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Sample records for adelgid hwa adelges

  1. Potential feeding deterrents found in hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anne C.; Mullins, Donald E.; Jones, Tappey H.; Salom, Scott M.

    2012-07-01

    The nonnative hemlock woolly adelgid ( Adelges tsugae Annand, Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Adelgidae) has been a significant mortality agent of eastern hemlock ( Tsuga canadensis Carriere) throughout a large portion of its geographic range. During a study investigating adelgid vigor in relation to host health, it was noted that adelgid extracts ranged from a yellow to a deep red color. Analysis by GC-MS identified the presence of the anthraquinone, chrysophanol and its anthrone precursor, chrysarobin in the extract. These compounds are predator deterrents in several other insects, including chrysomelid beetles. It is hypothesized that these compounds serve a similar purpose in the hemlock woolly adelgid.

  2. Assessment of Imidacloprid and Its Metabolites in Foliage of Eastern Hemlock Multiple Years Following Treatment for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in Forested Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benton, E P; Grant, J F; Webster, R J; Nichols, R J; Cowles, R S; Lagalante, A F; Coots, C I

    2015-12-01

    Widespread decline and mortality of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, have been caused by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Annand) (HWA) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). The current study is a retrospective analysis conducted in collaboration with Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) to determine longevity of imidacloprid and its insecticidal metabolites (imidacloprid olefin, 5-hydroxy, and dihydroxy) in GRSM's HWA integrated pest management (IPM) program. Foliage samples were collected from three canopy strata of hemlocks that were given imidacloprid basal drench treatments 4-7 yr prior to sampling. Foliage was analyzed to assess concentrations in parts per billion (ppb) of imidacloprid and its metabolites. Imidacloprid and its olefin metabolite were present in most, 95 and 65%, respectively, branchlets 4-7 yr post-treatment, but the 5-hydroxy and dihydroxy metabolites were present in only 1.3 and 11.7%, respectively, of the branchlets. Imidacloprid and olefin concentrations significantly decreased between 4 and 7 yr post-treatment. Concentrations of both imidacloprid and olefin were below the LC50 for HWA 5-7 yr post-treatment. Knowledge of the longevity of imidacloprid treatments and its metabolite olefin can help maximize the use of imidacloprid in HWA IPM programs.

  3. Laboratory studies of feeding and oviposition preference, developmental performance, and survival of the predatory beetle, Sasajiscymnus tsugae on diets of the woolly adelgids, Adelges tsugae and Adelges piceae.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Robert M; Monahan, John F; Hain, Fred P

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of the balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae Ratzeburg (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) as an alternate mass rearing host for the adelgid predator, Sasajiscymnus tsugae Sasaji and McClure (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was studied in the laboratory. This predator is native to Japan and has been introduced to eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière (Pinales: Pinaceae), forests throughout the eastern United States for biological control of the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), also of Japanese origin. Feeding, oviposition, immature development, and adult long-term survival of S. tsugae were tested in a series of no choice (single-prey) and paired-choice experiments between the primary host prey, A. tsugae, and the alternate host prey, A. piceae. In paired-choice feeding tests, the predator did not discriminate between eggs of the two adelgid species, but in the no choice tests the predator did eat significantly more eggs of A. piceae than those of A. tsugae. S. tsugae accepted both test prey for oviposition and preferred to lay eggs on adelgid infested versus noninfested host plants. Overall oviposition rates were very low (< 1 egg per predator female) in the oviposition preference tests. Predator immature development rates did not differ between the two test prey, but only 60% of S. tsugae survived egg to adult development when fed A. piceae compared to 86% when fed A. tsugae. S. tsugae adult long-term survival was significantly influenced (positively and negatively) by prey type and the availability of a supplemental food source (diluted honey) when offered aestivating A. tsugae sistens nymphs or ovipositing aestivosistens A. piceae adults, but not when offered ovipositing A. tsugae sistens adults. These results suggest that the development of S. tsugae laboratory colonies reared on a diet consisting only of A. piceae may be possible, and that the biological control potential of the predator might be expanded to

  4. Two Novel Techniques to Screen Abies Seedlings for Resistance to the Balsam Woolly Adelgid, Adelges piceae

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Leslie; Frampton, John; Monahan, John; Goldfarb, Barry; Hain, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction into the Southern Appalachians in the 1950s, the balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae Ratzeburg (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), has devastated native populations of Fraser fir, Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Pinales: Pinaceae), and has become a major pest in Christmas tree plantations requiring expensive chemical treatments. Adelges piceae—resistant Fraser fir trees would lessen costs for the Christmas tree industry and assist in the restoration of native stands. Resistance screening is an important step in this process. Here, four studies directed toward the development of time— and cost—efficient techniques for screening are reported. In the first study, three methods to artificially infest seedlings of different ages were evaluated in a shade—covered greenhouse. Two—year—old seedlings had much lower infestation levels than 7 year—old seedlings. Placing infested bark at the base of the seedling was less effective than tying infested bark to the seedling or suspending infested bolts above the seedling. Although the two latter techniques resulted in similar densities on the seedlings, they each have positive and negative considerations. Attaching bark to uninfested trees is effective, but very time consuming. The suspended bolt method mimics natural infestation and is more economical than attaching bark, but care must be taken to ensure an even distribution of crawlers falling onto the seedlings. The second study focused on the density and distribution of crawlers falling from suspended bolts onto paper gridded into 7.6 × 7.6 cm cells. Crawler density in a 30 cm band under and to each side of the suspended bolt ranged from 400 to over 3000 crawlers per cell (1 to 55 crawlers per cm2). In the third study, excised branches from 4 year—old A. fraseri and A. vetchii seedlings were artificially infested with A. piceae to determine whether this technique may be useful for early resistance screening. The excised A. fraseri branches supported

  5. Two novel techniques to screen Abies seedlings for resistance to the balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae.

    PubMed

    Newton, Leslie; Frampton, John; Monahan, John; Goldfarb, Barry; Hain, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction into the Southern Appalachians in the 1950s, the balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae Ratzeburg (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), has devastated native populations of Fraser fir, Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. (Pinales: Pinaceae), and has become a major pest in Christmas tree plantations requiring expensive chemical treatments. Adelges piceae-resistant Fraser fir trees would lessen costs for the Christmas tree industry and assist in the restoration of native stands. Resistance screening is an important step in this process. Here, four studies directed toward the development of time- and cost-efficient techniques for screening are reported. In the first study, three methods to artificially infest seedlings of different ages were evaluated in a shade-covered greenhouse. Two-year-old seedlings had much lower infestation levels than 7 year-old seedlings. Placing infested bark at the base of the seedling was less effective than tying infested bark to the seedling or suspending infested bolts above the seedling. Although the two latter techniques resulted in similar densities on the seedlings, they each have positive and negative considerations. Attaching bark to uninfested trees is effective, but very time consuming. The suspended bolt method mimics natural infestation and is more economical than attaching bark, but care must be taken to ensure an even distribution of crawlers falling onto the seedlings. The second study focused on the density and distribution of crawlers falling from suspended bolts onto paper gridded into 7.6 × 7.6 cm cells. Crawler density in a 30 cm band under and to each side of the suspended bolt ranged from 400 to over 3000 crawlers per cell (1 to 55 crawlers per cm²). In the third study, excised branches from 4 year-old A. fraseri and A. vetchii seedlings were artificially infested with A. piceae to determine whether this technique may be useful for early resistance screening. The excised A. fraseri branches supported complete

  6. Development of a rain down technique to artificially infest hemlocks with the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Robert M; Mayfield, Albert E; Powers, Zaidee L

    2014-01-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is a non-native invasive pest that has caused widespread decline and mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. (Pinales: Pinaceae)) and Carolina hemlock (T. caroliniana Engelm.) in the eastern United States. Our preliminary experiments evaluated the utility of a rain-down technique to induce artificial infestations of A. tsugae on hemlock seedlings en masse. Experiments were conducted in PVC (1 m3) cages topped with poultry wire for placement of A. tsugae-infested branches, and with 1 m(2) gridded glue sheets and/or hemlock seedlings placed below to capture adelgid abundance, distribution, and infestation rate data. In the March 2011 experiment, the density of progrediens crawlers (adelgid nymphs, first instars) that rained down inside the PVC cages was significantly higher in the high ovisac treatment compared to the low ovisac treatment, with an estimated 513,000 and 289,000 crawlers per m(2) falling beneath each treatment, respectively. Resulting A. tsugae infestation rates on Carolina hemlock seedlings placed inside the cages did not differ between the treatments but were at or above established damage threshold densities for the adelgid. Infestation rates on eastern hemlock seedlings that were placed in cages nine days after the experiment started were below damage threshold levels and did not differ between the treatments. In the May 2011 experiment, the density of sistens crawlers raining down was substantially lower, with 17,000 and 33,000 falling per m(2) in the low and high ovisac treatments, respectively. Resulting infestation rates on Carolina hemlock seedlings were extremely low and well below damage threshold levels. Although A. tsugae crawlers were well distributed across the 1 m(2) gridded glue sheets placed at the bottom of each cage, hot spots of unusually high crawler density did occur in both experiments. This rain-down technique shows potential for use in

  7. Development of a rain down technique to artificially infest hemlocks with the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Robert M; Mayfield, Albert E; Powers, Zaidee L

    2014-01-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is a non-native invasive pest that has caused widespread decline and mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. (Pinales: Pinaceae)) and Carolina hemlock (T. caroliniana Engelm.) in the eastern United States. Our preliminary experiments evaluated the utility of a rain-down technique to induce artificial infestations of A. tsugae on hemlock seedlings en masse. Experiments were conducted in PVC (1 m(3)) cages topped with poultry wire for placement of A. tsugae-infested branches, and with 1 m(2) gridded glue sheets and/or hemlock seedlings placed below to capture adelgid abundance, distribution, and infestation rate data. In the March 2011 experiment, the density of progrediens crawlers (adelgid nymphs, first instars) that rained down inside the PVC cages was significantly higher in the high ovisac treatment compared to the low ovisac treatment, with an estimated 513,000 and 289,000 crawlers per m(2) falling beneath each treatment, respectively. Resulting A. tsugae infestation rates on Carolina hemlock seedlings placed inside the cages did not differ between the treatments but were at or above established damage threshold densities for the adelgid. Infestation rates on eastern hemlock seedlings that were placed in cages nine days after the experiment started were below damage threshold levels and did not differ between the treatments. In the May 2011 experiment, the density of sistens crawlers raining down was substantially lower, with 17,000 and 33,000 falling per m(2) in the low and high ovisac treatments, respectively. Resulting infestation rates on Carolina hemlock seedlings were extremely low and well below damage threshold levels. Although A. tsugae crawlers were well distributed across the 1 m(2) gridded glue sheets placed at the bottom of each cage, hot spots of unusually high crawler density did occur in both experiments. This rain-down technique shows potential for use in

  8. Ancient and modern colonization of North America by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an invasive insect from East Asia.

    PubMed

    Havill, Nathan P; Shiyake, Shigehiko; Lamb Galloway, Ashley; Foottit, Robert G; Yu, Guoyue; Paradis, Annie; Elkinton, Joseph; Montgomery, Michael E; Sano, Masakazu; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-05-01

    Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, is an invasive pest of hemlock trees (Tsuga) in eastern North America. We used 14 microsatellites and mitochondrial COI sequences to assess its worldwide genetic structure and reconstruct its colonization history. The resulting information about its life cycle, biogeography and host specialization could help predict invasion by insect herbivores. We identified eight endemic lineages of hemlock adelgids in central China, western China, Ulleung Island (South Korea), western North America, and two each in Taiwan and Japan, with the Japanese lineages specializing on different Tsuga species. Adelgid life cycles varied at local and continental scales with different sexual, obligately asexual and facultatively asexual lineages. Adelgids in western North America exhibited very high microsatellite heterozygosity, which suggests ancient asexuality. The earliest lineages diverged in Asia during Pleistocene glacial periods, as estimated using approximate Bayesian computation. Colonization of western North America was estimated to have occurred prior to the last glacial period by adelgids directly ancestral to those in southern Japan, perhaps carried by birds. The modern invasion from southern Japan to eastern North America caused an extreme genetic bottleneck with just two closely related clones detected throughout the introduced range. Both colonization events to North America involved host shifts to unrelated hemlock species. These results suggest that genetic diversity, host specialization and host phylogeny are not predictive of adelgid invasion. Monitoring non-native sentinel host trees and focusing on invasion pathways might be more effective methods of preventing invasion than making predictions using species traits or evolutionary history.

  9. Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) infestation affects water and carbon relations of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana).

    PubMed

    Domec, Jean-Christophe; Rivera, Laura N; King, John S; Peszlen, Ilona; Hain, Fred; Smith, Benjamin; Frampton, John

    2013-07-01

    Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is an exotic insect pest causing severe decimation of native hemlock trees. Extensive research has been conducted on the ecological impacts of HWA, but the exact physiological mechanisms that cause mortality are not known. Water relations, anatomy and gas exchange measurements were assessed on healthy and infested eastern (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina (Tsuga caroliniana) hemlock trees. These data were then used in a mechanistic model to test whether the physiological responses to HWA infestation were sufficiently significant to induce changes in whole-plant water use and carbon uptake. The results indicated coordinated responses of functional traits governing water relations in infested relative to healthy trees. In response to HWA, leaf water potential, carbon isotope ratios, plant hydraulic properties and stomatal conductance were affected, inducing a reduction in tree water use by > 40% and gross primary productivity by 25%. Anatomical changes also appeared, including the activation of traumatic cells. HWA infestation had a direct effect on plant water relations. Despite some leaf compensatory mechanisms, such as an increase in leaf hydraulic conductance and nitrogen content, tree water use and carbon assimilation were diminished significantly in infested trees, which could contribute to tree mortality.

  10. The ecology of energy and nutrient fluxes in hemlock forests invaded by hemlock woolly adelgid.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Bernhard; Müller, Thomas; Orwig, David

    2006-07-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA, Adelges tsugae Annand) is currently causing a severe decline in vitality and survival of eastern hemlock in North American forests. We analyzed the effects of light HWA infestation on vertical energy and nutrient fluxes from the canopy to the forest floor. Canopy throughfall, litter lysimeters, and laboratory litter microcosms were used to examine the effects of HWA-affected and unaffected throughfall on litter type, leachate, and litter chemistry. Early in the season adelgid infestation caused higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC; +24.6%), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON; +28.5%), and K (+39.3%) fluxes and lower inorganic nitrogen fluxes (-39.8%) in throughfall and in adjacent litter solutions collected beneath infested compared to uninfested trees. Needle litter collected beneath uninfested hemlock had significantly lower N concentrations compared to needles collected beneath infested trees, while no difference in N concentrations was found in birch litter. Bacteria were significantly more abundant on hemlock and birch litter beneath infested trees, while yeasts and filamentous fungi showed no consistent response to HWA throughfall. Litter microcosms showed that less DOC was leaching from birch than from hemlock needles when exposed to HWA throughfall. Overall, NH4-N and DON leachate concentrations were higher from birch than from hemlock litter. Thus, HWA-affected throughfall leads to qualitative and quantitative differences in nitrogen export from the litter layer. The N concentration of hemlock litter did not change with time, but the N concentration in birch litter increased significantly during the course of the experiment, especially when HWA-affected throughfall was applied. We suggest a nonlinear conceptual model for the temporal and vertical transition of energy and nutrient fluxes relative to progressing HWA infestation from a pure hemlock to a birch/maple-dominated forest. Progressive needle loss and changes in needle

  11. Hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale induce changes in foliar and twig volatiles of eastern hemlock.

    PubMed

    Pezet, Joshua; Elkinton, Joseph; Gomez, Sara; McKenzie, E Alexa; Lavine, Michael; Preisser, Evan

    2013-08-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is in rapid decline because of infestation by the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae; 'HWA') and, to a lesser extent, the invasive elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa; 'EHS'). For many conifers, induced oleoresin-based defenses play a central role in their response to herbivorous insects; however, it is unknown whether eastern hemlock mobilizes these inducible defenses. We conducted a study to determine if feeding by HWA or EHS induced changes in the volatile resin compounds of eastern hemlock. Young trees were experimentally infested for 3 years with HWA, EHS, or neither insect. Twig and needle resin volatiles were identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We observed a suite of changes in eastern hemlock's volatile profile markedly different from the largely terpenoid-based defense response of similar conifers. Overall, both insects produced a similar effect: most twig volatiles decreased slightly, while most needle volatiles increased slightly. Only HWA feeding led to elevated levels of methyl salicylate, a signal for systemic acquired resistance in many plants, and benzyl alcohol, a strong antimicrobial and aphid deterrent. Green leaf volatiles, often induced in wounded plants, were increased by both insects, but more strongly by EHS. The array of phytochemical changes we observed may reflect manipulation of the tree's biochemistry by HWA, or simply the absence of functional defenses against piercing-sucking insects due to the lack of evolutionary contact with these species. Our findings verify that HWA and EHS both induce changes in eastern hemlock's resin chemistry, and represent the first important step toward understanding the effects of inducible chemical defenses on hemlock susceptibility to these exotic pests.

  12. Oak seedling growth and ectomycorrhizal colonization are less in eastern hemlock stands infested with hemlock woolly adelgid than in adjacent oak stands.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James D; Licitra, Jeff; Tuininga, Amy R; Sirulnik, Abby; Turner, Gregory D; Johnson, Jacqui

    2008-04-01

    Invasive, non-indigenous, phytophagous insects have caused widespread declines in several dominant tree species. The decline in dominant tree species may lead to cascading effects on other tree and microbial species and their interactions, affecting forest recovery following the decline. In the eastern USA, eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr) is declining because of infestation by the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae Annand). Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) is a common replacement species in declining hemlock stands, but reduced mycorrhizal inoculum potential in infested hemlock stands may cause oak to grow more slowly compared with oak in oak stands. We grew red oak seedlings for one growing season in declining hemlock-dominated stands infested with HWA and in adjacent oak-dominated stands. Ectomycorrhizal root tip density and morphotype richness in soil cores were 63 and 27% less, respectively, in declining hemlock stands than in oak stands. Similarly, ectomycorrhizal percent colonization and morphotype richness on oak seedlings were 33 and 30% less, respectively, in declining hemlock stands than in oak stands. In addition, oak seedlings in declining hemlock stands had 29% less dry mass than oak seedlings in oak stands. Analysis of covariance indicated that morphotype richness could account for differences in oak seedling dry mass between declining hemlock stands and oak stands. Additionally, oak seedling dry mass in declining hemlock stands significantly decreased with decreasing ectomycorrhizal percent colonization and morphotype richness. These results suggest that oak seedling growth in declining hemlock stands is affected by reduced ectomycorrhizal inoculum potential. Further, the rate of forest recovery following hemlock decline associated with HWA infestation may be slowed by indirect effects of HWA on the growth of replacement species, through effects on ectomycorrhizal colonization and morphotype richness.

  13. Induction of Cold Hardiness in an Invasive Herbivore: The Case of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Elkinton, Joseph S; Lombardo, Jeffrey A; Roehrig, Artemis D; McAvoy, Thomas J; Mayfield, Albert; Whitmore, Mark

    2016-12-19

    As a measure of cold hardiness, we tested the supercooling points or freezing temperatures of individual hemlock woolly adelgids (Adelges tsugae Annand) collected from 15 locations across the north to south range of the adelgid in eastern North America at different times during two winters. Adelgids from the northern interior locations with USDA hardiness zones of 5B-6B had lower supercooling points than adelgids from more southern or more coastal locations (zones 7A and 6B), where minimum winter temperatures were higher. Supercooling points reached a minimum in February in northern but not in southern locations. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that adelgids exposed to colder temperatures (-12 °C) had lower supercooling points after 3 d and adelgids held at 10 °C had higher supercooling points than did adelgids held at 2 °C for the same period. Extending these periods to 7 d produced no further change in supercooling points. Adelgids at northern sites had much lower supercooling points in February 2015 following at least 10 d of much colder weather than adelgids from those same sites in February 2016 following much warmer weather. The induction of cold hardiness produced much year-to-year variation in cold hardiness, especially in northern sites, in addition to concurrently and previously demonstrated genetic differences in cold hardiness between northern and southern adelgid populations. Consequently, the cold temperatures required to kill hemlock woolly adelgids will vary year to year and week to week based on exposure to prior temperatures.

  14. Host Range Specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), A Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Limbu, Samita; Cassidy, Katie; Keena, Melody; Tobin, Patrick; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-02-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is closely synchronized with that of A. tsugae and has several characteristics of a promising biological control agent. As a prerequisite to field release, S. camptodromus was evaluated for potential nontarget impacts. In host range studies, the predator was given the choice of sympatric adelgid and nonadelgid prey items. Nontarget testing showed that S. camptodromus will feed to some degree on other adelgid species, but highly prefers A. tsugae. We also evaluated larval development of S. camptodromus on pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi (Hartig)) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and larch adelgid (Adelges laricis Vallot) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae); a small proportion of predator larvae was able to develop to adulthood on P. strobi or A. laricis alone. Scymnus camptodromus showed no interest in feeding on woolly alder aphid (Paraprociphilus tessellatus Fitch) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum (Hausmann)) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and minimal interest in cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in choice and no-choice experiments. Scymnus camptodromus females did not oviposit on any host material other than A. tsugae-infested hemlock. Under the circumstances of the study, S. camptodromus appears to be a specific predator of A. tsugae, with minimal risk to nontarget species. Although the predator can develop on P. strobi, the likelihood that S. camptodromus would oviposit on pine hosts of this adelgid is small.

  15. Effects of fertilizer and low rates of imidacloprid on Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Joseph, S V; Hanula, J L; Braman, S K; Byrne, F J

    2011-06-01

    Healthy hemlock trees, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, and hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), populations should favor retention and population growth of adelgid predators such as Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) and Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Sasaji & McClure) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Eastern hemlock trees between 15 and 38 cm diameter at breast height (dbh) were treated with 0, 10, or 25% of 1.5 g imidacloprid (Merit 75 WP) per 2.5 cm dbh and were either fertilized or not, in a 3 by 2 factorial design. After 2 yr, imidacloprid reduced the numbers of ovisacs and eggs found on trees in a dosage-dependent manner, while enhancing tree growth parameters such as new shoots or needles and the length of new shoots. Fertilized trees had greater adelgid fecundity, which was positively correlated with total foliar N in both winter generations. In February 2009 (27 mo after imidacloprid treatment), higher imidacloprid dosages to unfertilized trees resulted in reduced adelgid fecundity. Concentrations of N, P, and K were higher in the foliage of trees treated with insecticide, whereas foliar aluminum concentrations were consistently lower in trees with higher insecticide dosages. Trees treated with low rates of imidacloprid were healthier than untreated trees, but only trees treated with the 0.1 x dosage had sufficient adelgids to possibly sustain predators over extended periods.

  16. Density-dependent survival and fecundity of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Sussky, Elizabeth M; Elkinton, Joseph S

    2014-10-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) has decimated eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis Carrière) in forests throughout the eastern United Sates, but its densities in central New England appear to have stabilized. To find out why, we infested 64 eastern hemlocks with varying densities of adelgid ovisacs in a typical eastern hemlock forest in western Massachusetts. We subsequently documented adelgid density, fecundity, and the amount of new growth on experimental trees over two consecutive years. We used a 2 by 2 randomized block design using previously and newly infested hemlocks that were either 1-m tall saplings or branches of mature trees. There was a density-dependent decline in the survival and fecundity of adelgid in both the spring and winter generations. This response was a function of both previous infestation by adelgid and current year's crawler density in the spring generation. Additionally, the production of sexuparae in the spring generation played a key role in the overall density-dependent survival of adelgid, suggesting that sexuparae production is strongly linked to developing crawler density.

  17. Fitness and physiology of Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in relation to the health of the eastern hemlock.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anne C; Mullins, Donald E; Brewster, Carlyle; Rhea, James P; Salom, Scott M

    2016-12-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand is an invasive insect that frequently causes hemlock (Tsuga spp.) mortality in the eastern United States. Studies have shown that once healthy hemlocks become infested by the adelgid, nutrients are depleted from the tree, leading to both tree decline and a reduction of the adelgid population. Since A. tsugae is dependent on hemlock for nutrients, feeding on trees in poor health may affect the ability of the insect to obtain necessary nutrients and may consequently affect their physiological and population health. Trees were categorized as lightly or moderately impacted by A. tsugae based on quantitative and qualitative tree health measurements. Population health of A. tsugae on each tree was determined by measuring insect density and peak mean fecundity; A. tsugae physiological health was determined by measuring insect biomass, total carbon, carbohydrate, total nitrogen, and amino nitrogen levels. Adelges tsugae from moderately impacted trees exhibited significantly greater fecundity than from lightly impacted trees. However, A. tsugae from lightly impacted hemlocks contained significantly greater levels of carbohydrates, total nitrogen, and amino nitrogen. While the results of the physiological analysis generally support our hypothesis that A. tsugae on lightly impacted trees are healthier than those on moderately impacted trees, this was not reflected in the population health measurements. Adelges tsugae egg health in response to tree health should be verified. This study provides the first examination of A. tsugae physiological health in relation to standard A. tsugae population health measures on hemlocks of different health levels.

  18. Evaluation of hemlock (Tsuga) species and hybrids for resistance to Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) using artificial infestation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Michael E; Bentz, S E; Olsen, Richard T

    2009-06-01

    Hemlock (Tsuga) species and hybrids were evaluated for resistance to the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). The adelgid was accidentally introduced from Asia to the eastern United States, where it is causing widespread mortality of the native hemlocks, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière and Tsuga caroliniana Engelm. These two native species plus the Asian species Tsuga chinensis (Franch.) E. Pritz and T. dumosa (D.Don) Eichler and Tsuga sieboldii Carrière, and the hybrids T. chinensis x T. caroliniana and T. chinensis x T. sieboldii, were artificially infested with the crawler stage of A. tsugae in the early spring 2006 and 2007. After 8 or 9 wk-when the spring (progrediens) generation would be mature--counts were made of the adelgid. In both years, the density of A. tsugae was highest on T. canadensis, T. caroliniana, and T. sieboldii; lowest on T. chinensis; and intermediate on the hybrids. On T. chinensis and the T. chinensis hybrids, fewer adelgids settled, fewer of the settled adelgids survived, and the surviving adelgids grew slower. Thus, the nature of the host resistance is both nonpreference (antixenosis) and adverse effects on biology (antibiosis). Tree growth (height) was associated with resistance, but no association was found between time of budbreak and resistance that was independent of the taxa. Many of the hybrids grow well, have attractive form, and are promising as resistant landscape alternatives for the native hemlocks.

  19. Effects of Light and Water Availability on the Performance of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Hickin, Mauri; Preisser, Evan L

    2015-02-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriere) is a dominant shade-tolerant tree in northeastern United States that has been declining since the arrival of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). Determining where A. tsugae settles under different abiotic conditions is important in understanding the insect's expansion. Resource availability such as light and water can affect herbivore selectivity and damage. We examined how A. tsugae settlement and survival were affected by differences in light intensity and water availability, and how adelgid affected tree performance growing in these different abiotic treatments. In a greenhouse at the University of Rhode Island, we conducted an experiment in which the factors light (full-sun, shaded), water (water-stressed, watered), and adelgid (infested, insect-free) were fully crossed for a total of eight treatments (20 two-year-old hemlock saplings per treatment). We measured photosynthesis, transpiration, water potential, relative water content, adelgid density, and survival throughout the experiment. Adelgid settlement was higher on the old-growth foliage of shaded and water-stressed trees, but their survival was not altered by foliage age or either abiotic factor. The trees responded more to the light treatments than the water treatments. Light treatments caused a difference in relative water content, photosynthetic rate, transpiration, and water potential; however, water availability did not alter these variables. Adelgid did not enhance the impact of these abiotic treatments. Further studies are needed to get a better understanding of how these abiotic factors impact adelgid densities and tree health, and to determine why adelgid settlement was higher in the shaded treatments.

