load decline of 0.7 from baseline. The decrease of the HIV RNA level at end point ranged from -0.3 log10 to 1.8 log10 with a mean decrease of 0.4 log10. Our results indicate that adefovir given intravenously once weekly has a short-lasting initial antiviral effect. The effect of more frequent dosing requires further evaluation. If adefovir is to be useful clinically, it needs to be combined with other antiviral agents.

  1. Quantitation of HBsAg predicts response to entecavir therapy in HBV genotype C patients

    PubMed Central

    Orito, Etsuro; Fujiwara, Kei; Kanie, Hiroshi; Ban, Tesshin; Yamada, Tomonori; Hayashi, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analysis the factors that predict the response to entecavir therapy in chronic hepatitis patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C. METHODS: Fifty patients [hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative:HBeAg-positive = 26:24] with HBV genotype C, who received naïve entecavir therapy for > 2 years, were analyzed. Patients who showed HBV DNA levels ≥ 3.0 log viral copies/mL after 2 years of entecavir therapy were designated as slow-responders, while those that showed < 3.0 log copies/mL were termed rapid-responders. Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels (qHBsAg) were determined by the Architect HBsAg QT immunoassay. Hepatitis B core-related antigen was detected by enzyme immunoassay. Pre-C and Core promoter mutations were determined using by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Drug-resistance mutations were detected by the PCR-Invader method. RESULTS: At year 2, HBV DNA levels in all patients in the HBeAg-negative group were < 3.0 log copies/mL. In contrast, in the HBeAg-positive group, 41.7% were slow-responders, while 58.3% were rapid-responders. No entecavir-resistant mutants were detected in the slow-responders. When the pretreatment factors were compared between the slow- and rapid-responders; the median qHBsAg in the slow-responders was 4.57 log IU/mL, compared with 3.63 log IU/mL in the rapid-responders (P < 0.01). When the pretreatment factors predictive of HBV DNA-negative status at year 2 in all 50 patients were analyzed, HBeAg-negative status, low HBV DNA levels, and low qHBsAg levels were significant (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed that the low qHBsAg level was the most significant predictive factor (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Quantitation of HBsAg could be a useful indicator to predict response to entecavir therapy. PMID:23112549

  2. Efficacy of HBV-pulsed DCs in combination with entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mei-Juan; Pan, Xing-Nan; Wei, Kai-Peng; Li, Xu-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Man; Jiang, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Shen, Jian-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are multifunctional cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have reduced numbers of DCs which may be functionally impaired, a defect that may contribute to viral persistence. Autologous DC-based immunotherapy is considered to be a treatment option for chronic HBV infection (CHB). We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of HBV-pulsed DCs in combination with the antiviral drug entecavir in patients with CHB. Eighty patients were divided into four groups: HBV-pulsed DCs only, HBV-pulsed DCs plus entecavir, entecavir only, and an untreated control group. Patients on combination therapy exhibited greater antiviral responses than patients on either monotherapy. The combination of HBV-pulsed DCs and entecavir resulted in the largest reduction in serum viral DNA levels and the highest percentage of virologic response. In addition, combination therapy resulted in viral e antigen (HBeAg) loss and seroconversion. These results suggest that the combination of HBV-pulsed autologous DCs and entecavir could be therapeutically advantageous for patients with CHB.

  3. The Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Entecavir and Lamivudine in Patients with HBV-Associated Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiao; Sun, Hang; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, both of entecavir and lamivudine are effective for patients with HBV-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). However, there is no consensus on the efficacy of entecavir versus lamivudine for patients with HBV-associated ACLF. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of entecavir with that of lamivudine for HBV-associated ACLF patients. Methods. Publications on entecavir versus lamivudine in HBV-associated ACLF patients were comprehensively identified. Odds ratio and mean difference were used to measure the effect. Results. Ten studies, totaling 1254 patients, were eligible. No significant differences between the two drugs presented in the 1-, 2-, 3-, or 6-month survival rates. However, after 12 months of treatment, patients prescribed entecavir had a statistically higher survival rate (p = 0.008) and lower total bilirubin (p < 0.0001) and alanine aminotransferase (p = 0.04) levels compared to patients prescribed lamivudine. More patients achieved HBV negative levels when taking entecavir as measured at 1-, 3-, and 12-month time points and had a lower rate of HBV recurrence. Conclusion. While entecavir and lamivudine are both relatively safe and well tolerated, entecavir was more efficacious in terms of survival rate and clinical improvement in long-term treatment. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these results. PMID:27148364

  4. Lamivudine/Adefovir Treatment Increases the Rate of Spontaneous Mutation of Hepatitis B Virus in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Gómez, Marianoel; Bou, Juan-Vicente; Andreu, Iván; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The high levels of genetic diversity shown by hepatitis B virus (HBV) are commonly attributed to the low fidelity of its polymerase. However, the rate of spontaneous mutation of human HBV in vivo is currently unknown. Here, based on the evolutionary principle that the population frequency of lethal mutations equals the rate at which they are produced, we have estimated the mutation rate of HBV in vivo by scoring premature stop codons in 621 publicly available, full-length, molecular clone sequences derived from patients. This yielded an estimate of 8.7 × 10−5 spontaneous mutations per nucleotide per cell infection in untreated patients, which should be taken as an upper limit estimate because PCR errors and/or lack of effective lethality may inflate observed mutation frequencies. We found that, in patients undergoing lamivudine/adefovir treatment, the HBV mutation rate was elevated by more than sixfold, revealing a mutagenic effect of this treatment. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms indicated that lamivudine/adefovir treatment increases the fraction of A/T-to-G/C base substitutions, consistent with recent work showing similar effects of lamivudine in cellular DNA. Based on these data, the rate at which HBV produces new genetic variants in treated patients is similar to or even higher than in RNA viruses. PMID:27649318

  5. Lamivudine/Adefovir Treatment Increases the Rate of Spontaneous Mutation of Hepatitis B Virus in Patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Gómez, Marianoel; Bou, Juan-Vicente; Andreu, Iván; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The high levels of genetic diversity shown by hepatitis B virus (HBV) are commonly attributed to the low fidelity of its polymerase. However, the rate of spontaneous mutation of human HBV in vivo is currently unknown. Here, based on the evolutionary principle that the population frequency of lethal mutations equals the rate at which they are produced, we have estimated the mutation rate of HBV in vivo by scoring premature stop codons in 621 publicly available, full-length, molecular clone sequences derived from patients. This yielded an estimate of 8.7 × 10-5 spontaneous mutations per nucleotide per cell infection in untreated patients, which should be taken as an upper limit estimate because PCR errors and/or lack of effective lethality may inflate observed mutation frequencies. We found that, in patients undergoing lamivudine/adefovir treatment, the HBV mutation rate was elevated by more than sixfold, revealing a mutagenic effect of this treatment. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms indicated that lamivudine/adefovir treatment increases the fraction of A/T-to-G/C base substitutions, consistent with recent work showing similar effects of lamivudine in cellular DNA. Based on these data, the rate at which HBV produces new genetic variants in treated patients is similar to or even higher than in RNA viruses. PMID:27649318

  6. [Adherence to entecavir for chronic hepatitis B and correlation with effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Romero Díaz-Maroto, Vanessa; Sánchez Cuervo, Marina; Rodríguez Sagrado, Miguel Ángel; Bermejo Vicedo, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Objetivo: evaluar la adherencia de pacientes con hepatitis B cronica que inician tratamiento con entecavir como primera linea, y relacionarla con la efectividad. Métodos: estudio observacional retrospectivo realizado entre enero de 2007 y junio de 2013. Se incluyeron pacientes tratados con entecavir al menos durante un ano. Se considero un paciente adherente si la adherencia media era ≥ 95%. Se evaluo la respuesta virologica (ADN VHB < 20UI/ml mediante la reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa), bioquimica (normalizacion de alanina aminotranferasa [AAT]) y serologica (perdida del antigeno de superficie [HBsAg]) a los 12 meses. Resultados: se incluyeron 85 pacientes. La adherencia media fue 94,2 (DE 12,8)%. El 85,7% de los pacientes adherentes lograron respuesta virologica vs. el 71,4% de los de no adherentes (OR:2,40; IC95%:0,60–9,54; p=0,19). El 87,9% de los pacientes adherentes y el 85,7% de los no adherentes normalizaron niveles de AAT (OR:1,21; IC95%:0,22- 6,60; p=0,56). Solo dos pacientes adherentes mostraron perdida del HBsAg. Conclusión: la adherencia media no es alta. Los pacientes sin adherencia presentan una mayor tendencia al fracaso virologico, por lo que es necesario fomentar una mejora en la adherencia a los tratamientos.

  7. Modeling and Simulating Dynamics of Complete- and Poor-Response Chronic Hepatitis B Chinese Patients for Adefovir and Traditional Chinese Medicine Plus Adefovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lequan; Chen, Xiao; Ye, Yongan; Zhang, Qun; Ru, Shuying; Li, Xiaoke

    2013-01-01

    ChiCTR-TRC-11001263 study was the first large-scale double-blind randomized placebo-controlled traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and adefovir (ADV) antihepatitis B virus (HBV) infection trial in the world. A total of 560 hepatitis B e antigen- (HBeAg-) positive Chinese patients with chronical HBV were randomly classified, in 1 : 1 ratio, into two groups: experimental group (EXG) receiving TCMs + ADV and controlled group (CTG) receiving ADV + TCM-placebo treatment for 48 weeks. This paper introduces two models to model and simulate the evolutions of dynamics for the complete-response patients and the poor-response patients in EXG and CTG, respectively. The stimulated mean HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were close to the patients' experimental data. Analysis and simulations suggest that the activated patients' immune functions by TCMs + ADV may not only clear infected hepatocytes, but also clear HBV, which made the complete-response patients' mean serum HBV DNA levels in EXG reduce rapidly 12 weeks' earlier than the ones in CTG. One can assume that both the TCMs and ADV have the function of preventing complete-response patients' infected hepatocytes from being injured by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs); the patients' activated immune cells may also block HBV replications. PMID:24282437

  8. Acute liver graft failure due to emergence of lamivudine resistant hepatitis B virus: rapid resolution during treatment with adefovir

    PubMed Central

    Mutimer, D; Feraz-Neto, B; Harrison, R; O'Donnell, K; Shaw, J; Cane, P; Pillay, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Strategies for prevention of liver graft reinfection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been developed during recent years. Initially, passive immunoprophylaxis with high titre HBV immunoglobulin (HBIg), followed by lamivudine prophylaxis, and then the combination of lamivudine and HBIg have been employed. However, suboptimal use of the combination may be associated with failure of prophylaxis reflected by the emergence of HBV species with genetic changes that confer resistance to lamivudine and HBIg. Reinfection of the graft by HBV can be associated with rapid development of liver failure.
CASE REPORT—A 43 year old HBV infected man received lamivudine before transplantation, and lamivudine and HBIg after transplantation. Despite prophylaxis, graft reinfection and severe hepatitis were observed. The observed serological evolution and genetic sequencing of the emergent HBV species suggested selection of lamivudine resistant and surface antigen escape mutants consecutively. Adefovir treatment began after the devlopment of graft failure.
OUTCOME—A rapid exponential decline in serum HBV titre was observed. Liver function tests normalised and signs of liver failure resolved.
CONCLUSION—The use of HBIg and lamivudine permits prevention of graft reinfection by HBV for the majority of patients. Adefovir, a potent inhibitor of lamivudine resistant HBV, should be used when failure of prophylaxis is associated with graft hepatitis.


Keywords: hepatitis B virus; adefovir; liver graft; lamivudine PMID:11709523

  9. Co-treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and entecavir for hepatitis D: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Memon, Mohammad Sadik; Umer, Muhammad Amir; Abbas, Minaam; Shazi, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFNα) therapy with and without entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis D. METHODS: Forty hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA positive patients were randomized to receive either PEG-IFNα-2a 180 μg weekly in combination with entecavir 0.5 mg daily (n = 21) or PEG-IFNα alone (n =19). Patients who failed to show 2 log reduction in HDV RNA level at 24 wk of treatment, or had detectable HDV RNA at 48 wk of therapy were considered as treatment failure. Treatment was continued for 72 wk in the rest of the patients. All the patients were followed for 24 wk post treatment. Intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 6.8 years, 31 were male. Two log reduction in HDV RNA levels at 24 wk of therapy was achieved in 9 (43%) patients receiving combination therapy and 12 (63%) patients receiving PEG-IFNα alone (P = 0.199). Decline in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels was insignificant. At the end of treatment, HDV RNA was negative in 8 patients (38%) receiving combination therapy and 10 patients (53%) receiving PEG-IFNα-2a alone. Virological response persisted in 7 (33%) and 8 (42%) patients, respectively at the end of the 24 wk follow-up period. One responder patient in the combination arm lost HBsAg and became hepatitis B surface antibody positive. Six out of 14 baseline hepatitis B e antigen reactive patients seroconverted and four of these seroconverted patients had persistent HDV RNA clearance. CONCLUSION: Administration of PEG-IFNα-2a with or without entecavir, resulted in persistent HDV RNA clearance in 37% of patients. The addition of entecavir did not improve the overall response. PMID:27190579

  10. Comparison of entecavir and lamivudine in preventing HBV reactivation in lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sisi; Luo, Huaichao; Pan, Meiling; Luis, Angel Palomino; Xiong, Zhujuan; Shuai, Pin; Zhang, Zhihui

    2016-10-01

    Background Multiple studies have compared the efficacy of entecavir with lamivudine in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation among HBV-carrying lymphoma patients with chemotherapy treatment. However, the results were slightly varied. Aim of the review to combine the findings of independent studies assessing the clinical efficacy of the two drugs using a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chongqing VIP and WanFang Data were retrieved. Two independent reviewers evaluated the study eligibility and extracted eight studies, with 770 patients in total. The meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 and STATA software. Results HBV-carrying lymphoma patients receiving lamivudine during chemotherapy had a statistically significantly higher odds of HBV reactivation compared to those receiving entecavir (OR 5.0, 95 % CI 2.85-8.78, P < 0.001). The odds of hepatitis, HBV-Reactivation caused hepatitis and chemotherapy disruption was statistically significantly elevated in the patient group receiving lamivudine compared to the entecavir group (OR 4.12, 95 % CI 1.70-9.98, P = 0.002; OR 11.44, 95 % CI 2.70-48.52, P < 0.001; OR 6.71, 95 % CI 2.34-19.26, P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, the HBV reactivation rate in Ann Arbor stages I - II patient group was statistically significantly lower than the one in Ann Arbor stages III-IV group, with an overall pooled value of 0.37 (95 % CI 0.17-0.82, P = 0.01). Conclusion The metaanalysis result suggested that among HBV-carrying lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy, entecavir is more effective than lamivudine in preventing HBV reactivation.

  11. [Treatment of hepatitis B virus infection: present and future].

    PubMed

    Planas, Ramón; Morillas, Rosa M

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HVB) infection constitutes a challenge in spite of the advances in the therapeutic arsenal available. At the moment there are 4 approved antiviral drug groups: interferons, nucleoside analogues (lamivudine, telbivudine), nucleotide analogues (adefovir- dipivoxil) and cyclopents (entecavir), with different antiviral efficacy among them. The primary target of the treatment is a prolonged suppression of viral replication in order to avoid long term complications (cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma) and increase survival. In first place we must decide when to initiate the treatment. Secondly, which is the best therapeutic option based on the demonstrated antiviral effectiveness, profile of security and appearance of resistances. And finally, the duration and modification of the treatment based on the answer to itself. The objective of this article is a practical revision of the present management of the infection by the HVB. PMID:18570812

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-04-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, AMA1-C1/alhydrogel, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Aripiprazole, Artesunate/amodiaquine, Asenapine maleate; Bosentan, Brivaracetam; Carisbamate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, Corticorelin acetate; Dasatinib; Elinogrel potassium, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Etazolate; Fampridine, Fluarix, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GDC-0941, GI-5005, Golimumab; Imatinib mesylate, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Levetiracetam, Liraglutide, LOLA; Mecasermin, Morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Poly I:CLC, Pralatrexate, Pregabalin; Ranolazine, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine hydrochloride, Rhenium Re-186 etidronate, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, RTL-1000, Rufinamide; Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Stiripentol; Tiotropium bromide; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate; XL-184; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:20448862

  13. What MELD score mandates use of entecavir for ACLF-HBV HBeAg-negative patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Mai, Li; Zheng, Yu-Bao; Zhang, Shao-Quan; Xu, Wen-Xiong; Gao, Zhi-Liang; Ke, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate optimal timing for therapeutic efficacy of entecavir for acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACLF-HBV) in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative patients. METHODS: A total of 109 inpatients with ACLF-HBV were recruited from the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University from October 2007 to October 2010. Entecavir 0.5 mg/d was added to each patient’s comprehensive therapeutic regimen. Patients were divided into three groups according to model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score: high (≥ 30, 20 males and 4 females, mean age 47.8 ± 13.5 years); intermediate (22-30, 49 males and 5 females, 45.9 ± 12.4 years); and low (≤ 22, 28 males and 3 females, 43.4 ± 9.4 years). Statistical analysis were performed using SPSS 11.0 software. Data with normal distribution were expressed as mean ± SD and comparisons were made with Student’s t tests. A value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Viral loads were related exponentially and logarithmic data were used for analysis. RESULTS: For 24 patients with MELD score ≥ 30, treatment lasted 17.2 ± 16.5 d. Scores before and after treatment were significantly different (35.97 ± 4.87 and 40.48 ± 8.17, respectively, t = -2.762, P = 0.011); HBV DNA load was reduced (4.882 ± 1.847 copies log10/mL to 3.685 ± 1.436 copies log10/mL); and mortality rate was 95.83% (23/24). Of 54 patients with scores of 22-30, treatment lasted for 54.0 ± 43.2 d; scores before and after treatment were 25.87 ± 2.33 and 25.82 ± 13.92, respectively (t = -0.030, P = 0.976); HBV DNA load decreased from 6.308 ± 1.607 to 3.473 ± 2.097 copies log10/mL; and mortality was 51.85% (28/54). Of 31 patients with scores ≤ 22, treatment lasted for 66.1 ± 41.9 d; scores before and after treatment were 18.88 ± 2.44 and 12.39 ± 7.80, respectively, (t = 4.860, P = 0.000); HBV DNA load decreased from 5.841 ± 1.734 to 2.657 ± 1.154 copies log10/mL; and

  14. Obesity and hepatocellular carcinoma in patients receiving entecavir for chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaemin; Yoo, Sun Hong; Sohn, Won; Kim, Hyung Woo; Choi, Yong Sun; Won, Jung Ho; Heo, Jin Young; Park, Sang Jong; Park, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to clarify the effect of obesity on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients receiving antiviral treatment. Methods This study applied a retrospective analysis to a historical cohort in Bundang Jesaeng Hospital. In total, 102 CHB patients were treated with entecavir as an initial treatment for CHB and checked for obesity using a body composition analyzer. Hepatic steatosis was measured semiquantitatively using Hamaguchi’s scoring system in ultrasonography. Risk factors for the development of HCC were analyzed, including obesity-related factors (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference [WC], waist-to-hip ratio [WHR], visceral fat area [VFA], and hepatic steatosis). Results The median follow-up duration of the patients was 45.2 months (interquartile range: 36.0-58.3 months). The cumulative incidence rates of HCC at 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years were 0%, 5.3%, and 9.0%, respectively. Univariable analysis revealed that the risk factors for HCC development were a platelet count of <120,000 /mm2 (hazard ratio [HR]=5.21, P=0.031), HBeAg negativity (HR=5.61, P=0.039), and liver cirrhosis (HR=10.26, P=0.031). Multivariable analysis showed that the significant risk factor for HCC development was liver cirrhosis (HR=9.07, P=0.042). However, none of the obesity-related risk factors were significantly associated with HCC: BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (HR=0.90, P=0.894), WC ≥90 cm (HR=1.10, P=0.912), WHR ≥0.9 (HR=1.94, P=0.386), VFA ≥100 cm2 (HR=1.69, P=0.495), and hepatic steatosis (HR=0.57, P=0.602). Conclusion HCC development is associated with liver cirrhosis but not obesity-related factors in CHB patients receiving entecavir. PMID:27729627

  15. High rates of viral suppression after long-term entecavir treatment of Asian patients with hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Pan, Calvin Q; Tong, Myron; Kowdley, Kris V; Hu, Ke-Qin; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yoon, Seung Kew; Lee, Samuel S; Cohen, David; Tang, Hong; Tsai, Naoky

    2012-09-01

    There are limited data on the effects of long-term entecavir therapy in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). We performed a post hoc analysis of 94 Asian hepatitis B e antigen-positive (HBeAg+), nucleos(t)ide analogue-naive patients who received 5 years of therapy with entecavir (up to 2 years in study ETV-022 and the remainder in study ETV-901). Among patients completing week 240, 95% (63 of 66) had levels of hepatitis B virus DNA <300 copies/mL, and 76% (50 of 66) had normalized levels of alanine aminotransferase. In addition to patients who achieved a serologic response during ETV-022, a further 40% (26 of 65) achieved HBeAg loss, and 18% (12 of 65) underwent HBeAg seroconversion through year 5 of entecavir therapy. No resistance to entecavir was detected, and the safety profile was consistent with previous reports. The long-term efficacy and safety of entecavir are therefore comparable between Asians and the overall population of HBeAg+ patients with CHB.

  16. Entecavir for Patients with Hepatitis B Decompensated Cirrhosis in China: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Li, B.; Li, Y.; Liu, H.; Qu, W. D.; Xu, H. W.; Qi, J. N.; Qin, C. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Evidence about the clinical effects of entecavir (ETV) for patients with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis remain controversial. Therefore, we perform this meta-analysis to assess the treatment outcomes of ETV in participants with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis. Relevant studies were identified by searching databases until the March 2016. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). GRADEprofiler3.6 was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence. A total of 26 studies (involving 2040 patients) were included. The quality of the evidence was classified from very low to high by the GRADED approach for all included RCTs. Meta-analysis showed that patients were more likely to experience HBV-DNA loss (RR:1.85, 95%CIs: 1.41 to 2.43, P < 0.0001 at 48 weeks), have normalized alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) (P = 0.003 at 24 weeks, P = 0.02 at 48 weeks), and have a low mortality rate at 24 weeks (P = 0.003) when treated with ETV. There was no significant different between ETV and the control groups at the total mortality (P = 0.06) and HBeAg seroconversion (P = 0.14). In conclusion, ETV could be the first line therapy for patients with HBV related decompensated cirrhosis, because ETV could reduce the early mortality and move HBV DNA load down.

  17. Entecavir for Patients with Hepatitis B Decompensated Cirrhosis in China: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F.Y.; Li, B.; Li, Y.; Liu, H.; Qu, W.D.; Xu, H.W.; Qi, J.N.; Qin, C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about the clinical effects of entecavir (ETV) for patients with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis remain controversial. Therefore, we perform this meta-analysis to assess the treatment outcomes of ETV in participants with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis. Relevant studies were identified by searching databases until the March 2016. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). GRADEprofiler3.6 was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence. A total of 26 studies (involving 2040 patients) were included. The quality of the evidence was classified from very low to high by the GRADED approach for all included RCTs. Meta-analysis showed that patients were more likely to experience HBV-DNA loss (RR:1.85, 95%CIs: 1.41 to 2.43, P < 0.0001 at 48 weeks), have normalized alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) (P = 0.003 at 24 weeks, P = 0.02 at 48 weeks), and have a low mortality rate at 24 weeks (P = 0.003) when treated with ETV. There was no significant different between ETV and the control groups at the total mortality (P = 0.06) and HBeAg seroconversion (P = 0.14). In conclusion, ETV could be the first line therapy for patients with HBV related decompensated cirrhosis, because ETV could reduce the early mortality and move HBV DNA load down. PMID:27601086

  18. Entecavir for Patients with Hepatitis B Decompensated Cirrhosis in China: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, F Y; Li, B; Li, Y; Liu, H; Qu, W D; Xu, H W; Qi, J N; Qin, C Y

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about the clinical effects of entecavir (ETV) for patients with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis remain controversial. Therefore, we perform this meta-analysis to assess the treatment outcomes of ETV in participants with hepatitis B decompensated cirrhosis. Relevant studies were identified by searching databases until the March 2016. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). GRADEprofiler3.6 was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence. A total of 26 studies (involving 2040 patients) were included. The quality of the evidence was classified from very low to high by the GRADED approach for all included RCTs. Meta-analysis showed that patients were more likely to experience HBV-DNA loss (RR:1.85, 95%CIs: 1.41 to 2.43, P < 0.0001 at 48 weeks), have normalized alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) (P = 0.003 at 24 weeks, P = 0.02 at 48 weeks), and have a low mortality rate at 24 weeks (P = 0.003) when treated with ETV. There was no significant different between ETV and the control groups at the total mortality (P = 0.06) and HBeAg seroconversion (P = 0.14). In conclusion, ETV could be the first line therapy for patients with HBV related decompensated cirrhosis, because ETV could reduce the early mortality and move HBV DNA load down. PMID:27601086

  19. Characterization of antiviral activity of entecavir in transgenic mice expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Julander, Justin G; Colonno, Richard J; Sidwell, Robert W; Morrey, John D

    2003-08-01

    Entecavir (ETV), a cyclopentyl guanosine nucleoside analog, was evaluated in transgenic mice expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV). ETV administered orally once daily for 10 days at a dosage of 3.2mg/kg significantly (P

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma risk in HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B patients with or without cirrhosis treated with entecavir: HepNet.Greece cohort.

