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Sample records for adelanto calif general

  1. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  2. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully thread control lines through a bulkhead during engine installation on NASA's Altair aircraft. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  3. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully thread control lines through a bulkhead during engine installation on NASA's Altair aircraft. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  4. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  5. EC02-0188-22

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-12

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully thread control lines through a bulkhead during engine installation on NASA's Altair aircraft.

  6. Perspective View, SRTM / Landsat, Los Angeles, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Los Angeles, Calif., is one of the world's largest metropolitan areas with a population of about 15 million people. The urban areas mostly cover the coastal plains and lie within the inland valleys. The intervening and adjacent mountains are generally too rugged for much urban development. This in large part because the mountains are 'young', meaning they are still building (and eroding) in this seismically active (earthquake prone) region.

    Earthquake faults commonly lie between the mountains and the lowlands. The San Andreas fault, the largest fault in California, likewise divides the very rugged San Gabriel Mountains from the low-relief Mojave Desert, thus forming a straight topographic boundary between the top center and lower right corner of the image. We present two versions of this perspective image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM): one with and one without a graphic overlay that maps faults that have been active in Late Quaternary times (white lines). The fault database was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    For the annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large image: 2 mB jpeg)

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on May 4, 2001, about seven weeks before the summer solstice, so natural terrain shading is not particularly strong. It is also not especially apparent given a view direction (northwest) nearly parallel to the sun illumination (shadows generally fall on the backsides of mountains). Consequently, topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image, with a false sun illumination from the left (southwest). This synthetic shading enhances the appearance of the topography.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and

  7. Perspective View, SRTM / Landsat, Los Angeles, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Los Angeles, Calif., is one of the world's largest metropolitan areas with a population of about 15 million people. The urban areas mostly cover the coastal plains and lie within the inland valleys. The intervening and adjacent mountains are generally too rugged for much urban development. This in large part because the mountains are 'young', meaning they are still building (and eroding) in this seismically active (earthquake prone) region.

    Earthquake faults commonly lie between the mountains and the lowlands. The San Andreas fault, the largest fault in California, likewise divides the very rugged San Gabriel Mountains from the low-relief Mojave Desert, thus forming a straight topographic boundary between the top center and lower right corner of the image. We present two versions of this perspective image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM): one with and one without a graphic overlay that maps faults that have been active in Late Quaternary times (white lines). The fault database was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    For the annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large image: 2 mB jpeg)

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on May 4, 2001, about seven weeks before the summer solstice, so natural terrain shading is not particularly strong. It is also not especially apparent given a view direction (northwest) nearly parallel to the sun illumination (shadows generally fall on the backsides of mountains). Consequently, topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image, with a false sun illumination from the left (southwest). This synthetic shading enhances the appearance of the topography.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and

  8. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  9. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  10. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  11. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  12. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  13. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. 110.111 Section 110.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.111 Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. An area...

  14. 33 CFR 110.115 - Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.115 Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. North of the Santa Barbara breakwater; seaward of the line of mean high water; and southwest of a line bearing...

  15. Stratigraphic and structural characterization of the OU-1 area at the former George Air Force Base, Adelanto, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The former George Air Force Base (GAFB), now known as the Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA), is located in the town of Adelanto, approximately 100 km northeast of Los Angeles, California (Fig. 1). In this report, we present acquisition parameters, data, and interpretations of seismic images that were acquired in the OU-1 area of GAFB during July 1999 (Fig. 2). GAFB is scheduled for conversion to civilian use, however, during its years as an Air Force base, trichlorethylene (TCE) was apparently introduced into the subsurface as a result of spills during normal aircraft maintenance operations. To comply with congressional directives, TCE contaminant removal has been ongoing since the early-tomid 1990s. However, only a small percentage of the TCE believed to have been introduced into the subsurface has been recovered, due largely to difficulty in locating the TCE within the subsurface. Because TCE migrates within the subsurface by ground water movement, attempts to locate the TCE contaminants in the subsurface have employed an array of ground-water monitoring and extraction wells. These wells primarily sample within a shallow-depth (~40 m) aquifer system. Cores obtained from the monitoring and extraction wells indicate that the aquifer, which is composed of sand and gravel channels, is bounded by aquitards composed largely of clay and other fine-grained sediments. Based on well logs, the aquifer is about 3 to 5 m thick along the seismic profiles. A more thorough understanding of the lateral variations in the depth and thickness of the aquifer system may be a key to finding and removing the remaining TCE. However, due to its complex depositional and tectonic history, the structural and stratigraphic sequences are not easily characterized. An indication of the complex nature of the structure and stratigraphy is the appreciable variation in stratigraphic sequences observed in some monitoring wells that are only a few tens of meters apart. To better

  16. EC02-0188-3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-12

    Technician Shawn Warren carefully smoothes out the composite skin of an instrument fairingatop the upper fuselage of the Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., facility at Adelanto, Calif.

  17. EC02-0188-18

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-12

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations.

  18. EC02-0188-19

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-12

    Technician Dave Brown installs a drilling template during construction of the all-composite left wing of NASA's Altair aircraft at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif.

  19. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Behind it can be seen the first stage of the Delta II. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Behind it can be seen the first stage of the Delta II. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  20. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., where it will be mated with the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-16

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., where it will be mated with the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  1. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment arrives at the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment arrives at the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  2. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is ready to be lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-15

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is ready to be lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  3. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  4. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Viewed from inside, the second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Viewed from inside, the second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  5. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is prepared for lifting up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It will enclose the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-16

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is prepared for lifting up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It will enclose the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  6. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is raised to a vertical position at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-15

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is raised to a vertical position at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  7. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-15

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  8. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It will enclose the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-16

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It will enclose the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  9. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers on the mobile service tower at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., check the Delta II rocket’s second stage as it is mated with the first stage. The Delta II is the launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment, developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers on the mobile service tower at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., check the Delta II rocket’s second stage as it is mated with the first stage. The Delta II is the launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment, developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  10. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., rolls back from the Delta II rocket that will launch the Gravity Probe B experiment. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., rolls back from the Delta II rocket that will launch the Gravity Probe B experiment. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  11. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Viewed from inside, the second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Behind it is the first stage of the Delta II. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Viewed from inside, the second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted up the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Behind it is the first stage of the Delta II. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  12. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted off the transporter after its arrival on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The second stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted off the transporter after its arrival on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  13. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment arrives at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-15

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The first stage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment arrives at Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  14. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., where it will be mated with the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - The interstage of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Gravity Probe B experiment is moved into the mobile service tower on Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., where it will be mated with the second stage. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  15. Naval Air Station, Santa Ana, Calif. Lighterthanairhangar roof truss details. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Naval Air Station, Santa Ana, Calif. Lighter-than-air-hangar roof truss details. Drawing no. 212817. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  16. 33 CFR 110.91 - Mission Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mission Bay, Calif. 110.91... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.91 Mission Bay, Calif. (a) Area M-1. In San Juan Cove... west of a line drawn from latitude 32°45′49.2″ N., longitude 117°14′42.9″ W.; to Mission Point Light...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1150 - Monterey Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and is approximately parallel to the shore. (ii) The danger zone is divided into a short range area...° true to the shore. (2) The regulations. The danger zone will be used for training in various phases of... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1150 Monterey Bay, Calif. (a) Firing range,...

  18. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  19. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  20. 33 CFR 110.93 - Dana Point Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Harbor, Calif. commencing at a point at latitude 33°27′36.2″ N., longitude 117°42′20.4″ W.; thence 016°20′ True for 612 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′42.1″ N., longitude 117°42′18.4″ W.; thence 106°20′ True for 85 feet to a point at latitude 33°27′41.8″ N., longitude 117°42′17.7″ W.; thence 196°20′ True...

  1. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334.921 Section 334.921 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. All waters...

  2. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas....980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island, Calif., extending about 3 miles seaward from the...

  3. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334.921 Section 334.921 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. All waters...

  4. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1) East...

  5. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas....980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island, Calif., extending about 3 miles seaward from the...

  6. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1) East...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1140 - Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. 334.1140 Section 334.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1140 Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. (a) The area. The waters around San...

  8. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1) East...

  9. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334.921 Section 334.921 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. All waters...

  10. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas....980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island, Calif., extending about 3 miles seaward from the...

  11. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, around San... REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area—(1) Perimeter (restricted). The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicholas Island, Calif...

  12. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas....980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island, Calif., extending about 3 miles seaward from the...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1140 - Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. 334.1140 Section 334.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1140 Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. (a) The area. The waters around San...

  14. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted area. All...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1140 - Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. 334.1140 Section 334.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1140 Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. (a) The area. The waters around San...

  16. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334.921 Section 334.921 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. All waters...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1140 - Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. 334.1140 Section 334.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1140 Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. (a) The area. The waters around San...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1140 - Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. 334.1140 Section 334.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1140 Pacific Ocean at San Miguel Island, Calif.; naval danger zone. (a) The area. The waters around San...

  19. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. 110.220 Section 110.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The restricted areas—(1) East...

  20. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334.921 Section 334.921 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. All waters...

  1. 33 CFR 334.880 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area adjacent to Point Loma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval....880 San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area adjacent to Point Loma. (a) The area. That portion of San Diego Bay southerly of Ballast Point, exclusive of the southwesterly portion of the restricted...

  2. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted... § 162.210 Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. (a) The areas—(1) Baldwin Beach, under the control of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture. The waters of Lake Tahoe shoreward of a...

  3. A coccidioidomycosis outbreak following the Northridge, Calif, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, E.; Hajjeh, R.A.; Spiegel, R.A.; Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Marshall, G.A.; Gunn, R.A.; McNeil, M.M.; Pinner, R.W.; Baron, R.C.; Burger, R.C.; Hutwagner, L.C.; Crump, C.; Kaufman, L.; Reef, S.E.; Feldman, G.M.; Pappagianis, D.; Werner, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. - To describe a coccidioidomycosis outbreak in Ventura County following the January 1994 earthquake, centered in Northridge, Calif, and to identify factors that increased the risk for acquiring acute coccidioidomycosis infection. Design. - Epidemic investigation, population- based skin test survey, and case-control study. Setting. - Ventura County, California. Results. - In Ventura County, between January 24 and March 15, 1994, 203 outbreak-associated coccidioidomycosis cases, including 3 fatalities, were identified (attack rate [AR], 30 cases per 100 000 population). The majority of cases (56%) and the highest AR (114 per 100 000 population) occurred in the town of Simi Valley, a community located at the base of a mountain range that experienced numerous landslides associated with the earthquake. Disease onset for cases peaked 2 weeks after the earthquake. The AR was 2.8 times greater for persons 40 years of age and older than for younger persons (relative risk, 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-3.7; P<.001). Environmental data indicated that large dust clouds, generated by landslides following the earthquake and strong aftershocks in the Santa Susana Mountains north of Simi Valley, were dispersed into nearby valleys by northeast winds. Simi Valley case-control study data indicated that physically being in a dust cloud (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.6-5.4; P<.001) and time spent in a dust cloud (P<.001) significantly increased the risk for being diagnosed with acute coccidioidomycosis. Conclusions. - Both the location and timing of cases strongly suggest that the coccidioidomycosis outbreak in Ventura County was caused when arthrospores were spread in dust clouds generated by the earthquake. This is the first report of a coccidioidomycosis outbreak following an earthquake. Public and physician awareness, especially in endemic areas following similar dust cloud- generating events, may result in prevention and early recognition of acute

  4. U.S. EPA orders companies in Visalia, Calif., to protect Mill Creek from polluted wastewater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the resolution of a series of enforcement actions for Clean Water Act violations at three manufacturing companies located in Visalia, Calif. The facilities owned by Univar USA, Advan

  5. EPA Resolves Violations with Newport Beach, Calif. Company for Failure to Report Imported Agricultural Chemicals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    LOS ANGELES -The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency settled its case against American Vanguard Corporation, located in Newport Beach, Calif., for failure to report toxic chemical substances imported by two of its subsidiary companies. American Vang

  6. NASA's MISR Instrument Captures View of Mountain Fire Near Idyllwild, Calif.

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  NASA's MISR Instrument Captures View of Mountain Fire Near Idyllwild, Calif.     ... and high daytime temperatures. As of July 19, 2013, the Mountain Fire, which began on July 15 in the San Jacinto Wilderness in Southern ...

  7. Watsonville, Calif. students receive Presidents environmental education award for fighting to protect sea turtles worldwide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that the fifth grade class at Mount Madonna School in Watsonville, Calif. will receive the President's Environmental Youth Award for their work to fight environmental threats

  8. 33 CFR 334.870 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Calif.; restricted area. (a) Restricted area at Bravo Pier, Naval Air Station—(1) The area. The water of... restricted area except that no transit will be allowed within 100 feet of the ammunition pier (Bravo Pier...

  9. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Mount Shasta, Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: scale varies in this perspective image Location: 41.4 degrees North latitude, 122.3 degrees West longitude Orientation: looking southeast Image Data: Landsat Bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, blue, respectively Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet) Thematic Mapper 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM)

  10. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Palm Springs, Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The city of Palm Springs nestles at the base of Mount San Jacinto in this computer-generated perspective viewed from the east. The many golf courses in the area show up as irregular green areas while the two prominent lines passing through the middle of the image are Interstate 10 and the adjacent railroad tracks. The San Andreas Fault passes through the middle of the sandy Indio Hills in the foreground.

    This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced color Landsat 5satellite image. Topographic expression is exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Size: scale varies in this perspective image Location: 33.8 deg. North lat., 116.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: looking west Image Data: Landsat Bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, blue, respectively Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond

  11. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Mount Shasta, Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At more than 4,300 meters (14,000 feet ), Mount Shasta is California's tallest volcano and part of the Cascade chain of volcanoes extending south from Washington. This computer-generated perspective viewed from the west also includes Shastina, a slightly smaller volcanic cone left of Shasta's summit and Black Butte, another volcano in the right foreground.

    This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced color Landsat 5satellite image. Topographic expression is exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Size: scale varies in this perspective image Location: 41.4 deg. North lat., 122.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: looking east Image Data: Landsat Bands 3,2,1 as red, green, blue, respectively Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet), Thematic Mapper 1 arcsecond

  12. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Mount Shasta, Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: scale varies in this perspective image Location: 41.4 degrees North latitude, 122.3 degrees West longitude Orientation: looking southeast Image Data: Landsat Bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, blue, respectively Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet) Thematic Mapper 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM)

  13. First-principles study of the structural, electronic and thermal properties of CaLiF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouit, N.; Amara Korba, S.; Slimani, M.; Meradji, H.; Ghemid, S.; Khenata, R.

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic and optical properties of CaLiF3 cubic fluoroperovskite. Our calculations were carried out by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) (Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof). Moreover, the alternative form of GGA proposed by Engel and Vosko is also used for band structure calculations. The calculated total energy versus volume allows us to obtain structural properties such as the lattice constant (a0), bulk modulus (B0) and pressure derivative of the bulk modulus (B'0 ). Band structure, density of states and band gap pressure coefficients are also given. Our calculations show that CaLiF3 has an indirect band gap (R-Γ). Following the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the temperature and pressure effects on the lattice constant, bulk modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, Debye temperature and heat capacities are calculated.

  14. 33 CFR 110.125 - Morro Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... prolongation of the center line of Seventh Street; thence in a generally southeasterly direction and parallel... yards to meet the prolongation of the center line of Seventh Street; and thence to the point of...

  15. 33 CFR 110.125 - Morro Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prolongation of the center line of Seventh Street; thence in a generally southeasterly direction and parallel... yards to meet the prolongation of the center line of Seventh Street; and thence to the point of...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1150 - Monterey Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the date of said use. (b) Display of red flags at Indian Head Beach and near the Point Pinos... regulations in this paragraph will be enforced by the Commanding General, Fort Ord, California. (b)...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1150 - Monterey Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the date of said use. (b) Display of red flags at Indian Head Beach and near the Point Pinos... regulations in this paragraph will be enforced by the Commanding General, Fort Ord, California. (b)...

  18. MEDIA ADVISORY: EchoWater Project Groundbreaking Event, May 28, in Elk Grove, Calif.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - On Thursday, May 28, 2015, U.S. EPA Region 9 Administrator Jared Blumenfeld will join federal, state and local officials and stakeholders at an official groundbreaking to launch construction of the EchoWater Project in Elk Grove, Calif. Thi

  19. 33 CFR 334.890 - Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Point Loma....890 Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending southerly from Point Loma, California, described as follows...

  20. 33 CFR 334.890 - Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Point Loma....890 Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending southerly from Point Loma, California, described as follows...

  1. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  2. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  3. 33 CFR 334.890 - Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Point Loma....890 Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending southerly from Point Loma, California, described as follows...

  4. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  5. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  6. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  7. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  8. 33 CFR 110.222 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Barbara Island, Calif. 110.222 Section 110.222 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.222 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  9. 33 CFR 334.890 - Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Point Loma....890 Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending southerly from Point Loma, California, described as follows...

  10. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  11. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  12. 33 CFR 334.890 - Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Point Loma....890 Pacific Ocean off Point Loma, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending southerly from Point Loma, California, described as follows...

  13. 33 CFR 110.216 - Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Santa Catalina Island, Calif. 110.216 Section 110.216 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.216 Pacific Ocean at Santa...

  14. 78 FR 67300 - Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas... follows: Sec. 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif; restricted anchorage areas. (a) The...

  15. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 162.210 Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. (a) The areas—(1) Baldwin Beach, under...) Pope Beach, under the control of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture. The waters of Lake... south 300 feet to the high waterline. (4) El Dorado County Beach. The waters of Lake Tahoe shoreward of...

  16. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 162.210 Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. (a) The areas—(1) Baldwin Beach, under...) Pope Beach, under the control of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture. The waters of Lake... south 300 feet to the high waterline. (4) El Dorado County Beach. The waters of Lake Tahoe shoreward of...

  17. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach.... Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as he may designate. ...

  18. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach.... Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as he may designate. ...

  19. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The water of Anaheim Bay Harbor between the east and west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach...

  20. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The water of Anaheim Bay Harbor between the east and west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach...

  1. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The water of Anaheim Bay Harbor between the east and west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach...

  2. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The water of Anaheim Bay Harbor between the east and west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach...

  3. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach.... Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as he may designate. ...

  4. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The water of Anaheim Bay Harbor between the east and west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach...

  5. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach.... Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as he may designate. ...

  6. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 162.210 Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. (a) The areas—(1) Baldwin Beach, under...) Pope Beach, under the control of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture. The waters of Lake... south 300 feet to the high waterline. (4) El Dorado County Beach. The waters of Lake Tahoe shoreward of...

  7. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach.... Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as he may designate. ...

  8. 33 CFR 334.870 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....; restricted area. 334.870 Section 334.870 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.870 San Diego Harbor, Calif.; restricted area. (a) Restricted area at Bravo Pier, Naval Air Station—(1) The area. The water of...

  9. 33 CFR 334.870 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; restricted area. 334.870 Section 334.870 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.870 San Diego Harbor, Calif.; restricted area. (a) Restricted area at Bravo Pier, Naval Air Station—(1) The area. The water of...

  10. 33 CFR 334.860 - San Diego Bay, Calif., Naval Amphibious Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Bay, Calif., Naval..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.860 San Diego... Middle San Diego Bay in an area extending from the northern and eastern boundary of the Naval Amphibious...

  11. NASA MISR Instrument Captures View of Mountain Fire Near Idyllwild, Calif.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-20

    NASA Terra spacecraft passed over the Mountain Fire near Idyllwild, Calif., on Jul. 17, 2013. Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean can been seen to the left and the Salton Sea is the dark feature in the right center of the image.

  12. 33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. 162.210 Section 162.210 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  13. 33 CFR 162.200 - Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area. 162.200 Section 162.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.200...

  14. 33 CFR 162.200 - Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area. 162.200 Section 162.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.200...

  15. 33 CFR 162.195 - Santa Monica Bay, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Santa Monica Bay, Calif.; restricted area. 162.195 Section 162.195 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.195...

