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Sample records for adenine dinucleotide flavin

  1. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a “stack” to a “close” conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the “solvation” effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  2. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  3. Bacterial degradation of styrene involving a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmans, S; van der Werf, M J; de Bont, J A

    1990-01-01

    By using styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy in concentrations of 10 to 500 microM, 14 strains of aerobic bacteria and two strains of fungi were isolated from various soil and water samples. In cell extracts of 11 of the bacterial isolates, a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-requiring styrene monooxygenase activity that oxidized styrene to styrene oxide (phenyl oxirane) was detected. In one bacterial strain (S5), styrene metabolism was studied in more detail. In addition to styrene monooxygenase, cell extracts from strain S5 contained styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. A pathway for styrene degradation via styrene oxide and phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetic acid is proposed. PMID:2339888

  4. Conformational behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide: conserved stereochemistry in bound and free states.

    PubMed

    Kuppuraj, Gopi; Kruise, Dennis; Yura, Kei

    2014-11-26

    Metabolic enzymes utilize the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to catalyze essential biochemical reactions. Because these enzymes have been implicated in disease pathways, it will be necessary to target them via FAD-based structural analogues that can either activate/inhibit the enzymatic activity. To achieve this, it is important to explore the conformational space of FAD in the enzyme-bound and free states. Herein, we analyze X-ray crystallographic data of the enzyme-bound FAD conformations and sample conformations of the molecule in explicit water by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Enzyme-bound FAD conformations segregate into five distinct groups based on dihedral angle principal component analysis (PCA). A notable feature in the bound FADs is that the adenine base and isoalloxazine ring are oppositely oriented relative to the pyrophosphate axis characterized by near trans hypothetical dihedral angle "δV" values. Not surprisingly, MD simulations in water show final compact but not perfectly stacked ring structures in FAD. Simulation data did not reveal noticeable changes in overall conformational dynamics of the dinucleotide in reduced and oxidized forms and in the presence and/or absence of ions. During unfolding-folding dynamics, the riboflavin moiety is more flexible than the adenosine monophosphate group in the molecule. Conversely, the isoalloxazine ring is more stable than the variable adenine base. The pyrophosphate group depicts an unusually highly organized fluctuation illustrated by its dihedral angle distribution. Conformations sampled from enzymes and MD are quantified. The extent to which the protein shifts the distribution from the unbound state is discussed in terms of prevalent FAD shapes and dihedral angle population.

  5. Flavin adenine dinucleotide as a chromophore of the Xenopus (6-4)photolyase.

    PubMed Central

    Todo, T; Kim, S T; Hitomi, K; Otoshi, E; Inui, T; Morioka, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohtsuka, E; Toh, H; Ikenaga, M

    1997-01-01

    Two types of enzyme utilizing light from the blue and near-UV spectral range (320-520 nm) are known to have related primary structures: DNA photolyase, which repairs UV-induced DNA damage in a light-dependent manner, and the blue light photoreceptor of plants, which mediates light-dependent regulation of seedling development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)photoproducts] are the two major photoproducts produced in DNA by UV irradiation. Two types of photolyases have been identified, one specific for CPDs (CPD photolyase) and another specific for (6-4)photoproducts [(6-4)photolyase]. (6-4)Photolyase activity was first found in Drosophila melanogaster and to date this gene has been cloned only from this organism. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned gene shows that (6-4)photolyase is a member of the CPD photolyase/blue light photoreceptor family. Both CPD photolyase and blue light photoreceptor are flavoproteins and bound flavin adenine dinucleotides (FADs) are essential for their catalytic activity. Here we report isolation of a Xenopus laevis(6-4)photolyase gene and show that the (6-4)photolyase binds non- covalently to stoichiometric amounts of FAD. This is the first indication of FAD as the chromophore of (6-4)photolyase. PMID:9016626

  6. Assembly of alcohol oxidase in peroxisomes of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha requires the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, M E; Titorenko, V I; van der Klei, I J; Harder, W; Veenhuis, M

    1994-01-01

    The peroxisomal flavoprotein alcohol oxidase (AO) is an octamer (600 kDa) consisting of eight identical subunits, each of which contains one flavin adenine dinucleotide molecule as a cofactor. Studies on a riboflavin (Rf) auxotrophic mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha revealed that limitation of the cofactor led to drastic effects on AO import and assembly as well as peroxisome proliferation. Compared to wild-type control cells Rf-limitation led to 1) reduced levels of AO protein, 2) reduced levels of correctly assembled and activated AO inside peroxisomes, 3) a partial inhibition of peroxisomal protein import, leading to the accumulation of precursors of matrix proteins in the cytosol, and 4) a significant increase in peroxisome number. We argue that the inhibition of import may result from the saturation of a peroxisomal molecular chaperone under conditions that normal assembly of a major matrix protein inside the target organelle is prevented. Images PMID:7803851

  7. The conserved baculovirus protein p33 (Ac92) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.M.; Rohrmann, G.F.; Merrill, G.F.

    2009-06-05

    Open reading frame 92 of the Autographa californica baculovirus (Ac92) is one of about 30 core genes present in all sequenced baculovirus genomes. Computer analyses predicted that the Ac92 encoded protein (called p33) and several of its baculovirus orthologs were related to a family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Alignment of these proteins indicated that, although they were highly diverse, a number of amino acids in common with the Erv1p/Alrp family of sulfhydryl oxidases are present. Some of these conserved amino acids are predicted to stack against the isoalloxazine and adenine components of FAD, whereas others are involved in electron transfer. To investigate this relationship, Ac92 was expressed in bacteria as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified, and characterized both spectrophotometrically and for its enzymatic activity. The purified protein was found to have the color (yellow) and absorption spectrum consistent with it being a FAD-containing protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated to have sulfhydryl oxidase activity using dithiothreitol and thioredoxin as substrates.

  8. In vivo native fluorescence spectroscopy and nicotinamide adinine dinucleotide/flavin adenine dinucleotide reduction and oxidation states of oral submucous fibrosis for chemopreventive drug monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Vedeswari, C. Ponranjini; Jayachandran, Sadaksharam; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Pravda, Chidambaranathan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2010-01-01

    Native fluorescence spectroscopy has shown potential to characterize and diagnose oral malignancy. We aim at extending the native fluorescence spectroscopy technique to characterize normal and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) patients under pre- and post-treated conditions, and verify whether this method could also be considered in the monitoring of therapeutic prognosis noninvasively. In this study, 28 normal subjects and 28 clinically proven cases of OSF in the age group of 20 to 40 years are diagnosed using native fluorescence spectroscopy. The OSF patients are given dexamethasone sodium phosphate and hyaluronidase twice a week for 6 weeks, and the therapeutic response is monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence emission spectra of normal and OSF cases of both pre- and post-treated conditions are recorded in the wavelength region of 350 to 600 nm at an excitation wavelength of 330 nm. The statistical significance is verified using discriminant analysis. The oxidation-reduction ratio of the tissue is also calculated using the fluorescence emission intensities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adinine dinucleotide at 530 and 440 nm, respectively, and they are compared with conventional physical clinical examinations. This study suggests that native fluorescence spectroscopy could also be extended to OSF diagnosis and therapeutic prognosis.

  9. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-03

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration.

  10. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  11. A computational comparison of electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to flavin adenine dinucleotide and a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Walch, Stephen P; Komadina, Jason D; Prinz, Fritz B

    2009-05-21

    We have carried out calculations of the electronic structure of ferredoxin and of the electronic coupling matrix element Hif for electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and to cluster models of the Au111 surface and a Au111 surface with a mercaptopyridene self-assembled monolayer (SAM). We conclude, based on Hif2, that a gold electrode is approximately 14 times less efficient as an electron acceptor than FAD and that the mercaptopyridine SAM enhances electron transfer. The magnitude of Hif is large enough for these systems that the weak coupling limit approximations may no longer be valid. However, the barrier to electron transfer in the strong coupling limit is computed to be small due to minimal geometry change between oxidized and reduced ferredoxin. MD simulations of the interaction of ferredoxin and protonated pyridine within a water solvation box indicate that the protonated pyridine does strongly orient the ferredoxin, favoring electron transfer as compared to a bare gold surface, where we speculate the orientation of the ferredoxin may be more random.

  12. Electrochemical behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide adsorbed onto carbon nanotube and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-11-05

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a cofactor for many enzymes, but also an informative redox active surface probe for electrode materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nitrogen-doped CNTs (N-CNTs). FAD spontaneously adsorbs onto the surface of CNTs and N-CNTs, displaying Langmuir adsorption characteristics. The Langmuir adsorption model provides a means of calculating the electroactive surface area (ESA), the equilibrium constant for the adsorption and desorption processes (K), and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption (ΔG°). Traditional ESA measurements based on the diffusional flux of a redox active molecule to the electrode surface underestimate the ESA of porous materials because pores are not penetrated. Techniques such as gas adsortion (BET) overestimate the ESA because it includes both electroactive and inactive areas. The ESA determined by extrapolation of the Langmuir adsorption model with the electroactive surface probe FAD will penetrate pores and only include electroactive areas. The redox activity of adsorbed FAD also displays a strong dependency on pH, which provides a means of determining the pKa of the surface confined species. The pKa of FAD decreases as the nitrogen content in the CNTs increases, suggesting a decreased hydrophobicity of the N-CNT surface. FAD desorption at N-CNTs slowly transforms the main FAD surface redox reaction with E1/2 at -0.84 V into two new, reversible, surface confined redox reactions with E1/2 at -0.65 and -0.76 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4), respectively (1.0 M sodium phosphate buffer pH = 6.75). This is the first time these redox reactions have been observed. The new surface confined redox reactions were not observed during FAD desorption from nondoped CNTs.

  13. Biocomposite based on reduced graphene oxide film modified with phenothiazone and flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase for glucose sensing and biofuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Ravenna, Yehonatan; Xia, Lin; Gun, Jenny; Mikhaylov, Alexey A; Medvedev, Alexander G; Lev, Ovadia; Alfonta, Lital

    2015-10-06

    A novel composite material for the encapsulation of redox enzymes was prepared. Reduced graphene oxide film with adsorbed phenothiazone was used as a highly efficient composite for electron transfer between flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and electrodes. Measured redox potential for glucose oxidation was lower than 0 V vs Ag/AgCl electrode. The fabricated biosensor showed high sensitivity of 42 mA M(-1) cm(-2), a linear range of glucose detection of 0.5-12 mM, and good reproducibility and stability as well as high selectivity for different interfering compounds. In a semibiofuel cell configuration, the hybrid film generated high power output of 345 μW cm(-2). These results demonstrate a promising potential for this composition in various bioelectronic applications.

  14. Urea induced unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD): spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation studies from femto-second to nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Singh, Reman K; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Mukherjee, Arnab; Hazra, Partha

    2014-02-20

    Here, we investigate the effect of urea in the unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), an important enzymatic cofactor, through steady state, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. Steady state results indicate the possibility of urea induced unfolding of FAD, inferred from increasing emission intensity of FAD with urea. The TCSPC and up-conversion results suggest that the stack-unstack dynamics of FAD severely gets affected in the presence of urea and leads to an increase in the unstack conformation population from 15% in pure water to 40% in 12 M urea. Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to understand the nature of the interaction between FAD and urea at the molecular level. Results depict that urea molecules replace many of the water molecules around adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD. However, the major driving force for the stability of this unstack conformations arises from the favorable stacking interaction of a significant fraction of the urea molecules with adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD, which overcomes the intramolecular stacking interaction between themselves observed in pure water.

  15. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of TiO(2) nanoparticles and their use as a platform for flavin adenine dinucleotide immobilization and efficient electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, S; Lo, Po-Hsun; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-06-25

    Here, we report the electrochemical synthesis of TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) using the potentiostat method. Synthesized particles have been characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the TiO(2) film produced was mainly composed of rutile and that the particles are of a size in the range of 100 ± 50 nm. TiO(2) NPs were used for the modification of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE). The resulting TiO(2) film coated SPE was used to immobilize flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The flavin enzyme firmly attached onto the metal oxide surface and this modified electrode showed promising electrocatalytic activities towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in physiological conditions. The electrochemistry of FAD confined in the oxide film was investigated. The immobilized FAD displayed a pair of redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.42 V in pH 7.0 oxygen-free phosphate buffers at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1). The FAD in the nanostructured TiO(2) film retained its bioactivity and exhibited excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H(2)O(2), based on which a mediated biosensor for H(2)O(2) was achieved. The linear range for the determination of H(2)O(2) was from 0.15 × 10(-6) to 3.0 × 10(-3) M with the detection limit of 0.1 × 10(-6) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The stability and repeatability of the biosensor is also discussed.

  16. Characterization of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-Hydroxylase (HpaB) of Escherichia coli as a Reduced Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Utilizing Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Luying; Sandvik, Erik R.

    2000-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (HpaB and HpaC) of Escherichia coli W has been reported as a two-component flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase that attacks a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds. However, the function of each component in catalysis is unclear. The large component (HpaB) was demonstrated here to be a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase. When an E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) having no apparent homology with HpaC was used to generate FADH2 in vitro, HpaB was able to use FADH2 and O2 for the oxidation of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate. HpaB also used chemically produced FADH2 for 4-hydroxyphenylacetate oxidation, further demonstrating that HpaB is an FADH2-utilizing monooxygenase. FADH2 generated by Fre was rapidly oxidized by O2 to form H2O2 in the absence of HpaB. When HpaB was included in the reaction mixture without 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, HpaB bound FADH2 and transitorily protected it from rapid autoxidation by O2. When 4-hydroxyphenylacetate was also present, HpaB effectively competed with O2 for FADH2 utilization, leading to 4-hydroxyphenylacetate oxidation. With sufficient amounts of HpaB in the reaction mixture, FADH2 produced by Fre was mainly used by HpaB for the oxidation of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate. At low HpaB concentrations, most FADH2 was autoxidized by O2, causing uncoupling. However, the coupling of the two enzymes' activities was increased by lowering FAD concentrations in the reaction mixture. A database search revealed that HpaB had sequence similarities to several proteins and gene products involved in biosynthesis and biodegradation in both bacteria and archaea. This is the first report of an FADH2-utilizing monooxygenase that uses FADH2 as a substrate rather than as a cofactor. PMID:10653707

  17. Detection, distribution, and organohalogen compound discovery implications of the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent halogenase gene in major filamentous actinomycete taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Huang, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Halogenases have been shown to play a significant role in biosynthesis and introducing the bioactivity of many halogenated secondary metabolites. In this study, 54 reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(2))-dependent halogenase gene-positive strains were identified after the PCR screening of a large collection of 228 reference strains encompassing all major families and genera of filamentous actinomycetes. The wide distribution of this gene was observed to extend to some rare lineages with higher occurrences and large sequence diversity. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed that strains containing highly homologous halogenases tended to produce halometabolites with similar structures, and halogenase genes are likely to propagate by horizontal gene transfer as well as vertical inheritance within actinomycetes. Higher percentages of halogenase gene-positive strains than those of halogenase gene-negative ones contained polyketide synthase genes and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes or displayed antimicrobial activities in the tests applied, indicating their genetic and physiological potentials for producing secondary metabolites. The robustness of this halogenase gene screening strategy for the discovery of particular biosynthetic gene clusters in rare actinomycetes besides streptomycetes was further supported by genome-walking analysis. The described distribution and phylogenetic implications of the FADH(2)-dependent halogenase gene present a guide for strain selection in the search for novel organohalogen compounds from actinomycetes.

  18. A novel flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) containing d-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7: purification, characterization and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2008-07-01

    Dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase activity was found in the crude extract of a continental thermoacidophilic crenarchaeota, Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7, and was purified 375-fold through four sequential chromatography steps. With a molecular mass of about 93 kDa, this enzyme was a homodimer comprised of identical subunits with molecular masses of about 48 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity after incubation at 80 degrees C for 10 min and after incubation at pHs ranging from 6.5 to 10.0 for 30 min at 50 degrees C. The preferred substrate for this enzyme was D-lactate, with 2,6-dichloroindophenol serving as the electron acceptor. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the enzyme's prosthetic group was determined to be flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was MLEGIEYSQGEEREDFVGFKIKPKI. Using that sequence and previously reported genome information, the gene encoding the enzyme (ST0649) was identified. It was subsequently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and found to encode a polypeptide of 440 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 49,715. The amino acid sequence of this dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase showed higher homology (39% identity) with that of a glycolate oxidase subunit homologue from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, but less similarity (32% identity) to D-lactate dehydrogenase from A. fulgidus. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from S. tokodaii is a novel type of FAD containing D-lactate dehydrogenase.

  19. The role of Val-265 for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding in pyruvate oxidase: FTIR, kinetic, and crystallographic studies on the enzyme variant V265A.

    PubMed

    Wille, Georg; Ritter, Michaela; Weiss, Manfred S; König, Stephan; Mäntele, Werner; Hübner, Gerhard

    2005-04-05

    In pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, valine 265 participates in binding the cofactor FAD and is responsible for the strained conformation of its isoalloxazine moiety that is visible in the crystal structure of POX. The contrasting effects of the conservative amino acid exchange V265A on the enzyme's catalytic properties, cofactor affinity, and protein structure were investigated. The most prominent effect of the exchange was observed in the 2.2 A crystal structure of the mutant POX. While the overall structures of the wild-type and the variant are similar, flavin binding in particular is clearly different. Local disorder at the isoalloxazine binding site prevents modeling of the complete FAD cofactor and two protein loops of the binding site. Only the ADP moiety shows well-defined electron density, indicating an "anchor" function for this part of the molecule. This notion is corroborated by competition experiments where ADP was used to displace FAD from the variant enzyme. Despite the fact that the affinity of FAD binding in the variant is reduced, the catalytic properties are very similar to the wild-type, and the redox potential of the bound flavin is the same for both proteins. The rate of electron transfer toward the flavin during turnover is reduced to one-third compared to the wild-type, but k(cat) remains unchanged. Redox-triggered FTIR difference spectroscopy of free FAD shows the nu(C(10a)=N(1)) band at 1548 cm(-)(1). In POX-V265A, this band is found at 1538 cm(-)(1) and thus shifted less strongly than in wild-type POX where it is found at 1534 cm(-)(1). Taking these observations together, the conservative exchange V265A in POX has a surprisingly small effect on the catalytic properties of the enzyme, whereas the effect on the three-dimensional structure is rather big.

  20. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR.

  1. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  2. Regulation of the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide- and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two distinct l-glutamate dehydrogenases. These enzymes are affected in a reciprocal fashion by growth on ammonia or dicarboxylic amino acids as the nitrogen source. The specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) (anabolic) enzyme is highest in ammonia-grown cells and is reduced in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate. Conversely, the specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) (catabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase is highest in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate and is much lower in cells grown on ammonia. The specific activity of both enzymes is very low in nitrogen-starved yeast. Addition of the ammonia analogue methylamine to the growth medium reduces the specific activity of the NAD-dependent enzyme and increases the specific activity of the NADP-dependent enzyme. PMID:4147647

  3. The chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) analogues containing C-nucleosides related to nicotinamide riboside.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Watanabe, Kyoichi A; Lesiak-Watanabe, Krystyna; Goldstein, Barry M; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Oncolytic C-nucleosides, tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and benzamide riboside (3-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzamide) are converted in cell into active metabolites thiazole-4-carboxamide- and benzamide adenine dinucleotide, TAD and BAD, respectively. TAD and BAD as NAD analogues were found to bind at the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (cofactor NAD) site of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an important target in cancer treatment. The synthesis and evaluation of anticancer activity of a number of C-nucleosides related to tiazofurin and nicotinamide riboside then followed and are reviewed herein. Interestingly, pyridine C-nucleosides (such as C-nicotinamide riboside) are not metabolized into the corresponding NAD analogues in cell. Their conversion by chemical methods is described. As dinucleotides these compounds show inhibition of IMPDH in low micromolar level. Also, the synthesis of BAD in metabolically stable bis(phosphonate) form is discussed indicating the usefulness of such preformed inhibitors in drug development. Among tiazofurin analogues, Franchetti and Grifantini found, that the replacement of the sulfur by oxygen (as in oxazafurin) but not the removal of nitrogen (tiophenfurin) of the thiazole ring resulted in inactive compounds. The anti cancer activity of their synthetic dinucleotide analogues indicate that inactive compounds are not only poorly metabolized in cell but also are weak inhibitors of IMPDH as dinucleotides.

  4. Properties of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Fun; Ljungdahl, Lars; Wood, Harland G.

    1966-01-01

    Li, Lan-Fun (Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio), Lars Ljungdahl, and Harland G. Wood. Properties of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum. J. Bacteriol. 92: 405–412. 1966.—A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent formate dehydrogenase has been isolated from C. thermoaceticum. The enzyme is very sensitive to oxygen and requires sulfhydryl compounds for activity. The apparent Km at 50 C and pH 7.0 for NADP is 5.9 × 10−5m and for formate, 2.2 × 10−4m. The enzyme is most active at about 60 C and at pH values between 7.0 and 9.0. The enzyme catalyzes an exchange between C14O2 and formate, which requires NADP, but net synthesis of formate from CO2 and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate could not be demonstrated. The reaction does not involve ferredoxin. PMID:16562128

  5. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters.

  6. Physical Separation of Streptococcal Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Glycohydrolase from Streptolysin O

    PubMed Central

    Shany, S.; Grushoff, Phyllis S.; Bernheimer, Alan W.

    1973-01-01

    Streptococcal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase (NADase) with a molecular weight of about 55,000 and an isoelectric pH of 8.55 was isolated from crude streptolysin O (SLO) preparations. NADase differed from SLO in size, charge, and immunological behavior. Streptococcal NADase is considered to have no role in the hemolytic process because it has no hemolytic activity; conversely, partially purified SLO showed no NADase activity. The hemolytic activity of crude SLO was completely inhibited by anti-tetanolysin, whereas the NADase activity in the same reaction mixture was unaffected. Experiments involving double diffusion in agar also demonstrated immunological nonidentity of the two proteins. Images PMID:4357989

  7. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  8. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-05-05

    The /sup 13/C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO/sub 2/ with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources.

  9. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    PubMed

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described.

  10. Evidence for two-step binding of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide to aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    MacGibbon, A K; Buckley, P D; Blackwell, L F

    1977-01-01

    The displacement of NADH from cytoplasmic aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) from sheep liver was studied by using NAD+, 1,10-phenanthroline, ADP-ribose, deamino-NAD+ and pyridine-3-aldehyde-adenine dinucleotide as displacing agents, by following the decrease in fluorescence as a function of time. The data obtained could be fitted by assuming two first-order processes were occurring, a faster process with an apparent rate constant of 0.85 +/- 0.20 s-1 and a relative amplitude of 60 +/- 10% and a slower process with an apparent rate constant of 0.20 +/- 0.05 s-1 and a relative amplitude of 40 +/- 10% (except for pyridine-3-aldehyde-adenine dinucleotide, where the apparent rate constant for the slow process was 0.05 s-1). The displacement rates did not change significantly when the pH was varied from 6.0 to 9.0. Kinetic data are also reported for the dependence of the rate of binding of NADH to the enzyme on the total concentration of NADH. Detailed arguments are presented based on the isolation and purification procedures, the equilibrium coenzyme-binding studies and the kinetic data, which lead to the following model for the release of NADH from the enzyme: (formula: see article). The parameters that best fit the data are: k + 1 = 0.2 s-1; k - 1 = 0.05 s-1; k + 2 = 0.8 s-1 and k - 2 = 5 X 10(5)litre-mol-1-s-1. The slow phase of the NADH release is similar to the steady-state turnover number for substrates such as acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde and appears to contribute significantly to the limitation of the steady-state rate. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:21657

  11. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  12. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  13. Preclinical evidence of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as an effective alarm parameter under hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Sun, Nannan; Mayevsky, Avraham; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of tissue hypoxia in the intensive care unit is essential for effective treatment. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been suggested to be the most sensitive indicator of tissue oxygenation at the mitochondrial level. However, no experimental evidence comparing the kinetics of changes in NADH and other physiological parameters has been provided. The aim of this study is to obtain the missing data in a systematic and reliable manner. We constructed four acute hypoxia models, including hypoxic hypoxia, hypemic hypoxia, circulatory hypoxia, and histogenous hypoxia, and measured NADH fluorescence, tissue reflectance, cerebral blood flow, respiration, and electrocardiography simultaneously from the induction of hypoxia until death. We found that NADH was not always the first onset parameter responding to hypoxia. The order of responses was mainly affected by the cause of hypoxia. However, NADH reached its alarm level earlier than the other monitored parameters, ranging from several seconds to >10 min. As such, we suggest that the NADH can be used as a hypoxia indicator, although the exact level that should be used must be further investigated. When the NADH alarm is detected, the body still has a chance to recover if appropriate and timely treatment is provided.

  14. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  15. Intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide promotes TNF-induced necroptosis in a sirtuin-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Preyat, N; Rossi, M; Kers, J; Chen, L; Bertin, J; Gough, P J; Le Moine, A; Rongvaux, A; Van Gool, F; Leo, O

    2016-01-01

    Cellular necrosis has long been regarded as an incidental and uncontrolled form of cell death. However, a regulated form of cell death termed necroptosis has been identified recently. Necroptosis can be induced by extracellular cytokines, pathogens and several pharmacological compounds, which share the property of triggering the formation of a RIPK3-containing molecular complex supporting cell death. Of interest, most ligands known to induce necroptosis (including notably TNF and FASL) can also promote apoptosis, and the mechanisms regulating the decision of cells to commit to one form of cell death or the other are still poorly defined. We demonstrate herein that intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has an important role in supporting cell progression to necroptosis. Using a panel of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that intracellular NAD+ promotes necroptosis of the L929 cell line in response to TNF. Use of a pan-sirtuin inhibitor and shRNA-mediated protein knockdown led us to uncover a role for the NAD+-dependent family of sirtuins, and in particular for SIRT2 and SIRT5, in the regulation of the necroptotic cell death program. Thus, and in contrast to a generally held view, intracellular NAD+ does not represent a universal pro-survival factor, but rather acts as a key metabolite regulating the choice of cell demise in response to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. PMID:26001219

  16. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  17. Studies of yeast cell oxygenation and energetics by laser fluorometry of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fu-shih; Chen, Stephen; Mintzer, Robert A.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Schumacker, Paul

    1991-03-01

    It is of fundamental importance for biological scientists to assess cellular energetics. Under aerobic conditions, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is coupled with the mitochondrial electron cascade pathway to provide the cell with energy. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-conjugated pair (NAD and NADH) is the coenzyme in numerous important biomedical reactions which include several important dehydrogenase reactions in the TCA cycle. Based on Le Chatelier's principle, NADH will accumulate when this energy production mechanism is impaired. The relative amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell are defined as the redox state of the cell (Williamson et.al. 1967) which provides a valuable index of cellular energetics. The sum of the amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell may be assumed to be constant during a finite time; therefore, a reliable means of measuring the NADH concentration would provide us with a useful indicator of tissue viability. Traditionally, the quantities of NADH and NAD may be measured by chemical assay methods. We can avoid these tediois analyses by exploiting the significant difference between the ultraviolet absorption spectra of this redox pair. However, because of the opacity of biological samples and the interference of other biochemicals that also absorb ultraviolet radiation, measurement of NADH and NAD+ concentrations in vivo by absorption spectroscopy is not feasible.