    PubMed

    Papatheodoridis, G V; Manolakopoulos, S; Touloumi, G; Nikolopoulou, G; Raptopoulou-Gigi, M; Gogos, C; Vafiadis-Zouboulis, I; Karamanolis, D; Chouta, A; Ilias, A; Drakoulis, C; Mimidis, K; Ketikoglou, I; Manesis, E; Mela, M; Hatzis, G; Dalekos, G N

    2015-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may still develop in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients treated with lamivudine. Whether HCC rates are comparable in patients treated with the current first-line antivirals remains uncertain. We estimated the incidence and evaluated predictors of HCC in a large nationwide prospective cohort (HepNet.Greece) of HBeAg-negative CHB patients treated with entecavir. HBeAg-negative CHB patients from the same cohort who were initially treated with lamivudine were used as controls. We included 321 patients treated with entecavir for a median of 40 months and 818 patients treated initially with lamivudine for a median of 60 months. In the entecavir group, HCC developed in 4 of 321 (1.2%) patients at a median of 1.5 (range: 1.0-4.5) years, while the cumulative HCC incidence was significantly higher in cirrhotics than noncirrhotics (1, 3, 5 years: 0%, 3%, 9% vs 1%, 1%, 1%; P = 0.024) and in older patients (P = 0.026). Entecavir compared with lamivudine group patients had lower HCC incidence (1, 3, 5 years: 0.3%, 1.2%, 2.8% vs 0.7%, 3.8%, 5.6%; P = 0.024). However, in multivariable Cox regression analysis, the HCC risk was independently associated with older age (P < 0.001), male gender (P = 0.011) and cirrhosis (P = 0.025), but not with the initial agent. In conclusion, our large nationwide study indicates that the HCC risk remains increased in entecavir-treated HBeAg-negative CHB patients with cirrhosis, particularly of older age, at least for the first 5 years. The HCC risk does not seem to be significantly reduced with entecavir compared with antiviral therapy starting with lamivudine.

  1. Adefovir- or Lamivudine-Induced Renal Tubular Dysfunction after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Geun; Lee, Juhan; Lee, Jung Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Ju, Man Ki; Choi, Gi Hong; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Jin Sub; Kim, Soon Il; Joo, Dong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To reduce hepatitis B virus reinfection after liver transplantation (LT), patients often receive antihepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) alone or combined with antiviral nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUCs); however, proximal renal tubular dysfunction (RTD) that was induced by NUCs in liver recipients was rarely reported. Here, we analyzed RTD and renal impairment (RI) following adefovir (ADV) and lamivudine (LAM) treatment in liver recipients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients treated with HBIG alone (group 1, n = 42) or combined with ADV or LAM (group 2, n = 21) after LT. We compared RTD and RI incidence during the 12 months after LT. An RTD diagnosis required manifestation of at least 3 of the following features: hypophosphatemia, RI, hypouricemia, proteinuria, or glucosuria. No significant differences were observed regarding sex, age, donor type, model of end-stage liver score, and estimated glomerular filtration rate at pre-LT between the 2 groups. Hepatitis B virus recurrence within 12 months was 4.8% in both groups (P = 1.000); however, the RTD incidence was 0% in group 1 and 19.0% in group 2 (P = 0.010). RI occurrence did not differ between the groups. The only risk factor for RI was HBIG administration combined with both LAM and ADV (odds ratio 11.27, 95% confidence interval 1.13–112.07, P = 0.039, vs HBIG alone). RTD occurred more frequently in patients treated with HBIG combined with LAM or ADV compared with HBIG alone. Thus, LAM or ADV therapy can induce RTD after LT, and when administered, liver recipients should be monitored. PMID:26402818

  2. Clinical course of partial virological responders under prolonged entecavir monotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Han; Ahn, Seon Joo; Cho, Hyo Jung; Kim, Soon Sun; Cheong, Jae Youn; Cho, Sung Won

    2016-02-01

    Studies about long-term entecavir (ETV) therapy for partial virological response (PVR) are lacking. This study aimed to assess the clinical course of PVR patients receiving ETV therapy and analyze the efficacy of tenofovir (TDF). We retrospectively evaluated 130 patients who showed a PVR to ETV. Among these patients, 102 were nucleot(s)ide analogue (NUC)-naïve and 28 were lamivudine (LAM)-experienced. The cumulative rates of VR were 54.1%, 70.8%, and 83.7% for the NUC-naïve group and 37.0%, 42.8%, and 42.8% for the LAM-experienced group after 24, 36, and 48 months of ETV therapy, respectively (P  = 0.008). Low HBV DNA level at 12 months (P < 0.001) and absence of a LAM treatment history (P  = 0.031) were significant associated factors for VR. In VR prediction at 36 months of ETV therapy in NUC-naïve patients, HBV DNA level <95 IU/ml at 12 months showed a 92.9% sensitivity and a 78.3% specificity (AUROC, 0.909; P < 0.001). ETV resistance did not develop in NUC-naïve patients with HBV DNA levels <95 IU/ml at 12 months. The cumulative probability of VR in patients who switched to or additionally received TDF was 91.3% at 15 months. Prolonged ETV therapy induced a VR without the risk of ETV resistance in NUC-naïve patients with HBV DNA levels <95 IU/ml at 12 months. All patients with LAM-experienced or NUC-naïve with HBV DNA levels ≥95 IU/ml at 12 months should be switched to TDF rescue therapy.

  3. Salting-out homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction approach applied in sample pre-processing for the quantitative determination of entecavir in human plasma by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Juan; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Jin; Davey, Andrew K; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2012-01-15

    A convenient, robust, economical and selective sample preparation method for the quantitative determination of entecavir in human plasma by LC-MS was developed and validated. Entecavir and the internal standard of acyclovir were extracted from 500 μL of human plasma by a salting-out homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction approach (SHLLE) with acetonitrile as the organic extractant and magnesium sulfate as the salting-out reagent. They were analyzed on a Hanbon® Lichrospher RP C18 HPLC column (150 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) with gradient elution. The mobile phase comprised 0.1% acetic acid-0.2 mmol ammonium acetate in water (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B). The flow rate is 0.2 mL/min. The analytes were detected by a LC-MS 2010 single quadrupole mass spectrometer instrument equipped with an electrospray ionization interface using selective ion monitoring positive mode. A "post cut" column switch technique was incorporated into the method to remove interferences of earlier and later eluting matrix components than entecavir and internal standard, including salting-out reagent used in sample pre-processing. The method was validated over the concentration range of 0.05-20 ng/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precision of the assay, as measured by the coefficient of variation (%CV), was within 3.59%, and the intra-day assay accuracy was found to be within 4.88%. The average recovery of entecavir was about 50% and the ion suppression was approximately 44% over the standard curve. Comparison of matrix effect between SHLLE and SPE by continuous post column infusion showed that these two methods got similar, slight ion suppression. The SHLLE method has been successfully utilized for the analysis of entecavir in post-dose samples from a clinical study.

  4. Comparison of the effectiveness and renal safety of tenofovir versus entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    López Centeno, Beatriz; Collado Borrell, Roberto; Pérez Encinas, Montserrat; Gutiérrez García, Maria Luisa; Sanmartin Fenollera, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Objetivo: Comparar la efectividad y seguridad renal del tratamiento con tenofovir frente al entecavir en pacientes con hepatitis B cronica. Métodos: Estudio retrospectivo en pacientes con hepatitis B que iniciaron tratamiento con tenofovir o entecavir entre enero 1998-2013. La variable principal de la efectividad fue definida como DNA viral < 20 UI/ml (HBV-DNA) y la de la seguridad renal como variaciones en el filtrado glomerular (eGFR) tras 48 semanas de tratamiento. Resultados: Se analizaron un total de 64 pacientes (1:1), con caracteristicas semejantes excepto por el predominio de pacientes sin tratamiento previo (p=0,036), comorbilidades (p=0,077) y farmacos nefrotoxicos (p=0,088) en el grupo-entecavir, y de pacientes con HBV-DNA < 20 UI/ml (p=0,032) y HBeAg-positivo (p=0,050) en el grupo-tenofovir. Se realizaron analisis estadisticos univariantes y se ajustaron las variables confusoras mediante Propensity score (PS). Los resultados para la variable principal de efectividad (HBV-DNA < 20 UI/ml) denotan una superioridad del tenofovir tras el ajuste por PS con una ORadj= 6,7 (IC95%: 1,2-35,3; p=0,028). Tres pacientes con tenofovir sufrieron seroconversion (p=0,148). Los resultados para la variable principal de seguridad (eGFR < 60ml/min/1.73m2) no mostraron diferencias entre ambas ramas tras el ajuste, obteniendo una ORadj= 0,6 (IC95%: 0,1-2,8; p=0,521). El grupo-tenofovir registro dos casos de suspension por toxicidad renal, con posterior recuperacion, entre ellos un sindrome de Fanconi. Conclusiones: En nuestro estudio existen diferencias significativas entre ambos tratamientos respecto a su efectividad, mostrandose el tenofovir superior. En cuanto a la seguridad renal, no hemos encontrado diferencias significativas, pero dos casos de suspension de tratamiento por toxicidad renal con tenofovir nos llevan a concluir que la decision de tratamiento en los pacientes con alteraciones en la funcion renal deberia incluir un analisis individualizado de cada caso.

  5. Covalently closed-circular hepatitis B virus DNA reduction with entecavir or lamivudine

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Scott; Locarnini, Stephen; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Chao, You-Chen; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Gish, Robert G; de Man, Robert A; Yu, Miao; Llamoso, Cyril; Tang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the reduction in hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed-circular DNA (cccDNA) with entecavir (ETV) or lamivudine (LAM). METHODS: This analysis included patients who had participated in the randomized Phase III study ETV-022 comparing ETV vs LAM in nucleos(t)ide-naive, HBeAg-positive patients. Patients received ETV (0.5 mg daily) or LAM (100 mg daily) for a minimum of 52 wk. Patients were eligible to participate in this sub-study if they had paired biopsies at baseline and week 48 with evaluable measurements for hepatic HBV cccDNA and total hepatic HBV DNA. The main objective was to compare changes in hepatic HBV cccDNA and total hepatic HBV DNA at week 48 of ETV or LAM treatment, which was a secondary endpoint of study ETV-022. Additional post hoc analyses included linear regression analyses to assess associations of baseline levels and on-treatment changes of cccDNA with other baseline factors [sex, age, serum HBV DNA, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Knodell necroinflammatory score, Ishak fibrosis score, total hepatic HBV DNA, and HBV genotype], or on-treatment factors (changes from baseline at week 48 in serum HBV DNA, ALT, Knodell necroinflammatory score, Ishak fibrosis score, total hepatic HBV DNA, and HBeAg loss at week 48). RESULTS: Overall, 305 patients (ETV = 159; LAM = 146) of ETV-022 had paired baseline and week 48 liver biopsies with evaluable measurements for hepatic HBV cccDNA and total hepatic HBV DNA, and were included in this analysis. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were comparable between the two arms. After 48 wk, ETV resulted in significantly greater reductions in hepatic HBV cccDNA [-0.9 log10 copies/human genome equivalent (HGEq) vs -0.7 log10 copies/HGEq; P = 0.0033] and total hepatic DNA levels (-2.1 log10 copies/HGEq vs -1.6 log10 copies/HGEq; P < 0.0001) than LAM. Virologic, biochemical, and histologic response rates at week 48 were also greater with ETV than with LAM. Baseline HBV cccDNA levels

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-11-01

    Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, AN-2728, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Bevacizumab, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Carfilzomib, Caspofungin acetate, Cediranib, Cetuximab, Choriogonadotropin alfa, Clevudine, Clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, Clofarabine, Daidzeol, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Dexlansoprazole, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Elacytarabine, Enfuvirtide, Enoxaparin, Entecavir, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Ezetimibe/simvastatin, Forodesine hydrochloride, Fosamprenavir calcium, Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Golimumab, Imatinib mesylate, Imetelstat, Insulin gl'argine, Insulin glulisine, Interferon alfa-2b XL, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Lintuzumab, Liposomal adriamycin, Liposomal belotecan, Liposome-encapsulated fentanyl, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lutropin alfa, LY-207320, Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MKC-253, MP-470, NGR-TNF, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, PAN-811, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, PF-734200, Phentermine/topiramate, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Pregabalin, Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Ranibizumab, Recombinant Bet V1, Recombinant human insulin, Regadenoson, rhITF, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, Ruboxistaurin hydrochloride, Rufinamide, Sapropterin dihydrochloride Saracatinib, SB-73, SC-599, Seliciclib, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate, Tadalafil, Tanespimycin, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tegaserod maleate, Telbivudine, Tenofovir

  7. Chronic Hepatitis B: Integrating Long-Term Treatment Data and Strategies to Improve Outcomes in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Afdhal, Nezam H.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Brown, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of agents can reduce viral replication in patients with chronic hepatitis B, but most patients do not undergo a curative response to these drugs and therefore require long-term therapy. Thus, recent studies have investigated the long-term safety, efficacy, and resistance profiles of several antiviral nucleotide/nucleoside agents: lamivudine, telbivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, entecavir, and tenofovir. The most recent data have revealed that lamivudine and telbivudine produce high rates of resistance when treatment is continued for 2–5 years; as a result, these agents are no longer preferred for first-line monotherapy. Entecavir and tenofovir, on the other hand, appear to have favorable safety and efficacy profiles when used as monotherapy, with very low rates of resistance over 5 years. In order to help clinicians incorporate these data into clinical practice, this monograph will review recently published data on hepatitis B antiviral medications, as well as explore when to consider cessation of therapy. The treatment of special patient populations and the need to screen patients for hepatocellular carcinoma will also be discussed. PMID:22557938

  8. Efficacy of entecavir and tenofovir in chronic hepatitis B under treatment in the public health system in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Camila V; Tovo, Cristiane Valle; Grossmann, Thiago K; Mirenda, Henrique; Dal-Pupo, Bruna B; de Almeida, Paulo RL; de Mattos, Angelo A

    2016-01-01

    There are about 350 million hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers worldwide and chronic HBV is considered a major public health problem. The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of the nucleos(t)ide analogues tenofovir (TDF) and entecavir (ETV) in the treatment of chronic HBV. A cross-sectional study was carried out from March-December 2013, including all patients with chronic HBV, over 18 years of age, undergoing therapy through the public health system in southern Brazil. Only the data relating to the first treatments performed with TDF or ETV were considered. Retreatment, co-infection, transplanted or immunosuppressed patients were excluded. Six hundred and forty patients were evaluated, of which 336 (52.5%) received TDF and 165 (25.8%) ETV. The other 139 (21.7%) used various combinations of nucleos(t)ide analogues and were excluded. The negativation of viral load was observed in 87.3% and 78.8% and the negativation of hepatitis B e antigen was achieved in 79% and 72% of those treated with ETV or TDF, respectively. Negativation of hepatitis B surface antigen was not observed. There was no occurrence of adverse effects. This is a real-life study demonstrating that long-term treatment with ETV and TDF is both safe and effective. PMID:27074254

  9. Cost-effectiveness of entecavir versus lamivudine for the suppression of viral replication in chronic hepatitis B patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Anna Maria N; L 'italien, Gilbert; Nita, Marcelo Eidi; Araujo, Evaldo Stanislau A

    2008-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is an important public-health issue. Chronic patients have a higher risk of death due to complications, which increases health-care expenses in. Cost-effectiveness analysis of entecavir (ETV) versus lamivudine (LVD) for treatment of chronic hepatitis B, in e antigen (AgHBe)-positive and negative patients, based on two phase 3, controlled and randomized studies. A decision analysis model was developed, using the following endpoints: cost per patient with undetectable viral load and cost per quality life year (QALY) gained. Risks for complications (compensated or decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) were based on the cohort study REVEAL, published in 2006. The REVEAL parameters were applied to the results of the viral load levels obtained from the clinical assay data. The complication costs were based on a study of the disease cost conducted in Brazil, in 2005. The cost data were obtained predominantly from Sistema Unico de Saúde [SUS - Brazilian public health system] payment tables and drug price lists. The utility data were obtained from literature and life expectancy information was based on IBGE data. The analysis perspective was that of SUS. A discount rate of 3% per year was used. For the horizon of time of 10 years, the ETV had an incremental cost of approximately two million Brazilian Reais (R$) compared to LVD. Reducing the number of complications, ETV treatment reduced costs by around 3 million, reducing final costs by 1 million, for AgHBe-positive patients. ETV also reduced the incremental cost per QALY gained. ETV was found to be the most cost-effective alternative for AgHBe-positive and negative patients. PMID:19219274

  10. Cimicifuga foetida L. plus adefovir effectively inhibits the replication of hepatitis B virus in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    DAI, XIUFANG; YI, XIANFU; SUN, ZEQUN; RUAN, PENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effect of Cimicifuga foetida L. (C. foetida) in the patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). A total of 60 randomly selected patients with CHB were recruited and divided into groups I and II. The patients in group I received a monotherapy of adefovir (ADV), and the patients in group II received a combination therapy of ADV and C. foetida for >48 weeks. Intrahepatic (IH) HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), serum HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), alanine aminotransferase levels and serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels were quantified during the test. Following the treatment, a significant reduction of the median IH cccDNA level was identified in group II (P=0.017), but not in group I (P=0.05, and P=0.01 between the 2 groups), and a significant reduction of log10 HBsAg was identified in groups I (P=0.012) and II (P<0.0001, and P=0.20 between the 2 groups). A significant increase of the median serum IFN-γ level was found in group II (P=0.0005), but not in group I (P=0.06, and P=0.004 between the 2 groups), and a significant reduction of the median TGF-β level was identified in groups I (P<0.0001) and II (P<0.0001, and P=0.002 between the 2 groups). A total of 24 patients in group I, and 27 patients in group II achieved a sustained virological response (P=0.0386), and 20 patients in group I and 24 in group II achieved hepatitis B e antigen seroclearance (P=0.0442). In conclusion, C. foetida can effectively inhibit HBV transcription and replication in the patients by stimulating the release of the inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ. PMID:27073640

  11. A predictive model for carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B undergoing entecavir therapy and its validation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We created a model to predict the development of liver carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing entecavir (ETV) therapy and to validate the accuracy using an independent dataset.A total of 328 CHB subjects were analyzed. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the training group (n = 164) and the validation group (n = 164). Using data from the training group, we built a predictive model for liver carcinogenesis by performing univariate and multivariate analyses using variables associated with liver carcinogenesis. We subsequently assessed the applicability of the constructed model in the validation group.The median (range) follow-up periods in the training and the validation groups were 5.03 years (1.03-9.98) and 4.84 years (1.10-9.97), respectively. The proportion of hepatitis B virus-DNA at 24 weeks <1.9 log IU/mL in the training group was 70.7% (116/164), while that in the validation group was 71.3% (117/164). For the entire cohort (n = 328), the median alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) value at 24 weeks (3.45 ng/mL; range, 0.9-102.7 ng/mL) significantly decreased compared to the baseline values (5.55 ng/mL; range, 0.9-1039.5 ng/mL), while the median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value at 24 weeks (24 IU/mL; range, 6-251 IU/mL) also significantly decreased compared to baseline values (57 IU/mL; range, 7-1450 IU/mL). During the observation period, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 15 (9.1%) patients in the training group and in 17 (10.4%) patients in the validation group. The 3- and 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates in the entire cohort were 4.48% and 9.52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of the training group, age ≥54 years (P = 0.0273), ALT level at 24 weeks (P = 0.0456), and AFP at 24 weeks (P = 0.0485) were found to be significant predictors linked to HCC. Using these independent predictors, the risk for HCC development was well stratified in the validation group (overall significance

  12. Continuous up to 4 Years Entecavir Treatment of HBV-Infected Adolescents – A Longitudinal Study in Real Life

    PubMed Central

    Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Smok, Beata; Rajewski, Paweł; Wietlicka-Piszcz, Magdalena; Halota, Waldemar; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term (up to 4 years) efficacy and safety of entecavir ETV treatment and analysed the significance of baseline and on-treatment factors in long-term ETV outcomes in adolescents with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). We determined the cumulative virological and serological outcomes of 44 adolescents with CHB receiving ETV for up to 4 years. To investigate the dynamics of HBV DNA, ALT activity and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion over time and their associations with the considered factors, generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used. The cumulative rates of undetectable HBV DNA (<20 IU/ml) and HBeAg seroconversion after 4 years were 89.7% and 55.4%, respectively. In the study group, we showed that having undetectable HBV DNA at the 6th or 12th month of therapy predicted the achievement of a sustained response rate (SRR, defined as the loss of HBV DNA, loss of HBeAg and ALT normalization) at year 3 of ETV therapy (P = 0.048, OR = 5.83; P = 0.012; OR = 14.57, respectively). The GEE analysis indicated that of the different factors, the duration of ETV therapy had a strong impact on the achievement of virological suppression, HBeAg seroconversion and SRR in adolescents. Each month after the initiation of therapy, the odds of loss of HBV DNA increased by approximately 5% (OR = 1.05, P<0.0001), on average. Additionally, the GEE analysis revealed that adolescents with an age at infection of ≥10 years had 3 times higher odds of achieving undetectable HBV DNA than patients with a younger infection age (OR = 3.67, P = 0.028). None of the ETV-treated patients reported significant adverse effects. ETV is an effective and safe treatment option for adolescents with CHB. Undetectable HBV DNA in the 6th and/or 12th month of ETV treatment and older age at infection could predict maintained virological suppression. PMID:27685782

  13. The Efficacy and Safety of Entecavir and Interferon Combination Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Ling-Hong; Fu, Lin-Lin; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of entecavir (ETV) and interferon (IFN) combination therapy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) mono-infection via a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). All eligible RCTs evaluating combination therapy for treating CHB were identified from nine electronic databases. A meta-analysis was performed in accordance with the Cochrane Systemic Review handbook. Eleven trials encompassing 1010 participants were included in this meta-analysis. It showed that at 12 and ≥ 96 weeks of therapy, the combination of ETV and IFN was not better than ETV in improving the undetectable HBV DNA (12 weeks: RR=1.12, 95% CI=0.88-1.42; ≥ 96 weeks: RR = 0.64, 95% CI=0.21-1.98, respectively) and HBeAg seroconversion rates (12 weeks: RR=1.35, 95% CI=0.60-3.04; ≥ 96 weeks: RR=1.36, 95% CI=0.75-2.64, respectively). But at 48 weeks of therapy and approximately 2 years of follow up, combination therapy was superior to ETV in improving the undetectable HBV DNA (48 weeks: RR=1.46, 95% CI=1.13-1.90; follow up: RR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26-3.81, respectively) and HBeAg seroconversion rates (48 weeks: RR=1.82, 95% CI=1.44-2.30; follow up: RR=1.92, 95% CI=1.19-3.11, respectively). When compared to IFN group, at 24 and 48 weeks of therapy, combination group showed a greater undetectable HBV DNA (24 weeks: RR=2.14, 95% CI=1.59-2.89; 48 weeks: RR=2.28, 95% CI=1.54-3.37, respectively) and ALT normalization rate (24 weeks: RR=1.56, 95% CI= 1.24-1.96; 48 weeks: RR=1.55, 95% CI = 1.16-2.07, respectively). At 48 weeks of therapy, combination group achieved a greater HBeAg seroconversion rate than IFN (48 weeks: RR=1.58, 95% CI=1.24-2.00). No significant differences were observed in the side effects of the three therapies. So we can conclude that ETV and IFN combination therapy is more effective than ETV or IFN mono-therapy in CHB treatment. ETV, IFN, and the combination of the two are safe in CHB treatment. PMID