  20. Hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) induces twig volatiles of eastern hemlock in a forest setting.

    PubMed

    Pezet, Joshua; Elkinton, Joseph S

    2014-10-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) is an invasive species causing high mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L) Carriere) in the forests of eastern North America. Recent findings revealed that sapling eastern hemlocks artificially infested with hemlock woolly adelgid in a plantation setting responded to the insect with an array of induced resin volatile changes. Here we determine if eastern hemlocks growing beneath a forest canopy respond to hemlock woolly adelgid infestation with the same patterns of constitutive and inducible volatile resin production as those plantation specimens. We inoculated previously uninfested branches of mature and immature hemlocks in a central New England forest with hemlock woolly adelgid. We then sampled twig tissue of infested and uninfested trees in late spring, early summer, and mid-autumn, after known intervals of adelgid activity when an induced response might be expected. We identified and quantified resin volatiles by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Constitutive levels of total monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and combined resin volatiles were all several-fold more abundant in forest trees than those previously measured in a plantation setting, pointing to further study of the influence of site factors on hemlock volatile production. Hemlock woolly adelgid infestation induced an array of changes in eastern hemlock's volatile profile, including many-fold increases in benzyl alcohol and methyl salicylate accumulation. Despite differences in constitutive concentrations of volatiles between the two sites, our findings verify that hemlock woolly adelgid elicits patterns of resin volatile induction in forest-grown eastern hemlocks quite similar to those previously observed in plantation grown trees.

  1. Comparison of numerical response and predation effects of two coccinellid species on hemlock woolly adelgid (Homoptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Butin, Elizabeth; Elkinton, Joseph; Havill, Nathan; Montgomery, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is an introduced pest in North America that is native to Asia, and is causing extensive damage to eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis Carriere) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Englemann) in the eastern United States. We compared two coccinellids imported for biological control of the adelgid: Scymnus ningshanensis Yu et Yao from China and Pseudoscymnus tsugae Sasaji and McClure from Japan. In a laboratory study, we measured the numerical response of each beetle species to a range of prey densities, and in field studies we examined the reproductive success and ability of the coccinellids to reduce populations of the hemlock woolly adelgid. In the laboratory, S. ningshanensis showed a positive numerical response as hemlock woolly adelgid density increased, and P. tsugae showed a density-independent response. In field cages, the presence of S. ningshanensis resulted in negative hemlock woolly adelgid population growth, in contrast to positive growth in both control cages and cages containing P. tsugae. Both our laboratory and field experiments suggest that S. ningshanensis has good potential as a biological control agent of hemlock woolly adelgid.

  2. Distribution and abundance of Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) within hemlock trees.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S V; Hanula, J L; Braman, S K

    2011-12-01

    We studied the distribution of hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), within hemlock trees for three summer (progrediens) and two winter (sistens) generations in northern Georgia. Eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, trees were treated with 0, 10, or 25% of 1.5 g of imidacloprid per 2.5 cm of tree diameter at breast height and fertilized or not in a factorial design. Adelgid ovisacs per centimeter of branch were more abundant from June 2007 to June 2008 in the upper tree crown of insecticide untreated trees and when all trees were combined and that was the general trend for most comparisons. However, ovisacs were more abundant in the lower crown of insecticide treated trees in June 2008. More sistens nymphs settled on the upper crown branches than on the lower branches in summers 2007 and 2008. Higher eggs per ovisac were observed in the upper crown in February 2008 and in both the winter and summer 2009. In contrast, adelgids were more fecund in the lower crown in June 2008. On fertilized trees, eggs laid per adult were higher in the upper crown in February 2008. In summer 2008, eggs per ovisac were higher in the lower crown, but this reversed again to the upper crown by summer 2009. New growth of branches also varied among sample dates. These data demonstrate the variable distribution of adelgid and hemlock growth within trees over time and suggest that sampling only one crown area will not provide accurate estimates of adelgid densities.

  3. Behavioral Responses of Laricobius spp. and Hybrids (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) to Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Adelgid Host Tree Odors in an Olfactometer.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Arielle L; Havill, Nathan P; Mayfield, Albert E; Wallin, Kimberly F

    2015-12-01

    The predatory species Laricobius nigrinus (Fender) and Laricobius osakensis (Shiyake and Montgomery) (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) have been released for biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae; Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in eastern North America. L. osakensis is native to Japan, whereas L. nigrinus is endemic to the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada. After release, L. nigrinus was found to hybridize with the native eastern species, Laricobius rubidus (LeConte). The purpose of this study is to observe prey location behaviors of these three Laricobius species and L. nigrinus × L. rubidus (Ln × Lr) hybrids. Olfactometer bioassays were used to test response to host odors of adelgid-infested eastern hemlock, uninfested eastern hemlock, and uninfested eastern white pine. Predators reacted in the olfactometer more quickly when adelgid-infested foliage was included as a choice. L. nigrinus preferred infested eastern hemlock over uninfested eastern white pine, and L. rubidus preferred uninfested eastern white pine over uninfested eastern hemlock. Laricobius hybrids did not show a preference for foliage types known to be primary adelgid hosts (eastern hemlock and eastern white pine). Unequal preference by species of Laricobius for host trees of different adelgid prey could therefore be maintaining Laricobius species barriers despite hybridization. L. osakensis for this study were reared in the laboratory, whereas other species in this study were collected from the field, yet still were attracted to infested and uninfested eastern hemlock. This species also responded most quickly in the olfactometer, which is encouraging for successful biological control with this species.

  4. Effects of fertilization of four hemlock species on Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) growth and feeding preference of predators.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S V; Braman, S K; Hanula, J L

    2011-02-01

    Understanding how fertilization affects host resistance to hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is important because fertilizers are often used to grow resistant selections to a suitable size for testing. We evaluated four hemlock species (Tsuga) under three different fertilizer regimes to assess whether fertility affected resistance to the adelgid and to determine whether it affected feeding preferences of the adelgid predators Laricobius nigrinus Fender and Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Sasaji & McClure). Treatments were long-term fertilization (from June 2008 to June 2009), short-term fertilization (from March to June 2009), and no fertilizer. Fertilizer was applied biweekly with 240 ppm N by using water-soluble fertilizer (N-P-K, 20:20:20). Plants (>1 yr old) were artificially infested with adelgids on 31 March 2009. Among unfertilized hemlocks (n=10 per species), foliar N was highest in Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.) CarriBre and lowest in T. chinensis (Franch.) E. Pritz. Significantly more progredien ovisacs or sisten eggs were present on T. mertensiana than on the other hemlock species with none on unfertilized T. chinensis. A. tsugae adults on T. heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. were unaffected by fertility, but densities of developing A. tsugae nymphs were higher on unfertilized T. heterophylla plants than on fertilized T. heterophylla plants regardless of fertilizer treatment. Both L. nigrinus and S. tsugae consumed more adelgid eggs that developed on fertilized T. canadensis than from unfertilized plants. The predators did not exhibit this preference for adelgid eggs from females that developed on T. heterophylla or T. mertensiana.

  5. Orientation behavior of the predator Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) to hemlock woolly adelgid and host tree odors in a multi-chambered olfactometer.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kimberly F; Latty, Tanya M; Ross, Darrell W

    2011-08-01

    We studied the adult ambulatory response of the predator, Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), to odors from its prey, Adelges tsugae Annand, the hemlock woolly adelgid, and foliage of hemlock woolly adelgid, host hemlocks (Tsuga spp.), and other conifers. Both the predator and hemlock woolly adelgid are apparently native to western North America, but the predator is being released in the eastern United States, which has different hemlock species, for biological control of a lineage of hemlock woolly adelgid inadvertently introduced from Japan. L. nigrinus responded to odors from hemlock woolly adelgid host trees, but not to odors from hemlock woolly adelgid. L. nigrinus collected from hemlock woolly adelgid-infested western hemlock were more strongly attracted to odors from western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla (Rafinesque) Sargent] than eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière] in most trials. Odors from western white pine (Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don) and white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] were as attractive as western hemlock odors whereas odors from Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii variety menziesii (Mirbel)] and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) were avoided. L. nigrinus reared on hemlock woolly adelgid-infested eastern hemlock in the laboratory were lethargic and were not attracted to either eastern or western hemlock odors. Predators collected in the field and tested monthly from December to March responded similarly each month, except February, when they flew rather than walked in the olfactometer, suggesting a period of dispersal or mate finding at that time of year. The implications of these results for programs to release L. nigrinus in the eastern United States for control of hemlock woolly adelgid are discussed.

  6. Prey suitability and phenology of Leucopis spp. (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae) associated with hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Grubin, Sarah M; Ross, Darrell W; Wallin, Kimberly F

    2011-12-01

    Leucopis spp. (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae) from the Pacific Northwest previously were identified as potential biological control agents for the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in the eastern United States. We collected Leucopis spp. larvae from A. tsugae infested western hemlocks in Oregon and Washington and reared them on an unidentified Pineus spp., Pineus strobi (Hartig), Adelges cooleyi (Gillette), Adelges piceae (Ratzeburg), and A. tsugae in three no-choice tests. Leucopis spp. survival on A. tsugae was significantly higher than on A. piceae during the 2010 progrediens generation test and significantly higher than on P. strobi and A. cooleyi during the 2010 sistens generation test. However, across all three tests, some larvae completed development to adult on all four of the alternative adelgid species. Larvae that survived to the adult stage were identified as Leucopis argenticollis Zetterstedt and Leucopis piniperda Malloch. These results suggest that populations of L. argenticollis and L. piniperda in the Pacific Northwest may not be specific to A. tsugae. We also studied the phenology of Leucopis spp. on fourteen A. tsugae infested western hemlock trees in Oregon and Washington over a period of 14 mo. Leucopis spp. larvae were collected year-round, but highest densities coincided with the presence of progrediens and sistens eggs and adults of A. tsugae. There was a positive correlation between Leucopis spp. and A. tsugae abundance.

  7. 76 FR 42675 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for a Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Significant Impact for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... biological control agent to reduce the severity of hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae, HWA) infestations... release of this biological control agent into the continental United States. \\1\\ To view the notice,...

  8. Bacteriocyte-associated gammaproteobacterial symbionts of the Adelges nordmannianae/piceae complex (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    PubMed Central

    Toenshoff, Elena R; Penz, Thomas; Narzt, Thomas; Collingro, Astrid; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Pfeiffer, Stefan; Klepal, Waltraud; Wagner, Michael; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Horn, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Adelgids (Insecta: Hemiptera: Adelgidae) are known as severe pests of various conifers in North America, Canada, Europe and Asia. Here, we present the first molecular identification of bacteriocyte-associated symbionts in these plant sap-sucking insects. Three geographically distant populations of members of the Adelges nordmannianae/piceae complex, identified based on coI and ef1alpha gene sequences, were investigated. Electron and light microscopy revealed two morphologically different endosymbionts, coccoid or polymorphic, which are located in distinct bacteriocytes. Phylogenetic analyses of their 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences assigned both symbionts to novel lineages within the Gammaproteobacteria sharing <92% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with each other and showing no close relationship with known symbionts of insects. Their identity and intracellular location were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and the names ‘Candidatus Steffania adelgidicola' and ‘Candidatus Ecksteinia adelgidicola' are proposed for tentative classification. Both symbionts were present in all individuals of all investigated populations and in different adelgid life stages including eggs, suggesting vertical transmission from mother to offspring. An 85 kb genome fragment of ‘Candidatus S. adelgidicola' was reconstructed based on a metagenomic library created from purified symbionts. Genomic features including the frequency of pseudogenes, the average length of intergenic regions and the presence of several genes which are absent in other long-term obligate symbionts, suggested that ‘Candidatus S. adelgidicola' is an evolutionarily young bacteriocyte-associated symbiont, which has been acquired after diversification of adelgids from their aphid sister group. PMID:21833037

  9. Variation in winter survival of the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) across the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Trotter, R Talbot; Shields, Kathleen S

    2009-06-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) is a small, aphid-like insect native to East Asia and western North America. First documented in the eastern United States in Richmond, VA, in 1951, it has spread to at least 17 states, where it causes increased mortality among both eastern and Carolina hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis Carrière and T. caroliniana Engelmann., respectively). Previous work has suggested low temperatures may limit northward spread of the adelgid. Using recent surveys of A. tsugae mortality across the infested latitudinal gradient of the eastern United States, we show there is a significant positive relationship between minimum winter temperatures and winter survival at the landscape scale. The strength and nature of this relationship, however, varies through time, with absolute minimum winter temperatures explaining almost one half of the tree-level variance in survival in the spring of 2004 but only 9% in 2003. Post hoc analyses of the data suggest the explanatory power of temperature can be improved in ongoing studies by examining seasonal temperature profiles. Previous studies have also suggested adelgid survival may be density dependent, and although these data support this observation, contemporary density is a poor predictor of adelgid survival at the landscape scale. Using landscape estimates of minimum winter temperature, we show two simple methods of estimating landscape-scale adelgid survival rates. Both methods suggest much of the range of T. canadensis in the eastern United States, and the entire range of T. caroliniana falls in areas where winter temperatures will not impose critical limits on A. tsugae populations.

  10. Activity and residues of imidacloprid applied to soil and tree trunks to control hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in forests.

    PubMed

    Cowles, R S; Montgomery, M E; Cheah, C A S J

    2006-08-01

    We studied imidacloprid application methods and timing to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in forests. The methods compared were 1) soil injection near the trunk; 2) soil injection dispersed throughout the area under the canopy; 3) soil drench near the base of the trunk; and trunk injection with the 4) Arborjet, 5) Wedgle, and 6) Mauget systems. The applications were made in the fall and the following spring. Adelgid populations on the hemlocks (Tsuga spp.) were assessed in the fall of two successive years after the treatments. Relative to the untreated control trees, all the soil applications resulted in population reductions, but none of the trunk injections resulted in reductions. Fall and spring treatment efficacy did not differ. Reductions by the soil treatments were between 50 and 100% (avg 80%) by the first fall and 83-100% (avg 98.5%) by the second fall. Analysis of imidacloprid residues using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found residues in sap, needles, and twigs 1 mo to 3-yr after application. A laboratory dose-response bioassay using excised, adelgid-infested hemlock branches with cut ends immersed in serial dilutions of imidacloprid determined the LC50 value to be 300 ppb, based on an exposure of 20 d. A high degree of suppression of the adelgid on forest trees was associated with residues in hemlock tissue > 120 ppb 2 yr after soil treatment. Although precise relationships between residues and efficacy are elusive, it is clear that soil application of imidacloprid resulted in chronic residues of imidacloprid in tissues and suppression of adelgid populations for > 2 yr.

  11. Visual ability and searching behavior of adult Laricobius nigrinus, a hemlock woolly adelgid predator.

    PubMed

    Mausel, D L; Salom, S M; Kok, L T

    2011-01-01

    Very little is known about the searching behavior and sensory cues that Laricobius spp. (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) predators use to locate suitable habitats and prey, which limits our ability to collect and monitor them for classical biological control of adelgids (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). The aim of this study was to examine the visual ability and the searching behavior of newly emerged L. nigrinus Fender, a host-specific predator of the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Phylloxeroidea: Adelgidae). In a laboratory bioassay, individual adults attempting to locate an uninfested eastern hemlock seedling under either light or dark conditions were observed in an arena. In another bioassay, individual adults searching for prey on hemlock seedlings (infested or uninfested) were continuously video-recorded. Beetles located and began climbing the seedling stem in light significantly more than in dark, indicating that vision is an important sensory modality. Our primary finding was that searching behavior of L. nigrinus, as in most species, was related to food abundance. Beetles did not fly in the presence of high A. tsugae densities and flew when A. tsugae was absent, which agrees with observed aggregations of beetles on heavily infested trees in the field. At close range of prey, slow crawling and frequent turning suggest the use of non-visual cues such as olfaction and contact chemoreception. Based on the beetles' visual ability to locate tree stems and their climbing behavior, a bole trap may be an effective collection and monitoring tool.

  12. Ecosystem function in Appalachian headwater streams during an active invasion by the hemlock woolly adelgid.

    PubMed

    Northington, Robert M; Webster, Jackson R; Benfield, Ernest F; Cheever, Beth M; Niederlehner, Barbara R

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems in the southeastern United States are currently undergoing an invasion by the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). Previous studies in this area have shown changes to forest structure, decreases in canopy cover, increases in organic matter, and changes to nutrient cycling on the forest floor and soil. Here, we were interested in how the effects of canopy loss and nutrient leakage from terrestrial areas would translate into functional changes in streams draining affected watersheds. We addressed these questions in HWA-infested watersheds at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in North Carolina. Specifically, we measured stream metabolism (gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) and nitrogen uptake from 2008 to 2011 in five streams across the Coweeta basin. Over the course of our study, we found no change to in-stream nutrient concentrations. While canopy cover decreased annually in these watersheds, this change in light penetration did not translate to higher rates of in-stream primary production during the summer months of our study. We found a trend towards greater heterotrophy within our watersheds, where in-stream respiration accounted for a much larger component of net ecosystem production than GPP. Additionally, increases in rhododendron cover may counteract changes in light and nutrient availability that occurred with hemlock loss. The variability in our metabolic and uptake parameters suggests an actively-infested ecosystem in transition between steady states.

  13. False ring formation in eastern hemlock branches: impacts of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale.

    PubMed

    Gonda-King, Liahna; Radville, Laura; Preisser, Evan L

    2012-06-01

    Herbivores can alter plant physiology through the induction of abnormal wood formation. Feeding by some insects induces the formation of false rings, a band of thick-walled latewood cells within the earlywood portion of the tree ring that reduces water transport. Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) and elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa Ferris) are invasive insects that both feed on eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière]. Adelges tsugae has a greater effect on tree health than F. externa, but the mechanism underlying their differential effect is unknown. We explored the effects of these herbivores by assessing growth ring formation in branches of trees that had been experimentally infested for 4 yr with A. tsugae, F. externa, or neither insect. We measured false ring density, ring growth, and earlywood: latewood ratios in the two most recently deposited growth rings. Branches from A. tsugae-infested trees had 30% more false rings than branches from F. externa-infested trees and 50% more than branches from uninfested trees. In contrast, branches from F. externa-infested trees and control trees did not differ in false ring formation. Radial growth and earlywood: latewood ratios did not differ among treatments. Our results show that two invasive herbivores with piercing-sucking mouth parts have differing effects on false ring formation in eastern hemlock. These false rings may be the product of a systemic plant hypersensitive response to feeding by A. tsugae on hemlock stems. If false rings are responsible for or symptomatic of hemlock water stress, this may provide a potential explanation for the relatively large effect of A. tsugae infestations on tree health.

  14. Spatial tools for managing hemlock woolly adelgid in the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Frank Henry, Jr.

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) has recently spread into the southern Appalachians. This insect attacks both native hemlock species (Tsuga canadensis and T. caroliniana ), has no natural enemies, and can kill hemlocks within four years. Biological control displays promise for combating the pest, but counter-measures are impeded because adelgid and hemlock distribution patterns have been detailed poorly. We developed a spatial management system to better target control efforts, with two components: (1) a protocol for mapping hemlock stands, and (2) a technique to map areas at risk of imminent infestation. To construct a hemlock classifier, we used topographically normalized satellite images from Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Employing a decision tree approach that supplemented image spectral data with several environmental variables, we generated rules distinguishing hemlock areas from other forest types. We then implemented these rules in a geographic information system and generated hemlock distribution maps. Assessment yielded an overall thematic accuracy of 90% for one study area, and 75% accuracy in capturing hemlocks in a second study area. To map areas at risk, we combined first-year infestation locations from Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Blue Ridge Parkway with points from uninfested hemlock stands, recording a suite of environmental variables for each point. We applied four different multivariate classification techniques to generate models from this sample predicting locations with high infestation risk, and used the resulting models to generate risk maps for the study region. All techniques performed well, accurately capturing 70--90% of training and validation samples, with the logistic regression model best balancing accuracy and regional applicability. Areas close to trails, roads, and streams appear to have the highest initial risk, perhaps due to bird- or human-mediated dispersal. Both components of our management

  15. Establishment of the hemlock woolly adelgid predator, Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), in the Eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Mausel, D L; Salom, S M; Kok, L T; Davis, G A

    2010-04-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), native to western North America and Asia, was accidentally introduced from Japan to the eastern United States. To potentially establish biological control of A. tsugae, we released a predator endemic to western North America, Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), from 2003 to 2005, in 22 localities from Georgia to Massachusetts. Release sites spanned the invasive range of the adelgid across five United States Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones (5a to 7a). Release sizes were 75, 150, 300, 600, or 1,200 adult L. nigrinus per site in the fall, winter, early spring, or sequentially (i.e., fall or winter and early spring). We monitored establishment by annual sampling for L. nigrinus adults with beat sheets and for L. nigrinus larvae by branch clipping. At the end of 3 yr, L. nigrinus was established in 13 of the 22 sites. The following variables were evaluated for their correlation with the numbers of L. nigrinus larvae and adults recovered and for their effect on establishment (scored as F(3) presence/absence): (1) Minimum winter temperature at the release site, (2) A. tsugae density at the time of release, (3) release size, and (4) release season. Only minimum winter temperature was correlated with larval recoveries and no variables were correlated with adult recoveries. Logistic regression modeling found that establishment was positively related to minimum winter temperature and release size. We recommend smaller release sizes in warm areas where establishment probability was high (i.e., zones 7a, 6b, and 6a) and larger release sizes in cold areas where establishment probability was low (i.e., zones 5b and 5a). Releases during fall-early spring and across the range of A. tsugae densities tested were successful.

  16. Binomial sequential sampling plan for hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) sistens infesting individual eastern hemlock trees.

    PubMed

    Fidgen, Jeffrey G; Legg, David E; Salom, Scott M

    2006-08-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an exotic insect pest that is killing eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, and Carolina hemlock, Tsuga caroliniana Engelmann, in the eastern United States. We used the sequential interval procedure to develop a binomial sequential sampling plan for A. tsugae sistens on individual eastern hemlock trees that uses nondestructive sampling of new shoots. The actual a (type I) and beta (type II) error rates were essentially 5 and 10%, respectively. Tallies of new shoots infested by at least one A. tsugae sistens were compared with stop values for thresholds of 10 and 30% of new hemlock shoots infested. Twenty to 80 new shoots had to be examined per tree to render a low, high, or indeterminate classification, which took < 2 min per tree regardless of the threshold used. This plan should be an efficient and cost-effective tool in the management of A. tsugae infestations on individual, high-value eastern hemlock trees.

  17. Effects of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale on eastern hemlock growth and foliar chemistry.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pierce, Mailea R; Orwig, David A; Preisser, Evan

    2010-04-01

    In the eastern United States, two invasive specialist insects share a native host plant, Eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis. In recent years, much research has focused on the impacts of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) because of the detrimental effects it has on hemlock growth and survival. In contrast, the invasive elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa) is thought to have only minor impacts on hemlock. We infested hemlock saplings with each insect and compared them with control (i.e., neither insect herbivore) saplings to assess how early infestations impact Eastern hemlock health (measured using new branch growth, foliar %N, and C:N ratio). Our study showed that, at equal densities, the two insects differed in their effect on Eastern hemlock. F. externa did not impact plant growth or foliar chemistry over the course of the 2-yr experiment. A. tsugae significantly reduced plant growth and caused a reduction of %N in the first year of the experiment. By the end of the experiment, A. tsugae trees had the same %N in their foliage as control and F. externa trees but drastically reduced growth patterns. The most likely explanation for this result is the greater growth in control and F. externa saplings during the second year resulted in the dilution of available foliar N over a larger amount of newly produced plant tissue. For early infestations of both insects, our study suggests that management plans should focus on the more detrimental A. tsugae.

  18. A Review of the Korean Cultural Syndrome Hwa-Byung: Suggestions for Theory and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Wachholtz, Amy; Choi, Keum-Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review Hwa-Byung, a cultural syndrome specific to Koreans and Korean immigrants. Hwa-Byung is a unique diagnosis and differs from other DSM disorders. However, Hwa-Byung has frequent comorbidity with other DSM disorders such as anger disorders, generalized anxiety disorder, and major depressive disorder. There are several risk factors for Hwa-Byung including psychosocial stress caused by marital conflicts and conflicts with their in-laws. Previous interventions of the Hwa-Byung syndrome were based primarily on the medical model. Therefore, based on previous research, we present a new ecological model of Hwa-Byung. We also recommend some areas of future research as well as present some limitations of our ecological model. Finally, we discuss some treatment issues, particularly for Korean women in the United States. PMID:25408922

  19. Impacts of trunk and soil injections of low rates of imidacloprid on hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and eastern hemlock (Pinales: Pinaceae) health.

    PubMed

    Eisenback, Brian M; Salom, Scott M; Kok, Loke T; Lagalante, Anthony F

    2014-02-01

    Eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis Carrière) at two sites in southwestern Virginia were treated by trunk and soil injections of imidacloprid to determine the insecticide's impact on hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand. Treatments were 25, 50, and 100% of the highest labeled dosage rates for both stem and soil injection. Three and 4 yr after treatment, the half and full rates had significantly reduced A. tsugae populations, which were accompanied by increased new hemlock shoot growth and higher hemlock health scores on a visual rating of tree appearance. Imidacloprid and metabolite concentrations in tissue of treated trees were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and A. tsugae density decreased as imidacloprid concentrations increased in wood tissue. There were no observed A. tsugae populations in all trees with imidacloprid tissue concentrations >413 ppb. Olefin, di-hydroxy, and 6-chloro-nicotinic-acid metabolites were the imidacloprid metabolites recovered in the highest concentrations. This suggests that hemlock metabolism of imidacloprid may increase efficacy of the parent compound. Stem and soil treatments of low rates of systemic imidacloprid reduce adelgid populations and promote hemlock health, but still may provide a remnant food source for beneficial predators.

  20. Predators associated with the hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Kohler, G R; Stiefel, V L; Wallin, K F; Ross, D W

    2008-04-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is causing widespread mortality of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis L. Carrière, in the eastern United States. In western North America, feeding by A. tsugae results in negligible damage to western hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sargent. Host tolerance and presence of endemic predators may be contributing to the relatively low levels of injury to T. heterophylla caused by A. tsugae. Field surveys of the predator community associated with A. tsugae infestations on 116 T. heterophylla at 16 sites in Oregon and Washington were conducted every 4-6 wk from March 2005 through November 2006. Fourteen uninfested T. heterophylla were also surveyed across 5 of the 16 sites. Each sample tree was assigned an A. tsugae population score ranging from 0 to 3. Predators collected from A. tsugae-infested T. heterophylla represent 55 species in 14 families, listed in order of abundance: Derodontidae, Chamaemyiidae, Hemerobiidae, Coccinellidae, Cantharidae, Reduviidae, Miridae, Syrphidae, Chrysopidae, Coniopterygidae, Staphylinidae, Anthocoridae, Nabidae, and Raphidiidae. Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), Leucopis argenticollis Zetterstedt (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae), and Leucopis atrifacies (Aldrich) (Chamaemyiidae) were the most abundant predators; together comprising 59% of predator specimens recovered. Relationships among predators and A. tsugae were determined through community structure analysis. The abundances of Laricobius spp. larvae, L. nigrinus adults, Leucopis spp. larvae, and L. argenticollis adults were found to be positively correlated to A. tsugae population score. Predators were most abundant when the two generations of A. tsugae eggs were present. L. argenticollis and L. atrifacies were reared on A. tsugae in the laboratory, and host records show them to feed exclusively on Adelgidae.

  1. Feeding by Leucopis argenticollis and Leucopis piniperda (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae) from the western USA on Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in the eastern USA.