  18. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide homeostasis and signalling in heart disease: Pathophysiological implications and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Mericskay, Mathias

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a highly morbid syndrome generating enormous socio-economic costs. The failing heart is characterized by a state of deficient bioenergetics that is not currently addressed by classical clinical approaches. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)/NADH) is a major coenzyme for oxidoreduction reactions in energy metabolism; it has recently emerged as a signalling molecule with a broad range of activities, ranging from calcium (Ca(2+)) signalling (CD38 ectoenzyme) to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression involved in the oxidative stress response, catabolic metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis (sirtuins, poly[adenosine diphosphate-ribose] polymerases [PARPs]). Here, we review current knowledge regarding alterations to myocardial NAD homeostasis that have been observed in various models of heart failure, and their effect on mitochondrial functions, Ca(2+), sirtuin and PARP signalling. We highlight the therapeutic approaches that are currently in use or in development, which inhibit or stimulate NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, and emerging approaches aimed at stimulating NAD biosynthesis in the failing heart.

  19. Naturally Occurring β-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Independent Avibacterium paragallinarum Isolate in Peru.

    PubMed

    Falconi-Agapito, Francesca; Saravia, Luis E; Flores-Pérez, Aldo; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo

    2015-06-01

    The β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) requirement has been considered to be essential for the isolation of the causal agent of infectious coryza, Avibacterium paragallinarum. Nevertheless, NAD-independent reports from South Africa and Mexico dismissed this paradigm. It is now accepted that both NAD-dependent and NAD-independent agents are able to cause infectious coryza and thus belong to the species A. paragallinarum. Here, we report for the first time in Peru a NAD-independent isolate from broiler chickens with typical signs of infectious coryza that have received a trivalent inactivated vaccine against infectious coryza. The isolate was identified based on its morphology, biochemical and serologic tests, and PCR results. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed the isolate as A. paragallinarum. There have been no cases of NAD-independent A. paragallinarum isolates reported in South America. Increasing reports around the world highlight not only the need to reconsider the in vitro nutritional requirements of this species for its correct isolation but also the cross-protection conferred by commercial infectious coryza vaccines against NAD-independent isolates.

  20. Eco-synthesis of graphene and its use in dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide sensing.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh Tabrizi, Mahmoud; Jalilzadeh Azar, Somayeh; Nadali Varkani, Javad

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report a green and eco-friendly approach to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via a mild hydrothermal process using malt as a reduced agent. The proposed method is based on the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) in malt solution by making use of the reducing capability of phenolic compounds contained in malt solution. The obtained rGO was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed that the charge transfer resistance of rGO modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was much lower than that of the GC electrode. The electrochemical behavior of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) on rGO modified GC electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. Electrochemical experiments indicated that rGO/GC electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the NADH, which can be attributed to excellent electrical conductivity and high specific surface area of the rGO composite. The resulting biosensor showed highly sensitive amperometric response to NADH with a low detection limit (0.33μM).

  1. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sifei; Wang, Zhenfei; Yang, Kai; Liu, Zhuochao

    2017-01-01

    The role of autophagy, neuroprotective mechanisms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and their relationship in spinal cord ischemic reperfusion injury (SCIR) was assessed. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham, ischemia reperfusion (I/R), 10 mg/kg NAD+, and 75 mg/kg NAD+. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess autophagy and apoptosis. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores were used to assess neurological function. Expression levels of Beclin-1, Atg12-Atg5, LC3B-II, cleaved caspase 3, and Bax were upregulated in the I/R group and downregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group; p-mTOR, p-AKT, p62, and Bcl-2 were downregulated in the I/R group and upregulated in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. Numbers of LC3B-positive, caspase 3-positive, Bax-positive, and TUNEL-positive cells were significantly increased in the I/R group and decreased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. The mean integrated option density of Bax increased and that of Nissl decreased in the I/R group, and it decreased and increased, respectively, in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group. BBB scores significantly increased in the 75 mg/kg NAD+ group relative to the I/R group. No difference was observed between I/R and 10 mg/kg NAD+ groups for these indicators. Therefore, excessive and sustained autophagy aggravates SCIR; administration of NAD+ alleviates injury. PMID:28367271

  2. Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, Martin; Suko, Josef; Gscheidlinger, Regina; Drobny, Helmut; Zidar, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Calcium is a universal second messenger. The temporal and spatial information that is encoded in Ca(2+)-transients drives processes as diverse as neurotransmitter secretion, axonal outgrowth, immune responses and muscle contraction. Ca(2+)-release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be triggered by diffusible second messengers like Ins P (3), cyclic ADP-ribose or nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). A target has not yet been identified for the latter messenger. In the present study we show that nanomolar concentrations of NAADP trigger Ca(2+)-release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. This was due to a direct action on the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor type-1, since in single channel recordings, NAADP increased the open probability of the purified channel protein. The effects of NAADP on Ca(2+)-release and open probability of the ryanodine receptor occurred over a similar concentration range (EC(50) approximately 30 nM) and were specific because (i) they were blocked by Ruthenium Red and ryanodine, (ii) the precursor of NAADP, NADP, was ineffective at equimolar concentrations, (iii) NAADP did not affect the conductance and reversal potential of the ryanodine receptor. Finally, we also detected an ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction of skeletal muscle. This enzyme was not only capable of synthesizing cyclic GDP-ribose but also NAADP, with an activity of 0.25 nmol/mg/min. Thus, we conclude that NAADP is generated in the vicinity of type 1 ryanodine receptor and leads to activation of this ion channel. PMID:12102654

  3. Covalent attachment of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to enzymes: the current state of affairs.

    PubMed Central

    Mewies, M.; McIntire, W. S.; Scrutton, N. S.

    1998-01-01

    The first identified covalent flavoprotein, a component of mammalian succinate dehydrogenase, was reported 42 years ago. Since that time, more than 20 covalent flavoenzymes have been described, each possessing one of five modes of FAD or FMN linkage to protein. Despite the early identification of covalent flavoproteins, the mechanisms of covalent bond formation and the roles of the covalent links are only recently being appreciated. The main focus of this review is, therefore, one of mechanism and function, in addition to surveying the types of linkage observed and the methods employed for their identification. Case studies are presented for a variety of covalent flavoenzymes, from which general findings are beginning to emerge. PMID:9514256

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of high affinity nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-binding proteins in sea urchin egg.

    PubMed

    Walseth, Timothy F; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Jain, Pooja; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Marchant, Jonathan S; Slama, James T

    2012-01-20

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a messenger that regulates calcium release from intracellular acidic stores. Recent studies have identified two-pore channels (TPCs) as endolysosomal channels that are regulated by NAADP; however, the nature of the NAADP receptor binding site is unknown. To further study NAADP binding sites, we have synthesized and characterized [(32)P-5-azido]nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate ([(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP) as a photoaffinity probe. Photolysis of sea urchin egg homogenates preincubated with [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP resulted in specific labeling of 45-, 40-, and 30-kDa proteins, which was prevented by inclusion of nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled NAADP or 5N(3)-NAADP, but not by micromolar concentrations of structurally related nucleotides such as NAD, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP binding was saturable and displayed high affinity (K(d) ∼10 nM) in both binding and photolabeling experiments. [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP photolabeling was irreversible in a high K(+) buffer, a hallmark feature of NAADP binding in the egg system. The proteins photolabeled by [(32)P-5N(3)]NAADP have molecular masses smaller than the sea urchin TPCs, and antibodies to TPCs do not detect any immunoreactivity that comigrates with either the 45-kDa or the 40-kDa photolabeled proteins. Interestingly, antibodies to TPC1 and TPC3 were able to immunoprecipitate a small fraction of the 45- and 40-kDa photolabeled proteins, suggesting that these proteins associate with TPCs. These data suggest that high affinity NAADP binding sites are distinct from TPCs.

  5. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a second messenger in muscarinic receptor-induced contraction of guinea pig trachea.

    PubMed

    Aley, Parvinder K; Singh, Nisha; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen; Churchill, Grant C

    2013-04-19

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is increasingly being demonstrated to be involved in calcium signaling in many cell types and species. Although it has been shown to play a role in smooth muscle cell contraction in several tissues, nothing is known about its possible role in tracheal smooth muscle, a muscle type that is clinically relevant to asthma. To determine whether NAADP functions as a second messenger in tracheal smooth muscle contraction, we used the criteria set out by Sutherland for a molecule to be designated a second messenger. We report that NAADP satisfies all five criteria as follows. First, the NAADP antagonist Ned-19 inhibited contractions in tracheal rings and calcium increases in isolated smooth muscle cells induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Second, NAADP increased cytosolic calcium in isolated cells when microinjected and was blocked by Ned-19. Third, tracheal homogenates could synthesize NAADP by base exchange from exogenous NADP and nicotinic acid and metabolize exogenous NAADP to nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide by a 2'-phosphatase. Fourth, carbachol induced a rapid and transient increase in endogenous NAADP levels. Fifth, tracheal homogenates contained NAADP-binding sites of high affinity. Taken together, these data demonstrate that NAADP functions as a second messenger in tracheal smooth muscle, and therefore, steps in the NAADP signaling pathway might provide possible new drug targets.

  6. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors.

  7. Simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in milk by a novel enzyme-coupled assay.

    PubMed

    Ummarino, Simone; Mozzon, Massimo; Zamporlini, Federica; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2017-04-15

    Nicotinamide riboside, the most recently discovered form of vitamin B3, and its phosphorylated form nicotinamide mononucleotide, have been shown to be potent supplements boosting intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, thus preventing or ameliorating metabolic and mitochondrial diseases in mouse models. Here we report for the first time on the simultaneous quantitation of nicotinamide riboside, nicotinamide mononucleotide and NAD in milk by means of a fluorometric, enzyme-coupled assay. Application of this assay to milk from different species revealed that the three vitamers were present in human and donkey milk, while being selectively distributed in the other milks. Human milk was the richest source of nicotinamide mononucleotide. Overall, the three vitamers accounted for a significant fraction of total vitamin B3 content. Pasteurization did not affect the bovine milk content of nicotinamide riboside, whereas UHT processing fully destroyed the vitamin. In human milk, NAD levels were significantly affected by the lactation time.

  8. Study on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide adsorbed at nano-boehmite/water and nano-corundum/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xie, Yanfang; Wang, Yanping; Yang, Xiaodi; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the adsorption behaviors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) on nano-boehmite (γ-AlOOH) and nano-corundum (γ-Al(2)O(3)) surfaces were investigated. The results showed that NAD(+) was predominantly adsorbed at the boehmite/water and corundum/water interfaces in outer-sphere fashions by electrostatic interaction between NAD(+) phosphate and surface hydroxyl groups. However, the features of ATR-FTIR spectra suggested that some minor inner-sphere complex should be considered at low pH conditions on corundum surface, which was consistent with the effect of NAD(+) on dissolution rate of corundum. In addition, the adsorption data well fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms on the boehmite and corundum surfaces, respectively. Also, the Gibbs adsorption energy was negative on the boehmite surface, which indicated that the adsorption behavior was spontaneous.

  9. A label-free fluorescence DNA probe based on ligation reaction with quadruplex formation for highly sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Zhang, Liangliang; Jiang, Jianhui; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-05-11

    A simple label-free fluorescent sensing scheme for sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has been developed based on DNA ligation reaction with ligand-responsive quadruplex formation. This approach can detect 0.5 nM NAD(+) with high selectivity against other NAD(+) analogs.

  10. A Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Dispersed Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Electrode for Direct and Selective Electrochemical Detection of Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Li, Yiwei; Ma, Yaohong; Meng, Qingjun; Yan, Yan; Shi, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    A nanocomposite platform built with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) via a noncovalent interaction between the large π systems in NAD(+) molecules and MWCNTs on a glassy carbon substrate was successfully developed for the sensitive and selective detection of uric acid (UA) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA). NAD(+) has an adenine subunit and a nicotinamide subunit, which enabled interaction with the purine subunit of UA through a strong π-π interaction to enhance the specificity of UA. Compared with a bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and MWCNTs/GCE, the MWCNTs-NAD(+)/GCE showed a low background current and a remarkable enhancement of the oxidation peak current of UA. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), a high sensitivity for the determination of UA was explored for the MWCNTs-NAD(+) modified electrode. A linear relationship between the DPV peak current of UA and its concentration could be obtained in the range of 0.05 - 10 μM with the detection limit as low as 10 nM (S/N = 3). This present strategy provides a novel and promising platform for the detection of UA in human urine and serum samples.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  12. Purification and characterization of the enzymes involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide degradation by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829.

    PubMed

    Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a new pathway for the degradation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by Penicillium brevicompactum NRC 829 extracts. Enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of NAD, i.e. alkaline phosphatase, aminohydrolase and glycohydrolase were determined. Alkaline phosphatase was found to catalyse the sequential hydrolysis of two phosphate moieties of NAD molecule to nicotinamide riboside plus adenosine. Adenosine was then deaminated by aminohydrolase to inosine and ammonia. While glycohydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of the nicotinamide-ribosidic bond of NAD+ to produce nicotinamide and ADP-ribose in equimolar amounts, enzyme purification through a 3-step purification procedure revealed the existence of two peaks of alkaline phosphatases, and one peak contained deaminase and glycohydrolase activities. NAD deaminase was purified to homogeneity as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 91 kDa. Characterization and determination of some of NAD aminohydrolase kinetic properties were conducted due to its biological role in the regulation of cellular NAD level. The results also revealed that NAD did not exert its feedback control on nicotinamide amidase produced by P. brevicompactum.

  13. 5' End Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Cap in Human Cells Promotes RNA Decay through DXO-Mediated deNADding.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinfu; Doamekpor, Selom K; Bird, Jeremy G; Nickels, Bryce E; Tong, Liang; Hart, Ronald P; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2017-03-09

    Eukaryotic mRNAs generally possess a 5' end N7 methyl guanosine (m(7)G) cap that promotes their translation and stability. However, mammalian mRNAs can also carry a 5' end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) cap that, in contrast to the m(7)G cap, does not support translation but instead promotes mRNA decay. The mammalian and fungal noncanonical DXO/Rai1 decapping enzymes efficiently remove NAD(+) caps, and cocrystal structures of DXO/Rai1 with 3'-NADP(+) illuminate the molecular mechanism for how the "deNADding" reaction produces NAD(+) and 5' phosphate RNA. Removal of DXO from cells increases NAD(+)-capped mRNA levels and enables detection of NAD(+)-capped intronic small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), suggesting NAD(+) caps can be added to 5'-processed termini. Our findings establish NAD(+) as an alternative mammalian RNA cap and DXO as a deNADding enzyme modulating cellular levels of NAD(+)-capped RNAs. Collectively, these data reveal that mammalian RNAs can harbor a 5' end modification distinct from the classical m(7)G cap that promotes rather than inhibits RNA decay.

  14. Tea polyphenols regulate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit expression and ameliorate angiotensin II-induced hyperpermeability in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chen-Jiang; Xu, Jin-Wen; Ikeda, Katsumi; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nara, Yasuo; Yamori, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    Out-of-control reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is one of the key events in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and essential hypertension. We observed that tea polyphenols decreased the production of ROS via regulation of the protein expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in bovine carotid artery endothelial cells (BCAECs). Both green tea polyphenols (GTP) and black tea polyphenols (BTP) down-regulated the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p22phox and p67phox while up-regulating catalase expression (p < 0.05, respectively). Pre-treatment with GTP or BTP for 24 h significantly decreased the superoxide anion level (p < 0.05) and permeable fluorescence intensities in Ang II-stimulated BCAECs. A decrease in cell permeability was also observed by pre-treatment with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI) or vitamin E (p < 0.05, respectively). The result demonstrates that tea polyphenols alleviate angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hyperpermeability mainly by decreasing ROS production. Our results suggest that tea polyphenols regulate ROS-related protein expression and may be beneficial in preventing endothelial cell dysfunction and development of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension.

  15. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by a novel peroxidase-catalyzed process in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Li, Yuping; Cao, Hongbin; Li, Xingang; Zhang, Yi

    2011-03-01

    A novel horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed H₂O₂ process in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) was applied to remove aqueous pentachlorophenol (PCP). Parameters (pH, H₂O₂ concentration, HRP activity and NADH dosage) on PCP removal were investigated. It was found that initial 0.05mM PCP was removed by 98% in HRP-NADH-H₂O₂ system at pH 5.0 and 30°C for 1h. Addition of O₂ in HRP-NADH-H₂O₂ system enhanced the removal rate of PCP due to promoting hydroxyl radicals (.OH) and superoxide anion radical (.O₂⁻) generation, which were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping method. PCP removal efficiency decreased when .O₂⁻ and H₂O₂ were scavenged by superoxide dismutase and catalase in HRP-NADH-O₂ system, indicating that .OH/.O₂⁻ played a great role in the degradation of PCP. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that octachlorinated dibenzodioxin (OCDD) in residual solution was reduced after treated by the HRP-NADH-O₂ process, resulting in lower toxicity of treated solution than conventional enzymatic process. Two enzymatic-catalysis pathways were proposed for PCP removal in HRP-NADH-H₂O₂/O₂ system: (i) OH/.O₂⁻ free radical oxidation (ii) conventional phenoxy polymerization.

  16. Development of an enzymatic chromatography strip with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-tetrazolium coupling reactions for quantitative l-lactate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Feng; Lan, Min-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lai, Wei-Shiang; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Hsiung, Kuang-Pin; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2015-02-15

    In this study, a dry assay of l-lactate via the enzymatic chromatographic test (ECT) was developed. An l-lactate dehydrogenase plus a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) regeneration reaction were applied simultaneously. Various tetrazolium salts were screened to reveal visible color intensities capable of determining the lactate concentrations in the sample. The optimal analysis conditions were as follows. The diaphorase (0.5 μl, 2(-6)U/μl) was immobilized in the test line of the ECT strip. Nitrotetrazolium blue chloride (5 μl, 12 mM), l-lactate dehydrogenase (1 μl, 0.25U/μl), and NAD(+) (2μl, 1.5×10(-5)M) were added into the mobile phase (100 μl) composed of 0.1% (w/w) Tween 20 in 10mM phosphate buffer (pH 9.0), and the process was left to run for 10 min. This detection had a linear range of 0.039 to 5mM with a detection limit of 0.047 mM. This quantitative analysis process for l-lactate was easy to operate with good stability and was proper for the point-of-care testing applications.

  17. Localization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity in electrosensory and electromotor systems of a gymnotiform teleost, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Turner, R W; Moroz, L L

    1995-05-29

    The distribution of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) activity was determined in electrosensory and electromotor systems of the weakly electric gymnotiform teleost Apteronotus leptorhynchus as an indicator of putative nitric oxide synthase-containing cells. NADPH-d activity was detected in electroreceptors and in afferent nerves of both ampullary and type I and type II tuberous organs. All cell bodies within the anterior lateral line nerve ganglion were positive for NADPH-d activity, as were the primary afferent axons and termination fields in the medullary electrosensory lateral line lobe. In the corpus cerebelli and valvula cerebelli, NADPH-d label was present in Purkinje cell somata, mossy fiber synaptic glomeruli, granule cells, and parallel fibers. In the midbrain, NADPH-d activity was apparent in layer VIIIB of the torus semicircularis dorsalis and in electrosensory laminae of the optic tectum. NADPH-d was particularly associated with diencephalic electrosensory and electromotor nuclei, including the prepacemaker nucleus, the nucleus subelectrosensorius, and the central posterior nucleus of the thalamus. Intense NADPH-d activity was present in pacemaker and relay cells of the medullary pacemaker nucleus but was absent from a novel class of smaller cells in this structure. Relay cell axons and spinal electromotor neurons and their axons within the electric organ were positive for NADPH-d activity. These results indicate that putative nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons in Apteronotus are localized preferentially to electrosensory and electromotor structures, suggesting a role for nitric oxide in determining the activity of cells involved in detecting or generating weakly electric fields.

  18. Cytoprotection of pyruvic acid and reduced beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide against hydrogen peroxide toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2003-05-01

    Elevated production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the central nervous system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, ischemic reperfusion, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. Pyruvic acid has a critical role in energy metabolism and a capability to nonenzymatically decarboxylate H2O2 into H2O. This study examined the effects of glycolytic regulation of pyruvic acid on H2O2 toxicity in murine neuroblastoma cells. Glycolytic energy substrates including D-(+)-glucose, D-(-) fructose and the adenosine transport blocker dipyridamole, were not effective in providing protection against H2O2 toxicity, negating energy as a factor. On the other hand, pyruvic acid completely prevented H2O2 toxicity, restoring the loss of ATP and cell viability. H2O2 toxicity was also attenuated by D-fructose 1,6 diphosphate (FBP), phospho (enol) pyruvate (PEP), niacinamide, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD+), and reduced form (beta-NADH). Both FBP and PEP exerted positive kinetic effects on pyruvate kinase (PK) activity. Interestingly, only pyruvic acid and beta-NADH exhibited powerful stoichiometric H2O2 antioxidant properties. Further, beta-NADH may exert positive effects on PK activity. Subsequent pyruvic acid accumulation can lead to the recycling of beta-NAD+ through lactate dehydrogenase and beta-NADH through glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It was concluded from these studies that intracellular pyruvic acid and beta-NADH appear to act in concert through glycolysis, to enhance H2O2 intracellular antioxidant capacity in neuroblastoma cells. Future research will be required to examine whether similar effects are observed in primary neuronal culture or intact tissue.

  19. Noncompetitive and irreversible inhibition of xanthine oxidase by benzimidazole analogues acting at the functional flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor.

    PubMed

    Skibo, E B

    1986-07-29

    Benzimidazole derivatives possessing a leaving group in the 2 alpha-position and either 4,7-dione, 4,7-diol, or 4,7-dimethoxy substituents were examined as inhibitors of buttermilk xanthine oxidase. The quinone and hydroquinone derivatives are not inhibitors of xanthine-oxygen reductase activity, even though the latter is a powerful alkylating agent. The methoxylated hydroquinones are linear noncompetitive inhibitors, the best of which is the 2 alpha-bromo analogue (Ki = 46 microM). During xanthine-oxygen reductase activity, the 2 alpha-bromo analogue irreversibly traps the reduced enzyme. Formation of a C(4a) adduct of the reduced functional FAD cofactor is postulated on the basis of UV-visible spectral evidence and reconstitution of the enzyme after removal of the altered FAD. A probable sequence of events is reversible binding at or near the reduced cofactor followed by adduct formation. It is concluded that potent tight binding inhibitors could be designed that act at the FAD cofactor rather than the purine active site.

  20. Release of beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide upon stimulation of postganglionic nerve terminals in blood vessels and urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Lisa M; Bobalova, Janette; Mendoza, Michael G; Lew, Christy; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N

    2004-11-19

    Chemical signaling in autonomic neuromuscular transmission involves agents that function as neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators. Using high performance liquid chromatography techniques with fluorescence and electrochemical detection we observed that, in addition to ATP and norepinephrine (NE), electrical field stimulation (EFS, 4-16 Hz, 0.1-0.3 ms, 15 V, 60-120 s) of isolated vascular and non-vascular preparations co-releases a previously unidentified compound with apparent nucleotide or nucleoside structure. Extensive screening of more than 25 nucleotides and nucleosides followed by detailed peak identification revealed that beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD) is released in tissue superfusates upon EFS of canine mesenteric artery (CMA), canine urinary bladder, and murine urinary bladder in the amounts of 7.1 +/- 0.7, 26.5 +/- 4.5, and 15.1 +/- 3.2 fmol/mg of tissue, respectively. Smaller amounts of the beta-NAD metabolites cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) and ADPR were also present in the superfusates collected during EFS of CMA (2.5 +/- 0.9 and 5.8 +/- 0.8 fmol/mg of tissue, respectively), canine urinary bladder (1.8 +/- 0.5 and 9.0 +/- 6.0 fmol/mg of tissue, respectively), and murine urinary bladder (1.4 +/- 0.1 and 6.2 +/- 2.4 fmol/mg of tissue, respectively). The three nucleotides were also detected in the samples collected before EFS (0.2-1.6 fmol/mg of tissue). Exogenous beta-NAD, cADPR, and ADPR (all 100 nm) reduced the release of NE in CMA at 16 Hz from 27.8 +/- 6.0 fmol/mg of tissue to 15.5 +/- 5.0, 12 +/- 3.0, and 10.0 +/- 4.0 fmol/mg of tissue, respectively. In conclusion, we detected constitutive and nerve-evoked overflow of beta-NAD, cADPR, and ADPR in vascular and non-vascular smooth muscles, beta-NAD being the prevailing compound. These substances modulate the release of NE, implicating novel nucleotide mechanisms of autonomic nervous system control of smooth muscle.

  1. Changes of collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in human cancerous and normal prostate tissues studied using native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Tang, Guichen; Alfano, Robert R.

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence spectra of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues obtained by the selective excitation wavelength of 340 nm were measured. The contributions of principle biochemical components to tissue fluorescence spectra were investigated using the method of multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. The results show that there is a reduced contribution from the emission of collagen and increased contribution from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cancerous tissues as compared with normal tissue. This difference is attributed to the changes of relative contents of NADH and collagen during cancer development. This research may present a potential native biomarker for prostate cancer detection.

  2. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime detected poly(adenosine-5'-diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1-mediated cell death and therapeutic effect of pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Han-Wen; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Noninvasive detection of cell death has the potential for definitive diagnosis and monitoring treatment outcomes in real time. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence intensity has long been used as a noninvasive optical probe of metabolic states. NADH fluorescence lifetime has recently been studied for its potential as an alternative optical probe of cellular metabolic states and cell death. In this study, we investigated the potential using NADH fluorescence intensity and/or lifetime to detect poly(adenosine-5'-diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-mediated cell death in HeLa cells. We also examined if NADH signals respond to treatment by pyruvate. The mechanism of PARP-1-mediated cell death has been well studied that extensive PARP-1 activation leads to cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide depletion resulting in glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial failure, and death. Pyruvate could restore electron transport chain to prevent energy failure and death. Our results show that NADH fluorescence lifetime, not intensity, responded to PARP-1-mediated cell death and the rescue effect of pyruvate. This lifetime change of NADH fluorescence happened before the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial uncoupling. Together with our previous findings in staurosporine-induced cell death, we suggest that NADH fluorescence lifetime increase during cell death is mainly due to increased protein-protein interactions but not the intracellular NADH content.