  14. A predictive model for carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B undergoing entecavir therapy and its validation

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We created a model to predict the development of liver carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing entecavir (ETV) therapy and to validate the accuracy using an independent dataset. A total of 328 CHB subjects were analyzed. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the training group (n = 164) and the validation group (n = 164). Using data from the training group, we built a predictive model for liver carcinogenesis by performing univariate and multivariate analyses using variables associated with liver carcinogenesis. We subsequently assessed the applicability of the constructed model in the validation group. The median (range) follow-up periods in the training and the validation groups were 5.03 years (1.03–9.98) and 4.84 years (1.10–9.97), respectively. The proportion of hepatitis B virus-DNA at 24 weeks <1.9 log IU/mL in the training group was 70.7% (116/164), while that in the validation group was 71.3% (117/164). For the entire cohort (n = 328), the median alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) value at 24 weeks (3.45 ng/mL; range, 0.9–102.7 ng/mL) significantly decreased compared to the baseline values (5.55 ng/mL; range, 0.9–1039.5 ng/mL), while the median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value at 24 weeks (24 IU/mL; range, 6–251 IU/mL) also significantly decreased compared to baseline values (57 IU/mL; range, 7–1450 IU/mL). During the observation period, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 15 (9.1%) patients in the training group and in 17 (10.4%) patients in the validation group. The 3- and 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates in the entire cohort were 4.48% and 9.52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of the training group, age ≥54 years (P = 0.0273), ALT level at 24 weeks (P = 0.0456), and AFP at 24 weeks (P = 0.0485) were found to be significant predictors linked to HCC. Using these independent predictors, the risk for HCC development was well stratified in the validation group

  15. Safe and cost-effective control of post-transplantation recurrence of hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yagi, Takahito; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    A combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUC) is the current standard of care for controlling hepatitis B recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost, and thus several protocols for treatment with low-dose HBIG combined with NUC or HBIG-free regimens have been developed. This article reviews recent advances in post-OLT hepatitis B virus (HBV) control and future methodological directions. New NUC such as entecavir, tenofovir or lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil combinations induce a very low frequency of viral resistance. The withdrawal of HBIG after several months of OLT under new NUC continuation also has permissible effects. Even after HBV reactivation, NUC can usually achieve viral control when viral markers are strictly followed up. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-HBV antibodies via vaccination with a hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine. However, HBV vaccination is not sufficiently effective in patients to treat liver cirrhosis type B after OLT because immune tolerance to the virus has already continued for several decades. Trials of its safety and cost-effectiveness are required. This review advocates a safe and economical approach to controlling post-OLT HBV recurrence. PMID:24905970

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AeroDose albuterol inhaler, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anidulafungin, anthrax vaccine, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, ceftobiprole, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, cilansetron; Darbepoetin alfa, degarelix acetate, dimethylfumarate, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, eletriptan, entecavir, esomeprazole magnesium, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gepirone hydrochloride; Human insulin; IDEA-070, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab; Lanthanum carbonate, lubiprostone; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, melatonin; NC-531, nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid, nolatrexed dihydrochloride; Oral insulin; Palifermin, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranibizumab, renzapride hydrochloride, RSD-1235; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, semapimod hydrochloride, Semax, SHL-749; Tegaserod maleate, tenatoprazole, tetrodotoxin, tolevamer sodium, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, visilizumab, Xcellerated T cells, XP-828L; Zoledronic acid monohydrate.

  17. Safe and cost-effective control of post-transplantation recurrence of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yagi, Takahito; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    A combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUC) is the current standard of care for controlling hepatitis B recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost, and thus several protocols for treatment with low-dose HBIG combined with NUC or HBIG-free regimens have been developed. This article reviews recent advances in post-OLT hepatitis B virus (HBV) control and future methodological directions. New NUC such as entecavir, tenofovir or lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil combinations induce a very low frequency of viral resistance. The withdrawal of HBIG after several months of OLT under new NUC continuation also has permissible effects. Even after HBV reactivation, NUC can usually achieve viral control when viral markers are strictly followed up. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-HBV antibodies via vaccination with a hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine. However, HBV vaccination is not sufficiently effective in patients to treat liver cirrhosis type B after OLT because immune tolerance to the virus has already continued for several decades. Trials of its safety and cost-effectiveness are required. This review advocates a safe and economical approach to controlling post-OLT HBV recurrence.

  18. Natural products as promising drug candidates for the treatment of hepatitis B and C.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Carolin; Efferth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a major threat worldwide. Combination therapy of interferon-alpha and ribavirin is currently the treatment of choice for HCV-infected patients. However, this regimen is only effective in approximately 50% of patients and provokes severe side-effects. Numerous natural alternatives for treating HCV have been suggested. Deoxynojirimycin and its derivatives are iminosugars which exert anti-HCV activity by inhibiting alpha-glucosidases. A non-immunosuppressive derivate of cyclosporine A, NIM811, exerts anti-HCV activity by binding to cyclophilin. Other natural products with promising anti-HCV activity are 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives, Mellein, and pseudoguaianolides. For HBV treatment, several drugs are available, specifically targeting the virus polymerase (lamivudine, entecavir, telbivudine, and adefovir dipivoxil). The efficacy of these drugs is hampered by the development of resistance due to point mutations in the HBV polymerase. Due to drug resistance and adverse side-effects, the search for novel drugs is mandatory. Wogonin, ellagic acid, artemisinin and artesunate, chrysophanol 8-O-beta-D-glucoside, saikosaponin C, and protostane triterpenes are active against HBV. Natural products need to be investigated in more detail to explore their potential as novel adjuncts to established HBV or HCV therapy.

  19. Natural products as promising drug candidates for the treatment of hepatitis B and C

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Carolin; Efferth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a major threat worldwide. Combination therapy of interferon-α and ribavirin is currently the treatment of choice for HCV-infected patients. However, this regimen is only effective in approximately 50% of patients and provokes severe side-effects. Numerous natural alternatives for treating HCV have been suggested. Deoxynojirimycin and its derivatives are iminosugars which exert anti-HCV activity by inhibiting α-glucosidases. A non-immunosuppressive derivate of cyclosporine A, NIM811, exerts anti-HCV activity by binding to cyclophilin. Other natural products with promising anti-HCV activity are 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives, Mellein, and pseudoguaianolides. For HBV treatment, several drugs are available, specifically targeting the virus polymerase (lamivudine, entecavir, telbivudine, and adefovir dipivoxil). The efficacy of these drugs is hampered by the development of resistance due to point mutations in the HBV polymerase. Due to drug resistance and adverse side-effects, the search for novel drugs is mandatory. Wogonin, ellagic acid, artemisinin and artesunate, chrysophanol 8-O-β-D-glucoside, saikosaponin C, and protostane triterpenes are active against HBV. Natural products need to be investigated in more detail to explore their potential as novel adjuncts to established HBV or HCV therapy. PMID:19060918

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-11-01

    1-Octanol, 9vPnC-MnCc; Abiraterone acetate, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, ARRY-520, AS-1404, Asimadoline, Atazanavir sulfate, AVE-0277, Azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Boceprevir, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Clevudine, Contusugene ladenovec, CP-751871, Crofelemer, Cypher, CYT006-AngQb; Darbepoetin alfa, Desmopressin, Dexlansoprazole, DG-041; E-5555, Ecogramostim, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Falecalcitriol, Fampridine, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fingolimod hydrochloride; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GS-7904L, GV-1001; HT-1001; Insulin detemir, ISIS-112989, Istradefylline; Laquinimod sodium, Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Levobetaxolol hydrochloride, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liposomal morphine sulfate, Lubiprostone, Lumiracoxib, LY-518674; MEM-1003, Mesna disulfide, Mipomersen sodium, MM-093, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naptumomab estafenatox, Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Pasireotide, Pazufloxacin mesilate, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimagedine, Pimecrolimus, Pramlintide acetate, Prasterone, Pregabalin, Prulifloxacin; QAE-397; Rec-15/2615, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhGAD65, Roflumilast, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, Rupatadine fumarate; Safinamide mesilate, SIR-Spheres, Sitagliptin phosphate, Sodium phenylacetate, Sodium phenylacetate/Sodium benzoate, Sorafenib, SSR-244738; Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Teduglutide, Tegaserod maleate, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Trabectedin, Travoprost

  1. A cutting-edge view on the current state of antiviral drug development.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    Prominent in the current stage of antiviral drug development are: (i) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs), the most recent example being Stribild(TM); (ii) for hepatitis C virus (HCV), the pleiade of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) that should be formulated in the most appropriate combinations so as to obtain a cure of the infection; (iii)-(v) new strategies (i.e., AIC316, AIC246, and FV-100) for the treatment of herpesvirus infections: herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), respectively; (vi) the role of a new tenofovir prodrug, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) (GS-7340) for the treatment of HIV infections; (vii) the potential use of poxvirus inhibitors (CMX001 and ST-246); (viii) the usefulness of new influenza virus inhibitors (peramivir and laninamivir octanoate); (ix) the position of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors [lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, entecavir, telbivudine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)]; and (x) the potential of new compounds such as FGI-103, FGI-104, FGI-106, dUY11, and LJ-001 for the treatment of filoviruses (i.e., Ebola). Whereas for HIV and HCV therapy is aimed at multiple-drug combinations, for all other viruses, HSV, CMV, VZV, pox, influenza, HBV, and filoviruses, current strategies are based on the use of single compounds.

  2. [Antiviral therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis B with multi-drug resistance to nucleoside analogues].

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Itaru; Hige, Shuhei; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Kimura, Mutsuumi; Arakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Tomoaki; Kuwata, Yasuaki; Ohmura, Takumi; Sato, Takahiro; Toyota, Joji

    2013-01-01

    In 18 of 547 patients who had received nucleoside analogue preparations for 1 year or more, multi-drug resistance was detected, after a median follow-up of 53 months. No patient showed liver failure related to multi-drug resistance acquisition. Multi-drug resistance was associated with entecavir (ETV) therapy in 7 lamivudine (LAM) -resistant patients, combination therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) in 8 LAM-resistant patients, LAM switching to ETV in 2 patients, and initial ETV administration in 1. For treatment, combination therapy with LAM and ADV was performed. In non-responders, combination therapy with ADV and ETV was employed. In all LAM- and ADV-resistant patients, and the HBV DNA level decreased to 3.0LC/ml or less. However, a similar decrease was noted in 7 (58.3%) of 12 LAM- and ETV-resistant patients. Of the 18 patients, 1 did not respond to combination therapy with ADV and ETV. Therapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) was required.

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AeroDose albuterol inhaler, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anidulafungin, anthrax vaccine, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, ceftobiprole, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, cilansetron; Darbepoetin alfa, degarelix acetate, dimethylfumarate, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, eletriptan, entecavir, esomeprazole magnesium, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gepirone hydrochloride; Human insulin; IDEA-070, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab; Lanthanum carbonate, lubiprostone; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, melatonin; NC-531, nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid, nolatrexed dihydrochloride; Oral insulin; Palifermin, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranibizumab, renzapride hydrochloride, RSD-1235; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, semapimod hydrochloride, Semax, SHL-749; Tegaserod maleate, tenatoprazole, tetrodotoxin, tolevamer sodium, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, visilizumab, Xcellerated T cells, XP-828L; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:16082427

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-09-01

    12B75, 274150; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Abatacept, Ad2/HIF-1alpha, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AGN-201904-Z, AIDSVAX, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amlodipine besylate/Olmesartan medoxomil, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Amodiaquine, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Arsenic trioxide, Artesunate/Amodiaquine, Ascorbic acid, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrigel-Leuprolide, Axitinib; Bevacizumab, Binodenoson, Bortezomib, Bovine lactoferrin; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Carisbamate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, Conivaptan hydrochloride, CP-690550, CP-751871, Cypher; Dapivirine, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, del-1 Genemedicine, Denosumab, Desloratadine, Dexlansoprazole, DiabeCell, Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, DTaP-HepB-IPV, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Eldecalcitol, Eletriptan, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Eritoran tetrasodium, Ertapenem sodium, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Estradiol acetate, Eszopiclone, ETEC vaccine, Etoricoxib, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fluticasone furoate, Fosmidomycin, Fosmidomycin/clindamycin; Glutamine; Heat Shock Protein 10, Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HIV vaccine, Hochuekki-to, Human Albumin, Human papillomavirus vaccine; Immune globulin subcutaneous [human], IMP-321, Interferon omega, ISIS-301012, Istaroxime; Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine; Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Linaclotide acetate, Lumiracoxib, LY-517717; Malaria vaccine, MAS-063D, Meningitis B vaccine, Mepolizumab, Methylnaltrexone bromide, Micafungin sodium, MK-0822A, Morphine glucuronide, Morphine hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nesiritide, Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol, NT-201; Oblimersen sodium, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, Omalizumab, Otamixaban; Paclitaxel nanoparticles

  6. The effects of the insulin resistance index on the virologic response to entecavir in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Yao; Wang, Yu-Gang; Wei, Li-Qing; Zhou, Jian; Dai, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To further observe and verify the effect of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on the response to antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and investigate the relationship between the virologic response and insulin resistance. Patients and methods A retrospective study was adopted and 61 NAFLD patients with HBeAg-positive CHB were included as the observation group (group A), and 64 patients with simple CHB were included as the control group (group B). Results After 12 weeks of treatment with entecavir, the total virologic response rate in group A was statistically significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.05). During weeks 24–96, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In weeks 48 and 96, there was no significant difference in the HBeAg seroconversion rates between the two groups (P>0.05). In weeks 12 and 24, there was also no significant difference in the alanine transaminase (ALT) normalization rate between the two groups (P>0.05). Then, in weeks 48 and 96, the ALT normalization rate of group A was obviously lower than that of group B (P<0.05). Group A patients were divided into group A1 (≤M) and group A2 (>M) according to the median value (M=2.79) of the baseline homeostatic model assessment method insulin resistance levels. In weeks 48 and 96, the ALT normalization rate of group A1 was significantly higher than that of group A2 (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient (r) of the baseline homeostatic model assessment method insulin resistance level and the severity of fatty liver in group A was 0.426 (P=0.001). Conclusion NAFLD cannot affect the long-term total virologic response rate and HBeAg seroconversion rate in CHB patients treated with entecavir but can reduce the long-term biochemical response rate, which has a positive correlation with the severity of fatty liver and the insulin resistance index. PMID:27621595

  7. The effects of the insulin resistance index on the virologic response to entecavir in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Yao; Wang, Yu-Gang; Wei, Li-Qing; Zhou, Jian; Dai, Wei-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To further observe and verify the effect of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) on the response to antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and investigate the relationship between the virologic response and insulin resistance. Patients and methods A retrospective study was adopted and 61 NAFLD patients with HBeAg-positive CHB were included as the observation group (group A), and 64 patients with simple CHB were included as the control group (group B). Results After 12 weeks of treatment with entecavir, the total virologic response rate in group A was statistically significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.05). During weeks 24–96, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In weeks 48 and 96, there was no significant difference in the HBeAg seroconversion rates between the two groups (P>0.05). In weeks 12 and 24, there was also no significant difference in the alanine transaminase (ALT) normalization rate between the two groups (P>0.05). Then, in weeks 48 and 96, the ALT normalization rate of group A was obviously lower than that of group B (P<0.05). Group A patients were divided into group A1 (≤M) and group A2 (>M) according to the median value (M=2.79) of the baseline homeostatic model assessment method insulin resistance levels. In weeks 48 and 96, the ALT normalization rate of group A1 was significantly higher than that of group A2 (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient (r) of the baseline homeostatic model assessment method insulin resistance level and the severity of fatty liver in group A was 0.426 (P=0.001). Conclusion NAFLD cannot affect the long-term total virologic response rate and HBeAg seroconversion rate in CHB patients treated with entecavir but can reduce the long-term biochemical response rate, which has a positive correlation with the severity of fatty liver and the insulin resistance index.

  8. Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants with primary resistance to antiviral therapy and S-mutants with potential primary resistance to adefovir in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Rivero, Cintia W; Minassian, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Gentile, Emiliano A; Trinks, Julieta; León, Liliana; Daleoso, Graciela; Frider, Bernardo; Lezama, Carol; Galoppo, Marcela; Giacove, Gisela; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants may either emerge in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) as a result of positive selection pressure exerted by their own immune response, or during therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs). Naturally occurring HBV variants with primary antiviral resistance are rarely observed. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the (eventual) circulation of HBV variants with natural resistance to NAs currently used as therapy for CHB in Argentina. This study reports 13 cases of CHB-infected patients with natural antiviral resistance to at least one NA. Five of them were also carriers of S-variants that might escape the humoral immune system recognition with potential resistance to adefovir. In addition to the already reported A2 HBV subgenotype association to NAs natural resistance, E and F genotypes association to such resistance is described for the first time. These findings suggest that sequence analysis of the HBV reverse transcriptase might be an essential tool before starting antiviral therapy, in order to choose the proper NAs for optimizing the therapeutic management of chronically infected patients. Moreover, the circulation and transmission of S-mutants with resistance to such antiviral drugs should be of public health concern as they may represent an additional risk for the community.

  9. Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants with primary resistance to antiviral therapy and S-mutants with potential primary resistance to adefovir in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Rivero, Cintia W; Minassian, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Gentile, Emiliano A; Trinks, Julieta; León, Liliana; Daleoso, Graciela; Frider, Bernardo; Lezama, Carol; Galoppo, Marcela; Giacove, Gisela; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants may either emerge in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) as a result of positive selection pressure exerted by their own immune response, or during therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs). Naturally occurring HBV variants with primary antiviral resistance are rarely observed. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the (eventual) circulation of HBV variants with natural resistance to NAs currently used as therapy for CHB in Argentina. This study reports 13 cases of CHB-infected patients with natural antiviral resistance to at least one NA. Five of them were also carriers of S-variants that might escape the humoral immune system recognition with potential resistance to adefovir. In addition to the already reported A2 HBV subgenotype association to NAs natural resistance, E and F genotypes association to such resistance is described for the first time. These findings suggest that sequence analysis of the HBV reverse transcriptase might be an essential tool before starting antiviral therapy, in order to choose the proper NAs for optimizing the therapeutic management of chronically infected patients. Moreover, the circulation and transmission of S-mutants with resistance to such antiviral drugs should be of public health concern as they may represent an additional risk for the community. PMID:20403388

  10. Combination therapy including CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and entecavir induces early viral response and enhanced inhibition of viral replication in a woodchuck model of chronic hepadnaviral infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhang, Ejuan; Kemper, Thekla; Vollmer, Jörg; Davis, Heather L; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) stimulate immune cells via TLR9 and are potentially useful immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic viral infections. In the present study, different classes of CpGs were tested for their capacities for innate immune activation and antiviral activities in the woodchuck model. A class P CpG ODN was found to stimulate interferon (IFN) production in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro, and following subcutaneous administration in vivo, it was observed to induce IFN and MxA expression in woodchuck PBMCs. Combination treatment with CpG ODN and entecavir (ETV) led to effective suppression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) load in the woodchucks, with early viral responses and inhibition of replication. The woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen (WHsAg) serum concentrations were strongly decreased by CpG and ETV together but not by either agent alone, indicating synergistic effects. However, viral control post-treatment was still transient, similar to that observed with ETV alone. Significantly elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but not of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in some of the woodchucks receiving CpG ODN were noted, but these increases were resolved before the completion of treatment and were not associated with an elevated serum bilirubin level or coagulation disorders, suggesting the absence of a significant safety concern. PMID:26585244

  11. Combination of DNA Prime – Adenovirus Boost Immunization with Entecavir Elicits Sustained Control of Chronic Hepatitis B in the Woodchuck Model

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Anna D.; Zhang, Ejuan; Johrden, Lena; Liu, Jia; Seiz, Pia L.; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ma, Zhiyong; Kemper, Thekla; Fiedler, Melanie; Glebe, Dieter; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A potent therapeutic T-cell vaccine may be an alternative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Previously, we developed a DNA prime-adenovirus (AdV) boost vaccination protocol that could elicit strong and specific CD8+ T-cell responses to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in mice. In the present study, we first examined whether this new prime-boost immunization could induce WHcAg-specific T-cell responses and effectively control WHV replication in the WHV-transgenic mouse model. Secondly, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of this new vaccination strategy in chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in combination with a potent antiviral treatment. Immunization of WHV-transgenic mice by DNA prime-AdV boost regimen elicited potent and functional WHcAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response that consequently resulted in the reduction of the WHV load below the detection limit in more than 70% of animals. The combination therapy of entecavir (ETV) treatment and DNA prime-AdV boost immunization in chronic WHV carriers resulted in WHsAg- and WHcAg-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, which were not detectable in ETV-only treated controls. Woodchucks receiving the combination therapy showed a prolonged suppression of WHV replication and lower WHsAg levels compared to controls. Moreover, two of four immunized carriers remained WHV negative after the end of ETV treatment and developed anti-WHs antibodies. These results demonstrate that the combined antiviral and vaccination approach efficiently elicited sustained immunological control of chronic hepadnaviral infection in woodchucks and may be a new promising therapeutic strategy in patients. PMID:23785279

  12. Prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus recurrence after liver transplantation: A registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shu; Jiang, Li; Xiao, Guang-Qin; Yan, Lu-Nan; Yang, Jia-Yin; Wen, Tian-Fu; Li, Bo; Wang, Wen-Tao; Xu, Ming-Qing; Wei, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) in combination with different nucleos(t)ide analogues. METHODS: A total of 5333 hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients from the China Liver Transplant Registry database were enrolled between January 2000 and December 2009. Low-dose intramuscular (im) HBIG combined with one nucleos(t)ide analogue has been shown to be very cost-effective in recent reports. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylactic outcomes were compared based on their posttransplant prophylactic protocols [group A (n = 4684): im HBIG plus lamivudine; group B (n = 491): im HBIG plus entecavir; group C (n = 158): im HBIG plus adefovir dipivoxil]. We compared the related baseline characteristics among the three groups, including the age, male sex, Meld score at the time of transplantation, Child-Pugh score at the time of transplantation, HCC, pre-transplantation hepatitis B e antigen positivity, pre-transplantation HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV DNA) positivity, HBV DNA at the time of transplantation, pre-transplantation antiviral therapy, and the duration of antiviral therapy before transplantation of the patients. We also calculated the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates and HBV recurrence rates according to the different groups. All potential risk factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The mean follow-up duration was 42.1 ± 30.3 mo. The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were lower in group A than in groups B (86.2% vs 94.4%, 76.9% vs 86.6%, 73.7% vs 82.4%, respectively, P < 0.001) and C (86.2% vs 92.5%, 76.9% vs 73.7%, 87.0% vs 81.6%, respectively, P < 0.001). The 1-, 3- and 5-year posttransplant HBV recurrence rates were significantly higher in group A than in group B (1.7% vs 0.5%, 3.5% vs 1.5%, 4.7% vs 1.5%, respectively, P = 0.023). No significant difference existed between groups A and C and between groups B and C with respect to the 1-, 3- and 5-year HBV recurrence rates

  13. Rapid detection of hepatitis B virus variants associated with lamivudine and adefovir resistance by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification combined with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuangrong; Wang, Feng; Li, Fake; Chang, Kai; Yang, Shaojun; Zhang, Kejun; Jiang, Wenbin; Shang, Ya; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ming

    2014-02-01

    Drug-resistant mutations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are the major obstacles to successful therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. Although there are many methods for detecting the antiviral drug-resistant mutations of HBV, their applications are restricted because of their shortcomings, such as low sensitivity, the time required, and the high cost. For this study, a multiplex ligation-dependent probe real-time PCR (MLP-RT-PCR) method was developed to simultaneously detect lamivudine (LAM)- and adefovir (ADV)-resistant HBV mutants (those with the mutations rtM204V/I, rtA181V/T, and rtN236T). The new method combined the high-throughput nature of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) with the rapid and sensitive detection of real-time PCR. In this report, MLP-RT-PCR was evaluated by detecting drug-resistant mutants in 116 patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. By MLP-RT-PCR analysis, LAM-resistant mutations were detected in 41 patients (35.3%), ADV-resistant mutations were detected in 17 patients (14.7%), and LAM- and-ADV-resistant mutations were detected in 5 patients (4.3%). Based on the results of MLP-RT-PCR, the mutations rtM204V, rtM204I, rtA181T, rtA181V, and rtN236T were 95.7% (111/116 patients), 98.3% (114/116 patients), 99.1% (115/116 patients), 98.3% (114/116 patients), and 99.1% (115/116 patients) concordant, respectively, with those of direct sequencing. The MLP-RT-PCR assay was more sensitive than direct sequencing for detecting mutations with low frequencies. Four samples containing the low-frequency (<10%) mutants were identified by MLP-RT-PCR and further confirmed by clonal sequencing. MLP-RT-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method that enables the detection of multidrug-resistant HBV mutations in clinical practice.