  16. EPA awards nearly $200,000 for environmental job training in Richmond, Calif.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a $192,300 environmental workforce development grant to RichmondBUILD, an environmental job training program in Richmond, Calif. RichmondBUILD will use the federal grant to tra

  17. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, East of Red Hill Avenue between Edinger Avenue & Barranca Parkway, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  18. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  19. U. S. EPA settlement requires Salinas, Calif. Realty company to remove lead-based paint

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a settlement with Piini Realty, Inc. for failing to notify its tenants about the potential presence of lead-based paint at 12 rental units located in Salinas, Calif. As part of the s

  20. 33 CFR 110.218 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. 110.218 Section 110.218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  1. 33 CFR 110.218 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. 110.218 Section 110.218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  2. 33 CFR 334.900 - Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.900 Section 334.900 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.900 Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. (a) The...

  3. 33 CFR 334.900 - Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.900 Section 334.900 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.900 Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. (a) The...

  4. 33 CFR 110.218 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. 110.218 Section 110.218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  5. 33 CFR 334.900 - Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.900 Section 334.900 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.900 Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. (a) The...

  6. 33 CFR 334.900 - Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.900 Section 334.900 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.900 Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. (a) The...

  7. 33 CFR 110.218 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. 110.218 Section 110.218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  8. 33 CFR 334.900 - Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.900 Section 334.900 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.900 Pacific Ocean, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. (a) The...

  9. 33 CFR 209.138a - Authorization for exploratory drilling in the Gulf of Santa Catalina, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drilling in the Gulf of Santa Catalina, Calif. 209.138a Section 209.138a Navigation and Navigable Waters... Authorization for exploratory drilling in the Gulf of Santa Catalina, Calif. (a) Department of the Army... with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Geological Survey for drilling in the Gulf of...

  10. 33 CFR 110.218 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. 110.218 Section 110.218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; in vicinity of Wilson Cove. (a) The anchorage grounds...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target... REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a..., Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target practice in the area at intervals...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target... REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a..., Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target practice in the area at intervals...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target... REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a..., Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target practice in the area at intervals...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target... REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a..., Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target practice in the area at intervals...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target... REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a..., Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target practice in the area at intervals...

  16. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) (b) Area A-2. Consisting of two parts in the outer basin of Fish Harbor on the...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″ N...

  17. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) (b) Area A-2. Consisting of two parts in the outer basin of Fish Harbor on the...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″ N...

  18. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) (b) Area A-2. Consisting of two parts in the outer basin of Fish Harbor on the...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″ N...

  19. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) (b) Area A-2. Consisting of two parts in the outer basin of Fish Harbor on the...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″ N...

  20. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base adjust the supports on a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base adjust the supports on a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  1. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Logos identify the mission of this Delta II rocket that will launch the Gravity Probe B experiment, developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Logos identify the mission of this Delta II rocket that will launch the Gravity Probe B experiment, developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  2. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, Dr. Francis Everitt, principal investigator, and Brad Parkinson, co-principal investigator, both from Stanford University, hold one of the small gyroscopes used in the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. The GP-B towers behind them. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, Dr. Francis Everitt, principal investigator, and Brad Parkinson, co-principal investigator, both from Stanford University, hold one of the small gyroscopes used in the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. The GP-B towers behind them. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  3. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base work on a solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base work on a solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  4. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach supports to a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach supports to a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  5. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with two solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with two solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  6. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare to rotate the framework containing one of four solar panels to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare to rotate the framework containing one of four solar panels to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  7. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with all four solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with all four solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  8. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach a solar array panel on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach a solar array panel on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  9. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B experiment sits on an assembly and test stand where it has been subject to various prelaunch testing. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B experiment sits on an assembly and test stand where it has been subject to various prelaunch testing. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  10. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base checks the Gravity Probe B experiment during prelaunch testing. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-12

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base checks the Gravity Probe B experiment during prelaunch testing. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The targeted launch date is Dec. 6, 2003.

  11. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a balloon gently lifts the solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a balloon gently lifts the solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  12. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to attach the top of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to attach the top of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  13. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare for the installation of solar array panel 3 on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare for the installation of solar array panel 3 on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  14. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a worker checks the installation of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a worker checks the installation of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  15. U.S. EPA Awards $100,000 to Emeryville, Calif., Small Business to Develop Sustainable Green Technologies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $100,000 to Industrial Microbes located in Emeryville, Calif., to develop sustainable technologies that address environmental issues. A total of $1.9 million was awarded to 19

  16. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. A triangular area extending westerly into the waters of the Pacific Ocean from a...

  17. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area about one-half mile off the west coast of San...

  18. 33 CFR 334.910 - Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.910 Section 334.910... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.910 Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps...

  19. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from the...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. A triangular area extending westerly into the waters of the Pacific Ocean from a...

  1. 33 CFR 334.910 - Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.910 Section 334.910... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.910 Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps...

  2. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area about one-half mile off the west coast of San...

  3. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area about one-half mile off the west coast of San...

  4. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending seaward...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending seaward...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending seaward...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. A triangular area extending westerly into the waters of the Pacific Ocean from a...

  8. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area about one-half mile off the west coast of San...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. A triangular area extending westerly into the waters of the Pacific Ocean from a...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. A triangular area extending westerly into the waters of the Pacific Ocean from a...

  11. 33 CFR 334.910 - Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.910 Section 334.910... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.910 Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps...

  12. 33 CFR 334.910 - Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.910 Section 334.910... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.910 Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps...

  13. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area about one-half mile off the west coast of San...

  14. 33 CFR 334.910 - Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif.; restricted area. 334.910 Section 334.910... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.910 Pacific Ocean, Camp Pendleton Boat Basin, U.S. Marine Corps...

  15. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from the...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending seaward...

  17. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from the...

  18. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from the...

  19. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from the...

  20. The United Farm Workers clinic in Delano, Calif.: a study of the rural poor.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, P

    1975-01-01

    Data on the utilization of services and morbidity were obtained for 1972 from the Rodrigo Terronez Memorial Clinic in Delano, Calif., a health care facility operated without government funds, which was established to serve the rural poor, specifically farmworkers and their dependents. There were 23,141 patient visits in the study year. The average number of physician visits per patient 3.4; 65 percent of the visits were by appointment, 9 percent were after hours, and 1 percent resulted in hospitalization. Only 0.2 percent constituted true emergencies. Ninety-nine percent of the prescriptions written at the clinic were from a 190-item drug formulary developed by the staff physicians. The data on the clinic are roughly comparable with those from other urban rural comprehensive health centers. The Terronez Clinic, however, differed significantly from most of these other centers in its orientation. It served as an organizing tool for a labor union trying to mobilize agricultural workers in the area so they would act together to improve their living conditions. Images p331-a p337-a PMID:808819

  1. NASA's SOFIA flying observatory was captured in striking relief during nighttime telescope characterization tests in Palmdale, Calif., in March 2008

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-10

    The SOFIA telescope team collected baseline operational measurements during several nights of characterization testing in March 2008 while the SOFIA 747SP aircraft that houses the German-built infrared telescope was parked on an unlit ramp next to its hangar at the NASA Dryden Flight Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif. The primary celestial target was Polaris, the North Star. The activity provided the team with a working knowledge of how telescope operating systems interact and the experience of tracking celestial targets from the ground.

  2. 33 CFR 334.940 - Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, and Coast Guard units. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.940 Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San...

  3. 33 CFR 334.940 - Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, and Coast Guard units. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.940 Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San...

  4. 33 CFR 334.940 - Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, and Coast Guard units. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.940 Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San...

  5. 33 CFR 334.940 - Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, and Coast Guard units. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.940 Pacific Ocean in vicinity of...

  6. 33 CFR 334.940 - Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in vicinity of San Pedro, Calif.; practice firing range for U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, and Coast Guard units. 334.940 Section 334.940 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED...

  7. Rapid Assessment of the Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates Detected in Spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, Calif.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. In the previous 3 years, 3, 1, and 5 trees were infected. The purpose of this research was to assess the aphid transmissibility and molecular ...

  8. Numerical simulation of separated flows. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ., Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, P. R.; Leonard, A.; Baganoff, D.

    1983-01-01

    A new numerical method, based on the Vortex Method, for the simulation of two-dimensional separated flows, was developed and tested on a wide range of gases. The fluid is incompressible and the Reynolds number is high. A rigorous analytical basis for the representation of the Navier-Stokes equation in terms of the vorticity is used. An equation for the control of circulation around each body is included. An inviscid outer flow (computed by the Vortex Method) was coupled with a viscous boundary layer flow (computed by an Eulerian method). This version of the Vortex Method treats bodies of arbitrary shape, and accurately computes the pressure and shear stress at the solid boundary. These two quantities reflect the structure of the boundary layer. Several versions of the method are presented and applied to various problems, most of which have massive separation. Comparison of its results with other results, generally experimental, demonstrates the reliability and the general accuracy of the new method, with little dependence on empirical parameters. Many of the complex features of the flow past a circular cylinder, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, are correctly reproduced.

  9. NASA's B377SGT Super Guppy Turbine cargo aircraft touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's B377SGT Super Guppy Turbine cargo aircraft touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on June 11, 2000 to deliver the latest version of the X-38 flight test vehicle to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The B-377SGT Super Guppy Turbine evolved from the 1960s-vintage Pregnant Guppy, Mini Guppy and Super Guppy, used for transporting sections of the Saturn rocket used for the Apollo program moon launches and other outsized cargo. The various Guppies were modified from 1940's and 50's-vintage Boeing Model 377 and C-97 Stratocruiser airframes by Aero Spacelines, Inc., which operated the aircraft for NASA. NASA's Flight Research Center assisted in certification testing of the first Pregnant Guppy in 1962. One of the turboprop-powered Super Guppies, built up from a YC-97J airframe, last appeared at Dryden in May, 1976 when it was used to transport the HL-10 and X-24B lifting bodies from Dryden to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. NASA's present Super Guppy Turbine, the fourth and last example of the final version, first flew in its outsized form in 1980. It and its three sister ships were built in the 1970s for Europe's Airbus Industrie to ferry outsized structures for Airbus jetliners to the final assembly plant in Toulouse, France. It later was acquired by the European Space Agency, and then acquired by NASA in late 1997 for transport of large structures for the International Space Station to the launch site. It replaced the earlier-model Super Guppy, which has been retired and is used for spare parts. NASA's Super Guppy Turbine carries NASA registration number N941NA, and is based at Ellington Field near the Johnson Space Center. For more information on NASA's Super Guppy Turbine, log onto the Johnson Space Center Super Guppy web page at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/assembly/superguppy/

  10. Teacher Kim Cantrell from the Edwards Air Force Base Middle School, Edwards, Calif., participating in a live uplink at NASA Dryden as part of NASA's Explorer Schools program, asks the crew of the International Space Station a question

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-15

    Teacher Kim Cantrell from the Edwards Air Force Base Middle School, Edwards, Calif., participating in a live uplink at NASA Dryden as part of NASA's Explorer Schools program, asks the crew of the International Space Station a question.

  11. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers stand by as the balloon at right is released to lift the solar array panel into position for installation on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers stand by as the balloon at right is released to lift the solar array panel into position for installation on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  12. 9. PIER NO. 4, REVISED GENERAL LAYOUT OF PILING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PIER NO. 4, REVISED GENERAL LAYOUT OF PILING AND FRAMING. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. John Hudspeth, Architect, at foot of Main Street, Alameda, Calif. Sheet no. S3 of 5 sheets, Plan no. 10,037. Various scales. August 26, 1942, last revised 4/15/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction September 17, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Pier 4, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  13. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg AFB, Calif., a solar array is tested before installing on the SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-29

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg AFB, Calif., a solar array is tested before installing on the SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  14. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., the Pegasus launch vehicle is moved toward its hangar. The Pegasus will carry the SciSat-1 spacecraft in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., the Pegasus launch vehicle is moved toward its hangar. The Pegasus will carry the SciSat-1 spacecraft in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  15. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The SciSat-1 spacecraft is revealed at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The SciSat-1 spacecraft is revealed at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  16. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg AFB, Calif., a solar array is installed on the SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-29

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg AFB, Calif., a solar array is installed on the SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  17. Rep. Ken Calvert, R-Calif., chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, was briefed by X-43A engineer Laurie Grindle during his tour of Dryden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-02

    Rep. Ken Calvert, (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, received an update on the mission of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a visit on June 2, 2005. Rep. Calvert, accompanied by several staff members, was briefed by center management on the Dryden's role as a flight research institution, and then reviewed some of the center's recent, current and upcoming flight research projects during a tour of the facility. During the afternoon, Rep. Calvert received similar briefings on a variety of projects at several aerospace development firms at the Civilian Flight Test Center in Mojave. Rep. Calvert's tour of NASA Dryden was the second in a series of visits to all 10 NASA field centers to better acquaint him with the roles and responsibilities of each center.

  18. Generalized spinfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, You; Han, Muxin; Rovelli, Carlo

    2011-06-01

    We reconsider the spinfoam dynamics that has been recently introduced, in the generalized Kamiński-Kisielowski-Lewandowski (KKL) version where the foam is not dual to a triangulation. We study the Euclidean as well as the Lorentzian case. We show that this theory can still be obtained as a constrained BF theory satisfying the simplicity constraint, now discretized on a general oriented 2-cell complex. This constraint implies that boundary states admit a (quantum) geometrical interpretation in terms of polyhedra, generalizing the tetrahedral geometry of the simplicial case. We also point out that the general solution to this constraint (imposed weakly) depends on a quantum number rf in addition to those of loop quantum gravity. We compute the vertex amplitude and recover the KKL amplitude in the Euclidean theory when rf=0. We comment on the eventual physical relevance of rf, and the formal way to eliminate it.

  19. Generalized morphea.

    PubMed

    Strober, Bruce E

    2003-10-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with symmetric erythematous, hyperpigmented, and ivory-colored plaques on the trunk and extremities. His clinical history, laboratory analysis, and histopathologic examination were consistent with generalized morphea, a subtype of localized scleroderma.

  20. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  1. Generalized Parabolas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dan; Hartman, Gregory; Gibson, Caleb

    2011-01-01

    In this article we explore the consequences of modifying the common definition of a parabola by considering the locus of all points equidistant from a focus and (not necessarily linear) directrix. The resulting derived curves, which we call "generalized parabolas," are often quite beautiful and possess many interesting properties. We show that…

  2. Calif. Laws Shift Gears on Algebra, Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    New laws in California have set the state on a course for some potentially significant changes to the curriculum, including a measure that revisits the matter of teaching Algebra 1 in 8th grade and another that revamps the state's textbook-adoption process and hands districts greater leeway in choosing instructional materials. The algebra-related…

  3. Calif. Districts Link to Push Shared Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2013-01-01

    Frustrated by their own state's pace and direction of school improvement, eight California districts have banded together to move ahead on rolling out the Common Core State Standards and designing new teacher evaluations based in part on student performance. Known as CORE--the California Office to Reform Education--the member districts also…

  4. Willard School Primary Reading Program, Pasadena, Calif.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasadena City Unified School District, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 460 students in grades one through three and includes black, white, and Spanish-surname children. Begun in 1971, the program uses the Ransom taxonomy of reading skills and Ransom criterion-referenced tests. The group tests, correlated with major basal readers, are…

  5. Calif. Laws Shift Gears on Algebra, Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    New laws in California have set the state on a course for some potentially significant changes to the curriculum, including a measure that revisits the matter of teaching Algebra 1 in 8th grade and another that revamps the state's textbook-adoption process and hands districts greater leeway in choosing instructional materials. The algebra-related…

  6. Geographic List of Prime Contract Awards. Oct 1992-Sep 1993. FY 1993. (Adelanto, California-Yuba County, California). Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    M M W W F- CD tn cn 0 z 0 0 W M 04 (V V V V F- w M CY) CT) ý_ co 0 Cj 0 cn I w w w 0 w 0 w cv) = X0 no - 0 0 <COOCcCjm ui 1 0 com C-Z COO (M ii LL x...0 CL 11 1 C3 0 -W La 11 :3 0 M 11 1 a Ov La 11 -F . I 11 o I ooqwo ca ca 130 ca cc co co < < M C) C 11 LL) 1 0 0 It L) 4)-0 < < < < com 0 0 CW...If 00 < r, U CD (D Cr Cj X -ýt CD Ci 4 COM 00 LL (I) I - T - Z; - If 0 1 0 cf) 11 1 ce I cr I (n Cn L𔃽 I < 10 1 > 10 1 L!) 1 0 000 0 11 u 1 0 cm it to

  7. A Generalization of Generalized Fibonacci and Generalized Pell Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-Elhameed, W. M.; Zeyada, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing a new class of generalized numbers. The main advantage of this class is that it generalizes the two classes of generalized Fibonacci numbers and generalized Pell numbers. Some new identities involving these generalized numbers are obtained. In addition, the two well-known identities of Sury and Marques which…

  8. A Generalization of Generalized Fibonacci and Generalized Pell Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-Elhameed, W. M.; Zeyada, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing a new class of generalized numbers. The main advantage of this class is that it generalizes the two classes of generalized Fibonacci numbers and generalized Pell numbers. Some new identities involving these generalized numbers are obtained. In addition, the two well-known identities of Sury and Marques which…

  9. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- The covered SciSat-1 spacecraft is lowered onto a test stand at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., for functional testing. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-29

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- The covered SciSat-1 spacecraft is lowered onto a test stand at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., for functional testing. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  10. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., spacecraft functional testing is underway on the SciSat-1. The solar arrays are being attached and the communications systems are also being checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., spacecraft functional testing is underway on the SciSat-1. The solar arrays are being attached and the communications systems are also being checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  11. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- A covered SciSat-1 spacecraft sits on a test stand at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-29

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- A covered SciSat-1 spacecraft sits on a test stand at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  12. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- The cover is being lifted off SciSat-1 spacecraft at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF.- The cover is being lifted off SciSat-1 spacecraft at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  13. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - Outside the clean room at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., the SciSat-1 spacecraft (background) has been removed from the shipping container mounting base (lower left) and placed on the handling fixture. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-26

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - Outside the clean room at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., the SciSat-1 spacecraft (background) has been removed from the shipping container mounting base (lower left) and placed on the handling fixture. Sci-Sat, which will undergo instrument checkout and spacecraft functional testing, weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  14. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. a covered SciSat-1 spacecraft is lifted onto a rotation stand. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-29

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - At Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. a covered SciSat-1 spacecraft is lifted onto a rotation stand. The solar arrays will be attached and the communications systems checked out. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  15. GENERALIZED CONVEXITY CONES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction The dual cone of C (psi sub 1,..., psi sub n) Extreme rays The cone dual to an intersection of generalized convexity cones... Generalized difference quotients and multivariate convexity Miscellaneous applications of generalized convexity.

  16. Technician Shawn Warren carefully smoothes out the composite skin of an instrument fairing atop the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technician Shawn Warren carefully smoothes out the composite skin of an instrument fairing atop the upper fuselage of the Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., facility at Adelanto, Calif. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  17. Technician Dave Brown installs a drilling template during construction of the all-composite left win

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Technician Dave Brown installs a drilling template during construction of the all-composite left wing of NASA's Altair aircraft at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  18. The payload bay in the nose of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) will be able to carry up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The payload bay in the nose of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), shown here during final construction at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., will be able to carry up to 700 lbs. of sensors, imaging equipment and other instruments for Earth science missions. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  19. The left wing of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) rests in a jig during construction at G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) rests in a jig during construction at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  20. The payload bay in the nose of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) will be able to carry up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The payload bay in the nose of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), shown here during final construction at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., will be able to carry up to 700 lbs. of sensors, imaging equipment and other instruments for Earth science missions. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  1. The left wing of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) rests in a jig during construction at G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of NASA's Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) rests in a jig during construction at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  2. General Aviation Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Programs exploring and demonstrating new technologies in general aviation propulsion are considered. These programs are the quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) program; the general aviation turbine engine (GATE) study program; the general aviation propeller technology program; and the advanced rotary, diesel, and reciprocating engine programs.