  3. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  4. Facile synthesis of near infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters with tunable emission for 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and ethanol sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-07-30

    A facile chemical synthetic route was developed to prepare near-infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (Try-Ag NCs). The fluorescence emission wavelength of the produced Try-Ag NCs is tunable by simple adjusting pH value of the synthesis system, and the Try-Ag NCs offer a symmetric fluorescent excitation and emission peak. The fluorescence of Try-Ag NCs remains constant in the presence of various ions and molecules, and it can be effectively quenched by 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) instead of its oxidized forms nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This property enables the Try-Ag NCs to be a novel analytical platform to monitor biological reaction involved with NADH. In this work, the Try-Ag NCs was also applied to analyze ethanol based on the generation of NADH which was the product of NAD(+) and ethanol in the catalysis of alcohol dehydrogenase. And the proposed platform allowed ethanol to be determined in the range from 10 to 300 μmol/L with 5 μmol/L detection limit.

  5. Myeloma with xanthoderma due to an IgG lambdamonoclonal anti-flavin antibody.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, M; Osserman, E F

    1976-01-22

    When yellow skin and yellow hair developed in an elderly patient with multiple myeloma, we ruled out the usual causes of such pigmentation but identified a monoclonal IgGlambda (lgGGar) with anti-flavin antibody activity. Purified IgGGar was bright yellow, and the acid-dissociated chromophore was identified as riboflavin by chromatography and absorption spectroscopy. Native IgGGar contained 1.45 moles of flavin per mole of IgG, and increased to 2 moles with addition of riboflavin to saturation. The flavin was localized to the Fab fragment and was bound to IgGGar with high affinity. IgGGar showed strongest affinities for riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and lower affinities for dinitrophenyl derivatives and naphthoquinone. The demonstration of hapten bound to the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin in this case suggests the possibility of bound but colorless haptens on other myeloma proteins as well as on normal immunoglobulins.

  6. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3.

  7. Flavin nucleotides in human lens: regional distribution in brunescent cataracts.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K S; Nayak, S

    1998-12-01

    The biochemical mechanism(s) underlying brunescent cataracts remain unclear. Oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species may have a role in the pigmentation process in eye lens. We have analysed human cataractous lenses for flavins by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), since flavins are light sensitive and act as endogenous sensitizers generating reactive oxygen species in the eye. The most significant observation in this study is that higher levels of flavin nucleotides occur in brown lens compared to yellow lens. The concentration of flavin nucleotides (flavin monouncleotide, FMN + flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD) was highest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by the cortical and capsule-epithelial regions. However, the ratio of FAD/FMN was lowest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by other regions. On the other hand, riboflavin was not detected in any of the lens (cataractous) regions. These results suggest that the observed increase in flavin nucleotides in the ocular tissue could contribute towards deepening of lens pigmentation.

  8. Microsecond light-induced proton transfer to flavin in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Langenbacher, Thomas; Immeln, Dominik; Dick, Bernhard; Kottke, Tilman

    2009-10-14

    Plant cryptochromes are blue light photoreceptors that regulate key responses in growth and daily rhythm of plants and might be involved in magnetoreception. They show structural homology to the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and bind flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore. Blue light absorption initiates the photoreduction from the oxidized dark state of flavin to the flavin neutral radical, which is the signaling state of the sensor. Previous time-resolved studies of the photoreduction process have been limited to observation of the decay of the radical in the millisecond time domain. We monitored faster, light-induced changes in absorption of an algal cryptochrome covering a spectral range of 375-750 nm with a streak camera setup. Electron transfer from tryptophan to flavin is completed before 100 ns under formation of the flavin anion radical. Proton transfer takes place with a time constant of 1.7 micros leading to the flavin neutral radical. Finally, the flavin radical and a tryptophan neutral radical decay with a time constant >200 micros in the millisecond and second time domain. The microsecond proton transfer has not been observed in animal cryptochromes from insects or photolyases. Furthermore, the strict separation in time of electron and proton transfer is novel in the field of flavin-containing photoreceptors. The reaction rate implies that the proton donor is not in hydrogen bonding distance to the flavin N5. Potential candidates for the proton donor and the involvement of the tryptophan triad are discussed.

  9. Protonation mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malic enzyme reaction from isotope effects and pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1986-01-14

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and the primary deuterium isotope effects with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and also thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) as the nucleotide substrates were determined in order to obtain information about the chemical mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction. The maximum velocity with thio-NAD as the nucleotide is pH-independent from pH 4.2 to 9.6, while with NAD, V decreases below a pK of 4.8. V/K for both nucleotides decreases below a pK of 5.6 and above a pK of 8.9. Both the tartronate pKi and V/Kmalate decrease below a pK of 4.8 and above a pK of 8.9. Oxalate is competitive vs. malate above pH 7 and noncompetitive below pH 7 with NAD as the nucleotide. The oxalate Kis increases from a constant value above a pK of 4.9 to another constant value above a pK of 6.7. The oxalate Kii also increases above a pK of 4.9, and this inhibition is enhanced by NADH. In the presence of thio-NAD the inhibition by oxalate is competitive vs. malate below pH 7. For thio-NAD, both DV and D(V/K) are pH-independent and equal to 1.7. With NAD as the nucleotide, DV decreases to 1.0 below a pK of 4.9, while D(V/KNAD) and D(V/Kmalate) are pH-independent. Above pH 7 the isotope effects on V and the V/K values for NAD and malate are equal to 1.45, the pH-independent value of DV above pH 7. Results indicate that substrates bind to only the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Two enzyme groups are necessary for binding of substrates and catalysis. Both NAD and malate are released from the Michaelis complex at equal rates which are equal to the rate of NADH release from E-NADH above pH 7. Below pH 7 NADH release becomes more rate-determining as the pH decreases until at pH 4.0 it completely limits the overall rate of the reaction.

  10. Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sisó-Terraza, Patricia; Rios, Juan J; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition. Flavins secreted by Fe-deficient plants were removed from the nutrient solution, and plants were compared with Fe-sufficient plants and Fe-deficient plants without flavin removal. Solubilization of a scarcely soluble Fe(III)-oxide was assessed in the presence or absence of flavins, NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) or plant roots, and an Fe(II) trapping agent. The removal of flavins from the nutrient solution aggravated the Fe deficiency-induced leaf chlorosis. Flavins were able to dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide in the presence of NADH. The addition of extracellular flavins enabled roots of Fe-deficient plants to reductively dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide. We concluded that root-secretion of flavins improves Fe nutrition in B. vulgaris. Flavins allow B. vulgaris roots to mine Fe from Fe(III)-oxides via reductive mechanisms.

  11. Enhancement of anaerobic degradation of azo dye with riboflavin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide harvested by osmotic lysis of wasted fermentation yeasts.

    PubMed

    Victral, Davi M; Dias, Heitor R A; Silva, Silvana Q; Baeta, Bruno E L; Aquino, Sérgio F

    2017-02-01

    The study presented here aims at identifying the source of redox mediators (riboflavin), electron carriers nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and carbon to perform decolorization of azo dye under anaerobic conditions after osmotic shock pretreatment of residual yeast from industrial fermentation. Pretreatment conditions were optimized by Doehlert experiment, varying NaCl concentration, temperature, yeast density and time. After the optimization, the riboflavin concentration in the residual yeast lysate (RYL) was 46% higher than the one present in commercial yeast extract. Moreover, similar NAD concentration was observed in both extracts. Subsequently, two decolorization experiments were performed, that is, a batch experiment (48 h) and a kinetic experiment (102 h). The results of the batch experiment showed that the use of the RYL produced by the optimized method increased decolorization rates and led to color removal efficiencies similar to those found when using the commercial extract (∼80%) and from 23% to 50% higher when compared to the control (without redox mediators). Kinetics analysis showed that methane production was also higher in the presence of yeast extract and RYL, and biogas was mostly generated after stabilization of color removal. In all kinetics experiments the azo dye degradation followed the pseudo-second-order model, which suggested that there was a concomitant adsorption/degradation of the dye on the biomass cell surface. Therefore, results showed the possibility of applying the pretreated residual yeast to improve color removal under anaerobic conditions, which is a sustainable process.

  12. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs.

  13. Tissue-specific regulation of sirtuin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways identified in C57Bl/6 mice in response to high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Horgan, Graham W; Williams, Lynda M

    2016-11-01

    The sirtuin (SIRT)/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) system is implicated in development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diet-induced obesity, a major risk factor for T2D. Mechanistic links have not yet been defined. SIRT/NAD system gene expression and NAD/NADH levels were measured in liver, white adipose tissue (WAT) and skeletal muscle from mice fed either a low-fat diet or high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days up to 16 weeks. An in-house custom-designed multiplex gene expression assay assessed all 7 mouse SIRTs (SIRT1-7) and 16 enzymes involved in conversion of tryptophan, niacin, nicotinamide riboside and metabolic precursors to NAD. Significantly altered transcription was correlated with body weight, fat mass, plasma lipids and hormones. Regulation of the SIRT/NAD system was associated with early (SIRT4, SIRT7, NAPRT1 and NMNAT2) and late phases (NMNAT3, NMRK2, ABCA1 and CD38) of glucose intolerance. TDO2 and NNMT were identified as markers of HFD consumption. Altered regulation of the SIRT/NAD system in response to HFD was prominent in liver compared with WAT or muscle. Multiple components of the SIRTs and NAD biosynthetic enzymes network respond to consumption of dietary fat. Novel molecular targets identified above could direct strategies for dietary/therapeutic interventions to limit metabolic dysfunction and development of T2D.

  14. Protective effect of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Zhenfei; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Liang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    As previous studies demonstrate that oxidative stress and apoptosis play crucial roles in ischemic pathogenesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) treatment attenuates oxidative stress-induced cell death among primary neurons and astrocytes as well as significantly reduce cerebral ischemic injury in rats. We used a spinal cord ischemia injury (SCII) model in rats to verify our hypothesis that NAD(+) could ameliorate oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. Adult male rats were subjected to transient spinal cord ischemia for 60min, and different doses of NAD(+) were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the start of reperfusion. Neurological function was determined by Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores. The oxidative stress level was assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. The degree of apoptosis was analyzed by deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF (apoptosis inducing factor). The results showed that NAD(+) at 50 or 100mg/kg significantly decreased the oxidative stress level and neuronal apoptosis in the spinal cord of ischemia-reperfusion rats compared with saline, as accompanied with the decreased oxidative stress, NAD(+) administration significantly restrained the neuronal apoptosis after ischemia injury while improved the neurological and motor function. These findings suggested that NAD(+) might protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion via reducing oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

  15. Differential effect of pH upon cyclic-ADP-ribose and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release systems.

    PubMed Central

    Chini, E N; Liang, M; Dousa, T P

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the pH dependence and the effects of thimerosal and dithiothreitol (DTT) upon the Ca2+ release induced by cADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in sea urchin egg homogenates. Both Ca2+ release triggered by cADPR and the binding of [3H]cADPR to sea urchin egg homogenates were decreased by alkalization of the assay media from pH 7.2 to 8.9. In contrast, NAADP-triggered Ca2+ release was not influenced by changes in pH. The Ca2+ release induced by cADPR was potentiated by thimerosal and inhibited by DTT, but neither thimerosal nor DTT had any effect upon the Ca2+ release induced by NAADP. We conclude that cADPR-sensitive Ca2+-release mechanisms are dependent on pH of the assay media and are sensitive to thiol group modification. On the other hand, these functional properties are not shared by NAADP-regulated Ca2+ channels. PMID:9794787

  16. Increase of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime precedes mitochondrial dysfunction in staurosporine-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Sin; Guo, Han-Wen; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-03-01

    In vivo noninvasive detection of apoptosis represents a new tool that may yield a more definite diagnosis, a more accurate prognosis, and help improve therapies for human diseases. The intrinsic fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be a potential optical biomarker for the apoptosis detection because NADH is involved in the respiration for the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) formation and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, and the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP level is the hallmark of apoptosis. We have previously observed the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with staurosporine (STS)-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. However, its relationship with mitochondrial functions such as ΔΨ, ATP, and oxygen consumption rate is not clear. In this study, we investigated this relationship. Our results indicate that the NADH fluorescence lifetime increased when ΔΨ and ATP levels were equal to or higher than their values of controls and decreased before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP, and the oxygen consumption rate did not change. These findings suggest that the increased NADH fluorescence lifetime in STS-induced cell death occurred before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP and activation of caspase 3, and was not simply caused by cellular metabolic change. Furthermore, the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with the pace of apoptosis.

  17. Discovery of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Binding Proteins in the Escherichia coli Proteome Using a Combined Energetic- and Structural-Bioinformatics-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingfei; Shin, Woong-Hee; Zhu, Xiaolei; Park, Sung Hoon; Park, Chiwook; Tao, W Andy; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-02-03

    Protein-ligand interaction plays a critical role in regulating the biochemical functions of proteins. Discovering protein targets for ligands is vital to new drug development. Here, we present a strategy that combines experimental and computational approaches to identify ligand-binding proteins in a proteomic scale. For the experimental part, we coupled pulse proteolysis with filter-assisted sample preparation (FASP) and quantitative mass spectrometry. Under denaturing conditions, ligand binding affected protein stability, which resulted in altered protein abundance after pulse proteolysis. For the computational part, we used the software Patch-Surfer2.0. We applied the integrated approach to identify nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding proteins in the Escherichia coli proteome, which has over 4200 proteins. Pulse proteolysis and Patch-Surfer2.0 identified 78 and 36 potential NAD-binding proteins, respectively, including 12 proteins that were consistently detected by the two approaches. Interestingly, the 12 proteins included 8 that are not previously known as NAD binders. Further validation of these eight proteins showed that their binding affinities to NAD computed by AutoDock Vina are higher than their cognate ligands and also that their protein ratios in the pulse proteolysis are consistent with known NAD-binding proteins. These results strongly suggest that these eight proteins are indeed newly identified NAD binders.

  18. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  19. Oxidation of C1 Compounds by Particulate fractions from Methylococcus capsulatus: distribution and properties of methane-dependent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase (methane hydroxylase).

    PubMed Central

    Ribbons, D W

    1975-01-01

    Cell-free particulate fractions of extracts from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus catalyze the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and O2-dependent oxidation of methane (methane hydroxylase). The only oxidation product detected was formate. These preparations also catalyze the oxidation of methanol and formaldehyde to formate in the presence or absence of phenazine methosulphate with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Methane hydroxylase activity cannot be reproducibly obtained from disintegrated cell suspensions even though the whole cells actively respired when methane was presented as a substrate. Varying the disintegration method or extraction medium had no significant effect on the activities obtained. When active particles were obtained, hydroxylase activity was stable at 0 C for days. Methane hydroxylase assays were made by measuring the methane-dependent oxidation of NADH by O2. In separate experiments, methane consumption and the accumulation of formate were also demonstrated. Formate is not oxidized by these particulate fractions. The effects of particle concentration, temperature, pH, and phosphate concentration on enzymic activity are described. Ethane is utilized in the presence of NADH and O2. The stoichiometric relationships of the reaction(s) with methane as substrate were not established since (i) the presumed initial product, methanol, is also oxidized to formate, and (ii) the contribution that NADH oxidase activity makes to the observed consumption of reactants could not be assessed in the presence of methane. Studies with known inhibitors of electron transport systems indicate that the path of electron flow from NADH to oxygen is different for the NADH oxidase, methane hydroxylase, and methanol oxidase activities. Images PMID:238946

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Leads to Hyperoxidation and Nitrosylation of Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor-1 Associated with Upregulation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Harlow, Lauren; Graham, Zachary A; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2017-02-27

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in marked atrophy and dysfunction of skeletal muscle. There are currently no effective treatments for SCI-induced muscle atrophy or the dysfunction of the remaining muscle tissue. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-4 (Nox4) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and has been identified as an important O2 sensor in skeletal muscle. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are calcium (Ca(2+)) channels that are responsible for Ca(2+) release from SR. In skeletal muscle, type1 RyR (RyR1) is predominantly functional. RyR1 is regulated by multiple proteins, including calstabin1, which assures that they close appropriately once contraction has ceased. RyR1 function is also regulated by oxidation and redox-dependent cysteine nitrosylation. Excessive oxidation/nitrosylation of RyR1 is associated with dissociation of calstabin1 and reduced muscle force generation. However, whether Nox4 levels in skeletal muscle are elevated or whether RyR1 is oxidized or nitrosylated after SCI has not been determined. In this study, we examined Nox4 expression, oxidation/nitrolysation status, and association of calstabin1 with RyR1 in skeletal muscle derived from rats that were subjected to T4 complete transection (SCI), and observed elevated expression of Nox4 messenger RNA and protein in muscle after SCI associated with enhanced binding of Nox4 to RyR1, increased oxidation and nitrosylation of RyR1, and dissociation of calstabin1 from RyR1 in SCI rat muscle. Our data suggest that RyR1 dysfunction resulting from excessive oxidation/nitrosylation may contribute to reduced specific force after SCI and suggest that Nox4 may be the source of ROS responsible for increased oxidation and nitrosylation of RyR1.

  1. A Novel Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Correction Method for Mitochondrial Ca2+ Measurement with FURA-2-FF in Single Permeabilized Ventricular Myocytes of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Ha, Jeong Mi

    2015-01-01

    Fura-2 analogs are ratiometric fluoroprobes that are widely used for the quantitative measurement of [Ca2+]. However, the dye usage is intrinsically limited, as the dyes require ultraviolet (UV) excitation, which can also generate great interference, mainly from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) autofluorescence. Specifically, this limitation causes serious problems for the quantitative measurement of mitochondrial [Ca2+], as no available ratiometric dyes are excited in the visible range. Thus, NADH interference cannot be avoided during quantitative measurement of [Ca2+] because the majority of NADH is located in the mitochondria. The emission intensity ratio of two different excitation wavelengths must be constant when the fluorescent dye concentration is the same. In accordance with this principle, we developed a novel online method that corrected NADH and Fura-2-FF interference. We simultaneously measured multiple parameters, including NADH, [Ca2+], and pH/mitochondrial membrane potential; Fura-2-FF for mitochondrial [Ca2+] and TMRE for Ψm or carboxy-SNARF-1 for pH were used. With this novel method, we found that the resting mitochondrial [Ca2+] concentration was 1.03 µM. This 1 µM cytosolic Ca2+ could theoretically increase to more than 100 mM in mitochondria. However, the mitochondrial [Ca2+] increase was limited to ~30 µM in the presence of 1 µM cytosolic Ca2+. Our method solved the problem of NADH signal contamination during the use of Fura-2 analogs, and therefore the method may be useful when NADH interference is expected. PMID:26170742

  2. The distribution of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial and spinal nerves of frog, Microhyla ornata.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Arun G; Biswas, Saikat P; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Pinelli, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) enzymatic activity has been reported in few amphibian species. In this study, we report its unusual localization in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial nerves, spinal nerves, and ganglions of the frog, Microhyla ornata. In the rhombencephalon, at the level of facial and vagus nerves, the NADPH-d labeling was noted in the nucleus of the abducent and facial nerves, dorsal nucleus of the vestibulocochlear nerve, the nucleus of hypoglossus nerve, dorsal and lateral column nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the dorsal field of spinal grey, the lateral and medial motor fields of spinal grey and radix ventralis and dorsalis (2-10). Many ependymal cells around the lining of the fourth ventricle, both facial and vagus nerves and dorsal root ganglion, were intensely labeled with NADPH-d. Most strikingly the NADPH-d activity was seen in small and large sized motoneurons in both medial and lateral motor neuron columns on the right and left sides of the brain. This is the largest stained group observed from the caudal rhombencephalon up to the level of radix dorsalis 10 in the spinal cord. The neurons were either oval or elongated in shape with long processes and showed significant variation in the nuclear and cellular diameter. A massive NADPH-d activity in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, and spinal nerves implied an important role of this enzyme in the neuronal signaling as well as in the modulation of motor functions in the peripheral nervous systems of the amphibians.

  3. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  4. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase–Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Katie Y.; Montezano, Augusto C.; Harvey, Adam P.; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)–induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen–Nox–dependent processes was studied in female Nox1−/− and Nox4−/− mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2–regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1−/− but not Nox4−/− mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1−/− mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2

  5. Hydrogen-bonding modulation of excited-state properties of flavins in a model of aqueous confined environment.

    PubMed

    Valle, Lorena; Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2012-06-01

    The singlet and triplet excited states properties of lumiflavin (LF), riboflavin (RF), flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in reversed micelles (RM) of sodium docusate (AOT) in n-hexane solutions were evaluated as a function of the water to surfactant molar ratio, w(0) = [H(2)O]/[AOT], by both steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that hydrogen-bonding interactions between the isoalloxazine ring of the flavins with the water molecules of the micellar interior play a crucial role on the modulation of the excited state properties of the flavins. Fluorescence dynamic experiments in the RM, allowed the calculation of similar values for both the internal rotational time of the flavins (θ(i)) and the hydrogen-bonding relaxation time (τ(HB)), e.g.≈ 7 and 1.5 ns at w(0) = 1 and 20, respectively. In turn, the triplet state lifetimes of the flavins were also enlarged in RM solutions at low w(0), without modifications of their quantum yields. A hydrogen bonding relaxation model is proposed to explain the singlet excited state properties of the flavins, while the changes of the triplet state decays of the flavins were related with the global composition and strength of the hydrogen bonding network inside of the RM.

  6. A Mutation in the Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Oxidoreductase FOXRED1 Results in Cell-Type-Specific Assembly Defects in Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes I and II

    PubMed Central

    Zurita Rendón, Olga; Antonicka, Hana; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a large multisubunit enzyme that catalyzes the first step in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In mammals, complex I biogenesis occurs in a stepwise manner, a process that requires the participation of several nucleus-encoded accessory proteins. The FAD-dependent oxidoreductase-containing domain 1 (FOXRED1) protein is a complex I assembly factor; however, its specific role in the assembly pathway remains poorly understood. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1308 G→A (p.V421M) in FOXRED1 in a patient who presented with epilepsy and severe psychomotor retardation. A patient myoblast line showed a severe reduction in complex I, associated with the accumulation of subassemblies centered around ∼340 kDa, and a milder decrease in complex II, all of which were rescued by retroviral expression of wild-type FOXRED1. Two additional assembly factors, AIFM1 and ACAD9, coimmunoprecipitated with FOXRED1, and all were associated with a 370-kDa complex I subassembly that, together with a 315-kDa subassembly, forms the 550-kDa subcomplex. Loss of FOXRED1 function prevents efficient formation of this midassembly subcomplex. Although we could not identify subassemblies of complex II, our results establish that FOXRED1 function is both broader than expected, involving the assembly of two flavoprotein-containing OXPHOS complexes, and cell type specific. PMID:27215383

  7. Dynamic and static quenching of 1,N6-ethenoadenine fluorescence in nicotinamide 1,N6-ethenoadenine dinucleotide and in 1,N6-etheno-9-(3-(indol-3-yl) propyl) adenine.

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, B A; Leonard, N J

    1975-01-01

    For nicotinamide 1,N6-ethenoadenine dinucleotide (epsilonNAD+), the fluorescent analog of NAD+, in neutral aqueous solution the quantum yield has been determined to be 0.028 and the fluorescent lifetime, 2.1 nsec. Simultaneous determination of quantum yields and lifetimes of epsilonNAD+ and of the "half molecule" epsilonAMP allows the calculation of the percentage of stacked and open conformations of the dinucleotide. At 25 degrees in neutral aqueous solution there is 45 +/- 5% of stacked forms. The value of the fluorescent impurities, especially those containing the epsilon-adenosine moiety, and a purification procedure using high performance liquid chromatography was devised to obtain fluorescently homogeneous preparations. In order to study the effect on epsilon-adenosine fluorescence caused by the possible close proximity of a tryptophan in a polypeptide chain or protein, we have prepared 1,N6-etheno-9-[3-(indol-3-yl)propyl]adenine (epsilonAde9-C3-Ind3), a model compound in which indole is used as a neutral substitute for tryptophan. Fluorescence studies on epsilonAde9-C3-Ind3 show that the formation of an intramolecular complex results in complete quenching of the epsilon-adenine fluorescence. It is therefore predictable that positioning of the epsilon-adenosine of any fluorescent coenzyme moiety (e.q., epsilonATP, epsilonADP) in close proximity to a tryptophan in a protein will result in complete fluorescence quenching of the former. PMID:172889

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of flavins and flavoenzymes: photochemical and photophysical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Petra A. W.; Widengren, Jerker; Hink, Mark A.; Rigler, Rudolf; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2001-09-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) was used to investigate the excited-state properties of flavins and flavoproteins in solution at the single molecule level. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and lipoamide dehydrogenase served as model systems in which the flavin cofactor is either free in solution (FMN, FAD) or enclosed in a protein environment as prosthetic group (lipoamide dehydrogenase). Parameters such as excitation light intensity, detection time and chromophore concentration were varied in order to optimize the autocorrelation traces. Only in experiments with very low light intensity (<10 kW/cm 2), FMN and FAD displayed fluorescence properties equivalent to those found with conventional fluorescence detection methods. Due to the high triplet quantum yield of FMN, the system very soon starts to build up a population of non-fluorescent molecules, which is reflected in an apparent particle number far too low for the concentration used. Intramolecular photoreduction and subsequent photobleaching may well explain these observations. The effect of photoreduction was clearly shown by titration of FMN with ascorbic acid. While titration of FMN with the quenching agent potassium iodide at higher concentrations (> 50 mM of I -) resulted in quenched flavin fluorescence as expected, low concentrations of potassium iodide led to a net enhancement of the de-excitation rate from the triplet state, thereby improving the fluorescence signal. FCS experiments on FAD exhibited an improved photostability of FAD as compared to FMN: As a result of stacking of the adenine and flavin moieties, FAD has a considerably lower triplet quantum yield. Correlation curves of lipoamide dehydrogenase yielded correct values for the diffusion time and number of molecules at low excitation intensities. However, experiments at higher light intensities revealed a process which can be explained by photophysical relaxation or photochemical destruction of the

  9. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy of flavin after optical excitation.