  14. Rapid Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Variants Associated with Lamivudine and Adefovir Resistance by Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Combined with Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuangrong; Wang, Feng; Li, Fake; Chang, Kai; Yang, Shaojun; Zhang, Kejun; Jiang, Wenbin; Shang, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant mutations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are the major obstacles to successful therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. Although there are many methods for detecting the antiviral drug-resistant mutations of HBV, their applications are restricted because of their shortcomings, such as low sensitivity, the time required, and the high cost. For this study, a multiplex ligation-dependent probe real-time PCR (MLP-RT-PCR) method was developed to simultaneously detect lamivudine (LAM)- and adefovir (ADV)-resistant HBV mutants (those with the mutations rtM204V/I, rtA181V/T, and rtN236T). The new method combined the high-throughput nature of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) with the rapid and sensitive detection of real-time PCR. In this report, MLP-RT-PCR was evaluated by detecting drug-resistant mutants in 116 patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. By MLP-RT-PCR analysis, LAM-resistant mutations were detected in 41 patients (35.3%), ADV-resistant mutations were detected in 17 patients (14.7%), and LAM- and-ADV-resistant mutations were detected in 5 patients (4.3%). Based on the results of MLP-RT-PCR, the mutations rtM204V, rtM204I, rtA181T, rtA181V, and rtN236T were 95.7% (111/116 patients), 98.3% (114/116 patients), 99.1% (115/116 patients), 98.3% (114/116 patients), and 99.1% (115/116 patients) concordant, respectively, with those of direct sequencing. The MLP-RT-PCR assay was more sensitive than direct sequencing for detecting mutations with low frequencies. Four samples containing the low-frequency (<10%) mutants were identified by MLP-RT-PCR and further confirmed by clonal sequencing. MLP-RT-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method that enables the detection of multidrug-resistant HBV mutations in clinical practice. PMID:24478474

  15. Hepatitis B surface antigen titer is a good indicator of durable viral response after entecavir off-treatment for chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Ah; Seo, Yeon Seok; Park, Seung Woon; Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Tae Hyung; Suh, Sang Jun; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Ji Hoon; An, Hyunggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo; Um, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Clear indicators for stopping antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are not yet available. Since the level of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is correlated with covalently closed circular DNA, the HBsAg titer might be a good indicator of the off-treatment response. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the HBsAg titer and the entecavir (ETV) off-treatment response. Methods This study analyzed 44 consecutive CHB patients (age, 44.6±11.4 years, mean±SD; men, 63.6%; positive hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg) at baseline, 56.8%; HBV DNA level, 6.8±1.3 log10 IU/mL) treated with ETV for a sufficient duration and in whom treatment was discontinued after HBsAg levels were measured. A virological relapse was defined as an increase in serum HBV DNA level of >2000 IU/mL, and a clinical relapse was defined as a virological relapse with a biochemical flare, defined as an increase in the serum alanine aminotransferase level of >2 × upper limit of normal. Results After stopping ETV, virological relapse and clinical relapse were observed in 32 and 24 patients, respectively, during 20.8±19.9 months of follow-up. The cumulative incidence rates of virological relapse were 36.2% and 66.2%, respectively, at 6 and 12 months, and those of clinical relapse were 14.3% and 42.3%. The off-treatment HBsAg level was an independent factor associated with clinical relapse (hazard ratio, 2.251; 95% confidence interval, 1.076–4.706; P=0.031). When patients were grouped according to off-treatment HBsAg levels, clinical relapse did not occur in patients with an off-treatment HBsAg level of ≤2 log10 IU/mL (n=5), while the incidence rates of clinical relapse at 12 months after off-treatment were 28.4% and 55.7% in patients with off-treatment HBsAg levels of >2 and ≤3 log10 IU/mL (n=11) and >3 log10 IU/mL (n=28), respectively. Conclusion The off-treatment HBsAg level is closely related to clinical relapse after treatment cessation. A

  16. Treatment for hepatitis B in patients with drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kroy, Daniela C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections affect about 240 million patients worldwide that are at risk of developing liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is a small, partially double stranded DNA virus with four overlapping genes and a unique life cycle, which involves the generation of an RNA template for replication via reverse transcription. Mutations occur frequently during chronic infection, and particular selection pressures select distinct mutants. Nucleoside and nucleotide analogues like lamivudine (LMV), entecavir (ETV), telbivudine (LdT), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and tenofovir (TDF) are used to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Importantly, these drugs have different barriers to resistance, explaining the higher incidence of treatment failure in the past due to drug resistant viral strains for the older compounds LMV, LdT and ADV. On a molecular level, drug resistant mutations usually affect the reverse transcriptase domain of the HBV polymerase protein. Secondary compensatory mutations restore the replication fitness of the mutant virus. From a clinical point of view, patients undergoing antiviral therapy require regular testing for HBV DNA (every 3–6 months). In case of insufficient viral suppression or viral breakthrough (>1 log increase in HBV DNA above nadir), strict adherence to therapy needs to be ensured. If drug resistance is suspected or even molecularly confirmed, rescue therapy strategies exist, usually switching to a noncross-resistant antiviral drug. LMV, LdT and ETV resistant HBV can be treated with TDF monotherapy, ADV resistance with ETV or TDF, and insufficient responses to TDF may require ETV either as mono- or combination therapy. Complex treatment histories with many antivirals may sometimes necessitate the combination of highly effective antivirals like ETV and TDF. Novel treatment targets such as core (capsid) inhibitors, siRNA targeting protein translation, entry inhibitors or immune modulators

  17. Gateways to clinical trials. July-August 2008.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, 501516, 89-12; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, AG-701, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Apixaban, Atazanavir sulfate, Atrasentan, Axitinib; BI-1744-CL, BIBF-1120, BIBW-2992, Bortezomib; Carboxyamidotriazole, Caspofungin acetate, CBP-501, Cediranib, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholesteryl hydrophobized polysaccharide-Her2 protein complex, CHP-NY-ESO-1, Cypher; Dalbavancin, Dalcetrapib, Daptomycin, Darapladib, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Denosumab, DNA-HIV-C, Dovitinib, DR-5001, Dronedarone hydrochloride, DT388IL3; E75, EC-17/EC-90, Ecogramostim, Efungumab, Entecavir, EP HIV-1090, EP-2101, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Faropenem daloxate, Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium, Fulvestrant; Golimumab, GSK-089, GW-590735; HO/03/03, hTERT572, hTERT572Y; Iloperidone; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Ispinesib mesylate, Istradefylline, Ixabepilone; JR-031, JX-594; KLH; Laropiprant, Lecozotan hydrochloride, Lenalidomide, Lestaurtinib, Linezolid; MGCD-0103, MK-0646, MVA-BN Measles; NI-0401, Niacin/laropiprant, NSC-719239, NYVAC-C; Ospemifene; Paliperidone palmitate, PAN-811, PCV7, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, PEGirinotecan, Perifosine, Pertuzumab, PF-00299804, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pitavastatin calcium, Pomalidomide, Prasterone, Pratosartan, Prucalopride, PSMA27/pDOM, Pyridoxal phosphate; QS-21, Quercetin; Rebimastat, Rimonabant, Rolofylline, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, RTS,S/SBAS2; SCH-530348, SN-29244, Soblidotin, Sodium dichloroacetate, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Spheramine, SU-6668, Succinobucol; Taranabant, Taxus, Telaprevir, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Triphendiol; UC-781, Udenafil, UNIL-025; V-5 Immunitor, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate, Velafermin, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Vinflunine, Vitespen, Vorinostat

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-04-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, [(123)I]-BZA, 9-Aminocamptothecin; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, Ambrisentan, Amsilarotene, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Apricitabine, Aripiprazole, Arsenic trioxide, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atrasentan, Azacitidine; Banoxantrone, Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bromfenac; Cachectin, Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Canakinumab, Carfilzomib, CAT-354, CCX-282, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, CNTO-328, Corifollitropin alfa, Crofelemer; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Emtricitabine, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Epoetin zeta, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farglitazar, Febuxostat, Fosamprenavir calcium, FX-06; Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib; HIVIS DNA; Imatinib mesylate, INCB- 18424, Indacaterol, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin detemir; JNJ-26854165; Lacosamide, Landiolol, Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, L-NAME, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib; Maraviroc, Mepolizumab, Methoxy polyethylene glycol- epoetin-beta, Miglustat, MK-0493, MVA-CMDR, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nepafenac, Neratinib, Neridronic acid, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel poliglumex, Palifermin, Patupilone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, PHA-848125, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Povidone-iodine liposome complex, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride; Raltegravir potassium, Retigabine, Revaprazan hydrochloride, rhFSH, Rilpivirine, Rivaroxaban, Romidepsin

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adefovir dipivoxil, AGI-1067, alefacept, alemtuzumab, ALVAC-p53, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AOD-9604, apafant, aprinocarsen sodium, arsenic trioxide; Balaglitazone, BIM-23190, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Canertinib dihydrochloride, CDP-850, cevimeline hydrochloride, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clenoliximab, clevudine, CN-787; D-003, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine dexanabinol, duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, elvucitabine emfilermin, EN-101, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epithalon, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, etilefrine pivalate hydrochloride etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Fidarestat, fondaparinux sodium; Ganstigmine hydrochloride; Homoharringtonine, HuMax-IL-15, hyperimmune IVIG; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-1C11, Inhaled insulin, irofulven, iseganan hydrochloride, ISIS-14803, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, LAS-34475, levocetirizine, liraglutide, LY-307161 SR; Magnesium sulfate, maribavir, melatonin, mycobacterium cell wall complex; NN-414, NO-aspirin, nociceptin, nolomirole hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil oral insulin, ospemifene; PDX, perillyl alcohol, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-542, PV-701, pyrazoloacridine; R-744, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rDNA insulin, resiniferatoxin, reslizumab, ridogrel, riplizumab ropivacaine, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate, ruboxistaurin mesilate

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  2. Hepatitis B core-related antigen levels are associated with response to entecavir and peginterferon add-on therapy in hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    van Campenhout, M J H; Brouwer, W P; van Oord, G W; Xie, Q; Zhang, Q; Zhang, N; Guo, S; Tabak, F; Streinu-Cercel, A; Wang, J; Pas, S D; Sonneveld, M J; de Knegt, R J; Boonstra, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), a new serum marker, may be useful in monitoring chronic hepatitis B infection. HBcrAg was measured in 175 hepatitis B e antigen-positive patients treated with entecavir (ETV) with or without peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on therapy. Decline in HBcrAg was stronger in patients with vs. without combined response (ETV: -3.22 vs. -1.71 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -3.16 vs. -1.83 IU/mL, p <0.001) and in patients with vs. without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) response (ETV: -2.60 vs. -1.74 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -2.38 vs. -2.15 log U/mL, p = 0.31). HBcrAg was associated with combined response (adjusted odds ratio 0.3, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.5, p <0.001), but was not superior to quantitative HBsAg (qHBsAg).

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  5. Inhibition of viral replication reduces regulatory T cells and enhances the antiviral immune response in chronic hepatitis B

    SciTech Connect

    Stoop, Jeroen N. . E-mail: j.n.stoop@erasmusmc.nl; Molen, Renate G. van der . E-mail: r.vandermolen@erasmusmc.nl; Kuipers, Ernst J. . E-mail: e.j.kuipers@erasmusmc.nl; Kusters, Johannes G. . E-mail: j.g.kusters@erasmusmc.nl; Janssen, Harry L.A. . E-mail: h.janssen@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-04-25

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the impaired immune response that is typical for a chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To gain more insight in the mechanism that is responsible for this impaired immune response, the effect of viral load reduction resulting from treatment with the nucleotide analogue adefovir dipivoxil on the percentages of Treg and HBV-specific T-cell responses was analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 12 patients were collected at baseline and during treatment. In parallel to the decline in viral load, we found a decline in circulating Treg, combined with an increase in HBV core antigen-specific IFN-{gamma} production and proliferation. The production of IL10 did not decrease during therapy. In conclusion, adefovir induced viral load reduction results in a decline of circulating Treg together with a partial recovery of the immune response.

  6. Impact of nucleos(t)ide analogues on the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with chronic hepatitis B: a prospective cohort study in China.

    PubMed

    Qi, X; Wang, J-Y; Mao, R-C; Zhang, J-M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues, particularly tenofovir or adefovir, may affect renal function. To date, there has not been a head-to-head controlled study to assess estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fluctuations in nucleos(t)ide-treated CHB patients. We aimed to evaluate the long-term effects of nucleos(t)ide on eGFR in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B. This prospective cohort study included 275 patients. Patient subgroups included those treated with lamivudine (n = 50), adefovir (n = 60), telbivudine (n = 68) and entecavir (n = 61); untreated patients (n = 36) served as control. After an average follow-up duration of 23 months, eGFR calculated by Cockcroft-Gault and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas increased by 18.35 mL/min and 19.34 mL/min (P < 0.0001) in the telbivudine group, respectively, and decreased by 10.95 mL/min and 12.17 mL/min (P = 0.0001) in the adefovir group, respectively. Even if renal function was normal or mildly impaired at baseline, eGFR increased significantly more in the telbivudine group than in the other groups (P < 0.001). More patients in the adefovir group (23%) had a ≥20% decrease in eGFR than the other groups (P < 0.0001). More patients in the telbivudine group (31%) had a ≥20% increase in eGFR than the other groups (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, prolonged telbivudine therapy resulted in improved eGFR, while adefovir therapy was associated with decreased eGFR. Lamivudine and entecavir therapy did not significantly influence eGFR.

  7. Long-term monitoring drug resistance by ultra-deep pyrosequencing in a chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patient exposed to several unsuccessful therapy schemes.

    PubMed

    Sede, M; Ojeda, D; Cassino, L; Westergaard, G; Vazquez, M; Benetti, S; Fay, F; Tanno, H; Quarleri, J

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the spectrum and dynamics of low-prevalent HBV mutations in the reverse transcriptase (rt) and S antigen by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS). Samples were obtained from a chronically infected patient who was followed throughout a thirteen-year period. This technology enabled simultaneous analysis of 4084 clonally amplified fragments from the patient allowing detecting low prevalent (<1%) mutations during the follow-up. At baseline, HBV sequences were predominately wild-type. Under sequential HBV monotherapies including lamivudine, adefovir and entecavir, a high frequency of rtM204I mutation was detected initially as unique and then coexisting with rtM204V. Both mutations were statistically associated with rtA200V and rtV207I, respectively. Once the entecavir and tenofovir combined therapy was started, polymerase and consequently envelope gene mutations appeared at several positions at a higher frequency than before, including the entecavir resistance-associated mutation rtT184L.

  8. Analysis of HBV genotype, drug resistant mutations, and pre-core/basal core promoter mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Hong, Sun Pyo; Jang, Eun Sun; Park, Sang Jong; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kang, Sook-Kyoung; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2015-06-01

    Acute hepatitis B, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains with drug resistant mutations or pre-core/basal core promoter (PC/BCP) mutations, is a public health concern, because this infection is often associated with poor disease outcome or difficulty in therapeutic choice. The HBV genotype, the prevalence of drug resistant mutations, and PC/BCP mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B were studied. From 2006 to 2008, 36 patients with acute hepatitis B were enrolled prospectively in four general hospitals. Among them, 20 showed detectable HBV DNA (median value was 4.8 log copies/mL). HBV genotyping and analysis of HBV mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine, adefovir, or entecavir and of PC/BCP mutations were performed using highly sensitive restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) analysis. All 20 patients were infected with HBV genotype C, which causes almost all cases of chronic hepatitis B in Korea. No patient showed mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine (L180M, M204V/I), adefovir (A181T, N236S), or entecavir (I169M, A184T/V, S202I/G, M250V/I/L). However, four patients had BCP mutations, and two had PC mutations. Platelet counts were significantly lower in the four patients with PC/BCP mutations compared to those with wild type. In this study, all acute hepatitis B patients had genotype C HBV strains with no drug resistant mutations. However, 20% showed PC/BCP mutations. This highlights the need for further study on the significance of PC/BCP mutations.

  9. Prevalence and types of drug-resistant variants in Chinese patients with acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Su, Feifei; Dai, Jianyi; Yang, Shoufeng; Jiang, Xiangao; Cui, Xiaoya; Ning, Hongye; Li, Junhua; Huang, Mohe

    2015-09-01

    The presence of therapy-associated hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants is the main drawback of antiviral therapy for HBV infection. Moreover, drug-resistant variants are more insensitive to a second agent and more therapy-associated mutations will be present. To apply better nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) and reduce the occurrence of resistance, the prevalence and types of drug-resistant mutations in acute hepatitis B patients were investigated in this study. One hundred three HBV DNA-positive patients with symptomatic acute hepatitis B that were observed from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled. Direct polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used firstly to screen HBV reverse-transcriptase domain to detect HBV mutants. Five lamivudine-resistant variants were identified. Clonal sequencing was performed for 5 resistance-positive samples and 10 other random samples. Interestingly, all detected samples harbored drug-resistant mutations, although with different percentage. Thirteen harbored lamivudine-related alone (five) or together with other NA related mutations (five with adefovir, one with entecavir, and one with telbivudine), and two of them harbored adefovir-related mutations. Also, mutations associated with four currently used NA were all detected, and the frequency is in accordance with the popularity of NA used in clinical practice. These data suggest that drug-resistant variants are present in patients with acute hepatitis B and NA should be applied more carefully for chronic hepatitis B patients developed from acute hepatitis B.

  10. Treatment of chronic hepatitis B with nucleos(t)ide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Waka; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-03-01

    Recently antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis B using nucleos(t)ide analogues have become standard treatment modalities on the basis of several independent guidelines, starting with those of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and other such organizations and bodies, including the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL), and the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW)'s research team. The philosophies underlying such treatment strategies are considered basically equivalent. MHLW's guidelines define subjects for medical intervention to be cases measuring alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ≥31 IU/L, with serological hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level ≥5 log copies/mL for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive cases, and serological HBV DNA level ≥4 log copies/mL for HBeAg-negative cases. These Japanese guidelines advocate entecavir as the first-line treatment option for nucleos(t)ide-naïve patients, and combination treatment of lamivudine and adefovir as the basis of treatment for patients with lamivudine- and/or entecavir-resistant viruses. Of particular note for patients undergoing lamivudine treatment with persistent HBV DNA level < 2.1 log copies/mL is the recommendation of a switch to entecavir. Early detection of drug-resistant virus is desirable after initiation of nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment, but such a procedure is not uniformly available at all medical institutions. Nevertheless, timely estimation of potential early-stage drug-resistant virus development is crucial for getting a head start on treatment. HBV core-related antigen (HBcrAg) level or HBV DNA level are considered useful markers for the appearance of such drug-resistant viruses.

  11. Mutational analysis of reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of patients with partial virological response during mono and combination antiviral therapies in genotype D chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Mahabadi, Mostafa; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Norouzi, Mehdi; Keyvani, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mutational pattern of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is unclear in patients who show incomplete response to antiviral therapy. The aims of this study were 1) to determine the benefit of combination therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and Lamivudine (LAM) versus ADV or LAM alone in maintaining virological, biochemical and histological responses and 2) to investigate the patterns of mutations in the reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of HBV with LAM and/or ADF-resistant in partially-responded chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Methods The study group consisted of 186 chronic HBV carriers who were admitted to the Tehran Hepatitis Network from 2010 to 2013. We retrospectively selected 86 patients who partially responded to different nucleoside analogue regimens. After 48 weeks of therapy, five groups of patients were defined including eight Lamivudine (LAM) Group (I), 30 Adefovir (ADV) Group (II), 16 ADV add on LAM Group (III), 32 ADV+LAM Group (IV), and 100 controls (no therapy). Reverse transcriptase (RT) and surface genes were amplified and sequenced for mutational analysis. Results All groups showed differences between mean values for age, gender, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and HBV DNA levels groups showed significant differences than other groups (p < 0.05). The mutation frequencies for groups were I (1.7%), II (1.39%), III (2.28%), IV (2.0%), and V (0.38%). T54N, L80I/V, I91L/V, L180M, M204I/V, Q215P/S, and F221Y/S showed the highest number of mutations in all groups with different frequencies. Four new, unreported mutations were found. Conclusion Those patients who failed to respond in the first 48 weeks, whether they were receiving mono or combination therapy, should be tested genotypically, for the early modification of treatment. PMID:27504160

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-12-01

    [Methoxy-(11)C]PD-153035, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Adalimumab, Adecatumumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, ADX-10059, Aflibercept, AIR-human growth hormone, Aliskiren fumarate, AMG-221, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, Aprepitant; Bavituximab, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BIBW-2992, BMS-690514, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Briakinumab; Capecitabine, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholecalciferol, Choline fenofibrate, Chorionic gonadotropin (human), Cixutumumab, Clopidogrel, CP-690550 citrate; Dabigatran, Dacetuzumab, Daclizumab, Dapagliflozin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; Efavirenz, Elisidepsin, Enoxaparin, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide; Fenobam, Figitumumab, Filibuvir, Fondaparinux sodium, Fresolimumab; Gefitinib, Golimumab, Golnerminogene pradenovec; Ifosfamide, Imatinib mesylate, Ipilimumab, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide; M-118, Masitinib mesylate, Metformin hydrochloride, Micafungin sodium, Moxifloxacin hydrochloride; Neratinib; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Palifosfamide lysine, Panobacumab, Panobinostat, Patupilone, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Piclozotan hydrochloride hydrate, Pixantrone maleate, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Prednisone, Progesterone, Prucalopride, pVGI.1 (VEGF-2); Retigabine, rhFSH, Rituximab, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salinosporamide A, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Somatropin, Sorafenib, SSR-244738, Sunitinib malate; Tamoxifen citrate, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telmisartan, Telmisartan/amlodipine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tipifarnib, Tolvaptan, Trastuzumab, Trastuzumab-MCC-DM1, Travoprost, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate/hydrochlorothiazide, Valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Vandetanib

  13. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  14. Efficacy of cationic lipid-DNA complexes (CLDC) on hepatitis B virus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Morrey, John D; Motter, Neil E; Taro, Brandon; Lay, Marla; Fairman, Jeffery

    2008-07-01

    Cationic lipid-DNA (non-coding) complexes (CLDC) are activators of the innate immune response that increase survival of rodents with some acute viral infections and cancers. CLDC were evaluated for their ability to impact viral DNA levels in transgenic mice carrying an infectious clone of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Mice used in the studies were diet-restricted as nursing pups from solid food, because the expression of HBV DNA in the liver was increased above background levels in some mice with this restriction. Survival surgery was performed on these mice to obtain liver biopsies from which to select animals with suitable levels of liver HBV DNA for entry into the experimental protocols. Intravenous administration of 5 microg/mouse of CLDC on days 1, 7 and 13 reduced liver HBV DNA to similar low levels achieved with the positive control, adefovir dipivoxil. In a subsequent experiment, the same treatment schedule was used to determine that the minimal effective CLDC dose was between 0.5 and 0.05 microg/mouse. Selective cytokines were increased in the livers of CLDC-treated compared to placebo-treated mice in a dose-responsive manner. CLDC were effective in reducing liver HBV DNA and could be considered for further evaluation in other hepatitis models. PMID:18358544

  15. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by quercetin in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhikui; Sun, Ge; Guo, Wei; Huang, Yayun; Sun, Weihua; Zhao, Fei; Hu, Kanghong

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most serious and prevalent viral diseases in the world. Although several anti-HBV drugs have been used clinically, their side and adverse effects limit treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is necessary to identify novel potential anti-HBV agents. The flavonol quercetin has shown activity against some retroviruses, but its effect on HBV remains unclear. In the present study, quercetin was incubated with HepG2.2.15 cells, as well as HuH-7 cells transfected with an HBV plasmid. Quercetin was shown to significantly reduce Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), secretion and HBV genomic DNA levels in both cell lines. In addition, co-incubation with lamivudine (3TC), entecavir (ETV), or adefovir (Ade) further enhanced the quercetin-induced inhibition of HBV replication. This inhibition was partially associated with decreased heat shock proteins and HBV transcription levels. The results indicate that quercetin inhibited HBV antigen secretion and genome replication in human hepatoma cell lines, which suggests that quercetin may be a potentially effective anti-HBV agent.