  3. Generalized holomorphic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yicao

    2014-12-01

    We define the notion of generalized holomorphic principal bundles and establish that their associated vector bundles of holomorphic representations are generalized holomorphic vector bundles defined by M. Gualtieri. Motivated by our definition, several examples of generalized holomorphic structures are constructed. A reduction theorem of generalized holomorphic structures is also included.

  4. Generalized Cartan Calculus in general dimension

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yi -Nan

    2015-07-22

    We develop the generalized Cartan Calculus for the groups G = SL(2,R) × R+, SL(5,R) and SO(5,5). They are the underlying algebraic structures of d=9,7,6 exceptional field theory, respectively. These algebraic identities are needed for the "tensor hierarchy" structure in exceptional field theory. The validity of Poincar\\'e lemmas in this new differential geometry is also discussed. Lastly, we explore some possible extension of the generalized Cartan calculus beyond the exceptional series.

  5. General Medical Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

  6. Generalized anxiety disorder - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007687.htm Generalized anxiety disorder - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  7. Generalized anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000917.htm Generalized anxiety disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a mental disorder in which a ...

  8. Generalized Cartan Calculus in general dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi -Nan

    2015-07-22

    We develop the generalized Cartan Calculus for the groups G = SL(2,R) × R+, SL(5,R) and SO(5,5). They are the underlying algebraic structures of d=9,7,6 exceptional field theory, respectively. These algebraic identities are needed for the "tensor hierarchy" structure in exceptional field theory. The validity of Poincar\\'e lemmas in this new differential geometry is also discussed. Lastly, we explore some possible extension of the generalized Cartan calculus beyond the exceptional series.

  9. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  10. Reframing General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zai, Robert, III.

    2015-01-01

    From the colonial colleges to the present-day flagship universities, the undergraduate general education curriculum has dramatically shifted from a single, faculty-prescribed, general program to a diverse array of elective, student-choice-driven, specialized programs of general studies. This transformation has also encouraged, if not established,…

  11. General Music Today Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The collected 2004-2005 issues of General Music Today, the online journal of MENC's Society for General Music includes articles, research, reviews and resources of interest to general music teachers of all levels. Topics covered include working with special-needs students; emphasizing early childhood environment to enhance musical growth;…

  12. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  13. General Music Today Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The collected 2004-2005 issues of General Music Today, the online journal of MENC's Society for General Music includes articles, research, reviews and resources of interest to general music teachers of all levels. Topics covered include working with special-needs students; emphasizing early childhood environment to enhance musical growth;…

  14. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  15. A study of the nonlinear aerodynamics of bodies in nonplanar motion. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ., Calif.; [numerical analysis of aerodynamic force and moment systems during large amplitude, arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts from the theory of functionals are used to develop nonlinear formulations of the aerodynamic force and moment systems acting on bodies in large-amplitude, arbitrary motions. The analysis, which proceeds formally once the functional dependence of the aerodynamic reactions upon the motion variables is established, ensures the inclusion, within the resulting formulation, of pertinent aerodynamic terms that normally are excluded in the classical treatment. Applied to the large-amplitude, slowly varying, nonplanar motion of a body, the formulation suggests that the aerodynamic moment can be compounded of the moments acting on the body in four basic motions: steady angle of attack, pitch oscillations, either roll or yaw oscillations, and coning motion. Coning, where the nose of the body describes a circle around the velocity vector, characterizes the nonplanar nature of the general motion.

  16. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  17. [Renaissance of general practice].

    PubMed

    Braun, R N; Fink, W; Kamenski, G

    2002-01-01

    Special research work has taught that general practice (family medicine) is a specialization of its own. It requires specific education and vocational training. As far as universities and administrative bodies have accepted it no doctor can start practising family medicine unless he has passed a vocational training of many years duration. That fact together with a successful continued research concerning applied general practice should initiate a true renaissance of general practice.

  18. [General anesthesia in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Cernea, Daniela; Enache, Monalisa; Deca, Andreea Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    General anesthesia is less utilized in ophthalmology. There are some criteria that lead to general anesthesia: patients with auditive debility, aged and senile patients, allergic patients, children and young patients, and subjects who totally refuse loco-regional procedures. General anesthesia utilizes as basic products: narcotic substances, analgesic substances, or neuroleptic substances utilized separately or associated, with posology adaptated to several factors: patients' pulse, physical statement, age, duration. The type of anesthetic substance depends also of specialist anesthetist experience.

  19. General surgery career resource.

    PubMed

    Parsee, Ana M; Ross, Sharona B; Gantt, Nancy L; Kichler, Kandace; Hollands, Celeste

    2013-11-01

    General surgery residency training can lead to a rewarding career in general surgery and serve as the foundation for careers in several surgical subspecialties. It offers broad-based training with exposure to the cognitive and technical aspects of several surgical specialties and prepares graduating residents for a wide range of career paths. This career development resource discusses the training aspects of general surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  1. A Heuristic Ceiling Point Algorithm for General Integer Linear Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    narrowly satisfies the il h constraint: taking a unit step from x toward the ilh constraining hyperplane in a direction parallel to some coordinate...Business, Stanford Univesity , Stanford, Calif., December 1964. Hillier, F., "Efficient Heuristic Procedures for Integer Linear Programming with an Inte- rior

  2. OASIS General Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    Recognizing the need to balance generality and economy in system costs, the Project INFO team at Stanford University developing OASIS has sought to provide generalized and powerful computer support within the normal range of operating and analytical requirements associated with university administration. The specific design objectives of the OASIS…

  3. Assessment of General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of general education is often approached through broad surveys or standardized instruments that fail to capture the learning goals most faculty members desire for this portion of the curriculum. The challenge in remedying this situation lies, first, in defining general education in meaningful ways that can be both articulated and…

  4. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  5. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  6. Certificateless Generalized Signcryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Huifang; Han, Wenbao; Zhao, Long

    Generalized Signcryption is a fresh cryptographic primitive that not only can obtain encryption and signature in a single operation, but also provide encryption or signature model alone when needed. This paper proposed a formal definition of certificateless generalized signcryption(CLGSC), then provide the security model of CLGSC. A concrete CLGSC scheme is also given in this paper.

  7. General Machinists Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Chester; And Others

    This curriculum guide for a general machinists course is intended for use in a program combining vocational English as a second language (VESL) with bilingual vocational education. A description of the VESL program design appears first. The next section provides a format on developing lesson plans for teaching the technical and general vocational…

  8. Accountability for General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, A. Owen

    This discussion of the role of general education in community college programs in Ontario begins with an acknowledgement of the absence of a broadly accepted working definition of general education and an admonition to community colleges to accept the responsibility for providing students with a total education. Next, the paper proposes various…

  9. Triangulating Speech Sound Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miccio, Adele W.; Powell, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Generalization refers to the extension of learned behaviours to novel conditions, and it is one of the criteria by which the effectiveness and efficiency of a remediation programme may be judged. This article extracts principles of generalization from the treatment literature, and provides examples of how this information may be used to help guide…

  10. Reliability Generalization: "Lapsus Linguae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the proposed Reliability Generalization (RG) method for studying reliability. RG employs the application of meta-analytic techniques similar to those used in validity generalization studies to examine reliability coefficients. This study explains why RG does not provide a proper research method for the study of reliability,…

  11. Assessment of General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of general education is often approached through broad surveys or standardized instruments that fail to capture the learning goals most faculty members desire for this portion of the curriculum. The challenge in remedying this situation lies, first, in defining general education in meaningful ways that can be both articulated and…

  12. NASA and general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethell, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    General aviation remains the single most misunderstood sector of aeronautics in the United States. A detailed look at how general aviation functions and how NASA helps keep it on the cutting edge of technology in airfoils, airframes, commuter travel, environmental concerns, engines, propellers, air traffic control, agricultural development, electronics, and safety is given.

  13. Juvenile generalized pustular psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ting; Li, Bo; He, Chun-Di; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2007-08-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is an erythrodermic, generalized form of pustular psoriasis. GPP is rare in children. The present study describes a case of juvenile GPP and reviews 12 juvenile GPP inpatients treated at our hospital in the period 1978-2005.

  14. GENERAL BIOLOGY OF PHYSALIA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The objective of this research was to investigate the general biology of Physalia. It was proposed to concentrate research efforts on two major...aspects of the general problem: first, the secretion of gas into the float, and second, the nature and circulation of the gastrovascular fluid. Attention

  15. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  16. Triangulating Speech Sound Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miccio, Adele W.; Powell, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Generalization refers to the extension of learned behaviours to novel conditions, and it is one of the criteria by which the effectiveness and efficiency of a remediation programme may be judged. This article extracts principles of generalization from the treatment literature, and provides examples of how this information may be used to help guide…

  17. Communication: General Semantics Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Lee, Ed.

    This book contains the edited papers from the eleventh International Conference on General Semantics, titled "A Search for Relevance." The conference questioned, as a central theme, the relevance of general semantics in a world of wars and human misery. Reacting to a fundamental Korzybski-ian principle that man's view of reality is…

  18. Reliability Generalization: "Lapsus Linguae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the proposed Reliability Generalization (RG) method for studying reliability. RG employs the application of meta-analytic techniques similar to those used in validity generalization studies to examine reliability coefficients. This study explains why RG does not provide a proper research method for the study of reliability,…

  19. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  20. General Machinists Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Chester; And Others

    This curriculum guide for a general machinists course is intended for use in a program combining vocational English as a second language (VESL) with bilingual vocational education. A description of the VESL program design appears first. The next section provides a format on developing lesson plans for teaching the technical and general vocational…

  1. Thunderstorm Program General Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    DISTRIBUTION A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. Thunderstorm Program General Overview Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thunderstorm Program General Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT Thunderstorm provides OSD, interagency partners, Combatant Commanders, Services, academia

  2. General relativity and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2015-10-01

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s 1915 landmark paper “Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation” in which the field equations of general relativity were correctly formulated for the first time, thus rendering general relativity a complete theory. Over the subsequent hundred years, physicists and astronomers have struggled with uncovering the consequences and applications of these equations. This paper, which was written as an introduction to six chapters dealing with the connection between general relativity and cosmology that will appear in the two-volume book One Hundred Years of General Relativity: From Genesis and Empirical Foundations to Gravitational Waves, Cosmology and Quantum Gravity, endeavors to provide a historical overview of the connection between general relativity and cosmology, two areas whose development has been closely intertwined.

  3. Context-dependent generalization

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan A.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The pattern of generalization following motor learning can provide a probe on the neural mechanisms underlying learning. For example, the breadth of generalization to untrained regions of space after visuomotor adaptation to targets in a restricted region of space has been attributed to the directional tuning properties of neurons in the motor system. Building on this idea, the effect of different types of perturbations on generalization (e.g., rotation vs. visual translation) have been attributed to the selection of differentially tuned populations. Overlooked in this discussion is consideration of how the context of the training environment may constrain generalization. Here, we explore the role of context by having participants learn a visuomotor rotation or a translational shift in two different contexts, one in which the array of targets were presented in a circular arrangement and the other in which they were presented in a rectilinear arrangement. The perturbation and environments were either consistent (e.g., rotation with circular arrangement) or inconsistent (e.g., rotation with rectilinear arrangement). The pattern of generalization across the workspace was much more dependent on the context of the environment than on the perturbation, with broad generalization for the rectilinear arrangement for both types of perturbations. Moreover, the generalization pattern for this context was evident, even when the perturbation was introduced in a gradual manner, precluding the use of an explicit strategy. We describe how current models of generalization might be modified to incorporate these results, building on the idea that context provides a strong bias for how the motor system infers the nature of the visuomotor perturbation and, in turn, how this information influences the pattern of generalization. PMID:23653603

  4. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions.

  5. Milestones of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    We present a summary for non-specialists of the special issue of the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity on ‘Milestones of general relativity’, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the theory.

  6. General Motors Goes Metric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Ted

    1976-01-01

    Describes the program to convert to the metric system all of General Motors Corporation products. Steps include establishing policy regarding employee-owned tools, setting up training plans, and making arrangements with suppliers. (MF)

  7. General purpose bioamplifier study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Based on known inputs and outputs, a set of specifications were developed for the major characteristics of a general purpose amplifier for use in the Integrated Medical, Behaviorial, and Laboratory Measurement System.

  8. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  9. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  10. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  11. General Relativity and Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  12. Science in General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    General education must develop in students an appreciation of the power of science, how it works, why it is an effective knowledge generation tool, and what it can deliver. Knowing what science has discovered is desirable but less important.

  13. General Relativity and Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  14. Generalized scale invariant theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Antonio; Stefanyszyn, David; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2014-03-01

    We present the most general actions of a single scalar field and two scalar fields coupled to gravity, consistent with second-order field equations in four dimensions, possessing local scale invariance. We apply two different methods to arrive at our results. One method, Ricci gauging, was known to the literature and we find this to produce the same result for the case of one scalar field as a more efficient method presented here. However, we also find our more efficient method to be much more general when we consider two scalar fields. Locally scale invariant actions are also presented for theories with more than two scalar fields coupled to gravity and we explain how one could construct the most general actions for any number of scalar fields. Our generalized scale invariant actions have obvious applications to early Universe cosmology and include, for example, the Bezrukov-Shaposhnikov action as a subset.

  15. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  16. Securing General Aviation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    ajor vulnerabilities still exist in ... general aviation security ,”3 the commission did not further elaborate on the nature of those vulnerabilities...commercial operations may make them an attractive alternative to terrorists seeking to identify and exploit vulnerabilities in aviation security . In this...3, 2003, p. A7. 2 See Report of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee Working Group on General Aviation Airport Security (October 1, 2003); and

  17. Matter in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  18. General Factors in Graphs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    conjectured that the general factor problem can be solved in polynomial time when, in each Bi, all the gaps (if any) have length one. We prove this conjecture...exactly bi edges incident with node i, for each i. This problem is well-solved. A polynomial algorithm is known (Edmonds and Johnson (1970)) as well as a...powerful theorem to characterize the existence of solutions ( Tutte (1952)). The following generalization of the factor problem was studied by Lovtsz

  19. Generalized concatenated quantum codes

    SciTech Connect

    Grassl, Markus; Shor, Peter; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John; Zeng Bei

    2009-05-15

    We discuss the concept of generalized concatenated quantum codes. This generalized concatenation method provides a systematical way for constructing good quantum codes, both stabilizer codes and nonadditive codes. Using this method, we construct families of single-error-correcting nonadditive quantum codes, in both binary and nonbinary cases, which not only outperform any stabilizer codes for finite block length but also asymptotically meet the quantum Hamming bound for large block length.

  20. Matter in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  1. Symmetric generalized binomial distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, H.; Curado, E. M. F.; Gazeau, J. P.; Rodrigues, Ligia M. C. S. E-mail: evaldo@cbpf.br E-mail: ligia@cbpf.br

    2013-12-15

    In two recent articles, we have examined a generalization of the binomial distribution associated with a sequence of positive numbers, involving asymmetric expressions of probabilities that break the symmetry win-loss. We present in this article another generalization (always associated with a sequence of positive numbers) that preserves the symmetry win-loss. This approach is also based on generating functions and presents constraints of non-negativeness, similar to those encountered in our previous articles.

  2. General aviation and community development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The summer program is summarized. The reports presented concern (1) general aviation components, (2) general aviation environment, (3) community perspective, and (4) transportation and general aviation in Virginia.

  3. [Generalized periarthritis calcarea (generalized hydroxyapatite disease)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Bahous, I

    1979-09-01

    The condition of generalized periarthritis calcarea (hydroxyapatite deposition disease) is characterised by multiple periarticular calcification which can be localised around practically any joint and also in proximity to the spine. This calcification consists of hydroxyapatite crystals which are responsible for the episodes of acute, subacute or chronic periarticular or articular inflammation so typical of the condition. Because of this one can classify periarthritis calcarea along with gout and chondrocalcinosis in the group of crystal deposition diseases. The actual cause of the calcification remains unknown but it is probable that, along with hereditary factors, disturbances in metabolism play an important role. The diagnosis of generalised periarthritis is made from the characteristic X-ray picture in conjunction with the clinical findings and, on occasion, the demonstration of hydroxyapatite crystals in the affected tissues. In the differential diagnosis gout, chondrocalcinosis, various inflammatory rheumatic conditions and septic arthritis must be excluded and various calcification processes, particularly interstitial calcinosis and lipocal cinogranulomatosis, must also be considered. Since the etiology of the calcification remains unknown to specific treatment is available. Symptomatic treatment with colchicine is mostly inadequate which is why one often has recourse to the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids.

  4. Chemistry as General Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    Science courses are common in most general education requirements. This paper addresses the role of chemistry classes in meeting these requirements. Chemistry professors have for many years questioned the appropriateness of the standard introductory chemistry course as general education, resulting in the growing popularity of specialized non-majors courses. I suggest that current non-major chemistry courses cover too much consumer chemistry and ignore some of the big contributions of chemistry to human knowledge. Majors chemistry courses, while they prepare students for majoring in science, do not address these issues either. Consequently, chemistry courses are often an ineffective and unpopular way to meet general education science requirements. Part of the reason for this dilemma is the lack of chemists who address the contributions of chemistry to human knowledge in general. I propose that faculty at liberal arts colleges engage in this important task and that non-majors chemistry textbooks incorporate questions and issues that relate chemistry to a broader view of human knowledge. If these things happen, perhaps chemistry courses will become more effective as general education.

  5. Generalized galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu E-mail: tsutomu@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2015-03-01

    The galilean genesis scenario is an alternative to inflation in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski in the asymptotic past by violating the null energy condition stably. Several concrete models of galilean genesis have been constructed so far within the context of galileon-type scalar-field theories. We give a generic, unified description of the galilean genesis scenario in terms of the Horndeski theory, i.e., the most general scalar-tensor theory with second-order field equations. In doing so we generalize the previous models to have a new parameter (denoted by α) which results in controlling the evolution of the Hubble rate. The background dynamics is investigated to show that the generalized galilean genesis solution is an attractor, similarly to the original model. We also study the nature of primordial perturbations in the generalized galilean genesis scenario. In all the models described by our generalized genesis Lagrangian, amplification of tensor perturbations does not occur as opposed to what happens in quasi-de Sitter inflation. We show that the spectral index of curvature perturbations is determined solely from the parameter α and does not depend on the other details of the model. In contrast to the original model, a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of curvature perturbations is obtained for a specific choice of α.

  6. Generalized classifier neural network.

    PubMed

    Ozyildirim, Buse Melis; Avci, Mutlu

    2013-03-01

    In this work a new radial basis function based classification neural network named as generalized classifier neural network, is proposed. The proposed generalized classifier neural network has five layers, unlike other radial basis function based neural networks such as generalized regression neural network and probabilistic neural network. They are input, pattern, summation, normalization and output layers. In addition to topological difference, the proposed neural network has gradient descent based optimization of smoothing parameter approach and diverge effect term added calculation improvements. Diverge effect term is an improvement on summation layer calculation to supply additional separation ability and flexibility. Performance of generalized classifier neural network is compared with that of the probabilistic neural network, multilayer perceptron algorithm and radial basis function neural network on 9 different data sets and with that of generalized regression neural network on 3 different data sets include only two classes in MATLAB environment. Better classification performance up to %89 is observed. Improved classification performances proved the effectivity of the proposed neural network.

  7. Generalized galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2015-03-31

    The galilean genesis scenario is an alternative to inflation in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski in the asymptotic past by violating the null energy condition stably. Several concrete models of galilean genesis have been constructed so far within the context of galileon-type scalar-field theories. We give a generic, unified description of the galilean genesis scenario in terms of the Horndeski theory, i.e., the most general scalar-tensor theory with second-order field equations. In doing so we generalize the previous models to have a new parameter (denoted by α) which results in controlling the evolution of the Hubble rate. The background dynamics is investigated to show that the generalized galilean genesis solution is an attractor, similarly to the original model. We also study the nature of primordial perturbations in the generalized galilean genesis scenario. In all the models described by our generalized genesis Lagrangian, amplification of tensor perturbations does not occur as opposed to what happens in quasi-de Sitter inflation. We show that the spectral index of curvature perturbations is determined solely from the parameter α and does not depend on the other details of the model. In contrast to the original model, a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of curvature perturbations is obtained for a specific choice of α.