    PubMed

    Motley, K; Havill, N P; Arsenault-Benoit, A L; Mayfield, A E; Ott, D S; Ross, D; Whitmore, M C; Wallin, K F

    2017-03-14

    Leucopis argenticollis (Zetterstedt) and Leucopis piniperda (Malloch) are known to feed on the lineage of Adelges tsugae Annand that is native to western North America, but it is not known if they will survive on the lineage that was introduced from Japan to the eastern USA. In 2014, western Leucopis spp. larvae were brought to the laboratory and placed on A. tsugae collected in either Washington (North American A. tsugae lineage) or Connecticut (Japanese lineage). There were no significant differences in survival or developmental times between flies reared on the two different adelgid lineages. In 2015 and 2016, western Leucopis spp. adults were released at two different densities onto enclosed branches of A. tsugae infested eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) in Tennessee and New York. Cages were recovered and their contents examined 4 weeks after release at each location. Leucopis spp. larvae and puparia of the F1 generation were recovered at both release locations and adults of the F1 generation were collected at the Tennessee location. The number of Leucopis spp. offspring collected increased with increasing adelgid density, but did not differ by the number of adult flies released. Flies recovered from cages and flies collected from the source colony were identified as L.argenticollis and L. piniperda using DNA barcoding. These results demonstrate that Leucopis spp. from the Pacific Northwest are capable of feeding and developing to the adult stage on A. tsugae in the eastern USA and they are able to tolerate environmental conditions during late spring and early summer at the southern and northern extent of the area invaded by A. tsugae in the eastern USA.

  2. Water use and carbon exchange of red oak- and eastern hemlock-dominated forests in the northeastern USA: implications for ecosystem-level effects of hemlock woolly adelgid.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Julian L; Kuzeja, Paul S; Daley, Michael J; Phillips, Nathan G; Mulcahy, Thomas; Singh, Safina

    2008-04-01

    Water use and carbon exchange of a red oak-dominated (Quercus rubra L.) forest and an eastern hemlock-dominated (Tsuga canadensis L.) forest, each located within the Harvard Forest in north-central Massachusetts, were measured for 2 years by the eddy flux method. Water use by the red oak forest reached 4 mm day(-1), compared to a maximum of 2 mm day(-1) by the eastern hemlock forest. Maximal carbon (C) uptake rate was also higher in the red oak forest than in the eastern hemlock forest (about 25 versus 15 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Sap flux measurements indicated that transpiration of red oak, and also of black birch (Betula lenta L.), which frequently replaces eastern hemlock killed by hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand.), were almost twice that of eastern hemlock. Despite the difference between species in maximum summertime C assimilation rate, annual C storage of the eastern hemlock forest almost equaled that of the red oak forest because of net C uptake by eastern hemlock during unusually warm fall and spring weather, and a near-zero C balance during the winter. Thus, the effect on C storage of replacing eastern hemlock forest with a forest dominated by deciduous species is unclear. Carbon storage by eastern hemlock forests during fall, winter and spring is likely to increase in the event of climate warming, although this may be offset by C loss during hotter summers. Our results indicate that, although forest water use will decrease immediately following eastern hemlock mortality due to the hemlock woolly adelgid, the replacement of eastern hemlock by deciduous species such as red oak will likely increase summertime water use over current rates in areas where hemlock is a major forest species.

  3. Catalog of the adelgids of the world (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A taxonomic and nomenclatural catalog of the adelgids (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) is presented. Six family-group names are listed, five being synonyms of Adelgidae. Twenty-two genus-group names, of which nine are valid and in use, are presented with their type species, etymology, and grammatical gender. ...

  4. Symptoms to Use for Diagnostic Criteria of Hwa-Byung, an Anger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Shin-Young; Song, Ki-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the characteristic symptoms which can be used for the diagnosis of hwa-byung, a culture-related anger syndrome in Korea. Methods The symptoms of the Hwa-byung Scale were correlated with the Korean versions of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (K-HDRS) and the State and Trait Anger Inventory (K-STAXI) in 89 patients, who were diagnosed as having major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, or adjustment disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and who had self-labeled hwa-byung. Also, the symptoms of the Hwa-byung Scale were correlated with each other. Results The symptoms of the Hwa-byung Scale which were significantly correlated with the state anger of the K-STAXI but not with the depressive mood (item 1 of K-HDRS) included feelings of unfairness, subjective anger, external anger, heat sensation, pushing-up in the chest, dry mouth, and sighing. The symptoms which were significantly correlated with state anger and depressed mood included respiratory stuffiness, "haan" and hate. The symptoms which were not significantly correlated with depressed mood and state anger included going-out, epigastric mass, palpitation, headache/pain, frightening easily, many thoughts, and much pleading. These symptoms also showed higher correlation with each other in the correlation matrix. Conclusion Our findings suggest that hwa-byung is different from depressive syndrome in terms of its symptom profile, and suggest what symptoms should be included in the diagnostic criteria of hwa-byung, an anger disorder. PMID:20046367

  5. Climate Risk Modelling of Balsam Woolly Adelgid Damage Severity in Subalpine Fir Stands of Western North America.

    PubMed

    Hrinkevich, Kathryn H; Progar, Robert A; Shaw, David C

    2016-01-01

    The balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae (Ratzeburg) (Homoptera: Adelgidae)) (BWA) is a nonnative, invasive insect that threatens Abies species throughout North America. It is well established in the Pacific Northwest, but continues to move eastward through Idaho and into Montana and potentially threatens subalpine fir to the south in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. We developed a climatic risk model and map that predicts BWA impacts to subalpine fir using a two-step process. Using 30-year monthly climate normals from sites with quantitatively derived BWA damage severity index values, we built a regression model that significantly explained insect damage. The sites were grouped into two distinct damage categories (high damage and mortality versus little or no mortality and low damage) and the model estimates for each group were used to designate distinct value ranges for four climatic risk categories: minimal, low, moderate, and high. We then calculated model estimates for each cell of a 4-kilometer resolution climate raster and mapped the risk categories over the entire range of subalpine fir in the western United States. The spatial variation of risk classes indicates a gradient of climatic susceptibility generally decreasing from the Olympic Peninsula in Washington and the Cascade Range in Oregon and Washington moving eastward, with the exception of some high risk areas in northern Idaho and western Montana. There is also a pattern of decreasing climatic susceptibility from north to south in the Rocky Mountains. Our study provides an initial step for modeling the relationship between climate and BWA damage severity across the range of subalpine fir. We showed that September minimum temperature and a metric calculated as the maximum May temperature divided by total May precipitation were the best climatic predictors of BWA severity. Although winter cold temperatures and summer heat have been shown to influence BWA impacts in other locations, these

  6. Climate Risk Modelling of Balsam Woolly Adelgid Damage Severity in Subalpine Fir Stands of Western North America

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae (Ratzeburg) (Homoptera: Adelgidae)) (BWA) is a nonnative, invasive insect that threatens Abies species throughout North America. It is well established in the Pacific Northwest, but continues to move eastward through Idaho and into Montana and potentially threatens subalpine fir to the south in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. We developed a climatic risk model and map that predicts BWA impacts to subalpine fir using a two-step process. Using 30-year monthly climate normals from sites with quantitatively derived BWA damage severity index values, we built a regression model that significantly explained insect damage. The sites were grouped into two distinct damage categories (high damage and mortality versus little or no mortality and low damage) and the model estimates for each group were used to designate distinct value ranges for four climatic risk categories: minimal, low, moderate, and high. We then calculated model estimates for each cell of a 4-kilometer resolution climate raster and mapped the risk categories over the entire range of subalpine fir in the western United States. The spatial variation of risk classes indicates a gradient of climatic susceptibility generally decreasing from the Olympic Peninsula in Washington and the Cascade Range in Oregon and Washington moving eastward, with the exception of some high risk areas in northern Idaho and western Montana. There is also a pattern of decreasing climatic susceptibility from north to south in the Rocky Mountains. Our study provides an initial step for modeling the relationship between climate and BWA damage severity across the range of subalpine fir. We showed that September minimum temperature and a metric calculated as the maximum May temperature divided by total May precipitation were the best climatic predictors of BWA severity. Although winter cold temperatures and summer heat have been shown to influence BWA impacts in other locations, these

  7. Emergence, Seasonality, and Hybridization of Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), an Introduced Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in the Tennessee Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Gregory J; Grant, Jerome F; Rhea, James R; Mayfield, Albert E; Hakeem, Abdul; Lambdin, Paris L; Galloway, A B Lamb

    2016-09-29

    From 2010 through 2013, adult emergence and seasonality of Laricobius nigrinus Fender, an introduced predatory species native to western North America, as well as hybridization with the native species Laricobius rubidus (LeConte), were evaluated using emergence traps and beat-sheet sampling in areas of previous release against hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand. The shortest emergence period of adult L. nigrinus was 7 wk beginning 22 October 2010, and the longest emergence was 15 wk beginning 17 October 2012. Native L. rubidus also were collected from emergence traps placed on the ground surface and beat-sheet samples all 3 yr, with emergence of L. rubidus initiating later than L. nigrinus each season. Seasonality of both Laricobius species was similar across a 44-mo study period. Adult L. nigrinus were present from October through April, and larvae of Laricobius spp. were collected from February to May. The average number of L. nigrinus from emergence traps was significantly greater than the average number of beetles collected from beat-sheet samples in 2010, while the converse was observed during 2012. Hybridization between L. nigrinus and L. rubidus was documented from 10.75% of specimens collected during 2010 and 2011, indicating periodic interbreeding between the introduced and native species. These findings suggest emergence trapping may be a useful method to assess establishment, population densities, and seasonality of Laricobius species in areas of release to enhance their use in management of A. tsuage.

  8. Emergence, Seasonality, and Hybridization of Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), an Introduced Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in the Tennessee Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Gregory J; Grant, Jerome F; Rhea, James R; Mayfield, Albert E; Hakeem, Abdul; Lambdin, Paris L; Galloway, A B Lamb

    2016-12-01

    From 2010 through 2013, adult emergence and seasonality of Laricobius nigrinus Fender, an introduced predatory species native to western North America, as well as hybridization with the native species Laricobius rubidus (LeConte), were evaluated using emergence traps and beat-sheet sampling in areas of previous release against hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand. The shortest emergence period of adult L. nigrinus was 7 wk beginning 22 October 2010, and the longest emergence was 15 wk beginning 17 October 2012. Native L. rubidus also were collected from emergence traps placed on the ground surface and beat-sheet samples all 3 yr, with emergence of L. rubidus initiating later than L. nigrinus each season. Seasonality of both Laricobius species was similar across a 44-mo study period. Adult L. nigrinus were present from October through April, and larvae of Laricobius spp. were collected from February to May. The average number of L. nigrinus from emergence traps was significantly greater than the average number of beetles collected from beat-sheet samples in 2010, while the converse was observed during 2012. Hybridization between L. nigrinus and L. rubidus was documented from 10.75% of specimens collected during 2010 and 2011, indicating periodic interbreeding between the introduced and native species. These findings suggest emergence trapping may be a useful method to assess establishment, population densities, and seasonality of Laricobius species in areas of release to enhance their use in management of A. tsuage.

  9. Terpene chemistry of eastern hemlocks resistant to hemlock woolly adelgid.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, E Alexa; Elkinton, Joseph S; Casagrande, Richard A; Preisser, Evan L; Mayer, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have identified a small number of individual eastern hemlock trees that demonstrate relative resistance to the introduced sap-feeding insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid. Using gas chromatography, we compared concentrations of twenty-two terpenoids in susceptible and relatively resistant trees, both in the forest and in propagated cuttings in a common-garden setting. Terpenoid concentrations were higher in twig tissue of resistant versus susceptible trees, across six sampling dates and at both sites. These changes may be particularly important because the hemlock woolly adelgid feeds on twig tissue. Because the common-garden cuttings were free of herbivores, the higher terpenoid concentrations are interpreted as a constitutive defense. Increased levels of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes imply an overall increase in the input of carbon precursors to both terpenoid synthesis pathways.

  10. Catalog of the adelgids of the world (Hemiptera, Adelgidae)

    PubMed Central

    Favret, Colin; Havill, Nathan P.; Miller, Gary L.; Sano, Masakazu; Victor, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A taxonomic and nomenclatural Catalogue of the adelgids (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) is presented. Six family-group names are listed, five being synonyms of Adelgidae. Twenty-two genus-group names, of which nine are subjectively valid and in use, are presented with their type species, etymology, and grammatical gender. One hundred and six species-group names are listed, of which 70 are considered subjectively valid. PMID:26668546

  11. Factors affecting establishment and recovery of Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), an introduced predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) on eastern hemlock (Pinales: Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Hakeem, A; Grant, J F; Wiggins, G J; Lambdin, P L; Hale, F A; Buckley, D S; Rhea, J R; Parkman, J P; Taylor, G

    2013-12-01

    To reduce populations of hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), >500,000 Sasajiscymnus tsugae (Sasaji and McClure) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) have been released in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park since 2002. To determine factors affecting establishment and recovery of these predatory beetles, 65 single release sites were sampled using beat sheets from 2008 to 2012. Several abiotic and biotic factors were evaluated for their association with establishment and recovery of S. tsugae. Information on predatory beetle releases (location, year of release, number released, and season of release), topographic features (elevation, slope, Beers transformed aspect, and topographic relative moisture index), and temperature data (minimum and maximum temperatures 1 d after release and average minimum and maximum temperatures 7 d after release) were obtained from Great Smoky Mountains National Park personnel. These factors were evaluated using stepwise logistic regression and Pearson correlation. S. tsugae was recovered from 13 sites 2 to 10 yr after release, and the greatest number was recovered from 2002 release sites. Regression indicated establishment and recovery was negatively associated with year of release and positively associated with the average maximum temperature 7 d after release and elevation (generally, recovery increased as temperatures increased). Several significant correlations were found between presence and number of S. tsugae and year of release, season of release, and temperature variables. These results indicate that releases of S. tsugae should be made in warmer (≍10-25°C) temperatures and monitored for at least 5 yr after releases to enhance establishment and recovery efforts.

  12. Survival and Near Extinction of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) During Summer Aestivation in a Hemlock Plantation.

    PubMed

    Sussky, Elizabeth M; Elkinton, Joseph S

    2015-02-01

    Varying densities of the spring generation of the hemlock woolly adelgid were manipulated on 16 previously uninfested eastern hemlocks in an open-field plantation in Massachusetts. In contrast to experimentally created hemlock woolly adelgid populations in a forest, as reported previously, there was no evidence of density-dependent survival on a tree-wide basis in the plantation in the spring (progrediens) generation. There was, however, comparable density-dependent survival of settled crawlers and sexupara production when samples of the population were examined from branches with high density. Plantation hemlocks had 9.3 times more foliage and 10 times lower adelgid densities per cm than the forest hemlocks. These results show that density-dependent processes in the progrediens generation may only be evident when hemlock woolly adelgid density reaches a critical threshold. In the sistens generation that begins in midsummer, we counted a mean of 126 settled crawlers on marked branch on all 16 trees, but none of these adelgids survived the mid-summer aestivation phase, perhaps due to higher temperatures that were recorded in the plantation compared with a nearby hemlock forest, where 16% of the adelgids survived the aestivation phase. Whole tree counts of overwintering adelgids revealed that the adelgid populations had gone extinct on 13 out of the 16 trees. Mortality in the midsummer aestivation phase often exceeds overwintering mortality that has been widely thought to be the main factor that limits adelgid population growth and spread, particularly in northern states.

  13. Variation in plant defense against invasive herbivores: evidence for a hypersensitive response in eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis).

    PubMed

    Radville, Laura; Chaves, Arielle; Preisser, Evan L

    2011-06-01

    Herbivores can trigger a wide array of morphological and chemical changes in their host plants. Feeding by some insects induces a defensive hypersensitive response, a defense mechanism consisting of elevated H(2)O(2) levels and tissue death at the site of herbivore feeding. The invasive hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae ('HWA') and elongate hemlock scale Fiorinia externa ('EHS') feed on eastern hemlocks; although both are sessile sap feeders, HWA causes more damage than EHS. The rapid rate of tree death following HWA infestation has led to the suggestion that feeding induces a hypersensitive response in hemlock trees. We assessed the potential for an herbivore-induced hypersensitive response in eastern hemlocks by measuring H(2)O(2) levels in foliage from HWA-infested, EHS-infested, and uninfested trees. Needles with settled HWA or EHS had higher H(2)O(2) levels than control needles, suggesting a localized hypersensitive plant response. Needles with no direct contact to settled HWA also had high H(2)O(2) levels, suggesting that HWA infestation may induce a systemic defense response in eastern hemlocks. There was no similar systemic defensive response in the EHS treatment. Our results showed that two herbivores in the same feeding guild had dramatically different outcomes on the health of their shared host.

  14. Invasive insect effects on nitrogen cycling and host physiology are not tightly linked.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Lucy; Charles, Sherley; Sirulnik, Abby G; Tuininga, Amy R; Lewis, James D

    2015-02-01

    Invasive insects may dramatically alter resource cycling and productivity in forest ecosystems. Yet, although responses of individual trees should both reflect and affect ecosystem-scale responses, relationships between physiological- and ecosystem-scale responses to invasive insects have not been extensively studied. To address this issue, we examined changes in soil nitrogen (N) cycling, N uptake and allocation, and needle biochemistry and physiology in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L) Carr) saplings, associated with infestation by the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) (Adelges tsugae Annand), an invasive insect causing widespread decline of eastern hemlock in the eastern USA. Compared with uninfested saplings, infested saplings had soils that exhibited faster nitrification rates, and more needle (15)N uptake, N and total protein concentrations. However, these variables did not clearly covary. Further, within infested saplings, needle N concentration did not vary with HWA density. Light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Asat) declined by 42% as HWA density increased from 0 to 3 adelgids per needle, but did not vary with needle N concentration. Rather, Asat varied with stomatal conductance, which was highest at the lowest HWA density and accounted for 79% of the variation in Asat. Photosynthetic light response did not differ among HWA densities. Our results suggest that the effects of HWA infestation on soil N pools and fluxes, (15)N uptake, needle N and protein concentrations, and needle physiology may not be tightly coupled under at least some conditions. This pattern may reflect direct effects of the HWA on N uptake by host trees, as well as effects of other scale-dependent factors, such as tree hydrology, affected by HWA activity.

  15. Exotic herbivores on a shared native host: tissue quality after individual, simultaneous, and sequential attack.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; Orians, Colin M; Preisser, Evan L

    2012-08-01

    Plants in nature are often attacked by multiple enemies whose effect on the plant cannot always be predicted based on the outcome of individual attacks. We investigated how two invasive herbivores, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) (HWA) and the elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa) (EHS), alter host plant quality (measured as amino acid concentration and composition) when feeding individually or jointly on eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), an important long-lived forest tree that is in severe decline. The joint herbivore treatments included both simultaneous and sequential infestations by the two herbivores. We expected resource depletion over time, particularly in response to feeding by HWA. In contrast, HWA dramatically increased the concentration and altered the composition of individual free amino acids. Compared to control trees, HWA increased total amino acid concentration by 330% after 1 year of infestation. Conversely, EHS had a negligible effect when feeding individually. Interestingly, there was a marginally significant HWA × EHS interaction that suggests the potential for EHS presence to reduce the impact of HWA on foliage quality when the two species co-occur. We suggest indirect effects of water stress as a possible physiological mechanism for our results. Understanding how species interactions change the physiology of a shared host is crucial to making more accurate predictions about host mortality and subsequent changes in affected communities and ecosystems, and to help design appropriate management plans.

  16. Clinical Correlates of Hwa-Byung and a Proposal for a New Anger Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

  17. Development of a scale to assess Hwa-Byung, a Korean culture-bound syndrome, using the Korean MMPI-2.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Miguel E; Han, Kyunghee; Weed, Nathan C

    2006-09-01

    This study documents the development of an MMPI-2 scale designed to assess features of the Korean culture-bound syndrome, Hwa-Byung (HB). An American research team and psychiatric practitioners in Korea created an 18-item HB scale via rational item selection and psycho-metric refinement. Principal components analysis of scale items revealed four components, reflecting content domains of general health, gastrointestinal symptoms, hopelessness, and anger. This four-component solution applied well to both Korean men and women, but not to an American sample. Although some findings were encouraging, future studies employing clinical samples are needed to provide further validation of this scale.

  18. Hwa-Byung among middle-aged Korean women: family relationships, gender-role attitudes, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunha; Hogge, Ingrid; Ji, Peter; Shim, Young R; Lothspeich, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    We surveyed 395 Korean middle-aged women and examined how their perceptions of family relationships, gender-role attitudes, and self-esteem were associated with Hwa-Byung (HB; Korean anger syndrome). Our regression analyses revealed that participants who reported worse family relationship problems experienced more HB symptoms. Having profeminist, egalitarian attitudes toward women's gender roles was also associated with more HB symptoms. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with HB. Based on the results, we suggest that what is crucial to understanding HB is not how women evaluate themselves, but rather the level of stress caused by family relationship problems and their perception of women's roles.

  19. Density-Dependent Recruitment and Diapause in the Spring-Feeding Generation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Weed, Aaron S; Elkinton, Joseph S; Lany, Nina K

    2016-12-01

    Insect populations are affected by density-dependent and density-independent factors, and knowing how these factors affect long-term population growth is critical to pest management. In this study, we experimentally manipulated densities of the hemlock woolly adelgid on eastern and western hemlock trees in the western USA to evaluate the effects of density and host species on hemlock woolly adelgid crawler colonization. We then followed development of hemlock woolly adelgid on each hemlock species. Settlement of crawlers was strongly density-dependent and consistent between host species. In addition, a period of hot days that coincided with the settlement of hemlock woolly adelgid crawlers put our experimental and naturally occurring populations into diapause during April. Diapause resulted in one generation that yr in our experimental population. Analyses of long-term air temperature records indicated that diapause-inducing temperatures in April similar to those observed in our experiment have occurred rarely since 1909 and the frequency of these events has not changed over time. Prior work suggests that hemlock woolly adelgid completes two generations per yr in the western USA with a diapause occurring in the summer. This typical life history reflects the long-term influence of regional average seasonal temperature patterns on development and the timing of diapause-inducing temperatures. However, the timing of unseasonal weather, such as the hot days observed in our experiment, occasionally changes life history trajectories from this normal pattern. Our results show that density-dependent and density-independent factors have strong effects on generational mortality and life history of hemlock woolly adelgid that are important to its population dynamics and management.

  20. Density-Dependent Recruitment and Diapause in the Spring-Feeding Generation of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Weed, Aaron S; Elkinton, Joseph S; Lany, Nina K

    2016-09-30

    Insect populations are affected by density-dependent and density-independent factors, and knowing how these factors affect long-term population growth is critical to pest management. In this study, we experimentally manipulated densities of the hemlock woolly adelgid on eastern and western hemlock trees in the western USA to evaluate the effects of density and host species on hemlock woolly adelgid crawler colonization. We then followed development of hemlock woolly adelgid on each hemlock species. Settlement of crawlers was strongly density-dependent and consistent between host species. In addition, a period of hot days that coincided with the settlement of hemlock woolly adelgid crawlers put our experimental and naturally occurring populations into diapause during April. Diapause resulted in one generation that yr in our experimental population. Analyses of long-term air temperature records indicated that diapause-inducing temperatures in April similar to those observed in our experiment have occurred rarely since 1909 and the frequency of these events has not changed over time. Prior work suggests that hemlock woolly adelgid completes two generations per yr in the western USA with a diapause occurring in the summer. This typical life history reflects the long-term influence of regional average seasonal temperature patterns on development and the timing of diapause-inducing temperatures. However, the timing of unseasonal weather, such as the hot days observed in our experiment, occasionally changes life history trajectories from this normal pattern. Our results show that density-dependent and density-independent factors have strong effects on generational mortality and life history of hemlock woolly adelgid that are important to its population dynamics and management.

  1. Deer herbivory alters forest response to canopy decline caused by an exotic insect pest.

    PubMed

    Eschtruth, Anne K; Battles, John J

    2008-03-01

    Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) infestations have resulted in the continuing decline of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) throughout much of the eastern United States. While the initial impacts of HWA infestations have been documented, our understanding of forest response to this disturbance remains incomplete. HWA infestation is not occurring in isolation but within a complex ecological context. The role of potentially important interacting factors, such as elevated levels of white-tailed deer herbivory, is poorly understood. Despite the potential for herbivory to alter forest successional trajectories following a canopy disturbance, little is known about herbivory-disturbance interactions, and herbivory is rarely considered in assessing forest response to a co-occurring disturbance. We used repeated censuses of deer exclosures and paired controls (400 paired plots) to quantify the impact of deer herbivory on tree seedling species abundance in 10 eastern hemlock ravines that span a gradient in HWA-induced canopy decline severity. Use of a maximum likelihood estimation framework and information theoretics allowed us to quantify the strength of evidence for alternative models developed to estimate the impacts of herbivory on tree seedling abundance as a function of varying herbivore density and canopy decline severity. The exclusion of deer herbivory had marked impacts on the abundance of the studied seedling species: Acer rubrum, Acer saccharum, Betula lenta, Nyssa sylvatica, Quercus montana, and Tsuga canadensis. For all six species, the relationship between seedling abundance and deer density was either exponential or saturating. Although the functional form of the response varied among seedling species, the inclusion of both deer density and canopy decline severity measures consistently resulted in models with substantially greater support. Canopy decline resulted in higher proportional herbivory impacts and altered the ranking of herbivory impacts

  2. Resolving mantle and crustal contributions to ancient hydrothermal fluids: HeAr isotopes in fluid inclusions from Dae Hwa WMo mineralisation, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, F. M.; Burnard, P. G.; Taylor, R. P.; Turner, G.

    1995-11-01

    Helium and argon isotopes from fluid inclusions in individual colour zones (B, C, D, and E) of a large scheelite crystal from the 88 Ma Dae Hwa WMo deposit, South Korea, trace the source and history of the ore fluids. A gradual decrease of the fluid 3He/4He, 3He/36Ar, and 40Ar/36Ar from the core to the edge of the scheelite reflects the progressive dilution of a magmatic fluid by meteoric water and is consistent with the previously observed decrease of δ 18O H 2O and fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures ( Th) (Shelton et al., 1987). The covariation of fluid inclusion HeAr isotope systematics with δ 18O and Th defines a magmatic component with 3He/4He = 1-2 × 10 -6, 3He/36Ar > 0.01 , and 40Ar/36Ar > 1000 . Anomalously high helium and argon isotope ratios in zone D fluids represents undiluted magmatic noble gases. This may reflect local variation in the magmatic gas flux or gas loss due to boiling of the hydrothermal fluids prior to mixing with magmatic gas. Helium and argon isotope systematics constrain mantle and crustal components in the hydrothermal fluids. 40Ar/3He (4.5 × 10 4) are close to the mid-ocean ridge basalt value, implying that 40Ar is mantle in origin. Radiogenic isotope ratios of the mantle endmember ( 40Ar/4He = 0.69 ± 0.06 ) are similar to contemporary geothermal fluids. The coincidence of mantle-derived He and Ar in the fluids is strong evidence that mantle melting during Late Cretaceous subduction triggered the crystal melting responsible for granite formation. 40Ar/4He of the meteoric fluid (0.007 ± 0.001) is far lower than the crystal production ratio (0.2) implying an origin in crust below 200°C.

  3. Aerially released spray penetration of a tall coniferous canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aerial spray deposition project was designed to evaluate aerial application to an Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) canopy to combat Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae). This adelgid offers a difficult target residing in the forest canopy at the nodes of branchlets. The study collected 1680 ...

  4. Seasonal phenology and abundance of Leucopis argenticollis, Leucopis piniperda (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae), Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Deridontidae) and Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in the Pacific Northwest USA.

    PubMed

    Kohler, G R; Wallin, K F; Ross, D W

    2016-08-01

    Adelges tsugae infested western hemlock trees were sampled periodically for 1 year at two locations in Oregon and Washington to compare the phenology and abundance of three associated predators (Leucopis argenticollis, Leucopis piniperda, and Laricobius nigrinus) and their host. On each sample date, two 3-10 cm long terminal twigs were collected from each tree and brought to the laboratory to count all life stages of A. tsugae and the three predators. Peak larval abundance of Leucopis spp. and La. nigrinus coincided with the presence of A. tsugae adults and eggs. Leucopis spp. larvae were present for a much longer period of time than were La. nigrinus larvae. Furthermore, Leucopis spp. larvae were present during both the progrediens and sistens egg stages, while La. nigrinus larvae were only present during the progrediens egg stage. Overall, we collected 2.3-3.5 times more Leucopis spp. of all life stages than La. nigrinus. These results support the continued study of Leucopis spp. from the Pacific Northwest as biological control agents for A. tsugae in the Eastern USA.