    PubMed

    Weigel, A; Dobryakov, A; Klaumünzer, B; Sajadi, M; Saalfrank, P; Ernsting, N P

    2011-04-07

    In blue-light photoreceptors using flavin (BLUF), the signaling state is formed already within several 100 ps after illumination, with only small changes of the absorption spectrum. The accompanying structural evolution can, in principle, be monitored by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). The method is used here to characterize the excited-state properties of riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide in polar solvents. Raman modes are observed in the range 90-1800 cm(-1) for the electronic ground state S(0) and upon excitation to the S(1) state, and modes >1000 cm(-1) of both states are assigned with the help of quantum-chemical calculations. Line shapes are shown to depend sensitively on resonance conditions. They are affected by wavepacket motion in any of the participating electronic states, resulting in complex amplitude modulation of the stimulated Raman spectra. Wavepackets in S(1) can be marked, and thus isolated, by stimulated-emission pumping with the picosecond Raman pulses. Excited-state absorption spectra are obtained from a quantitative comparison of broadband transient fluorescence and absorption. In this way, the resonance conditions for FSRS are determined. Early differences of the emission spectrum depend on excess vibrational energy, and solvation is seen as dynamic Stokes shift of the emission band. The nπ* state is evidenced only through changes of emission oscillator strength during solvation. S(1) quenching by adenine is seen with all methods in terms of dynamics, not by spectral intermediates.

  10. Purification, Characterization, and Overexpression of Flavin Reductase Involved in Dibenzothiophene Desulfurization by Rhodococcus erythropolis D-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Ohshiro, Takashi; Nishina, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Yoshikazu

    2001-01-01

    The dibenzothiophene (DBT)-desulfurizing bacterium, Rhodococcus erythropolis D-1, removes sulfur from DBT to form 2-hydroxybiphenyl using four enzymes, DszC, DszA, DszB, and flavin reductase. In this study, we purified and characterized the flavin reductase from R. erythropolis D-1 grown in a medium containing DBT as the sole source of sulfur. It is conceivable that the enzyme is essential for two monooxygenase (DszC and DszA) reactions in vivo. The purified flavin reductase contains no chromogenic cofactors and was found to have a molecular mass of 86 kDa and four identical 22-kDa subunits. The enzyme catalyzed NADH-dependent reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and the Km values for NADH and FMN were 208 and 10.8 μM, respectively. Flavin adenine dinucleotide was a poor substrate, and NADPH was inert. The enzyme did not catalyze reduction of any nitroaromatic compound. The optimal temperature and optimal pH for enzyme activity were 35°C and 6.0, respectively, and the enzyme retained 30% of its activity after heat treatment at 80°C for 30 min. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified flavin reductase was identical to that of DszD of R. erythropolis IGTS8 (K. A. Gray, O. S. Pogrebinsky, G. T. Mrachko, L. Xi, D. J. Monticello, and C. H. Squires, Nat. Biotechnol. 14:1705–1709, 1996). The flavin reductase gene was amplified with primers designed by using dszD of R. erythropolis IGTS8, and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The specific activity in crude extracts of the overexpressed strain was about 275-fold that of the wild-type strain. PMID:11229908

  11. Molecular characterization of Fasciola hepatica and phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) genes from the North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Reaghi, Saber; Haghighi, Ali; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Spotin, Adel; Arzamani, Kourosh; Rouhani, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Fascioliasis is one of the most zoonotic diseases with global extension. As the epidemiological distribution of Fasciola may lead to various genetic patterns of the parasite, the aim of this study is to identify Fasciola hepatica based on spermatogenesis, and phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I [ND1] and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) gene marker. Materials and Methods: In this study, 90 F. hepatica collected from 30 cattle at slaughterhouse located in three different geographical locations in the North-East of Iran were evaluated based on spermatogenetic ability and internal transcribed spacer 1 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship using mtDNA gene marker for the isolates from the North-East of Iran, and other countries were then analyzed. Results: Partial sequences of mtDNA showed eight haplotypes in both genes. The phylogenic analysis using neighbor joining as well as maximum likelihood methods showed similar topologies of trees. Pairwise fixation index between different F. hepatica populations calculated from the nucleotide data set of ND1 gene are statistically significant and show the genetic difference. Conclusion: F. hepatica found in this region of Iran has different genetic structures through the other Fasciola populations in the world. PMID:27733809

  12. An essential role for UshA in processing of extracellular flavin electron shuttles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth D; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Kotloski, Nicholas J; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis can reduce a number of insoluble extracellular metals. Direct adsorption of cells to the metal surface is not necessary, and it has been shown that S. oneidensis releases low concentrations flavins, including riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), into the surrounding medium to act as extracellular electron shuttles. However, the mechanism of flavin release by Shewanella remains unknown. We have conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen to identify mutants deficient in extracellular flavin accumulation. Mutations in ushA, encoding a predicted 5'-nucleotidase, resulted in accumulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in culture supernatants, with a corresponding decrease in FMN and riboflavin. Cellular extracts of S. oneidensis convert FAD to FMN, whereas extracts of ushA mutants do not, and fractionation experiments show that UshA activity is periplasmic. We hypothesize that S. oneidensis secretes FAD into the periplasmic space, where it is hydrolysed by UshA to FMN and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). FMN diffuses through outer membrane porins where it accelerates extracellular electron transfer, and AMP is dephosphorylated by UshA and reassimilated by the cell. We predict that transport of FAD into the periplasm also satisfies the cofactor requirement of the unusual periplasmic fumarate reductase found in Shewanella.

  13. Sinorhizobium meliloti flavin secretion and bacteria-host interaction: role of the bifunctional RibBA protein.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Rice, Jennifer; Domreis, Elizabeth; Lynch, Joseph; Sa, Na; Qamar, Zeeshan; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Roje, Sanja; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2014-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago spp. and other legumes, secretes a considerable amount of riboflavin. This precursor of the cofactors flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide is a bioactive molecule that has a beneficial effect on plant growth. The ribBA gene of S. meliloti codes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps of the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. We show here that an in-frame deletion of ribBA does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy or affect the ability of S. meliloti to establish an effective symbiosis with the host plant but does affect the ability of the bacteria to secrete flavins, colonize host-plant roots, and compete for nodulation. A strain missing the RibBA protein retains considerable GTP cyclohydrolase II activity. Based on these results, we hypothesize that S. meliloti has two partly interchangeable modules for biosynthesis of riboflavin, one fulfilling the internal need for flavins in bacterial metabolism and the other producing riboflavin for secretion. Our data also indicate that bacteria-derived flavins play a role in communication between rhizobia and the legume host and that the RibBA protein is important in this communication process even though it is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis and symbiosis.

  14. Distribution of valence electrons of the flavin cofactor in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Takaba, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kazuki; Kosugi, Masayuki; Tamada, Taro; Miki, Kunio

    2017-01-01

    Flavin compounds such as flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin make up the active centers in flavoproteins that facilitate various oxidoreductive processes. The fine structural features of the hydrogens and valence electrons of the flavin molecules in the protein environment are critical to the functions of the flavoproteins. However, information on these features cannot be obtained from conventional protein X-ray analyses at ordinary resolution. Here we report the charge density analysis of a flavoenzyme, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R), at an ultra-high resolution of 0.78 Å. Valence electrons on the FAD cofactor as well as the peptide portion, which are clearly visualized even after the conventional refinement, are analyzed by the multipolar atomic model refinement. The topological analysis for the determined electron density reveals the valence electronic structure of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protein environment. The tetrahedral electronic distribution around the N5 atom of FAD in b5R is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with CαH of Tyr65 and amide-H of Thr66. The hydrogen bonding network leads to His49 composing the cytochrome b5-binding site via non-classical hydrogen bonds between N5 of FAD and CαH of Tyr65 and O of Tyr65 and CβH of His49. PMID:28225078

  15. Evolution of function in the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Sunil; Meng, Elaine C; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2007-07-01

    Structural and biochemical constraints force some segments of proteins to evolve more slowly than others, often allowing identification of conserved structural or sequence motifs that can be associated with substrate binding properties, chemical mechanisms, and molecular functions. We have assessed the functional and structural constraints imposed by cofactors on the evolution of new functions in a superfamily of flavoproteins characterized by two-dinucleotide binding domains, the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins (tDBDF) superfamily. Although these enzymes catalyze many different types of oxidation/reduction reactions, each is initiated by a stereospecific hydride transfer reaction between two cofactors, a pyridine nucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Sequence and structural analysis of more than 1,600 members of the superfamily reveals new members and identifies details of the evolutionary connections among them. Our analysis shows that in all of the highly divergent families within the superfamily, these cofactors adopt a conserved configuration optimal for stereospecific hydride transfer that is stabilized by specific interactions with amino acids from several motifs distributed among both dinucleotide binding domains. The conservation of cofactor configuration in the active site restricts the pyridine nucleotide to interact with FAD from the re-side, limiting the flow of electrons from the re-side to the si-side. This directionality of electron flow constrains interactions with the different partner proteins of different families to occur on the same face of the cofactor binding domains. As a result, superimposing the structures of tDBDFs aligns not only these interacting proteins, but also their constituent electron acceptors, including heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Thus, not only are specific aspects of the cofactor-directed chemical mechanism conserved across the superfamily, the constraints they impose are manifested in the

  16. Chloramphenicol Biosynthesis: The Structure of CmlS, a Flavin-Dependent Halogenase Shwing a Covalent Flavin-Aspartate Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Podzelinska, K.; Latimer, R; Bhattacharya, A; Vining, L; Zechel, D; Jia, Z

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a halogenated natural product bearing an unusual dichloroacetyl moiety that is critical for its antibiotic activity. The operon for chloramphenicol biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae encodes the chloramphenicol halogenase CmlS, which belongs to the large and diverse family of flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH's). CmlS was previously shown to be essential for the formation of the dichloroacetyl group. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CmlS determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a flavin monooxygenase domain shared by all FDHs, but also a unique 'winged-helix' C-terminal domain that creates a T-shaped tunnel leading to the halogenation active site. Intriguingly, the C-terminal tail of this domain blocks access to the halogenation active site, suggesting a structurally dynamic role during catalysis. The halogenation active site is notably nonpolar and shares nearly identical residues with Chondromyces crocatus tyrosyl halogenase (CndH), including the conserved Lys (K71) that forms the reactive chloramine intermediate. The exception is Y350, which could be used to stabilize enolate formation during substrate halogenation. The strictly conserved residue E44, located near the isoalloxazine ring of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, is optimally positioned to function as a remote general acid, through a water-mediated proton relay, which could accelerate the reaction of the chloramine intermediate during substrate halogenation, or the oxidation of chloride by the FAD(C4{alpha})-OOH intermediate. Strikingly, the 8{alpha} carbon of the FAD cofactor is observed to be covalently attached to D277 of CmlS, a residue that is highly conserved in the FDH family. In addition to representing a new type of flavin modification, this has intriguing implications for the mechanism of FDHs. Based on the crystal structure and in analogy to known halogenases, we propose a reaction mechanism for CmlS.

  17. Investigations of blue light-induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide on inactivation of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji-Yuan; Cheng, Chien-Wei; Yu, Chin-Hao; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2015-02-01

    The micronutrients in many cellular processes, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are photo-sensitive to UV and visible light for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Produced from phosphorylation of riboflavin, FMN is more water-soluble and rapidly transformed into free riboflavin after ingestion. This study investigated the application of visible blue light with FMN to development of an effective antimicrobial treatment. The photosensitization of bacterial viability with FMN was investigated by light quality, intensity, time, and irradiation dosage. The blue light-induced photochemical reaction with FMN could inactivate Escherichiacoli by the generated ROS in damaging nucleic acids, which was validated. This novel photodynamic technique could be a safe practice for photo-induced inactivation of environmental microorganism to achieve hygienic requirements in food processing.

  18. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves.

  19. Genetic Control of Biosynthesis and Transport of Riboflavin and Flavin Nucleotides and Construction of Robust Biotechnological Producers†

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Charles A.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Riboflavin [7,8-dimethyl-10-(1′-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine, vitamin B2] is an obligatory component of human and animal diets, as it serves as the precursor of flavin coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are involved in oxidative metabolism and other processes. Commercially produced riboflavin is used in agriculture, medicine, and the food industry. Riboflavin synthesis starts from GTP and ribulose-5-phosphate and proceeds through pyrimidine and pteridine intermediates. Flavin nucleotides are synthesized in two consecutive reactions from riboflavin. Some microorganisms and all animal cells are capable of riboflavin uptake, whereas many microorganisms have distinct systems for riboflavin excretion to the medium. Regulation of riboflavin synthesis in bacteria occurs by repression at the transcriptional level by flavin mononucleotide, which binds to nascent noncoding mRNA and blocks further transcription (named the riboswitch). In flavinogenic molds, riboflavin overproduction starts at the stationary phase and is accompanied by derepression of enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis, sporulation, and mycelial lysis. In flavinogenic yeasts, transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis is exerted by iron ions and not by flavins. The putative transcription factor encoded by SEF1 is somehow involved in this regulation. Most commercial riboflavin is currently produced or was produced earlier by microbial synthesis using special selected strains of Bacillus subtilis, Ashbya gossypii, and Candida famata. Whereas earlier RF overproducers were isolated by classical selection, current producers of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides have been developed using modern approaches of metabolic engineering that involve overexpression of structural and regulatory genes of the RF biosynthetic pathway as well as genes involved in the overproduction of the purine precursor of riboflavin, GTP. PMID:21646432

  20. Two-pore Channels (TPC2s) and Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) at Lysosomal-Sarcoplasmic Reticular Junctions Contribute to Acute and Chronic β-Adrenoceptor Signaling in the Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Capel, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Emma L.; Lin, Wee K.; Aston, Daniel; Wang, Yanwen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Burton, Rebecca-Ann B.; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Shade, Kai-Ting; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C.; Lei, Ming; Galione, Antony; Terrar, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-permeable type 2 two-pore channels (TPC2) are lysosomal proteins required for nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-evoked Ca2+ release in many diverse cell types. Here, we investigate the importance of TPC2 proteins for the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. NAADP-AM failed to enhance Ca2+ responses in cardiac myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice, unlike myocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors suppressed actions of NAADP in myocytes. Ca2+ transients and contractions accompanying action potentials were increased by isoproterenol in myocytes from WT mice, but these effects of β-adrenoreceptor stimulation were reduced in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice. Increases in amplitude of L-type Ca2+ currents evoked by isoproterenol remained unchanged in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice showing no loss of β-adrenoceptors or coupling mechanisms. Whole hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice also showed reduced inotropic effects of isoproterenol and a reduced tendency for arrhythmias following acute β-adrenoreceptor stimulation. Hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice chronically exposed to isoproterenol showed less cardiac hypertrophy and increased threshold for arrhythmogenesis compared with WT controls. Electron microscopy showed that lysosomes form close contacts with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (separation ∼25 nm). We propose that Ca2+-signaling nanodomains between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum dependent on NAADP and TPC2 comprise an important element in β-adrenoreceptor signal transduction in cardiac myocytes. In summary, our observations define a role for NAADP and TPC2 at lysosomal/sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions as unexpected but major contributors in the acute actions of β-adrenergic signaling in the heart and also in stress pathways linking chronic stimulation of β-adrenoceptors to hypertrophy and associated arrhythmias. PMID:26438825

  1. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Based Therapeutics, Update.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, K W; Petrelli, R; Singh, R; Felczak, K

    2015-01-01

    About 500 NAD (P)-dependent enzymes in the cell use NAD (P) as a cofactor or a substrate. This family of broadly diversified enzymes is crucial for maintaining homeostasis of all living organisms. The NAD binding domain of these enzymes is conserved and it was believed that NAD mimics would not be of therapeutic value due to lack of selectivity. Consequently, only mycophenolic acid which selectively binds at the cofactor pocket of NAD-dependent IMP-dehydrogenase (IMPDH) has been approved as an immunosuppressant. Recently, it became clear that the NAD (P)-binding domain was structurally much more diversified than anticipated and numerous highly potent and selective inhibitors of NAD (P) dependent enzymes have been reported. It is likely, that as in the case of protein kinases inhibitors, inhibitors of NAD (P)-dependent enzymes would find soon their way to the clinic. In this review, recent developments of selective inhibitors of NAD-dependent human IMPDH, as well as inhibitors of IMPDHs from parasites, and from bacterial sources are reported. Therapies against Cryptosporidium parvum and the development of new antibiotics that are on the horizon will be discussed. New inhibitors of bacterial NAD-ligases, NAD-kinases, NMN-adenylyl transferases, as well as phosphoribosyl transferases are also described. Although none of these compounds has yet to be approved, the progress in revealing and understanding crucial factors that might allow for designing more potent and efficient drug candidates is enormous and highly encouraging.

  2. Allelic Analyses of the Arabidopsis YUC1 Locus Reveal Residues and Domains Essential for the Functions of YUC Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xianhui; Liu, Sainan; Pierri, Florencia; Dai, Xinhua; Qu, Li-Jia; Zhao, Yunde

    2011-01-01

    Flavin monooxygenases (FMOs) play critical roles in plant growth and development by synthesizing auxin and other signaling molecules. However, the structure and function relationship within plant FMOs is not understood. Here we defined the important residues and domains of the Arabidopsis YUC1 FMO, a key enzyme in auxin biosynthesis. We previously showed that simultaneous inactivation of YUC1 and its homologue YUC4 caused severe defects in vascular and floral development. We mutagenized the yuc4 mutant and screened for mutants with phenotypes similar to those of yuc1 yuc4 double mutants. Among the isolated mutants, five of them contained mutations in the YUC1 gene. Interestingly, the mutations identified in the new yuc1 alleles were concentrated in the two GXGXXG motifs that are highly conserved among the plant FMOs. One such motif presumably binds to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and the other binds to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). We also identified the Ser139 to Phe conversion in yuc1, a mutation that is located between the two nucleotide-binding sites. By analyzing a series of yuc1 mutants, we identified key residues and motifs essential for the functions of YUC1 FMO. PMID:21205174

  3. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-11-21

    The process known as 'adaptive response' allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 {+-} 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure in space group P3{sub 2} that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB.

  4. Photoirradiation products of flavin derivatives, and the effects of photooxidation on guanine.

    PubMed

    Kino, Katsuhito; Kobayashi, Teruhiko; Arima, Eiji; Komori, Rie; Kobayashi, Takanobu; Miyazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    Photoirradiation in the presence of riboflavin led to guanine oxidation and the formation of imidazolone. Meanwhile, riboflavin itself was degraded by ultraviolet light A (UV-A) and visible light (VIS) radiation, and the end product was lumichrome. VIS radiation in the presence of riboflavin oxidized guanine similarly to UV-A radiation. Although UV-A radiation with lumichrome oxidized guanine, VIS radiation with lumichrome did not. Thus, UV-A radiation with riboflavin can oxidize guanine even if riboflavin is degraded to lumichrome. In contrast, following VIS radiation degradation of riboflavin to lumichrome, VIS radiation with riboflavin is hardly capable of oxidizing guanine. The consequences of riboflavin degradation and guanine photooxidation can be extended to flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide. In addition, we report advanced synthesis; carboxymethylflavin was obtained by oxidation of formylmethylflavin with chlorite and hydrogen peroxide; lumichrome was obtained by heating of formylmethylflavin in 50% AcOH; lumiflavin was obtained by incubation of formylmethylflavin in 2 M NaOH, followed by isolation by step-by-step concentration.

  5. Unprecedented head-to-head right-handed cross-links between the antitumor bis(mu-N,N'-di-p-tolylformamidinate) dirhodium(II,II) core and the dinucleotide d(ApA) with the adenine bases in the rare imino form.

    PubMed

    Chifotides, Helen T; Dunbar, Kim R

    2007-10-17

    Reactions of the anticancer active compound cis-[Rh2(DTolF)2(CH3CN)6](BF4)2 with 9-ethyladenine (9-EtAdeH) or the dinucleotide d(ApA) proceed with bridging adenine bases in the rare imino form (A*), spanning the Rh-Rh bond at equatorial positions via N7/N6. The inflection points for the pH-dependent H2 and H8 NMR resonance curves of cis-[Rh2(DTolF)2(9-EtAdeH)2](BF4)2 correspond to N1H deprotonation of the metal-stabilized rare imino tautomer, which takes place at pKa approximately 7.5 in CD3CN-d3, a considerably reduced value as compared to that of the imino form of 9-EtAdeH. Similarly, coordination of the metal atoms to the N7/N6 adenine sites in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} induces formation of the rare imino tautomer of the bases with a concomitant substantial decrease in the basicity of the N1H sites (pKa approximately 7.0 in CD3CN-d3), as compared to the imino form of the free dinucleotide. The presence of the adenine bases in the rare imino form, due to bidentate metalation of the N6/N7 sites, is further corroborated by DQF-COSY H2/N1H and ROE N1H/N6H cross-peaks in the 2D NMR spectra of Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} in CD3CN-d3 at -38 degrees C. Due to the N7/N6 bridging mode of the adenine bases in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)}, only the anti orientation of the imino tautomer is possible. The imino form A* of adenine in DNA may result in AT-->CG transversions or AT-->GC transitions, which can eventually lead to lethal mutations. The HH arrangement of the bases in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} is indicated by the H8/H8 NOE cross-peaks in the 2D ROESY NMR spectrum, whereas the formamidinate bridging groups dictate the presence of one right-handed conformer HH1R in solution. Complete characterization of Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} by 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling supports the presence of the HH1R conformer, anti orientation of both sugar residues about the glycosyl bonds, and N-type conformation for the 5'-A base.

  6. Proximity of reactive cysteine residue and flavin in Escherichia coli pyruvate oxidase as estimated by fluorescence energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Gennis, R B

    1982-08-31

    Pyruvate oxidase of Escherichia coli possesses a reactive cysteine residue believed to be associated with the thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) binding site. This residue is not reactive in the presence of TPP. Exposure of the enzyme to cysteine-directed fluorescent reagents results in the formation of fluorescent protein conjugates. Although these reagents do not react solely with the TPP-protectable cysteine residue, the fluorescence emission spectrum of a probe attached to this residue can be obtained by a difference technique. It was determined that the fluorescence emission of probes at the TPP-protectable site is very low due to energy transfer to the FAD coenzyme and that this fluorescence is greatly enhanced upon reduction or extraction of the flavin. Application of fluorescence energy transfer theory enabled the determination of an upper limit for the distance between the probes at the TPP-protectable site and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (roughly 20 A). Thus, the TPP binding site and the FAD coenzyme are likely in close proximity.

  7. The structure of a Xanthomonas general stress protein involved in citrus canker reveals its flavin-binding property.

    PubMed

    Hilario, Eduardo; Li, Yang; Niks, Dimitri; Fan, Li

    2012-07-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker and affects citrus agriculture worldwide. Functional genetic analysis has indicated that a putative general stress protein (XacGSP) encoded by the Xac2369 gene is involved in the bacterial infection. In this report, the crystal structure of XacGSP was determined to 2.5 Å resolution. There are four XacGSP molecules in the crystal asymmetric unit. Each XacGSP monomer folds into a six-stranded antiparallel β-barrel flanked by five α-helices. A C-terminal extension protrudes from the sixth β-strand of the β-barrel and pairs with its counterpart from another monomer to form a bridge between the two subunits of an XacGSP dimer. Two XacGSP dimers cross over each other to form a tetramer; the β-barrels from one dimer contact the β-barrels of the other, while the two bridges are distant from each other and do not make contacts. The three-dimensional structure of the XacGSP monomer is very similar to those of pyridoxine 5-phosphate oxidases, a group of enzymes that use flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a cofactor. Consistent with this, purified XacGSP protein binds to both FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), suggesting that XacGSP may help the bacteria to react against the oxidative stress induced by the defense mechanisms of the plant.

  8. A novel modified carbon paste electrode based on NiO/CNTs nanocomposite and (9, 10-dihydro-9, 10-ethanoanthracene-11, 12-dicarboximido)-4-ethylbenzene-1, 2-diol as a mediator for simultaneous determination of cysteamine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Maleh, Hassan; Biparva, Pourya; Hatami, Mehdi

    2013-10-15

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with (9, 10-dihydro-9, 10-ethanoanthracene-11, 12-dicarboximido)-4-ethylbenzene-1, 2-diol (DEDE) and NiO/CNTs nanocomposite was used for the sensitive voltammetric determination of cysteamine (CA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and folic acid (FA) for the first time. The synthesized materials were characterized with different methods such as XRD, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and square wave voltammetry (SWV). The modified electrode exhibited a potent and persistent electron mediating behavior followed by well-separated oxidation peaks of CA, NADH and FA. The peak currents were linearly dependent on CA, NADH and FA concentrations using square wave voltammetry (SWV) method in the ranges of 0.01-250, 1.0-500, and 3.0-550 µmol L⁻¹, with detection limits of 0.007, 0.6, and 0.9 µmol L⁻¹, respectively. The modified electrode was used for the determination of CA, NADH and FA in biological and pharmaceutical samples.

  9. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  10. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGES

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; ...

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  11. Kinetic isotope effects on the noncovalent flavin mutant protein of pyranose 2-oxidase reveal insights into the flavin reduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-05-04

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor contains a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor covalently linked to the N(3) atom of His167. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of aldopyranoses by molecular oxygen to generate 2-keto-aldoses and H(2)O(2) as products. In this study, the transient kinetics and primary and solvent kinetic isotope effects of the mutant in which His167 has been replaced with Ala (H167A) were investigated, to elucidate the functional role of the 8a-N(3)-histidyl FAD linkage and to gain insights into the reaction mechanism of P2O. The results indicate that the covalent linkage is mainly important for a reductive half-reaction in which the FAD cofactor is reduced by d-glucose, while it is not important for an oxidative half-reaction in which oxygen reacts with the reduced FAD to generate H(2)O(2). d-Glucose binds to H167A via multiple binding modes before the formation of the active Michaelis complex, and the rate constant of flavin reduction decreases approximately 22-fold compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. The reduction of H167A using d-glucose isotopes (2-d-d-glucose, 3-d-d-glucose, and 1,2,3,4,5,6,6-d(7)-d-glucose) as substrates indicates that the primary isotope effect results only from substitution at the C2 position, implying that H167A catalyzes the oxidation of d-glucose regiospecifically at this position. No solvent kinetic isotope effect was detected during the reductive half-reaction of the wild-type or H167A enzyme, implying that the deprotonation of the d-glucose C2-OH group may occur readily upon the binding to P2O and is not synchronized with the cleavage of the d-glucose C2-H bond. The mutation has no drastic effect on the oxidative half-reaction of P2O, as H167A is very similar to the wild-type enzyme with respect to the kinetic constants and the formation of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. Kinetic mechanisms for both half-reactions of H167A were proposed on the basis of transient kinetic data and

  12. The g-tensor of the flavin cofactor in (6-4) photolyase: a 360 GHz/12.8 T electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, A.; Kay, C. W. M.; Schleicher, E.; Hitomi, K.; Todo, T.; Möbius, K.; Weber, S.