  8. Generalized isometries in superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryb, Itai

    N = (2, 2) supersymmetric models are of interest for mathematicians and physicists and have been used extensively as a tool for the investigation of generalized Kahler geometry. In the sigma-model approach, it is convenient to formulate and manipulate sigmamodels in superspace where essential geometric properties are captured by the generalized Kahler potential which gives rise to bihermitian geometry description. Recent developments in differential geometry show that one can also characterize these targets using structures that interpolate between complex and symplectic geometry and are defined on the sum T ⊕ T*. The research work that will be presented here extends the set of known superspace tools for the manipulation of bihermitian/generalized Kahler geometries, namely, the gauging of isometries along directions that mix chiral and twisted chiral or semichiral multiplets. Other results that will be presented relate to possible N = (4, 4) supersymmetry in semichiral models and sigma models formulation on the sum T ⊕ T*.

  9. General Practitioners in Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Weston; O'Donovan, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    An acute general hospital of 68 beds at Tamworth, a Midland town of 50,000 people, is staffed by general practitioners for both inpatient and casualty work. During the period 1967-8 there were 889 general practitioner admissions to the hospital for intermediate surgical and medical care, the average length of stay being 6·3 days and the average cost per case £44·3. Of these patients 96 were transferred to other hospitals. The patients, doctors, and standard of medical care have benefited from this kind of service. A “satellite” hospital of this type therefore has an important role in the community for carefully selected types of cases. PMID:5429111

  10. Generalized energy failure criterion.

    PubMed

    Qu, R T; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, P; Liu, Z Q; Zhang, Z F

    2016-03-21

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the "generalized energy criterion", as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components.

  11. Generalized energy failure criterion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the “generalized energy criterion”, as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components. PMID:26996781

  12. Generalized Combinatoric Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Seo, Jae Woo; Lee, Pil Joong

    The accumulator was introduced as a decentralized alternative to digital signatures. While most of accumulators are based on number theoretic assumptions and require time-consuming modulo exponentiations, Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator dose not depend on any computational assumption and requires only bit operations and hash function evaluations. In this article, we present a generalization of Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator, which allows a lower false positive rate with the same output length. Our generalization also shows that the Bloom filter can be used as a cryptographic accumulator and moreover excels the Nyberg's accumulator.

  13. General Environmental Verification Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milne, J. Scott, Jr.; Kaufman, Daniel S.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center s General Environmental Verification Specification (GEVS) for STS and ELV Payloads, Subsystems, and Components is currently being revised based on lessons learned from GSFC engineering and flight assurance. The GEVS has been used by Goddard flight projects for the past 17 years as a baseline from which to tailor their environmental test programs. A summary of the requirements and updates are presented along with the rationale behind the changes. The major test areas covered by the GEVS include mechanical, thermal, and EMC, as well as more general requirements for planning, tracking of the verification programs.

  14. Implementing general gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Dine, Michael; Festuccia, Guido; Mason, John D.

    2009-02-01

    Recently there has been much progress in building models of gauge mediation, often with predictions different than those of minimal gauge mediation. Meade, Seiberg, and Shih have characterized the most general spectrum which can arise in gauge-mediated models. We discuss some of the challenges of building models of general gauge mediation, especially the problem of messenger parity and issues connected with R symmetry breaking and CP violation. We build a variety of viable, weakly coupled models which exhibit some or all of the possible low energy parameters.

  15. General aviation technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1975-01-01

    The existing problem areas in general aviation were investigated in order to identify those which can benefit from technological payoffs. The emphasis was placed on acceptance by the pilot/passenger in areas such as performance, safety, handling qualities, ride quality, etc. Inputs were obtained from three sectors: industry; government; and user, although slanted toward the user group. The results should only be considered preliminary due to the small sample sizes of the data. Trends are evident however and a general methodology for allocating effort in future programs is proposed.

  16. The generalized master fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, Guillaume; Dahlqvist, Antoine; Gabriel, Franck

    2017-09-01

    The master field is the large N limit of the Yang-Mills measure on the Euclidean plane. It can be viewed as a non-commutative process indexed by loops on the plane. We construct and study generalized master fields, called free planar Markovian holonomy fields which are versions of the master field where the law of a simple loop can be as more general as it is possible. We prove that those free planar Markovian holonomy fields can be seen as well as the large N limit of some Markovian holonomy fields on the plane with unitary structure group.

  17. Generalized Deterministic Traffic Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Henryk; Boccara, Nino

    We study a family of deterministic models for highway traffic flow which generalize cellular automaton rule 184. This family is parameterized by the speed limit m and another parameter k that represents a "degree of aggressiveness" in driving, strictly related to the distance between two consecutive cars. We compare two driving strategies with identical maximum throughput: "conservative" driving with high speed limit and "aggressive" driving with low speed limit. Those two strategies are evaluated in terms of accident probability. We also discuss fundamental diagrams of generalized traffic rules and examine limitations of maximum achievable throughput. Possible modifications of the model are considered.

  18. Generalized Communities in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2015-08-01

    A substantial volume of research is devoted to studies of community structure in networks, but communities are not the only possible form of large-scale network structure. Here, we describe a broad extension of community structure that encompasses traditional communities but includes a wide range of generalized structural patterns as well. We describe a principled method for detecting this generalized structure in empirical network data and demonstrate with real-world examples how it can be used to learn new things about the shape and meaning of networks.

  19. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-08-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  20. Generalized Random Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skřivánek, Václav; Frič, Roman

    2015-12-01

    Phenomena in quantum physics motivate studies of mathematical quantum structures and generalized probability. We introduce a new domain of generalized probability which is equivalent to the difference posets (also to effect algebras) of fuzzy sets. It is in terms of a partial operation of addition and it has a natural interpretation as a disjunction in the original spirit of G. Boole. The extension to a binary operation leads to the Łukasiewicz operations, bold algebras and fuzzy probability. We study states on products and mention some applications.

  1. 33 CFR 110.90 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal property owned by the United States Navy, and it is reserved for active duty military, their... District. Temporary floats or buoys for marking anchors are allowed. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are...

  2. 33 CFR 110.212 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Anchorage C-2. A parallelogram-shaped area, 100 feet wide and 400 feet long, lying 100 feet bayward from and... parallelogram-shaped area, 100 feet wide and 500 feet long, lying 100 feet bayward from and parallel to the...

  3. NASA Radar Captures Earth Deformation from 2010 Baja Calif. Quake

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-04

    This radar image from NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar UAVSAR shows the deformed Earth caused by a 7.2 earthquake in Mexico state of Baja California and parts of the American Southwest on April 4, 2010.

  4. 33 CFR 110.126 - Monterey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... latitude 36°36′27.5″ N., longitude 121°53′35.0″ W.; thence to latitude 36°36′32.4″ N., longitude 121°53′31.0″ W., in an easterly direction to latitude 36°36′28.8″ N., 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence south to latitude 36°36′23.1″ N., longitude 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence to the north end of Municipal Wharf No. 1...

  5. 33 CFR 110.90 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... latitude 32°42′56.7″ N., longitude 117°13′47.1″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 32°42′53.6″ N., longitude 117°13′51.3″ W.; thence northwesterly to latitude 32°43′01.3″ N., longitude 117°13′59.1″ W.; thence northeasterly to latitude 32°43′02.6″ N., longitude 117°13′55.5″ W.; thence southeasterly...

  6. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at latitude 33°58′58″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′53″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southeasterly to latitude 33°58′52″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′39″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence westerly to latitude 33°58′38″, longitude 118°26′55″;...

  7. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... water area within beginning at latitude 33°36′09.3″ N., longitude 117°53′52.6″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′11.4″ N., longitude 117°53′51.2″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′04.0″ N., longitude 117°53′33.4″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′03.9″ N., longitude 117°53′20.4″ W.; thence to 33°36′01.1″ N., longitude...

  8. 33 CFR 110.126 - Monterey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... latitude 36°36′27.5″ N., longitude 121°53′35.0″ W.; thence to latitude 36°36′32.4″ N., longitude 121°53′31.0″ W., in an easterly direction to latitude 36°36′28.8″ N., 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence south to latitude 36°36′23.1″ N., longitude 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence to the north end of Municipal Wharf No. 1...

  9. 33 CFR 110.90 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... latitude 32°42′56.7″ N., longitude 117°13′47.1″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 32°42′53.6″ N., longitude 117°13′51.3″ W.; thence northwesterly to latitude 32°43′01.3″ N., longitude 117°13′59.1″ W.; thence northeasterly to latitude 32°43′02.6″ N., longitude 117°13′55.5″ W.; thence southeasterly...

  10. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... water area within beginning at latitude 33°36′09.3″ N., longitude 117°53′52.6″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′11.4″ N., longitude 117°53′51.2″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′04.0″ N., longitude 117°53′33.4″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′03.9″ N., longitude 117°53′20.4″ W.; thence to 33°36′01.1″ N., longitude...

  11. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... at latitude 33°58′58″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′53″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southeasterly to latitude 33°58′52″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′39″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence westerly to latitude 33°58′38″, longitude 118°26′55″;...

  12. 33 CFR 110.90 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... latitude 32°42′56.7″ N., longitude 117°13′47.1″ W.; thence southwesterly to latitude 32°42′53.6″ N., longitude 117°13′51.3″ W.; thence northwesterly to latitude 32°43′01.3″ N., longitude 117°13′59.1″ W.; thence northeasterly to latitude 32°43′02.6″ N., longitude 117°13′55.5″ W.; thence southeasterly...

  13. 33 CFR 110.126 - Monterey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... latitude 36°36′27.5″ N., longitude 121°53′35.0″ W.; thence to latitude 36°36′32.4″ N., longitude 121°53′31.0″ W., in an easterly direction to latitude 36°36′28.8″ N., 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence south to latitude 36°36′23.1″ N., longitude 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence to the north end of Municipal Wharf No. 1...

  14. 33 CFR 110.126 - Monterey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... latitude 36°36′27.5″ N., longitude 121°53′35.0″ W.; thence to latitude 36°36′32.4″ N., longitude 121°53′31.0″ W., in an easterly direction to latitude 36°36′28.8″ N., 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence south to latitude 36°36′23.1″ N., longitude 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence to the north end of Municipal Wharf No. 1...

  15. 33 CFR 110.126 - Monterey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... latitude 36°36′27.5″ N., longitude 121°53′35.0″ W.; thence to latitude 36°36′32.4″ N., longitude 121°53′31.0″ W., in an easterly direction to latitude 36°36′28.8″ N., 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence south to latitude 36°36′23.1″ N., longitude 121°53′19.0″ W.; thence to the north end of Municipal Wharf No. 1...

  16. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... water area within beginning at latitude 33°36′09.3″ N., longitude 117°53′52.6″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′11.4″ N., longitude 117°53′51.2″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′04.0″ N., longitude 117°53′33.4″ W.; thence to latitude 33°36′03.9″ N., longitude 117°53′20.4″ W.; thence to 33°36′01.1″ N., longitude...

  17. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... at latitude 33°58′58″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′53″, longitude 118°26′46″; thence southeasterly to latitude 33°58′52″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence southerly to latitude 33°58′39″, longitude 118°26′45″; thence westerly to latitude 33°58′38″, longitude 118°26′55″;...

  18. Calif. Charter Failure Affects 10,000 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2004-01-01

    Thousands of California students were left to look for new schools after one of the nation's largest charter school operators shut its doors. The closure of the 5-year-old California Charter Academy (CCA), which ran about 60 schools under four charters and enrolled some 10,000 students, represents one of the largest charter school failures since…

  19. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for recreational and small craft of such size and alignment as permitted.... Fore and aft moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor... moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for...

  20. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for recreational and small craft of such size and alignment as permitted.... Fore and aft moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor... moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for...

  1. 33 CFR 110.126a - San Francisco Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Mariners anchoring in the special anchorage area should consult applicable ordinances of the Richardson Bay... anchoring of vessels, placement of moorings, and use of anchored and moored vessels within the special...

  2. 33 CFR 110.91 - Mission Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the anchoring of vessels and placing of temporary moorings in this area is exercised by the City of....; to latitude 32°46′33.5″ N., longitude 117°14′45.5″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and...; latitude 32°45′43.7″ N., longitude 117°14′41.9″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and the...

  3. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... floats and buoys for anchoring will be allowed in the area. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are... beyond the limits of the area. The anchoring of all vessels and placing of all moorings will be under the...

  4. 33 CFR 110.91 - Mission Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the anchoring of vessels and placing of temporary moorings in this area is exercised by the City of....; to latitude 32°46′33.5″ N., longitude 117°14′45.5″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and...; latitude 32°45′43.7″ N., longitude 117°14′41.9″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and the...

  5. 33 CFR 110.126a - San Francisco Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Mariners anchoring in the special anchorage area should consult applicable ordinances of the Richardson Bay... anchoring of vessels, placement of moorings, and use of anchored and moored vessels within the special...

  6. 33 CFR 110.126a - San Francisco Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Mariners anchoring in the special anchorage area should consult applicable ordinances of the Richardson Bay... anchoring of vessels, placement of moorings, and use of anchored and moored vessels within the special...

  7. 33 CFR 110.126a - San Francisco Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Mariners anchoring in the special anchorage area should consult applicable ordinances of the Richardson Bay... anchoring of vessels, placement of moorings, and use of anchored and moored vessels within the special...

  8. 33 CFR 110.91 - Mission Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the anchoring of vessels and placing of temporary moorings in this area is exercised by the City of....; to latitude 32°46′33.5″ N., longitude 117°14′45.5″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and...; latitude 32°45′43.7″ N., longitude 117°14′41.9″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and the...

  9. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... floats and buoys for anchoring will be allowed in the area. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are... beyond the limits of the area. The anchoring of all vessels and placing of all moorings will be under the...

  10. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... floats and buoys for anchoring will be allowed in the area. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are... beyond the limits of the area. The anchoring of all vessels and placing of all moorings will be under the...

  11. 33 CFR 110.91 - Mission Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the anchoring of vessels and placing of temporary moorings in this area is exercised by the City of....; to latitude 32°46′33.5″ N., longitude 117°14′45.5″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and...; latitude 32°45′43.7″ N., longitude 117°14′41.9″ W. Note: Control over the anchoring of vessels and the...

  12. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... floats and buoys for anchoring will be allowed in the area. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are... beyond the limits of the area. The anchoring of all vessels and placing of all moorings will be under the...

  13. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... floats and buoys for anchoring will be allowed in the area. Fixed moorings, piles or stakes are... beyond the limits of the area. The anchoring of all vessels and placing of all moorings will be under the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.126a - San Francisco Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Mariners anchoring in the special anchorage area should consult applicable ordinances of the Richardson Bay... anchoring of vessels, placement of moorings, and use of anchored and moored vessels within the special...

  15. 33 CFR 110.90 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; thence northeasterly to latitude 32°42′36.0″ N., longitude 117°13′45.1″ W. (c) Area A-1b. The water area... beginning. (h) Area A-5. In Central San Diego Bay, the Glorietta Bay Anchorage, the water area enclosed by a... Federal property owned by the United States Navy, and it is reserved for active duty military,...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1150 - Monterey Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the date of said use. (b) Display of red flags at Indian Head Beach and near the Point Pinos... operations will be carried on which will involve placing any obstructions in the water nor will...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1150 - Monterey Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the date of said use. (b) Display of red flags at Indian Head Beach and near the Point Pinos... operations will be carried on which will involve placing any obstructions in the water nor will...

  18. Calif. Governor vetoes bill to furnish clean drinking water.

    PubMed

    1995-11-03

    Several water suppliers in California have detected cryptosporidium, a parasite, in the drinking water. This parasite causes a variety of medical problems for normally healthy people, but can prove fatal to those with compromised immune systems, such as AIDS patients. California legislators adopted A.B. 590, a bill which would have added bottled water and water filters to the list of medical benefits offered by Medi-Cal, the State's medical assistance program. When the legislation reached Governor Pete Wilson on October 12, 1995, it was vetoed. The governor stated that if a Medi-Cal beneficiary was unable to boil water or obtain boiled water from a family member, then that beneficiary was eligible for attendant services. AIDS advocates argued that it is more cost effective for the State to provide clean water and filters than attendant services.

  19. Calif. Charter Failure Affects 10,000 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2004-01-01

    Thousands of California students were left to look for new schools after one of the nation's largest charter school operators shut its doors. The closure of the 5-year-old California Charter Academy (CCA), which ran about 60 schools under four charters and enrolled some 10,000 students, represents one of the largest charter school failures since…

  20. Calif. ISO gears up for growing renewables portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-15

    Operating the grid is going to become more of a challenge as wind and solar generation -- the biggest two contributors with the most hourly and daily variations -- grow over time. Forecasting exactly how much capacity will be available a mere one hour ahead still remains difficult. More renewable generation is not good business for conventional peaking and load-following thermal generation, mostly burning natural gas. Their revenues, depending on the specific scenario considered, may drop by 20 to 40 percent. Something has to be done to sustain these critical players even as their output is not required as much as in the past.

  1. New Calif. Community-College Chief Seeks Unity over Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that the incoming chancellor of California's enormous community-college system is facing a crucial choice amid tough times. Jack Scott, a longtime chair of State Senate's committee on education, will take the helm of the California community-college system in January. But in a twist of state politics, his influence over the…

  2. 33 CFR 110.212 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Anchorage C-2. A parallelogram-shaped area, 100 feet wide and 400 feet long, lying 100 feet bayward from and... parallelogram-shaped area, 100 feet wide and 500 feet long, lying 100 feet bayward from and parallel to the...

  3. Calif. Puts Spotlight on Long-Term ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2012-01-01

    California is poised to become the first state to unmask the extent to which English-language learners (ELLs) languish in public schools for years without ever reaching fluency. Under a measure that received broad, bipartisan support from the legislature, the state education department would be required to break out and report data annually on…

  4. Total Reading at Juan Cabrillo School, Seaside City Schools, Calif.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 115 disadvantaged children in first through third grade and includes black, Filipino, white, and Spanish-surname students. Begun in 1965, Total Reading is a complete language arts program for the primary grades which integrates the teaching of reading, writing, spelling,…

  5. Triangular covariance factorizations for. Ph.D. Thesis. - Calif. Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved computational form of the discrete Kalman filter is derived using an upper triangular factorization of the error covariance matrix. The covariance P is factored such that P = UDUT where U is unit upper triangular and D is diagonal. Recursions are developed for propagating the U-D covariance factors together with the corresponding state estimate. The resulting algorithm, referred to as the U-D filter, combines the superior numerical precision of square root filtering techniques with an efficiency comparable to that of Kalman's original formula. Moreover, this method is easily implemented and involves no more computer storage than the Kalman algorithm. These characteristics make the U-D method an attractive realtime filtering technique. A new covariance error analysis technique is obtained from an extension of the U-D filter equations. This evaluation method is flexible and efficient and may provide significantly improved numerical results. Cost comparisons show that for a large class of problems the U-D evaluation algorithm is noticeably less expensive than conventional error analysis methods.