  16. Epidemiology study of HBV genotypes and antiviral drug resistance in multi-ethnic regions from Western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Liao, Yun; Chen, Jie; Cai, Bei; Su, Zhenzhen; Ying, Binwu; Lu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a critical global health issue and moderately epidemic in Western China, but HBV molecular epidemiology characteristics are still limited. We conducted this study to investigate HBV genotypes and antiviral resistant mutations in this multi-ethnic area. A total of 1316 HBV patients were recruited from four ethnic groups from 2011 to 2013. Genotypes and resistant mutations were determined by Sanger sequencing. Four genotypes (B, C, D and C/D) were identified. Genotype B and C were common in Han population, while genotype D was predominant in Uygurs. Genotype C was the major genotype in both Tibetans and Yis, and recombinant C/D was found in Tibetans only. Lamivudine resistance was common in all populations, especially in Hans with prevalence of 42.8%. Entecavir resistance was barely observed regardless of ethnicity. Genotype C isolates had higher rates of rtA181T/V than genotype B (13.5% vs. 5.1%, P < 0.001), in accordance with higher prevalence of resistance to adefovir (20.0% vs. 9.5%, P < 0.001). While incidence of resistant mutations to other drugs and clinical factors showed no difference among different genotypes. HBV genotypes and resistance-conferring mutations had different geographic and demographic distributions in Western China, which provided molecular epidemiology data for clinical management. PMID:26612031

  17. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-08-21

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB. PMID:27610013

  18. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB. PMID:27610013

  19. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of a niobium-substituted-heteropolytungstate on hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Qi, Yanfei; Ding, Yanhua; Wang, Juan; Li, Qingmei; Zhang, Jingzhou; Jiang, Yanfang; Chi, Xiumei; Li, Juan; Niu, Junqi

    2012-02-15

    To synthesise and characterize the polyoxometalate Cs(2)K(4)Na[SiW(9)Nb(3)O(40)]·H(2)O 1 for its anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) properties by using the HepG2.2.15 cell. The methylthiazol tetrazolium assay was used to evaluate the growth inhibitory effect of Compound 1 on HepG2.2.15 cell. By using ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively, the presence of extracellular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV DNA were measured. The levels of intracellular HBV DNA and mRNA were determined by using Southern blot or reverse-transcription-PCR, respectively. Intracellular distribution of antigen were measured by Western blot. A 1995 μmol/L concentration of the commercially-available hepatitis B drug, adefovir dipivoxil (ADV), was required to achieve 50% cytotoxicity against cultured cells (CC(50)) by day nine; in contrast, only 1747 μmol/L of Compound 1 was required for the same result. Treatment of HepG2.2.15 cells with Compound 1 effectively suppress the secretion of HBV antigens and HBV DNA in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. IC(50) values were determined to be 80 μmol/L for HBsAg, 75 μmol/L for HBeAg and 3.72 μmol/L for supernatant HBV DNA at day nine post-exposure, as opposed to 266, 296, 30.09 μmol/L, respectively, for ADV. Intracellular HBV DNA, mRNA and antigen were also found to be decreased by Compound 1. The same dose of ADV yielded a significantly less robust inhibitory effect. Compound 1 can clear HBV from hepatic cells and may represent a therapeutic agent to treat HBV infection.

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  2. Clinical characteristics and current management of hepatitis B and C in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Tang, Hong; Mao, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Ling-Yi; Chen, Hong; Zhong, Ying-Na; Lin, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Da-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe a population of outpatients in China infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV), and assess their current management status. METHODS: A multicenter, cross-sectional study of HBV- and/or HCV-infected patients was conducted from August to November, 2011 in western China. Patients ≥ 18 years of age with HBV and/or HCV infections who visited outpatient departments at 10 hospitals were evaluated, whether treated or not. Data were collected on the day of visit from medical records and patient interviews. RESULTS: A total 4010 outpatients were analyzed, including 2562 HBV-infected and 1406 HCV-infected and 42 HBV/HCV co-infected patients. The median duration of documented infection was 7.5 years in HBV-infected and 1.8 years in HCV-infected patients. Cirrhosis was the most frequent hepatic complication (12.2%), appearing in one-third of patients within 3 years prior to or at diagnosis. The HCV genotype was determined in only 10% of HCV-infected patients. Biopsy data were only available for 54 patients (1.3%). Antiviral medications had been received by 58.2% of patients with HBV infection and 66.6% with HCV infection. Nucleos(t)ide analogs were the major antiviral medications prescribed for HBV-infected patients (most commonly adefovir dipivoxil and lamivudine). Ribavirin + pegylated interferon was prescribed for two-thirds of HCV-infected patients. In the previous 12 mo, around one-fifth patients had been hospitalized due to HBV or HCV infection. CONCLUSION: This observational, real-life study has identified some gaps between clinical practice and guideline recommendations in China. To achieve better health outcomes, several improvements, such as disease monitoring and optimizing antiviral regimens, should be made to improve disease management. PMID:25309089

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  6. Antiviral therapy improves the survival rate and decreases recurrences and fatalities in liver cancer patients following curative resection: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HAO; ZHOU, YUCHEN; YUAN, GUOSHENG; ZHOU, GUANGYAO; YANG, DINGHUA; ZHOU, YUANPING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of postoperative antiviral treatment on tumor recurrence, fatalities and survival of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A systematic meta-analysis was performed. All the studies comparing nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) versus placebo or no treatment were considered. The results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) for 1-, 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), recurrence HCC and fatalities with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using STATA 11.0. In total, 15 trials with 7,619 patients were included. There were significant improvements for 1-, 3- and 5-year RFS (RR, 1.09; P=0.003; RR, 1.202; P<0.001; and RR, 1.219; P=0.02; respectively) and in 3- and 5-year OS (RR, 1.087, P=0.006; and RR, 1.186; P<0.001) in the NAs group compared with the control group. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results. In addition, the significantly high rate of recurrence HCC and fatalities existed in the control group (RR, 1.301; P=0.002; and RR, 1.816, P<0.001). One study was for an entecavir (ETV)-treated group compared with an adefovir (ADV)-treated group and lamivudine (LAM)-treated group. The 3-year disease-free survival rate for the ETV group was significantly better compared with the ADV and LAM groups [hazard ratio (HR), 0.810; P=0.049; and HR, 0.737; P=0.007]. The present study demonstrated the beneficial effects of NAs therapy following curative treatment of HBV-related HCC. ETV may be the superior choice compared to ADV or LAM for the antiviral treatment. PMID:26807227

  7. A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Interferon Monotherapy or Combined with Different Nucleos(t)ide Analogues for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jialing; Wu, Xiaoning; Wei, Wei; You, Hong; Jia, Jidong; Kong, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of interferon (IFN) with or without different nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs). Methods: The PubMed, Wan Fang and CNKI databases were searched to identify relevant trials up to May 2015. Meta-analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.0. The stability and reliability were evaluated by publication bias tests. Results: Fifty-six studies fulfilled the criteria for the meta-analysis. Compared with IFN monotherapy, combination therapy were superior in HBV DNA undetectable rate (Risk Ratio (RR) = 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.44–1.66, p < 0.00001), HBeAg and HBsAg loss rate (RR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.22–1.56, p < 0.00001; RR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.03–2.78, p = 0.04, respectively) at the end of week 48 treatment. Sub-analysis showed the RRs of virological response for entecavir (ETV), adefovir (ADV), and lamivudine (LAM) were 1.64, 1.61 and 1.52, respectively; RRs of HBeAg loss rate were 1.34, 1.71 and 1.34, respectively. However, at the end of follow-up, IFN plus NAs therapy was better than IFN monotherapy only in terms of HBV DNA undetectable rate (p = 0.0007). Conclusions: Combination therapy was better than IFN monotherapy in virological and serological responses at the end of treatment. After follow-up, only HBV DNA undetectable rate was superior for combination therapy. PMID:27455288

  8. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotyping and drug resistance gene mutations based on massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingxin; Zhang, Yinxin; Mei, Yanhua; Wang, Yuqi; Liu, Tao; Guan, Yanfang; Tan, Deming; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ling; Yi, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance to nucleoside analogs is a serious problem worldwide. Both drug resistance gene mutation detection and HBV genotyping are helpful for guiding clinical treatment. Total HBV DNA from 395 patients who were treated with single or multiple drugs including Lamivudine, Adefovir, Entecavir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir and Emtricitabine were sequenced using the HiSeq 2000 sequencing system and validated using the 3730 sequencing system. In addition, a mixed sample of HBV plasmid DNA was used to determine the cutoff value for HiSeq-sequencing, and 52 of the 395 samples were sequenced three times to evaluate the repeatability and stability of this technology. Of the 395 samples sequenced using both HiSeq and 3730 sequencing, the results from 346 were consistent, and the results from 49 were inconsistent. Among the 49 inconsistent results, 13 samples were detected as drug-resistance-positive using HiSeq but negative using 3730, and the other 36 samples showed a higher number of drug-resistance-positive gene mutations using HiSeq 2000 than using 3730. Gene mutations had an apparent frequency of 1% as assessed by the plasmid testing. Therefore, a 1% cutoff value was adopted. Furthermore, the experiment was repeated three times, and the same results were obtained in 49/52 samples using the HiSeq sequencing system. HiSeq sequencing can be used to analyze HBV gene mutations with high sensitivity, high fidelity, high throughput and automation and is a potential method for hepatitis B virus gene mutation detection and genotyping.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  10. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of different rescue therapies in patients with lamivudine-resistant chronic hepatitis B in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several rescue therapies have been used in patients with lamivudine (LAM)-resistant chronic hepatitis B (CHB); however, the economic outcome of these therapies is unclear. The object of the current analysis was to evaluate the lifetime cost-effectiveness of rescue therapies among patients with LAM-resistant CHB. Methods A Markov model was developed to simulate the clinical course of patients with LAM-resistant CHB. From the perspective of Chinese health care, a lifetime cost-utility analysis was performedfor 4 rescue strategies: adefovir (ADV), entecavir (ETV) or tenofovir (TDF) monotherapy and combination therapy using LAM and ADV. A hypothetical cohort of 45-year-old patients with genotypic or clinical LAM-resistant CHB entered the model, and the beginning health state was LAM-resistant CHB without other complications. The transition probabilities, efficacy and resistance data for each rescue therapy as well as the costs and utility data were estimated from the literature. The discount rate (3%) utilized for costs and benefits. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of uncertainty on the results. Results In LAM-resistant HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative CHB cohorts, TDF monotherapy and combination therapy were on the efficiency frontier for both positive and negative populations. Compared with no treatment, the use of combination therapy cost an additional $6,531.7 to gain 1 additional quality-adjusted life year (QALY) for HBeAg-positive patients and $4,571.7 to gain 1 additional QALY for HBeAg-negative patients. TDF monotherapy for HBeAg-positive patients, shows greater increase in QALYs but higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in comparison with combination therapy. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, combination therapy was the preferred option for health care systems with limited health resources, such as Chinese health care system. Conclusion In Chinese patients with LAM-resistant CHB, combination therapy is a more

  12. Medical management of chronic liver diseases in children (part I): focus on curable or potentially curable diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

    2011-12-01

    The management of children with chronic liver disease (CLD) mandates a multidisciplinary approach. CLDs can be classified into 'potentially' curable, treatable non-curable, and end-stage diseases. Goals pertaining to the management of CLDs can be divided into prevention or minimization of progressive liver damage in curable CLD by treating the primary cause; prevention or control of complications in treatable CLD; and prediction of the outcome in end-stage CLD in order to deliver definitive therapy by surgical procedures, including liver transplantation. Curative, specific therapies aimed at the primary causes of CLDs are, if possible, best considered by a pediatric hepatologist. Medical management of CLDs in children will be reviewed in two parts, with part I (this article) specifically focusing on 'potentially' curable CLDs. Dietary modification is the cornerstone of management for galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, and certain glycogen storage diseases, as well as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is also essential in tyrosinemia, in addition to nitisinone [2-(nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione] therapy, as well as in Wilson disease along with copper-chelating agents such as D-penicillamine, triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Zinc and antioxidants are adjuvant drugs in Wilson disease. New advances in chronic viral hepatitis have been made with the advent of oral antivirals. In children, currently available drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection are standard interferon (IFN)-α-2, pegylated IFN-α-2 (PG-IFN), and lamivudine. In adults, adefovir and entecavir have also been licensed, whereas telbivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, clevudine, and thymosin α-1 are currently undergoing clinical testing. For chronic hepatitis C virus infection, the most accepted treatment is PG-IFN plus ribavirin. Corticosteroids, with or without azathioprine, remain the basic

  13. Association of serum gamma-glutamyl transferase with treatment outcome in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Yang, Chen-Chen; Liu, Yong; Xia, Juan; Su, Ran; Xiong, Ya-Li; Wang, Gui-Yang; Sun, Zhen-Hua; Yan, Xiao-Min; Lu, Shan; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels with chronic hepatitis B infection and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on clinical data collected from patients who had been positive for hepatitis B surface antigen for > 6 mo and who were antiviral-treatment naïve (n = 215) attending the Hepatitis Clinic at Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital between August 2010 and December 2013. Healthy individuals without liver disease (n = 83) were included as controls. Patients were categorized into four groups based on disease status as recommended by the European Association for the Study of the Liver: immune tolerance (IT; n = 47), HBeAg-positive hepatitis (EPH; n = 93), HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH; n = 20), and inactive carrier (IC; n = 55). Prediction of complete response (CR) based on serum GGT was also examined in EPH patients (n = 33) treated for 48 wk with nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA) therapy, including lamivudine plus adefovir combination therapy (n = 20) or entecavir monotherapy (n = 13). CR was defined as a serum hepatitis B virus DNA level < 500 copies/mL and HBeAg seroconversion by 48 wk of treatment. RESULTS: Serum GGT levels were significantly increased in EPH and ENH patients relative to the IT, IC, and healthy control groups (P < 0.01 for all). However, no significant difference in serum GGT levels was found between the EPH and ENH groups. Baseline serum GGT levels were significantly higher in patients who achieved CR (7/33; 21.2%) compared to patients in the non-CR group (26/33; 78.8%; P = 0.011). In addition, the decline in serum GGT was greater in CR patients compared to non-CR patients after 24 wk and 48 wk of treatment (P = 0.012 and P = 0.008, respectively). The receiver operating characteristic curve yielded a sensitivity of 85.71% and a specificity of 61.54% at a threshold value of 0.89 times the upper limit of normal for baseline serum GGT in the prediction of CR

  14. Resistance management in chronic hepatitis B complicated by renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, J; Karlas, T; Schiefke, I; Krasselt, U; Bock, T; Mössner, J; Tillmann, H L

    2010-07-01

    Therapy of chronic hepatitis B has improved by the invention of the potent nucleos(t)ide analogues entecavir, telbivudine and tenofovir disoproxil. Due to increasing prevalence of lamivudine resistance the appropriate first line therapy may prevent emergence of any new resistance and avoid combination therapy. The present case describes a complex history of chronic hepatitis B in the setting of renal failure after two renal transplants illustrating why lamivudine should not be used as first line treatment option any more. Instead, entecavir offers high antiviral potency, low risk for resistance and possible individual dose titration by an oral solution.

  15. What's in a name?

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    A table charts the various nomenclature of drugs used to treat HIV and AIDS. The common name, generic name, and brand name are given for several categories including NARTIs (NRTIs, "Nukes", Nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors), NNRTIs (Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), and PIs (Protease Inhibitors). Other drugs listed are Hydroxyurea (anti-cancer drug) and preveon (Adefovir (Nucleotide)).

  16. Two cases of malignant lymphoma with reactivation of resolved hepatitis B virus infection after bendamustine hydrochloride monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Yoshiki; Kawano, Akira; Shigematsu, Hirohisa; Miki, Koichiro; Nomura, Hideyuki; Shimoda, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    A 63-year-old female and a 63-year-old male with resolved HBV infection suffered a relapse of malignant lymphoma. After bendamustine hydrochloride monotherapy, HBV reactivation occurred. Entecavir treatment was commenced immediately, with tests for HBV DNA negative without development of hepatitis. Regular monitoring of HBV DNA based on the guidelines from the Japan Society of Hepatology was useful. PMID:27593368

  17. Differential effects of anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis drugs on liver cystatin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aaliya; Priyadarshini, Medha; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Aatif, Mohammad; Amin, Fakhra; Tabrez, Shams; Zaher, Galila F.; Bano, Bilqees

    2014-01-01

    The drug–protein interaction has been the subject of increasing interest over the decades. In the present communication, the interaction of liver cystatin with anti-cancer (adriamycin) and anti-hepatitis (adevofir dipivoxil) drugs was studied by thiol-protease inhibitory assay, UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). A static type of quenching was observed between the protein and the drug molecules. Binding constant (Ka) of adriamycin to liver cystatin (LC) was found to be 1.08 × 106 M−1. Moreover, binding site number was found to be 2. Importantly, cystatin loses its activity in the presence of adriamycin. However, intrinsic fluorescence studies in the presence of adevofir dipivoxil showed enhancement in the fluorescence intensity suggesting that binding of adevofir to LC caused unfolding of the protein. The unfolding of the test protein was also accompanied by significant loss of inhibitory activity. CD spectroscopy result showed, both adriamycin and adevofir dipivoxil caused perturbation in the secondary structure of liver cystatin. The possible implications of these results will help in combating drug induced off target effects. PMID:25561887

  18. A biomimetic chitosan derivates: preparation, characterization and transdermal enhancement studies of N-arginine chitosan.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui-Xia; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Pan; Cheng, Qing-Qing; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xu-Hui; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Hou, Lu-Lu; Huo, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel arginine-rich chitosan (CS) derivates mimicked cell penetration peptides; N-Arginine chitosan (N-Arg-CS) was prepared by two reaction methods involving activated L-arginine and the amine group on the chitosan. FTIR spectra showed that arginine was chemically coupled with CS. Elemental analysis estimated that the degrees of substitution (DS) of arginine in CS were 6%, 31.3% and 61.5%, respectively. The drug adefovir was chosen as model and its permeation flux across excised mice skin was investigated using a Franz diffusion cell. The results showed that the most effective enhancer was 2% (w/v) concentration of 10 kDa N-Arg-CS with 6% DS. At neutral pH, the cumulative amount of adefovir permeated after 12 hours was 2.63 ± 0.19 mg cm(-2) which was 5.83-fold more than adefovir aqueous solution. Meanwhile N-Arg-CS was 1.83, 2.22, and 2.45 times more effective than Azone, eucalyptus and peppermint, respectively. The obtained results suggest that N-Arg-CS could be a promising transdermal enhancer. PMID:21829153

  19. Successful Management of Graft Reinfection of HCV Genotype 2 in Living Donor Liver Transplantation from a Hepatitis B Core Antibody-Positive Donor with Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are relatively safe and highly effective for the eradication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in liver transplant recipients. In this case study, we present a female with a graft reinfected with HCV genotype 2 who was treated with a combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Because the graft was from a hepatitis B core antibody-positive donor, passive immunization with hyperimmune hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and entecavir were also provided to prevent hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. It became clear that the combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin promptly led to a sustained virologic response and that this combination was safe to treat graft reinfection with HCV genotype 2 after LDLT. Adverse events caused by DAAs were not observed, except for slight anemia. HBIG and entecavir were useful in the prevention of HBV reactivation. In conclusion, the present case indicated that DAA treatment for graft reinfection with HCV is safe and effective in LDLT from hepatitis B core antibody-positive donors. PMID:27721720

  20. Rapid detection of drug-resistant mutations in hepatitis B virus by the PCR-Invader assay.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Nagano, Makoto; Egashira, Toru; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of resistant mutations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is important for patients on nucleos(t)ide analog therapy. An assay based on the PCR-Invader technology was developed to detect resistant mutations with high sensitivity. The assay specifically detects mutations at codons 180, 181, 184, 202, 204, and 250 of the HBV polymerase reverse transcriptase domain. These mutations result in resistance to lamivudine and entecavir. In mixtures of plasmids containing wild-type and resistant mutants, fold-over-zero values for resistant mutations were detected in 2% of the total. Seventy-five serum samples from patients, whose treatment had been switched from lamivudine to entecavir, were examined by the PCR-Invader assay and direct sequencing. The PCR-Invader assay detected all resistant mutations that were detected by direct sequencing and even detected the presence of mutants that direct sequencing could not. Cloning sequencing confirmed those mutations found by the PCR-Invader assay and not by direct sequencing. The PCR-Invader assay is a useful tool for the early detection of drug-resistant mutations. PMID:20950650

  1. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver

    SciTech Connect

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y.; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A.; Mason, William S.; Litwin, Samuel; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2013-11-15

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10{sup 5}-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis. - Highlights: • The hepatitis B virus nuclear template is covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). • cccDNA was studied during liver growth in duck hepatitis B virus infected ducks. • Virus DNA replication and new cccDNA synthesis were inhibited with Entecavir. • At least 49% of cccDNA appeared to survive hepatocyte mitosis. • Low level virus DNA synthesis may contribute to survival of cccDNA through mitosis.

  2. Virtual screening reveals a viral-like polymerase inhibitor that complexes with the DNA polymerase of Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B S; Souza, C S; Santos, G; Góes-Neto, A

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is a basidiomycota that causes the witches' broom disease in cocoa trees (Theobroma cacao L.). The mitochondrial DNA polymerase of M. perniciosa (MpmitDNApol) is classified within the B family of DNA polymerases, which can be found in viruses and cellular organelles. Using virtual screening processes, accessing KEGG, PubChem, and ZINC databases, we selected the 27 best putative nucleoside viral-like polymerase inhibitors to test against MpmitDNApol. We used Autodock Vina to perform docking simulations of the selected molecules and to return energy values in several ligand conformations. Then, we used Pymol v1.7.4.4 to check the stereochemistry of chiral carbons, hydrogen bonding receptors, absence or presence of hydrogen, sub and superstructure, numbers of rings, rotatable bonds, and donor groups. We selected the Entecavir Hydrate, a drug used to control hepatitis B; subsequently AMBER 14 was used to describe the behavior of polymerase-entecavir complex after setting up 3500 ps of simulation in water at a temperature of 300 K. From the simulation, a graph of Potential Energy was generated revealing that the ligand remains in the catalytic site after 3500 ps with a final energy of -612,587.4214 kcal/mol. PMID:27323084

  3. Detection of hepatitis D virus RNA carrying large fragment deletions in patients with severe hepatitis B/D receiving oral antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wei; Chao, Mei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Ming-Ling; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2015-04-01

    A chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient had achieved complete virological suppression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by oral antiviral therapy. Unexpectedly, fulminant hepatitis D virus (HDV) reactivation occurred, resulting in mortality. Cloning and sequence analysis identified a novel large fragment HDV deletion mutant containing only 69% of the standard genome. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed persistence of this mutant with variations of the wild-type-to-mutant ratios during the clinical course. Serum samples from 405 patients with chronic hepatitis B were then submitted for HDV RNA analysis. Of them, 20 (4.9%) were positive for HDV RNA and 5 HDV RNA large fragment deletions were identified in three patients, all under entecavir treatment. Two of them suffered from acute hepatitis exacerbations leading to liver failure while the third had repeated hepatitis flares. The peak bilirubin levels in these three patients were significantly higher than the others without large fragment deletions (P = 0.003). The deleted regions (527-702 bases) encompassed two ribozyme domains as well as part of the hepatitis D antigen (HDAg) reading frame. In conclusion, exacerbations of hepatitis D could occur, leading to fulminant hepatitis, even after complete virological suppression of HBV. Large fragment HDV RNA deletions were identified in some hepatitis D patients who were treated with entecavir but still experiencing severe hepatitis.