    2006-05-01

    The g-tensor of the neutral radical form of the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor FADH• of (6-4) photolyase from Xenopus laevis has been determined by very high-magnetic-field/high-microwave-frequency electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) performed at 360 GHz/12.8 T. Due to the high spectral resolution the anisotropy of the g-tensor could be fully resolved in the frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectrum. By least square fittings of spectral simulations to experimental data, the principal values of the g-tensor have been established: gX = 2.00433(5), gY = 2.00368(5), gZ = 2.00218(7). A comparison of very high-field EPR data and proton and deuteron electron-nuclear double resonance measurements yielded precise information concerning the orientation of the g-tensor with respect to the molecular frame. This data allowed a comparison to be made between the principal values of the g-tensors of the FADH• cofactors of photolyases involved in the repair of two different DNA lesions: the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and the (6-4) photoproduct. It was found that gX and gZ are similar in both enzymes, whereas the gY component is slightly larger in (6-4) photolyase. This result clearly shows the sensitivity of the g-tensor to subtle differences in the protein environment experienced by the flavin.

  13. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  14. Fluorescence of the Flavin group in choline oxidase. Insights and analytical applications for the determination of choline and betaine aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; de Marcos, S; Sanz-Vicente, I; Ubide, C; Ostra, M; Vidal, M; Galbán, J

    2016-01-15

    Choline oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme catalysing the oxidation of choline (Ch) to betaine aldehyde (BA) and glycine betaine (GB). In this paper a fundamental study of the intrinsic fluorescence properties of ChOx due to Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) is presented and some analytical applications are studied in detail. Firstly, an unusual alteration in the excitation spectra, in comparison with the absorption spectra, has been observed as a function of the pH. This is ascribed to a change of polarity in the excited state. Secondly, the evolution of the fluorescence spectra during the reaction seems to indicate that the reaction takes place in two consecutive, but partially overlapped, steps and each of them follows a different mechanism. Thirdly, the chemical system can be used to determine the Ch concentration in the range from 5×10(-6)M to 5×10(-5)M (univariate and multivariate calibration) in the presence of BA as interference, and the joint Ch+BA concentration in the range 5×10(-6)-5×10(-4)M (multivariate calibration) with mean errors under 10%; a semiquantitative determination of the BA concentration can be deduced by difference. Finally, Ch has been successfully determined in an infant milk sample.

  15. Bioluminescent Cell-Based NAD(P)/NAD(P)H Assays for Rapid Dinucleotide Measurement and Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, Donna; Sobol, Mary; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Cali, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in cellular energy metabolism and signaling makes them important nodes that link the metabolic state of cells with energy homeostasis and gene regulation. In this study, we describe the implementation of cell-based bioluminescence assays for rapid and sensitive measurement of those important redox cofactors. We show that the sensitivity of the assays (limit of detection ∼0.5 nM) enables the selective detection of total amounts of nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated dinucleotides directly in cell lysates. The total amount of NAD+NADH or NADP+NADPH levels can be detected in as low as 300 or 600 cells/well, respectively. The signal remains linear up to 5,000 cells/well with the maximum signal-to-background ratios ranging from 100 to 200 for NAD+NADH and from 50 to 100 for NADP+NADPH detection. The assays are robust (Z′ value >0.7) and the inhibitor response curves generated using a known NAD biosynthetic pathway inhibitor FK866 correlate well with the reported data. More importantly, by multiplexing the dinucleotide detection assays with a fluorescent nonmetabolic cell viability assay, we show that dinucleotide levels can be decreased dramatically (>80%) by FK866 treatment before changes in cell viability are detected. The utility of the assays to identify modulators of intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels was further confirmed using an oncology active compound library, where novel dinucleotide regulating compounds were identified. For example, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat was a potent inhibitor of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides, whereas the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene unexpectedly caused a twofold increase in cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide levels. PMID:25506801

  16. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  17. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand T; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C; Tokuda, Joshua M; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W; Crane, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation.

  18. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  19. Adenine formation without HCN.

    PubMed

    Merz, Kenneth M; Aguiar, Eduardo C; da Silva, Joao Bosco P

    2014-05-22

    From a historic point of view adenine was always presumed to be the product of HCN pentamerization. In this work a new mechanism for adenine synthesis in the gas phase without HCN is proposed. The concept of retrosynthetic analysis was employed to create a tautomer of adenine, which can be reached from previously observed interstellar molecules C3NH and HNCNH and its isomer H2NCN. MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations were performed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of the minimum and the transition state (TS) structures involved in the six step mechanism. This new mechanism requires a smaller number of steps, the reaction energy is twice as exergonic, and the rate determining TS is lower in energy than the corresponding ones proposed elsewhere in the literature.

  20. Structure and general properties of flavins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Flavins are a family of yellow-colored compounds with the basic structure of 7,8-dimethyl-10-alkylisoalloxazine. Riboflavin, commonly known as vitamin B2, is an essential component of living organisms and is the precursor of all biologically important flavins. In this chapter, the redox properties of flavins are described, with special emphasis in their ability to participate in both one-electron and two-electron transfer processes; hence, flavins are indispensable mediators between two-electron and one-electron processes in biological systems. The photophysical and photochemical properties of flavins are also discussed. All oxidized flavins exhibit strong absorption in the ultraviolet and visible regions and an intense yellow-green fluorescence (in their neutral oxidized form). Flavins are thermostable compounds; however, they are photosensitive. In the absence of an external reductant, the isoalloxazine ring system undergoes intramolecular photoreduction. Some flavins are efficient photosensitizers; they can induce photomodifications of compounds that are not directly modified by visible light.

  1. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  2. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined.

  3. Dinucleotide circular codes and bijective transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-12-07

    The presence of circular codes in mRNA coding sequences is postulated to be involved in informational mechanisms aimed at detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame during protein synthesis. Most of the recent research is focused on trinucleotide circular codes. However, also dinucleotide circular codes are important since dinucleotides are ubiquitous in genomes and associated to important biological functions. In this work we adopt the group theoretic approach used for trinucleotide codes in Fimmel et al. (2015) to study dinucleotide circular codes and highlight their symmetry properties. Moreover, we characterize such codes in terms of n-circularity and provide a graph representation that allows to visualize them geometrically. The results establish a theoretical framework for the study of the biological implications of dinucleotide circular codes in genomic sequences.

  4. Repertoires of the nucleosome-positioning dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bettecken, Thomas; Trifonov, Edward N

    2009-11-02

    It is generally accepted that the organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin is strongly governed by a code inherent in the genomic DNA sequence. This code, as well as other codes, is superposed on the triplets coding for amino acids. The history of the chromatin code started three decades ago with the discovery of the periodic appearance of certain dinucleotides, with AA/TT and RR/YY giving the strongest signals, all with a period of 10.4 bases. Every base-pair stack in the DNA duplex has specific deformation properties, thus favoring DNA bending in a specific direction. The appearance of the corresponding dinucleotide at the distance 10.4 xn bases will facilitate DNA bending in that direction, which corresponds to the minimum energy of DNA folding in the nucleosome. We have analyzed the periodic appearances of all 16 dinucleotides in the genomes of thirteen different eukaryotic organisms. Our data show that a large variety of dinucleotides (if not all) are, apparently, contributing to the nucleosome positioning code. The choice of the periodical dinucleotides differs considerably from one organism to another. Among other 10.4 base periodicities, a strong and very regular 10.4 base signal was observed for CG dinucleotides in the genome of the honey bee A. mellifera. Also, the dinucleotide CG appears as the only periodical component in the human genome. This observation seems especially relevant since CpG methylation is well known to modulate chromatin packing and regularity. Thus, the selection of the dinucleotides contributing to the chromatin code is species specific, and may differ from region to region, depending on the sequence context.

  5. Maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-01-21

    The problem of retrieval and maintenance of the correct reading frame plays a significant role in RNA transcription. Circular codes, and especially comma-free codes, can help to understand the underlying mechanisms of error-detection in this process. In recent years much attention has been paid to the investigation of trinucleotide circular codes (see, for instance, Fimmel et al., 2014; Fimmel and Strüngmann, 2015a; Michel and Pirillo, 2012; Michel et al., 2012, 2008), while dinucleotide codes had been touched on only marginally, even though dinucleotides are associated to important biological functions. Recently, all maximal dinucleotide circular codes were classified (Fimmel et al., 2015; Michel and Pirillo, 2013). The present paper studies maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes and their close connection to maximal dinucleotide circular codes. We give a construction principle for such codes and provide a graphical representation that allows them to be visualized geometrically. Moreover, we compare the results for dinucleotide codes with the corresponding situation for trinucleotide maximal self-complementary C(3)-codes. Finally, the results obtained are discussed with respect to Crick׳s hypothesis about frame-shift-detecting codes without commas.

  6. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  7. Mechanisms of reduced flavin transfer in the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Tinikul, Ruchanok; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-08-01

    Two-component flavin-dependent enzymes are abundant in nature and are involved in a wide variety of biological reactions. These enzymes consist of a reductase which generates a reduced flavin and a monooxygenase that utilizes the reduced flavin as a substrate for monooxygenation. As reduced flavin is unstable and can be oxidized by oxygen, these enzymes must have a means to efficiently coordinate the transfer of the reduced flavin such that auto-oxidation can be minimized. Various types of experiments and methodologies have been used to probe the mode of reduced flavin transfer. Results from many systems have indicated that the transfer can be achieved by free diffusion and that the presence of one component has no influence on the kinetics of the other component. Contradicting results indicating that the transfer of the reduced flavin may be achieved via protein-protein mediation also exist. Regardless of the mode of reduced flavin transfer, these enzymes have a means to control their overall kinetics such that the reaction rate is slow when the demand for oxygenation is not high.

  8. The Responses of Isolated Plant Mitochondria to External Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide 1

    PubMed Central

    Soole, Kathleen L.; Dry, Ian B.; Wiskich, Joseph T.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of added NAD on substrate oxidation by turnip (Brassica rapa L.) and beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) mitochondria were investigated. State 3 malate and 2-oxoglutarate oxidation rates with turnip mitochondria were stimulated 25 to 40% by external NAD. Following NAD-depletion this stimulation by NAD was increased to 70 to 80%. With purified beetroot mitochondria, state 3 malate and 2-oxoglutarate oxidation rates were only marginally increased (10-15%) by the addition of NAD but after NAD-depletion treatments this stimulation increased to 55%. The effect of added NAD on oxidation rates could be reduced by preloading mitochondria with NAD in the presence of succinate. Oxidation rates were found to be most sensitive to the addition of external NAD when rotenone was present. The uptake of external NAD into beetroot mitochondria appeared to be composed of both an active and a diffusive component. The active component displayed saturation kinetics with an approximate Km of 0.105 ± 0.046 millimolar. These results provide further evidence, reported previously with potato mitochondria, that NAD can move across the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. They are particularly significant with respect to beetroot mitochondria which in contrast to other plant mitochondria, have not demonstrated any response to added NAD. PMID:16664861

  9. Partial purification of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pyrophosphatase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, M.M.; Foster, J.W.; Kasvinsky, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    NAD is an extremely important compound in cellular physiology. In the pyridine nucleotide cycle of S. typhimurium NAD pyrophosphatase, located in the inner membrane, carries out the cleavage of NAD prior to the transport of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) into the cell. The partial purification of this enzyme is reported here. A cell suspension of S. typhimurium was passed twice through a French pressure cell, centrifugated at 5000 xg, and at 200,000 xg, for 1 hr. The pellet containing the crude membrane fraction was extracted with a novel detergent extraction using the differential solubility of NAD pyrophosphatase at various concentrations of the non-ionic detergent n-octyl glucoside (nOG). Extraction of the membrane fraction with 0.5% nOG in the presence of 10mM MgCl/sub 2/ removed 60% of the protein with no loss in activity. A second extraction with 2% nOG and 10mM MgCl/sub 2/ removed 20% of the protein and 71% of the activity from the membrane fraction. Ammonium sulfate fractionation at 45 to 50% sat. gave a partially purified enzyme preparation having a specific activity of about 2500 units/mg with a 94% recovery compared to the crude extract. One unit of activity is the cleavage of 1 nmole /sup 14/C NAD to /sup 14/C NMN per minute. The enzyme appears to have a MW of 200,000 on Sephacryl S-200, is temperature labile, and stabilized by 1mM Mg/sup + +/ and storage at -70/sup 0/.

  10. Modification of Metabolic Pattern by Variation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Level 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yukio

    1969-01-01

    The experiments were designed to get some information on the metabolism controlled by variation of the NADP level, which is known to change with the variation of environmental factors. The exogenous NADP added to the mitochondria prepared from Vigna sesquipedalis cotyledons was associated with and/or penetrated into the mitochondria. The combined NADP served in the operation of the mitochondrial NADP-isocitric acid dehydrogenase. The variation of NADP level by exogenous NADP was observed to modify the rates of metabolic processes. The increase of exogenous NADP in Vigna hypocotyl slices lowered malic- and citric-acid contents and raised the α-ketoglutaric acid content. The incorporation of 14C from acetate-2-14C into lipid, organic acid, amino acid, was promoted with the exogenous NADP. The 14C-incorporation into glycolic acid, malic acid and glutamic acid was accelerated. In the mannitol homogenate of Vigna cotyledon, 14CO2 evolution and 14C-incorporation into lipid, sugar, and glycolic acid from acetate-2-14C were promoted with the exogenous NADP. Endogenous citric acid content was lowered by NADP, while malic acid content was increased. The activation of NADP-enzymes by NADP was discussed to be involved in these variations. PMID:16657076

  11. Grafted Azure A modified electrodes as disposable β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide sensors.

    PubMed

    Revenga-Parra, M; Gómez-Anquela, C; García-Mendiola, T; Gonzalez, E; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E

    2012-10-17

    We report the in situ generation of aryl diazonium cations of Azure A, a redox-active phenothiazine dye, by reaction between the corresponding aromatic aminophenyl group and sodium nitrite in 0.1 M HCl. The subsequent electrochemical reduction of these dye diazonium salts gives rise to conductive electrografted films onto screen-printed carbon (SPC) electrodes. The resulting Azure A films have a very stable and reversible electrochemical response and exhibit potent and persistent electrocatalytic behavior toward NADH oxidation. We have optimized the electrografting conditions in order to obtain SPC modified electrodes with high and stable electrocatalytic response. The kinetic of the reaction between the NADH and the redox active centers in the Azure A film has been characterized using cyclic voltammetry and single step chronoamperometry. The catalytic currents were proportional to the concentration of NADH giving rise to linear calibration plots up to a concentration of 0.5 mM with a detection limit of 0.57±0.03 μM and a sensitivity of 9.48 A mol cm(-2) μM(-1). The precision of chronoamperometric determinations was found to be 2.3% for five replicate determinations of 3.95 μM NADH. The great stability of such modified electrodes makes them ideal for their application in the development of biosensing platforms based on dehydrogenases.

  12. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-02-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analogue of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS)—a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy—to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 ± 0.5 Å , twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5° ), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  13. Biomimetic flavin-catalyzed aldehyde oxidation.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander T; Matton, Pascal; Fairhurst, Nathan W G; John, Matthew P; Carbery, David R

    2012-07-20

    The oxidation of alkyl and aryl aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids has been achieved through the action of a biomimetic bridged flavin catalyst. The reaction uses readily available 35% aqueous hydrogen peroxide and is operationally simple. The oxidation is a green and sustainable reaction, obviating chlorinated solvents with minimal byproducts.

  14. Quantitative bioluminescent detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Phosphoflavins in sample are measured using photobacterial luciferase assay technique for flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Boiling perchloric acid is used to rupture cells to free bound flavin and to hydrolyze flavin adenine dinucleotide to FMN. Base-stabilized water solution of sodium borohydride is used as reactant.

  15. Protein modification by adenine propenal.

    PubMed

    Shuck, Sarah C; Wauchope, Orrette R; Rose, Kristie L; Kingsley, Philip J; Rouzer, Carol A; Shell, Steven M; Sugitani, Norie; Chazin, Walter J; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A; Galligan, James J; Beavers, William N; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2014-10-20

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. N(ε)-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine-lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is N(ε)-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA's ability to bind to a DNA substrate.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei adenine-phosphoribosyltransferases mediate adenine salvage and aminopurinol susceptibility but not adenine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Alexandra; Lamprea-Burgunder, Estelle; Graf, Fabrice E; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    African trypanosomes, like all obligate parasitic protozoa, cannot synthesize purines de novo and import purines from their hosts to build nucleic acids. The purine salvage pathways of Trypanosoma brucei being redundant, none of the involved enzymes is likely to be essential. Nevertheless they can be of pharmacological interest due to their role in activation of purine nucleobase or nucleoside analogues, which only become toxic when converted to nucleotides. Aminopurine antimetabolites, in particular, are potent trypanocides and even adenine itself is toxic to trypanosomes at elevated concentrations. Here we report on the T. brucei adenine phosphoribosyltransferases TbAPRT1 and TbAPRT2, encoded by the two genes Tb927.7.1780 and Tb927.7.1790, located in tandem on chromosome seven. The duplication is syntenic in all available Trypanosoma genomes but not in Leishmania. While TbAPRT1 is cytosolic, TbAPRT2 possesses a glycosomal targeting signal and co-localizes with the glycosomal marker aldolase. Interestingly, the distribution of glycosomal targeting signals among trypanosomatid adenine phosphoribosyltransferases is not consistent with their phylogeny, indicating that the acquisition of adenine salvage to the glycosome happened after the radiation of Trypanosoma. Double null mutant T. brucei Δtbaprt1,2 exhibited no growth phenotype but no longer incorporated exogenous adenine into the nucleotide pool. This, however, did not reduce their sensitivity to adenine. The Δtbaprt1,2 trypanosomes were resistant to the adenine isomer aminopurinol, indicating that it is activated by phosphoribosyl transfer. Aminopurinol was about 1000-fold more toxic to bloodstream-form T. brucei than the corresponding hypoxanthine isomer allopurinol. Aminopurinol uptake was not dependent on the aminopurine permease P2 that has been implicated in drug resistance.

  17. Presence of a flavin semiquinone in methanol oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Mincey, T; Tayrien, G; Mildvan, A S; Abeles, R H

    1980-01-01

    Methanol oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha contains five "red" flavin semiquinones and two oxidized flavins per octamer. Addition of substrate results in the reduction of the two oxidized flavins but does not affect the flavin semiquinones. Enhanced water proton relaxation rates indicate that the unpaired electron of the flavin semiquinones is accessible to the solvent and this accessibility is significantly decreased upon binding of the suicide inhibitor cyclopropanol. In the native enzyme, the semiquinones are not oxidizable by air. All flavins were resolved from the enzyme, and holoenzyme was reconstituted by addition of oxidized flavin. The reconstituted enzyme was catalytically active. The specific activity was 50% that of the original enzyme. It was concluded that the semiquinone is not required for the oxidation of methanol, although it may be present at an otherwise intact site. PMID:6261238

  18. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  19. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  20. Reduction–Oxidation Photocycle Dynamics of Flavins in Starch Films

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    The blue-light photo-reduction (conversion of oxidized flavin quinone via flavin semiquinone to fully reduced flavin hydroquinone) and dark re-oxidation of the flavins riboflavin and lumiflavin in starch (α-amylose) films was studied by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Blue-light photo-excitation caused an absorption, fluorescence, and phosphorescence decrease which recovered in the dark. The photo-reduction dark-oxidation cycle could be repeated. The efficiency of photo-reduction decreased with exposed excitation energy, and the speed of re-oxidation in the dark slowed down with time after excitation. The absorption did not fully recover. The fluorescence efficiency after a long time of storage in the dark increased beyond the initial flavin quinone fluorescence efficiency. Flavin photo-excitation is thought to cause starch-flavin restructuring (static fluorescence quenching center formation), enabling enhanced photo-induced starch to flavin electron transfer with subsequent flavin reduction and starch oxidation. In the dark, after light switch-off, thermal reversion of flavin reduction and starch oxidation occurred. PMID:22942758

  1. Was adenine the first purine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Bakker, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Oligomerization of HCN (1 molar) in the presence of added formaldehyde (0.5 molar) produced an order of magnitude more 8-hydroxymethyladenine than adenine or any other biologically significant purine. This result suggests that on the prebiotic earth, nucleoside analogs may have been synthesized directly in more complex mixtures of HCN with other aldehydes.

  2. Molybdopterin Dinucleotide Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Meina; Seduk, Farida; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Leimkühler, Silke

    2011-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is modified by the addition of GMP or CMP to the C4′ phosphate of molybdopterin forming the molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide or molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor, respectively. The two reactions are catalyzed by specific enzymes as follows: the GTP:molybdopterin guanylyltransferase MobA and the CTP:molybdopterin cytidylyltransferase MocA. Both enzymes show 22% amino acid sequence identity and are specific for their respective nucleotides. Crystal structure analysis of MobA revealed two conserved motifs in the N-terminal domain of the protein involved in binding of the guanine base. Based on these motifs, we performed site-directed mutagenesis studies to exchange the amino acids to the sequence found in the paralogue MocA. Using a fully defined in vitro system, we showed that the exchange of five amino acids was enough to obtain activity with both GTP and CTP in either MocA or MobA. Exchange of the complete N-terminal domain of each protein resulted in the total inversion of nucleotide specificity activity, showing that the N-terminal domain determines nucleotide recognition and binding. Analysis of protein-protein interactions showed that the C-terminal domain of either MocA or MobA determines the specific binding to the respective acceptor protein. PMID:21081498

  3. Onset of chiral adenine surface growth.

    PubMed

    Capitán, María Jose; Álvarez, Jesús; Wang, Yang; Otero, Roberto; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2013-10-07

    The structure and stability of adenine crystals and thin layers has been studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations. We have found that adenine crystals can be grown in two phases that are energetically quasi-degenerate, the structure of which can be described as a pile-up of 2D adenine planes. In each plane, the structure can be described as an aggregation of adenine dimers. Under certain conditions, kinetic effects can favor the growth of the less stable phase. These results have been used to understand the growth of adenine thin films on gold under ultra-high vacuum conditions. We have found that the grown phase corresponds to the α-phase, which is composed of stacked prochiral planes. In this way, the adenine nanocrystals exhibit a surface that is enantiopure. These results could open new insight into the applications of adenine in biological, medical, and enantioselective or pharmaceutical fields.

  4. Quantitive determination of flavin nucleotide using the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Photometric method based on the use of bacterial luminiscent reaction quantitatively detects the presence of flavin compounds in all forms of life. Aqueous cellular dispersion of a biological sample with an aqueous perchloric acid ruptures the cells and frees the flavin coenzymes from their proteins.

  5. Supramolecular polymer formation by cyclic dinucleotides and intercalators affects dinucleotide enzymatic processing

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shizuka; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Yue; Szmacinski, Henryk; Sintim, Herman O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyclic dinucleotides form supramolecular aggregates with intercalators, and this property could be utilized in nanotechnology and medicine. Methods & results: Atomic force microscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to show that cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) forms G-wires in the presence of intercalators. The average fluorescence lifetime of thiazole orange, when bound to c-di-GMP was greater than when bound to DNA G-quadruplexes or dsDNA. The stability of c-di-GMP supramolecular polymers is dependent on both the nature of the cation present and the intercalator. C-di-GMP or cyclic diadenylic acid/intercalator complexes are more resistant to cleavage by YybT, a phosphodiesterase, than the uncomplexed nucleotides. Conclusion: Cleavage of bacterial cyclic dinucleotides could be slowed down via complexation with small molecules and that this could be utilized for diverse applications in nanotechnology and medicine. PMID:28031943

  6. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS).

    PubMed

    Widom, Julia R; Johnson, Neil P; von Hippel, Peter H; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-02-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) - a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy - to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  7. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  8. Efficient UV-induced charge separation and recombination in an 8-oxoguanine-containing dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A.; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2014-01-01

    During the early evolution of life, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (O) may have functioned as a proto-flavin capable of repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA or RNA by photoinduced electron transfer using longer wavelength UVB radiation. To investigate the ability of O to act as an excited-state electron donor, a dinucleotide mimic of the FADH2 cofactor containing O at the 5′-end and 2′-deoxyadenosine at the 3′-end was studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in aqueous solution. Following excitation with a UV pulse, a broadband mid-IR pulse probed vibrational modes of ground-state and electronically excited molecules in the double-bond stretching region. Global analysis of time- and frequency-resolved transient absorption data coupled with ab initio quantum mechanical calculations reveal vibrational marker bands of nucleobase radical ions formed by electron transfer from O to 2′-deoxyadenosine. The quantum yield of charge separation is 0.4 at 265 nm, but decreases to 0.1 at 295 nm. Charge recombination occurs in 60 ps before the O radical cation can lose a deuteron to water. Kinetic and thermodynamic considerations strongly suggest that all nucleobases can undergo ultrafast charge separation when π-stacked in DNA or RNA. Interbase charge transfer is proposed to be a major decay pathway for UV excited states of nucleic acids of great importance for photostability as well as photoredox activity. PMID:25071180

  9. Formation of the imidazolides of dinucleotides under potentially prebiotic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, H. L.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Imidazolides of dinucleotides such as ImpApA can be formed from the corresponding dinucleotides in a two-stage process, which gives up to 15% yields under potentially prebiotic conditions. First a solution of the dinucleotide and sodium trimetaphosphate is dried out at constant temperature and humidity. This produces polyphosphates such as p(n)ApA in excellent yield (greater than or equal to 80%). The products are dissolved in water, imidazole is added, and the solution is dried out again. This yields the 5'-phosphorimidazolides.

  10. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  11. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  12. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  13. A biomimetic redox flow battery based on flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    Orita, Akihiro; Verde, Michael G; Sakai, Masanori; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-10-21

    The versatility in design of redox flow batteries makes them apt to efficiently store energy in large-scale applications at low cost. The discovery of inexpensive organic electroactive materials for use in aqueous flow battery electrolytes is highly attractive, but is thus far limited. Here we report on a flow battery using an aqueous electrolyte based on the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide. Flavins are highly versatile electroactive molecules, which catalyse a multitude of redox reactions in biological systems. We use nicotinamide (vitamin B3) as a hydrotropic agent to enhance the water solubility of flavin mononucleotide. A redox flow battery using flavin mononucleotide negative and ferrocyanide positive electrolytes in strong base shows stable cycling performance, with over 99% capacity retention over the course of 100 cycles. We hypothesize that this is enabled due to the oxidized and reduced forms of FMN-Na being stabilized by resonance structures.