  5. 75 FR 28232 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... alternatives to, the release of an insect, Laricobius osakensis, into the continental United States for use as... Service (APHIS) is proposing to issue permits for the release of an insect, Laricobius osakensis, into the... adelgid (HWA) infestations. HWA, an introduced insect pest destructive to forest and ornamental...

  6. Functional response of ungulate browsers in disturbed eastern hemlock forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Destefano, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Ungulate browsing in predator depleted North American landscapes is believed to be causing widespread tree recruitment failures. However, canopy disturbances and variations in ungulate densities are sources of heterogeneity that can buffer ecosystems against herbivory. Relatively little is known about the functional response (the rate of consumption in relation to food availability) of ungulates in eastern temperate forests, and therefore how “top down” control of vegetation may vary with disturbance type, intensity, and timing. This knowledge gap is relevant in the Northeastern United States today with the recent arrival of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) that is killing eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) and initiating salvage logging as a management response. We used an existing experiment in central New England begun in 2005, which simulated severe adelgid infestation and intensive logging of intact hemlock forest, to examine the functional response of combined moose (Alces americanus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) foraging in two different time periods after disturbance (3 and 7 years). We predicted that browsing impacts would be linear or accelerating (Type I or Type III response) in year 3 when regenerating stem densities were relatively low and decelerating (Type II response) in year 7 when stem densities increased. We sampled and compared woody regeneration and browsing among logged and simulated insect attack treatments and two intact controls (hemlock and hardwood forest) in 2008 and again in 2012. We then used AIC model selection to compare the three major functional response models (Types I, II, and III) of ungulate browsing in relation to forage density. We also examined relative use of the different stand types by comparing pellet group density and remote camera images. In 2008, total and proportional browse consumption increased with stem density, and peaked in logged plots, revealing a Type I response. In 2012

  7. Impact of an Invasive Insect and Plant Defense on a Native Forest Defoliator

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Claire M.; Vendettuoli, Justin F.; Orwig, David A.; Preisser, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carriére) in the United States is threatened by the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). The native hemlock looper (Lambdina fiscellaria Guenée) also appears to have played a role in previous population declines of this conifer. Although these two insects co-occur in much of the adelgid’s invaded range, their interactions remain unstudied. We assessed looper performance and preference on both uninfested and adelgid-infested foliage from adelgid-susceptible hemlocks, as well as on uninfested foliage from an eastern hemlock that is naturally adelgid-resistant. Larvae reared on uninfested foliage from adelgid-susceptible hemlocks experienced 60% mortality within the first two weeks of the experiment, and pupated at a lower weight than larvae fed adelgid-infested foliage. Despite differences in foliage source, this first look and strong pattern suggests that the hemlock looper performs better (pupates earlier, weighs more) on adelgid-infested foliage. In addition, trends suggested that larvae reared on foliage from the adelgid-resistant tree survived better, pupated earlier, and weighed more than in the other treatments. Larvae preferred adelgid-resistant over adelgid-susceptible foliage. Our results suggest that looper perform slightly better on adelgid-infested foliage and that plant resistance to xylem-feeding adelgid may increase susceptibility to foliar-feeding looper larvae. PMID:27649247

  8. Integrating spatial modeling, climate change scenarios, invasive species risk, and public perceptions to inform sustainable management in mixed hemlock-hardwood forests in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunckel, Kathleen Lois

    Introduced invasive pests and climate change are perhaps the most important and persistent catalyst for changes in forest composition. Infestation and outbreak of the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA, Adelges tsugae) along the eastern coast of the USA, has led to widespread loss of hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.), and a shift in tree species composition towards hardwood stands. Maine's forest dominated landscape and position at the leading edge of the HWA invasion provides an excellent opportunity to inform sustainable forest management (SFM) practices by using spatially explicit models to predict current tree species distribution, future range shifts, and solicit broad based feedback from Maine residents about forest management goals and preferences. This paper describes an interdisciplinary study of the ecological and social implications of changes in mixed northern hardwood forests due to disturbance. A two stage mapping approach was used where presence/absence of eastern hemlock is predicted with an overall accuracy of 85% and the continuous distribution (% basal area) was predicted with an accuracy of 83%. Given the importance of climate variables in predicting eastern hemlock, forecasts of future range shifts are possible using data generated through climate scenarios. The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Downscaled Climate Projections (NEX-DCP30) dataset was used to model future shifts in the geographic range of eastern hemlock throughout the state of Maine. The results clearly describe a significant shift in eastern hemlock range with gains in total geographic area that is suitable habitat. Sustaining forest systems across the landscape requires not only ecological knowledge, but also the integration of multiple socio-economic criteria as well, including data obtained through broad-based public participation approaches. Here, 3000 Maine residents were surveyed and asked how they: (1) value local forests; (2) view forest management goals and threats to forest

  9. Future species composition will affect forest water use after loss of eastern hemlock from southern Appalachian forests.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Steven; Ford, Chelcy R; Vose, James M

    2013-06-01

    Infestation of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) with hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA, Adelges tsugae) has caused widespread mortality of this key canopy species throughout much of the southern Appalachian Mountains in the past decade. Because eastern hemlock is heavily concentrated in riparian habitats, maintains a dense canopy, and has an evergreen leaf habit, its loss is expected to have a major impact on forest processes, including transpiration (E(t)). Our goal was to estimate changes in stand-level E(t) since HWA infestation, and predict future effects of forest regeneration on forest E(t) in declining eastern hemlock stands where hemlock represented 50-60% of forest basal area. We used a combination of community surveys, sap flux measurements, and empirical models relating sap flux-scaled leaf-level transpiration (E(L)) to climate to estimate the change in E(t) after hemlock mortality and forecast how forest E(t) will change in the future in response to eastern hemlock loss. From 2004 to 2011, eastern hemlock mortality reduced annual forest E(t) by 22% and reduced winter E(t) by 74%. As hemlock mortality increased, growth of deciduous tree species--especially sweet birch (Betula lenta L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), and the evergreen understory shrub rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum L.)--also increased, and these species will probably dominate post-hemlock riparian forests. All of these species have higher daytime E(L) rates than hemlock, and replacement of hemlock with species that have less conservative transpiration rates will result in rapid recovery of annual stand E(t). Further, we predict that annual stand E(t) will eventually surpass E(t) levels observed before hemlock was infested with HWA. This long-term increase in forest E(t) may eventually reduce stream discharge, especially during the growing season. However, the dominance of deciduous species in the canopy will result in a

  10. Comparison of Soil Geochemistry and Nitrogen Cycling beneath Eastern Hemlock and Black Birch Regrowth Forest, West Whately, MA, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Blanchett, S.; Sweezy, T.; Mansen, S.

    2011-12-01

    Ecological forest successions associated with introduction of invasive species, human disturbance, and climate change may alter biogeochemical cycles within forested New England watersheds. Spread of the invasive insect hemlock wooly adelgid (Adelges tsungae, HWA) to eastern North America is causing decline and mortality of the eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis). To evaluate whether changes in nutrient cycling could be altered by this disturbance, we investigated differences in soil geochemistry in secondary growth forest located at the MacLeish Field Station, Whately, MA, where HWA occurrences recently have been observed. Eastern hemlock on this property was selectively logged 20 years ago, with black birch regrowth succeeding hemlock. We hypothesize that such a succession could repeat should hemlock on the property experience mortality due to the HWA. Between 2010-2011, we measured soil pH, exchangeable acidity (Al3+ and H+), exchangeable base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+), and nitrogen mineralization rates of soil cores collected beneath a hemlock stand and beneath an adjacent, younger black birch stand that succeeded hemlock following logging. Although soil pH of organic horizons between hemlock and black birch are both acidic (pH<4.5), the concentration of exchangeable base cations in the organic horizon beneath black birch is approximately 1.5 times higher than hemlock, reflecting its higher total cation exchange capacity. These results suggest that the acidity typically associated with soils that support hemlock forests has not been neutralized by black birch regrowth, and soil acidity may be stabilized by exchangeable Al3+, which is similar for the two sites. More base cations may be becoming available within the cation exchange pool of the black birch soil, possibly reflecting variation in inputs of base cations from throughfall and leaf litter. Net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates determined for incubated soil cores, measured between

  11. Development of a Hyperspectral Index for Detection of Initial Water Stress in Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, M. J.; Rock, B. N.

    2008-12-01

    Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) is an invasive insect pathogen that is causing significant mortality in existing eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis Carriere) stands across the Northeastern USA. Unchecked, A. tsugae will continue to decimate hemlock forests, initiating irreversible ecological alterations. Hemlock survival is dependent upon site conditions, where trees in mesic environments tend to decline at slower rates than trees in xeric ones. In addition, A. tsugae has been reported to restrict xylem flow in hemlock needles, potentially causing foliar drying. There has been little research on the ability of remote sensing tools to detect eastern hemlock water stress, a key factor in resistance to A. tsugae. In this study, 2007 hemlock needles were collected from 10 sites across the northeast and subjected to simulated water stress in order to determine the applicability of multispectral and hyperspectral indices in diagnosing hemlock water stress. Samples were dried in an oven at 65° C in two time groups: 60 minutes and 300 minutes. Spectral scans by a Visible Infrared Intelligent Spectrometer (VIRIS) in addition to percent water loss measurements were made at regular intervals throughout the drying period. Results include the rapid formation of reflectance peaks at 530 nm, 590 nm, and 644 nm which may be used to create hyperspectral water stress indices tailored to hemlocks that are extremely accurate in predicting both initial (R644/R669 r2=.773, p<.0001; Normalized R644/R669 r2=.801, p<.0001) and long-term (R644/R669 r2=.864, p<.0001; Normalized R644/R669 r2=.889, p<.0001) water stress. These findings can provide a significant tool in current management efforts of the HWA, by identifying both hemlock stands under environmental water stress, which are likely prone to infestation, in addition to regions under the initial stages of infestation. As a result, conservationists and forest managers will be afforded an opportunity to direct control

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana).

    PubMed

    Josserand, S A; Potter, K M; Echt, C S; Nelson, C D

    2008-11-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 31 polymorphic di- and trinucleotide microsatellite marker loci for Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Englem.). In addition, primer pairs for 16 loci amplified scoreable alleles in six other Tsuga species. In eastern North America, both Carolina hemlock and eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carr.) populations are declining due to infestation by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae. The markers described here should enhance population genetic studies of hemlocks, providing valuable information for conserving and restoring these important forest tree species.

  13. Arboreal spiders in eastern hemlock.

    PubMed

    Mallis, Rachael E; Rieske, Lynne K

    2011-12-01

    Eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière] is a foundation species in forests of eastern North America that plays a key role in ecosystem function. It is highly susceptible to the exotic invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand), which is causing widespread hemlock mortality. We surveyed the spider communities of eastern hemlock and deciduous canopies over 2 yr, collecting over 4,000 spiders from 21 families. We found that eastern hemlock canopies harbored a more abundant, rich, and diverse spider community than did deciduous canopies. Five spider families were present in our hemlock collections that were absent from the deciduous collections, including Mysmenidae, Theridiosomatidae, Mimetidae, Lycosidae, and Agelenidae. In hemlock canopies there were 4× the number of web builders, consisting primarily of the Tetragnathidae and Araneidae, than active hunters, consisting primarily of the Anyphaenidae and the Salticidae. Ours is the first in depth study of the spider community in eastern hemlock. Spider abundance in hemlock canopies suggest that they may play a role regulating herbivore populations, and could possibly affect the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid, either through direct consumption of the adelgids themselves or through interactions with classical biological control agents.

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid in eastern hemlock in the southern Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Dilling, Carla; Lambdin, Paris; Grant, Jerome; Rhea, Rusty

    2010-04-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an exotic insect species dramatically reducing populations of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrieré, throughout the eastern United States. Systemic imidacloprid is one of the primary chemicals used to successfully control infestations of the hemlock woolly adelgid. The concentration levels for this systemic insecticide present in the sap of eastern hemlocks were evaluated from three strata within the canopy over a two year time span. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were conducted every three months posttreatment to assess imidacloprid concentration within the sap. The effect of application timing (fall versus spring) and application method (soil drench, soil injection, and tree injection) on the translocation of imidacloprid throughout the canopy, and the quantity of imidacloprid translocated in the sap of eastern hemlock branches and the terminal twig and needle tissue was determined. Concentration levels progressively declined from the bottom strata to the top strata of the canopy. This trend was consistent in all chemically treated trees. Tree injections provided the lowest concentration and the most nonuniform distribution of imidacloprid throughout the canopy. The highest insecticide concentrations within the tree across all strata over the two year period were consistently associated with the soil drench method followed by the soil injection method. Imidacloprid concentrations peaked between month 9 and 12 posttreatment, and then declined; however, at two years posttreatment, soil drench and soil injected trees contained concentrations reported as being effective for control of the hemlock woolly adelgid.

  15. Numerical simulation of the flow field from a radially lobed nozzle and validation via HWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    With a constant need for higher performance and efficiency in engineering (particularly aerospace) applications, lobed nozzles have experienced a regained interest in the recent past, owing to their superior mixing capabilities. Although previous experimental studies (Hu et al. 1999, Hu et al. 2008) have analyzed the flow field from lobed nozzles and made conjectures about the physics and flow mechanisms involved, the absence of a ``complete'' 3D dataset elicits unanswered questions. The present numerical study is intended as a complement to an existing experimental (single component hot wire anemometry) investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (N. Amini et al., 2012). A full 3D URANS simulation of the lobed nozzle is carried out, initially validated with experimental data, and then used to examine the stream-wise vortices and obtain a visual corroboration of the structure formation and breakup mechanism as described earlier (Hu et al., 2008). Further, the study takes a close look at the nature of the instabilities which trigger and enhance the mixing process in lobed nozzles in order to determine the precise role of the lobes and eventually obtain more effective mixing in industrial applications.

  16. Avenging the General Sherman: The 1871 Battle of Kang Hwa Do

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    mission. Koreans could be seen on the shore near fishing villages and small hamlets as the ships and launches made their way cautiously up the river ...visit from the Russians) resulted in several thousand Korean Catholics being killed or driven from their homes. All of the priests were killed except...had a crew of approximately 21 men and was heavily armed. Upon entering the mouth of the Taedong River (which runs into Pyongyang), the ship’s

  17. Host Genetics and Environment Drive Divergent Responses of Two Resource Sharing Gall-Formers on Norway Spruce: A Common Garden Analysis.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, E Petter; Iason, Glenn R; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Whitham, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    A central issue in the field of community genetics is the expectation that trait variation among genotypes play a defining role in structuring associated species and in forming community phenotypes. Quantifying the existence of such community phenotypes in two common garden environments also has important consequences for our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions at the community level. The existence of community phenotypes has not been evaluated in the crowns of boreal forest trees. In this study we address the influence of tree genetics on needle chemistry and genetic x environment interactions on two gall-inducing adelgid aphids (Adelges spp. and Sacchiphantes spp.) that share the same elongating bud/shoot niche. We examine the hypothesis that the canopies of different genotypes of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) support different community phenotypes. Three patterns emerged. First, the two gallers show clear differences in their response to host genetics and environment. Whereas genetics significantly affected the abundance of Adelges spp. galls, Sacchiphantes spp. was predominately affected by the environment suggesting that the genetic influence is stronger in Adelges spp. Second, the among family variation in genetically controlled resistance was large, i.e. fullsib families differed as much as 10 fold in susceptibility towards Adelges spp. (0.57 to 6.2 galls/branch). Also, the distribution of chemical profiles was continuous, showing both overlap as well as examples of significant differences among fullsib families. Third, despite the predicted effects of host chemistry on galls, principal component analyses using 31 different phenolic substances showed only limited association with galls and a similarity test showed that trees with similar phenolic chemical characteristics, did not host more similar communities of gallers. Nonetheless, the large genetic variation in trait expression and clear differences in how community members respond to host

  18. Host Genetics and Environment Drive Divergent Responses of Two Resource Sharing Gall-Formers on Norway Spruce: A Common Garden Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, E. Petter; Iason, Glenn R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Whitham, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    A central issue in the field of community genetics is the expectation that trait variation among genotypes play a defining role in structuring associated species and in forming community phenotypes. Quantifying the existence of such community phenotypes in two common garden environments also has important consequences for our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions at the community level. The existence of community phenotypes has not been evaluated in the crowns of boreal forest trees. In this study we address the influence of tree genetics on needle chemistry and genetic x environment interactions on two gall-inducing adelgid aphids (Adelges spp. and Sacchiphantes spp.) that share the same elongating bud/shoot niche. We examine the hypothesis that the canopies of different genotypes of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) support different community phenotypes. Three patterns emerged. First, the two gallers show clear differences in their response to host genetics and environment. Whereas genetics significantly affected the abundance of Adelges spp. galls, Sacchiphantes spp. was predominately affected by the environment suggesting that the genetic influence is stronger in Adelges spp. Second, the among family variation in genetically controlled resistance was large, i.e. fullsib families differed as much as 10 fold in susceptibility towards Adelges spp. (0.57 to 6.2 galls/branch). Also, the distribution of chemical profiles was continuous, showing both overlap as well as examples of significant differences among fullsib families. Third, despite the predicted effects of host chemistry on galls, principal component analyses using 31 different phenolic substances showed only limited association with galls and a similarity test showed that trees with similar phenolic chemical characteristics, did not host more similar communities of gallers. Nonetheless, the large genetic variation in trait expression and clear differences in how community members respond to host

  19. Differential response by hardwood and deciduous stands in New England forests to climate change and insect-induced mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, J. William; Wofsy, Steven C.; Orwig, David A.; Williams, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Forests in the northeastern United States include large areas dominated by mosaics of oak/maple and hemlock stands. Often the hardwood dominated stands include a significant cohort of hemlock saplings. However, long-term survival of hemlock in this region is threatened by Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (HWA), an invasive insect that is fatal to eastern hemlock. The northern limit of HWA is affected in part by winter minimum temperature and warmer winters are enabling northward expansion of HWA infestation. At the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts, two long-term eddy flux towers are measuring carbon exchange in a >100 year old hardwood stand since 1992 (EMS- Ha1) and in a 100-200 year old hemlock stand (Ha2) since 2004. The flux measurements are complemented by vegetation dynamics plots. Carbon exchange at the two sites has distinctly different seasonality. The hardwood site has a shorter carbon uptake period, but higher peak fluxes, while the hemlock stand has a long carbon uptake period extending from spring thaw until early winter freeze. Some contribution from the evergreen hemlock in the understory is evident before canopy greenup at the EMS tower and spring and fall carbon uptake rates have been increasing and contribute in part to a trend towards larger annual carbon uptake at this site. Carbon uptake by hemlock increases with warmer temperatures in the spring and fall transition. Adelgids have reached the hemlock stand near Ha2 and have been widely distributed in the canopy since spring of 2012. The hemlock canopy in that stand is thinning and net carbon uptake and evapotranspiration have been decreasing since 2012. Adelgids have also been observed in scattered stands near the Ha1 tower, but as of 2015 the trees are still healthy. Because hemlocks stands have different seasonality and provide a distinct soil and sub-canopy light environment, their mortality and replacement by hardwood species will have significant impacts on forest dynamics, carbon balance, and

  20. Web orientation and prey resources for web-building spiders in eastern hemlock.

    PubMed

    Mallis, Rachael E; Rieske, Lynne K

    2010-10-01

    We examined the arthropod community on eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr, in the context of its role in providing potential prey items for hemlock-associated web-weaving spiders. Using sticky traps simulating spider webs, we evaluated what prey items are available to web-weaving spiders in eastern hemlock based on web orientation (horizontal versus vertical) and cardinal direction. We found that the overwhelming majority (>70%) of prey items available to spiders in hemlock canopies were Diptera. Psocoptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera comprised most of the remaining potential prey. A significant direction × orientation interaction, and greater trap capture in some direction-orientation combinations, suggests that spiders might locate their webs in eastern hemlock canopies for thermoregulatory purposes, ultimately optimizing prey capture. We also evaluated these findings in the context of hemlock infestation by the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand. The adelgid is a sedentary insect with a mobile crawler stage that provides a readily available, easily obtained food source for predators in hemlock canopies. However, an abundance of alternative prey will affect within canopy spider distribution and the potential intensity with which spiders consume these prey. Understanding the response of spiders to potential prey availability is essential to understanding the trophic interactions involving these predators and their potential for influencing herbivore populations.

  1. Influence of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.) on fish community structure and function in headwater streams of the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Bennett, R.M.; Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.; Smith, D.R.; Lemarie, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forest of the eastern U.S. are in decline due to invasion by the exotic insect hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). Aquatic biodiversity in hemlock ecosystems has not been documented; thus the true impact of the infestation cannot be assessed. We compared ichthyofaunal assemblages and trophic structure of streams draining hemlock and hardwood forests by sampling first- and second-order streams draining 14 paired hemlock and hardwood stands during base flows in July 1997 at the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Over 1400 fish of 15 species and 7 families were collected, but hemlock and hardwood streams individually harbored only one to four species. Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were two to three times as prevalent in hemlock than hardwood streams. Insectivorous fishes occurred in significantly higher proportion in streams of hardwood (0.90) than hemlock (0.46) stands, while piscivores occurred more often in hemlock (0.85) than hardwood (0.54) stands. Functional (trophic) diversity of fishes in hemlock and second-order streams was numerically greater than that of hardwood and first-order streams. Species composition also differed by stream order and terrain type. Biodiversity is threatened at several levels within hemlock ecosystems at risk to the hemlock woolly adelgid in eastern U.S. forests.

  2. Spatial and temporal distribution of residues of imidacloprid and its insecticidal 5-hydroxy and olefin and metabolites in eastern hemlock (Pinales: Pinaceae) in the southern Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Coots, Carla; Lambdin, Paris; Grant, Jerome; Rhea, Rusty

    2013-12-01

    Widespread mortality of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière, resulting from infestation by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), has occurred throughout the native range of eastern hemlock within the eastern United States. Imidacloprid, a systemic insecticide, is one of the primary chemical compounds used to control hemlock woolly adelgid in both urban and, in a limited manner, in natural forest environments. The metabolism of imidacloprid in eastern hemlock produces 12 metabolites; two of these, imidacloprid 5-hydroxy and imidacloprid olefin, are considered toxicologically important metabolites. However, little is known about the persistence of these metabolites in eastern hemlock in the southern Appalachians. Concentrations ofimidacloprid, olefin, and 5-hydroxy were quantified by using HPLC/MS/MS techniques. Over the 3-yr study, concentrations of imidacloprid and consequent 5-hydroxy and olefin were highest in trees treated with a soil injection in the spring. Imidacloprid and 5-hydroxy concentrations in sap were highest at 12 mo posttreatment and in tissue at 15 mo posttreatment. Imidacloprid was detected through 36 mo posttreatment and 5-hydroxy was detected through 15 mo posttreatment. Olefin concentrations in both sap and tissue were highest at 36 mo posttreatment and were detected in high concentrations through 36 mo posttreatment. Concentrations of imidacloprid were highest in the bottom stratum of the canopy and lowest in the top stratum. Concentrations of olefin and 5-hydroxy were highest in the top stratum and lowest in the bottom stratum.

  3. Biomechanical Properties of Hemlocks: A Novel Approach to Evaluating Physical Barriers of the Plant–Insect Interface and Resistance to a Phloem-Feeding Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Ayayee, Paul; Yang, Fuqian; Rieske, Lynne K.

    2014-01-01

    Micromechanical properties that help mediate herbivore access may be particularly important when considering herbivorous insects that feed with piercing-sucking stylets. We used microindentation to quantify the micromechanical properties of hemlock, Tsuga spp., to quantify the hardness of the feeding site of the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae. We measured hardness of the hemlock leaf cushion, the stylet insertion point of the adelgid, across four seasons in a 1 y period for four hemlock species growing in a common garden, including eastern, western, mountain, and northern Japanese hemlocks. Leaf cushion hardness was highest in the fall and winter and lowest in summer for all species. Northern Japanese hemlock had relatively greater hardness than the remaining species. Our data contributes an additional perspective to the existing framework within which greater susceptibility and subsequent mortality of eastern hemlocks is observed. The potential application of microindentation to understanding the nature and relevance of plant mechanical defenses in plant–herbivore interactions is also demonstrated and highlighted. PMID:26462689

  4. Large wood dynamics in central Appalachian hemlock headwater ravines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Soltesz, P.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Large wood (LW) is a critical component to forested mountain headwater streams contributing significantly to geomorphic and ecological processes. The character of LW is a function of valley recruitment processes that influence LW entering the channel and instream retention processes that influence LW transport through the channel reach. In the central Appalachian Mountains, US, LW dynamics in eastern hemlock-dominated ravines may change due to the invasive insect Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (HWA). However, quantitative LW studies are lacking for this region, which are necessary for effective management of projected HWA-associated change. We examined LW dynamics across central Appalachian headwater streams to identify 1) the current state of LW load, 2) the relative environmental factors that influence LW load, 3) potential signs of HWA impact on LW dynamics, and 4) functional grouping patterns of LW pieces in these systems. In a field study that included 24 sites in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, mean wood density was 36 pieces/100m ± 21 and mean wood volume was 5.6 m3/100m ± 3.5. Most pieces were less than bankfull width suggesting high transportability, but large pieces (>10m) contributed significantly to wood volume, jam formation, and geomorphic function. Central Appalachian LW load was on the lower end of mountain headwater streams, but comparable to the northeastern US. A mixture of recruitment and retention processes influence wood dynamics, but channel retention processes better explain jam dynamics. Specifically, higher wood load was associated with lower forest basal area, smaller channel dimensions, and lower hydraulic driving forces, which is consistent with other studies. We did not detect a significant influence on wood load as a result of HWA infestation of ~20 years, which may reflect a lag period between tree mortality, toppling, and LW load. Pieces clustered in three functional groups of 1) larger, stable pieces that store sediment, stabilize the

  5. Biophysical characteristics of Adelges tsugae feeding sites on six hemlock (Tsuga) species and a hybrid: implications for resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characteristics of the plant surface significantly affect host-plant selection by phytophagous insects. Surface morphology of six hemlock species (Tsuga spp.) and a hybrid was investigated using low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Observations focused on trichome presence and placement a...

  6. An Introduction to Human Resource Development in Taiwan, R.O.C. = Jong Hwa Min Gwo Ren Li Tz Yuan Fa Jaan Jyan Jieh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Chen, Ya-Yan

    In Taiwan, human resource development (HRD) is defined as the systematic education, training, and development employers provide for their employees as well as organizational development for corporations. A history of HRD development indicates that in the 1960s, the government began to implement planning measures for HRD in business and industry;…

  7. Community response of insects associated with eastern hemlock to imidacloprid and horticultural oil treatments.

    PubMed

    Dilling, Carla; Lambdin, Paris; Grant, Jerome; Rhea, Rusty

    2009-02-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is an invasive species reducing the populations of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis L. Carrière, throughout the eastern United States. Systemic imidacloprid and horticultural oil are the primary chemicals used to control infestations of this invasive pest; however, the impact of these two chemicals on nontarget canopy insects is unknown. This study was initiated in November 2005 to assess the effects of (1) imidacloprid soil drench, (2) imidacloprid soil injection, (3) imidacloprid tree injections, and (4) horticultural oil applications on multiple levels of organization (composition, overall specimen abundance and species richness, guild specimen abundance and species richness, and individual species) within the phytophagous and transient canopy insect community. Community composition differed significantly among treatments based on analysis of similarity. Mean species richness and specimen abundance were significantly reduced by one or more treatments. Soil drench applications significantly reduced species richness for the detritivore and phytophaga guilds. Furthermore, specimen abundance for species in the detritivore, fungivore, phytophaga, scavenger, and transient phytophaga guilds was significantly lower in the soil drench treatment. This trend was consistent in all insect guilds examined, with the exception of the hematophaga guild that was not significantly lower than for species on the control trees. Of the 293 species documented to be associated with eastern hemlocks, 33 species were found to be directly effected by one or more of the chemical treatments.