  6. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  7. General Construction. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This guide contains materials for a general construction course. Introductory materials include a list of videos, schedule for the 10-day course, and tools and material list. The course is divided into 10 sections. Each section consists of some or all of these components: list of trainee objectives, instructor notes, instructor outline,…

  8. General Aviation Avionics Statistics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 5" FAA-MS-80-7* a and. SubtitleDecember 1&80 "GENERAL AVIATION AVIONICS STATISTICS 0 6...Altimeter 8. Fuel gage 3. Compass 9. Landing gear 4. Tachometer 10. Belts 5. Oil temperature 11. Special equipment for 6. Emergency locator over water

  9. General Aviation Manpower Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a study examining manpower supply/demand in general aviation. Eight job categories were examined: pilots, flight instructors, engineers, machinists/toolers, and A&P, airframe, and avionics technicians. Findings among others indicate that shortages in indicated job categories exist because personnel are recruited by other industries.…

  10. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  11. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  12. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  13. General Business 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This teaching guide contains guidelines for conducting a secondary-level general business course. Intended to serve as an introduction to business and consumer fundamentals, the course provides socioeconomic background useful to students seeking vocational preparation for office and clerical occupations. The goals and objectives of the course are…

  14. General Aviation Manpower Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a study examining manpower supply/demand in general aviation. Eight job categories were examined: pilots, flight instructors, engineers, machinists/toolers, and A&P, airframe, and avionics technicians. Findings among others indicate that shortages in indicated job categories exist because personnel are recruited by other industries.…

  15. Work and General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Presentations and other materials are provided from the Asia and the Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID) Planning and Review Meeting on Work as an Integral Part of General Education. The focus is on how education, through an orientation to work, could help to decrease the gravity of the problems of population…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  19. General Business 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This teaching guide contains guidelines for conducting a secondary-level general business course. Intended to serve as an introduction to business and consumer fundamentals, the course provides socioeconomic background useful to students seeking vocational preparation for office and clerical occupations. The goals and objectives of the course are…

  20. Interrogation: General vs. Local.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette

    This paper proposes a set of hypotheses on the nature of interrogration as a possible language universal. Examples and phrase structure rules and diagrams are given. Examining Tamazight and English, genetically unrelated languages with almost no contact, the author distinguishes two types of interrogation: (1) general, querying acceptability to…

  1. General Construction. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This guide contains materials for a general construction course. Introductory materials include a list of videos, schedule for the 10-day course, and tools and material list. The course is divided into 10 sections. Each section consists of some or all of these components: list of trainee objectives, instructor notes, instructor outline,…

  2. General Drafting. Technical Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    The manual provides instructional guidance and reference material in the principles and procedures of general drafting and constitutes the primary study text for personnel in drafting as a military occupational specialty. Included is information on drafting equipment and its use; line weights, conventions and formats; lettering; engineering charts…

  3. Annals of General Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos

    2005-02-01

    Our regular readers will notice that the title of our journal has changed from Annals of General Hospital Psychiatry (AGHP) to Annals of General Psychiatry (AGP) since January 1st, 2005. This was judged as necessary, in order to be able to serve better the aims of the journal. Our initial thoughts were that including the term 'General Hospital' in the journal's title would help us to launch a journal dedicated to the idea of Psychiatry as a medical specialty. But they were not justified; so, now the Annals of General Psychiatry (AGP) is born! It is still an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal covering the wider field of Psychiatry, Neurosciences and Psychological Medicine, and aims at publishing articles on all aspects of psychiatry. Primary research articles are the journal's priority, and both basic and clinical neuroscience contributions are encouraged. The AGP strongly supports and follows the principles of evidence-based medicine. AGP's articles are archived in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature, and also in repositories at the University of Potsdam in Germany, at INIST in France and in e-Depot, the National Library of the Netherlands' digital archive of all electronic publications. We hope that the change in the journal's name will cure the confusion caused by its previous title and help to achieve the journal's aims and scope, that is to help the world-wide promotion of research and publishing in the mental health area.

  4. The General Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, David T.; Robinson, Roger E.

    The General Teaching Model is a procedural guide for the design, implementation, evaluation, and improvement of instruction. The Model is considered applicable to all levels of education, all subject matters, and any length of instructional unit. It consists of four components: 1) instructional objectives, 2) pre-assessment, 3) instructional…

  5. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  6. Obstacles to General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry; Shaw, Ruth G.

    1982-01-01

    Identifies and describes five obstacles to effective general education: intangible, intrinsic conflicts; impediments pertaining to organization and delivery; staff-related obstacles; student-related problems; and external and societal restraints. Offers ways to cope with obstacles, e.g., review of goals and methods; staff development; alternate…

  7. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  8. General Education for Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kunihiko

    The basic program of general education of engineers is based on European culture from the times of ancient Greece to the 20th century. However, when considering its results, such as colonialism and the World Wars, this system can be said to lack the most important goal of “culture,” which is “to accept the existence of others.” In particular, the cooperation of European culture and engineering has ravaged the weaker cultures and is currently causing severe environmental problems in nature. Therefore, when considering the general education of engineers, it is indispensable to doubt European scholarship and to analyze what is lacking in current Japanese educational programs. Then, it is desirable that the relationship between the mind and the body, the characteristics of the Japanese climate, and the essence of Japanese artisanship be taken into consideration. It may also be beneficial to study the Ainu culture for its qualities as a peaceful culture.

  9. Generalized BPS magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2012-10-01

    We show the existence of Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) magnetic monopoles in a generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model which is controlled by two positive functions, g(ϕaϕa) and f(ϕaϕa). This effective model, in principle, would describe the dynamics of the nonabelian fields in a chromoelectric media. We check the consistency of our generalized construction by analyzing an explicit case ruled by a parameter β. We also use the well-known spherically symmetric Ansatz to attain the corresponding self-dual equations describing the topological solutions. The overall conclusion is that the new solutions behave around the canonical one, with smaller or greater characteristic length depending on the values of β.

  10. [Hypnosis in general medicine].

    PubMed

    Tozzi, A

    1981-10-27

    Organic pathologies with psychoaffective aetiology are numerous, and in all diseases, mental and rational elements are concomitant with the organic situation. Aware of the psycho-dynamic mechanisms he sets in motion by his actions and appreciating those underlying the symptomatology he has to deal with, the hypnologist transcends the overspecialisation of medical science to restore the patient's psycho-physical unitary reality. This explains both the possibilities of hypnositherapy in general medicine and its impassable limits. The hypnositherapy that the general practitioner can (and most implement must be perfected by a qualified psychotherapeutist when symptomatology cannot be eradicated without tackling the aetiological factor with a serious analysis of the profound. Hypnosis is, therefore, an extra therapeutic possibility for the physician and this is why it can only be used with science, awareness and on the basis of ethics.

  11. Generalized uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdegen, Andrzej; Ziobro, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    The standard uncertainty relations (UR) in quantum mechanics are typically used for unbounded operators (like the canonical pair). This implies the need for the control of the domain problems. On the other hand, the use of (possibly bounded) functions of basic observables usually leads to more complex and less readily interpretable relations. In addition, UR may turn trivial for certain states if the commutator of observables is not proportional to a positive operator. In this letter we consider a generalization of standard UR resulting from the use of two, instead of one, vector states. The possibility to link these states to each other in various ways adds additional flexibility to UR, which may compensate some of the above-mentioned drawbacks. We discuss applications of the general scheme, leading not only to technical improvements, but also to interesting new insight.

  12. Generalized Magnetic Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    We propose generalized magnetic mirrors that can be achieved by excitations of sole electric resonances. Conventional approaches to obtain magnetic mirrors rely heavily on exciting the fundamental magnetic dipoles, whereas here we reveal that, besides magnetic resonances, electric resonances of higher orders can be also employed to obtain highly efficient magnetic mirrors. Based on the electromagnetic duality, it is also shown that electric mirrors can be achieved by exciting magnetic resonances. We provide direct demonstrations of the generalized mirrors proposed in a simple system of a one-dimensional periodic array of all-dielectric wires, which may shed new light on many advanced fields of photonics related to resonant multipolar excitations and interferences.

  13. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect

    Rivasseau, Vincent E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org; Tanasa, Adrian E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org

    2014-04-15

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  14. Categorization = Decision Making + Generalization

    PubMed Central

    Seger, Carol A; Peterson, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    We rarely, if ever, repeatedly encounter exactly the same situation. This makes generalization crucial for real world decision making. We argue that categorization, the study of generalizable representations, is a type of decision making, and that categorization learning research would benefit from approaches developed to study the neuroscience of decision making. Similarly, methods developed to examine generalization and learning within the field of categorization may enhance decision making research. We first discuss perceptual information processing and integration, with an emphasis on accumulator models. We then examine learning the value of different decision making choices via experience, emphasizing reinforcement learning modeling approaches. Next we discuss how value is combined with other factors in decision making, emphasizing the effects of uncertainty. Finally, we describe how a final decision is selected via thresholding processes implemented by the basal ganglia and related regions. We also consider how memory related functions in the hippocampus may be integrated with decision making mechanisms and contribute to categorization. PMID:23548891

  15. Tests of General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Michael

    2011-09-22

    The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of 'dark energy' but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

  16. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian-Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  17. Generalized quasiperiodic Rauzy tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Rémy

    2001-05-01

    We present a geometrical description of new canonical d-dimensional codimension one quasiperiodic tilings based on generalized Fibonacci sequences. These tilings are made up of rhombi in 2d and rhombohedra in 3d as the usual Penrose and icosahedral tilings. Thanks to a natural indexing of the sites according to their local environment, we easily write down, for any approximant, the sites coordinates, the connectivity matrix and we compute the structure factor.

  18. TURBULENT GENERAL MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-10

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian–Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  19. Entrepreneurship within General Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullmann, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    Many modern economic theories place great importance upon entrepreneurship in the economy. Some see the entrepreneur as the individual who bears risk of operating a business in the face of uncertainty about future conditions and who is rewarded through profits and losses. The 20th century economist Joseph Schumpter saw the entrepreneur as the medium by which advancing technology is incorporated into society as businesses seek competitive advantages through more efficient product development processes. Due to the importance that capitalistic systems place upon entrepreneurship, it has become a well studied subject with many texts to discuss how entrepreneurs can succeed in modern society. Many entrepreneuring and business management courses go so far as to discuss the characteristic phases and prominent challenges that fledgling companies face in their efforts to bring a new product into a competitive market. However, even with all of these aids, start-up companies fail at an enormous rate. Indeed, the odds of shepherding a new company through the travails of becoming a well established company (as measured by the ability to reach Initial Public Offering (IPO)) have been estimated to be six in 1,000,000. Each niche industry has characteristic challenges which act as barriers to entry for new products into that industry. Thus, the applicability of broad generalizations is subject to limitations within niche markets. This paper will discuss entrepreneurship as it relates to general aviation. The goals of this paper will be to: introduce general aviation; discuss the details of marrying entrepreneurship with general aviation; and present a sample business plan which would characterize a possible entrepreneurial venture.

  20. Laparoscopy in General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Patrick J.; Anderson, Dawn L.

    1992-01-01

    After a period of rather slow initial acceptance by general surgeons, laparoscopy and video endoscopic surgery have suddenly burst on to the surgical scene. Almost overnight many of the surgical procedures once requiring a large incision are now being performed through small punctures. This article describes some of the more common procedures and discusses the merits and difficulties associated with these innovations. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21221367

  1. Generalized DBI quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Gumjudpai, Burin; Ward, John

    2009-07-15

    We investigate the phase space of a quintessence theory governed by a generalized version of the DBI action, using a combination of numeric and analytic methods. The additional degrees of freedom lead to a vastly richer phase-space structure, where the field covers the full equation of state parameter space: -1{<=}{omega}{<=}1. We find many nontrivial solution curves to the equations of motion which indicate that DBI quintessence is an interesting candidate for a viable k-essence model.

  2. Generalized Hampel Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ronald K.; Neuvo, Yrjö; Astola, Jaakko; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2016-12-01

    The standard median filter based on a symmetric moving window has only one tuning parameter: the window width. Despite this limitation, this filter has proven extremely useful and has motivated a number of extensions: weighted median filters, recursive median filters, and various cascade structures. The Hampel filter is a member of the class of decsion filters that replaces the central value in the data window with the median if it lies far enough from the median to be deemed an outlier. This filter depends on both the window width and an additional tuning parameter t, reducing to the median filter when t=0, so it may be regarded as another median filter extension. This paper adopts this view, defining and exploring the class of generalized Hampel filters obtained by applying the median filter extensions listed above: weighted Hampel filters, recursive Hampel filters, and their cascades. An important concept introduced here is that of an implosion sequence, a signal for which generalized Hampel filter performance is independent of the threshold parameter t. These sequences are important because the added flexibility of the generalized Hampel filters offers no practical advantage for implosion sequences. Partial characterization results are presented for these sequences, as are useful relationships between root sequences for generalized Hampel filters and their median-based counterparts. To illustrate the performance of this filter class, two examples are considered: one is simulation-based, providing a basis for quantitative evaluation of signal recovery performance as a function of t, while the other is a sequence of monthly Italian industrial production index values that exhibits glaring outliers.

  3. Alopecia in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Rajani; Harries, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Appreciation of different types of hair loss (alopecia) that may be encountered in hospital medicine is important to ensure accurate diagnosis and management, identify underlying medical conditions or treatments that may present with increased hair loss, recognise autoimmune alopecias and their associations, and understand the significant psychological impact of hair loss on an individual. This article discusses common causes of hair loss, as well as those conditions that may be associated with systemic disease, relevant to a general physician.

  4. Generalized fiber Fourier optics.

    PubMed

    Cincotti, Gabriella

    2011-06-15

    A twofold generalization of the optical schemes that perform the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is given: new passive planar architectures are presented where the 2 × 2 3 dB couplers are replaced by M × M hybrids, reducing the number of required connections and phase shifters. Furthermore, the planar implementation of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) is also described, with a waveguide grating router (WGR) configuration and a properly modified slab coupler.

  5. Generalized FFT Beamsteering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE...on a 2D lattice, offers an electronically controlled , agile beam or even multiple beams associated with mul- tiple antenna outputs, a technology...versions both derive fundamentally from the same ideas in elementary group theory . Likewise, classic FFT algo- rithms and the generalized FFT

  6. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  7. Generalized Causal Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Nelson, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Summary The goal of mediation analysis is to assess direct and indirect effects of a treatment or exposure on an outcome. More generally, we may be interested in the context of a causal model as characterized by a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where mediation via a specific path from exposure to outcome may involve an arbitrary number of links (or ‘stages’). Methods for estimating mediation (or pathway) effects are available for a continuous outcome and a continuous mediator related via a linear model, while for a categorical outcome or categorical mediator, methods are usually limited to two-stage mediation. We present a method applicable to multiple stages of mediation and mixed variable types using generalized linear models. We define pathway effects using a potential outcomes framework and present a general formula that provides the effect of exposure through any specified pathway. Some pathway effects are nonidentifiable and their estimation requires an assumption regarding the correlation between counterfactuals. We provide a sensitivity analysis to assess of the impact of this assumption. Confidence intervals for pathway effect estimates are obtained via a bootstrap method. The method is applied to a cohort study of dental caries in very low birth weight adolescents. A simulation study demonstrates low bias of pathway effect estimators and close-to-nominal coverage rates of confidence intervals. We also find low sensitivity to the counterfactual correlation in most scenarios. PMID:21306353

  8. Generalized simplicial chiral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, Masoud

    2000-02-01

    Using the auxiliary field representation of the simplicial chiral models on a ( d-1)-dimensional simplex, the simplicial chiral models are generalized through replacing the term Tr (AA †) in the Lagrangian of these models by an arbitrary class function of AA †; V(AA †) . This is the same method used in defining the generalized two-dimensional Yang-Mills theories (gYM 2) from ordinary YM 2. We call these models the "generalized simplicial chiral models". Using the results of the one-link integral over a U( N) matrix, the large- N saddle-point equations for eigenvalue density function ρ( z) in the weak ( β> βc) and strong ( β< βc) regions are computed. In d=2, where the model is in some sense related to the gYM 2 theory, the saddle-point equations are solved for ρ( z) in the two regions, and the explicit value of critical point βc is calculated for V(B)= Tr B n(B=AA †) . For V(B)= Tr B 2, Tr B 3, and Tr B4, the critical behaviour of the model at d=2 is studied, and by calculating the internal energy, it is shown that these models have a third order phase transition.

  9. Generalized Fisher matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, A. F.; Seikel, M.; Nord, B. D.; Aich, M.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bassett, B. A.; Hobson, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Fisher Information Matrix formalism (Fisher 1935) is extended to cases where the data are divided into two parts (X, Y), where the expectation value of Y depends on X according to some theoretical model, and X and Y both have errors with arbitrary covariance. In the simplest case, (X, Y) represent data pairs of abscissa and ordinate, in which case the analysis deals with the case of data pairs with errors in both coordinates, but X can be any measured quantities on which Y depends. The analysis applies for arbitrary covariance, provided all errors are Gaussian, and provided the errors in X are small, both in comparison with the scale over which the expected signal Y changes, and with the width of the prior distribution. This generalizes the Fisher Matrix approach, which normally only considers errors in the `ordinate' Y. In this work, we include errors in X by marginalizing over latent variables, effectively employing a Bayesian hierarchical model, and deriving the Fisher Matrix for this more general case. The methods here also extend to likelihood surfaces which are not Gaussian in the parameter space, and so techniques such as DALI (Derivative Approximation for Likelihoods) can be generalized straightforwardly to include arbitrary Gaussian data error covariances. For simple mock data and theoretical models, we compare to Markov Chain Monte Carlo experiments, illustrating the method with cosmological supernova data. We also include the new method in the FISHER4CAST software.

  10. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  11. General aviation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaosi

    In the last four decades, China has accomplished economic reform successfully and grown to be a leading country in the world. As the "world factory", the country is able to manufacture a variety of industrial products from clothes and shoes to rockets and satellites. But the aviation industry has always been a weak spot and even the military relies on imported turbofan engines and jet fighters, not to mention the airlines. Recently China has launched programs such as ARJ21 and C919, and started reform to change the undeveloped situation of its aviation industry. As the foundation of the aviation industry, the development of general aviation is essential for the rise of commercial aviation. The primary goal of this study is to examine the general aviation industry and finds the issues that constrain the development of the industry in the system. The research method used in this thesis is the narrative research of qualitative approach since the policy instead of statistical data is analyzed. It appears that the main constraint for the general aviation industry is the government interference.

  12. Beyond generalized Proca theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    We consider higher-order derivative interactions beyond second-order generalized Proca theories that propagate only the three desired polarizations of a massive vector field besides the two tensor polarizations from gravity. These new interactions follow the similar construction criteria to those arising in the extension of scalar-tensor Horndeski theories to Gleyzes-Langlois-Piazza-Vernizzi (GLPV) theories. On the isotropic cosmological background, we show the existence of a constraint with a vanishing Hamiltonian that removes the would-be Ostrogradski ghost. We study the behavior of linear perturbations on top of the isotropic cosmological background in the presence of a matter perfect fluid and find the same number of propagating degrees of freedom as in generalized Proca theories (two tensor polarizations, two transverse vector modes, and two scalar modes). Moreover, we obtain the conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities of tensor, vector, and scalar perturbations. We observe key differences in the scalar sound speed, which is mixed with the matter sound speed outside the domain of generalized Proca theories.