  14. A biomimetic redox flow battery based on flavin mononucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Akihiro; Verde, Michael G.; Sakai, Masanori; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    The versatility in design of redox flow batteries makes them apt to efficiently store energy in large-scale applications at low cost. The discovery of inexpensive organic electroactive materials for use in aqueous flow battery electrolytes is highly attractive, but is thus far limited. Here we report on a flow battery using an aqueous electrolyte based on the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide. Flavins are highly versatile electroactive molecules, which catalyse a multitude of redox reactions in biological systems. We use nicotinamide (vitamin B3) as a hydrotropic agent to enhance the water solubility of flavin mononucleotide. A redox flow battery using flavin mononucleotide negative and ferrocyanide positive electrolytes in strong base shows stable cycling performance, with over 99% capacity retention over the course of 100 cycles. We hypothesize that this is enabled due to the oxidized and reduced forms of FMN-Na being stabilized by resonance structures. PMID:27767026

  15. A biomimetic redox flow battery based on flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Akihiro; Verde, Michael G.; Sakai, Masanori; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-10-01

    The versatility in design of redox flow batteries makes them apt to efficiently store energy in large-scale applications at low cost. The discovery of inexpensive organic electroactive materials for use in aqueous flow battery electrolytes is highly attractive, but is thus far limited. Here we report on a flow battery using an aqueous electrolyte based on the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide. Flavins are highly versatile electroactive molecules, which catalyse a multitude of redox reactions in biological systems. We use nicotinamide (vitamin B3) as a hydrotropic agent to enhance the water solubility of flavin mononucleotide. A redox flow battery using flavin mononucleotide negative and ferrocyanide positive electrolytes in strong base shows stable cycling performance, with over 99% capacity retention over the course of 100 cycles. We hypothesize that this is enabled due to the oxidized and reduced forms of FMN-Na being stabilized by resonance structures.

  16. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed. PMID:4393612

  17. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  18. Electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotineamide adenine dinucleotide on gold electrode modified with catechol-terminated alkanethiol self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Ohkubo, Kimihiko; Taira, Hiroaki; Takagi, Makoto; Imato, Toshihiko

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis of a mercaptoundecaneamide derivative having a terminus of catechol is described. FT-IR spectroscopic characterization showed that the new molecular entry simply undergoes molecular self-assembly on Au substrate surfaces promoting intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds to form well-packed monolayers. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements on the monolayer-modified Au electrode revealed that the surface adlayer possesses specific electrochemical activity due to the reversible catechol/o-quinone redox reaction having characteristics of a surface process and also pH-dependence in its formal potential (59 mV per pH). Detailed analysis of CVs gave fundamental electrochemical parameters including the electroactive surface coverage (0.20-0.24 nmol cm(-2)), the transfer coefficients (0.24 in oxidation and 0.81 in reduction), and also the electron transfer rate constant (1.10-2.76 s(-1)). These data were almost consistent to those seen in literature. We have also found that the catechol monolayer modified electrode exhibits an electrocatalytic function in NADH oxidation. That is, the faradaic current appeared reinforcingly at around the same potential where catechol function is oxidized in the monolayer and increased with an increase in the NADH concentration from 1 to 5 mM, and then reached to a plateau indicating a catalyzed reaction pathway. Detailed analyses revealed that the present system could be characterized by its weak stability of the intermediate compound formed and prompt reaction rate compared with the previously reported chemically modified electrode (CME) systems. We think this type of achievement should be important for the basics of biosensors that rely on dehydrogenase enzymes.

  19. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells.

  20. The ascorbic acid-dependent oxidation of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide by ciliary and retinal microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Heath, H.; Fiddick, Rosemary

    1965-01-01

    1. The presence of an ascorbic acid-dependent NADH oxidation in ocular tissues has been established. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the enzyme is localized in the microsomes. The distribution of the enzyme in some ocular tissues has been determined; microsomes from the ciliary processes and the retina have comparable activities, which are much higher than those from the cornea or lens. 2. NADPH cannot replace NADH, and cysteine, reduced glutathione, ergothioneine and dehydroascorbic acid cannot be substituted for ascorbic acid in the reaction. The rate of NADH oxidation was greatly increased in the presence of cucumber ascorbate oxidase, and the enzyme appears to be NADH–monodehydroascorbate transhydrogenase. 3. Cytochrome b5 is present in retinal microsomes. 4. The enzyme is inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and iodoacetate, but not by cyanide, Amytal or malonate. 5. High concentrations of chloroquine cause a partial inhibition of the reaction, probably owing to interaction of this compound with the enzyme thiol groups. Low concentrations of Diamox, comparable with those attained in tissues during therapy with this drug, bring about partial inhibition of the reaction. Eserine, cortisone, hydrocortisone, 11-deoxycorticosterone and dexamethasone have no effect on the rate of oxidation. 6. The possible role of ascorbic acid and NADH–monodehydroascorbate transhydrogenase in the formation of aqueous humour and secretory mechanisms is discussed. PMID:14345883

  1. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  2. Alternative splicing and differential expression of two transcripts of nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase B gene from Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Ming-Yi

    2009-03-01

    With the exception of rice, little is known about the existence of respiratory burst oxidase homolog (rboh) gene in cereals. The present study reports the cloning and analysis of a novel rboh gene, termed ZmrbohB, from maize (Zea mays L.). The full-length cDNA of ZmrbohB encodes a 942 amino acid protein containing all of the respiratory burst oxidase homolog catalytically critical motifs. Alternative splicing of ZmrbohB has generated two transcript isoforms, ZmrbohB-alpha and -beta. Spliced transcript ZmrbohB-beta retains an unspliced intron 11 that carries a premature termination codon and probably leads to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Expression analysis showed that two splice isoforms were differentially expressed in various tissues and at different developmental stages, and the major product was ZmrbohB-alpha. The transcripts of ZmrbohB-alpha accumulated markedly when the maize seedlings were subjected to various abiotic stimuli, such as wounding, cold (4 degrees C), heat (40 degrees C), UV and salinity stress. In addition, several abiotic stimuli also affected the alternative splicing pattern of ZmrbohB except wounding. These results provide new insight into roles in the expression regulation of plant rboh genes and suggest that ZmrbohB gene may play a role in response to environmental stresses.

  3. The purification and properties of the respiratory-chain reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase of Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Ragan, C. I.

    1971-01-01

    1. An NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity has been isolated from the respiratory chain of Torulopsis utilis by using detergents. The isolated enzyme contains non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide and FMN in the molar proportions 27.5:28.4:1. The preparation is free of FAD and largely free of cytochrome. 2. The enzyme catalyses ferricyanide reduction by NADPH at about 1% of the rate with NADH, and reacts poorly with acceptors other than ferricyanide. The rates of reduction of some acceptors are, as percentages of the rate with ferricyanide: menadione, 0.35%; lipoate, 0.01%; cytochrome c, 0.065%; dichlorophenolindophenol, 0.35%; ubiquinone-1, 0.08%. 3. Several properties of submitochondrial particles of T. utilis (non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide, FMN and an NADH-reducible electron-paramagnetic-resonance signal) were found to co-purify with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity. Thus about 70% of the FMN and, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments, 100% of the non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide of submitochondrial particles derived from T. utilis cells grown under conditions of glycerol limitation (but relatively low iron availability) can be attributed to the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 4. It was also shown that the component of submitochondrial particles specifically bleached at 460nm by NADH [species 1 of Ragan & Garland (1971)] co-purifies with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 5. This successful purification of an NADH dehydrogenase from T. utilis forms a starting point for investigating the molecular properties of phenotypically modified mitochondrial NADH oxidation pathways that lack energy conservation between NADH and the cytochromes. PMID:4399788

  4. Analysing two dinucleotide repeats of FVIII gene in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, B; Rezaeian, A; Khanahmad, H; Bagheri, R; Kamali, E; Zeinali, S

    2007-11-01

    Using dinucleotide repeats for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of haemophilia A patients, led us to find different alleles and their frequencies in Iranian population. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of two short tandem repeat (STR) loci of factor VIII (FVIII) gene was performed, and the PCR products were resolved on 10% native polyacrylamide gel, and samples were analysed with sequenced DNA markers made of PCR cloning of the dinucleotide FVIII gene fragments. Seven different alleles were observed for intron 13 STR, having 18-24 (CA) repeating units and five alleles for intron 22 STR having 24-28 repeating units of (CACT). Bands produced during dinucleotide study were defined in detail so this could improve the genotyping of heterozygotes and homozygotes. Conformational band produced were characterized to specify the dinucleotide pattern. Our results confirm the Hardy-Weinberg proportions of the heterozygosity rate of the 85 analysed individuals. The observed heterozygosity rate for intron 13 and 22 was 52% and 59% respectively. Our data also indicate that our population is closer to caucasians than to any other populations. Finding different dinucleotide repeat alleles and their frequencies has made it possible to identify carriers and provide prenatal diagnosis with more confidence. This allows antenatal diagnosis to be performed in the vast majority of carriers.

  5. On the origin of multiexponential fluorescence decays from 2-aminopurine-labeled dinucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Jacob M.; Philip, Abbey M.; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2016-10-01

    The fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2Ap) has been used for decades to study local conformational fluctuations in DNA. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements of 2Ap fluorescence have been used to predict specific conformational states through suitable modeling of the quenching of the fluorescence of a 2Ap residue incorporated site-specifically into a DNA strand. The success of this approach has been limited by a lack of understanding of the precise factors responsible for the complex, multiexponential decays observed experimentally. In this study, dinucleotides composed of 2Ap and adenine were studied by the time-correlated single-photon counting technique to investigate the causes of heterogeneous emission kinetics. Contrary to previous reports, we argue that emission from 2Ap that is stacked with a neighboring base contributes negligibly to the emission signals recorded more than 50 ps after excitation, which are instead dominated by emission from unstacked 2Ap. We find that the decay kinetics can be modeled using a continuous lifetime distribution, which arises from the inherent distance dependence of electron transfer rates without the need to postulate a small number of discrete states with decay times derived from multiexponential fits. These results offer a new perspective on the quenching of 2Ap fluorescence and expand the information that can be obtained from experiments.

  6. On the origin of multiexponential fluorescence decays from 2-aminopurine-labeled dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Remington, Jacob M; Philip, Abbey M; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2016-10-21

    The fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2Ap) has been used for decades to study local conformational fluctuations in DNA. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements of 2Ap fluorescence have been used to predict specific conformational states through suitable modeling of the quenching of the fluorescence of a 2Ap residue incorporated site-specifically into a DNA strand. The success of this approach has been limited by a lack of understanding of the precise factors responsible for the complex, multiexponential decays observed experimentally. In this study, dinucleotides composed of 2Ap and adenine were studied by the time-correlated single-photon counting technique to investigate the causes of heterogeneous emission kinetics. Contrary to previous reports, we argue that emission from 2Ap that is stacked with a neighboring base contributes negligibly to the emission signals recorded more than 50 ps after excitation, which are instead dominated by emission from unstacked 2Ap. We find that the decay kinetics can be modeled using a continuous lifetime distribution, which arises from the inherent distance dependence of electron transfer rates without the need to postulate a small number of discrete states with decay times derived from multiexponential fits. These results offer a new perspective on the quenching of 2Ap fluorescence and expand the information that can be obtained from experiments.

  7. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion.

  8. Spin Densities in Flavin Analogs within a Flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Jesús Ignacio; Frago, Susana; Lans, Isaías; Alonso, Pablo Javier; García-Rubio, Inés; Medina, Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Characterization by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques of several variants of Anabaena flavodoxin, where the naturally occurring FMN cofactor is substituted by different analogs, makes it possible to improve the details of the spin distribution map in the isoallosazine ring in its semiquinone state. The analyzed variants were selected to monitor the effects of intrinsic changes in the flavin ring electronic structure, as well as perturbations in the apoflavodoxin-flavin interaction, on the spin populations. When these effects were analyzed together with the functional properties of the different flavodoxin variants, a relationship between spin population and biochemical parameters, as the reduction potential, could be envisaged. PMID:26840722

  9. Excited flavin and pterin coenzyme molecules in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, M S; Telegina, T A; Vechtomova, Y L; Kolesnikov, M P; Lyudnikova, T A; Golub, O A

    2010-10-01

    Excited flavin and pterin molecules are active in intermolecular energy transfer and in photocatalysis of redox reactions resulting in conservation of free energy. Flavin-containing pigments produced in models of the prebiotic environment are capable of converting photon energy into the energy of phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. However, during evolution photochemical reactions involving excited FMN or FAD molecules failed to become participants of bioenergy transfer systems, but they appear in enzymes responsible for repair of UV-damaged DNA (DNA photolyases) and also in receptors of blue and UV-A light regulating vital functions of organisms. The families of these photoproteins (DNA-photolyases and cryptochromes, LOV-domain- and BLUF-domain-containing proteins) are different in the structure and in mechanisms of the photoprocesses. The excited flavin molecules are involved in photochemical processes in reaction centers of these photoproteins. In DNA photolyases and cryptochromes the excitation energy on the reaction center flavin is supplied from an antenna molecule that is bound with the same polypeptide. The role of antenna is played by MTHF or by 8-HDF in some DNA photolyases, i.e. also by molecules with known coenzyme functions in biocatalysis. Differences in the structure of chromophore-binding domains suggest an independent origin of the photoprotein families. The analysis of structure and properties of coenzyme molecules reveals some specific features that were significant in evolution for their being selected as chromophores in these proteins.

  10. Fundamental Role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677 C → T Genotype and Flavin Compounds in Biochemical Phenotypes for Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fryar-Williams, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The Mental Health Biomarker Project (2010–2016) explored variables for psychosis in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Blood samples from 67, highly characterized symptomatic cases and 67 gender and age matched control participants were analyzed for methyl tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C → T gene variants and for vitamin B6, B12 and D, folate, unbound copper, zinc cofactors for enzymes in the methylation cycle, and related catecholamine pathways. Urine samples were analyzed for indole-catecholamines, their metabolites, and oxidative-stress marker, hydroxylpyrolline-2-one (HPL). Rating scales were Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Global Assessment of Function scale, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) score, and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS). Analysis used Spearman’s correlates, receiver operating characteristics and structural equation modeling (SEM). The correlative pattern of variables in the overall participant sample strongly implicated monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme inactivity so the significant role of MAO’s cofactor flavin adenine nucleotide and its precursor flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) within the biochemical pathways was investigated and confirmed as 71% on SEM of the total sample. Splitting the data sets for MTHFR 677C → T polymorphism variants coding for the MTHFR enzyme, discovered that biochemistry variables relating to the wild-type enzyme differed markedly in pattern from those coded by the homozygous variant and that the hereozygous-variant pattern resembled the wild-type-coded pattern. The MTHFR 677C → T-wild and -heterozygous gene variants have a pattern of depleted vitamin cofactors characteristic of flavin insufficiency with under-methylation and severe oxidative stress. The second homozygous MTHFR 677TT pattern related to elevated copper:zinc ratio and a vitamin pattern related to flavin sufficiency and risk of over-methylation. The

  11. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  12. Cyclic Dinucleotide-Controlled Regulatory Pathways in Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotides cyclic 3′,5′-diguanylate (c-di-GMP) and cyclic 3′,5′-diadenylate (c-di-AMP) have emerged as key components of bacterial signal transduction networks. These closely related second messengers follow the classical general principles of nucleotide signaling by integrating diverse signals into regulatory pathways that control cellular responses to changing environments. They impact distinct cellular processes, with c-di-GMP having an established role in promoting bacterial adhesion and inhibiting motility and c-di-AMP being involved in cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, and DNA repair. The involvement of c-dinucleotides in the physiology of the filamentous, nonmotile streptomycetes remained obscure until recent discoveries showed that c-di-GMP controls the activity of the developmental master regulator BldD and that c-di-AMP determines the level of the resuscitation-promoting factor A(RpfA) cell wall-remodelling enzyme. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of c-dinucleotide signaling in Streptomyces species and highlight the important roles of c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP in the biology of these antibiotic-producing, multicellular bacteria. PMID:26216850

  13. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  14. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  15. Studies of Monolayers of Cyclodextrin and Flavin Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    formation has been continued. These flavins are modified in the N-10 position with a methylthiopropyl group or other alkyl groups and can have electron ...the reduction potentials for the 7- carboxyl (-0.36 V) and 7-trifluoromethyl (-0.25 V) vs. Ag|AgCl show the versatility of this approach. Electron ...for polishing silver foil and electrochemical roughening have been investigated and practiced by the PI. (3) An automated surface tensiometer has

  16. Substrate Activation in Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate is a critical DNA nucleotide that has to be synthesized in cells de novo by all organisms. Flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) catalyzes the final step in this de novo production of thymidylate in many human pathogens, but it is absent from humans. The FDTS reaction proceeds via a chemical route that is different from its human enzyme analogue, making FDTS a potential antimicrobial target. The chemical mechanism of FDTS is still not understood, and the two most recently proposed mechanisms involve reaction intermediates that are unusual in pyrimidine biosynthesis and biology in general. These mechanisms differ in the relative timing of the reaction of the flavin with the substrate. The consequence of this difference is significant: the intermediates are cationic in one case and neutral in the other, an important consideration in the construction of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors. Here we test these mechanisms via chemical trapping of reaction intermediates, stopped-flow, and substrate hydrogen isotope exchange techniques. Our findings suggest that an initial activation of the pyrimidine substrate by reduced flavin is required for catalysis, and a revised mechanism is proposed on the basis of previous and new data. These findings and the newly proposed mechanism add an important piece to the puzzle of the mechanism of FDTS and suggest a new class of intermediates that, in the future, may serve as targets for mechanism-based design of FDTS-specific inhibitors. PMID:25025487

  17. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  18. The Application Of Picosecond-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy In The Study Of Flavins And Flavoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Antonie J.; van Hoek, Arie

    1988-06-01

    Picosecond relaxation processes of flavins and flavoproteins were investigated with mode-locked and synchronously pumped lasers as source of excitation and time-correlated single photon counting in detection. Free flavin rotational correlation times of 80-150 ps (values depending on the flavin derivative used) could be precisely determined. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence of the flavin bound in the electron-carrier protein flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris yields a fluorescence lifetime component of 30 ps in the fluorescence decay. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in flavodoxin exhibits a short lifetime component, which is attributed in part to energy transfer from tryptophan to flavin. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the two tryptophan residues in flavodoxin provide new evidence for specific flavin-tryptophan interaction. Finally, picosecond-resolved spectroscopy enables the direct measurement of energy transfer between two different chromophores in a protein, from which topographical details can be inferred.

  19. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J

    2013-11-26

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  20. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  1. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of flavin fluorescence in purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrova, Elena; Kudryasheva, N.; Cheng, K.

    2006-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay measurements have been used to study the environment and rotational mobility of endogenous flavin in two purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria, Luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri. We compared the time-resolved fluorescence parameters, intensity decay lifetimes, rotational correlation times, and their fractional contribution, of the endogeneous flavin fluorescence in each of the two enzymes in the presence or absence of quinones of different structures and redox potentials. The endogeneous flavin exhibited multi-exponential decay characteristics as compared to a single decay lifetime of around 5 ns for free flavin, suggesting a complex and heterogeneous environment of flavin bound to the enzyme. In addition, a significant increase in the rotational correlation time and a certain degree of ordering of the molecule were observed for endogenous flavin when compared to a single and fast rotational correlation time of 150 ps of free flavin. Quinone significantly altered both the lifetime and rotational characteristics of endogenous flavin suggesting specific interactions of quinones to the endogeneous flavin in the bacterial enzyme.

  3. Exploration of Excited State Deactivation Pathways of Adenine Monohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri; Sapunar, Marin; Ponzi, Aurora; Decleva, Piero; Došlić, Nađa

    2015-10-29

    Binding of a single water molecule has a dramatic effect on the excited state lifetime of adenine. Here we report a joint nonadiabatic dynamics and reaction paths study aimed at understanding the sub-100 fs lifetime of adenine in the monohydrates. Our nonadiabatic dynamics simulations, performed using the ADC(2) electronic structure method, show a shortening of the excited state lifetime in the monohydrates with respect to bare adenine. However, the computed lifetimes were found to be significantly longer that the observed one. By comparing the reaction pathways of several excited state deactivation processes in adenine and adenine monohydrates, we show that electron-driven proton transfer from water to nitrogen atom N3 of the adenine ring may be the process responsible for the observed ultrafast decay. The inaccessibility of the electron-driven proton transfer pathway to trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics simulation is discussed.

  4. Interaction of flavins with electron-rich metals.

    PubMed

    Yu, M W; Fritchie, C J

    1975-02-10

    A complex of the electron-rich ion Cu(I) with the flavoquinone analogue 10-methylisoalloxazine has been synthesized and characterized by x-ray methods. The complex is unstable to oxygen. It is black-green in color, in contrast with the bright yellow, orange, or orange-brown crystalline complexes of 10-methylisoalloxazine or riboflavin with Cu(II), Ag(I), and Pb(II). These results are indicative of strong perturbation of the flavin electronic structure by the Cu(I) ion and suggest that this complex is a reasonable model for incipient transfer of an electron from a reduced metal to flavoquinone. the crystal structure is orthorhombic, Pna2-1, with unit cell constants a = 31.24(1) (figures in parentheses are estimated standard deviations), b = 12.862(4), c = 6.239(2) A, Pobs = 1.76 g per cm-3 and Pcalc = 1.77 g per cm-3 for Z = 4 and asymmetric formula CuClO4-2(C11H8N4O2). HCOOH. The final R factor based on 1250 counter-measured data is 8.8%. The 2 independent 10-methylisoalloxazine molecules, A and B, bind strongly to the cuprous ion throug N(5) of each flavin. The copper is approximately linearly coordinated with an N-Cu-N angle of 153(1) degrees, and Cu-N(5) distances of 1.94(2) A and 1.92(2) A. The next nearest atoms to Cu are the O(4) oxygens of each flavin, forming weak bonds with distances Cu-O(4) = 2.27(2) A and 2.21(2) A for molecules A and B. The dihedral angle between the 2 10-methylisoalloxazine molecules is 65.4 degrees.

  5. The relationship between periodic dinucleotides and the nucleosomal DNA deformation revealed by normal mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Debby D.; Yan, Hong

    2011-12-01

    Nucleosomes, which contain DNA and proteins, are the basic unit of eukaryotic chromatins. Polymers such as DNA and proteins are dynamic, and their conformational changes can lead to functional changes. Periodic dinucleotide patterns exist in nucleosomal DNA chains and play an important role in the nucleosome structure. In this paper, we use normal mode analysis to detect significant structural deformations of nucleosomal DNA and investigate the relationship between periodic dinucleotides and DNA motions. We have found that periodic dinucleotides are usually located at the peaks or valleys of DNA and protein motions, revealing that they dominate the nucleosome dynamics. Also, a specific dinucleotide pattern CA/TG appears most frequently.

  6. CpG Dinucleotide Frequencies Reveal the Role of Host Methylation Capabilities in Parvovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vasaikar, Suhas; Biswas, Banhi; Gomes, James

    2013-01-01

    Parvoviruses are rapidly evolving viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including vertebrates and invertebrates. Extensive methylation of the parvovirus genome has been recently demonstrated. A global pattern of methylation of CpG dinucleotides is seen in vertebrate genomes, compared to “fractional” methylation patterns in invertebrate genomes. It remains unknown if the loss of CpG dinucleotides occurs in all viruses of a given DNA virus family that infect host species spanning across vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the link between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion among autonomous parvoviruses and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We demonstrate major differences in the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides among autonomous parvoviruses which share similar genome organization and common ancestry, depending on the infected host species. Parvoviruses infecting vertebrate hosts had significantly lower relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides than parvoviruses infecting invertebrate hosts. The strong correlation of CpG dinucleotide depletion with the gain in TpG/CpA dinucleotides and the loss of TpA dinucleotides among parvoviruses suggests a major role for CpG methylation in the evolution of parvoviruses. Our data present evidence that links the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides in parvoviruses to the methylation capabilities of the infected host. In sum, our findings support a novel perspective of host-driven evolution among autonomous parvoviruses. PMID:24109231

  7. CpG dinucleotide frequencies reveal the role of host methylation capabilities in parvovirus evolution.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vasaikar, Suhas; Biswas, Banhi; Gomes, James; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Parvoviruses are rapidly evolving viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including vertebrates and invertebrates. Extensive methylation of the parvovirus genome has been recently demonstrated. A global pattern of methylation of CpG dinucleotides is seen in vertebrate genomes, compared to "fractional" methylation patterns in invertebrate genomes. It remains unknown if the loss of CpG dinucleotides occurs in all viruses of a given DNA virus family that infect host species spanning across vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the link between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion among autonomous parvoviruses and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We demonstrate major differences in the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides among autonomous parvoviruses which share similar genome organization and common ancestry, depending on the infected host species. Parvoviruses infecting vertebrate hosts had significantly lower relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides than parvoviruses infecting invertebrate hosts. The strong correlation of CpG dinucleotide depletion with the gain in TpG/CpA dinucleotides and the loss of TpA dinucleotides among parvoviruses suggests a major role for CpG methylation in the evolution of parvoviruses. Our data present evidence that links the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides in parvoviruses to the methylation capabilities of the infected host. In sum, our findings support a novel perspective of host-driven evolution among autonomous parvoviruses.

  8. Functional expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiose dehydrogenase flavin domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Desriani; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) is an extracellular glycosylated protein composed of two distinct domains, a C-terminal catalytic flavin domain and an N-terminal cytochrome-b-type heme domain, which transfers electrons from the flavin domain to external electron acceptors. The soluble flavin domain of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium CDH was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme showed dye-mediated CDH activity higher than that of the complete CDH, composed of flavin domain and heme domain, prepared using Pichia pastoris as the host microorganism. The ability to conveniently express the recombinant CDH flavin domain in E. coli provides great opportunities for the molecular engineering of the catalytic properties of CDH.

  9. Dinucleotide Composition in Animal RNA Viruses Is Shaped More by Virus Family than by Host Species.

    PubMed

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlub, Timothy E; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-04-15

    Viruses use the cellular machinery of their hosts for replication. It has therefore been proposed that the nucleotide and dinucleotide compositions of viruses should match those of their host species. If this is upheld, it may then be possible to use dinucleotide composition to predict the true host species of viruses sampled in metagenomic surveys. However, it is also clear that different taxonomic groups of viruses tend to have distinctive patterns of dinucleotide composition that may be independent of host species. To determine the relative strength of the effect of host versus virus family in shaping dinucleotide composition, we performed a comparative analysis of 20 RNA virus families from 15 host groupings, spanning two animal phyla and more than 900 virus species. In particular, we determined the odds ratios for the 16 possible dinucleotides and performed a discriminant analysis to evaluate the capability of virus dinucleotide composition to predict the correct virus family or host taxon from which it was isolated. Notably, while 81% of the data analyzed here were predicted to the correct virus family, only 62% of these data were predicted to their correct subphylum/class host and a mere 32% to their correct mammalian order. Similarly, dinucleotide composition has a weak predictive power for different hosts within individual virus families. We therefore conclude that dinucleotide composition is generally uniform within a virus family but less well reflects that of its host species. This has obvious implications for attempts to accurately predict host species from virus genome sequences alone.IMPORTANCE Determining the processes that shape virus genomes is central to understanding virus evolution and emergence. One question of particular importance is why nucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies differ so markedly between viruses. In particular, it is currently unclear whether host species or virus family has the biggest impact on dinucleotide frequencies and

  10. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  11. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  12. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q) is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected. Here we report that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyltransferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases. The active site environment is dominated by π systems, which assist phosphate-C1' bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1' bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3'-C6 bond. Our findings establish the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoires.