  4. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  5. Elevation of the Hepatitis B Virus DNA during the Treatment of Polycythemia Vera with the JAK Kinase Inhibitor Ruxolitinib.

    PubMed

    Kirito, Keita; Sakamoto, Minoru; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is a useful treatment option for myelofibrosis since it effectively resolves splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. After the widespread use of ruxolitinib outside of clinical trials, a series of case reports indicated a potential risk of ruxolitinib-associated opportunistic infections, including the reactivation of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). We herein report the case of a polycythemia vera patient who showed an elevation of HBV-DNA viral DNA with an elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) after the initiation of ruxolitinib. Anti-viral therapy with entecavir was immediately started and the HBV viral load thereafter decreased with an improvement of the liver function. Physicians should thus be aware of the potential risk of ruxolitinib-associated HBV reactivation. PMID:27181544

  6. Factors associated with adherence to nucleos(t)ide analogs in chronic hepatitis B patients: results from a 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; Yin, Junhua; Cai, Shaohang; Yu, Tao; Zhong, Chunxiu

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with patient compliance with nucleos(t)ide analog (NUC) treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and adherence to NUCs among patients with CHB. A total of 211 CHB patients receiving NUC monotherapy were asked to report the number of prescribed doses of medication they had taken during the last 90 days. A total of four 3-month adherence scores were averaged to obtain a combined rate of NUC adherence during a 1-year follow up period. The mean age of the patients was 29.6 years, 79% were men, and 68% had no prior NUC treatment for CHB. Females, patients without a previous NUC treatment, and those who had NUC drug resistance showed better adherence to NUC treatment, and compliance was better with telbivudine than with lamivudine and entecavir.

  7. Application of Bayesian Approach to Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Antiviral Treatments in Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Huo, Mingdong; Chao, Jianqian; Liu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major problem for public health; timely antiviral treatment can significantly prevent the progression of liver damage from HBV by slowing down or stopping the virus from reproducing. In the study we applied Bayesian approach to cost-effectiveness analysis, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation methods for the relevant evidence input into the model to evaluate cost-effectiveness of entecavir (ETV) and lamivudine (LVD) therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in Jiangsu, China, thus providing information to the public health system in the CHB therapy. Methods Eight-stage Markov model was developed, a hypothetical cohort of 35-year-old HBeAg-positive patients with CHB was entered into the model. Treatment regimens were LVD100mg daily and ETV 0.5 mg daily. The transition parameters were derived either from systematic reviews of the literature or from previous economic studies. The outcome measures were life-years, quality-adjusted lifeyears (QALYs), and expected costs associated with the treatments and disease progression. For the Bayesian models all the analysis was implemented by using WinBUGS version 1.4. Results Expected cost, life expectancy, QALYs decreased with age. Cost-effectiveness increased with age. Expected cost of ETV was less than LVD, while life expectancy and QALYs were higher than that of LVD, ETV strategy was more cost-effective. Costs and benefits of the Monte Carlo simulation were very close to the results of exact form among the group, but standard deviation of each group indicated there was a big difference between individual patients. Conclusions Compared with lamivudine, entecavir is the more cost-effective option. CHB patients should accept antiviral treatment as soon as possible as the lower age the more cost-effective. Monte Carlo simulation obtained costs and effectiveness distribution, indicate our Markov model is of good robustness. PMID:27574976

  8. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Principal Findings Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Conclusions/Significance Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine. PMID:27348302

  9. UGT2B28 genomic variation is associated with hepatitis B e-antigen seroconversion in response to antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kung-Hao; Lin, Chih-Lang; Hsu, Chao-Wei; Lai, Ming-Wei; Chien, Rong-Nan; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Seroconversion of hepatitis B virus (HBV) e-antigen (HBeAg) is a critical but often-missed therapeutic goal in standard antiviral treatments. An extreme-phenotype genome-wide association study was performed, comparing untreated spontaneous recoverers (with seroconversion of HBV surface antigen) versus entecavir-treated patients failing to achieve HBeAg seroconversion. A single-nucleotide-polymorphism rs2132039 on the UGT2B28 gene, alongside an adjacent copy number polymorphism (CNP605), manifested the strongest clinical associations (P = 3.4 × 10−8 and 0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that rs2132039-TT genotypes, but not CNP605 copy numbers, remained associated to spontaneous recoverers (P = 0.009). The clinical association of rs2132039 was validated successfully in an independent cohort (n = 302; P = 0.002). Longitudinal case-only analyses revealed that the rs2132039-TT genotype predicted shorter time-to-HBeAg-seroconversion in all antiviral-treated patients (n = 380, P = 0.012), as well as the peginterferon-treated subgroup (n = 123; P = 0.024, Hazard ratio [HR] = 2.104, Confidence interval [CI] = 1.105–4.007). In the entecavir-treated subgroup, the predictive effect was restricted by pretreatment alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, with effective prediction observed in patients with ALT < 200 IU/ml and ALT/AST ratio <2 (n = 132; P = 0.013, HR = 10.538, CI = 1.420–78.196). PMID:27665939

  10. Salvage solitaire (or, HAART takes a holiday).

    PubMed

    Mascolini, M

    1999-07-01

    Attendees at the Second International Workshop on Salvage Therapy heard little to make them optimistic about the immediate future of salvage therapy. Treatment veterans with only a few virologic failures stand a slim chance of ongoing viral control. Current salvage treatment, even combination therapy, only pushes viral loads to below 500 copies in 20 to 40 percent of patients, and those patients who have had viral loads suppressed to below 20 copies/mL stand the best chance of having a sustained response to the treatment. Results of several studies are reviewed. Adefovir, which had been considered an option, has performed poorly in trials. One table shows the effects of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/protease inhibitor (NNRTI/PI) salvage therapy in the NNRTI-naive patient. Another table presents figures to show that salvage success correlates significantly with lower viral loads prior to treatment. A third table shows the "megasalvage" track record, while a fourth presents a proposal for a rapid-assessment salvage study. The concept of using drug holidays as a means to force the immune system to begin fighting HIV on its own remains controversial.

  11. Persistence versus reversion of 3TC resistance in HIV-1 determine the rate of emergence of NVP resistance.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara A; Olshen, Richard A; Halpern, Jerry; Merigan, Thomas C

    2012-08-01

    When HIV-1 is exposed to lamivudine (3TC) at inhibitory concentrations, resistant variants carrying the reverse transcriptase (RT) substitution M184V emerge rapidly. This substitution confers high-level 3TC resistance and increased RT fidelity. We established a novel in vitro system to study the effect of starting nevirapine (NVP) in 3TC-resistant/NNRTI-naïve clinical isolates, and the impact of maintaining versus dropping 3TC pressure in this setting. Because M184V mutant HIV-1 seems hypersusceptible to adefovir (ADV), we also tested the effect of ADV pressure on the same isolates. We draw four conclusions from our experiments simulating combination therapy in vitro. (1) The presence of low-dose (1 μM) 3TC prevented reversal to wild-type from an M184V mutant background. (2) Adding low-dose 3TC in the presence of NVP delayed the selection of NVP-associated mutations. (3) The presence of ADV, in addition to NVP, led to more rapid reversal to wild-type at position 184 than NVP alone. (4) ADV plus NVP selected for greater numbers of mutations than NVP alone. Inference about the "selection of mutation" is based on two statistical models, one at the viral level, more telling, and the other at the level of predominance of mutation within a population. Multidrug pressure experiments lend understanding to mechanisms of HIV resistance as they bear upon new treatment strategies.

  12. Specific primer sets used to amplify by PCR the hepatitis B virus overlapping S/Pol region select different viral variants.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, M L; Mathet, V L; Oubiña, J R

    2012-10-01

    PCR detection of viral genomes has provided new insights into viral diagnosis. Nowadays, it is the most frequently used nucleic acid testing (qualitative and quantitative) technique. The aim of this study was to analyse the major circulating hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants PCR-amplified by three sets of primers in a patient infected with genotype E. The HBV S/Pol overlapping genomic region was amplified from the serum of an infected child using three primer sets previously described. Sequence analysis corresponding to the HBV S/Pol region revealed the presence of different viral populations depending on the set of primers used. D144A S-escape mutant was detected with two of the primer sets, while the rtL217R mutant within the Pol - conferring resistance to Adefovir - could be picked up with a different pair of primer sets. This study undoubtedly implies that the description of viral polymorphisms should be stated together with the sequence of the primers used for PCR amplification when studies of escape and/or antiviral-resistant HBV mutants are carried out.

  13. RNAi for Treating Hepatitis B Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the leading causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current treatment strategies of HBV infection including the use of interferon (IFN)-α and nucleotide analogues such as lamivudine and adefovir have met with only partial success. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more effective antiviral therapies that can clear HBV infection with fewer side effects. RNA interference (RNAi), by which a small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces the gene silence at a post-transcriptional level, has the potential of treating HBV infection. The successful use of chemically synthesized siRNA, endogenous expression of small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or microRNA (miRNA) to silence the target gene make this technology towards a potentially rational therapeutics for HBV infection. However, several challenges including poor siRNA stability, inefficient cellular uptake, widespread biodistribution and non-specific effects need to be overcome. In this review, we discuss several strategies for improving the anti-HBV therapeutic efficacy of siRNAs, while avoiding their off-target effects and immunostimulation. There is an in-depth discussion on the (1) mechanisms of RNAi, (2) methods for siRNA/shRNA production, (3) barriers to RNAi-based therapies, and (4) delivery strategies of siRNA for treating HBV infection. PMID:18074201

  14. The Use of Cytochrome C Oxidase Enzyme Activity and Immunohistochemistry in Defining Mitochondrial Injury in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-09-01

    The renal biopsy is a dynamic way of looking at renal disease, and tubular elements are an important part of this analysis. The mitochondria in 20 renal biopsies were examined by immunohistochemical (electron transport chain enzyme: cytochrome C oxidase IV [COX IV]) and enzyme histochemical methods (COX), both by light and electron microscopy. The distal convoluted tubules and thick ascending limbs showed the greatest intensity in the COX immunostains and enzyme activity in controls. The degree of mitochondrial COX protein and enzyme activity diminished as the tubules became atrophic. With proximal hypertrophic changes, there was great variation in both COX activity and protein expression. In contrast, in three cases of systemic lupus erythematosus, biopsied for high-grade proteinuria, the activity was consistently upregulated, whereas protein expression remained normal. These unexpected findings of heterogeneous upregulation in hypertrophy and the dyssynchrony of protein expression and activity may indicate mitochondrial dysregulation. Functional electron microscopy showed COX activity delineated by the intense mitochondrial staining in normal or hypertrophic proximal tubules. With atrophic changes, residual small mitochondria with diminished activity could be seen. With mitochondrial size abnormalities (enlargement and irregularity, adefovir toxicity), activity persisted. In the renal biopsy, mitochondrial analysis is feasible utilizing immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical techniques. PMID:27578326

  15. Specific primer sets used to amplify by PCR the hepatitis B virus overlapping S/Pol region select different viral variants.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, M L; Mathet, V L; Oubiña, J R

    2012-10-01

    PCR detection of viral genomes has provided new insights into viral diagnosis. Nowadays, it is the most frequently used nucleic acid testing (qualitative and quantitative) technique. The aim of this study was to analyse the major circulating hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants PCR-amplified by three sets of primers in a patient infected with genotype E. The HBV S/Pol overlapping genomic region was amplified from the serum of an infected child using three primer sets previously described. Sequence analysis corresponding to the HBV S/Pol region revealed the presence of different viral populations depending on the set of primers used. D144A S-escape mutant was detected with two of the primer sets, while the rtL217R mutant within the Pol - conferring resistance to Adefovir - could be picked up with a different pair of primer sets. This study undoubtedly implies that the description of viral polymorphisms should be stated together with the sequence of the primers used for PCR amplification when studies of escape and/or antiviral-resistant HBV mutants are carried out. PMID:22967107

  16. Insights into the mechanism of action of cidofovir and other acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against polyoma- and papillomaviruses and non-viral induced neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Andrei, G; Topalis, D; De Schutter, T; Snoeck, R

    2015-02-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) are well-known for their antiviral properties, three of them being approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection (tenofovir), chronic hepatitis B (tenofovir and adefovir) or human cytomegalovirus retinitis (cidofovir). In addition, cidofovir is mostly used off-label for the treatment of infections caused by several DNA viruses other than cytomegalovirus, including papilloma- and polyomaviruses, which do not encode their own DNA polymerases. There is considerable interest in understanding why cidofovir is effective against these small DNA tumor viruses. Considering that papilloma- and polyomaviruses cause diseases associated either with productive infection (characterized by high production of infectious virus) or transformation (where only a limited number of viral proteins are expressed without synthesis of viral particles), it can be envisaged that cidofovir may act as antiviral and/or antiproliferative agent. The aim of this review is to discuss the advances in recent years in understanding the mode of action of ANPs as antiproliferative agents, given the fact that current data suggest that their use can be extended to the treatment of non-viral related malignancies.

  17. A Novel Pyridazinone Derivative Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Inducing Genome-Free Capsid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Lu, Dong; Xu, Yi-Bin; Xing, Wei-Qiang; Tong, Xian-Kun; Wang, Gui-Feng; Feng, Chun-Lan; He, Pei-Lan; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Here we first identified a novel pyridazinone derivative, compound 3711, as a nonnucleosidic hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitor in a cell model system. 3711 decreased extracellular HBV DNA levels by 50% (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) at 1.5 ± 0.2 μM and intracellular DNA levels at 1.9 ± 0.1 μM, which demonstrated antiviral activity at levels far below those associated with toxicity. Both the 3TC/ETV dually resistant L180M/M204I mutant and the adefovir (ADV)-resistant A181T/N236T mutant were as susceptible to 3711 as wild-type HBV. 3711 treatment induced the formation of genome-free capsids, a portion of which migrated faster on 1.8% native agarose gel. The induced genome-free capsids sedimented more slowly in isopycnic CsCl gradient centrifugation without significant morphological changes. 3711 treatment decreased levels of HBV DNA contained in both secreted enveloped virion and naked virus particles in supernatant. 3711 could interfere with capsid formation of the core protein (Cp) assembly domain. A Cp V124W mutant, which strengthens capsid interdimer interactions, recapitulated the effect of 3711 on capsid assembly. Pyridazinone derivative 3711, a novel chemical entity and HBV inhibitor, may provide a new opportunity to combat chronic HBV infection. PMID:26349829

  18. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  19. The assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma risk in patients with chronic hepatitis B under antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Varbobitis, Ioannis; Papatheodoridis, George V.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary concern for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Antiviral therapy has been reasonably the focus of interest for HCC prevention, with most studies reporting on the role of the chronologically preceding agents, interferon-alfa and lamivudine. The impact of interferon-alfa on the incidence of HCC is clearer in Asian patients and those with compensated cirrhosis, as several meta-analyses have consistently shown HCC risk reduction, compared to untreated patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogues also seem to have a favorable impact on the HCC incidence when data from randomized or matched controlled studies are considered. Given that the high-genetic barrier agents, entecavir and tenofovir, are mainly used in CHB because of their favorable effects on the overall long-term outcome of such patients, the most clinically important challenge is the identification of patients who require close HCC surveillance despite on-therapy virological remission. Several risk scores have been developed for HCC prediction in CHB patients. Most of them, such as GAG-HCC, CU-HCC and REACH-B, have been developed and validated in Asian untreated and treated CHB patients, but they do not seem to offer good predictability in Caucasian CHB patients for whom a newer score, PAGE-B, has been recently developed. PMID:27729632

  20. Primary Hepatic Small-Cell Carcinoma Developed during Antiviral Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suk Bae

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported cases of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma were all detected at progressed state with associated symptoms. Therefore, the natural course of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma remains unknown. This case shows the natural course of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma. We detected a 1.2 cm hypodense nodule 6 months ago in a patient with cirrhosis who had been taking entecavir. It was suspected to be a regenerating or degenerating nodule. Three months later, liver computed tomography (CT) revealed that the mass was increased to 2.1 cm with the same characteristics. The patient wanted to do a follow-up CT scan after 3 months instead of a biopsy. Another 3 months later, the mass was markedly increased, involving the whole left lobe and was confirmed as small-cell carcinoma on biopsy. Here, we report the first case of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma developed during treatment for chronic hepatitis B with cirrhosis. PMID:26951743

  1. Anti-virus prophylaxis withdrawal may be feasible in liver transplant recipients whose serum HBeAg and HBV DNA are negative.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lei; Lin, Bing-Yi; Shen, Tian; Guo, Hua; Ye, Yu-Fu; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2016-06-01

    Anti-virus prophylactic therapy may be not necessary for the prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after HBV-related liver transplantation (LT). However, studies on completely stopping the hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogs (NUC) after LT are few. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the safety of anti-virus prophylaxis withdrawal in liver recipients whose serum hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and HBV DNA are negative. We analyzed 190 patients undergone LT for HBV-related liver disease from 2006 to 2012 and found that 10 patients completely stopped the HBIG and NUC due to poor compliance. These patients were liver biopsied and checked monthly with serum HBV markers, HBV DNA and liver function. Among the 10 patients, 9 did not show the signs of HBV recurrence after a mean follow-up of 51.6 months (range 20-73) after withdrawal of the HBIG and NUC. The average time from LT to the withdrawal of the anti-virus drug was 23.8 (13-42) months; one patient showed hepatitis B surface antigen-positive and detectable HBV DNA after stopping anti-virus drugs and this patient was successfully treated with entecavir. Our data suggested that complete withdrawal of anti-virus prophylaxis was safe and feasible for patients whose serum HBeAg and HBV DNA were negative at the time of LT.

  2. A false occult hepatitis B virus infection developed in a patient with psoriatic arthritis under infliximab and methotrexate therapy.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, A; Iannone, F; Lopalco, G; Covelli, M; Lapadula, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite lacking of international guidelines about the management of patients with occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) starting TNF-α blockers, there is some evidence from real life settings that these drugs are safe in OBI patients with rheumatic diseases. On the contrary, the management of the so-called false OBI patients appears still undefined. We describe a case of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurred in an anti-HBs and anti- HBc positive patient affected by psoriatic arthritis, who had been treated for five years with infliximab. Baseline HBV-DNA analysis had not been performed. Although HBs Ag was still negative and the transaminases in the normal range, HBV-DNA serum analysis surprisingly showed high replication rate. Entecavir was added, and three months later HBV-DNA was no longer detectable. Even if HBs Ag is persistently negative, the assessment of HBV-DNA should be recommended at least at baseline in order to rule out hidden active necro-inflammatory liver disease.

  3. Hepatitis B Reactivation with Novel Agents in Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O.; Sokol, Lubomir; Dalia, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an endemic disease in most parts of the world despite available prophylactic vaccines. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy, and certain patients undergoing therapy are at increased risk of HBV reactivation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody, is well studied in HBV reactivation, but newer agents have been implicated as well. Here, we review novel agents suspected in HBV reactivation and effective strategies to prevent HBV reactivation. Fifteen years of literature were reviewed in order to better understand the reactivation rates of hepatitis B in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Anti-CD20 antibodies continue to be the main medications that can lead to HBV reactivation, and HBV reactivation rates have decreased with increased awareness. HBV reactivation is uncommon when using other novel agents. Entecavir and lamivudine remain the agents of choice to prevent HBV reactivation in high risk patients. In conclusion, the immunosuppressive effect of NHL and its therapy provide a pathway for HBV reactivation, especially in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibody. Since many HBV positive patients are often excluded from clinical trials of novel agents in NHL, more aggressive post-market surveillance of new agents, well-designed best practice advisories, and timely case reports are needed to reduce the incidence of HBV reactivation. Lastly, large prospective investigations coupled with well-utilized best practice advisories need to be conducted to understand the impact of more potent novel NHL therapy on HBV reactivation. PMID:27350944

  4. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  5. [Management and treatment of patients with hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    den Eynde, Eva Van; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar

    2016-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Approximately one third of the world's population has serological evidence of past or present infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 350-400 million people are chronic HBV surface antigen carriers. The aim of therapy is to prevent the onset of liver fibrosis and development of cirrhosis or hepatocarcinoma by sustained suppression of viral replication. Currently there are 2 strategies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: the pegylated interferon and long-term treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Pegylated interferon has the advantage of being a treatment of limited duration, and is particularly suitable for patients with chronic hepatitis with positive HBeAg (hepatitis B e antigen), but the unfavorable adverse event profile and route of parenteral administration makes it less used than nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Tenofovir and entecavir have shown to be potent inhibitors of HBV with a high genetic barrier to resistance and few adverse effects, so are considered as the first line therapy. PMID:27474247

  6. [Hepatitis B virus reactivation after cessation of prophylactic lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab combined CHOP therapy].