  8. Assessing the potential impacts to riparian ecosystems resulting from hemlock mortality in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Scott W; Tankersley, Roger; Orvis, Kenneth H

    2009-08-01

    Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is spreading across forests in eastern North America, causing mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carr.) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Engelm.). The loss of hemlock from riparian forests in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) may result in significant physical, chemical, and biological alterations to stream environments. To assess the influence of riparian hemlock stands on stream conditions and estimate possible impacts from hemlock loss in GSMNP, we paired hardwood- and hemlock-dominated streams to examine differences in water temperature, nitrate concentrations, pH, discharge, and available photosynthetic light. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify stream pairs that were similar in topography, geology, land use, and disturbance history in order to isolate forest type as a variable. Differences between hemlock- and hardwood-dominated streams could not be explained by dominant forest type alone as forest type yields no consistent signal on measured conditions of headwater streams in GSMNP. The variability in the results indicate that other landscape variables, such as the influence of understory Rhododendron species, may exert more control on stream conditions than canopy composition. The results of this study suggest that the replacement of hemlock overstory with hardwood species will have minimal impact on long-term stream conditions, however disturbance during the transition is likely to have significant impacts. Management of riparian forests undergoing hemlock decline should, therefore, focus on facilitating a faster transition to hardwood-dominated stands to minimize long-term effects on water quality.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Imidacloprid Within the Crown of Eastern Hemlock

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Richard M.; Lagalante, Anthony; Jones, Jonathan; Cook, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Billings, Anthony A.; Park, Yong-Lak

    2017-01-01

    Systemic imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an exotic pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriére in the United States. This study was conducted to 1) determine the effect of treatment timing (spring vs. fall) and application method (trunk injection vs. soil injection) on the spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid within the crown of A. tsugae-free eastern hemlock using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2) compare ELISA to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the detection of imidacloprid in xylem fluid, and 3) determine the concentration of imidacloprid in leaf tissue using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection methods. Xylem fluid concentrations of imidacloprid were found to be significantly higher for spring applications than for fall applications and for trunk injections than soil injections in the first year posttreatment. A total of 69% of samples analyzed by ELISA gave 1.8 times higher concentrations of imidacloprid than those found by GC/MS, leading to evidence of a matrix effect and overestimation of imidacloprid in xylem fluid by ELISA. A comparison of the presence of imidacloprid with xylem fluid and in leaf tissue on the same branch showed significant differences, suggesting that imidacloprid moved intermittently within the crown of eastern hemlock. PMID:28130463

  10. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Imidacloprid Within the Crown of Eastern Hemlock.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Richard M; Lagalante, Anthony; Jones, Jonathan; Cook, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Billings, Anthony A; Park, Yong-Lak

    2017-01-01

    Systemic imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an exotic pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriére in the United States. This study was conducted to 1) determine the effect of treatment timing (spring vs. fall) and application method (trunk injection vs. soil injection) on the spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid within the crown of A. tsugae-free eastern hemlock using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2) compare ELISA to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the detection of imidacloprid in xylem fluid, and 3) determine the concentration of imidacloprid in leaf tissue using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection methods. Xylem fluid concentrations of imidacloprid were found to be significantly higher for spring applications than for fall applications and for trunk injections than soil injections in the first year posttreatment. A total of 69% of samples analyzed by ELISA gave 1.8 times higher concentrations of imidacloprid than those found by GC/MS, leading to evidence of a matrix effect and overestimation of imidacloprid in xylem fluid by ELISA. A comparison of the presence of imidacloprid with xylem fluid and in leaf tissue on the same branch showed significant differences, suggesting that imidacloprid moved intermittently within the crown of eastern hemlock.

  11. Hydraulic responses to environmental perturbations in Tsuga canadensis and Betula lenta.

    PubMed

    Daley, Michael J; Phillips, Nathan G; Pettijohn, Justin C; Hadley, Julian

    2008-09-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L). Carr.) is a late-successional species found across the northeastern United States of America that is currently threatened by the exotic pest, hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). Because whole-tree physiological characteristics may scale to influence ecosystem processes, we considered whole-tree hydraulic controls in eastern hemlock and the replacement species black birch (Betula lenta L.). Through a series of misting perturbations, whole-tree resistances (R), capacitances (C) and time constants (tau) were determined from time series sap flux data in eastern hemlock and black birch. Black birch trees responded more rapidly to environmental perturbations than eastern hemlock. Utilizing the step function after applied treatments, whole-tree tau ranged between 9.4 and 24.8 min in eastern hemlock trees compared with 5.9 to 10.5 min in black birch. Species was not a significant predictor of R or C when controlling for tree size. In both species, R decreased with sapwood area and C increased. Our tau results indicate that the loss and replacement of eastern hemlock by black birch will decrease the lag between transpiration and absorption of water from the soil and potentially alter the diurnal pattern of carbon and water uptake.

  12. Controls on Nitrogen Retention and Loss in Urban and Rural Forest Ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    (Adelges tsugae Annand), an introduced aphid-like insect from Japan, threatens hemlock stands throughout the eastern United States. The hemlock woolly adelgid was first reported in forests of the eastern United States in the early 1950s and is currently leading to mortality of eastern hemlock trees from Georgia to Massachusetts. We found that rates of nitrogen inputs to the forest floor were 4-5 times greater, and rates of nitrogen losses via leachate were more than ten times greater, at the Arnold Arboretum compared to Harvard Forest. Our results also show that current management regimes used to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, such as salvage cutting, may be reducing nitrogen losses in urban areas due to rapid regrowth of vegetation and the associated uptake of nitrogen by those plants. In contrast, cutting of trees in rural areas may be leading to proportionately greater losses of nitrogen in those sites, though the total magnitude of nitrogen lost is still smaller than in urban sites. Results of this study suggest that the combination of the hemlock woolly adelgid, atmospheric nitrogen inputs and management practices lead to changes in the nitrogen cycle within eastern hemlock forest ecosystems.

  13. Influences of Forest Tree Species and Early Spring Temperature on Surface-Atmosphere Transfers of Water and Carbon in the Northeastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, J. L.; Kuzeja, P.; Mulcahy, T.; Singh, S.

    2008-12-01

    Influences of Forest Tree Species and Early Spring Temperature on Surface-Atmosphere Transfers of Water and Carbon in the Northeastern U.S. Julian Hadley, Paul Kuzeja, Safina Singh and Thomas Mulcahy Transfers of water vapor from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere affect regional hydrology, weather and climate over short time scales, and forest-atmosphere CO2 exchange affects global climate over long timescales. To better understand these effects for forests dominated by two very different tree species, we measured forest-atmosphere water vapor and CO2 transfers by the eddy flux technique to at two sites in central Massachusetts USA for three years. Average annual evapotranspiration (ET) for a young deciduous forest dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra L., the most abundant tree species in the area), was about 430 mm or 25 percent greater than for a coniferous forest dominated by 100 to 230 year old eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.). The difference in ET was most pronounced in July and August when the deciduous forest lost about 50 percent more water by ET in the average year (192 mm for oak forest versus 130 mm for hemlock). These data indicate that if deciduous trees with similar physiology to red oak replace hemlocks, summertime ET will increase while summer streamflow, soil water content and the extent of year- round wetlands will decrease. Increased summertime ET should also lead to slightly higher regional atmospheric humidity and precipitation. Hemlock-to-deciduous forest conversion has occurred from North Carolina to southern New England and is continuing northward as a lethal insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) continues to kill hemlocks. Average annual carbon storage for the old hemlock forest in our study was about 3.3 Mg C/ha, nearly equal to the average for the deciduous forest, 3.5 Mg C/ha. This calls into question ecological theory that predicts large declines in the rate of carbon uptake for old forests, and

  14. Foundation species loss affects vegetation structure more than ecosystem function in a northeastern USA forest

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, David A.; Barker Plotkin, Audrey A.; Davidson, Eric A.; Lux, Heidi; Savage, Kathleen E.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of foundation tree species rapidly alters ecological processes in forested ecosystems. Tsuga canadensis, an hypothesized foundation species of eastern North American forests, is declining throughout much of its range due to infestation by the nonnative insect Adelges tsugae and by removal through pre-emptive salvage logging. In replicate 0.81-ha plots, T. canadensis was cut and removed, or killed in place by girdling to simulate adelgid damage. Control plots included undisturbed hemlock and mid-successional hardwood stands that represent expected forest composition in 50–100 years. Vegetation richness, understory vegetation cover, soil carbon flux, and nitrogen cycling were measured for two years prior to, and five years following, application of experimental treatments. Litterfall and coarse woody debris (CWD), including snags, stumps, and fallen logs and branches, have been measured since treatments were applied. Overstory basal area was reduced 60%–70% in girdled and logged plots. Mean cover and richness did not change in hardwood or hemlock control plots but increased rapidly in girdled and logged plots. Following logging, litterfall immediately decreased then slowly increased, whereas in girdled plots, there was a short pulse of hemlock litterfall as trees died. CWD volume remained relatively constant throughout but was 3–4× higher in logged plots. Logging and girdling resulted in small, short-term changes in ecosystem dynamics due to rapid regrowth of vegetation but in general, interannual variability exceeded differences among treatments. Soil carbon flux in girdled plots showed the strongest response: 35% lower than controls after three years and slowly increasing thereafter. Ammonium availability increased immediately after logging and two years after girdling, due to increased light and soil temperatures and nutrient pulses from leaf-fall and reduced uptake following tree death. The results from this study illuminate ecological processes

  15. Foundation species loss affects vegetation structure more than ecosystem function in a northeastern USA forest.

    PubMed

    Orwig, David A; Barker Plotkin, Audrey A; Davidson, Eric A; Lux, Heidi; Savage, Kathleen E; Ellison, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    Loss of foundation tree species rapidly alters ecological processes in forested ecosystems. Tsuga canadensis, an hypothesized foundation species of eastern North American forests, is declining throughout much of its range due to infestation by the nonnative insect Adelges tsugae and by removal through pre-emptive salvage logging. In replicate 0.81-ha plots, T. canadensis was cut and removed, or killed in place by girdling to simulate adelgid damage. Control plots included undisturbed hemlock and mid-successional hardwood stands that represent expected forest composition in 50-100 years. Vegetation richness, understory vegetation cover, soil carbon flux, and nitrogen cycling were measured for two years prior to, and five years following, application of experimental treatments. Litterfall and coarse woody debris (CWD), including snags, stumps, and fallen logs and branches, have been measured since treatments were applied. Overstory basal area was reduced 60%-70% in girdled and logged plots. Mean cover and richness did not change in hardwood or hemlock control plots but increased rapidly in girdled and logged plots. Following logging, litterfall immediately decreased then slowly increased, whereas in girdled plots, there was a short pulse of hemlock litterfall as trees died. CWD volume remained relatively constant throughout but was 3-4× higher in logged plots. Logging and girdling resulted in small, short-term changes in ecosystem dynamics due to rapid regrowth of vegetation but in general, interannual variability exceeded differences among treatments. Soil carbon flux in girdled plots showed the strongest response: 35% lower than controls after three years and slowly increasing thereafter. Ammonium availability increased immediately after logging and two years after girdling, due to increased light and soil temperatures and nutrient pulses from leaf-fall and reduced uptake following tree death. The results from this study illuminate ecological processes underlying

  16. A multi-scale conceptual model of fire and disease interactions in North American forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, J. M.; Kreye, J. K.; Sherriff, R.; Metz, M.

    2013-12-01

    One aspect of global change with increasing attention is the interactions between irruptive pests and diseases and wildland fire behavior and effects. These pests and diseases affect fire behavior and effects in spatially and temporally complex ways. Models of fire and pathogen interactions have been constructed for individual pests or diseases, but to date, no synthesis of this complexity has been attempted. Here we synthesize North American fire-pathogen interactions into syndromes with similarities in spatial extent and temporal duration. We base our models on fire interactions with three examples: sudden oak death (caused by the pathogen Phytopthora ramorum) and the native tree tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus); mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and western Pinus spp.; and hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) on Tsuga spp. We evaluate each across spatial (severity of attack from branch to landscape scale) and temporal scales (from attack to decades after) and link each change to its coincident effects on fuels and potential fire behavior. These syndromes differ in their spatial and temporal severity, differentially affecting windows of increased or decreased community flammability. We evaluate these models with two examples: the recently emergent ambrosia beetle-vectored laurel wilt (caused by the pathogen Raffaelea lauricola) in native members of the Lauraceae and the early 20th century chestnut blight (caused by the pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica) that led to the decline of American chestnut (Castanea dentata). Some changes (e.g., reduced foliar moisture content) have short-term consequences for potential fire behavior while others (functional extirpation) have more complex indirect effects on community flammability. As non-native emergent diseases and pests continue, synthetic models that aid in prediction of fire behavior and effects will enable the research and management community to prioritize mitigation efforts to realized effects.

  17. Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. mortality will impact hydrologic processes in southern Appalachian forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ford, Chelcy R; Vose, James M

    2007-06-01

    Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) is one of the principal riparian and cove canopy species in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Throughout its range, eastern hemlock is facing potential widespread mortality from the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). If HWA-induced eastern hemlock mortality alters hydrologic function, land managers will be challenged to develop management strategies that restore function or mitigate impacts. To estimate the impact that the loss of this forest species will have on the hydrologic budget, we quantified and modeled transpiration over a range of tree sizes and environmental conditions. We used heat dissipation probes, leaf-level gas-exchange measurements, allometric scaling, and time series modeling techniques to quantify whole-tree and leaf-level transpiration (E(L)) of eastern hemlock. We monitored trees ranging from 9.5 to 67.5 cm in diameter along a riparian corridor in western North Carolina, USA during 2004 and 2005. Maximum rates of daily tree water use varied by diameter and height, with large trees transpiring a maximum of 178-186 kg H2O x tree(-1) x d(-1). Values of E(L) could be predicted from current and lagged environmental variables. We forecasted eastern hemlock E(L) for inventoried stands and estimated a mean annual transpiration rate of 63.3 mm/yr for the hemlock component, with 50% being transpired in the winter and spring. In typical southern Appalachian stands, eastern hemlock mortality would thus reduce annual stand-level transpiration by approximately 10% and reduce winter and spring stand-level transpiration by approximately 30%. Eastern hemlock in the southern Appalachians has two distinct ecohydrological roles: an evergreen tree that maintains year-round transpiration rates and a riparian tree that has high transpiration rates in the spring. No other native evergreen in the southern Appalachians will likely fill the ecohydrological role of eastern hemlock if widespread mortality occurs. With the loss of

  18. Effects of forest die-off on hydrologic processes in southern Appalachian forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, J.; Ford, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Forests in the southern Appalachian region of the eastern U.S. have been impacted by numerous disturbances over the past century. Many of these disturbances have resulted in non-random species losses. For example, in the early 1900s, American chestnut (Castenea dentata) was decimated by the chestnut blight. Severe droughts in the 1980s and 1990s resulted in significant southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis, SPB) outbreaks; and, most of the native pines (Pinus rigida) were killed. These same droughts resulted in a pulse of mortality of older red oaks and extensive SPB infestation of white pine (Pinus strobus) plantations. In the 2000s, the introduction of the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) resulted in widespread mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis). Linking hydrologic responses to partial or complete changes in forest conditions due to die-off is especially challenging in the eastern U.S. because high vegetation diversity and substantial differences in tree-level water use makes it difficult to generalize or predict responses. Gauged watersheds and sapflow monitoring across multiple tree species at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western NC provides a unique opportunity to quantify the impacts of large-scale forest die-off on hydrologic processes. Here, we provide three examples of our efforts to quantify and predict impacts. First, we analyzed long-term streamflow data from WS17, a 53 year old white pine plantation, where approximately 15% of the watershed was killed by SPB in the late 1990s. Second, we examined the effects of losing an individual species (i.e., loss of eastern hemlock from HWA) using sapflow, long-term permanent plot data, and models to scale from the individual tree to the watershed. Third, sapflow data from 11 forest canopy species were used to evaluate the potential impacts of losses of individual species on stand transpiration. Annual streamflow responses are exponentially related to decreases in forest cover (e.g., from

  19. Effect of hemlock and deciduous forest canopy on chemistry of throughfall, West Whately, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Guswa, A. J.; McNicholas, J.; Mehter, S.; Spence, C.

    2009-12-01

    Ecological forest successions associated with climate change and human disturbance may alter chemical loads to forested New England watersheds. Spread of the invasive insect hemlock wooly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) to eastern North America is causing decline and mortality of the eastern hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis). To begin an evaluation of whether changes in nutrient cycling and rainfall amounts could be altered by this disturbance, we investigated differences in chemistry and volume of rain and throughfall between predominately hemlock and deciduous tree stands in a secondary growth forest located in West Whately, Massachusetts. From 3 June to 25 July 2009, we sampled 14 rain events from two plots: one dominated by eastern hemlock (LAI = 5.6 with 64% of stems as hemlock) and the other dominated by a mix of deciduous species (LAI = 4.7 with 47% of stems as maple and 42% of basal area accounted as white ash). Plots consisted of a 5 x 6 meter grid of 30 collectors for measuring throughfall volume. Half of these were combined into a composite sample and analyzed for pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+), anions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42+), dissolved silica, and specific conductance. Throughfall results were compared against precipitation sampled from a collector located in a nearby field. Over the period of the study, rainfall totaled 311 mm. Throughfall amounted to 242 mm (78%) in the hemlock plot and 276 mm (89%) in the deciduous plot. On an event-by-event basis, the fraction of precipitation that appears as throughfall increases with amount. Throughfall from both hemlock and deciduous plots showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher pH, ANC, DOC, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations than open precipitation, suggesting that the canopy counteracts some acidity in rain and adds organic carbon and nutrients to throughfall. ANC is positively correlated with K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and DOC, indicating that cation exchange between

  20. Evaluation of Electrical Characteristics and Trap-State Density in Bottom-Gate Polycrystalline Thin Film Transistors Processed with High-Pressure Water Vapor Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    This paper discusses electrical characteristics and trap-state density in polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) used in bottom-gate poly-Si thin film transistors (TFTs) processed with high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA). The threshold voltage uniformity of the HWA-processed TFTs is improved by 42% for N-channel and 38% for P-channel TFTs in terms of standard deviation, and carrier mobility is enhanced by 10% or greater for both N- and P-channel TFTs than those TFTs processed conventionally. Subthreshold swing is also improved by HWA, showing that HWA postannealing is effective for improving the Si/SiO2 interface of the bottom-gate TFTs. Two types of TFTs having different poly-Si crystallinities are examined to investigate carrier transport in poly-Si processed by HWA postannealing. The evaluation of trap-state density for the two types of poly-Si reveals that HWA postannealing is more efficient for N-channel than for P-channel TFTs. Furthermore, HWA postannealing is more effective for poly-Si with high crystallinity to improve TFT characteristics. The analysis of the trap-state distributions and the activation energy of TFT drain current indicate that HWA deactivates dangling bonds highly localized at poly-Si grain boundaries (GBs). Thus, HWA postannealing effects can be interpreted by a GB barrier potential model similar to that applied to conventional hydrogenation.

  1. 78 FR 34640 - Certain Lined Paper Products From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ...; Shanghai Lian Li Paper Products Co., Ltd. (``Lian Li'') made no shipments of subject merchandise during the POR and will retain its separate rate status; and Hwa Fuh Plastics Co., Ltd./Li Teng Plastics (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. (``Hwa Fuh/Li Teng'') could not be contacted so review of this company will...

  2. 78 FR 65274 - Certain Lined Paper Products From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Final Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Products Co., Ltd./Denmax Plastic Stationery Factory (Leo/Denmax), Shanghai Lian Li Paper Products Co., Ltd. (Lian Li), and Hwa Fuh Plastics Co., Ltd./Li Teng Plastics (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. (Hwa Fuh/Li Teng). For... plastic front and rear covers made of a blended polyolefin plastic material joined by 300 denier...

  3. Structural Validation of the Holistic Wellness Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charlene; Applegate, E. Brooks; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The Holistic Wellness Assessment (HWA) is a relatively new assessment instrument based on an emergent transdisciplinary model of wellness. This study validated the factor structure identified via exploratory factor analysis (EFA), assessed test-retest reliability, and investigated concurrent validity of the HWA in three separate samples. The…

  4. Ecological implications of Laurel Wilt infestation on Everglades Tree Islands, southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a long history of introduced pests attacking native forest trees in the United States (Liebhold and others, 1995; Aukema and others, 2010). Well-known examples include chestnut blight that decimated the American chestnut (Castanea dentata), an extremely important tree in the eastern United States, both as a food source for wildlife and humans and for the wood; Dutch elm disease that attacks native elms (Ulmus spp.), including those commonly planted as shade trees along city streets; and the balsam wooly adelgid (Adelges piceae), an insect that is destroying Fraser firs (Abies fraseri) in higher elevations of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Laurel wilt, a fungal disease transmitted by the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus), is a 21st-century example of an introduced forest pest that attacks native tree species in the laurel family (Lauraceae) (Mayfield, 2007; Hulcr and Dunn, 2011).The introduction of laurel wilt disease has been traced to the arrival of an Asian ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus) at Port Wentworth, Georgia, near Savannah, in 2002, apparently accidently introduced in wooden shipping material (Mayfield, 2007). Within the next 2 years, it was determined that the non-native wood-boring insect was the vector of an undescribed species of fungus, responsible for killing large numbers of red bay (Persea borbonia) trees in the surrounding area. Dispersing female redbay ambrosia beetles drill into live trees and create tunnels in the wood. They carry with them fungal spores in specialized organs called mycangia at the base of each mandible and sow the spores in the tunnels they excavate. The fungus, since named Raffaelea lauricola (Harrington and others, 2008), is the food source for adults and larvae. The introduction of Raffaelea lauricola causes the host plant to react in such a way as to block the vascular tissue, resulting in loss of water conduction, wilt, and death (Kendra and others, 2013).Although first seen in red bay

  5. Effects of Forest Succession on Exchangeable Cation Concentrations and Nitrogen Mineralization Rates in Soils Following Logging of Eastern Hemlock Forest, Whately, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Sweezy, T.; Zukswert, J. M.; Dwyer, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Ecological forest successions associated with invasive species and human disturbance may alter biogeochemical cycles within New England forests. Spread of the invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) to eastern North America is causing mortality of the eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), prompting salvage logging. Regrowth by deciduous hardwood trees is often observed. To evaluate whether changes in nutrient cycling could be altered by forest succession, we investigated exchangeable cation chemistry and nitrogen mineralization rates for soil in a mature, eastern hemlock forest and in a juvenile black birch (Betula lenta) forest in western MA. Eastern hemlock on this property was selectively logged 20 years ago, with black birch regrowth succeeding hemlock. We measured soil pH, exchangeable acidity (Al3+ and H+), exchangeable base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+), and nitrogen mineralization rates of organic and mineral horizons for 7 incubation periods between May 2011 - July 2012. We also measured the cation exchange capacity and nitrogen mineralization rates of soils from May - July 2012 (2 incubations) in a mature deciduous forest composed primarily of black birch. At each field site, 7 soil cores were collected. Soil horizons (organic and mineral) were separated and homogenized, and 3 replicates of each composite sample were analyzed for soil geochemistry. Organic soils within the juvenile black birch plot (BB) exhibit a low pH (4.3) similar to hemlock organic soils (HEM, pH=4.2). Surprisingly, exchangeable Al3+—the dominant cation in both plots—is significantly greater in organic soils at BB than at HEM (p<.001), and base saturation is less at BB (29%) than at HEM (46%, p<0.001) due to less Ca2+. There are no significant differences in the exchangeable cation chemistry of the mineral horizons at both sites, suggesting that the acidity difference of organic matter is not due to different soil mineralogy. In comparison, organic soil at the

  6. Comparison of throughfall chemistry in a mature hemlock forest and an early-successional deciduous forest resulting from salvage logging in Whately, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukswert, J. M.; Rhodes, A. L.; Dwyer, C. H.; Sweezy, T.

    2012-12-01

    Removal of foundation species as a result of disturbance events such as exotic species invasions can alter community composition and ecosystem function. The current hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) infestation in eastern North America that threatens the eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), a foundation species, has motivated salvage logging efforts. Ecological succession resulting from salvage logging of hemlock would eventually produce a deciduous hardwood forest. The chemistry of throughfall beneath a mature hemlock forest canopy is expected to be more acidic than throughfall from a mature deciduous forest canopy because hemlock foliage releases more organic acids and fewer base cations. The chemical composition of throughfall during the early successional transition from hemlock to deciduous is less understood. We hypothesize that throughfall chemistry in a deciduous forest consisting primarily of juvenile trees may be more similar to direct precipitation because leaf area index is smaller. Differences between hemlock throughfall and direct precipitation may be larger due to the denser canopy of these mature trees. We compared the chemical composition of precipitation, hemlock throughfall, and black birch throughfall for 26 precipitation events from 4 March to 30 July 2012. The black birch (Betula lenta) forest patch resulted from salvage logging of hemlocks twenty years ago at the MacLeish Field Station in Whately, MA. From the three plots we measured the volume of water collected and pH, acid neutralizing capacity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and concentrations of cations (Ca2+, K+, Na+, Mg2+, NH4+), anions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-), and dissolved silica. Precipitation totaled 405 mm during the course of the study. Throughfall totaled 347 mm in the black birch plot and 315 mm in the hemlock plot. The proportion of precipitation passing through the forest canopy was smaller in hemlock throughfall than black birch throughfall during small precipitation events

  7. Taiwan Earthquake Damage Index Sin Mei Nga* and Masataka Andob a* Department of Geology, Chinese Culture University, No. 55, Hwa-Kang Road, Yang-Ming-Shan, Taipei 11114, Taiwan b Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, 128, Sec2, Academia Road, Nangang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan * Corresponding author. Tel.: +886 (02) 28 61 05 11 ext.26133 fax: +886 (02) 28 61 49 59 E-mail: wsw2@ulive.pccu.edu.tw or sin_mei_josephine_ng@hotmail.com

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S.

    2012-12-01

    Taking advantage of a previous study and twelve-year, free-field strong motion data in Taiwan, a preliminary, five-level earthquake damage index is newly proposed: I-No (no damage), II-Very Light, III-Light, IV-Moderate, and V-Heavy. For index I, PGA and PGV are, respectively, <62.5 gal and <11 cm/s. Likewise, for index II, PGA is ≧62.5 and ≦187.5 gal; but, PGV is ≧11 and ≦35 cm/s. Similarly, PGA is ≧187.5 and ≦325 gal; but, PGV is ≧35 and ≦55 cm/s for index III. The corresponding PGA and PGV, for index IV, are ≧325 and ≦450 gal and ≧55 and ≦75 cm/s. Finally, for index V, PGA and PGV are respectively >450 gal and >75 cm/s. Ten damaging seismic events in the past twelve years are redefined using this new earthquake damage index, with the devastating Chi-Chi earthquake and one non-damaging event as reference earthquakes. This newly proposed index depicts seismic hazard of these earthquakes with higher accuracy when compared to the existing intensity scale in Taiwan region. For further analysis, Japan earthquakes are also plotted as references.