  13. Hyperuniformity and its generalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Disordered many-particle hyperuniform systems are exotic amorphous states of matter that lie between crystal and liquid: They are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These exotic states of matter play a vital role in a number of problems across the physical, mathematical as well as biological sciences and, because they are endowed with novel physical properties, have technological importance. Given the fundamental as well as practical importance of disordered hyperuniform systems elucidated thus far, it is natural to explore the generalizations of the hyperuniformity notion and its consequences. In this paper, we substantially broaden the hyperuniformity concept along four different directions. This includes generalizations to treat fluctuations in the interfacial area (one of the Minkowski functionals) in heterogeneous media and surface-area driven evolving microstructures, random scalar fields, divergence-free random vector fields, and statistically anisotropic many-particle systems and two-phase media. In all cases, the relevant mathematical underpinnings are formulated and illustrative calculations are provided. Interfacial-area fluctuations play a major role in characterizing the microstructure of two-phase systems (e.g., fluid-saturated porous media), physical properties that intimately depend on the geometry of the interface, and evolving two-phase microstructures that depend on interfacial energies (e.g., spinodal decomposition). In the instances of random vector fields and statistically anisotropic structures, we show that the standard definition of hyperuniformity must be generalized such that it accounts for the dependence of the relevant spectral functions on the direction in which the origin in Fourier space is approached (nonanalyticities at the origin). Using this analysis, we place some well-known energy

  14. Hyperuniformity and its generalizations.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Disordered many-particle hyperuniform systems are exotic amorphous states of matter that lie between crystal and liquid: They are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These exotic states of matter play a vital role in a number of problems across the physical, mathematical as well as biological sciences and, because they are endowed with novel physical properties, have technological importance. Given the fundamental as well as practical importance of disordered hyperuniform systems elucidated thus far, it is natural to explore the generalizations of the hyperuniformity notion and its consequences. In this paper, we substantially broaden the hyperuniformity concept along four different directions. This includes generalizations to treat fluctuations in the interfacial area (one of the Minkowski functionals) in heterogeneous media and surface-area driven evolving microstructures, random scalar fields, divergence-free random vector fields, and statistically anisotropic many-particle systems and two-phase media. In all cases, the relevant mathematical underpinnings are formulated and illustrative calculations are provided. Interfacial-area fluctuations play a major role in characterizing the microstructure of two-phase systems (e.g., fluid-saturated porous media), physical properties that intimately depend on the geometry of the interface, and evolving two-phase microstructures that depend on interfacial energies (e.g., spinodal decomposition). In the instances of random vector fields and statistically anisotropic structures, we show that the standard definition of hyperuniformity must be generalized such that it accounts for the dependence of the relevant spectral functions on the direction in which the origin in Fourier space is approached (nonanalyticities at the origin). Using this analysis, we place some well-known energy

  15. General Permits for Ocean Dumping

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    General permits are issued by EPA for the ocean dumping of certain materials that will have a minimal adverse environmental impact and are generally disposed of in small quantities. Information includes examples and ocean disposal sites for general permits

  16. Generalized quantum potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottale, Laurent

    2009-07-01

    We first recall that the system of fluid mechanics equations (Euler and continuity) that describes a fluid in irrotational motion subjected to a generalized quantum potential (depending on a constant which may be different from the standard quantum constant planck) is equivalent to a generalized Schrödinger equation for a 'wavefunction' whose modulus squared yields the fluid density. Then we show that even in the case of the presence of vorticity, it is also possible to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation (now of the vectorial field type) from the continuity and Euler equations including a quantum potential. The same kind of transformation also applies to a classical charged fluid subjected to an electromagnetic field and to an additional potential having the form of a quantum potential. Such a fluid can therefore be described by an equation of the Ginzburg-Landau type, and is expected to show some superconducting-like properties. Moreover, a Schrödinger form can be obtained for a fluctuating rotational motion of a solid. In this case the mass is replaced by the tensor of inertia, and a generalized form of the quantum potential is derived. We finally reconsider the case of a standard diffusion process, and we show that, after a change of variable, the diffusion equation can also be given the form of a continuity and Euler system including an additional potential energy. Since this potential is exactly the opposite of a quantum potential, the quantum behavior may be considered, in this context, as an anti-diffusion.

  17. Transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Lamprokostopoulou, Agaristi; Polyzos, Alexandros; Kino, Tomoshige; Katsantoni, Eleni; Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christophoridis, Athanasios; Katzos, George; Dracopoulou, Maria; Sertedaki, Amalia; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2015-12-01

    Transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity is a rare disorder characterized by increased tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids and compensatory hypo-activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The condition itself and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. To present the clinical manifestations, endocrinologic evaluation and transcriptomic profile in a patient with transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity. A 9-year-old girl presented with an 8-month history of clinical manifestations suggestive of Cushing syndrome. Endocrinologic evaluation revealed undetectable 08:00 h ACTH (<1 pg/mL) and cortisol (0·025 μg/dL) concentrations, which remained decreased throughout the 24-h period and did not respond to stimulation with ovine CRH. The disease gradually resolved spontaneously over the ensuing 3 months. Sequencing of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene revealed no mutations or polymorphisms. Western blot analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed equal protein expression of hGRα of the patient in the disease and postresolution phases compared with a control subject. Transcriptomic analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the disease and postresolution phases identified 903 differentially expressed genes. Of these, 106 genes were up-regulated and 797 were down-regulated in the disease compared with the resolution phase. Bioinformatics analysis on the differentially expressed gene networks revealed Nuclear Factor-κB as the predominant transcription factor influencing the expression of the majority of differentially expressed genes. Our findings indicate that a transient postreceptor defect, or a virus- or bacterium-encoded molecule, may have enhanced glucocorticoid signal transduction, leading to transient generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity and hypo-activation of the HPA axis. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  18. Robotics and general surgery.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Brian P; Gagner, Michel

    2003-12-01

    Robotics are now being used in all surgical fields, including general surgery. By increasing intra-abdominal articulations while operating through small incisions, robotics are increasingly being used for a large number of visceral and solid organ operations, including those for the gallbladder, esophagus, stomach, intestines, colon, and rectum, as well as for the endocrine organs. Robotics and general surgery are blending for the first time in history and as a specialty field should continue to grow for many years to come. We continuously demand solutions to questions and limitations that are experienced in our daily work. Laparoscopy is laden with limitations such as fixed axis points at the trocar insertion sites, two-dimensional video monitors, limited dexterity at the instrument tips, lack of haptic sensation, and in some cases poor ergonomics. The creation of a surgical robot system with 3D visual capacity seems to deal with most of these limitations. Although some in the surgical community continue to test the feasibility of these surgical robots and to question the necessity of such an expensive venture, others are already postulating how to improve the next generation of telemanipulators, and in so doing are looking beyond today's horizon to find simpler solutions. As the robotic era enters the world of the general surgeon, more and more complex procedures will be able to be approached through small incisions. As technology catches up with our imaginations, robotic instruments (as opposed to robots) and 3D monitoring will become routine and continue to improve patient care by providing surgeons with the most precise, least traumatic ways of treating surgical disease.

  19. On generalized Volterra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambides, S. A.; Damianou, P. A.; Evripidou, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We construct a large family of evidently integrable Hamiltonian systems which are generalizations of the KM system. The algorithm uses the root system of a complex simple Lie algebra. The Hamiltonian vector field is homogeneous cubic but in a number of cases a simple change of variables transforms such a system to a quadratic Lotka-Volterra system. We present in detail all such systems in the cases of A3, A4 and we also give some examples from higher dimensions. We classify all possible Lotka-Volterra systems that arise via this algorithm in the An case.

  20. Nonlocal General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2014-12-01

    A brief account of the present status of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation is presented. The main physical assumptions that underlie this theory are described. We clarify the physical meaning and significance of Weitzenbock's torsion and emphasize its intimate relationship with the gravitational field, characterized by the Riemannian curvature of spacetime. In this theory, nonlocality can simulate dark matter; in fact, in the Newtonian regime, we recover the phenomenological Tohline-Kuhn approach to modified gravity. To account for the observational data regarding dark matter, nonlocality is associated with a characteristic length scale of order 1 kpc. The confrontation of nonlocal gravity with observation is briefly discussed.

  1. Tachyons in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Charles

    2011-05-15

    We consider the motion of tachyons (faster-than-light particles) in the framework of general relativity. An important feature is the large contribution of low energy tachyons to the energy-momentum tensor. We also calculate the gravitational field produced by tachyons in particular geometric arrangements; and it appears that there could be self-cohering bundles of such matter. This leads us to suggest that such theoretical ideas might be relevant to major problems (dark matter and dark energy) in current cosmological models.

  2. General curvilinear coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The basic ideas of the construction and use of numerically-generated boundary-fitted coordinate systems for the numerical solution of partial differential equations are discussed. With such coordinate systems, all computation can be done on a fixed square grid in the rectangular transformed region regardless of the shape or movement of the physical boundaries. A number of different types of configurations for the transformed region and the basic transformation relations from a cartesian system to a general curvilinear system are given. The material of this paper is applicable to all types of coordinate system generation.

  3. Generalized sine condition.

    PubMed

    Elazhary, Tamer T; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Chunyu; Burge, James H

    2015-06-01

    The classic Abbe sine condition relates pupil distortion to aberrations with linear field dependence such as coma. This paper provides a fully generalized form of the sine condition that does not use any symmetry. It accurately predicts the change in aberration in the presence of field independent and pupil aberrations. The definitions of the image, object, and coordinate system are completely arbitrary. The relationship is verified using ray trace simulations of a number of systems that have varying degrees of complexity. The potential applications are discussed.

  4. General Services Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Federal Energy Management Improvement Act of 1988 requires all federal agencies, including the General Services Administration (GSA), to reduce building energy usage by 10 percent from 1985 levels by 1995. While GSA has been actively pursuing energy conservation, it faces a formidable challenge in achieving the required 10-percent building energy reduction by 1995, and it is too early to tell whether GSA's efforts will be successful. Because GSA has developed a comprehensive strategy to reduce building energy usage, has begun funding a variety of specific energy conservation initiatives, and is actively exploring other energy-saving opportunities, this paper makes no recommendations to GSA.

  5. Itch Management: General Principles.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Like pain, itch is a challenging condition that needs to be managed. Within this setting, the first principle of itch management is to get an appropriate diagnosis to perform an etiology-oriented therapy. In several cases it is not possible to treat the cause, the etiology is undetermined, there are several causes, or the etiological treatment is not effective enough to alleviate itch completely. This is also why there is need for symptomatic treatment. In all patients, psychological support and associated pragmatic measures might be helpful. General principles and guidelines are required, yet patient-centered individual care remains fundamental. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  7. Generalized Nonlinear Yule Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansky, Petr; Polito, Federico; Sacerdote, Laura

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of considering models related to random graphs growth exhibiting persistent memory, we propose a fractional nonlinear modification of the classical Yule model often studied in the context of macroevolution. Here the model is analyzed and interpreted in the framework of the development of networks such as the World Wide Web. Nonlinearity is introduced by replacing the linear birth process governing the growth of the in-links of each specific webpage with a fractional nonlinear birth process with completely general birth rates. Among the main results we derive the explicit distribution of the number of in-links of a webpage chosen uniformly at random recognizing the contribution to the asymptotics and the finite time correction. The mean value of the latter distribution is also calculated explicitly in the most general case. Furthermore, in order to show the usefulness of our results, we particularize them in the case of specific birth rates giving rise to a saturating behaviour, a property that is often observed in nature. The further specialization to the non-fractional case allows us to extend the Yule model accounting for a nonlinear growth.

  8. Omnigenity as generalized quasisymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Landreman, Matt; Catto, Peter J.

    2012-05-15

    Any viable stellarator reactor will need to be nearly omnigenous, meaning the radial guiding-center drift velocity averages to zero over time for all particles. While omnigenity is easier to achieve than quasisymmetry, we show here that several properties of quasisymmetric plasmas also apply directly or with only minor modification to the larger class of omnigenous plasmas. For example, concise expressions exist for the flow and current, closely resembling those for a tokamak, and these expressions are explicit in that no magnetic differential equations remain. A helicity (M, N) can be defined for any omnigenous field, based on the topology by which B contours close on a flux surface, generalizing the helicity associated with quasisymmetric fields. For generalized quasi-poloidal symmetry (M = 0), the bootstrap current vanishes, which may yield desirable equilibrium and stability properties. A concise expression is derived for the radial electric field in any omnigenous plasma that is not quasisymmetric. The fact that the tokamak-like analytical calculations are possible in omnigenous plasmas despite their fully 3D magnetic spectrum makes these configurations useful for gaining insight and benchmarking codes. A construction is given to produce omnigenous B({theta},{zeta}) patterns with stellarator symmetry.

  9. General composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocca, David; Serone, Marco; Shu, Jing

    2012-08-01

    We construct a general class of pseudo-Goldstone composite Higgs models, within the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset structure, that are not necessarily of moose-type. We characterize the main properties these models should have in order to give rise to a Higgs mass around 125 GeV. We assume the existence of relatively light and weakly coupled spin 1 and 1/2 resonances. In absence of a symmetry principle, we introduce the Minimal Higgs Potential (MHP) hypothesis: the Higgs potential is assumed to be one-loop dominated by the SM fields and the above resonances, with a contribution that is made calculable by imposing suitable generalizations of the first and second Weinberg sum rules. We show that a 125 GeV Higgs requires light, often sub-TeV, fermion resonances. Their presence can also be important for the models to successfully pass the electroweak precision tests. Interestingly enough, the latter can also be passed by models with a heavy Higgs around 320 GeV. The composite Higgs models of the moose-type considered in the literature can be seen as particular limits of our class of models.

  10. [Congenital cataract: general review].

    PubMed

    Roche, O; Beby, F; Orssaud, C; Dupont Monod, S; Dufier, J L

    2006-04-01

    Cataract is a loss of lens transparency because of a protein alteration. Etiopathogenesis is poorly understood but new mutations of different developmental genes involved are found in 25% of cases. Frequency of onset, particularly when different ocular development anomalies occur, is related to the lens induction phenomena on the eye's anterior segment structure during embryologic development. Genetic transmission is often found on the dominant autosomal mode. Diagnosis is based on a complete and detailed examination of the eye, often with general anaesthesia. This condition predisposes children to later, sometimes serious amblyopia. Different clinical aspects can be observed: from cataract with ocular and/or systemic anomalies to polymalformative syndrome, skeletal, dermatological, neurological, metabolic, and genetic or chromosomal diseases. A general systematic pediatric examination is necessary. Congenital cataract requires first and foremost early diagnosis and a search for all etiologies. Surgical treatment is adapted case by case but it has progressed with the quality of today's intraocular lenses even if systematic implantation continues to be debated. Life-long monitoring is absolutely necessary.

  11. General Aviation Data Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Elaine M.; Chung, Victoria I.

    2006-01-01

    The Flight Research Services Directorate at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provides development and operations services associated with three general aviation (GA) aircraft used for research experiments. The GA aircraft includes a Cessna 206X Stationair, a Lancair Colombia 300X, and a Cirrus SR22X. Since 2004, the GA Data Framework software was designed and implemented to gather data from a varying set of hardware and software sources as well as enable transfer of the data to other computers or devices. The key requirements for the GA Data Framework software include platform independence, the ability to reuse the framework for different projects without changing the framework code, graphics display capabilities, and the ability to vary the interfaces and their performance. Data received from the various devices is stored in shared memory. This paper concentrates on the object oriented software design patterns within the General Aviation Data Framework, and how they enable the construction of project specific software without changing the base classes. The issues of platform independence and multi-threading which enable interfaces to run at different frame rates are also discussed in this paper.

  12. Cyclic generalized projection MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Gordon E

    2015-04-01

    Progress in the development of portable MRI hinges on the ability to use lightweight magnets that have non-uniform magnetic fields. An image encoding method and mathematical procedure for recovering the image from the NMR signal from non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours is given. Individual frequencies in an NMR signal from an object in a non-uniform magnetic field give rise to integrals of the object along contours of constant magnetic field: generalized projections. With closed isomagnetic field contours a simple, cyclic, direct reconstruction of the image from the generalized projections is possible when the magnet and RF transmit coil are held fixed relative to the imaged object while the RF receive coil moves. Numerical simulations, using the Shepp and Logan mathematical phantom, were completed to show that the mathematical method works and to illustrate numerical limitations. The method is numerically verified and exact reconstruction demonstrated for discrete mathematical image phantoms. Correct knowledge of the RF receive field is necessary or severe image distortions will result. The cyclic mathematical reconstruction method presented here will be useful for portable MRI schemes that use non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours along with mechanically or electronically moving the RF receive coils.

  13. Generalized mosaicing: polarization panorama.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Yoav Y; Nayar, Shree K

    2005-04-01

    We present an approach to image the polarization state of object points in a wide field of view, while enhancing the radiometric dynamic range of maging systems by generalizing image mosaicing. The approach is biologically-inspired, as it emulates spatially varying polarization sensitivity of some animals. In our method, a spatially varying polarization and attenuation filter is rigidly attached to a camera. As the system moves, it senses each scene point multiple times, each time filtering it through a different filter polarizing angle, polarizance, and transmittance. Polarization is an additional dimension of the generalized mosaicing paradigm, which has recently yielded high dynamic range images and multispectral images in a wide field of view using other kinds of filters. The image acquisition is as easy as in traditional image mosaics. The computational algorithm can easily handle nonideal polarization filters (partial polarizers), variable exposures, and saturation in a single framework. The resulting mosaic represents the polarization state at each scene point. Using data acquired by this method, we demonstrate attenuation and enhancement of specular reflections and semireflection separation in an image mosaic.

  14. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  15. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  16. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  17. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  18. Generalized BEC in superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grether, M.; de Llano, M.

    2007-09-01

    A generalized Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) statistical theory of superconductors accounts not for BB interactions but rather for boson-fermion (BF) interactions. It extends the 1989 Friedberg-Lee BEC theory by including as bosons two-hole (2h) singlet Cooper pairs (CPs) in addition to the usual two-electron (2e) ones. It contains BCS theory when both kinds of pairs are equal in the BE condensate and in excited states-at least as far as identically reproducing the BCS gap equation for all temperatures T as well as the T = 0 BCS condensation energy for all couplings. As a ternary BF model with BF interactions, it yields Tcs one-to-three orders-of-magnitude higher than BCS theory with the same Cooper/BCS model electron-phonon interaction. These Tcs appear to be surprisingly insensitive to the BF interaction.

  19. Generalized teleportation protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Goren; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2006-04-15

    A generalized teleportation protocol (GTP) for N qubits is presented, where the teleportation channels are nonmaximally entangled and all the free parameters of the protocol are considered: Alice's measurement basis, her sets of acceptable results, and Bob's unitary operations. The full range of fidelity (F) of the teleported state and the probability of success (P{sub suc}) to obtain a given fidelity are achieved by changing these free parameters. A channel efficiency bound is found, where one can determine how to divide it between F and P{sub suc}. A one-qubit formulation is presented and then expanded to N qubits. A proposed experimental setup that implements the GTP is given using linear optics.

  20. Generalized entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2016-07-01

    We discuss two measures of entanglement in quantum field theory and their holographic realizations. For field theories admitting a global symmetry, we introduce a global symmetry entanglement entropy, associated with the partitioning of the symmetry group. This quantity is proposed to be related to the generalized holographic entanglement entropy defined via the partitioning of the internal space of the bulk geometry. Thesecond measure of quantum field theory entanglement is the field space entanglement entropy, obtained by integrating out a subset of the quantum fields. We argue that field space entanglement entropy cannot be precisely realised geometrically in a holographic dual. However, for holographic geometries with interior decoupling regions, the differential entropy provides a close analogue to the field space entanglement entropy. We derive generic descriptions of such inner throat regions in terms of gravity coupled to massive scalars and show how the differential entropy in the throat captures features of the field space entanglement entropy.

  1. Generalized acoustic energy density.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Leishman, Timothy W

    2011-09-01

    The properties of acoustic kinetic energy density and total energy density of sound fields in lightly damped enclosures have been explored thoroughly in the literature. Their increased spatial uniformity makes them more favorable measurement quantities for various applications than acoustic potential energy density (or squared pressure), which is most often used. In this paper, a generalized acoustic energy density (GED), will be introduced. It is defined by introducing weighting factors into the formulation of total acoustic energy density. With an additional degree of freedom, the GED can conform to the traditional acoustic energy density quantities, or it can be optimized for different applications. The properties of the GED will be explored in this paper for individual room modes, a diffuse sound field, and a sound field below the Schroeder frequency. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. Generalized quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Srikanth, R.

    2005-01-01

    We explore a generalization of quantum secret sharing (QSS) in which classical shares play a complementary role to quantum shares, exploring further consequences of an idea first studied by Nascimento, Mueller-Quade, and Imai [Phys. Rev. A 64, 042311 (2001)]. We examine three ways, termed inflation, compression, and twin thresholding, by which the proportion of classical shares can be augmented. This has the important application that it reduces quantum (information processing) players by replacing them with their classical counterparts, thereby making quantum secret sharing considerably easier and less expensive to implement in a practical setting. In compression, a QSS scheme is turned into an equivalent scheme with fewer quantum players, compensated for by suitable classical shares. In inflation, a QSS scheme is enlarged by adding only classical shares and players. In a twin-threshold scheme, we invoke two separate thresholds for classical and quantum shares based on the idea of information dilution.