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Tsujimura, Hideki; Ise, Mikiko; Sakai, Chikara; Kojima, Hiroshige; Fukai, Kenichi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Kyoya

    2009-12-01

    Here we report three cases of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation after cessation of preemptive lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). Two patients received eight cycles of R-CHOP, and one received two cycles of R-CHOP followed by two courses of rituximab. As all the patients were HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, lamivudine was administered simultaneously with R-CHOP to prevent virus reactivation. All the patients developed hepatitis due to HBV reactivation 6, 8 and 13 months after completion of chemotherapy, and 4, 2 and 2 months after cessation of lamivudine, respectively. They were treated with either lamivudine or entecavir and all achieved full recovery. When HBV carriers undergo immunosuppressive anticancer treatment, prophylactic antiviral therapy is well recognized as effective. However, the optimal method of prophylaxis has not yet been established. Since the introduction of rituximab, new problems such as delayed HBV reactivation from HBsAg positive patients and de novo hepatitis B from HBsAg negative patients have emerged. Guidelines for prophylactic antiviral therapy in the era of rituximab need to be established. PMID:20068280

  7. Antiviral Treatment among Pregnant Women with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Methods. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10–50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. Results. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Conclusion. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:25548510

  8. Hepatitis B and immunosuppressive therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases: When and how to apply prophylaxis, with a special focus on corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    López-Serrano, Pilar; de la Fuente Briongos, Elsa; Alonso, Elisa Carrera; Pérez-Calle, Jose Lázaro; Rodríguez, Conrado Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Currently immunosuppressive and biological agents are used in a more extensive and earlier way in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatic or dermatologic diseases. Although these drugs have shown a significant clinical benefit, the safety of these treatments is a challenge. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivations have been reported widely, even including liver failure and death, and it represents a deep concern in these patients. Current guidelines recommend to pre-emptive therapy in patients with immunosuppressants in general, but preventive measures focused in patients with corticosteroids and inflammatory diseases are scarce. Screening for HBV infection should be done at diagnosis. The patients who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, but do not meet criteria for antiviral treatment must receive prophylaxis before undergoing immunosuppression, including corticosteroids at higher doses than prednisone 20 mg/d during more than two weeks. Tenofovir and entecavir are preferred than lamivudine because of their better resistance profile in long-term immunosuppressant treatments. There is not a strong evidence, to make a general recommendation on the necessity of prophylaxis therapy in patients with inflammatory diseases that are taking low doses of corticosteroids in short term basis or low systemic bioavailability corticosteroids such as budesonide or beclomethasone dipropionate. In these cases regularly HBV DNA monitoring is recommended, starting early antiviral therapy if DNA levels begin to rise. In patients with occult or resolved hepatitis the risk of reactivation is much lower, and excepting for Rituximab treatment, the prophylaxis is not necessary. PMID:25848477

  9. Eliminating hepatitis B by antagonizing cellular inhibitors of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Gregor; Allison, Cody; Preston, Simon; Cooney, James; Toe, Jesse G.; Stutz, Michael D.; Ojaimi, Samar; Baschuk, Nikola; Nachbur, Ueli; Torresi, Joseph; Silke, John; Begley, C. Glenn; Pellegrini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) impair clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by preventing TNF-mediated killing/death of infected cells. A key question, with profound therapeutic implications, is whether this finding can be translated to the development of drugs that promote elimination of infected cells. Drug inhibitors of cIAPs were developed as cancer therapeutics to promote TNF-mediated tumor killing. These drugs are also known as Smac mimetics, because they mimic the action of the endogenous protein Smac/Diablo that antagonizes cIAP function. Here, we show using an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection that birinapant and other Smac mimetics are able to rapidly reduce serum HBV DNA and serum HBV surface antigen, and they promote the elimination of hepatocytes containing HBV core antigen. The efficacy of Smac mimetics in treating HBV infection is dependent on their chemistry, host CD4+ T cells, and TNF. Birinapant enhances the ability of entecavir, an antiviral nucleoside analog, to reduce viral DNA production in HBV-infected animals. These results indicate that birinapant and other Smac mimetics may have efficacy in treating HBV infection and perhaps, other intracellular infections. PMID:25902530

  10. The prevalence of mutations in the major hydrophilic region of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus varies with subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Harrison, T J; He, X; Chen, Q Y; Li, G J; Liu, M H; Li, H; Yang, J Y; Fang, Z L

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBV) may result in vaccine escape, failure of immunotherapy and antiviral resistance. These mutants may be transmitted and constitute a public health threat. We aimed to determine the prevalence of MHR mutations of HBV in areas of high endemicity in Guangxi, China. HBV surface gene was analysed from 278 HBsAg-positive asymptomatic individuals recruited from Guangxi using cluster sampling. Three genotypes, B, C and I, were identified. The overall prevalence of MHR mutations is 17·6%. The prevalence of MHR mutations in genotype B (15·1%) is not significantly different from that in genotype C (16·4%). However, the prevalence in subgenotype C5 (31·1%) is significantly higher than in subgenotype C2 (13·0%) (χ 2 = 6·997, P < 0·05). The prevalence of escape mutations and overlapping polymerase substitutions in subgenotype C5 is significantly higher than in subgenotypes B2 and C2. In total, 7·9% of MHR mutants are escape mutations and 72·1% of MHR mutations produced amino-acid changes in the overlapping polymerase, including resistance mutations to entecavir. Our results suggest that the prevalence of MHR mutations varies with subgenotype. The prevalence of escape mutations and polymerase mutations may be associated with subgenotype.

  11. Hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with multiple myeloma receiving bortezomib-containing regimens followed by autologous stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Huang, Beihui; Li, Ying; Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Zhenhai; Liu, Junru

    2015-06-01

    To investigate hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving bortezomib-containing regimens, we analyzed 139 patients with MM receiving bortezomib-containing regimens in our hospital. Twenty-seven/139 patients were hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg+) with nine having DNA levels > 500 IU/mL, including four > 1000 IU/mL. All but five HBsAg+ patients were treated with lamivudine or entecavir before chemotherapy until at least 6 months after chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). HBV reactivation occurred in six HBsAg+ patients and two HBsAg- patients, including six who received ASCT. Overall survival and progression-free survival of HBsAg- patients were significantly longer than for HBsAg+ patients (both p < 0.01). From these results, we confirmed that the incidence of HBV reactivation was notable in patients with MM receiving bortezomib-containing regimens, especially those who underwent ASCT. HBsAg+ patients with MM had a poorer prognosis than HBsAg- patients. Prophylactic treatment should be prescribed to all patients with HBsAg+ MM for a minimum duration of 12 months.

  12. Renal disease in patients infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jaryal, Ajay; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in hepatic diseases which may include an asymptomatic non-replicative carrier state, immunotolerant phase characterized by high DNA levels without significant hepatic injury, immune-reactive phase characterized by occurrence of chronic hepatitis and fibrosis in the liver, or complications like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Extrahepatic manifestations may also accompany HBV infection. These may include serum sickness syndrome, polyarthralgia, polyarthritis, dermatologic manifestations like pitted keratolysis, urticaria, purpura, oral lichen planus or Gianotti-Crosti syndrome-a childhood papular eruption. Renal involvement may occur with HBV infection and usually involves glomerular or vascular injury. Various morphologic forms of renal injury have been reported with HBV infection, the commonest being membranous glomerulonephritis. The manifestations may include swelling over face and body, pedal edema, and urinary abnormalities. Evaluation may detect proteinuria, hematuria and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The management options include use of antiviral drugs targeting HBV infection with or without concomitant immunosuppressive medication. With availability of newer drugs like entecavir and tenofovir, these have become the first line agents as they have a high barrier to resistance. Sole use of immunosuppression is not recommended for lack of clear benefit and the possible risk of HBV reactivation or flare. PMID:27509699

  13. [Management and treatment of patients with hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    den Eynde, Eva Van; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar

    2016-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Approximately one third of the world's population has serological evidence of past or present infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 350-400 million people are chronic HBV surface antigen carriers. The aim of therapy is to prevent the onset of liver fibrosis and development of cirrhosis or hepatocarcinoma by sustained suppression of viral replication. Currently there are 2 strategies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: the pegylated interferon and long-term treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Pegylated interferon has the advantage of being a treatment of limited duration, and is particularly suitable for patients with chronic hepatitis with positive HBeAg (hepatitis B e antigen), but the unfavorable adverse event profile and route of parenteral administration makes it less used than nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Tenofovir and entecavir have shown to be potent inhibitors of HBV with a high genetic barrier to resistance and few adverse effects, so are considered as the first line therapy.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-09-01

    Aclidinium bromide, AE-37, Alemtuzumab, AMA1-C1/ISA 720, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Arachidonic acid, Arbaclofen placarbil, Aripiprazole, ARQ-621, Azelnidipine, Azilsartan medoxomil potassium; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib; Choriogonadotropin alfa, CTS-1027; Dapagliflozin, Dasatinib, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denufosol tetrasodium, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dronedarone hydrochloride, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Etaracizumab, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Ferric carboxymaltose, Fludarabine, Foretinib; Gefitinib, GFT-505, GSK-256066; HPV-6/11/16/18, HuM195/rGel, HyperAcute-Lung cancer vaccine; I5NP, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; L2G7, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide, Lixivaptan; Meningococcal (groups A, C, Y and W-135) oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-β, Mirabegron, Morphine/oxycodone, MR Vaccine, MSC-1936369B, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Narlaprevir, N-Desmethylclozapine; Ocriplasmin, Olaparib, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/azelnidipine, ONO-5334, ONO-8539; Palifermin, Panitumumab, Pardoprunox hydrochloride, PCV7, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, PF-337210, Pitavastatin calcium; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant interleukin-7, Regadenoson, Reniale, Roflumilast, Rosuvastatin calcium; Safinamide mesilate, SB-1518, SCH-527123, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talaporfin sodium, Tanespimycin, Technosphere/Insulin, Telaprevir, Telatinib, Telcagepant, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Teriparatide, Testosterone transdermal gel, TH-302, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Trabedersen, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Visilizumab, Voreloxin, Vorinostat. PMID

  15. Hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa presenting with multiple lung nodules and cavitary lesions.

    PubMed

    Naniwa, Taio; Maeda, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Rei

    2010-07-01

    The patient presented here is a 59-year-old Japanese man with active chronic hepatitis B with precore and core promoter mutated virus, presenting with high fever, bloody sputum, and multiple lung nodules with excavation. Surgical biopsy of the lung nodule showed necrotizing vasculitis affecting pulmonary arteries without granulomatous changes. The pulmonary manifestations of this patient resembled Wegener granulomatosis. However, the pathologic findings showing nongranulomatous necrotizing vasculitis involving the small pulmonary arteries, presence of circulating immune complex, absence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and excellent response to the combination therapy of corticosteroid and an anti-hepatitis B virus agent, entecavir, led us to the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Radiographic evidence of lung nodules or cavitations seen in systemic vasculitis patients has been considered a sign suggestive of granulomatous disease and a diagnostic surrogate marker for necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis, but a clinical relevance to hepatitis B virus-related PAN has not been reported before this case. PMID:20605819

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  17. Management of chronic hepatitis B infection: Current treatment guidelines, challenges, and new developments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ceen-Ming; Yau, Tung On; Yu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection is a global public health problem, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. The clinical spectrum is wide, ranging from a subclinical inactive carrier state, to progressive chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, complications of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related chronic liver disease may be reduced by viral suppression. Current international guidelines recommend first-line treatment of CHB infection with pegylated interferon, entecavir, or tenofovir, but the optimal treatment for an individual patient is controversial. The indications for treatment are contentious, and increasing evidence suggests that HBV genotyping, as well as serial on-treatment measurements of hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV DNA kinetics should be used to predict antiviral treatment response. The likelihood of achieving a sustained virological response is also increased by extending treatment duration, and using combination therapy. Hence the paradigm for treatment of CHB is constantly evolving. This article summarizes the different indications for treatment, and systematically reviews the evidence for the efficacy of various antiviral agents. It further discusses the shortcomings of current guidelines, use of rescue therapy in drug-resistant strains of HBV, and highlights the promising clinical trials for emerging therapies in the pipeline. This concise overview presents an updated practical approach to guide the clinical management of CHB. PMID:24876747

  18. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  19. Traditional Chinese medicine and related active compounds: a review of their role on hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, F H; Wang, Z X; Cai, P P; Zhao, L; Gao, J J; Kokudo, N; Li, A Y; Han, J Q; Tang, W

    2013-12-01

    Since the significant public health hazard of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and obvious drug resistance and dose-dependent side effects for common antiviral agents (e.g., interferon α, lamivudine, and adefovir), continuous development of agents to treat HBV infection is urgently needed. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an established segment of the health care system in China. Currently, it is widely used for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in China and many parts of the world. Over a long period of time in clinical practice and in basic research progress, the effectiveness and beneficial contribution of TCM on CHB have been gradually known and confirmed. Based upon our review of related papers and because of our prior knowledge and experience, we have selected some Chinese medicines, including Chinese herbal formulas (e.g., Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang, Xiao-Yao-San, and Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang), single herbs (e.g., Phyllanthus niruri, Radix astragali, Polygonum cuspidatum, Rheum palmatum, and Salvia miltiorrhiza) and related active compounds (e.g., wogonin, artesunate, saikosaponin, astragaloside IV, and chrysophanol 8-O-beta-Dglucoside) and Chinese medicine preparations (e.g., silymarin, silibinin, kushenin, and cinobufacini), which seem effective and worthy of additional and indepth study in treating CHB, and we have given them a brief review. We conclude that these Chinese herbal medicines exhibit significant anti-HBV activities with improved liver function, and enhanced HBeAg and HBsAg sero-conversion rates as well as HBV DNA clearance rates in HepG2 2.2.15 cells, DHBV models, or patients with CHB. We hope this review will contribute to an understanding of TCM and related active compounds as an effective treatment for CHB and provide useful information for the development of more effective antiviral drugs. PMID:24423652

  20. Murine cytomegalovirus resistant to antivirals has genetic correlates with human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Scott, G M; Ng, H-L; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; Rawlinson, W D

    2005-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resistance to antivirals is a significant clinical problem. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection of mice is a well-described animal model for in vivo studies of CMV pathogenesis, although the mechanisms of MCMV antiviral susceptibility need elucidation. Mutants resistant to nucleoside analogues aciclovir, adefovir, cidofovir, ganciclovir, penciclovir and valaciclovir, and the pyrophosphate analogue foscarnet were generated by in vitro passage of MCMV (Smith) in increasing concentrations of antiviral. All MCMV antiviral resistant mutants contained DNA polymerase mutations identical or similar to HCMV DNA polymerase mutations known to confer antiviral resistance. Mapping of the mutations onto an MCMV DNA polymerase three-dimensional model generated using the Thermococcus gorgonarius Tgo polymerase crystal structure showed that the DNA polymerase mutations potentially confer resistance through changes in regions surrounding a catalytic aspartate triad. The ganciclovir-, penciclovir- and valaciclovir-resistant isolates also contained mutations within MCMV M97 identical or similar to recognized GCV-resistant mutations of HCMV UL97 protein kinase, and demonstrated cross-resistance to antivirals of the same class. This strongly suggests that MCMV M97 has a similar role to HCMV UL97 in the phosphorylation of nucleoside analogue antivirals. All MCMV mutants demonstrated replication-impaired phenotypes, with the lowest titre and plaque size observed for isolates containing mutations in both DNA polymerase and M97. These findings indicate DNA polymerase and protein kinase regions of potential importance for antiviral susceptibility and replication. The similarities between MCMV and HCMV mutations that arise under antiviral selective pressure increase the utility of MCMV as a model for in vivo studies of CMV antiviral resistance. PMID:16033961

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors interact with ATP binding cassette transporter 4/multidrug resistance protein 4: a basis for unanticipated enhanced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Schuetz, John D

    2013-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV-associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors Interact with ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 4/Multidrug Resistance Protein 4: A Basis for Unanticipated Enhanced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV–associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside

  3. HLA-C and KIR combined genotype as new response marker for HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients treated with interferon-based combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Stelma, F; Jansen, L; Sinnige, M J; van Dort, K A; Takkenberg, R B; Janssen, H L A; Reesink, H W; Kootstra, N A

    2016-08-01

    Current treatment for chronic hepatitis B infection (CHB) consists of interferon-based therapy. However, for unknown reasons, a large proportion of patients with CHB do not respond to this treatment. Hence, there is a pressing need to establish response markers to select patients who will benefit from therapy and to spare potential nonresponders from unnecessary side effects of antiviral therapy. Here, we assessed whether HLA-C and KIR genotypes were associated with treatment outcome for CHB. Twelve SNPs in or near the HLA-C gene were genotyped in 86 CHB patients (41 HBeAg positive; 45 HBeAg negative) treated with peginterferon alfa-2a + adefovir. Genotyping of killer immunoglobin-like receptors (KIRs) was performed by SSP-PCR. One SNP in HLA-C (rs2308557) was significantly associated with combined response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients (P = 0.003). This SNP is linked to the HLA-C group C1 or C2 classification, which controls KIR binding. The combination of KIR2DL1 with its ligand HLA-C2 was observed significantly more often in HBeAg-positive patients with a combined response (13/14) than in nonresponders (11/27, P = 0.001). Patients with the KIR2DL1/C2 genotype had significantly higher baseline ALT levels (136 vs 50 U/L, P = 0.002) than patients without this combination. Furthermore, KIR2DL1-C2 predicted response independent of HBV genotype and ALT at baseline. HLA-C and KIR genotype is strongly associated with response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients treated with interferon-based therapy. In combination with other known response markers, HLA-C/KIR genotype could enable the selection of patients more likely to respond to interferon-based therapy. PMID:26945896

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil

  5. [Evaluation of viral hepatitis in solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Mikolašević, Ivana; Sladoje-Martinović, Branka; Orlić, Lidija; Milić, Sandra; Lukenda, Vesna; Župan, Željko; Štimac, Davor; Rački, Sanjin

    2014-04-01

    Renal transplantation has significantly improved survival of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Transplantation is the best treatment in this population of patients. Despite the introduction of various preventive measures, viral hepatitis, i.e. hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, are still a major problem because they are common in patients on renal replacement therapy as well as in allograft recipients. They are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. In recent years, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been added as an emergent cause of chronic hepatitis in solid organ transplantation, mainly in renal and liver allograft recipients. Most studies show higher mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) infected with HBV, compared with RTRs without HBV infection, although this topic is still under debate. Furthermore, HCV infection in RTRs is associated with a significant reduction in patient and graft survival due to liver disease and septic complications related to cirrhosis and immunosuppressive therapy. The immunosuppressive therapy prescribed after transplantation modifies the natural history of chronic HCV infection. Given the high prevalence of HCV and HBV infections in RTRs, a growing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and the possible contribution of immunosuppression might be expected in these patients. Therefore, after renal transplantation, early screening with abdominal ultrasound (every 3 months in cirrhotic patients and every 6-12 months in non-cirrhotic RTRs) is necessary when the risk factors such as HBV and HCV are present. The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) recommends that all HbsAg-positive patients who are candidates for solid organ transplantation should be treated with nucleoside analogs. The KDIGO guidelines recommend that all HbsAg-positive RTRs receive prophylaxis with tenofovir, entecavir or lamivudine; however, tenofovir and

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Core-Related Antigens as Markers for Monitoring Chronic Hepatitis B Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Lai, Ching-Lung; Mizokami, Masashi; Fung, James; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2007-01-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay has been developed for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) detection. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of HBcrAg measurement for monitoring chronic hepatitis B disease. HBcrAg levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay in 54 untreated patients and 39 patients treated with either entecavir or lamivudine. The HBcrAg concentration correlated positively with the levels of serum HBV DNA (r = 0.820), intrahepatic total HBV DNA (r = 0.700), and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) (r = 0.664; for all, P values were <0.001). A higher HBcrAg concentration was associated with a greater proportion of hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. Although the differences were not statistically significant, patients with higher Knodell necroinflammation and fibrosis scores tended to have higher serum HBcrAg concentration levels. In the treated patients, the logarithmic reduction in HBcrAg at week 48 correlated positively with the logarithmic reduction of serum HBV DNA, intrahepatic total HBV DNA, and cccDNA. Of the 31 patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA (<300 copies/ml) at the end of treatment, 20 (65%) still had detectable HBcrAg. A greater reduction in posttreatment HBcrAg concentration was associated with histological improvement and a decrease in hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. HBcrAg concentrations of <40,000 kU/ml at baseline and <200 kU/ml at week 24 were associated with a higher chance of having undetectable HBV DNA at week 48. In conclusion, serum HBcrAg levels correlated with HBV virological markers and reflected the chronic hepatitis B disease activity in the liver. PMID:17942661

  7. Hepatitis B virus core-related antigens as markers for monitoring chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Lai, Ching-Lung; Mizokami, Masashi; Fung, James; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2007-12-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay has been developed for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) detection. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of HBcrAg measurement for monitoring chronic hepatitis B disease. HBcrAg levels were measured by a chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay in 54 untreated patients and 39 patients treated with either entecavir or lamivudine. The HBcrAg concentration correlated positively with the levels of serum HBV DNA (r = 0.820), intrahepatic total HBV DNA (r = 0.700), and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) (r = 0.664; for all, P values were <0.001). A higher HBcrAg concentration was associated with a greater proportion of hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. Although the differences were not statistically significant, patients with higher Knodell necroinflammation and fibrosis scores tended to have higher serum HBcrAg concentration levels. In the treated patients, the logarithmic reduction in HBcrAg at week 48 correlated positively with the logarithmic reduction of serum HBV DNA, intrahepatic total HBV DNA, and cccDNA. Of the 31 patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA (<300 copies/ml) at the end of treatment, 20 (65%) still had detectable HBcrAg. A greater reduction in posttreatment HBcrAg concentration was associated with histological improvement and a decrease in hepatitis B core antigen immunostaining. HBcrAg concentrations of <40,000 kU/ml at baseline and <200 kU/ml at week 24 were associated with a higher chance of having undetectable HBV DNA at week 48. In conclusion, serum HBcrAg levels correlated with HBV virological markers and reflected the chronic hepatitis B disease activity in the liver.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness and Cost Thresholds of Generic and Brand Drugs in a National Chronic Hepatitis B Treatment Program in China.

    PubMed

    Toy, Mehlika; Hutton, David W; So, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and liver cancer associated with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are leading causes of death among adults in China. Although newborn hepatitis B immunization has successfully reduced the prevalence of CHB in children, about 100 million Chinese adults remain chronically infected. If left unmanaged, 15-25% will die from liver cancer or liver cirrhosis. Antiviral treatment is not necessary for all patients with CHB, but when it is indicated, good response to treatment would prevent disease progression and reduce disease mortality and morbidity, and costly complications. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of generic and brand antiviral drugs for CHB treatment in China, and assessing various thresholds at which a highly potent, low resistance antiviral drug would be cost-saving and/or cost-effective to introduce in a national treatment program. We developed a Markov simulation model of disease progression using effectiveness and cost data from the medical literature. We measured life-time costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and clinical outcomes. The no treatment strategy incurred the highest health care costs ($12,932-$25,293) per patient, and the worst health outcomes, compared to the antiviral treatment strategies. Monotherapy with either entecavir or tenofovir yielded the most QALYs (14.10-19.02) for both HBeAg-positive and negative patients, with or without cirrhosis. Threshold analysis showed entercavir or tenofovir treatment would be cost saving if the drug price is $32-75 (195-460 RMB) per month, highly cost-effective at $62-110 (379-670 RMB) per month and cost-effective at $63-120 (384-734 RMB) per month. This study can support policy decisions regarding the implementation of a national health program for chronic hepatitis B treatment in China at the population level. PMID:26536626

  9. Differences in the availability of diagnostics and treatment modalities for chronic hepatitis B across Europe.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, R; Corti, G; Ruta, S; Lacombe, K; Mondelli, M U; Irwing, W L; Puoti, M; Khalighi, A; Santos, M L; Harxhi, A; Lazarevic, I; Soriano, V; Gervain, J; Leblebicioglu, H; Salmon, D; Arends, J E

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence and management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection differ among European countries. The availability and reimbursement of diagnostics and drugs may also vary, determining distinct treatment outcomes. Herein, we analyse differences in medical facilities for the care of patients with chronic HBV infection across Europe. A survey was sent to the members of the ESCMID Study Group for Viral Hepatitis, all of whom are experts in chronic HBV infection management. The comprehensive survey asked questions regarding hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) prevalence, the availability of diagnostics and drugs marketed, and distinct clinical practice behaviours in the management of chronic HBV infection. World Bank data were used to assess the economic status of the countries. With 16 expert physicians responding (69%), the HBsAg prevalence rates were <1% in France, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the UK, intermediate (1-5%) in Turkey, Romania, and Serbia, and high (>5%) in Albania and Iran. Regarding the availability and reimbursement of HBV diagnostics (HBV DNA and liver stiffness measurement), HBV drugs (interferon, lamivudine, tenofovir, and entecavir), HBV prophylaxis, and duration of HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative HBV infection, the majority of high-income and middle-income countries had no restrictions; Albania, Iran and Serbia had several restrictions in diagnostics and HBV drugs. The countries in the high-income group were also the ones with no restrictions in medical facilities, whereas the upper-middle-income countries had some restrictions. The prevalence of chronic HBV infection is much higher in southern and eastern than in western European countries. Despite the availability of European guidelines, policies for diagnostics and treatment vary significantly across European countries. PMID:26166544