  8. Development of Artificial Haircell Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    fixture that is rigidly attached to the base of the water tank with a suction cup, and is entirely submerged in water. All testing of the HWA was performed...the dipole. The packaged HWA was mounted on a test fixture that is rigidly attached to the base of the water tank through a suction cup. Since this... testing showed that polyurethanes withstand long-term exposure to temperatures commonly encountered in MEMS processing, with weight loss greater than 1

  9. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    SCC susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 C (statically loaded U-bend specimens) is dependent on microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures (optical metallography). In CWA tubing materials, one crack dominated and grew to a visible size. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (<925 C) and final anneals at 1010-1065 C developed both large cracks (similar to those in CWA materials) and small intergranular microcracks detectable only by destructive metallography. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (>980 C) and a high-temperature final anneal (>1040 C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks in all specimens. These materials did not develop large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 C for 7h), which reduces or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in high temperature processed HWA materials. Conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were done on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behavior. Major difference between high-temperature HWA and low-temperature HWA and CWA materials was that the high temperature processing and final annealing produced predominantly ``semi-continuous`` dendritic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides along grain boundaries with a minimal amount of intragranular carbides. Lower temperature processing produced intragranular M7C3 carbides, with less intergranular carbides.

  10. 77 FR 46373 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... predators similar to that found in areas in which it is native is needed in order to provide more efficient... provide a predator that the spring generation of hemlock woolly adelgid currently lacks in the...

  11. Social Red Bull: Exploring Energy Relationships in a School District Leadership Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Alan J.; Liou, Yi-Hwa; Brown, Chris

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Alan J. Daly, Yi-Hwa Liou, and Chris Brown explore the idea of positive affective arousal through "energy exchange relationships" within a district leadership team. Education leaders have long been expected to be not only effective leaders but also motivators who can move change efforts forward. Although there has been…

  12. Aperiodicity Correction for Rotor Tip Vortex Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Wire Anemometry (HWA), see, e.g., Refs. 1–5. Further- more, for such point measurement techniques...techniques such LDV and Hot - 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is

  13. Training for Whom? For What? Reflection on the Lack of Training Opportunities for Immigrant Garment Workers. NALL Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Roxana

    Unlike many recent immigrants who entered Canada as highly trained professionals in their countries of origin, most of Canada's immigrant garment workers are working-class women with little education. The Apparel Textile Action Committee (ATAC) and Homeworker's Association (HWA) are among the bodies that were established to assist immigrant…

  14. 76 FR 57951 - Certain Lined Paper Products From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Final Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Lined Paper Products From the People's Republic of China: Notice of... request an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on lined paper from the People's Republic... review the following four companies: Shanghai Lian Li Paper Products Co., Ltd. (``Lian Li''), Hwa...

  15. Flow Dynamics In Eccentrically Rotating Flasks Used For Dispersant Effectiveness Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of dispersant effectiveness used for oil spills is commonly done using tests conducted in laboratory flasks. We used a Hot Wire Anemometer (HWA) to characterize mixing dynamics in the Swirling Flask (SF) and the Baffled Flask (BF), the latter is being considered b...

  16. Lives of Notable Asian Americans: Business, Politics, Science. The Asian American Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragaza, Angelo

    The lives of 12 Asian Americans prominent in business, politics, or science are profiled for young readers. Included are biographical sketches of: (1) Ellison Onizuka, astronaut; (2) Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Nobel prize-winning astrophysicist; (3) Constance (Connie) Yu-Hwa Chung, television broadcaster; (4) Daniel Inouye, U.S. senator from…

  17. Individual and Institutional Influences on Faith-Based Health and Wellness Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of the US population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBO). Health and wellness activities (HWAs) within FBOs have great potential for reach, though the factors influencing faith-based HWA are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine individual faith leader and institutional influences on HWAs offered…

  18. Comparison of pneumotachography and anemometery for flow measurement during mechanical ventilation with volatile anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R; Herrmann, Jacob; McNeil, John S; Kaczka, David W

    2016-11-14

    Volatile anesthetics alter the physical properties of inhaled gases, such as density and viscosity. We hypothesized that the use of these agents during mechanical ventilation would yield systematic biases in estimates of flow ([Formula: see text]) and tidal volume (V T) for two commonly used flowmeters: the pneumotachograph (PNT), which measures a differential pressure across a calibrated resistive element, and the hot-wire anemometer (HWA), which operates based on convective heat transfer from a current-carrying wire to a flowing gas. We measured [Formula: see text] during ventilation of a spring-loaded mechanical test lung, using both the PNT and HWA placed in series at the airway opening. Delivered V T was estimated from the numerically-integrated [Formula: see text]. Measurements were acquired under baseline conditions with room air, and during ventilation with increasing concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane. We also evaluated a simple compensation technique for HWA flow, which accounted for changes in gas mixture density. We found that discrepancies in estimated V T between the PNT and HWA occurred during ventilation with isoflurane (6.3 ± 3.0%), sevoflurane (10.0 ± 7.3%), and desflurane (25.8 ± 17.2%) compared to baseline conditions. The magnitude of these discrepancies increased with anesthetic concentration. A simple compensation factor based on density reduced observed differences between the flowmeters, regardless of the anesthetic or concentration. These data indicate that the choice and concentration of anesthetic agents are primary factors for differences in estimated V T between the PNT and HWA. Such discrepancies may be compensated by accounting for alterations in gas density.

  19. Brain MAPS: an automated, accurate and robust brain extraction technique using a template library

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kelvin K.; Barnes, Josephine; Modat, Marc; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Fox, Nick C.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Whole brain extraction is an important pre-processing step in neuro-image analysis. Manual or semi-automated brain delineations are labour-intensive and thus not desirable in large studies, meaning that automated techniques are preferable. The accuracy and robustness of automated methods are crucial because human expertise may be required to correct any sub-optimal results, which can be very time consuming. We compared the accuracy of four automated brain extraction methods: Brain Extraction Tool (BET), Brain Surface Extractor (BSE), Hybrid Watershed Algorithm (HWA) and a Multi-Atlas Propagation and Segmentation (MAPS) technique we have previously developed for hippocampal segmentation. The four methods were applied to extract whole brains from 682 1.5T and 157 3T T1-weighted MR baseline images from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. Semi-automated brain segmentations with manual editing and checking were used as the gold-standard to compare with the results. The median Jaccard index of MAPS was higher than HWA, BET and BSE in 1.5T and 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests), and the 1st-99th centile range of the Jaccard index of MAPS was smaller than HWA, BET and BSE in 1.5T and 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests). HWA and MAPS were found to be best at including all brain tissues (median false negative rate ≤ 0.010% for 1.5T scans and ≤ 0.019% for 3T scans, both methods). The median Jaccard index of MAPS were similar in both 1.5T and 3T scans, whereas those of BET, BSE and HWA were higher in 1.5T scans than 3T scans (p < 0.05, all tests). We found that the diagnostic group had a small effect on the median Jaccard index of all four methods. In conclusion, MAPS had relatively high accuracy and low variability compared to HWA, BET and BSE in MR scans with and without atrophy. PMID:21195780

  20. Emission Properties of Porous Silicon Electron Emitters Formed by Pulsed Anodic Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. B.; Zhao, W.; Fan, J. L.; Wu, S. L.; Zhang, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed by pulsed anodic etching and subsequently processed by electrochemical oxidization (ECO) and high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA), and their morphologies and oxidation degrees were analyzed. The electron emitters based on these PS layers were fabricated, and their emission properties were investigated. The experimental results show that a PS layer formed by pulsed anodic etching has a better pore-diameter homogeneity in the longitudinal direction, and it can obtain good oxidation quality more easily by the combined treatment of ECO and HWA. The as-formed PS electron emitters have better emission properties in comparison with those based on PS layers prepared by constant-current anodic etching.

  1. Corrections on LIFPA velocity measurements in microchannel with moderate velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Khan, Jamil; Reifsnider, Ken; Wang, Guiren

    2015-02-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA) has been developed in order to measure velocity fluctuations of the unsteady micro electrokinetic turbulent flows in microfluidics. The statistical errors of LIFPA measurement, because of 3-D flows and Taylor's hypothesis (compared with local Taylor's hypothesis Pinton and Labbé in J Phys II 4:1461-1468, 1994), are theoretically estimated and compared to hot-wire anemometer (HWA) measurement that is used for conventional turbulence measurement. The correction factor in the direction parallel to the laser beam is estimated, and the influence of directional correction factors of LIFPA is also investigated. It is found that in our investigation, the error due to Taylor's hypothesis is negligible. The influence of 3-D flows on the first derivative variance of velocity fluctuations in LIFPA is smaller than that in HWA measurement.

  2. A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    AD__ _ _ _ Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8471 TITLE: A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sara S. Strom...Molecular Epidmeiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate DAMD17-98-1-8471 Cancer Susceptibility 6. AUTHOR(S) Sara S. Strom, Ph.D. Sue-Hwa Lin 7. PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in

  3. Development and Characterization of New Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polymers and Fullerene Nanoparticles for High Performance Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-14

    Nanoparticles for High Performance Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Jan. 14,2011 Name of Principal Investigators: Kung-Hwa Wei - e-mail address : khwei...donor-π-bridge-acceptor side chains for high efficiency polymer solar cells . Different from the commonly used linear D-A conjugated polymers, the...Development and Characterization of New Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polymers and Fullerene Nanoparticles for High Performance Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

  4. Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks Anthony Cowley, Hwa-Chow Hsu, Camillo J. Taylor GRASP Laboratory University of...network, distributed computing , software design 1. INTRODUCTION As efforts to field sensor networks, or teams of mobile robots, become more...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modular Programming Techniques for Distributed Computing Tasks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  5. World History Workshop (1983).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Ultimately what Luther and Calvin sought to do was stress the idea that man’s spiritual salvation depends far more on God than on man himself. It is a ...III. COURSE MATERIALS A . Syllabus. B. Textbooks. 1. Richard Goff, Walter Moss, Janice Terry, Jim-Hwa Upshur, The Twentieth Century, A Brief Global...angry Martin Luther nailed 95 theocrats to a church door. Theologically, Luthar was into reorientation mutation. Calvinism was the most convenient

  6. Taiwan - AFOSR Nanoscience Initiative Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-06

    University • 04 x, Synthesis and Study of Water-soluble Two- photon Absorptive Fullerene Compounds, Dr. Long Y. Chiang, National Taiwan University 15...Block Copolymer/Quantum Dot Nanocomposites for Optical Application, Kung-Hwa Wei, National Chiao Tung University – 044069, 3D Photonic Crystals Build...quantum nanojets – structures, dynamics and energetic, Huei-huang Chiu, National Cheng Kung University 19 Agenda • Overview • Research Funding • WOS

  7. The Basic Research Manager for the Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-18

    nano-electronics/nano-magnetics - nano- photonics & nano-optics ENERGETIC MATERIALS COMPACT POWER GENERATION AND STORAGE BIO-INSPIRED CONCEPTS...Nanocomposites for Optical Application, Kung-Hwa Wei, National Chiao Tung University – 044069, 3D Photonic Crystals Build Up By Self-Organization Of...Nanospheres, Yu-Wen Chen, National Central University • Modeling and Simulation (foundation) – 034039, Fundamental study on quantum nanojets – structures

  8. Waste ashes for use in agricultural production: I. Liming effect, contents of plant nutrients and chemical characteristics of some metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Yamasaki, S; Nanzyo, M

    2002-02-04

    The chemical characteristics of 89 municipal waste ashes, including food scrap ash (FSA), animal waste ash (AWA), horticulture waste ash (HWA), sewage sludge ash (SSA) and incinerator bottom ash (IBA), from various locations in Japan were examined with the aim of evaluating their suitability for use in agriculture. Although the waste ashes came from different sources and consisted of various materials, the gross elemental composition was similar. Acid neutralization capacity (liming effect) for the waste ashes was equivalent to 10-30% of CaO and followed the sequence SSA > IBA > AWA > FSA > HWA. Average P concentrations for the five types of waste ashes ranged from 10 to 29 g kg(-1) and average K concentrations ranged from 14 to 63 g kg(-1), respectively. Metal contents in the waste ashes were compared with levels in Japanese agricultural soils. K in the waste ashes was 1.3-6 times higher and Ca was 3-12 times higher; contents of the other metals in FSA, AWA and HWA were generally less than five times higher, but Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Pb in SSA or IBA were approximately 10-200 times higher than those in soils. Moreover, the ceiling amounts of waste ashes that may be applied to main Japanese agricultural soils were calculated by using soil contamination standards for Cu. Water solubility of P and metals in the waste ashes were also examined.

  9. Effects of Random Environment on a Self-Organized Critical System: Renormalization Group Analysis of a Continuous Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kakin, P. I.

    2016-02-01

    We study effects of the random fluid motion on a system in a self-organized critical state. The latter is described by the continuous stochastic model proposed by Hwa and Kardar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62: 1813 (1989)]. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form ∝ δ(t - t')/k⊥d-1+ξ , where k⊥ = |k⊥| and k⊥ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to a certain preferred direction - the d-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [Commun. Math. Phys. 131: 381 (1990)]. Using the field theoretic renormalization group we show that, depending on the relation between the exponent ξ and the spatial dimension d, the system reveals different types of large-scale, long-time scaling behaviour, associated with the three possible fixed points of the renormalization group equations. They correspond to ordinary diffusion, to passively advected scalar field (the nonlinearity of the Hwa-Kardar model is irrelevant) and to the "pure" Hwa-Kardar model (the advection is irrelevant). For the special case ξ = 2(4 - d)/3 both the nonlinearity and the advection are important. The corresponding critical exponents are found exactly for all these cases.

  10. Diversification of genes for carotenoid biosynthesis in aphids following an ancient transfer from a fungus.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Eva; Moran, Nancy A

    2012-01-01

    The pea aphid genome was recently found to harbor genes for carotenoid biosynthesis, reflecting an ancestral transfer from a fungus. To explore the evolution of the carotene desaturase gene family within aphids, sequences were retrieved from a set of 34 aphid species representing numerous deeply diverging lineages of aphids and analyzed together with fungal sequences retrieved from databases. All aphids have at least one copy of this gene and some aphid species have up to seven, whereas fungal genomes consistently have a single copy. The closest relatives of aphids, adelgids, also have carotene desaturase; these sequences are most closely related to those from aphids, supporting a shared origin from a fungal to insect transfer predating the divergence of adelgids and aphids. Likewise, all aphids, and adelgids, have carotenoid profiles that are consistent with their biosynthesis using the acquired genes of fungal origin rather than derivation from food plants. The carotene desaturase was acquired from a fungal species outside of Ascomycota or Basidiomycota and closest to Mucoromycotina among sequences available in databases. In aphids, an ongoing pattern of gene duplication is indicated by the presence of both anciently and recently diverged paralogs within genomes and by the presence of a high frequency of pseudogenes that appear to be recently inactivated. Recombination among paralogs is evident, making analyses of patterns of selection difficult, but tests of selection for a nonrecombining region indicates that duplications tend to be followed by bouts of positive selection. Species of Macrosiphini, which often show color polymorphisms, typically have a larger number of desaturase copies relative to other species sampled in the study. These results indicate that aphid evolution has been accompanied by ongoing evolution of carotenogenic genes, which have undergone duplication, recombination, and occasional positive selection to yield a wide variety of carotenoid

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Environmental Applications of Hybrid Materials Based on Humic Acid Obtained by the Sol-Gel Route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lílian Karla de; Molina, Eduardo Ferreira; Moura, André L A; de Faria, Emerson Henrique; Ciuffi, Katia Jorge

    2016-01-20

    Humic acids (HAs) are ubiquitous macromolecules in the environment. Due to their high contents of oxygenated functional groups, they can interact with contaminants present in the natural environment and therefore influence the behavior of pollutants. However, a pH of 2 or lower is required to maintain HAs in the solid form. To increase the stability of HAs and their capacity to bind to contaminants, this work proposes the development of new hybrid materials based on alkoxysilanes and HAs for environmental applications such as dye adsorption. Three different materials with new functional groups were prepared by employing the following alkoxysilanes: tetraethyl orthosilicate, (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, and N-[3-(trimethoxylsilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine. The final materials were denoted HWA, HOA, and HTA, respectively, and they were characterized by elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 gas-volumetric adsorption. The point of zero charge (pzc) and stability of these materials were also determined. Their selectivity was evaluated in adsorption experiments performed with two different charged dyes in aqueous medium, namely anionic rose bengal (RB) and cationic methylene blue (MB). The elemental, DRIFT, SAXS, SEM, and textural analyses confirmed the presence of a combination of the features of HAs and alkoxysilanes. The pzc results showed that the new materials displayed different characteristics and affinities. All the materials were stable in aqueous solution up to pH 10. For MB, the percentage removal values obtained by using HWA, HOA, and HTA were 98, 85, and 67%, respectively. As for RB, the percentage removal values were 19, 18, and 44% for HWA, HOA, and HTA, respectively. These hybrid materials have potential use as adsorbents for the removal of cationic or anionic species and could be viable alternatives to remove various

  12. Epidemoligic Investigation of Health Effects in Air Force Personnel Following Exposure to Herbicides: Baseline Questionnaires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    1IF "YES" TO ANY COLUMN HEADING. ASK Q.42b-h FOR THAT COLUMNI _ _._ __ C. Skin that was extra Patches Easier bruising of the akin sensitive or seemed to... yout mI tory experience occupational experience, family history, heal tti hitory and hwa th car# util Ation, Since the interview may take one or two...HEADINC)? I’F "YES" TO ANY COLUMN HEADI.NG ASK p.35b-h FOR THAT COLUMN) A. B. C. Skin that was extra Patches Easier bruising of the skin sensitive or seemed

  13. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, Jan; Jedelský, Jan; Vach, Tomáš; Forman, Matěj; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE), which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA). CFD simulations have been performed on the same geometry and compared with experiments in order to find a tool for correct prediction of the CE.

  14. An Integrated Science-based methodology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The data is secondary in nature. Meaning that no data was generated as part of this review effort. Rather, data that was available in the peer-reviewed literature was used.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Tolaymat , T., A. El Badawy, R. Sequeira, and A. Genaidy. An integrated science-based methodology to assess potential risks and implications of engineered nanomaterials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 298: 270-281, (2015).

  15. Two-Dimensional Air-Flow Tests of the Effect of ITA Flowliner Slot Modification by Grinding/Polishing on Edge Tone Generation Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor); Walker, Bruce E.

    2004-01-01

    Hersh Walker Acoustics (HWA) has performed a series of wind tunnel tests to support crack-repair studies for ITA flowliner vent slots. The overall goal of these tests is to determine if slot shape details have a significant influence on the propensity of the flowliner to produce aero-acoustic oscillations that could increase unsteady stresses on the flowliner walls. The test series, conducted using a full-scale two-dimensional model of a six-slot segment of the 38 slot liner, was intended to investigate the effects of altering slot shape by grinding away cracked portions.

  16. Investigation into air flow characteristics through inlet valve of directed ports

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Xiao, F.; Guan, L.; Liu, X.

    1994-09-01

    The velocity and turbulence intensity profiles at exit of intake valve from typical SI engine intake ports (horizontal and sloping directed ports) were measured by hot wire anemometry (HWA) in a steady flow rig. The characteristics of velocity and turbulence intensity distribution under different valve lifts and at distances along valve axis were analysed and compared between above two intake ports. Results showed that velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are strongly dependent on intake port form, valve lift and surrounding geometry. They vary not only around the valve head periphery but also along the valve axis. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Modeling ecosystem disturbance over regional scales with the Ecosystem Demography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, M.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Medvigy, D.

    2004-12-01

    The Ecosystem Demography (ED) model is a mechanistic individual-based terrestrial ecosystem model that is capable of explicitly incorporating ecosystem disturbance and recovery in regional and continental scale simulations. The ED model is a momentum approximation of a traditional `gap model', a stochastic individual model of forest dynamics. As such, ED models both the age and the size structures of the terrestrial ecosystems it simulates. The age structure directly accounts for the distribution of ages since last disturbance in each simulation grid cell, and captures the disturbance impact on the ecosystem's carbon stocks. The size structure is used to model the impact of different kinds of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics and the recovery processes following disturbance. We present a set of ED simulations of the carbon dynamics of New England for the period 1700-2100 that account for both natural and anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance. We simulate tree-fall, land-use change, forest harvesting, and the impact of the Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, an introduced pathogen of eastern hemlock. While all these disturbances involve tree mortality, their simulated impact on the carbon dynamics is substantially different depending on the timing, frequency, and selectivity of the disturbance. In particular the temporal patterns of net ecosystem productivity during ecosystem recovery from Hemlock Wooly Adelgid infestation is not only influenced by the amount of hemlock present, but also by the ecological role that hemlock played in that specific ecosystem, and by the species that replace it after removal.

  18. Femtosecond Laser Tagging Characterization of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Operating in the Compressible Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Christopher J.; Miles, Richard B.; Burns, Ross A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Gregory S.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    A sweeping jet (SWJ) actuator operating over a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) was characterized with femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET), single hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and high-speed/phase-averaged schlieren. FLEET velocimetry was successfully demonstrated in a highly unsteady, oscillatory flow containing subsonic through supersonic velocities. Qualitative comparisons between FLEET and HWA (which measured mass flux since the flow was compressible) showed relatively good agreement in the external flow profiles. The spreading rate was found to vary from 0.5 to 1.2 depending on the pressure ratio. The precision of FLEET velocity measurements in the external flow field was poorer (is approximately equal to 25 m/s) than reported in a previous study due to the use of relatively low laser fluences, impacting the velocity fluctuation measurements. FLEET enabled velocity measurements inside the device and showed that choking likely occurred for NPR = 2.0, and no internal shockwaves were present. Qualitative oxygen concentration measurements using FLEET were explored in an effort to gauge the jet's mixing with the ambient. The jet was shown to mix well within roughly four throat diameters and mix fully within roughly eight throat diameters. Schlieren provided visualization of the internal and external flow fields and showed that the qualitative structure of the internal flow does not vary with pressure ratio and the sweeping mechanism observed for incompressible NPRs also probably holds for compressible NPRs.

  19. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  20. A Mathematical Model for River Ice Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    expression for S is n m S I G " -(35) i=-l A~l 12 where yi* is the simulated value of the ith state variable at time k. The objective function of the minimax...hwa 20.0 W m - 2 ’C Specific heat of water, Cp 4.1855 x 103 J kg--. 19 100 I I I I I S80 0) o Lagrangian 0 60" Solution 40 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 X 10...fluctuating component of water velocity ( m s-I) z C = Chezy’s coefficient (m0 . 5 s- 1) g = gravitational acceleration ( m s-2). Equation 81 is valid

  1. A combined model for pseudo-rapidity distributions in Cu-Cu collisions at BNL-RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. J.; Wang, J.; Huang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions come from leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The leading particles are conventionally supposed having Gaussian rapidity distributions normalized to the number of participants. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a time-like hypersurface with a proper time of τFO. The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in different centrality Cu-Cu collisions at sNN = 200 and 62.4GeV, respectively. The model predictions are consistent with experimental measurements.

  2. Current emotion research in cultural neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, Joan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Classical theories of emotion have long debated the extent to which human emotion is a universal or culturally-constructed experience. Recent advances in emotion research in cultural neuroscience highlight several aspects of emotional generation and experience that are both phylogenetically conserved as well as constructed within human cultural contexts. This review highlights theories and methods from cultural neuroscience that examine how cultural and biological processes shape emotional generation, experience and regulation across multiple time scales. Recent advances in the neurobiological basis of culture-bound syndromes, such as Hwa-Byung (fire illness), provide further novel insights into emotion and mental health across cultures. Implications of emotion research in cultural neuroscience for population health disparities in psychopathology and global mental health will be discussed. PMID:26346827

  3. Linear Combination Fitting (LCF)-XANES analysis of As speciation in selected mine-impacted materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This table provides sample identification labels and classification of sample type (tailings, calcinated, grey slime). For each sample, total arsenic and iron concentrations determined by acid digestion and ICP analysis are provided along with arsenic in-vitro bioaccessibility (As IVBA) values to estimate arsenic risk. Lastly, the table provides linear combination fitting results from synchrotron XANES analysis showing the distribution of arsenic speciation phases present in each sample along with fitting error (R-factor).This dataset is associated with the following publication:Ollson, C., E. Smith, K. Scheckel, A. Betts, and A. Juhasz. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 313: 130-137, (2016).

  4. Considerations in applying the general equilibrium approach to environmental health assessment.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Yang, Hong-Wei; Masui, Toshihiko

    2005-10-01

    There are currently two commonly used approaches to assessing economic impacts of health damage resulting from environmental pollution: human capital approach (HCA) and willingness-to-pay (WTP). WTP can be further divided into averted expenditure approach (AEA), hedonic wage approach (HWA), contingent valuation approach (CVA) and hedonic price approach (HPA). A general review of the principles behind these approaches by the authors indicates that these methods are incapable of unveiling the mechanism of health impact from the point of view of national economy. On a basis of economic system, the shocks brought about by health effects of environmental pollution change the labor supply and medical expenditure, which in turn affects the level of production activity in each sector and the total final consumption pattern of the society. The general equilibrium approach within the framework of macroeconomic theory is able to estimate the health impact on national economy comprehensively and objectively. Its mechanism and applicability are discussed in detail by the authors.

  5. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  6. Physiological aspects of swimming performance for persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Chatard, J C; Lavoie, J M; Ottoz, H; Randaxhe, P; Cazorla, G; Lacour, J R

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the various factors involved in the performances of three groups of swimmers with disabilities. These factors were average VO2max (Av-VO2max) measured during swimming and gliding factors measured by the passive drag. Thirty-four swimmers with disabilities were assigned into three groups ranging from more disabilities to fewer disabilities. The first group (G I) included 13 subjects in wheelchairs, the second group (G II) 10 subjects walking with technical aids, and the third group (G III) 11 swimmers with disabilities walking without any help. For G I, the performances and Av-VO2max were lower (P < 0.05) than for G II and G III while the passive drag was higher than for G III (P < 0.05). The performances, Av-VO2max, and passive drag were not statistically different between G II and G III. Some of the swimmers had a pronounced amyotrophia of the lower extremities (i.e., reduced volume of inactive muscles). The height from the top of the head to the beginning of the bilateral amyotrophia was called "height without amyotrophia" (HWA). In the whole group, passive drag was not related to the mass or the height but to the ratio mass/HWA (r = 0.71, P < 0.01). However, within each group, passive drag was mainly related to the mass (r = 0.63, 0.78, 0.62, P < 0.01, for G I, G II, and G III respectively). Performances of a 100-m and 400-m swim were mainly related to Av-VO2peak (r = 0.81 and 0.79, P < 0.01, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Flavonoids from the grains of C1/R-S transgenic rice, the transgenic Oryza sativa spp. japonica, and their radical scavenging activities.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Song, Na-Young; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Shrestha, Sabina; Park, Hee-Jung; Lyu, Ha-Na; Kim, Dae-Ok; Lee, Gihwan; Woo, Young-Min; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-10-30

    The transgenic rice cultivar of Oryza sativa spp. japonica cv. Hwa-Young, C1/R-S transgenic rice (C1/R-S rice), is a flavonoid-rich cultivar of rice. The grains of C1/R-S rice were extracted with aqueous MeOH, and the concentrated extract was partitioned with EtOAc, n-BuOH, and H2O, successively. Repeated silica gel, octadecyl silica gel (ODS), and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies for the EtOAc and n-BuOH fractions afforded four new flavonoids (compounds 2, 3, 7, and 8) along with four known flavonoids: (+)-3'-O-methyltaxifolin (1), brassicin (4), isorhamnetin-4'-O-β-D-glucosyranoside (5), and 3'-O-methyltaxifolin-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6). The new flavonoids were identified as 3'-O-methyltaxifolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), 3'-O-methyltaxifolin-4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), isorhamnetin-7-O-β-D-cellobioside (brassicin-4″-O-β-D-glucopyranoside) (7), and brassicin-4'-O-β-D-glucosyranoside (8) from the result of spectroscopic data including nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Also, quantitative analysis of major flavonoids (compounds 2, 3, and 8) in C1/R-S rice, O. sativa spp. japonica cv. Hwa-Young (HY), and a hybrid of two cultivar (C1/R-S rice/HY) extracts was performed using HPLC experiment. The isolated flavonoids were evaluated for their radical-scavenging effect on DPPH and ABTS radicals.