  3. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  4. Neutron stars - General review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  5. Immunizations: vaccinations in general.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Catherine C

    2015-06-01

    The childhood immunization schedule is complex and nuanced. Although serious adverse reactions to immunizations are uncommon, clinicians must be well-versed in these reactions as well as the contraindications and precautions to each vaccine. • Conjugate vaccine technology links polysaccharide antigens to carrier proteins, triggering T-cell-dependent immunity to polysaccharides, thereby strengthening immune memory. • On the basis of some research evidence and consensus, live vaccines are generally contraindicated in immunocompromised patients and in pregnancy. Most live vaccines can be administered to household contacts of immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of some research and consensus, modified administration of meningococcal, pneumococcal, and less commonly, other vaccines may be indicated to protect immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of disease epidemiology and consensus, international travelers should be up-to-date with all routine immunizations; depending on destination, additional vaccines or immune globulin may be required.

  6. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  7. Methemoglobin levels in generally anesthetized pediatric dental patients receiving prilocaine versus lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Gutenberg, Lauren L; Chen, Jung-Wei; Trapp, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare peak methemoglobin levels and times to peak methemoglobin levels following the use of prilocaine and lidocaine in precooperative children undergoing comprehensive dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. Ninety children, 3-6 years of age, undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia were enrolled and randomly assigned into 3 equal groups: group 1, 4% prilocaine plain, 5 mg/kg; group 2, 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, 2.5 mg/kg; and group 3, no local anesthetic. Subjects in groups 1 and 2 were administered local anesthetic prior to restorative dental treatment. Methemoglobin levels (SpMET) were measured and recorded throughout the procedure using a Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-Oximeter (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, Calif, RDS-1 with SET software with methemoglobin interface). Data were analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson correlation (significance of P < .05). Group 1 had a significantly higher mean peak SpMET level at 3.55% than groups 2 and 3 at 1.63 and 1.60%, respectively. The mean time to peak SpMET was significantly shorter for group 3 at 29.50 minutes than that of group 1 at 62.73 and group 2 at 57.50 minutes. Prilocaine, at 5 mg/kg in pediatric dental patients, resulted in significantly higher peak SpMET levels than lidocaine and no local anesthetic. In comparison to no local anesthetic, the administration of prilocaine and lidocaine caused peak SpMET levels to occur significantly later in the procedure.

  8. Methemoglobin Levels in Generally Anesthetized Pediatric Dental Patients Receiving Prilocaine Versus Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Gutenberg, Lauren L.; Chen, Jung-Wei; Trapp, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare peak methemoglobin levels and times to peak methemoglobin levels following the use of prilocaine and lidocaine in precooperative children undergoing comprehensive dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. Ninety children, 3–6 years of age, undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia were enrolled and randomly assigned into 3 equal groups: group 1, 4% prilocaine plain, 5 mg/kg; group 2, 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine, 2.5 mg/kg; and group 3, no local anesthetic. Subjects in groups 1 and 2 were administered local anesthetic prior to restorative dental treatment. Methemoglobin levels (SpMET) were measured and recorded throughout the procedure using a Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-Oximeter (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, Calif, RDS-1 with SET software with methemoglobin interface). Data were analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson correlation (significance of P < .05). Group 1 had a significantly higher mean peak SpMET level at 3.55% than groups 2 and 3 at 1.63 and 1.60%, respectively. The mean time to peak SpMET was significantly shorter for group 3 at 29.50 minutes than that of group 1 at 62.73 and group 2 at 57.50 minutes. Prilocaine, at 5 mg/kg in pediatric dental patients, resulted in significantly higher peak SpMET levels than lidocaine and no local anesthetic. In comparison to no local anesthetic, the administration of prilocaine and lidocaine caused peak SpMET levels to occur significantly later in the procedure. PMID:24010987

  9. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  10. Natural generalized mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Serce, Hasan; Tata, Xerxes

    2016-12-01

    In the supersymmetric scenario known as mirage mediation (MM), the soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking terms receive comparable anomaly-mediation and moduli-mediation contributions leading to the phenomenon of mirage unification. The simplest MM SUSY breaking models which are consistent with the measured Higgs mass and sparticle mass constraints are strongly disfavored by fine-tuning considerations. However, while MM makes robust predictions for gaugino masses, the scalar sector is quite sensitive to specific mechanisms for moduli stabilization and potential uplifting. We suggest here a broader setup of generalized mirage mediation (GMM), where heretofore discrete parameters are allowed as continuous to better parametrize these other schemes. We find that natural SUSY spectra consistent with both the measured value of mh as well as LHC lower bounds on superpartner masses are then possible. We explicitly show that models generated from natural GMM may be beyond the reach of even high-luminosity LHC searches. In such a case, the proposed International Linear e+e- Collider will be required for natural SUSY discovery via higgsino pair production reactions. We also outline prospects for detection of higgsino-like WIMPs from natural GMM.

  11. [General review of rhinolithiases].

    PubMed

    Kharoubi, S

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and characteristics of rhinolithiasis, a rare and forgotten entity. Between 1990 and 2007, 20 cases of rhinolithiasis presented for consultation. The clinical course noted chronic nasal discharge associated with nasal obstruction. The protocol was the same for all patients: history of disease, meticulous endonasal endoscopy and plain radiography (+/-CT scan). Rhinolithiasis was found in adults (55%), females, patients living in rural areas (66%) with unfavorable socioeconomic conditions. The diagnosis delay varied between six months and eight years. The examination showed the rhinolith in the form of a grey concretion, primarily unilateral and on the right-hand side in 60% of the patients. Only one bilateral case presented following destruction of the posterior nasal septum. The rhinolith measured between 5 and 50mm in diameter with only three associated foreign bodies (15%). The rhinolith was extracted through the natural pathways under local anesthesia in 60% of the cases. Complications were rare (epistaxis 10%) and favorable progression without recurrence was generally observed after a mean 16 months of follow-up (range, six months to 11 years). Chronic nasal discharge without a history of rhinologic disease requires an endonasal examination under good conditions after retraction. Rhinolithiasis is easily recognized, in particular on imaging studies. Treatment is simple and curative in the majority of cases.

  12. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2008-01-01

    We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work on generalized covariance analysis methods. This prior work allowed for partitioning of the state space into "solve-for" and "consider" parameters, allowed for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and a priori solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator s anchor time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the "variance sandpile" and the "sensitivity mosaic," and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  13. Generalized teleparallel theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.

    2016-07-01

    We construct a theory in which the gravitational interaction is described only by torsion, but that generalizes the teleparallel theory still keeping the invariance of local Lorentz transformations in one particular case. We show that our theory falls, in a certain limit of a real parameter, under f(bar{R}) gravity or, in another limit of the same real parameter, under modified f( T) gravity; on interpolating between these two theories it still can fall under several other theories. We explicitly show the equivalence with f(bar{R}) gravity for the cases of a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker flat metric for diagonal tetrads, and a metric with spherical symmetry for diagonal and non-diagonal tetrads. We study four applications, one in the reconstruction of the de Sitter universe cosmological model, for obtaining a static spherically symmetric solution of de Sitter type for a perfect fluid, for evolution of the state parameter ω _{DE}, and for the thermodynamics of the apparent horizon.

  14. Generalized Canonical Time Warping.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; De la Torre, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Temporal alignment of human motion has been of recent interest due to its applications in animation, tele-rehabilitation and activity recognition. This paper presents generalized canonical time warping (GCTW), an extension of dynamic time warping (DTW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) for temporally aligning multi-modal sequences from multiple subjects performing similar activities. GCTW extends previous work on DTW and CCA in several ways: (1) it combines CCA with DTW to align multi-modal data (e.g., video and motion capture data); (2) it extends DTW by using a linear combination of monotonic functions to represent the warping path, providing a more flexible temporal warp. Unlike exact DTW, which has quadratic complexity, we propose a linear time algorithm to minimize GCTW. (3) GCTW allows simultaneous alignment of multiple sequences. Experimental results on aligning multi-modal data, facial expressions, motion capture data and video illustrate the benefits of GCTW. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/ctw.

  15. Beyond Einstein's General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2015-04-01

    Modern astrophysical and cosmological models are plagued with two severe theoretical difficulties, namely, the dark energy and the dark matter problems. Relative to the former, high-precision observational data have confirmed with startling evidence that the Universe is undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. This phase, one of the most important and challenging current problems in cosmology, represents a new imbalance in the governing gravitational equations. Several candidates, responsible for this expansion, have been proposed in the literature, in particular, dark energy models and modified gravity, amongst others. Outstanding questions are related to the nature of this so-called “dark energy” that is driving the acceleration of the universe, and whether it is due to the vacuum energy or a dynamical field. On the other hand, the late-time cosmic acceleration may be due to modifications of General Relativity, which introduce new degrees of freedom to the gravitational sector itself. We analyze some of the modified theories of gravity that address these intriguing and exciting problems facing modern physics, and explore the foundations of gravitation theory, essential for the construction of modified theories of gravity.

  16. Adenotomy under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vokurka, J; Jakoubková, S; Vít, Z; Drahokoupilová, M

    1989-01-01

    Experience obtained from adenotomy (AT) under general anesthesia using Ketamin hydrochloride (Ketalar, Narkamon) in children are presented in this paper. The authors had used intramuscular premedication with Prothazin, Dolsin and Atropin at the first stage, then they shifted to oral administration of a combination of Diazepam, Theadryl and Atropin. Ketamin may be applied intravenously in the dosage of 1.0 to 1.5 mg/kg of body weight in most children. Where it is not possible, a triple dose into the muscle is used. A total of 2,266 AT were performed. About 70% of patients were calm during the operation, once a suspected aspiration was considered but it was not confirmed. The main contribution of the method is 100% amnesia of the surgery made. The procedure is a compromise between a requirement for minimal traumatization of the child's psyche by the intervention and the resources available, particularly the need of personnel at the majority of otorhinolaryngo-logical departments nowadays.

  17. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  18. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  19. 75 FR 62879 - Individual Exemption Involving General Motors Company, General Motors Holdings LLC, and General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Benefits Security Administration Individual Exemption Involving General Motors Company, General Motors Holdings LLC, and General Motors LLC, Located in Detroit, MI AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security... ERISA (the Notice).\\2\\ The proposed exemption was requested in an application filed by General Motors...

  20. 27. GENERAL VIEW OF ORE TRANSPORT AND GENERAL WORK AREA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. GENERAL VIEW OF ORE TRANSPORT AND GENERAL WORK AREA BETWEEN MARISCAL WORKS CONDENSER STACK AND VIVIANNA WORKS BUILDINGS LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  1. GENERAL VIEW OF ORE TRANSPORT AND GENERAL WORK AREA BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF ORE TRANSPORT AND GENERAL WORK AREA BETWEEN MARISCAL WORKS CONDENSER STACK AND VIVIANNA WORKS BUILDINGS LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  2. 2. General view to southwest, showing general context at low ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view to southwest, showing general context at low tide, with Building 24 in background right. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Marine Railway, Between Piers 2 & 3, on Charlestown Waterfront at west end of Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  3. 33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 15, Upper Mississipi River (Arsenal Island), Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. 13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING. October 1982 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  5. 16. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. GENERAL HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL VIEW OF COMPLEX AND GENERAL SETTING - Upper Mississippi River Nine-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam Complex No. 22, Upper Mississippi River, Saverton, Ralls County, MO

  6. Action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. David

    2011-10-15

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela action is discussed in detail.

  7. Primary Generalized Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Murphy; Delanty

    2000-11-01

    For pure childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), ethosuximide (ESM) remains the drug of first choice. Although valproic acid (VPA) is of equal efficacy, it is more toxic, and is reserved for those patients with accompanying convulsions. Lamotrigine (LTG) is effective as both add-on and monotherapy for CAE. If any of these three drugs fails, one of the other two can be used as monotherapy. Rarely, when ESM, VPA, or LTG does not effectively control CAE, phenytoin (PHT), primidone (PRM), and phenobarbital (PB) may be partially effective, although carbamazepine (CBZ) may worsen absence seizures. Experience is limited with the newer AEDs. Tiagabine (TGB) may induce absence status epilepticus in PGE. Oxcarbazepine (OXC) and vigabatrin (VGB) may worsen absence seizures. Felbamate (FBM) is probably effective, but is potentially fatal. Lifelong therapy is not anticipated. For juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE), VPA is the drug of first choice. LTG is also of proven efficacy. The risks of VPA-induced teratogenicity (possibly lessened by the concurrent use of folic acid) and weight gain are potentially unacceptable in young women of childbearing age. Not enough data exists on the safety of LTG in pregnancy. A combination of VPA and LTG can be used if either drug alone is unsuccessful. For juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), VPA is the traditional drug of first choice in most patients. As in JAE, side effects may make VPA an unacceptable choice in many patients, especially young women. In clinical practice, TPM is being increasingly used as monotherapy for JME. Many patients appreciate the accompanying weight loss seen with TPM, but it has potentially troubling side effects, has not been well studied as monotherapy for JME, and its safety in pregnancy has yet to be confirmed. PHT and CBZ may worsen myoclonus when used alone, but they may have a role as add-on treatment to VPA, LTG, or TPM, especially when generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) are not controlled. PB and PRM may also

  8. Quadratic Generalized Scale Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Addor, J. B.

    Nearly twenty years ago, two of us argued that in order to account for the scaling strat- ification of the atmosphere, that an anisotropic "unified scaling model" of the atmo- sphere was required with elliptical dimension 23/9=2.555... "in between" the standard 3-D (small scale) and 2-D large scale model. This model was based on the formal- ism of generalized scale invariance (GSI). Physically, GSI is justified by arguing that various conserved fluxes (energy, buoyancy force variance etc.) should define the ap- propriate notion of scale. In a recent large scale satellite cloud image analysis, we directly confirmed this model by studying the isotropic (angle averaged) horizontal cloud statistics. Mathematically, GSI is based on a a group of scale changing opera- tors and their generators but to date, both analyses (primarily of cloud images) and nu- merical (multifractal) simulations, have been limited to the special case of linear GSI. This has shown that cloud texture can plausibly be associated with local linearizations. However realistic morphologies involve spatially avarying textures; the full non linear GSI is clearly necessary. In this talk, we first show that the observed angle averaged (multi)scaling statistics only give a realtively weak constraint on the nonlinear gner- ator: that the latter can be expressed by self-similar (isotropic) part, and a deviatoric part described (in two dimensions) by an arbitrary scalar potential which contains all the information about the cloud morphology. We then show (using a theorem due to Poincaré) how to reduce nonlinear GSI to linear GSI plus a nonlinear coordinate trans- formation numerically, using this to take multifractal GSI modelling to the next level of approximation: quadratic GSI. We show many examples of the coresponding simu- lations which include transitions from various morphologies (including cyclones) and we discuss the results in relation to satellite cloud images.

  9. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  10. The generalized triangular decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Hager, William W.; Li, Jian

    2008-06-01

    Given a complex matrix mathbf{H} , we consider the decomposition mathbf{H} = mathbf{QRP}^* , where mathbf{R} is upper triangular and mathbf{Q} and mathbf{P} have orthonormal columns. Special instances of this decomposition include the singular value decomposition (SVD) and the Schur decomposition where mathbf{R} is an upper triangular matrix with the eigenvalues of mathbf{H} on the diagonal. We show that any diagonal for mathbf{R} can be achieved that satisfies Weyl's multiplicative majorization conditions: prod_{iD1}^k \\vert r_{i}\\vert le prod_{iD1}^k sigma_i, ; ; 1 le k < K, quad prod_{iD1}^K \\vert r_{i}\\vert = prod_{iD1}^K sigma_i, where K is the rank of mathbf{H} , sigma_i is the i -th largest singular value of mathbf{H} , and r_{i} is the i -th largest (in magnitude) diagonal element of mathbf{R} . Given a vector mathbf{r} which satisfies Weyl's conditions, we call the decomposition mathbf{H} = mathbf{QRP}^* , where mathbf{R} is upper triangular with prescribed diagonal mathbf{r} , the generalized triangular decomposition (GTD). A direct (nonrecursive) algorithm is developed for computing the GTD. This algorithm starts with the SVD and applies a series of permutations and Givens rotations to obtain the GTD. The numerical stability of the GTD update step is established. The GTD can be used to optimize the power utilization of a communication channel, while taking into account quality of service requirements for subchannels. Another application of the GTD is to inverse eigenvalue problems where the goal is to construct matrices with prescribed eigenvalues and singular values.

  11. Directions in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B. L.; Ryan, M. P., Jr.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    2005-10-01

    Preface; Dieter Brill: a spacetime perspective; 1. Thawing the frozen formalism: the difference between observables and what we observe A. Anderson; 2. Jacobi's action and the density of states J. D. Brown and J. W. York; 3. Decoherence of correlation histories E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu; 4. The initial value problem in light of Ashtekar's variables R. Capovilla, J. Dell and T. Jacobson; 5. Status report on an axiomatic basis for functional integration P. Cartier and C. DeWitt-Morette; 6. Solution of the coupled Einstein constraints on asymptotically Euclidean manifolds Y. Choquet-Bruhat; 7. Compact Cauchy horizons and Cauchy surfaces P. Chrusciel and J. Isenberg; 8. The classical electron J. M. Cohen and E. Mustafa; 9. Gauge (in)variance, mass and parity in D=3 revisited S. Deser; 10. Triality, exceptional Lie groups and Dirac operators F. Flaherty; 11. The reduction of the state vector and limitations on measurement in the quantum mechanics of closed systems J. B. Hartle; 12 Quantum linearization instabilities of de Sitter spacetime A. Higuchi; 13. What is the true description of charged black holes? G. T. Horowitz; 14. Limits on the adiabatic index in static stellar models L. Lindblom and A. K. M. Masood-ul-Alam; 15. On the relativity of rotation B. Mashhoon; 16. Recent progress and open problems in linearization stability V. E. Moncrief; 17. Brill waves N. Ó Murchadha; 18. You can't get there from here: constraints on topology change K. Schleich and D. M. Witt; 19. Time, measurement and information loss in quantum cosmology L. Smolin; 20. Impossible measurements on quantum fields R. Sorkin; 21. A new condition implying the existence of a constant mean curvature foliation F. J. Tipler; 22. Maximal slices in stationary spacetimes with ergoregions R. M. Wald; 23. (1 + 1) - Dimensional methods for general relativity J. H. Yoon; 24. Coalescence of primal gravity waves to make cosmological mass without matter D. E. Holz, W. A. Miller, M. Wakano and J. A. Wheeler.

  12. Generalization of Stochastic Visuomotor Rotations

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Hugo L.; Stevenson, Ian H.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2012-01-01

    Generalization studies examine the influence of perturbations imposed on one movement onto other movements. The strength of generalization is traditionally interpreted as a reflection of the similarity of the underlying neural representations. Uncertainty fundamentally affects both sensory integration and learning and is at the heart of many theories of neural representation. However, little is known about how uncertainty, resulting from variability in the environment, affects generalization curves. Here we extend standard movement generalization experiments to ask how uncertainty affects the generalization of visuomotor rotations. We find that although uncertainty affects how fast subjects learn, the perturbation generalizes independently of uncertainty. PMID:22916198

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee (right), The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Bill Prosser (left) and Eric Madaras, NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee (right), The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Eric Madaras (left), NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee, The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Eric Madaras (left), NASA-Langley Research Center, and Jim McGee, The Boeing Company, Huntington Beach, Calif., conduct impulse tests on the right wing leading edge (WLE) of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The tests monitor how sound impulses propagate through the WLE area. The data collected will be analyzed to explore the possibility of adding new instrumentation to the wing that could automatically detect debris or micrometeroid impacts on the Shuttle while in flight. The study is part of the initiative ongoing at KSC and around the agency to return the orbiter fleet to flight status.