  13. Rate enhancement of bacterial extracellular electron transport involves bound flavin semiquinones

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular redox-active compounds, flavins and other quinones, have been hypothesized to play a major role in the delivery of electrons from cellular metabolic systems to extracellular insoluble substrates by a diffusion-based shuttling two-electron-transfer mechanism. Here we show that flavin molecules secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 enhance the ability of its outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) to transport electrons as redox cofactors, but not free-form flavins. Whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that the redox potential of flavin was reversibly shifted more than 100 mV in a positive direction, in good agreement with increasing microbial current generation. Importantly, this flavin/OM c-Cyts interaction was found to facilitate a one-electron redox reaction via a semiquinone, resulting in a 103- to 105-fold faster reaction rate than that of free flavin. These results are not consistent with previously proposed redox-shuttling mechanisms but suggest that the flavin/OM c-Cyts interaction regulates the extent of extracellular electron transport coupled with intracellular metabolic activity. PMID:23576738

  14. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  15. Adenine oxidation by pyrite-generated hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Corey A; Fisher, Shawn C; Brownawell, Bruce J; Schoonen, Martin Aa

    2010-04-26

    Cellular exposure to particulate matter with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidization of biomolecules may lead to negative health outcomes. Evaluating the particle-induced formation of ROS and the oxidation products from reaction of ROS with biomolecules is useful for gaining a mechanistic understanding of particle-induced oxidative stress. Aqueous suspensions of pyrite particles have been shown to form hydroxyl radicals and degrade nucleic acids. Reactions between pyrite-induced hydroxyl radicals and nucleic acid bases, however, remain to be determined. Here, we compared the oxidation of adenine by Fenton-generated (i.e., ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide) hydroxyl radicals to adenine oxidation by hydroxyl radicals generated in pyrite aqueous suspensions. Results show that adenine oxidizes in the presence of pyrite (without the addition of hydrogen peroxide) and that the rate of oxidation is dependent on the pyrite loading. Adenine oxidation was prevented by addition of either catalase or ethanol to the pyrite/adenine suspensions, which implies that hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are causing the adenine oxidation. The adenine oxidation products, 8-oxoadenine and 2-hydroxyadenine, were the same whether hydroxyl radicals were generated by Fenton or pyrite-initiated reactions. Although nucleic acid bases are unlikely to be directly exposed to pyrite particles, the formation of ROS in the vicinity of cells may lead to oxidative stress.

  16. The FAD Cofactor of RebC Shifts to an IN Conformation upon Flavin Reduction†,‡

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    RebC is a putative flavin hydroxylase functioning together with RebP to carry out a key step in the biosynthesis of rebeccamycin. To probe the mechanism of flavin-based chemistry in RebC, we solved the structure of RebC with reduced flavin. Upon flavin reduction, the RebC crystal undergoes a change in its unit cell dimension concurrent with a 5 Å movement of the isoalloxazine ring, positioning the flavin ring adjacent to the substrate-binding pocket. Additionally, a disordered helix becomes ordered upon flavin reduction, closing off one side of the substrate-binding pocket. This structure, along with previously reported structures, increases our understanding of the RebC enzyme mechanism, indicating that either the reduction of the flavin itself or binding of substrate is sufficient to drive major conformational changes in RebC to generate a closed active site. Our finding that flavin reduction seals the active site such that substrate cannot enter suggests that our reduced flavin RebC structure is off-pathway and that substrate binding is likely to precede flavin reduction during catalysis. Along with kinetic data presented here, these structures suggest that the first cycle of catalysis in RebC may resemble that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, with substrate binding promoting flavin reduction. PMID:19035832

  17. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins: emerging paradigms in biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-02-01

    Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) are an emerging class of fluorescent reporters characterized by oxygen-independent fluorescence and a small size - key advantages compared to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development. However, they have already been used as versatile reporters for studying anaerobic biosystems and viral assemblies. Recently, FbFPs with improved brightness and photostability have been engineered. In addition, several FbFPs show high degrees of thermal and pH stability. For these reasons, FbFPs hold strong promise to extend bioimaging to clinically and industrially significant systems that have been challenging to study using GFPs. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the FbFP toolbox and explore further improvements necessary to maximize the potential of FbFPs.

  18. Electrode-assisted catalytic water oxidation by a flavin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakulova, Ekaterina; Khatmullin, Renat; Walpita, Janitha; Corrigan, Thomas; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M.; Vyas, Shubham; Oottikkal, Shameema; Manzer, Samuel F.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Glusac, Ksenija D.

    2012-10-01

    The success of solar fuel technology relies on the development of efficient catalysts that can oxidize or reduce water. All molecular water-oxidation catalysts reported thus far are transition-metal complexes, however, here we report catalytic water oxidation to give oxygen by a fully organic compound, the N(5)-ethylflavinium ion, Et-Fl+. Evolution of oxygen was detected during bulk electrolysis of aqueous Et-Fl+ solutions at several potentials above +1.9 V versus normal hydrogen electrode. The catalysis was found to occur on glassy carbon and platinum working electrodes, but no catalysis was observed on fluoride-doped tin-oxide electrodes. Based on spectroelectrochemical results and preliminary calculations with density functional theory, one possible mechanistic route is proposed in which the oxygen evolution occurs from a peroxide intermediate formed between the oxidized flavin pseudobase and the oxidized carbon electrode. These findings offer an organic alternative to the traditional water-oxidation catalysts based on transition metals.

  19. FRET in a Synthetic Flavin- and Bilin-binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julian; Losi, Aba; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-05

    The last decade has seen development and application of a large number of novel fluorescence-based techniques that have revolutionized fluorescence microscopy in life sciences. Preferred tags for such applications are genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FP), mostly derivatives of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Combinations of FPs with wavelength-separated absorption/fluorescence properties serve as excellent tools for molecular interaction studies, for example, protein-protein complexes or enzyme-substrate interactions, based on the FRET phenomenon (Förster resonance energy transfer). However, alternatives are requested for experimental conditions where FP proteins or FP couples are not or less efficiently applicable. We here report as a "proof of principle" a specially designed, non-naturally occurring protein (LG1) carrying a combination of a flavin-binding LOV- and a photochromic bilin-binding GAF domain and demonstrate a FRET process between both chromophores.

  20. Shewanella secretes flavins that mediate extracellular electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Enrico; Baron, Daniel B.; Shikhare, Indraneel D.; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria able to transfer electrons to metals are key agents in biogeochemical metal cycling, subsurface bioremediation, and corrosion processes. More recently, these bacteria have gained attention as the transfer of electrons from the cell surface to conductive materials can be used in multiple applications. In this work, we adapted electrochemical techniques to probe intact biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-4 grown by using a poised electrode as an electron acceptor. This approach detected redox-active molecules within biofilms, which were involved in electron transfer to the electrode. A combination of methods identified a mixture of riboflavin and riboflavin-5′-phosphate in supernatants from biofilm reactors, with riboflavin representing the dominant component during sustained incubations (>72 h). Removal of riboflavin from biofilms reduced the rate of electron transfer to electrodes by >70%, consistent with a role as a soluble redox shuttle carrying electrons from the cell surface to external acceptors. Differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry revealed a layer of flavins adsorbed to electrodes, even after soluble components were removed, especially in older biofilms. Riboflavin adsorbed quickly to other surfaces of geochemical interest, such as Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy(hydr)oxides. This in situ demonstration of flavin production, and sequestration at surfaces, requires the paradigm of soluble redox shuttles in geochemistry to be adjusted to include binding and modification of surfaces. Moreover, the known ability of isoalloxazine rings to act as metal chelators, along with their electron shuttling capacity, suggests that extracellular respiration of minerals by Shewanella is more complex than originally conceived. PMID:18316736

  1. Control of redox reactivity of flavin and pterin coenzymes by metal ion coordination and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kojima, Takahiko

    2008-03-01

    The electron-transfer activities of flavin and pterin coenzymes can be fine-tuned by coordination of metal ions, protonation and hydrogen bonding. Formation of hydrogen bonds with a hydrogen-bond receptor in metal-flavin complexes is made possible depending on the type of coordination bond that can leave the hydrogen-bonding sites. The electron-transfer catalytic functions of flavin and pterin coenzymes are described by showing a number of examples of both thermal and photochemical redox reactions, which proceed by controlling the electron-transfer reactivity of coenzymes with metal ion binding, protonation and hydrogen bonding.

  2. Discrepancy variation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan; Cai, Shengli; Yan, Binlun; Chen, Baiyao; Yu, Fei

    2009-01-01

    To address whether there are differences of variation among repeat motif types and among taxonomic groups, we present here an analysis of variation and correlation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Ten taxonomic groups were compared, those being primates, mammalia (excluding primates and rodentia), rodentia, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, molluscs, plants and fungi, respectively. The data used in the analysis is from the literature published in the Journal of Molecular Ecology Notes. Analysis of variation reveals that there are no significant differences between AC and AG repeat motif types. Moreover, the number of alleles correlates positively with the copy number in both AG and AC repeats. Similar conclusions can be obtained from each taxonomic group. These results strongly suggest that the increase of SSR variation is almost linear with the increase of the copy number of each repeat motif. As well, the results suggest that the variability of SSR in the genomes of low-ranking species seem to be more than that of high-ranking species, excluding primates and fungi.

  3. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives.

  4. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  5. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  6. Intermolecular band dispersion in quasi-one-dimensional adenine assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Fleurence, Antoine; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko; Friedlein, Rainer

    2011-12-07

    Highly-ordered, hydrated adenine multilayer films grown on the surface of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite, HOPG(0001), display extended electronic states, affording anisotropic band-like charge transport along the π-π stacking direction.

  7. Thiamin and riboflavin vitamers in human milk: effects of lipid-based nutrient supplementation and stage of lactation on vitamer secretion and contributions to total vitamin content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main...

  8. Biological Sensors Using DNA Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    hydrodynamic voltammetry and the results have been discussed. 5 2. Experimental Methods Reagents GOD (EC 1.1.3.4, Aspergillus niger , >100 U...is of practical use, stable and inexpensive. GOD from Aspergillus , is a homodimer containing two tightly bound flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD

  9. A three-state model for the photophysics of adenine.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2006-08-25

    An ab initio theoretical study at the CASPT2 level is reported on minimum energy reaction paths, state minima, transition states, reaction barriers, and conical intersections on the potential energy hypersurfaces of two tautomers of adenine: 9H- and 7H-adenine. The obtained results led to a complete interpretation of the photophysics of adenine and derivatives, both under jet-cooled conditions and in solution, within a three-state model. The ultrafast subpicosecond fluorescence decay measured in adenine is attributed to the low-lying conical intersection (gs/pipi* La)(CI), reached from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) state along a path which is found to be barrierless only in 9H-adenine, while for the 7H tautomer the presence of an intermediate plateau corresponding to an NH2-twisted conformation may explain the absence of ultrafast decay in 7-substituted compounds. A secondary picosecond decay is assigned to a path involving switches towards two other states, 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*), ultimately leading to another conical intersection with the ground state, (gs/npi*), with a perpendicular disposition of the amino group. The topology of the hypersurfaces and the state properties explain the absence of secondary decay in 9-substituted adenines in water in terms of the higher position of the 1(npi*) state and also that the 1(pipi* Lb) state of 7H-adenine is responsible for the observed fluorescence in water. A detailed discussion comparing recent experimental and theoretical findings is given. As for other nucleobases, the predominant role of a pipi*-type state in the ultrafast deactivation of adenine is confirmed.

  10. Aerobic organocatalytic oxidation of aryl aldehydes: flavin catalyst turnover by Hantzsch's ester.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Foss, Frank W

    2012-10-05

    The first Dakin oxidation fueled by molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant is reported. Flavin and NAD(P)H coenzymes, from natural enzymatic redox systems, inspired the use of flavin organocatalysts and a Hantzsch ester to perform transition-metal-free, aerobic oxidations. Catechols and electron-rich phenols are achieved with as low as a 0.1 mol % catalyst loading, 1 equiv of Hantzsch ester, and O(2) or air as the stoichiometric oxidant source.

  11. The two-photon excitation cross section of 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Robert J; Hou, Zhanjia; Yang, Aiping; Hawkins, Mary E

    2005-03-03

    6MAP is a fluorescent analogue of adenine that undergoes Watson-Crick base pairing and base stacking in double-stranded DNA. The one-photon absorption spectrum of 6MAP is characterized by a maximum around 330 nm with moderate quantum yield fluorescence centered at about 420 nm. To take advantage of this probe for confocal and single-molecule microscopy, it would be advantageous to be able to excite the analogue via two photons. We report the first determination of the two-photon excitation cross section and spectrum for 6MAP from 614 to 700 nm. The power dependence of the fluorescence indicates that emission results from the absorption of two photons. The one-photon and two-photon emission line shapes are identical within experimental error. A study of the concentration dependence of the fluorescence yield for one-photon excitation shows no measurable quenching up to about 5 microM. The maximum in the two-photon excitation spectrum gives a two-photon cross section, delta(TPE), of 3.4 +/- 0.1 Goeppert-Mayer (G.M.) at 659 nm, which correlates well with the one-photon absorption maximum. This compares quite favorably with cross sections of various naturally fluorescent biological molecules such as flavins and nicotiamide. In addition, we have also obtained the two-photon-induced fluorescence emission spectrum of quinine sulfate. It is approximately the same as that for one-photon excitation, suggesting that two-photon excitation of quinine sulfate may be used for calibration purposes.

  12. Renal reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:cytochrome c reductase-mediated metabolism of the carcinogen N-(4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mattammal, M.B.; Zenser, T.V.; Palmier, M.O.; Davis, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    N-(4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide (NFTA) metabolism was examined in vitro using microsomes prepared from rat liver and renal cortex and from rabbit liver and renal cortex and outer and inner medulla. NFTA nitroreduction was observed with each tissue. Three mol of NADPH were used per mol of NFTA reduced. Substrate and inhibitor specificity suggested that the microsomal nitroreduction was due to NADPH:cytochrome c reductase. Metabolite(s) formed bound to protein, RNA, DNA, and synthetic polyribonucleotides. Maximum covalent binding was seen with polyguanylic acid. A guanosine-NFTA adduct was isolated. Binding was inhibited by sulfhydryl compounds and vitamin E. The (/sup 14/C)NFTA:glutathione or (/sup 3/H)glutathione:NFTA conjugates obtained from microsomal incubations showed identical chromatographic properties as the product obtained by the reaction of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA with (/sup 3/H)glutathione. Structures of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA and the microsomal reduction product 1-(4-(2-acetylaminothiazolyl))-3-cyano-1-propanone were established by mass spectrometry. The latter reduction product did not bind macromolecules. These results suggest that renal NADPH:cytochrome c reductase reduces NFTA to an N-hydroxy-NFTA intermediate that binds nucleophilic sites on macromolecules.

  13. Effect of Exogenous Extracellular Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD⁺) on Bioelectric Activity of the Pacemaker and Conduction System of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, K B; Kuz'min, V S; Sukhova, G S

    2015-06-01

    In rat sinoatrial node, NAD(+) (10 μM) reduced the rate of spontaneous action potentials, duration of action potentials, and the velocity of slow diastolic depolarization, but the rate of action potential front propagation increases. In passed rabbit Purkinje fibers, NAD(+) (10 μM) reduced the duration of action potentials. Under conditions of spontaneous activity of Purkinje fibers, NAD(+) reduced the fi ring rate and the rate of slow diastolic depolarization. The effects of extracellular NAD(+) on bioelectric activity of the pacemaker (sinoatrial node) and conduction system of the heart (Purkinje fibers) are probably related to activation of P1 and P2 purinoceptors.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, convalesce behavior and biochemistry of hypertension induced vascular dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhupesh; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive disorders are likely to increase over the coming years (5-10). Vascular dementia (VaD) has heterogeneous pathology and is a challenge for clinicians. Current Alzheimer's disease drugs have had limited clinical efficacy in treating VaD and none have been approved by major regulatory authorities specifically for this disease. Role of iNOS and NADPH-oxidase has been reported in various pathological conditions but there role in hypertension (Hypt) induced VaD is still unclear. This research work investigates the salutiferous effect of aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor and 4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone (HMAP), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor in Hypt induced VaD in rats. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-S) hypertension has been used for development of VaD in rats. Morris water-maze was used for testing learning and memory. Vascular system assessment was done by testing endothelial function. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), oxidative stress [aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and brain glutathione (GSH)], nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) and cholinergic activity (brain acetyl cholinesterase activity-AChE) were also measured. DOCA-S treated rats have shown increased MABP with impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate & brain GSH levels along with increase in serum & brain TBARS, and brain AChE activity. AG as well as HMAP significantly convalesce Hypt induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that AG, an iNOS inhibitor and HMAP, a NADPH-oxidase inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of Hypt induced VaD.

  15. Effect of sulphate-limited growth on mitochondrial electron transfer and energy conservation between reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide and the cytochromes in Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, B. A.; Garland, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    1. Conditions have been established for the sulphate-limited growth of Torulopsis utilis in continuous culture. 2. Mitochondria prepared from sulphate-limited cells lack both piericidin A sensitivity and the first energy-conservation site (site 1). Sensitivity to antimycin A or cyanide and the second and third energy-conservation sites were apparently unaffected by sulphate-limited growth. 3. Aerobic incubation for 8h of sulphate-limited cells with a low concentration of sulphate (50μm or less) resulted in the recovery of mitochondrial piericidin A sensitivity and site 1. The use of higher concentrations of sulphate (250μm or more) still resulted in the recovery of mitochondrial piericidin A sensitivity and site 1, but also resulted in the appearance of a non-phosphorylating oxidase, which mediated oxidation of the respiratory chain at about the level of cytochrome b in an antimycin A- and cyanide-insensitive manner. Both this alternative route and the conventional normal route of respiration were shown to coexist and to intercommunicate at the level of cytochrome b. 4. Low-temperature spectroscopy failed to identify any new respiratory component to explain the alternative route. 5. The apparent affinity of the alternative route for oxygen was similar to that for the conventional route through cytochrome oxidase, namely half-maximal activity at 0.1μm-oxygen or less. 6. The non-haem iron concentration of submitochondrial particles was unaffected by sulphate limitation, whereas the acid-labile sulphide concentration was lowered tenfold. Marked increases (between four- and 30-fold) in the acid-labile sulphide concentration of submitochondrial particles were observed in sulphate-limited cells after aerobic incubation with various concentrations of sulphate. The lowest increase (fourfold) was observed without added sulphate, the highest (30-fold) with 1.0mm added sulphate. 7. The ratio of non-haem iron to acid-labile sulphide in submitochondrial particles varied with different growth conditions from a maximum of 15.0 to a minimum of 0.72. It is suggested that analytical measurements of non-haem iron are an inadequate guide to the concentration of iron–sulphur protein in complex systems. 8. The effects of sulphate-limited growth on site 1 and piericidin sensitivity are interpreted to indicate a role for iron–sulphur protein in these properties. 9. The aerobic incubation of sulphate-limited cells with cycloheximide resulted in the recovery by mitochondria of site 1 but not of piericidin sensitivity. 10. The appearance of the alternative route for cyanide- and antimycin-A (but not piericidin A-) insensitive respiration on incubating sulphate-limited cells with sulphate concentrations higher than 250μm indicates that the alternative route involves an iron–sulphur protein. PMID:4399517

  16. HIV-1 trans activator of transcription protein elicits mitochondrial hyperpolarization and respiratory deficit, with dysregulation of complex IV and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide homeostasis in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Norman, John P; Perry, Seth W; Kasischke, Karl A; Volsky, David J; Gelbard, Harris A

    2007-01-15

    HIV-1 causes a common, progressive neurological disorder known as HIV-associated dementia (HAD). The prevalence of this disorder has increased despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and its underlying pathogenesis remains poorly understood. However, evidence suggests that some aspects of HAD may be reversible. To model the reversible aspects of HAD, we have used the HIV-1 neurotoxin trans activator of transcription protein (Tat) to investigate nonlethal changes in cultured neurons. Exposure of rodent cortical neurons to sublethal concentrations of Tat elicits mitochondrial hyperpolarization. In this study, we used the cationic lipophilic dye rhodamine 123 to confirm this observation, and then performed follow-up studies to examine the mechanism involved. In intact neurons, we found Tat elicited a rapid drop in internal mitochondrial pH, and addition of Tat to purified mitochondrial extracts inhibited complex IV of the electron transport chain. To correlate enzyme activity in mitochondrial extracts with results in intact cells, we measured neuronal respiration following Tat exposure. Cortical neurons demonstrated decreased respiration upon Tat treatment, consistent with inhibition of complex IV. We examined mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis using a mitochondrial targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein-calmodulin construct. We detected a decrease in mitochondrial calcium concentration following exposure to Tat. Finally, we measured the energy intermediate NAD(P)H after Tat treatment, and found a 20% decrease in the autofluorescence. Based on these findings, we suggest that decreased NADPH and calcium concentration contribute to subsequent respiratory decline after exposure to Tat, with detrimental effects on neuronal signaling.

  17. Towards understanding the origins of the different specificities of binding the reduced (NADPH) and oxidised (NADP +) forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate coenzyme to dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshakov, Vladimir I.; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Birdsall, Berry; Feeney, James

    2002-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) binds more than a thousand times tighter to NADPH than to NADP +. The origins of the difference in binding affinity to DHFR between NADPH and NADP + are investigated in the present study using experimental NMR data and hybrid density functional, B3LYP, calculations. Certain protein residues (Ala 6, Gln 7, Ile 13 and Gly 14) that are directly involved in hydrogen bonding with the nicotinamide carboxamide group show consistent differences in 1H and 15N chemical shift between NADPH and NADP + in a variety of ternary complexes. B3LYP calculations in model systems of protein-coenzyme interactions show differences in the H-bond geometry and differences in charge distribution between the oxidised and reduced forms of the nicotinamide ring. GIAO isotropic nuclear shieldings calculated for nuclei in these systems reproduce the experimentally observed trends in magnitudes and signs of the chemical shifts. The experimentally observed reduction in binding of NADP + compared with NADPH results partly from NADP + having to change its nicotinamide amide group from a cis- to a trans-conformation on binding and partly from the oxidised nicotinamide ring of NADP + being unable to take up its optimal hydrogen bonding geometry in its interactions with protein residues.

  18. New approach to biosensing of co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by incorporation of neutral red in aluminum doped nanostructured ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    V T, Fidal; T S, Chandra

    2017-01-04

    Biosensing of NADH on bare electrodes has drawbacks such as high over-potential and poisoning during the oxidation reaction. To overcome this challenge a different approach has been undertaken by incorporating neutral red (NR) in Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films using one-pot chemical bath deposition (CBD). The surface morphology of the films was hexagonal nanorods along the c-axis, perpendicular to the substrate. The thickness of the thin films were ranging from 400 to 3000nm varying dependent on time of deposition (30 to 150min). The average diameter of the nanorods was larger in the presence of neutral red (NR-AZO) with ~300nm in contrast to its absence (AZO) with ~200nm. The density of the packing of nanorods was dependent on the citrate concentration used during deposition. Control over the dopant concentration in the films was achieved by varying the area of Al foil used in the deposition solution. The selected area diffraction (SAED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated 002 plane of orientation in the nanorods. FTIR and FT-Raman analysis revealed conserved structure of NR and AZO. Chronoamperometric (CA) analysis showed a sensitivity of 0.45μAcm(-2)mM(-1) and LoD of 22μM within the range 0.075-4mM of NADH. The biological sensing of NADH was validated by physical adsorption of NAD(+) dependent-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) on NR-AZO. CA showed sensitivity of 0.56μAcm(-2)mM(-1) and LoD for lactate was 27μM in the range of 0.1-1mM of lactate. Further validation with real-time serum sample shows that LDH/NR-AZO correlates with the clinical values. The distinction in this study is that the organic mediator like neutral red has been incorporated into the grain structure of the ZnO thin film whereas other study with the mediators have only attempted surface functionalization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editor: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  19. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Cyclic ADP-Ribose (cADPR) Mediate Ca2+ Signaling in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Im, Soo-Yeul; Nam, Tae-Sik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Ko, Jae-Ki; Jang, Kyu Yoon; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a fundamental role in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers, NAADP and cADPR, in the cardiac hypertrophy induced by β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. Isoproterenol induced an initial Ca2+ transients followed by sustained Ca2+ rises. Inhibition of the cADPR pathway with 8-Br-cADPR abolished only the sustained Ca2+ increase, whereas inhibition of the NAADP pathway with bafilomycin-A1 abolished both rapid and sustained phases of the isoproterenol-mediated signal, indicating that the Ca2+ signal is mediated by a sequential action of NAADP and cADPR. The sequential production of NAADP and cADPR was confirmed biochemically. The isoproterenol-mediated Ca2+ increase and cADPR production, but not NAADP production, were markedly reduced in cardiomyocytes obtained from CD38 knockout mice. CD38 knockout mice were rescued from chronic isoproterenol infusion-induced myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and decrease in fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Thus, our findings indicate that β-adrenergic stimulation contributes to the development of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy via Ca2+ signaling mediated by NAADP-synthesizing enzyme and CD38 that produce NAADP and cADPR, respectively. PMID:26959359

  20. Novel concept of enzyme selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-modified inhibitors based on enzyme taxonomy from the diphosphate conformation of NAD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuyuki; Iida, Shui; Kato, Keisuke; Ono, Machiko

    2015-11-15

    The dihedral angle θ of the diphosphate part of NAD(P) were investigated to distinguish the differences in the binding-conformation of NAD(P) to enzymes and to create an enzyme taxonomy. Furthermore, new inhibitors with fixed dihedral angles showed that enzymes could recognize the differences in the dihedral angle θ. We suggest the taxonomy and the dihedral angle θ are important values for chemists to consider when designing inhibitors and drugs that target enzymes.