  8. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Baratto, Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina, Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Baratto Filho, Flares; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the manufacturer's instructions; HA - dried with hot air; NWA - washed and dried with water and air at room temperature; HWA - washed and dried with hot water and hot air. Thereafter, adhesive was applied and light-cured for 20 s. Silicon molds were used to prepare resin cement cylinders (1x1 mm) on the ceramic surface. The specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 48 h and subjected to a micro-shear test. The data were submitted to statistical analysis (?#61537;=0.05). Group G1 showed higher bond strengths than G2, except for the CTL and NWA subgroups. Differences as function of the silanization protocol were only observed in G1: HWA (25.13±6.83)≥HA (22.95±7.78)≥CTL(17.44±7.24) ≥NWA(14.63±8.76). For G2 there was no difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, the silanization protocol affected the resin cement/ceramic bond strengths, depending on the material. Washing/drying with hot water and/or hot air increased only the bond strength of the dual-cured resin cement.

  9. Collaborative framework for PIV uncertainty quantification: the experimental database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Douglas R.; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Smith, Barton L.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2015-07-01

    The uncertainty quantification of particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements has recently become a topic of great interest as shown by the recent appearance of several different methods within the past few years. These approaches have different working principles, merits and limitations, which have been speculated upon in subsequent studies. This paper reports a unique experiment that has been performed specifically to test the efficacy of PIV uncertainty methods. The case of a rectangular jet, as previously studied by Timmins et al (2012) and Wilson and Smith (2013b), is used. The novel aspect of the experiment is simultaneous velocity measurements using two different time-resolved PIV systems and a hot-wire anemometry (HWA) system. The first PIV system, called the PIV measurement system (‘PIV-MS’), is intended for nominal measurements of which the uncertainty is to be evaluated. It is based on a single camera and features a dynamic velocity range (DVR) representative of typical PIV experiments. The second PIV system, called the ‘PIV-HDR’ (high dynamic range) system, features a significantly higher DVR obtained with a higher digital imaging resolution. The hot-wire is placed in close proximity to the PIV measurement domain. The three measurement systems were carefully set to simultaneously measure the flow velocity at the same time and location. The comparison between the PIV-HDR system and the HWA provides an estimate of the measurement precision of the reference velocity for evaluation of the instantaneous error in the measurement system. The discrepancy between the PIV-MS and the reference data provides the measurement error, which is later used to assess the different uncertainty quantification methods proposed in the literature. A detailed comparison of the uncertainty estimation methods based on the present datasets is presented in a second paper from Sciacchitano et al (2015). Furthermore, this database offers the potential to be used for

  10. Comparative analysis of carbon, water, and energy exchanges in co-located mid-latitude forests at various stages of development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Munger, J. W.; Hadley, J.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of mass and energy vary with forest type, stand age, and following disturbance, but the degree, character, and persistence of these variations remain poorly understood. This work explores such gradients by synthesizing across a local network of flux tower sites within Harvard Forest (central Massachusetts). We examine how CO2, H2O, and energy exchanges compare among mature and intermediate aged deciduous forests, a mature hemlock forest, and a newly instrumented site in the early stages of secondary succession following a recent clearcut. We find markedly lower growing season evapotranspiration in the hemlock stand compared to adjacent deciduous forests, lower still in the revegetating clearcut. Daytime net ecosystem carbon exchange follows a similar pattern, with highest uptake in the deciduous forests, intermediate in the hemlock site, and lowest in the clearcut. This is true despite sizeable midday uptake in the clearcut during the second growing season post-harvest. Large nighttime CO2 emissions from the clearcut indicate high respiration rates of the early succession vegetation as well as vigorous decomposition of the abundant woody debris and litter left onsite after harvest. Surface albedo and corresponding net radiation are both surprisingly consistent across these adjacent cover types. Implications for water resources and carbon balance of New England landscapes will be discussed, particularly within the contexts of human and natural disturbances, such as harvesting and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid infestations.

  11. Entomopathogenic Fungi Associated with Exotic Invasive Insect Pests in Northeastern Forests of the USA.

    PubMed

    Gouli, Vladimir; Gouli, Svetlana; Marcelino, José A P; Skinner, Margaret; Parker, Bruce L

    2013-11-04

    Mycopathogens of economically important exotic invasive insects in forests of northeastern USA have been the subject of research at the Entomology Research Laboratory, University of Vermont, for the last 20 years. Elongate hemlock scale, European fruit lecanium, hemlock woolly adelgid and pear thrips were analyzed for the presence of mycopathogens, in order to consider the potential for managing these pests with biological control. Fungal cultures isolated from insects with signs of fungal infection were identified based on morphological characters and DNA profiling. Mycopathogens recovered from infected insects were subdivided into three groups, i.e., specialized entomopathogenic; facultative entomopathogens; ubiquitous opportunistic contaminants. Epizootics were caused by fungi in the specialized group with the exception of M. microspora, P. marquandii and I. farinosa. Inoculation of insects in laboratory and field conditions with B. bassiana, L. muscarium and Myriangium sp. caused insect mortality of 45 to 95%. Although pest populations in the field seemed severely compromised after treatment, the remnant populations re-established themselves after the winter. Although capable of inducing high mortality, a single localized aerial application of a soil-dwelling fungus does not maintain long-time suppression of pests. However, it can halt their range expansion and maintain populations below the economic threshold level without the use of expensive insecticides which have a negative impact on the environment.

  12. Mortality rates associated with crown health for eastern forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Morin, Randall S; Randolph, KaDonna C; Steinman, Jim

    2015-03-01

    The condition of tree crowns is an important indicator of tree and forest health. Crown conditions have been evaluated during inventories of the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program since 1999. In this study, remeasured data from 55,013 trees on 2616 FIA plots in the eastern USA were used to assess the probability of survival among various tree species using the suite of FIA crown condition variables. Logistic regression procedures were employed to develop models for predicting tree survival. Results of the regression analyses indicated that crown dieback was the most important crown condition variable for predicting tree survival for all species combined and for many of the 15 individual species in the study. The logistic models were generally successful in representing recent tree mortality responses to multiyear infestations of beech bark disease and hemlock woolly adelgid. Although our models are only applicable to trees growing in a forest setting, the utility of models that predict impending tree mortality goes beyond forest inventory or traditional forestry growth and yield models and includes any application where managers need to assess tree health or predict tree mortality including urban forest, recreation, wildlife, and pest management.

  13. Assessing hemlock decline using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy: indices comparison and algorithm development.

    PubMed

    Pontius, Jennifer; Hallett, Richard; Martin, Mary

    2005-06-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy was evaluated for its effectiveness at predicting pre-visual decline in eastern hemlock trees. An ASD FieldSpec Pro FR field spectroradiometer measuring 2100 contiguous 1-nm-wide channels from 350 nm to 2500 nm was used to collect spectra from fresh hemlock foliage. Full spectrum partial least squares (PLS) regression equations and reduced stepwise linear regression equations were compared. The best decline predictive model was a 6-term linear regression equation (R2= 0.71, RMSE = 0.591) based on: Carter Miller Stress Index (R694/R760), Derivative Chlorophyll Index (FD705/FD723), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index ((R800 - R680)/(R800 + R680)), R950, R1922, and FD1388. Accuracy assessment showed that this equation predicted an 11-class decline rating with a 1-class tolerance accuracy of 96% and differentiated healthy trees from those in very early decline with 72% accuracy. These results indicate that narrow-band sensors could be developed to detect very early stages of hemlock decline, before visual symptoms are apparent. This capability would enable land managers to identify early hemlock woolly adelgid infestations and monitor forest health over large areas of the landscape.

  14. Imidacloprid movement in soils and impacts on soil microarthropods in southern Appalachian eastern hemlock stands.

    PubMed

    Knoepp, Jennifer D; Vose, James M; Michael, Jerry L; Reynolds, Barbara C

    2012-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a systemic insecticide effective in controlling the exotic pest (hemlock woolly adelgid) in eastern hemlock () trees. Concerns over imidacloprid impacts on nontarget species have limited its application in southern Appalachian ecosystems. We quantified the movement and adsorption of imidacloprid in forest soils after soil injection in two sites at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. Soils differed in profile depth, total carbon and nitrogen content, and effective cation exchange capacity. We injected imidacloprid 5 cm into mineral soil, 1.5 m from infested trees, using a Kioritz soil injector. We tracked the horizontal and vertical movement of imidacloprid by collecting soil solution and soil samples at 1 m, 2 m, and at the drip line from each tree periodically for 1 yr. Soil solution was collected 20 cm below the surface and just above the saprolite, and acetonitrile-extractable imidacloprid was determined through the profile. Soil solution and extractable imidacloprid concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Soil solution and extractable imidacloprid concentrations were greater in the site with greater soil organic matter. Imidacloprid moved vertically and horizontally in both sites; concentrations generally declined downward in the soil profile, but preferential flow paths allowed rapid vertical movement. Horizontal movement was limited, and imidacloprid did not move to the tree drip line. We found a negative relationship between adsorbed imidacloprid concentrations and soil microarthropod populations largely in the low-organic-matter site; however, population counts were similar to other studies at Coweeta.

  15. Influence of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forests on aquatic invertebrate assemblages in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.; Lemarie, D.P.; Smith, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to determine the potential long-term impacts of hemlock forest decline on stream benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Hemlock forests throughout eastern North America have been declining because of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. We found aquatic invertebrate community structure to be strongly correlated with forest composition. Streams draining hemlock forests supported significantly more total taxa than streams draining mixed hardwood forests, and over 8% of the taxa were strongly associated with hemlock. In addition, invertebrate taxa were more evenly distributed (i.e., higher Simpson's evenness values) in hemlock-drained streams. In contrast, the number of rare species and total densities were significantly lower in streams draining hemlock, suggesting that diversity differences observed between forest types were not related to stochastic factors associated with sampling and that streams draining mixed hardwood forests may be more productive. Analysis of stream habitat data indicated that streams draining hemlock forests had more stable thermal and hydrologic regimes. Our findings suggest that hemlock decline may result in long-term changes in headwater ecosystems leading to reductions in both within-stream (i.e., alpha) and park-wide (i.e., gamma) benthic community diversity.

  16. Entomopathogenic Fungi Associated with Exotic Invasive Insect Pests in Northeastern Forests of the USA

    PubMed Central

    Gouli, Vladimir; Gouli, Svetlana; Marcelino, José A. P.; Skinner, Margaret; Parker, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Mycopathogens of economically important exotic invasive insects in forests of northeastern USA have been the subject of research at the Entomology Research Laboratory, University of Vermont, for the last 20 years. Elongate hemlock scale, European fruit lecanium, hemlock woolly adelgid and pear thrips were analyzed for the presence of mycopathogens, in order to consider the potential for managing these pests with biological control. Fungal cultures isolated from insects with signs of fungal infection were identified based on morphological characters and DNA profiling. Mycopathogens recovered from infected insects were subdivided into three groups, i.e., specialized entomopathogenic; facultative entomopathogens; ubiquitous opportunistic contaminants. Epizootics were caused by fungi in the specialized group with the exception of M. microspora, P. marquandii and I. farinosa. Inoculation of insects in laboratory and field conditions with B. bassiana, L. muscarium and Myriangium sp. caused insect mortality of 45 to 95%. Although pest populations in the field seemed severely compromised after treatment, the remnant populations re-established themselves after the winter. Although capable of inducing high mortality, a single localized aerial application of a soil-dwelling fungus does not maintain long-time suppression of pests. However, it can halt their range expansion and maintain populations below the economic threshold level without the use of expensive insecticides which have a negative impact on the environment. PMID:26462527

  17. The concentrations and fluxes of total gaseous mercury in a western coastal area of Korea during late March 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Kim, Joon; Lee, Gangwoong

    Factors affecting the distribution and exchange of total gaseous mercury (Hg) were investigated over a bare paddy field at Hari, a relatively clean district at Kang Hwa Island, Korea in late March 2001. The Hg concentrations were quantified at two heights (1 and 5 m above the ground), and then combined with micrometeorological measurements of turbulent exchange coefficients for flux computation. During the 8-day period of measurements, mean concentrations of Hg (3.72 ng m -3, N=164) were lower than those reported from urbanized/industrialized areas but higher than the background concentration (i.e., 1-2 ng m -3). The Hg fluxes, however, were comparable to those reported in the literature for polluted environments and showed clear diurnal pattern with maximum (˜600 ng m -2 h -1) during midday and the minimum (˜100 ng m -2 h -1) at nighttime. Occasionally, at nighttime when the turbulent mixing was weak under stable conditions, a deposition of Hg was observed at much lower rates (about -32.3 ng m -2 h -1). The rate of Hg emission tended to increase with increasing air/soil temperatures and pollutant levels under enhanced turbulent mixing. By contrast, dry deposition of Hg seemed to be related to the increase of certain pollutants such as fine particles (PM 2.5) and CO. Overall, the bare paddy field was a strong source of Hg with the daily net Hg emission of 4.4 μg m -2 during the measurement period.

  18. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Nicolas Lopez (University of California, Riverside, USA) Chi-Yong Lin (National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan) Shan-Wen Tsai (University of California, Riverside, USA) Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state and this exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel.

  19. Analysis of the chloroacetanilide herbicides in water using SPME with CAR/PDMS and GC/ECD.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ying-Ming; Wong, Yih-Gang; Ho, Wu-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    The solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique using a 75 mm film of carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane was applied to the analysis of chloroacetanilide herbicides (acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor) residues. The feasibility of SPME with gas chromatography electron capture detection analysis has been evaluated. The effects of experimental parameters such as magnetic stirring, salt addition, humic acid addition, pH value, and extraction time, as well as desorption temperature and time, were investigated. Analytical parameters such as linearity, repeatability and limit of detection were also evaluated. The inhibition of humic acid to the extraction of chloroacetanilide herbicides was observed. A standard addition method for calibration was recommended to reduce deviations caused by matrix interferences. The proposed method provided a simple and rapid analytical procedure for chloroacetanilide herbicides in water with limits of detection 0.002-0.065 microg/L for deionized water, and 0.005-0.22 microg/L for farm water. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) for analyses of farm water were 7-20% for 5 [corrected] microg/L chloroacetanilide herbicides. This application was illustrated by the analysis of sample collected from farm water in the Chung-hwa area, Taiwan.

  20. Strong anisotropy in two-dimensional surfaces with generic scale invariance: Gaussian and related models.

    PubMed

    Vivo, Edoardo; Nicoli, Matteo; Cuerno, Rodolfo

    2012-11-01

    Among systems that display generic scale invariance, those whose asymptotic properties are anisotropic in space (strong anisotropy, SA) have received relatively less attention, especially in the context of kinetic roughening for two-dimensional surfaces. This is in contrast with their experimental ubiquity, e.g., in the context of thin-film production by diverse techniques. Based on exact results for integrable (linear) cases, here we formulate a SA ansatz that, albeit equivalent to existing ones borrowed from equilibrium critical phenomena, is more naturally adapted to the type of observables that are measured in experiments on the dynamics of thin films, such as one- and two-dimensional height structure factors. We test our ansatz on a paradigmatic nonlinear stochastic equation displaying strong anisotropy like the Hwa-Kardar equation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1813 (1989)], which was initially proposed to describe the interface dynamics of running sand piles. A very important role to elucidate its SA properties is played by an accurate (Gaussian) approximation through a nonlocal linear equation that shares the same asymptotic properties.

  1. Cycle-resolved LDV integral length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, R.A.; Bracco, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Lateral integral length scales were measured directly using a two-point, single prove-volume, laser Doppler velocimetry system in a motored, ported, single-cylinder I.C. engine with a pancake-shaped chamber. The measurements were made on the mid-plane of the TDC clearance height form 43 degrees before TDC to 20 degrees after TDC. The engine was operated at 60 rpm with a swirl ratio at TDC of approximately 4. Both an ensemble and a cycle-resolved statistical analysis were performed. Three compression ratios (5.7, 7.6, and 11.4) were used. Isotropy of the lateral turbulence integral length scale (deduced from the cycle-resolved analysis) and of the lateral fluctuation integral length scale (deduced from the simple ensemble analysis) was investigated by measuring 3 of the 27 definable length scales. IN-CYLINDER MEASUREMENTS have concentrated mostly on the turbulence intensity, but the measurement of a second parameter, such as the turbulence length scale, is necessary even for the characterization of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. In the absence of combustion, many in-cylinder measurements of turbulence or fluctuation intensities have been made with hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV).

  2. Preparation of the First Shipment of Transuranic Waste by the Los Alamos National Laboratory: A Rest Stop on the Road to WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.; Barr, A.; Betts, S.E.; Farr, J.; Foxx, J.; Gavett, M.A.; Janecky, D.R.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Liebman, C.P.; Montoya, A.; Poths, H.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Taggart, D.P.; Triay, I.R.; Vigil, G.I.; Vigil, J.J.; Wander, S.G.; Yeamans, D.

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) achieved a national milestone on the road to shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) when it received certification authority on September 12, 1997. Since that time, LANL has been characterizing a non-mixed TRU waste stream and preparing shipments of this TRU waste for disposal in the WIPP. The paper describes the TRU waste identified as waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 from LANL Technical Area-55 and the process used to determine that it does not contain hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) or the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA). The non-mixed determination is based on the acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization process, which clearly shows that the waste does not exhibit any RCRA characteristics nor meet any RCRA listing descriptions. LANL has certified TRU waste from waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 and is prepared to certify additional quantities of TRU waste horn other non-mixed TRU waste streams. Assembly and preparation of AK on the processes that generated TRU waste is recognized as a necessary part of the process for having waste ready for shipment to the WIPP.

  3. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  4. Effects of acid deposition on calcium nutrition and health of Southern Appalachian spruce fir forests

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.; Stone, A.; Wimmer, R.; Joslin, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    The role of acid deposition in the health of spruce fir forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains has been investigated by a wide variety of experimental approaches during the past 10 years. These studies have proceeded from initial dendroecological documentation of altered growth patterns of mature trees to increasingly more focused ecophysiological research on the causes and characteristics of changes in system function associated with increased acidic deposition. Field studies across gradients in deposition and soil chemistry have been located on four mountains spanning 85 km of latitude within the Southern Appalachians. The conclusion that calcium nutrition is an important component regulating health of red spruce in the Southern Appalachians and that acid deposition significantly reduces calcium availability in several ways has emerged as a consistent result from multiple lines or research. These have included analysis of trends in wood chemistry, soil solution chemistry, foliar nutrition, gas exchange physiology, root histochemistry, and controlled laboratory and field studies in which acid deposition and/or calcium nutrition has been manipulated and growth and nutritional status of saplings or mature red spruce trees measured. This earlier research has led us to investigate the broader implications and consequences of calcium deficiency for changing resistance of spruce-fir forests to natural stresses. Current research is exploring possible relationships between altered calcium nutrition and shifts in response of Fraser fir to insect attack by the balsam wooly adelgid. In addition, changes in wood ultrastructural properties in relation to altered wood chemistry is being examined to evaluate its possible role in canopy deterioration, under wind and ice stresses typical of high elevation forests.

  5. Spatial pulses of water inputs in deciduous and hemlock forest stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.; Mussehl, M.; Pecht, A.; Spence, C.

    2010-12-01

    Trees intercept and redistribute precipitation in time and space. While spatial patterns of throughfall are challenging to link to plant and canopy characteristics, many studies have shown that the spatial patterns persist through time. This persistence leads to wet and dry spots under the trees, creating spatial pulses of moisture that can affect infiltration, transpiration, and biogeochemical processes. In the northeast, the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid poses a significant threat to eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), and replacement of hemlock forests by other species, such as birch, maple, and oak, has the potential to alter throughfall patterns and hydrologic processes. During the summers of 2009 and 2010, we measured throughfall in both hemlock and deciduous plots to assess its spatial distribution and temporal persistence. From 3 June to 25 July 2009, we measured throughfall in one hemlock and one deciduous plot over fourteen events with rainfall totaling 311 mm. From 8 June through 28 July 2010, we measured throughfall in the same two plots plus an additional hemlock stand and a young black birch stand, and rainfall totaled 148 mm over eight events. Averaged over space and time, throughfall was 81% of open precipitation in the hemlock stands, 88% in the mixed deciduous stand, and 100% in the young black birch stand. On an event basis, spatial coefficients of variation are similar among the stands and range from 11% to 49% for rain events greater than 5 mm. With the exception of very light events, coefficients of variation are insensitive to precipitation amount. Spatial patterns of throughfall persist through time, and seasonal coefficients of variation range from 13% to 33%. All stands indicate localized concentrations of water inputs, and there were individual collectors in the deciduous stands that regularly received more than twice the stand-average throughfall.

  6. A New Severity Rating System for Evaluating and Predicting the Impacts of a Nonnative Invasive Forest Insect on Two Pacific Northwest Fir Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinkevich, K.; Progar, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Balsam woolly adelgid (BWA) is a nonnative invasive forest insect introduced from Europe to North America around 1900. The insect established and spread in the northeast, infesting and causing mortality of balsam fir and has since established infestations in all true firs in eastern and western North America. There are several indicators of the presence and severity of BWA, and mortality can occur rapidly or trees may persist for many decades depending on the type and intensity of infestation. Severity ratings to describe damage have largely been based on a system developed for balsam fir in Newfoundland. Modifications to this system, also developed in eastern North America, used similar characteristics, but reduced the number of classes using qualitative damage assessments. Quantitative rating systems have been developed in the western United States, however much of the research in the Pacific Northwest is based on long-term monitoring studies that describe damage patterns for host species and quantify mortality rates. Results are inconsistent geographically and between tree species, and do not incorporate stand-specific information with individual tree ratings. This emphasizes the need for a species-specific, stand-level rating system, particularly in the west where the insect is expanding its range into novel habitat, likely as a result of climatic changes. We developed a new, more comprehensive rating system for grand fir and subalpine fir in the northwest US that combines all the symptoms of BWA-related tree damage with stand-level information about species composition and structure. Our scale identifies differences between each species and quantitatively differentiates between damage classes, identifying the symptoms defining each class. This rating system allows for more efficient classification of stand-level risk for BWA and will be used to develop a predictive risk model that identifies factors that can assist land managers with damage mitigation

  7. Research on Earthquake Precursor in E-TEC: A Study on Land Surface Thermal Anomalies Using MODIS LST Product in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Taiwan has been known as an excellent natural laboratory characterized by rapid active tectonic rate and high dense seismicity. The Eastern Taiwan Earthquake Research Center (E-TEC) is established on 2013/09/24 in National Dong Hwa University and collaborates with Central Weather Bureau (CWB), National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE), National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR), Institute of Earth Science of Academia Sinica (IES, AS) and other institutions (NCU, NTU, CCU) and aims to provide an integrated platform for researchers to conduct the new advances on earthquake precursors and early warning for seismic disaster prevention in the eastern Taiwan, as frequent temblors are most common in the East Taiwan rift valley. E-TEC intends to integrate the multi-disciplinary observations and is equipped with stations to monitor a wide array of factors of quake precursors, including seismicity, GPS, strain-meter, ground water, geochemistry, gravity, electromagnetic, ionospheric density, thermal infrared remote sensing, gamma radiation etc, and will maximize the value of the data for researches with the range of monitoring equipment that enable to predict where and when the next devastated earthquake will strike Taiwan and develop reliable earthquake prediction models. A preliminary study on earthquake precursor using monthly Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) data before 2013/03/27 Mw6.2 Nantou earthquake in Taiwan is presented. Using the statistical analysis, the result shows the peak of the anomalous LST that exceeds a standard deviation of LST appeared on 2013/03/09 and became less or none anomalies observed on 2013/03/16 before the main-shock, which is in consist with the phenomenon observed by other researchers. This preliminary experimental result shows that the thermal anomalies reveal the possibility to associate surface thermal phenomena before the strong earthquakes.

  8. Knowledge-guided robust MRI brain extraction for diverse large-scale neuroimaging studies on humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Nie, Jingxin; Yap, Pew-Thian; Li, Gang; Shi, Feng; Geng, Xiujuan; Guo, Lei; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and robust brain extraction is a critical step in most neuroimaging analysis pipelines. In particular, for the large-scale multi-site neuroimaging studies involving a significant number of subjects with diverse age and diagnostic groups, accurate and robust extraction of the brain automatically and consistently is highly desirable. In this paper, we introduce population-specific probability maps to guide the brain extraction of diverse subject groups, including both healthy and diseased adult human populations, both developing and aging human populations, as well as non-human primates. Specifically, the proposed method combines an atlas-based approach, for coarse skull-stripping, with a deformable-surface-based approach that is guided by local intensity information and population-specific prior information learned from a set of real brain images for more localized refinement. Comprehensive quantitative evaluations were performed on the diverse large-scale populations of ADNI dataset with over 800 subjects (55 ∼ 90 years of age, multi-site, various diagnosis groups), OASIS dataset with over 400 subjects (18 ∼ 96 years of age, wide age range, various diagnosis groups), and NIH pediatrics dataset with 150 subjects (5 ∼ 18 years of age, multi-site, wide age range as a complementary age group to the adult dataset). The results demonstrate that our method consistently yields the best overall results across almost the entire human life span, with only a single set of parameters. To demonstrate its capability to work on non-human primates, the proposed method is further evaluated using a rhesus macaque dataset with 20 subjects. Quantitative comparisons with popularly used state-of-the-art methods, including BET, Two-pass BET, BET-B, BSE, HWA, ROBEX and AFNI, demonstrate that the proposed method performs favorably with superior performance on all testing datasets, indicating its robustness and effectiveness.

  9. IMPEx : enabling model/observational data comparison in planetary plasma sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, V.; Khodachenko, M.; Kallio, E. J.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Alexeev, I. I.; Topf, F.; Gangloff, M.; André, N.; Bourrel, N.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Kalegaev, V.

    2013-09-01

    The FP7 IMPEx infrastructure, whose general goal is to encourage and facilitate inter-comparison between observational and model data in planetary plasma sciences, is now established for 2 years. This presentation will focus on a tour of the different achievements which occurred during this period. Within the project, data originate from multiple sources : large observational databases (CDAWeb, AMDA at CDPP, CLWeb at IRAP), simulation databases for hybrid and MHD codes (FMI, LATMOS), planetary magnetic field models database and online services (SINP). Each of these databases proposes dedicated access to their models and runs (HWA@FMI, LATHYS@LATMOS, SMDC@SINP). To gather this large data ensemble, IMPEx offers a distributed framework in which these data may be visualized, analyzed, and shared thanks to interoperable tools; they comprise of AMDA - an online space physics analysis tool -, 3DView - a tool for data visualization in 3D planetary context -, and CLWeb - an online space physics visualization tool. A simulation data model, based on SPASE, has been designed to ease data exchange within the infrastructure. On the communication point of view, the VO paradigm has been retained and the architecture is based on web services and the IVOA protocol SAMP. The presentation will focus on how the tools may be operated synchronously to manipulate these heterogeneous data sets. Use cases based on in-flight missions and associated model runs will be proposed for the demonstration. Finally the motivation and functionalities of the future IMPEx portal will be exposed. As requirements to and potentialities of joining the IMPEx infrastructure will be shown, the presentation could be seen as an invitation to other modeling teams in the community which may be interested to promote their results via IMPEx.

  10. Effects of changes in environmental conditions on atmospheric mercury exchange: Comparative analysis from a rice paddy field during the two spring periods of 2001 and 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Kim, Joon; Lee, Gangwoong

    2003-10-01

    The environmental mobilization characteristics of Hg were investigated in a rice paddy field in the Hari district of Kang Hwa Island, Korea during two field campaigns held in late March 2001 and late April 2002. In the course of these two field campaigns, we measured the concentration, concentration gradients (between two different heights of 1 and 5 m), and fluxes of Hg with the aid of micrometeorological approaches. The results of our experiments consistently indicate that the study area behaved as both source and sink of Hg, yielding a net emission rate of 183 (1st) to 28 ng m-2 h-1 (2nd campaign). It was however found that the soil-air exchange patterns of Hg during the two study periods, although investigated in similar seasonal cycles, contrast to a large extent. Upward emission prevailed in both the frequency and magnitude during the 1st study period, but dry deposition was seen more dominantly in terms of frequency during the 2nd study period. In light of the fact that the occurrence patterns of Asian Dust events differed greatly between the two study periods, the possible role of long-range transport of airborne pollutants (LRTAP) as sources of Hg into the study area has also been examined using information on air mass movement patterns. Because observed differences in Hg flux patterns generally reflect changes in environmental conditions across study periods, the bi-directional exchange patterns of Hg during the two field campaigns were explained in relation to highly diverse environmental conditions that persisted in each study period.