  10. New antiviral targets for innovative treatment concepts for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Current therapies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain limited to pegylated-interferon-alpha (PegIFN-α) or any of the five approved nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUC) treatments. While viral suppression can be achieved in the majority of patients with the high-barrier-to-resistance new-generation of NUC, i.e. entecavir and tenofovir, HBsAg loss is achieved by PegIFN-α and/or NUC in only 10% of patients, after a 5-year follow-up. Attempts to improve the response by administering two different NUC or a combination of NUC and PegIFN-α have not provided a dramatic increase in the rate of functional cure. Because of this and the need of long-term NUC administration, there is a renewed interest regarding the understanding of various steps of the HBV replication cycle, as well as specific virus-host cell interactions, in order to define new targets and develop new antiviral drugs. This includes a direct inhibition of viral replication with entry inhibitors, drugs targeting cccDNA, siRNA targeting viral transcripts, capsid assembly modulators, and approaches targeting the secretion of viral envelope proteins. Restoration of immune responses is a complementary approach. The restoration of innate immunity against HBV can be achieved, with TLR agonists or specific antiviral cytokine delivery. Restoration of adaptive immunity may be achieved with inhibitors of negative checkpoint regulators, therapeutic vaccines, or autologous transfer of engineered HBV-specific T cells. Novel targets and compounds will readily be evaluated using both relevant and novel in vitro and in vivo models of HBV infection. The addition of one or several new drugs to current therapies should offer the prospect of a markedly improved response to treatments and an increased rate of functional cure. This should lead to a reduced risk of antiviral drug resistance, and to a decreased incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  11. Study on the antiviral activity of San Huang Yi Gan Capsule against hepatitis B virus with seropharmacological method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Seropharmacology arising recently is a novel method of in vitro pharmacological study on Chinese herb using drug-containing animal serum. As seropharmacology possesses the advantages of experiments in vitro and in vivo, it is increasingly applied in pharmacological research on Chinese medicine. However, some issues of seropharmacology remain controversial and need to be clearly defined. San Huang Yi Gan Capsule (SHYGC) is a Chinese herbal formula with antiviral property against hepatitis B virus (HBV), but little is known about the mechanism underlying its anti-HBV activity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the action mechanism of SHYGC using seropharmacological method and systematically address the methodology of preparing drug-containing serum. Methods New Zealand rabbits were orally administrated SHYGC with various regimens, followed by preparation of SHYGC-containing rabbit sera with a variety of methods. After HBV-producing HepG2 2.2.15 cells were treated with SHYGC-containing sera or entecavir for 9 days, the levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV DNA and the activity of DNA Polymerase were determined in HepG2 2.2.15 cells-conditioned media. Results An optimally standardized method of preparing drug-containing serum was raised for seropharmacology, with which SHYGC was demonstrated to suppress HBsAg expression, HBV DNA replication and DNA Polymerase activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions This seropharmacological study shows SHYGC is a potentially powerful anti-HBV agent. Additionally, seropharmacology is a promising pharmacological method with a broad range of advantages, and it can be widely used in biomedical research, if combined with pharmacokinetics. PMID:24073917

  12. New antiviral targets for innovative treatment concepts for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Current therapies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remain limited to pegylated-interferon-alpha (PegIFN-α) or any of the five approved nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUC) treatments. While viral suppression can be achieved in the majority of patients with the high-barrier-to-resistance new-generation of NUC, i.e. entecavir and tenofovir, HBsAg loss is achieved by PegIFN-α and/or NUC in only 10% of patients, after a 5-year follow-up. Attempts to improve the response by administering two different NUC or a combination of NUC and PegIFN-α have not provided a dramatic increase in the rate of functional cure. Because of this and the need of long-term NUC administration, there is a renewed interest regarding the understanding of various steps of the HBV replication cycle, as well as specific virus-host cell interactions, in order to define new targets and develop new antiviral drugs. This includes a direct inhibition of viral replication with entry inhibitors, drugs targeting cccDNA, siRNA targeting viral transcripts, capsid assembly modulators, and approaches targeting the secretion of viral envelope proteins. Restoration of immune responses is a complementary approach. The restoration of innate immunity against HBV can be achieved, with TLR agonists or specific antiviral cytokine delivery. Restoration of adaptive immunity may be achieved with inhibitors of negative checkpoint regulators, therapeutic vaccines, or autologous transfer of engineered HBV-specific T cells. Novel targets and compounds will readily be evaluated using both relevant and novel in vitro and in vivo models of HBV infection. The addition of one or several new drugs to current therapies should offer the prospect of a markedly improved response to treatments and an increased rate of functional cure. This should lead to a reduced risk of antiviral drug resistance, and to a decreased incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:27084032

  13. [A case of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma successfully treated by liver resection after complete response induced by sorafenib administration].

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkook; Hosoda, Yohei; Kakita, Naruyasu; Yamada, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Masaru; Nishino, Masaya; Okano, Miho; Nagai, Kenichi; Yasui, Masayoshi; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2014-11-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital with the chief complaint of right hypochondriac pain and a palpable tumor. Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic hepatitis B infection were diagnosed and treated by twice-repeated transcatheterarterial chemoembolization (TACE) followed by administration of entecavir. Two months after the last TACE, alpha-fetoprotein(AFP)and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonistII (PIVKA-II) levels had elevated, and multiple small early enhancing nodules were detected on computed tomography(CT)scan. Based on his age and liver function (Child-Pugh score A5), a full dose of sorafenib (800 mg/day) was administered. The sorafenib dose was decreased after one month to 400mg/day because of hand-foot syndrome. Following sorafenib administration, the lesions shrank markedly, and complete response (CR) according to modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors(mRECIST)was achieved within 4 months. Six months after sorafenib treatment was begun, recurrent HCC was detected in segment 6, near the previously treated lesion. The decreased size of the main tumor and normalization of AFP levels allowed curative surgical resection. The patient was discharged 5 days after surgery and is currently treated with a half dose of sorafenib. Thirteen months after surgery, a small early enhancing lesion is visible on postoperative CT scan, but AFP and PIVKA-II levels are still keeping in a normal range. This case demonstrates that if sorafenib treatment is effective, then subsequent surgical treatment can be reconsidered in patients with advanced HCC responding to this combined therapy. PMID:25731444

  14. Cost-Effectiveness and Cost Thresholds of Generic and Brand Drugs in a National Chronic Hepatitis B Treatment Program in China.

    PubMed

    Toy, Mehlika; Hutton, David W; So, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and liver cancer associated with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are leading causes of death among adults in China. Although newborn hepatitis B immunization has successfully reduced the prevalence of CHB in children, about 100 million Chinese adults remain chronically infected. If left unmanaged, 15-25% will die from liver cancer or liver cirrhosis. Antiviral treatment is not necessary for all patients with CHB, but when it is indicated, good response to treatment would prevent disease progression and reduce disease mortality and morbidity, and costly complications. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of generic and brand antiviral drugs for CHB treatment in China, and assessing various thresholds at which a highly potent, low resistance antiviral drug would be cost-saving and/or cost-effective to introduce in a national treatment program. We developed a Markov simulation model of disease progression using effectiveness and cost data from the medical literature. We measured life-time costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and clinical outcomes. The no treatment strategy incurred the highest health care costs ($12,932-$25,293) per patient, and the worst health outcomes, compared to the antiviral treatment strategies. Monotherapy with either entecavir or tenofovir yielded the most QALYs (14.10-19.02) for both HBeAg-positive and negative patients, with or without cirrhosis. Threshold analysis showed entercavir or tenofovir treatment would be cost saving if the drug price is $32-75 (195-460 RMB) per month, highly cost-effective at $62-110 (379-670 RMB) per month and cost-effective at $63-120 (384-734 RMB) per month. This study can support policy decisions regarding the implementation of a national health program for chronic hepatitis B treatment in China at the population level.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness and Cost Thresholds of Generic and Brand Drugs in a National Chronic Hepatitis B Treatment Program in China

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Mehlika; Hutton, David W.; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and liver cancer associated with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are leading causes of death among adults in China. Although newborn hepatitis B immunization has successfully reduced the prevalence of CHB in children, about 100 million Chinese adults remain chronically infected. If left unmanaged, 15–25% will die from liver cancer or liver cirrhosis. Antiviral treatment is not necessary for all patients with CHB, but when it is indicated, good response to treatment would prevent disease progression and reduce disease mortality and morbidity, and costly complications. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of generic and brand antiviral drugs for CHB treatment in China, and assessing various thresholds at which a highly potent, low resistance antiviral drug would be cost-saving and/or cost-effective to introduce in a national treatment program. We developed a Markov simulation model of disease progression using effectiveness and cost data from the medical literature. We measured life-time costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and clinical outcomes. The no treatment strategy incurred the highest health care costs ($12,932-$25,293) per patient, and the worst health outcomes, compared to the antiviral treatment strategies. Monotherapy with either entecavir or tenofovir yielded the most QALYs (14.10–19.02) for both HBeAg-positive and negative patients, with or without cirrhosis. Threshold analysis showed entercavir or tenofovir treatment would be cost saving if the drug price is $32–75 (195–460 RMB) per month, highly cost-effective at $62–110 (379–670 RMB) per month and cost-effective at $63–120 (384–734 RMB) per month. This study can support policy decisions regarding the implementation of a national health program for chronic hepatitis B treatment in China at the population level. PMID:26536626

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials reported in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:[188Re]-HDD; A-179578, adalimumab, AK-602, albumin interferon alfa, alfimeprase, amelubant, anakinra, anti-CD2 MAb, APD-356, aripiprazole, atvogen; Bimatoprost, bimosiamose, BLP-25, brivaracetam; Caspofungin acetate, cilansetron, CMV vaccine (bivalent), conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, D-D4FC, decitabine, dnaJP1, doranidazole, dronedarone hydrochloride; Efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, Endeavor, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, etravirine, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenretinide, ferumoxtran-10, forodesine hydrochloride; Gantacurium chloride, gemi-floxacin mesilate, Glyminox, GW-501516; HBV-ISS, hepavir B, human insulin, HuMax-CD20, hyaluronic acid, HyCAMP; Icatibant, IDEA-070, IGN-311, imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine; Lapatinib, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, liarozole fumarate, liposome encapsulated doxorubicin, lumiracoxib, LY-570310; MC-1, melatonin, merimepodib, metanicotine, midostaurin; Natalizumab, nicotine conjugate vaccine, NYVAC-HIV C; Patupilone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pelitinib, Peru-15, pexelizumab, PHP, pimecrolimus, prednisolone sodium metasulfobenzoate; Recombinant alfa1-antitrypsin (AAT), retigabine, rHA influenza vaccine, rifalazil, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/Metformin hydrochloride, rostaporfin, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan; Selenite sodium, semilente insulin, SMP-797, sorafenib; Talampanel, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-199, tiotropium bromide, torcetrapib, treprostinil sodium, TTA

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  19. Pharmacokinetics of LB80331 and LB80317 following Oral Administration of LB80380, a New Antiviral Agent for Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB), in Healthy Adult Subjects, CHB Patients, and Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Man-Fung; Lee, Sung-Hack; Kang, Hyang-Mi; Kim, Chung Ryeol; Kim, John; Ngai, Vincent; Lai, Ching-Lung

    2009-01-01

    LB80380, a dipivoxil ester prodrug of LB80331 (metabolite, LB80317), is a novel antiviral agent for chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The pharmacokinetics of LB80331/LB80317 were evaluated in two clinical studies and a study with mice. The clinical studies were dose-escalating pharmacokinetic studies with six healthy subjects per single-dose group and six CHB patients per repeated-dose group. The mouse study was designed to measure the amounts of the phosphorylated portions of LB80331 and LB80317 in the liver. In healthy subjects receiving a single dose of LB80380, the plasma level of LB80331 increased as the dose increased. Although a high-fat diet delayed the time to the maximum concentration in plasma (Tmax) of LB80331, the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity was similar between the subjects in the fasted group and those in the group who consumed a high-fat diet. In CHB patients, the mean Tmax of LB80331 was 1.0 to 2.0 h postdosing at steady state. The steady-state plasma concentration of LB80331 declined in a monoexponential manner, and the apparent elimination half-life was 2.5 to 3.3 h. The steady-state plasma concentration of LB80317 was maximum at 3 to 8 h postdoing and declined in a monoexponential manner; the apparent elimination half-life was 45 to 62 h at the 30- to 240-mg doses, while LB80317 was measurable in plasma only at higher doses of 120 and 240 mg after the administration of the first dose of LB80380. Forty percent of the amount of LB80331/LB80317 in the mouse liver was detected as the phosphorylated form. In conclusion, LB80380 is rapidly absorbed and converted to LB80331. LB80317 has a long half-life at steady-state, supporting the use of a once-daily dosing regimen. The ingestion of a high-fat diet delays the rate of absorption of LB80380 without affecting the extent of absorption. PMID:19223649

  20. Improved Efficacy of a pegylated interferon-α-2a stepwise optimization treatment strategy in the treatment of hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pu; Yang, Feifei; Wang, Jinyu; Mao, Richeng; Qi, Xun; Huang, Yuxian; Zhang, Jiming

    2015-05-01

    Current pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive patients are suboptimal, and effective ways of improving PEG-IFN treatment efficacy are needed.This retrospective cohort study compared the efficacy of a PEG-IFN stepwise optimization treatment (PEG-IFN SOT) strategy with that of a 48-week PEG-IFN standard therapy (PEG-IFN ST) in HBeAg-positive CHB patients.A total of 110 patients were included in our study. Of these, 70 received the PEG-IFN SOT and 40 received the PEG-IFN ST (control group). We based the decision whether to add adefovir and/or extend the PEG-IFN-based treatment to 96 weeks on the patients' 12-week or 24-week early virological response (12W EVR, at least a 2 log10 reduction in HBV DNA copies/mL at week 12; 24W EVR, at least 1 log10 reduction in HBsAg IU/mL or HBsAg <1500 IU/mL at week 24) and their 48-week partial response (48W PR, 1.0 ≤HBeAg ≤10.0 S/CO or HBeAg >10.0 S/CO but HBsAg <1000 IU/mL).The HBeAg seroconversion rate 24 weeks post-PEG-IFN treatment was significantly higher in the PEG-IFN SOT than the PEG-IFN ST group (50% vs 22.5%, P = 0.005). The HBsAg clearance rates in the PEG-IFN SOT and ST groups were 10% and 0% (P = 0.04), respectively. Receiving PEG-IFN SOT (OR = 0.26, P = 0.01), ALT × ULN at baseline (OR = 0.74, P = 0.003), and achieving 12 and 24W EVR (OR = 0.29, P = 0.03) were independent factors associated with HBeAg seroconversion.PEG-IFN SOT is a promising strategy for achieving high rates of serological response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients.

  1. In search of a selective antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes several approaches to a selective therapy of virus infections: (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU [brivudin]) for the therapy of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus infections: (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine (HPMPC [cidofovir]) for the therapy of various DNA virus (i.e., herpesvirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, polyomavirus, and poxvirus) infections; 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA [adefovir]) for the therapy of retrovirus, hepadnavirus, and herpesvirus infections; (R)-9-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (PMPA) for the therapy and prophylaxis of retrovirus and hepadnavirus infections; and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), such as tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(IH)-one and -thione (TIBO), 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT), alpha-anilinophenylacetamide (alpha-APA), and 2',5'bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-3'-spiro-5"-(4"-amino-1",2"-oxat hiole- 2",2"-dioxide)pyrimidine (TSAO) derivatives, and thiocarboxanilides for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. For the clinical use of NNRTIs, some guidelines have been elaborated, such as starting treatment with combinations of different compounds at sufficiently high concentrations to effect a pronounced and sustained suppression of the virus. Despite the diversity of the compounds described here and the different viruses at which they are targeted, they have a number of characteristics in common. As they interact with specific viral proteins, the compounds achieve a selective inhibition of the replication of the virus, which, in turn, should be able to develop resistance to the compounds. However, as has been established for the NNRTIs, the problem of viral resistance may be overcome if the compounds are used from the start at sufficiently high doses, which could be reduced if different compounds are combined. For HIV infections, drug treatment

  2. Application of a Newly Developed High-Sensitivity HBsAg Chemiluminescent Enzyme Immunoassay for Hepatitis B Patients with HBsAg Seroclearance

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai, Noboru; Matsuura, Kentaro; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Murakami, Shuko; Iio, Etsuko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We modified and automated a highly sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for surface antigen (HBsAg) detection using a combination of monoclonal antibodies, each for a specific epitope of HBsAg, and by improving an earlier conjugation technique. Of 471 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers seen in our hospital between 2009 and 2012, 26 were HBsAg seronegative as determined by the Abbott Architect assay. The Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was used to recheck those 26 patients who demonstrated seroclearance by the Abbott Architect assay. The performance of the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was compared with that of a quantitative HBsAg detection system (Abbott Architect) and the Roche Cobas TaqMan HBV DNA assay (CTM) (lower limit of detection, 2.1 log copies/ml) using blood serum samples from patients who were determined to be HBsAg seronegative by the Abbott Architect assay. Ten patients had spontaneous HBsAg loss. Of 8 patients treated with nucleotide analogues (NAs), two were HBsAg seronegative after stopping lamivudine therapy and 6 were HBsAg seronegative during entecavir therapy. Eight acute hepatitis B (AH) patients became HBsAg seronegative. Of the 26 patients, 16 were HBsAg positive by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay but negative by the Abbott Architect assay. The differences between the two assays in terms of detectable HBsAg persisted over the long term in the spontaneous loss group (median, 10 months), the NA-treated group (2.5 months), and the AH group (0.5 months). In 9 patients, the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay detected HBsAg when HBV DNA was negative by the CTM assay. HBsAg was also detected by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay in 4 patients with an anti-HBs concentration of >10 mIU/ml, 3 of whom had no HBsAg escape mutations. The automatic, highly sensitive HBsAg CLEIA Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ is a convenient and precise assay for HBV monitoring. PMID:23946517

  3. Prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing nucleoside analog antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    NISHIKAWA, HIROKI; NISHIJIMA, NORIHIRO; ARIMOTO, AKIRA; INUZUKA, TADASHI; KITA, RYUICHI; KIMURA, TORU; OSAKI, YUKIO

    2013-01-01

    In the present era of entecavir (ETV) use for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), the prognostic factors in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prognostic factors in patients with HBV-related HCC treated with ETV who underwent curative therapy. A total of 74 HBV-related HCC patients treated with ETV who underwent curative therapy were analyzed. Predictive factors associated with overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our study population included 49 males and 25 females with a median age of 62 years. The median observation period was 3.4 years (range, 0.2–11.5 years). The 1-, 3- and 5-year cumulative OS rates were 100, 89.8 and 89.8%, respectively. The corresponding RFS rates were 82.8, 52.1 and 25.6%, respectively. In this study, 73 patients (98.6%) achieved an HBV DNA level of <400 copies/ml during the follow-up period. No viral breakthrough hepatitis, as defined by 1 log increase from nadir, was observed during ETV therapy. According to multivariate analysis, only hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity was significantly associated with OS [hazard ratio (HR), 0.058; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.005–0.645; P=0.020)], whereas HCC stage (HR, 0.359; 95% CI, 0.150–0.859; P=0.021), HBeAg positivity (HR, 0.202; 95% CI, 0.088–0.463; P<0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase ≥50 IU/l (HR, 0.340; 95% CI, 0.152–0.760; P=0.009) were significant predictive factors linked to RFS. In conclusion, HBeAg positivity was significantly associated with OS and RFS in HBV-related HCC patients treated with ETV who underwent curative therapy. In such patients, close observation is required, even after curative therapy for HCC. PMID:24179497

  4. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  5. Hepatitis B Infection, Viral Load and Resistance in HIV-Infected Patients in Mozambique and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Musukuma, Kalo; Zürcher, Samuel; Vinikoor, Michael J.; Llenas-García, Jara; Aly, Mussa M.; Mulenga, Lloyd; Chi, Benjamin H.; Ehmer, Jochen; Hobbins, Michael A.; Bolton-Moore, Carolyn; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Egger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data on the virological determinants of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are available from southern Africa. Methods We enrolled consecutive HIV-infected adult patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at two urban clinics in Zambia and four rural clinics in Northern Mozambique between May 2013 and August 2014. HBsAg screening was performed using the Determine® rapid test. Quantitative real-time PCR and HBV sequencing were performed in HBsAg-positive patients. Risk factors for HBV infection were evaluated using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and associations between baseline characteristics and high level HBV replication explored in multivariable logistic regression. Results Seventy-eight of 1,032 participants in Mozambique (7.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.1–9.3) and 90 of 797 in Zambia (11.3%, 95% CI: 9.3–13.4) were HBsAg-positive. HBsAg-positive individuals were less likely to be female compared to HBsAg-negative ones (52.3% vs. 66.1%, p<0.001). Among 156 (92.9%) HBsAg-positive patients with an available measurement, median HBV viral load was 13,645 IU/mL (interquartile range: 192–8,617,488 IU/mL) and 77 (49.4%) had high values (>20,000 UI/mL). HBsAg-positive individuals had higher levels of ALT and AST compared to HBsAg-negative ones (both p<0.001). In multivariable analyses, male sex (adjusted odds ratio: 2.59, 95% CI: 1.22–5.53) and CD4 cell count below 200/μl (2.58, 1.20–5.54) were associated with high HBV DNA. HBV genotypes A1 (58.8%) and E (38.2%) were most prevalent. Four patients had probable resistance to lamivudine and/or entecavir. Conclusion One half of HBsAg-positive patients demonstrated high HBV viremia, supporting the early initiation of tenofovir-containing ART in HIV/HBV-coinfected adults. PMID:27032097

  6. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-07-28

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  7. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-07-28

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  8. Prevention and management of hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with hematological malignancies treated with anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Ho, Rita; Cheung, Carmen K M; Tam, Lydia H P; Ma, Karen; So, Kent C Y; Ip, Bonaventure; So, Jacqueline; Lai, Jennifer; Ng, Joyce; Tam, Tommy H C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation can be severe and potentially fatal, but is preventable. HBV reactivation is most commonly reported in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, especially rituximab-containing therapy for hematological malignancies and those receiving stem cell transplantation. All patients with hematological malignancies receiving anticancer therapy should be screened for active or resolved HBV infection by blood tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Patients found to be positive for HBsAg should be given prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBV reactivation. For patients with resolved HBV infection, no standard strategy has yet been established to prevent HBV reactivation. There are usually two options. One is pre-emptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring, whereby antiviral therapy is given as soon as HBV DNA becomes detectable. However, there is little evidence regarding the optimal interval and period of monitoring. An alternative approach is prophylactic antiviral therapy, especially for patients receiving high-risk therapy such as rituximab, newer generation of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This strategy may effectively prevent HBV reactivation and avoid the inconvenience of repeated HBV DNA monitoring. Entecavir or tenofovir are preferred over lamivudine as prophylactic therapy. Although there is no well-defined guideline on the optimal duration of prophylactic therapy, there is growing evidence to recommend continuing prophylactic antiviral therapy for at least 12 mo after cessation of chemotherapy, and even longer for those who receive rituximab or who had high serum HBV DNA levels before the start of immunosuppressive therapy. Many novel agents have recently become available for the treatment of hematological malignancies, and these agents may be associated with HBV reactivation. Although

  9. Application of a newly developed high-sensitivity HBsAg chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B patients with HBsAg seroclearance.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Noboru; Matsuura, Kentaro; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Murakami, Shuko; Iio, Etsuko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2013-11-01

    We modified and automated a highly sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for surface antigen (HBsAg) detection using a combination of monoclonal antibodies, each for a specific epitope of HBsAg, and by improving an earlier conjugation technique. Of 471 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers seen in our hospital between 2009 and 2012, 26 were HBsAg seronegative as determined by the Abbott Architect assay. The Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was used to recheck those 26 patients who demonstrated seroclearance by the Abbott Architect assay. The performance of the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay was compared with that of a quantitative HBsAg detection system (Abbott Architect) and the Roche Cobas TaqMan HBV DNA assay (CTM) (lower limit of detection, 2.1 log copies/ml) using blood serum samples from patients who were determined to be HBsAg seronegative by the Abbott Architect assay. Ten patients had spontaneous HBsAg loss. Of 8 patients treated with nucleotide analogues (NAs), two were HBsAg seronegative after stopping lamivudine therapy and 6 were HBsAg seronegative during entecavir therapy. Eight acute hepatitis B (AH) patients became HBsAg seronegative. Of the 26 patients, 16 were HBsAg positive by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay but negative by the Abbott Architect assay. The differences between the two assays in terms of detectable HBsAg persisted over the long term in the spontaneous loss group (median, 10 months), the NA-treated group (2.5 months), and the AH group (0.5 months). In 9 patients, the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay detected HBsAg when HBV DNA was negative by the CTM assay. HBsAg was also detected by the Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ assay in 4 patients with an anti-HBs concentration of >10 mIU/ml, 3 of whom had no HBsAg escape mutations. The automatic, highly sensitive HBsAg CLEIA Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ is a convenient and precise assay for HBV monitoring.