  15. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - Workers mate the Pegasus , with its cargo of the SciSat-1 payload to the L-1011 carrier aircraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-09

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - Workers mate the Pegasus , with its cargo of the SciSat-1 payload to the L-1011 carrier aircraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  16. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The SciSat-1 payload and Pegasus launch vehicle are lifted and mated to the L-1011 carrier aircraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-09

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The SciSat-1 payload and Pegasus launch vehicle are lifted and mated to the L-1011 carrier aircraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  17. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The L-1011 carrier aircraft is in flight with its cargo of the Pegasus launch vehicle and SciSat-1 spacecraft underneath. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-12

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The L-1011 carrier aircraft is in flight with its cargo of the Pegasus launch vehicle and SciSat-1 spacecraft underneath. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  18. VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The L-1011 carrier aircraft is in flight with its cargo underneath of the Pegasus launch vehicle and SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-12

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, CALIF. - The L-1011 carrier aircraft is in flight with its cargo underneath of the Pegasus launch vehicle and SciSat-1 spacecraft. The SciSat-1 weighs approximately 330 pounds and after launch will be placed in a 400-mile-high polar orbit to investigate processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The data from the satellite will provide Canadian and international scientists with improved measurements relating to global ozone processes and help policymakers assess existing environmental policy and develop protective measures for improving the health of our atmosphere, preventing further ozone depletion. The mission is designed to last two years.

  19. GVS - GENERAL VISUALIZATION SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of GVS (General Visualization System) is to support scientific visualization of data output by the panel method PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on the Silicon Graphics Iris computer. GVS allows the user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. Additionally, geometries can be color shaded according to phenomena such as pressure coefficient or velocity. Screen objects can be interactively translated and/or rotated to permit easy viewing. Keyframe animation is also available for studying unsteady cases. The purpose of scientific visualization is to allow the investigator to gain insight into the phenomena they are examining, therefore GVS emphasizes analysis, not artistic quality. GVS uses existing IRIX 4.0 image processing tools to allow for conversion of SGI RGB files to other formats. GVS is a self-contained program which contains all the necessary interfaces to control interaction with PMARC data. This includes 1) the GVS Tool Box, which supports color histogram analysis, lighting control, rendering control, animation, and positioning, 2) GVS on-line help, which allows the user to access control elements and get information about each control simultaneously, and 3) a limited set of basic GVS data conversion filters, which allows for the display of data requiring simpler data formats. Specialized controls for handling PMARC data include animation and wakes, and visualization of off-body scan volumes. GVS is written in C-language for use on SGI Iris series computers running IRIX. It requires 28Mb of RAM for execution. Two separate hardcopy documents are available for GVS. The basic document price for ARC-13361 includes only the GVS User's Manual, which outlines major features of the program and provides a tutorial on using GVS with PMARC_12 data. Programmers interested in modifying GVS for use with data in formats other than PMARC_12 format may purchase a copy of the draft GVS 3.1 Software Maintenance

  20. Human factors in general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The relation of the pilot to the aircraft in general aviation is considered. The human component is analyzed, along with general aviation facilities. The man-machine interface, and the man-environment interface are discussed.

  1. General Healthcare Maintenance of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources > General Healthcare Maintenance Go Back General Healthcare Maintenance Email Print + Share It is important to continue ... Bowel Diseases. September 2009, 1399-1409 Health Care Maintenance Chart YEAR PPD (Tuberculosis skin test) Vaccinations Hepatitis ...

  2. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    PubMed

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists.

  3. Generalized gravity from modified DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakatani, Yuho; Uehara, Shozo; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2017-04-01

    Recently, generalized equations of type IIB supergravity have been derived from the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of type IIB superstring theory in the Green-Schwarz formulation. These equations are covariant under generalized T -duality transformations and hence one may expect a formulation similar to double field theory (DFT). In this paper, we consider a modification of the DFT equations of motion by relaxing a condition for the generalized covariant derivative with an extra generalized vector. In this modified double field theory (mDFT), we show that the flatness condition of the modified generalized Ricci tensor leads to the NS-NS part of the generalized equations of type IIB supergravity. In particular, the extra vector fields appearing in the generalized equations correspond to the extra generalized vector in mDFT. We also discuss duality symmetries and a modification of the string charge in mDFT.

  4. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  5. General Aviation Pilot Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Warren L.

    General Aviation Pilot Education (GAPE) was a safety program designed to improve the aeronautical education of the general aviation pilot in anticipation that the national aircraft accident rate might be improved. GAPE PROGRAM attempted to reach the average general aviation pilot with specific and factual information regarding the pitfalls of his…

  6. General Aviation Pilot Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Warren L.

    General Aviation Pilot Education (GAPE) was a safety program designed to improve the aeronautical education of the general aviation pilot in anticipation that the national aircraft accident rate might be improved. GAPE PROGRAM attempted to reach the average general aviation pilot with specific and factual information regarding the pitfalls of his…

  7. The Generalized DINA Model Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    The G-DINA ("generalized deterministic inputs, noisy and gate") model is a generalization of the DINA model with more relaxed assumptions. In its saturated form, the G-DINA model is equivalent to other general models for cognitive diagnosis based on alternative link functions. When appropriate constraints are applied, several commonly used…

  8. New Directions in General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Desna W.

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the present situation and trends in general education. Considers the general education reform models of Harvard University, St. Anselm's College (a private, liberal arts college), Bowling Green State University, and Los Medanos Community College. Suggests general principles for curriculum development. (DMM)

  9. The Generalized DINA Model Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    The G-DINA ("generalized deterministic inputs, noisy and gate") model is a generalization of the DINA model with more relaxed assumptions. In its saturated form, the G-DINA model is equivalent to other general models for cognitive diagnosis based on alternative link functions. When appropriate constraints are applied, several commonly used…

  10. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  11. OLEDS FOR GENERAL LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect

    Anil Duggal; Don Foust; Chris Heller; Bill Nealon; Larry Turner; Joe Shiang; Nick Baynes; Tim Butler; Nalin Patel

    2004-02-29

    The goal of this program was to reduce the long term technical risks that were keeping the lighting industry from embracing and developing organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology for general illumination. The specific goal was to develop OLEDs for lighting to the point where it was possible to demonstrate a large area white light panel with brightness and light quality comparable to a fluorescence source and with an efficacy comparable to that of an incandescent source. it was recognized that achieving this would require significant advances in three area: (1) the improvement of white light quality for illumination, (2) the improvement of OLED energy efficiency at high brightness, and (3) the development of cost-effective large area fabrication techniques. The program was organized such that, each year, a ''deliverable'' device would be fabricated which demonstrated progress in one or more of the three critical research areas. In the first year (2001), effort concentrated on developing an OLED capable of generating high illumination-quality white light. Ultimately, a down-conversion method where a blue OLED was coupled with various down-conversion layers was chosen. Various color and scattering models were developed to aid in material development and device optimization. The first year utilized this approach to deliver a 1 inch x 1 inch OLED with higher illumination-quality than available fluorescent sources. A picture of this device is shown and performance metrics are listed. To their knowledge, this was the first demonstration of true illumination-quality light from an OLED. During the second year, effort concentrated on developing a scalable approach to large area devices. A novel device architecture consisting of dividing the device area into smaller elements that are monolithically connected in series was developed. In the course of this development, it was realized that, in addition to being scalable, this approach made the device tolerant to the most

  12. General dental practitioner's views on dental general anaesthesia services.

    PubMed

    Threlfall, A G; King, D; Milsom, K M; Blinkhom, A S; Tickle, M

    2007-06-01

    Policy has recently changed on provision of dental general anaesthetic services in England. The aim of this study was to investigate general dental practitioners' views about dental general anaesthetics, the reduction in its availability and the impact on care of children with toothache. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and clinical case scenarios. General dental practitioners providing NHS services in the North West of England. 93 general dental practitioners were interviewed and 91 answered a clinical case scenario about the care they would provide for a 7-year-old child with multiple decayed teeth presenting with toothache. Scenario responses showed variation; 8% would immediately refer for general anaesthesia, 25% would initially prescribe antibiotics, but the majority would attempt to either restore or extract the tooth causing pain. Interview responses also demonstrated variation in care, however most dentists agree general anaesthesia has a role for nervous children but only refer as a last resort. The responses indicated an increase in inequalities, and that access to services did not match population needs, leaving some children waiting in pain. Most general dental practitioners support moving dental general anaesthesia into hospitals but some believe that it has widened health inequalities and there is also a problem associated with variation in treatment provision. Additional general anaesthetic services in some areas with high levels of tooth decay are needed and evidence based guidelines about caring for children with toothache are required.

  13. General aviation avionics equipment maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

  14. Conditioned Fear Acquisition and Generalization in Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-González, Daniella; Fullana, Miquel Angel; Torrents-Rodas, David; Bonillo, Albert; Vervliet, Bram; Blasco, María Jesús; Farré, Magí; Torrubia, Rafael

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal fear conditioning processes (including fear acquisition and conditioned fear-generalization) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. Previous research has shown that individuals with panic disorder present enhanced conditioned fear-generalization in comparison to healthy controls. Enhanced conditioned fear-generalization could also characterize generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but research so far is inconclusive. An important confounding factor in previous research is comorbidity. The present study examined conditioned fear-acquisition and fear-generalization in 28 patients with GAD and 30 healthy controls using a recently developed fear acquisition and generalization paradigm assessing fear-potentiated startle and online expectancies of the unconditioned stimulus. Analyses focused on GAD patients without comorbidity but included also patients with comorbid anxiety disorders. Patients and controls did not differ as regards fear acquisition. However, contrary to our hypothesis, both groups did not differ either in most indexes of conditioned fear-generalization. Moreover, dimensional measures of GAD symptoms were not correlated with conditioned fear-generalization indexes. Comorbidity did not have a significant impact on the results. Our data suggest that conditioned fear-generalization is not enhanced in GAD. Results are discussed with special attention to the possible effects of comorbidity on fear learning abnormalities.

  15. Generalized Hopf bifurcation and its dual generalized homoclinic bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyal, Pierre

    1988-06-01

    The duality between the generalized Hopf bifurcation (GHB) and the generalized homoclinic bifurcation has been demonstrated using the Poincare-Andronov theorem of Arnold (1983). In order to study the correspondence map F, two normal forms are given which are dual to the normal forms of the GHB and which provide standard algorithms for calculating various quantities characterizing the generalized homoclinic bifurcation. The duality is shown using the Poincare normal forms at a weak focus and at a weak saddle, and using the bifurcation diagrams of the GHB and the generalized homoclinic bifurcation.

  16. Generalized Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Kähler geometry is the natural analogue of Kähler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We prove that generalized Kähler geometry is equivalent to the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2, 2) supersymmetry. We also prove the existence of natural holomorphic Courant algebroids for each of the underlying complex structures, and that these split into a sum of transverse holomorphic Dirac structures. Finally, we explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kähler geometry.

  17. Generalized synchronization via nonlinear control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Meng; Xingyuan, Wang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, the generalized synchronization problem of drive-response systems is investigated. Using the drive-response concept and the nonlinear control theory, a control law is designed to achieve the generalized synchronization of chaotic systems. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a generalized synchronization condition is derived. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations further demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  18. Generalized series of Bessel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jarrah, A.; Dempsey, K. M.; Glasser, M. L.

    2002-06-01

    Known series of Bessel functions, currently available in handbooks, and many of Neumann type, are generalized to arbitrary order. The underlying result is a Poisson formula due to Titchmarsh. This formula gives rise to a Neumann series involving modified Bessel functions of integral order. The latter is the basis of many of the generalized series that follow. Included are examples of generalized trigonometric identities. The paper concludes by indicating the wide range of results that can be obtained.

  19. [European general practice research agenda].

    PubMed

    Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Koskela, Tuomas

    2014-01-01

    The EGPRN (European General Practice Research Network) research agenda is a review compiling the strengths and areas of development of European general practice, based on a systematic literature survey and its versatile analysis. The research agenda is a framework paper sharpening the definition and functions of general practice as well as its significance for researchers and decisionmakers. The agenda is useful in structuring the research, evaluation of research needs, strengthening of infrastructure and strategic planning of new research.

  20. 2008 Contruction General Permits & Multi-Sector General Permits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View stormwater notices of intent (NOIs) for construction projects under EPA's 2008 Construction General Permit (CGP), for Low Erosivity Waivers (LEWs) submitted prior to September 10, 2013, or for industrial facilities under EPA's 2008 Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) or industrial facilities that are covered under the No Exposure certification.

  1. 3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of structures; view to southeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  2. Generalized Heisenberg algebras and k-generalized Fibonacci numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schork, Matthias

    2007-04-01

    It is shown how some of the recent results of de Souza et al (2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10415) can be generalized to describe Hamiltonians whose eigenvalues are given as k-generalized Fibonacci numbers. Here k is an arbitrary integer and the cases considered by de Souza et al correspond to k = 2.

  3. 27 CFR 9.107 - Lodi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Buffalo Creek, Calif. map); (17) Proceed southeast along State Highway 16 to its intersection with Deer Creek (ending on the Sloughhouse, Calif. map); (18) Then proceed generally northeast along Deer Creek...

  4. Technical highlights in general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements in performance, safety, efficiency, and emissions control in general aviation craft are reviewed. While change is slow, the U.S. industries still account for the bulk (90%) of the world's general aviation fleet. Advances in general aviation aerodynamics, structures and materials, acoustics, avionics, and propulsion are described. Supercritical airfoils, drag reduction design, stall/spin studies, crashworthiness and passenger safety, fiberglass materials, flight noise abatement, interior noise and vibration reduction, navigation systems, quieter and cleaner (reciprocating, turboprop, turbofan) engines, and possible benefits of the Global Position Satellite System to general aviation navigation are covered in the discussion. Some of the developments are illustrated.

  5. Generalized second law for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    We conjecture a novel generalized second law that can be applied in cosmology, regardless of whether an event horizon is present: the generalized entropy increases monotonically outside of certain hypersurfaces we call past Q-screens. A past Q-screen is foliated by surfaces whose generalized entropy (sum of area and entanglement entropy) is stationary along one future null direction and increasing along the other. We prove that our generalized second law holds in spacetimes obeying the quantum focusing conjecture. An analogous law applies to future Q-screens, which appear inside evaporating black holes and in collapsing regions.

  6. Generalized Three-Form Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjun, Pitayuth

    2017-08-01

    A generalized three-form field is an extended version of the canonical three-form field by considering a Lagrangian of the generalized three-form field as a function of the kinetic and the mass terms. In this work, we investigated cosmological models due to this generalized three-form field. It is found that one can use the three-form field to interpret the non-relativistic matter without the caustic problem. Moreover, by analyzing the dynamical system, a viable model of dark energy due to the generalized three-form field can be obtained.

  7. Generally Covariant Hamiltonian Approach to the Generalized Harmonic Formulation of General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Meng

    The goal of this dissertation is to develop a generally covariant Hamiltonian approach to the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity. As en route investigations, an important class of coordinate transformations in the context of the 3 + 1 decomposition, foliation preserving transformations, is defined; transformation rules of various 3 + 1 decomposition variables under this change of coordinates are investigated; the notion of covariant time derivative under foliation preserving transformations is defined; gauge conditions of various numerical relativity formulations are rewritten in generally covariant form. The Hamiltonian formulation of the generalized harmonic system is defined in the latter part of this dissertation. With the knowledge of covariant time derivative, the Hamiltonian formulation is extended to achieve general covariance. The Hamiltonian formulation is further proved to be symmetric hyperbolic.

  8. Freshman General Studies Thematic. 1973-.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    The Freshman General Studies Thematic Program (GST) at California State University, Chico was established in 1973 to create a general education program for freshmen and to give faculty the opportunity to explore innovative teaching methods. What resulted was a 33-unit, year-long interdisciplinary course for 36 well-motivated, well-prepared…

  9. 14 CFR Section 8 - General

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General Section 8 Section 8 Aeronautics and... Section 8 General (a) The profit and loss accounts are designed to reflect, through natural groupings, the... activities, are set forth in section 7, Chart of Profit and Loss Accounts. (d) The prescribed system of...

  10. 14 CFR Section 8 - General

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General Section 8 Section 8 Aeronautics and... Section 8 General (a) The profit and loss accounts are designed to reflect, through natural groupings, the... activities, are set forth in section 7, Chart of Profit and Loss Accounts. (d) The prescribed system of...

  11. 14 CFR Section 8 - General

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General Section 8 Section 8 Aeronautics and... Section 8 General (a) The profit and loss accounts are designed to reflect, through natural groupings, the... activities, are set forth in section 7, Chart of Profit and Loss Accounts. (d) The prescribed system of...

  12. Using "Informances" in General Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    General music teachers might be faced with formal performance expectations placed on them by administrators. While performance expectations are common in performance-based ensembles, meeting these expectations can be cumbersome and daunting to those who serve in the realm of general music. Informances--informative presentations of student learning…

  13. Student Views of General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaff, Jerry G.; Davis, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A student survey conducted at 10 colleges by the Project on General Education Models (GEM) demonstrates that students do value a broad general education, especially if that goal is seen in relation to other goals of specialized knowledge, self-knowledge, and preparation for a career. (Author/MLW)

  14. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  15. Generalized pustular psoriasis in childhood.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Sarah Toyomi; Maragno, Luciana; Arnone, Marcelo; Fonseca Takahashi, Maria Denise; Romiti, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis consisting of a generalized eruption of sudden onset with erythema and sterile pustules. In children, generalized pustular psoriasis is even more uncommon and may present as a severe and potentially life-threatening disorder. In this study, we present demographics, clinical aspects, treatment response, and follow-up of seven children with generalized pustular psoriasis. Retrospective study reviewing the records of seven children with generalized pustular psoriasis including age, gender, age of onset, presence of scalp and nail involvement, family history, concomitant diseases, precipitating factors, treatment modalities, and outcome. Age of first symptoms ranged from 1 month to 11 years. All patients received systemic retinoids at one time of the follow-up period. Other treatment modalities included immunosuppressive drugs, biologics, phototherapy, and sulfasalazine. Two patients presented with severe constitutional illness, secondary infection and septic shock, including one fatal outcome. All further cases have remained free of recurrences for a mean period of up to 3 years. In our study, generalized pustular psoriasis presented a wide clinical spectrum in children ranging from mild, asymptomatic outbreaks to more severe, life-threatening episodes. One fatality was observed. Children generally responded well to systemic retinoids. Further studies and long-term follow-up periods are needed to define potential trigger factors, efficacy and safety of different treatment modalities in children with generalized pustular psoriasis.

  16. Personality, Intelligence and General Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furnham, Adrian; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Three studies, all on student populations, looked at the relationship between a recently psychometrised measure of General Knowledge [Irwing, P., Cammock, T., & Lynn, R. (2001). Some evidence for the existence of a general factor of semantic memory and its components. "Personality and Individual Differences," 30, 857-871], both long…

  17. Freshman General Studies Thematic. 1973-.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    The Freshman General Studies Thematic Program (GST) at California State University, Chico was established in 1973 to create a general education program for freshmen and to give faculty the opportunity to explore innovative teaching methods. What resulted was a 33-unit, year-long interdisciplinary course for 36 well-motivated, well-prepared…

  18. The Construct of General Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Lloyd G.

    1979-01-01

    The construct of general intelligence is discussed in the context of factor models, differential validity of tests, Piagetian tasks, heritability, social class, and race. The general factor is an abstraction resulting from genes, environmental pressures, and neural structures involved in cognitive or intellectual human behavior. (Author/RD)

  19. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  20. Integrability and generalized monodromy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Lhallabi, T.; Moujib, A.

    2007-09-15

    We construct the generalized monodromy matrix M-circumflex({omega}) of two-dimensional string effective action by introducing the T-duality group properties. The integrability conditions with general solutions depending on spectral parameter are given. This construction is investigated for the exactly solvable Wess, Zumino, Novikov, and Witten model in pp-wave limit when B=0.