  11. A wind tunnel study of flows over idealised urban surfaces with roughness sublayer corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yat-Kiu; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Dynamics in the roughness (RSLs) and inertial (ISLs) sublayers in the turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over idealised urban surfaces are investigated analytically and experimentally. In this paper, we derive an analytical solution to the mean velocity profile, which is a continuous function applicable to both RSL and ISL, over rough surfaces in isothermal conditions. Afterwards, a modified mixing-length model for RSL/ISL transport is developed that elucidates how surface roughness affects the turbulence motions. A series of wind tunnel experiments are conducted to measure the vertical profiles of mean and fluctuating velocities, together with momentum flux over various configurations of surface-mounted ribs in cross flows using hot-wire anemometry (HWA). The analytical solution agrees well with the wind tunnel result that improves the estimate to mean velocity profile over urban surfaces and TBL dynamics as well. The thicknesses of RSL and ISL are calculated by monitoring the convergence/divergence between the temporally averaged and spatio-temporally averaged profiles of momentum flux. It is found that the height of RSL/ISL interface is a function of surface roughness. Examining the direct, physical influence of roughness elements on near-surface RSL flows reveals that the TBL flows over rough surfaces exhibit turbulence motions of two different length scales which are functions of the RSL and ISL structure. Conclusively, given a TBL, the rougher the surface, the higher is the RSL intruding upward that would thinner the ISL up to 50 %. Therefore, the conventional ISL log-law approximation to TBL flows over urban surfaces should be applied with caution.

  12. Immunosuppressive agent leflunomide: a SWNTs-immobilized dihydroortate dehydrogenase inhibitory effect and computational study of its adsorption properties on zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as controlled drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Raissi, Heidar; Mollania, Fariba

    2014-06-02

    Leflunomide [HWA 486 or RS-34821, 5-methyl-N-(4trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide] is an immunosuppressive agent effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Dihydroortate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.3.1) immobilization on the nanotubes was carried out and biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzyme was determined. In comparison with free enzyme, the immobilized DHODH showed improved stability and reusability for investigation of inhibition pattern of drugs such as leflunomide. The experimental data showed that, DHODH was inhibited by the active metabolite of leflunomide (RS-61980) with a Ki and KI of 0.82 and 0.06 mM, respectively. Results exhibited mixed-type inhibition kinetics towards dihydroorotate as a substrate in the free and immobilized enzyme. Furthermore, the behavior of anticancer drug leflunomide adsorbed on the external surface of zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (SWCNT and SWBNNT) was studied by means of DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(*) level of theory. The larger adsorption energies and charges transfer showed that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT is more stable than that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWCNT. Frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) suggest that adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT behave as charge transfer compounds with leflunomide as an electron donor and SWBNNT as an electron acceptor. Thus, nanotubes (NTs) have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative carriers for drug delivery and diagnostic application. The AIM theory has been also applied to analyze the properties of the bond critical points: their electron densities and their laplacians. Also, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to derive natural atomic orbital occupancies, and partial charges of the interacting atoms in the equilibrium tube-molecule distance.

  13. Physical fitness factors to predict male Olympic wrestling performance.

    PubMed

    García-Pallarés, Jesús; López-Gullón, José María; Muriel, Xabier; Díaz, Arturo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2011-08-01

    To determine differences in maximal strength and muscle power output of the arm and leg extensor muscles, peak and mean power during a modified standing crank-arm Wingate test, running speed, muscle extensibility, and anthropometric markers between elite and amateurs wrestlers according to the weight classes system; 92 male wrestlers were assigned into 6 groups according to their body mass (light, middle and heavy weight) and their competitive level (elite and amateur): Light Weight (body mass ranged between 55 and 68 kg) in elite (LW(E), n = 18) and amateur (LW(A), n = 15) level; Middle Weight (body mass ranged between 68 and 84 kg) in elite (MW(E), n = 18) and amateur (MW(A), n = 19) level; and Heavy Weight (body mass ranged between 84 and 100 kg) in elite (HW(E), n = 10) and amateur (HW(A), n = 12) level. Elite wrestlers were older (8-12%), had more training experience (25-37%), fat-free mass (3-5%), maximal strength in absolute and relative terms (8-25%), muscle power (14-30%), mean and peak power during crank-arm Wingate testing in absolute and relative terms (13-22%), jumping height (8-17%) as well as grip (6-19%) and back strength (7-20%) compared to amateur wrestlers. However, no differences were observed between elite and amateur groups in height, body mass index, percentage of body fat, hamstring extensibility and running speed. The present results suggest that the higher absolute and relative values of maximal strength, muscle power, and anaerobic metabolism, explained in part by the differences in lean mass and neural activation patterns, will give elite wrestlers a clear advantage during the most frequently used techniques in Olympic wrestling.

  14. Lack of Association between Angiotensin Converting Enzyme I/D Polymorphism and Unexplained Recurrent Miscarriage in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mukaynizi, Fatimah Basil; AlKhuriji, Afrah; Babay, Zaineb; Addar, Mohammad; AlDaihan, Sooad; Alanazi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with recurrent miscarriage (RM) in several populations. We initiated this study to determine the association, if any, between the I/D polymorphism of ACE gene and RM in Saudi females. Method This study was conducted on 61 Saudi females suffering from RM (mean age: 34.1±6.2 years; range 15–45) attending clinics at King Khalid University Hospital, and 59 age matched females who had at least 2 children, as controls. Blood samples were drawn in EDTA tubes by venipuncture. DNA was extracted using the Puregene DNA purification kits. Insertion/Deletion (I/D) polymorphism of ACE gene was investigated by amplifying the genomic DNA by PCR using gene-specific primers. A single 190 bp or 490 bp band was obtained in the homozygous cases for the D allele or I allele, respectively, while the presence of both 190 and 490 bp bands indicated heterozygosity (ID). Statistical analysis Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was determined (http://ihg.gsf.de/cgi-bin/hw/hwa1.pl). A standard chi-square (χ2) test was used for comparing the genotype and allele frequencies in the two groups and Students’t’ test and χ2 test were employed to compare values between the two groups. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The frequencies of DD, ID, and II genotypes were 56.7%, 29.5% and 4.9%, respectively, in females with RM and 54.2%, 42.3% and 3.3% respectively in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion In some populations, meta-analyses showed an association between I/D polymorphism and RM risk, and the D allele was implicated as an increased risk factor for RM. However, this association was not apparent in the Saudi females. PMID:28356877

  15. Comparison of Physical and Physiological Profiles in Elite and Amateur Young Wrestlers.

    PubMed

    Demirkan, Erkan; Koz, Mitat; Kutlu, Mehmet; Favre, Mike

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the physical and physiological determinants of wrestling success between elite and amateur male wrestlers. The wrestlers (N = 126) were first assigned to 3 groups based on their competitive level (top elite, elite, and amateur) and then to 6 groups according to their body mass (light, middle, and heavy weight) and their competitive level (elite and amateur). Top elite and elite wrestlers had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more training experiences and maximal oxygen uptake compared with the amateur group. In separating weight classes, light- and middle-weight elite (MWE) wrestlers had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more training experience (7-20%) compared with the light- and middle-weight amateur (MWA) wrestlers. No significant differences were detected between elite and amateur groups (light-, middle-, and heavy-weight wrestlers) for age, body mass, height, body mass index, and body fat (p > 0.05), with the exception of height for heavy wrestlers. Leg average and peak power values (in watts and watts per kilogram) in MWE were higher than MWA (6.5 and 13%, p ≤ 0.05). Relative leg average power value in heavy-weight elite (HWE) (in watts per kilogram) was higher than heavy-weight amateur (HWA) (9.6%, p ≤ 0.05). It was seen that elite wrestlers in MWE and HWE statistically possessed a higher V̇O2max (12.5 and 11.4%, respectively) than amateur middle- and heavy-weight wrestlers (p ≤ 0.05). The results of this study suggest that training experience, aerobic endurance, and anaerobic power and capacity will give a clear advantage for the wrestlers to take part in the elite group.

  16. QCD and Multiparticle Production - Proceedings of the XXIX International Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarcevic, Ina; Tan, Chung-I.

    2000-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Monday morning session: Hadronic Final States - Conveners: E. de Wolf and J. W. Gary * Session Chairman: J. W. Gary * Inclusive Jets at the Tevatron * Forward Jets, Dijets, and Subjets at the Tevatron * Inclusive Hadron Production and Dijets at HERA * Recent Opal Results on Photon Structure and Interactions * Review of Two-Photon Physics at LEP * Session Chairman: E. de Wolf * An Intriguing Area-Law-Based Hadron Production Scheme in e+e- Annihilation and Its Possible Extensions * Hyperfine Splitting in Hadron Production at High Energies * Event Selection Effects on Multiplicities in Quark and Gluon Jets * Quark and Gluon Jet Properties at LEP * Rapidity Gaps in Quark and Gluon Jets -- A Perturbative Approach * Monday afternoon session: Diffractive and Small-x - Conveners: M. Derrick and A. White * Session Chairman: A. White * Structure Functions: Low x, High y, Low Q2 * The Next-to-Leading Dynamics of the BFKL Pomeron * Renormalization Group Improved BFKL Equation * Session Chairman: G. Briskin * New Experimental Results on Diffraction at HERA * Diffractive Parton Distributions in Light-Cone QCD * The Logarithmic Derivative of the F2 Structure Function and Saturation * Spin Dependence of Diffractive DIS * Monday evening session * Session Chairman: M. Braun * Tests of QCD with Particle Production at HERA: Review and Outlook * Double Parton Scattering and Hadron Structure in Transverse Space * The High Density Parton Dynamics from Eikonal and Dipole Pictures * Hints of Higher Twist Effects in the Slope of the Proton Structure Function * Tuesday morning session: Correlations and Fluctuations - Conveners: R. Hwa and M. Tannenbaum * Session Chairman: A. Giovannini -- Fluctuations and Correlations * Bose-Einstein Results from L3 * Short-Range and Long-Range Correlations in DIS at HERA * Coior Mutation Model, Intermittency, and Erraticity * QCD Queuing and Hadron Multiplicity * Soft and Semi

  17. A Long Term View of Forest Response to Environmental Change: 25 Years of Studying Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Lindaas, J.; David, F.; David, O.

    2014-12-01

    partially matched by carbon stored in woody biomass, leaving a large fraction of carbon to have accumulated in litter and fine roots in the forest floor, which has as much carbon as the above-ground woody biomass, but shorter turnover time. Invasion by Hemlock wooly adelgid, an insect that kills hemlock trees portends a major shift in NEE for the hemlock stand in the next decade.

  18. Ecohydrologic implications of differences in throughfall between hemlock and deciduous forest plots, West Whately, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guswa, A. J.; Rhodes, A. L.; McNicholas, J.; Mehter, S.; Spence, C.

    2009-12-01

    Invasive pests, especially in conjunction with climate change, have the potential to transform the species composition of many forests. In the northeastern United States, the hemlock woolly adelgid poses a significant threat to eastern hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis), a tree known for its ecological role more than its timber value. To begin to assess the effect on the water cycle of converting hemlock to deciduous forest, we carried out a throughfall investigation in West Whately, MA during the summer of 2009. From 3 June to 25 July, we measured the volume and chemistry of throughfall in two forest plots: one dominated by hemlock (LAI = 5.6) and one comprising a variety of deciduous species (LAI = 4.7), including many saplings and sub-canopy trees. Over the period of the study, rainfall totaled 311 mm and throughfall amounted to 276 mm (89%) in the deciduous plot and 242 mm (78%) in the hemlock stand. When compared to open precipitation, throughfall from both plots showed significantly higher levels of acid neutralizing capacity, pH, and concentrations of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+. On an event-by-event basis, the fraction of precipitation that shows up as throughfall increases with amount, and representing interception as a constant depth, Δ, provides a reasonable fit (Δdeciduous = 2.5 mm, R2 = 0.99; Δhemlock = 5 mm, R2 = 0.96). Analysis of variance and time-stability plots indicate a strong persistent effect of collector position on throughfall depth, leading to potential efficiencies in measurement strategies. In both stands, the spatial variability of throughfall depths is higher for lower intensity events, and the coefficient of variation has a value around 30% for larger events. The skewness of throughfall depths among collectors within the hemlock plot is generally small. Throughfall depths are positively skewed in the deciduous plot, and one collector consistently received throughfall equal to twice the incident rainfall. Should hemlock stands be eliminated and

  19. Using Land Surface Phenology as the Basis for a National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Spruce, J.; Norman, S. P.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    surrounding non-urban forests. An EWS news page (http://www.geobabbble.org/~hnw/EWSNews) highlights disturbances the system has detected during the 2011 season. Unsupervised statistical multivariate clustering of smoothed phenology data every 8 days over an 11-year period produces a detailed map of national vegetation types, including major disturbances. Examining the constancy of these phenological classifications at a particular location from year to year produces a national map showing the persistence of vegetation, regardless of vegetation type. Using spectral unmixing methods, national maps of evergreen decline can be produced which are a composite of insect, disease, and anthropogenic factors causing chronic decline in these forests, including hemlock wooly adelgid, mountain pine beetle, wildfire, tree harvest, and urbanization. Because phenology shows vegetation responses, all disturbance and recovery events detected by the EWS are viewed through the lens of the vegetation.

  20. New Remote Sensing Methods for Labeling Disturbance Agents in Appalachian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. J.; Hayes, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forests in the eastern United States are species rich and affected by a variety of disturbance agents such as fire, invasive insects, diseases, and storm events. Millions of hectares of forest are disturbed each year, altering the forest carbon sink and changing forest nutrient cycles. The magnitude and direction of these changes, though, can be different for different disturbance agents. For example, trees that burn in severe fire rapidly release stored carbon into the atmosphere whereas standing deadwood from insect attacks decompose slowly while atmospheric carbon is fixed in regenerating vegetation. The diagnosis and attribution of these processes require accurate and reliable estimates of the extent and frequency of different disturbance agents. Here, a new method is presented that classifies disturbance events identified using time-series analysis of Landsat TM imagery. The method exploits information about changes in the canopy heterogeneity as measured by several texture indices within forest patches. Classifiers were trained using data from the US Forest Service Aerial Detection Surveys and currently differentiate between fires, southern pine beetle, gypsy moth, hemlock woolly adelgid, beech bark disease, anthracnose, and storm events. In addition, the classifier returns a value of 'uncertain' when it is unable to make a clear determination, which is currently approximately 10% of identified disturbances. Classification accuracy for the remainder is 81%, though is variable between agents. For example, the classifier performs well in identifying southern pine beetle and gypsy moth affected areas, but poorly in identifying storms. Reliabilities are similar to accuracies for each agent. The results presented are the first yearly, regional-scale estimates of forest disturbance partitioned by disturbance agent. We find good correspondence with previously described patterns of disturbance and distribution, including direct observational evidence of their

  1. The Reconstruction of the 1867 Keelung Tsunami Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Wu, T.

    2012-12-01

    The 1867 Keelung tsunami event has been reported to be the most destructive in Taiwan history, hence it's been documented in many historical literatures. In this event, the sea withdrew and the seabed exposed after a strong ground shake. Then, a series of big waves followed and fluxed into Keelung harbor. Hundreds of people died and the wave height was up to 6 m (Hsu, 1983). Since this event was not recorded instrumentally by tidal gauges or seismographs, the location and focal mechanism are still uncertain. According to the studies by many seismologists (Tsai, 1985; Cheng et al, 1989; Hsu et al, 1996; Lin et al 2005), this event was generated by a large seismic motion with an earthquake magnitude about Mw=7.0, and sourcing from the Shanchiao Fault (Lin et al, 2005). However, none of the parameter sets was able to explain the 7-m tsunami height presented in many historical documents. In this study, we intend to reconstruct this event by means of numerical tsunami simulation. Considering the cliff slop along the Keelung coast, one reasonable assumption is that the earthquake triggered a submarine landslide which increased the tsunami wave height dramatically. To confirm this hypothesis, we conduct a series of numerical experiments to reproduce the 1867 Keelung tsunami event. The Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model (COMCOT) is utilized to perform the tsunami simulations. We follow the earthquake magnitude Mw=7.0 proposed by Lin et al. (2006) and add the landslide effect (Watts et al., 2005). The latest scaling law proposed by Yen and Ma (2011) is used to determine the rupture parameters. Two landslide locations, near-field and Mien-Hwa Canyo, are considered in this study. The results show the 7-m tsunami height was most likely to be generated by the near-field submarine landslide with debris amount of 1400000 m3. This result is significant not only to the safety of Keelung city, but also to the security of the 3 nuclear power plants located nearby. The detailed

  2. Coevolutionary modeling of protein sequences: Predicting structure, function, and mutational landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigt, Martin

    . Sander, R. Zecchina, J.N. Onuchic, T. Hwa, M. Weigt, ''Direct-coupling analysis of residue co-evolution captures native contacts across many protein families'', Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 108, E1293-E1301 (2011).

  3. GRID integration of oceanographic remote instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salon, S.; Bolzon, G.; Mauri, E.; Poulain, P.-M.

    2009-04-01

    OGS. The main goal of DORII is the deployment of an eInfrastructure for those scientific communities where ICT technology and the concept of GRID is perceived as a big opportunity to boost their research but that, at present, results not fully exploited. The oceanographic community may greatly benefit from the resources being offered by the GRID technology, in particular concerning the data driven control/interaction workflow and the post-processing/visualization issues that characterize the remote instruments. [1] N.C. Flemming, S. Vallerga, N. Pinardi, H.W.A. Behrens, G. Manzella, D. Prandle and J.H. Stel (eds), Operational Oceanography - Implementation at the European and Regional Scales, Elsevier Oceanography Vol. 66. Elsevier, Amsterdam (2002). [2] http://poseidon.ogs.trieste.it/sire/medargo [3] P.-M. Poulain, R. Barbanti, J. Font, A. Cruzado, C. Millot, I. Gertman, A. Griffa, A. Molcard, V. Rupolo, S. Le Bras and L. Petit de la Villeon, MedArgo: a drifting profiler program in the Mediterranean Sea, Ocean Science 3, 379-395 (2007). [4] http://www.dorii.eu/home

  4. Closing the Gap on Measuring Heat Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, S. E.; Alexander, L.

    2012-12-01

    compare the temperature of a three-day window to the previous 30 days and the climatological 95th percentile (see Nairn and Fawcett, 2012, CAWCR Technical Report). Based on a previously defined methodology (Fischer and Shar, 2010, Nature Geoscience), each index is analysed with respect to five properties - heat wave number (HWN) and length (HWD), the number of participating days (HWF), the amplitude or peak of the hottest day (HWA), and mean heat wave magnitude (HWM), thereby assessing the occurrence, intensity and duration of heat waves for each index. The methodology is demonstrated for characterizing changes in observed heat waves at the global scale and regionally over Australia for the latter half of the 20th Century. Overall, general increases in heat wave intensity and duration occur, although the magnitude and significance of this trend shows variation both regionally and among the indices. Trend magnitudes also differ for "warm-spell" (year-round) and summer only events. This framework therefore allows for the broad examination of heat waves, such that the results presented are informative to multiple sectors affected by such events. Indeed, it "closes the gap" on heat wave measurement by reducing the number of indices employed, yet realizing that heat wave measurement cannot be a one size fits all approach, and that there is more than one feature of heat waves that causes adverse impacts.

  5. PREFACE: IARD 2010: The 7th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Hu, Bei-Lok; Lee, Da-Shin; Gill, Tepper; Land, Martin

    2011-12-01

    properties of spacetime structure. The scope of this series of conferences is, however, much wider. There have been recent develpments in the understanding of the quantum properties of spacetime, the application of quantum field theory and statistical quantum field theory to problems in relativistic dynamics, as well as new techniques in general relativity; some of these topics have been discussed in the IARD 2010 conference, and which will be reported in these Proceedings. It was for this purpose, to bring together researchers from a wide variety of fields, such as particle physics, astrophysics, cosmology, heavy ion collisions, plasma research, and mathematical physics, with a common interest in relativistic dynamics, that this Association was founded. The International Association for Relativistic Dynamics was organized at its first meeting as an informal session of seminars among researchers with common interest in February 1998 in Houston, Texas, with John R Fanchi as president. The second meeting took place, in 2000, at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, the third, in 2002, at Howard University in Washington, DC, and the fourth, on 12-19 June 2004, in Saas Fee, Switzerland. In 2006, the meeting took place at the University of Connecticut campus in Storrs, Connecticut, and the sixth meeting, in Thessaloniki, Greece. The seventh meeting, took place at the National Dong Hwa University in Hulien, Taiwan from 30 May to 1 June 2010. This meeting forms the basis for the Proceedings that are recorded in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Along with the work of some of the founding members of the Association, we were fortunate to have lecturers from application areas that provided strong challenges for further developments in quantum field theory, statistical quantum field theory and its potential applications to relativistic quantum information theory, cosmological problems, and in the dynamics of systems described in the framework of general

  6. In-Situ Testing and Performance Assessment of a Redesigned WIPP Panel Closure - 13192

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Thomas; Patterson, Russell; Camphouse, Chris; Herrick, Courtney; Kirchner, Thomas; Malama, Bwalya; Zeitler, Todd; Kicker, Dwayne

    2013-07-01

    There are two primary regulatory requirements for Panel Closures at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the nation's only deep geologic repository for defense related Transuranic (TRU) and Mixed TRU waste. The Federal requirement is through 40 CFR 191 and 194, promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The state requirement is regulated through the authority of the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) under the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA), New Mexico Statutes Annotated (NMSA) 1978, chap. 74-4-1 through 74-4-14, in accordance with the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (HWMR), 20.4.1 New Mexico Annotated Code (NMAC). The state regulations are implemented for the operational period of waste emplacement plus 30 years whereas the federal requirements are implemented from the operational period through 10,000 years. The 10,000 year federal requirement is related to the adequate representation of the panel closures in determining long-term performance of the repository. In Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking for 40 CFR Part 194, the EPA required a specific design for the panel closure system. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has requested, through the Planned Change Request (PCR) process, that the EPA modify Condition 1 via its rulemaking process. The DOE has also requested, through the Permit Modification Request (PMR) process, that the NMED modify the approved panel closure system specified in Permit Attachment G1. The WIPP facility is carved out of a bedded salt formation 655 meters below the surface of southeast New Mexico. Condition 1 of the Final Certification Rulemaking specifies that the waste panels be closed using Option D which is a combination of a Salado mass concrete (SMC) monolith and an isolation/explosion block wall. The Option D design was also accepted as the panel closure of choice by the NMED. After twelve years of waste handling

  7. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    , local properties of spacetime structure. The scope of this series of conferences is, however, much wider. There have been recent developments in the understanding of general relativity concerning questions associated with dark energy and the dark matter problem, the distribution of stars in galaxies, and the distribution of galaxies in the visible universe, as well as the internal structure of stars. There are, moreover fundamental questions in the applications of relativistic dynamics to physical problems, and in its mathematical and logical structure. It was for this purpose, to bring together researchers from a wide variety of fields, such as particle physics, astrophysics, cosmology, heavy ion collisions, plasma research, and mathematical physics, with a common interest in relativistic dynamics, that this Association was founded. The International Association for Relativistic Dynamics was organized at its first meeting as an informal session of seminars among researchers with common interest in February 1998 in Houston, Texas, with John R Fanchi as president. The second meeting took place, in 2000, at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, the third, in 2002, at Howard University in Washington, D.C., and the fourth, on 12--19 June 2004, in Saas Fee, Switzerland. In 2006, the meeting took place at the University of Connecticut campus in Storrs, Connecticut, and the sixth meeting, in Thessaloniki, Greece. The seventh meeting took place at the National Dong Hwa University in Hualien, Taiwan from 30 May to 1 June 2010, and the eighth meeting, reported here, at the Galileo Galilei Institute for Theoretical Physics (GGI) in Florence, Italy, 29 May to 1 June 2012. This meeting forms the basis for the Proceedings of IARD 2012, recorded in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Along with the work of some of the founding members of the Association, we were fortunate to have lecturers from application areas that provided strong challenges for further

  8. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  9. PREFACE: Nanosafe2010: International Conference on Safe Production and Use of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentein, Carole; Schuster, Frédéric; Tardif, François

    2011-07-01

    ESevertsov Inst. of Ecology and Evolution, RU KÜCK AUniv. Bremen, DE KUO Y-MChung Hwa University, TW KVITEK LPalacky Univ., CZ LABILLE JCEREGE, FR LAMMINEN EDekati, FI LARUE CCEA, FR LE BIHAN OINERIS, FR LE DUR DEcomesure, FR LECERF PCILAS, FR LEGRAND MCordouan, FR LELONG CUJF CEA, FR LIMOUSIN SINERIS, FR LINDELOEV JGEA Process Engineering, DK LIU P PChina Jiliang University, CN LIU WCEREGE, FR MACHEREY A-CCNRS, FR MAGGA YCEA, FR MAHLENDORF FUniversity Duisburg-Essen, DE MANIER NINERIS, FR MANZO LUniv. Pavia, IT MARCHETTO ACEA, FR MARCONE GUNICAMP, BR MARI DEPFL, CH MARIE-DESVERGNE CCEA, FR MARIE-LOUISE APSA Peugeot-Citroen, FR MARMUSE LNano-H S.A.S., FR MARRA JPhilips Research Aerasense, NL MASION ACEREGE, FR MATEI EPolitehnica University Bucharest, RO MATSUI YKyoto Univ., JP MATZKE MUniv. Gothenburg, SE MAYNE-L'HERMITE MCEA, FR MELINTE G ABabes-Bolyai University, RO MERINO CGrupo Antolin Ingenieria, ES MICHAUD-SORET ICEA, FR MICHELETTI CJRC, IT MONTIGEL EBasler Versicherungen, CH MONTOYA ERAMEM, ES MOSSUZ VCEA, FR MOTELLIER SCEA, FR MOTZKUS CLNE, FR MUIR BNaneum, GB NAKAMURA KJAPAN NUS CO., JP NEUBAUER NKarlsruhe Institute of Technologie, DE NEUMEISTER LBG ETEM, DE NGUYEN TNIST, US NIORT NINTERTEK, FR NOIRTIN AINTERTEK, FR NOWACK BEmpa, CH NYEMBE DUniv. Johannesburg, ZA Ó CLAONADH NDublin Institute of Technology, IE OBERDÖRSTER GUniv. Rochester, US OGURA IAIST, JP OSTIGUY CIRSST, CA OTSUKA KJFE Techno-Research Corp., JP OUF F-XIRSN, FR OUSACI SALMA, FR PAGET VCEA, FR PAILLEUX MEcole des Mines de Saint Etienne, FR PANDARD PINERIS, FR PANZER OEuropean Research Services, DE PARISELLI FCNRS, FR PERLET JNANO Magazine, GB PETERS RRIKILT, NL PETIT A-NCEA, FR PETKOVIC JNational Institute of Biology, SI PIMENOFF JBeneq, FI PINAULT MCEA, FR PIRET J-PUniv. Namur, BE PONTONE RTekna Plasma Systems, FR POURCHEZ JEcole des Mines de Saint Etienne, FR PRAETORIUS AETH Zurich, CH PRAT OCEA, FR PREVENSLIK TQED Radiations, CN PREVOST CIRSN, FR PROY HUART DFrance Nature Environnement, FR PUI