  1. Enhanced Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide electrocatalysis onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes-decorated gold nanoparticles and their use in hybrid biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino Neto, S.; Almeida, T. S.; Belnap, D. M.; Minteer, S. D.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of Au nanoparticles synthetized by different protocols and supported on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes containing different functional groups, focusing on their electrochemical performance towards NADH oxidation, ethanol bioelectrocatalysis, and ethanol/O2 biofuel cell. We describe four different synthesis protocols: microwave-assisted heating, water-in-oil, and dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles using acid or thiol species in the extraction step. The physical characterization of the metallic nanoparticles indicated that both the synthetic protocol as well as the type of functional groups on the carbon nanotubes affect the final particle size (varying from 13.4 to 2.4 nm) and their distribution onto the carbon surface. Moreover, the electrochemical data indicated that these two factors also influence their performance toward the electrooxidation of NADH. We observed that the samples containing Au nanoparticles with smaller size leads to higher catalytic currents and also shifts the oxidation potential of the targeted reaction, which varied from 0.13 to -0.06 V vs Ag/AgCl. Ethanol/O2 biofuel cell tests indicated that the hybrid bioelectrodes containing smaller and better distributed Au nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes generates higher power output, confirming that the electrochemical regeneration of NAD+ plays an important role in the overall biofuel cell performance.

  2. Dehydrogenation of androsterone by purified 3α-hydroxy steroid-dependent nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)-transhydrogenating enzyme of rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Pietruszko, Regina; Baron, D. N.

    1965-01-01

    1. An enzyme from rat liver, catalysing 3α-hydroxy steroid-dependent NAD(P) transhydrogenation and NAD-linked and NADP-linked dehydrogenation of 3α-hydroxy steroids, has been purified 100-fold by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and calcium phosphate gel. 2. No separation of these activities into different protein fractions has been achieved. 3. The properties of the enzyme in catalysing NAD-linked and NADP-linked dehydrogenation have been compared, with androsterone as substrate. Differences were found in pH optima, affinity for coenzyme and steroid, equilibrium constants and effects of salts. 4. NAD-linked dehydrogenation is inhibited by NADPH2 but is protected from this inhibition by chloride, which alone is itself an inhibitor. 5. The relevance of these findings to the problem of the number of enzymes involved in catalysis of 3α-hydroxy steroid-dependent transhydrogenation is discussed. PMID:4378709

  3. Mature microsatellites: mechanisms underlying dinucleotide microsatellite mutational biases in human cells.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D; Krasilnikova, Maria M; Eckert, Kristin A

    2013-03-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans.

  4. Implications of Dna-Nanostructures by Hoogsteen-Dinucleotides on Transcription Factor Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanke, Dierk; Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Peschke, Florian; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings showed that non-harmonic DNA-nanostructures are formed by Hoogsteen (HG) dinucleotides in vivo. In contrast to Waston-Crick (WC) base pairing, the purine base component is flipped from anti- to syn-conformation. This change consequently alters the width of the DNA-helix, the sizes of minor and major groove and biophysical properties, such as the melting temperature. Three dinucleotides (CA, TG and TA) have been identified that form stable HG conformations. Functional data and structural models imply that transcription factors specifically bind DNA-motifs that consist of both HG and WC base pairs - especially at the topological transition between HG and WC dinucleotides. We could show that most know cis -regulatory elements contain at least one HG dinucleotide. In addition, we focused our work on human promoter sequences that encode gene regulatory information within double stranded DNA. We compared occurrences of HG dinucleotides to all 16 dinucleotides. These ratios differed most in sequences closer to gene transcripts, where the promoters are located. These findings imply that transcription factors might explicitly recognize their DNA-motifs in regulatory promoter sequences that exhibit HG nanostructure islands.

  5. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  6. KDM1 Class Flavin-Dependent Protein Lysine Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Link, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Brittany S.; Heller, Frederick J.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein demethylases (KDM1s) are a subfamily of amine oxidases that catalyze the selective posttranslational oxidative demethylation of methyllysine side chains within protein and peptide substrates. KDM1s participate in the widespread epigenetic regulation of both normal and disease state transcriptional programs. Their activities are central to various cellular functions, such as hematopoietic and neuronal differentiation, cancer proliferation and metastasis, and viral lytic replication and establishment of latency. Interestingly, KDM1s function as catalytic subunits within complexes with coregulatory molecules that modulate enzymatic activity of the demethylases and coordinate their access to specific substrates at distinct sites within the cell and chromatin. Although several classes of KDM1 -selective small molecule inhibitors have been recently developed, these pan-active site inhibition strategies lack the ability to selectively discriminate between KDM1 activity in specific, and occasionally opposing, functional contexts within these complexes. Here we review the discovery of this class of demethylases, their structures, chemical mechanisms, and specificity. Additionally, we review inhibition of this class of enzymes as well as emerging interactions with coregulatory molecules that regulate demethylase activity in highly specific functional contexts of biological and potential therapeutic importance. PMID:25787087

  7. Photo-induced reduction of flavin mononucleotide in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.-H.; Dick, B.; Penzkofer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The photo-induced reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous solutions is studied by absorption spectra measurement under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Samples without exogenous reducing agent and with the exogenous reducing agents ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) are investigated. Under anaerobic conditions the photo-induced reduction with and without reducing agents is irreversible. Under aerobic conditions the photo-reduction without added reducing agent is small compared to the photo-degradation, and the photo-reduction of FMN by the reducing agents is reversible (re-oxidation in the dark). During photo-excitation of FMN the dissolved oxygen is consumed by singlet oxygen formation and subsequent chemical reaction. After light switch-off slow re-oxidation (slow absorption recovery) occurs due to air in-diffusion from surface. EDTA degradation by FMN excitation leads to oxygen scavenging. The quantum efficiencies of photo-reduction under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are determined. The re-oxidation of reduced FMN under aerobic conditions and due to air injection is investigated.

  8. Electrode-assisted catalytic water oxidation by a flavin derivative.

    PubMed

    Mirzakulova, Ekaterina; Khatmullin, Renat; Walpita, Janitha; Corrigan, Thomas; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M; Vyas, Shubham; Oottikkal, Shameema; Manzer, Samuel F; Hadad, Christopher M; Glusac, Ksenija D

    2012-10-01

    The success of solar fuel technology relies on the development of efficient catalysts that can oxidize or reduce water. All molecular water-oxidation catalysts reported thus far are transition-metal complexes, however, here we report catalytic water oxidation to give oxygen by a fully organic compound, the N(5)-ethylflavinium ion, Et-Fl(+). Evolution of oxygen was detected during bulk electrolysis of aqueous Et-Fl(+) solutions at several potentials above +1.9 V versus normal hydrogen electrode. The catalysis was found to occur on glassy carbon and platinum working electrodes, but no catalysis was observed on fluoride-doped tin-oxide electrodes. Based on spectroelectrochemical results and preliminary calculations with density functional theory, one possible mechanistic route is proposed in which the oxygen evolution occurs from a peroxide intermediate formed between the oxidized flavin pseudobase and the oxidized carbon electrode. These findings offer an organic alternative to the traditional water-oxidation catalysts based on transition metals.

  9. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  10. Regulated O2 activation in flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Rosanne E; Mayfield, Jeffery A; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2011-08-17

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) are involved in important biosynthetic pathways in diverse organisms, including production of the siderophores used for the import and storage of essential iron in serious pathogens. We have shown that the FMO from Aspergillus fumigatus, an ornithine monooxygenase (Af-OMO), is mechanistically similar to its well-studied distant homologues from mammalian liver. The latter are highly promiscuous in their choice of substrates, while Af-OMO is unusually specific. This presents a puzzle: how do Af-OMO and other FMOs of the biosynthetic classes achieve such specificity? We have discovered substantial enhancement in the rate of O(2) activation in Af-OMO in the presence of L-arginine, which acts as a small molecule regulator. Such protein-level regulation could help explain how this and related biosynthetic FMOs manage to couple O(2) activation and substrate hydroxylation to each other and to the appropriate cellular conditions. Given the essentiality of Fe to Af and the avirulence of the Af-OMO gene knock out, inhibitors of Af-OMO are likely to be drug targets against this medically intractable pathogen.

  11. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Sch. Agustsdottir, Inger M.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Edvardsson, Vidar O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. Study Design An observational cohort study. Setting & Participants All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Outcomes Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD and kidney failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in eGFR. Measurements Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Results Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were female and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6–67.9) years. The median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0–31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 patients (55%) and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3–5, including 11 patients (21%) with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 patients (62%) had had kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stage 3–5. Of the 14 (26%) patients with CKD stage 5, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 patients (55%). The median eGFR slope was −0.38 (range, −21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in patients receiving treatment with xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and −5.74 (range, −75.8 to −0.10) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (p=0.001). Limitations Use of observational registry data. Conclusions Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, while nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. PMID:26724837

  12. [Study of some pharmacological properties of a new adenine derivative].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov; Ozerov, A A; Motin, V G; Iasnetsov, Vik V; Karsanova, S K; Ivanov, Iu V; Chel'naia, N A

    2014-01-01

    It is established that the new compound, 9-[2-(4-isopropylphenoxy)ethyl]adenine (9-IPE-adenine) in a dose of 10 mg/kg per day produces neuroprotective effect in rats with brain ischemia model. 9-IPE-adenine decreased the neurologic deficiency 1.2 times more effectively (p < 0.05) than the reference drug mexidol in analogous dose, and had equal effect with this drug at 25 mg/kg per day on the neurologic deficiency and survival of animals. Electrophysiological studies in hippocampal slices in rats showed that 9-IPE-adenine depressed orthodromic population spikes in CA1 area by 42 ± 4%. Non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor complex MK-801, in contrast to D-AP5 (competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) and CNQX (competitive AMPA receptor antagonist), enhanced the depressive effect of the new drug more than two times. These ese results are indicative of the ability of 9-IPE-adenine to modulate the ion channel of NMDA receptor complex.

  13. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-03

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  14. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  15. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  16. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  17. Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-10-02

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

  18. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  19. Conformational Switching in the Fungal Light Sensor Vivid

    SciTech Connect

    Zoltowski,B.; Schwerdtgeger, C.; Widom, J.; Loros, J.; Bilwes, A.; Dunlap, J.; Crane, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa photoreceptor Vivid tunes blue-light responses and modulates gating of the circadian clock. Crystal structures of dark-state and light-state Vivid reveal a light, oxygen, or voltage Per-Arnt-Sim domain with an unusual N-terminal cap region and a loop insertion that accommodates the flavin cofactor. Photoinduced formation of a cystein-flavin adduct drives flavin protonation to induce an N-terminal conformational change. A cysteine-to-serine substitution remote from the flavin adenine dinucleotide binding site decouples conformational switching from the flavin photocycle and prevents Vivid from sending signals in Neurospora. Key elements of this activation mechanism are conserved by other photosensors such as White Collar-1, ZEITLUPE, ENVOY, and flavin-binding, kelch repeat, F-BOX 1 (FKF1).

  20. Adenine and 2-aminopurine: paradigms of modern theoretical photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio C

    2006-06-06

    Distinct photophysical behavior of nucleobase adenine and its constitutional isomer, 2-aminopurine, has been studied by using quantum chemical methods, in particular an accurate ab initio multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory. After light irradiation, the efficient, ultrafast energy dissipation observed for nonfluorescent 9H-adenine is explained here by the nonradiative internal conversion process taking place along a barrierless reaction path from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) excited state toward a low-lying conical intersection (CI) connected with the ground state. In contrast, the strong fluorescence recorded for 2-aminopurine at 4.0 eV with large decay lifetime is interpreted by the presence of a minimum in the 1(pipi* La) hypersurface lying below the lowest CI and the subsequent potential energy barrier required to reach the funnel to the ground state. Secondary deactivation channels were found in the two systems related to additional CIs involving the 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*) states. Although in 9H-adenine a population switch between both states is proposed, in 7H-adenine this may be perturbed by a relatively larger barrier to access the 1(npi*) state, and, therefore, the 1(pipi* Lb) state becomes responsible for the weak fluorescence measured in aqueous adenine at approximately 4.5 eV. In contrast to previous models that explained fluorescence quenching in adenine, unlike in 2-aminopurine, on the basis of the vibronic coupling of the nearby 1(pipi*) and 1(npi*) states, the present results indicate that the 1(npi*) state does not contribute to the leading photophysical event and establish the prevalence of a model based on the CI concept in modern photochemistry.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis flavin reductase 1 and its role in metronidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Janssen, Brian D; Kolarich, Daniel; Johnson, Patricia J; Duchêne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme flavin reductase 1 (FR1) from Trichomonas vaginalis, formerly known as NADPH oxidase, was isolated and identified. Flavin reductase is part of the antioxidative defence in T. vaginalis and indirectly reduces molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide via free flavins. Importantly, a reduced or absent flavin reductase activity has been reported in metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis, resulting in elevated intracellular oxygen levels and futile cycling of metronidazole. Interestingly, FR1 has no close homologue in any other sequenced genome, but seven full-length and three truncated isoforms exist in the T. vaginalis genome. However, out of these, only FR1 has an affinity for flavins, i.e. FMN, FAD and riboflavin, which is high enough to be of physiological relevance. Although there are no relevant changes in the gene sequence or any alterations of the predicted FR1-mRNA structure in any of the strains studied, FR1 is not expressed in highly metronidazole-resistant strains. Transfection of a metronidazole-resistant clinical isolate (B7268), which does not express any detectable amounts of FR, with a plasmid bearing a functional FR1 gene nearly completely restored metronidazole sensitivity. Our results indicate that FR1 has a significant role in the emergence of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis.

  2. Resolution of strongly competitive product channels with optimal dynamic discrimination: Application to flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslund, Jonathan; Roth, Matthias; Guyon, Laurent; Boutou, Véronique; Courvoisier, Francois; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental molecular selectivity limits are probed by exploiting laser-controlled quantum interferences for the creation of distinct spectral signatures in two flavin molecules, erstwhile nearly indistinguishable via steady-state methods. Optimal dynamic discrimination (ODD) uses optimally shaped laser fields to transiently amplify minute molecular variations that would otherwise go unnoticed with linear absorption and fluorescence techniques. ODD is experimentally demonstrated by combining an optimally shaped UV pump pulse with a time-delayed, fluorescence-depleting IR pulse for discrimination amongst riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide in aqueous solution, which are structurally and spectroscopically very similar. Closed-loop, adaptive pulse shaping discovers a set of UV pulses that induce disparate responses from the two flavins and allows for concomitant flavin discrimination of ˜16σ. Additionally, attainment of ODD permits quantitative, analytical detection of the individual constituents in a flavin mixture. The successful implementation of ODD on quantum systems of such high complexity bodes well for the future development of the field and the use of ODD techniques in a variety of demanding practical applications.

  3. Negative ion formation in potassium-adenine collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; García, G.; Limáo Vieira, P.

    2016-09-01

    We have devoted experimental studies to time-of-flight negative ion formation in electron transfer experiments from neutral potassium atoms with neutral adenine molecules1. Total partial cross sections have been obtained as a function of the collision energy, together with branching ratios for the most relevant fragment anions. Additional set of measurements in adenine derivatives have been performed in order to probe the role of negative ions as well as to probe whether site- and bond-selective excision is also a prevalent mechanism within electron transfer in atom-molecule collision experiments.

  4. Multiple isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Urbauer, J.L.; Cleland, W.W. ); Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. )

    1991-06-11

    Deuterium isotope effects and {sup 13}C isotope effects with deuterium- and protium-labeled malate have been obtained for both NAD- and NADP-malic enzymes by using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates. With nicotinamide-containing dinucleotides as the oxidizing substrate, the {sup 13}C effect decreases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data are consistent with a stepwise chemical mechanism in which hydride transfer precedes decarboxylation of the oxalacetate intermediate as previously proposed. When dinucleotide substrates such as thio-NAD, 3-nicotinamide rings are used, the {sup 13}C effect increases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data, at face value, are consistent with a change in mechanism from stepwise to concerted for the oxidative decarboxylation portion of the mechanism. However, the increase in the deuterium isotope effect from 1.5 to 3 with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect from 1.034 to 1.003 as the dinucleotide substrate is changed suggests that the reaction may still be stepwise with the non-nicotinamide dinucleotides. A more likely explanation is that a {beta}-secondary {sup 13}C isotope effect accompanies hydride transfer as a result of hyperconjugation of the {beta}-carboxyl of malate as the transition state for the hydride transfer step is approached.

  5. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  6. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  7. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A.P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E.J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone, or coenzyme Q, is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains1. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor2. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as an FMN-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected3–4. We report here that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD5. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases6–7, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyl transferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases8. The active site environment is dominated by π-systems, which assist phosphate-C1’ bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1’ bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3’-C6 bond. The study establishes the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoire. PMID:26083743

  8. Base excision repair of tandem modifications in a methylated CpG dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Akira; Çağlayan, Melike; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Beard, William A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-05-16

    Cytosine methylation and demethylation in tracks of CpG dinucleotides is an epigenetic mechanism for control of gene expression. The initial step in the demethylation process can be deamination of 5-methylcytosine producing the TpG alteration and T:G mispair, and this step is followed by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiated base excision repair (BER). A further consideration is that guanine in the CpG dinucleotide may become oxidized to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), and this could affect the demethylation process involving TDG-initiated BER. However, little is known about the enzymology of BER of altered in-tandem CpG dinucleotides; e.g. Tp8-oxoG. Here, we investigated interactions between this altered dinucleotide and purified BER enzymes, the DNA glycosylases TDG and 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β, and DNA ligases. The overall TDG-initiated BER of the Tp8-oxoG dinucleotide is significantly reduced. Specifically, TDG and DNA ligase activities are reduced by a 3'-flanking 8-oxoG. In contrast, the OGG1-initiated BER pathway is blocked due to the 5'-flanking T:G mispair; this reduces OGG1, AP endonuclease 1, and DNA polymerase β activities. Furthermore, in TDG-initiated BER, TDG remains bound to its product AP site blocking OGG1 access to the adjacent 8-oxoG. These results reveal BER enzyme specificities enabling suppression of OGG1-initiated BER and coordination of TDG-initiated BER at this tandem alteration in the CpG dinucleotide.

  9. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  10. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  11. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  12. Relationship between periodic dinucleotides and the nucleosome structure revealed by alpha shape modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong

    2010-04-01

    As the fundamental repeating units in eukaryotic chromatin, nucleosomes play an important role in many biological processes. For this reason, the study of the structure of nucleosomes may help to reveal some of the crucial principals of these processes. In our research, we have used alpha shapes to model nucleosome structure and discovered that the periodic DNA dinucleotides AA, TT and GC occupy special positions in nucleosome structure with one nucleotide inside and the other outside the nucleosome surface. This structural feature and other dinucleotide characteristics can provide useful information for the study of nucleosome positioning.

  13. In vitro adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zietara, Marek S; Słomińska, Ewa; Rurangwa, Eugene; Ollevier, Frans; Swierczyński, Julian; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2004-08-01

    It has been shown recently that African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) spermatozoa possess relatively low ATP content and low adenylate energy charge (AEC). One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the spermatozoa actively catabolize adenine nucleotides. A relatively high rate of such catabolism could then contribute to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in the spermatozoa in vitro. To check this hypothesis, we investigated ATP content and adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa stored at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine as an energetic substrate. Our results indicate that the storage of African catfish sperm at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine causes time-dependent ATP depletion. In contrast to ATP, the AMP content increases significantly during the same period of sperm storage, while the ADP increases only slightly. Moreover, a significant increase of inosine and hypoxanthine content was also found. Hypoxanthine was accumulated in the storage medium, but xanthine was found neither in spermatozoa nor in the storage medium. It indicates that hypoxanthine is not converted to xanthine, probably due to lack of xanthine oxidase activity in catfish spermatozoa. Present results suggest that adenine nucleotides may be converted to hypoxanthine according to the following pathway: ATP-->ADP-->AMP (adenosine/IMP)-->inosine-->hypoxanthine. Moreover, hypoxanthine seems to be the end product of adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa. In conclusion, our results suggest that a relatively high rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism contributes to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in African catfish spermatozoa in vitro.

  14. Resolution of overlapping skin auto-fluorescence for development of non-invasive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Zheng; Lin, Li-Wu; Chen, Chuen-Yau; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Skin auto-fluorescence spectra can provide useful biological information, but the obtained spectrum is overlapped and is difficult to distinguish each contributed component. We applied the genetic algorithm to decompose the overlapping spectrum. First, we simulate the overlapping spectral to confirm our feasible algorithm. The skin auto-fluorescence spectra were obtained from the normal human skin with 337 nm excitation light source. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotid (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are accurately decomposed and demonstrated. The developed algorithm can be widely applied to achieve qualitative and quantitative analysis for overlapping spectra.

  15. Improved predictive test for MEN2, using flanking dinucleotide repeats and RFLPs

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, J.R.; Lairmore, T.C.; Mishra, S.K.; Shenshen Dou; Veile, R.; Wells, S.A. Jr.; Donis-Keller, H. )

    1992-12-01

    Gene(s) for the autosomal dominant endocrine cancer syndromes, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B), and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC1) all map to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. Predictive testing for the inheritance of mutant alleles in individuals at risk for these disorders has been limited by the availability of highly informative and closely linked flanking markers. The authors describe the development of eight new markers, including two PCR-based dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms and six RFLPs that flank the disease loci. One of the dinucleotide repeat markers (sJRH-1) derives from the RBP3 locus on 10q11.2 and has a PIC of .88. The other dinucleotide repeat (sTCL-1) defines a new locus, D10S176, that maps by in situ hybridization to 10p11.2 and has a PIC of .68. The authors have constructed a new genetic linkage map of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10, on the basis of 13 polymorphisms at six loci, which places the MEN2A locus between the dinucleotide repeat markers, with odds of 5,750:1 over the next most likely position. Using this set of markers, predictive genetic testing of 130 at-risk individuals from six families segregating MEN2A revealed that 95% were jointly informative with flanking markers, representing a significant improvement in genetic testing capabilities. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Study on the oxidation form of adenine in phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zhi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Feng-Xia; Ye, Yong; Xie, Ji-Min

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of adenine in phosphate buffer solution is investigated using square-wave voltammetry and in situ UV spectroelectrochemistry. The geometry of adenine and the derivatives optimized at DFTB3LYP-6-31G (d, p)-PCM level is in agreement with the crystal structure, and the imitated UV spectra of adenine and the product at electrode are consistent with the in situ UV spectra. The relationship between the electrochemical property and the molecular structure is also discussed. The experimental and theoretical results show that the adenine oxidation origins from the neutral adenine.

  17. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, André; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  18. A Click Chemistry Approach towards Flavin-Cyclodextrin Conjugates-Bioinspired Sulfoxidation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tomanová, Petra; Šturala, Jiří; Buděšínský, Miloš; Cibulka, Radek

    2015-11-04

    A click chemistry approach based on the reaction between alkynylflavins and mono(6-azido-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin has proven to be a useful tool for the synthesis of flavin-cyclodextrin conjugates studied as monooxygenase mimics in enantioselective sulfoxidations.

  19. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-07-21

    Synthetic flavin molecules were anchored on Degussa P25 titanium dioxide (TiO2). The effect of their presence on the photocatalytic (PC) activity of TiO2 was studied. Under UV light, an increase in the degradation rate of ethanol was observed. This increase was accompanied by stabilization of the anchored flavin against self-degradation. The unprecedented stabilization effect was found also in the absence of a reducing agent such as ethanol. In contrast, under the less energetic visible light, fast degradation of the anchored flavin was observed. These rather surprising observations were attributed to the propensity for charge transport from excited flavin molecules to the semiconductor and to the role that such charge transfer may play in stabilizing the overall assembly. Anchored flavins excited by UV light to their S2, S3 electronic states were able to transfer the excited electrons to the TiO2 phase whereas anchored flavin molecules that were excited by visible light to the S1 state were less likely to transfer the photo-excited electrons and therefore were destabilized. These findings may be relevant not only to anchored flavins in general but to other functionalized photocatalysts, and may open up new vistas in the implementation of sensitizers in PC systems.

  1. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors.

  2. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine).

  3. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  4. The nucleobase adenine as a signalling molecule in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Thimm, D; Schiedel, A C; Peti-Peterdi, J; Kishore, B K; Müller, C E

    2015-04-01

    In 2002, the first receptor activated by the nucleobase adenine was discovered in rats. In the past years, two adenine receptors (AdeRs) in mice and one in Chinese hamsters, all of which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), were cloned and pharmacologically characterized. Based on the nomenclature for other purinergic receptor families (P1 for adenosine receptors and P2 for nucleotide, e.g. ATP, receptors), AdeRs were designated P0 receptors. Pharmacological data indicate the existence of G protein-coupled AdeRs in pigs and humans as well; however, those have not been cloned so far. Current data suggest a role for adenine and AdeRs in renal proximal tubules. Furthermore, AdeRs are suggested to be functional counterplayers of vasopressin in the collecting duct system, thus exerting diuretic effects. We are only at the beginning of understanding the significance of this new class of purinergic receptors, which might become future drug targets.

  5. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-07

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1.

  6. Human augmenter of liver regeneration: probing the catalytic mechanism of a flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Ramadan, Stephanie; Gannon, Shawn A; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-11-19

    Augmenter of liver regeneration is a member of the ERV family of small flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidases that contain a redox-active CxxC disulfide bond in redox communication with the isoalloxazine ring of bound FAD. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of thiol substrates with the reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. This work studies the catalytic mechanism of the short, cytokine form of augmenter of liver regeneration (sfALR) using model thiol substrates of the enzyme. The redox potential of the proximal disulfide in sfALR was found to be approximately 57 mV more reducing than the flavin chromophore, in agreement with titration experiments. Rapid reaction studies show that dithiothreitol (DTT) generates a transient mixed disulfide intermediate with sfALR signaled by a weak charge-transfer interaction between the thiolate of C145 and the oxidized flavin. The subsequent transfer of reducing equivalents to the flavin ring is relatively slow, with a limiting apparent rate constant of 12.4 s(-1). However, reoxidation of the reduced flavin by molecular oxygen is even slower (2.3 s(-1) at air saturation) and thus largely limits turnover at 5 mM DTT. The nature of the charge-transfer complexes observed with DTT was explored using a range of simple monothiols to mimic the initial nucleophilic attack on the proximal disulfide. While β-mercaptoethanol is a very poor substrate of sfALR (∼0.3 min(-1) at 100 mM thiol), it rapidly generates a mixed disulfide intermediate allowing the thiolate of C145 to form a strong charge-transfer complex with the flavin. Unlike the other monothiols tested, glutathione is unable to form charge-transfer complexes and is an undetectable substrate of the oxidase. These data are rationalized on the basis of the stringent steric requirements for thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. The inability of the relatively bulky glutathione to attain the in-line geometry required for efficient disulfide exchange in sfALR may be

  7. X-ray Crystallography Reveals a Reduced Substrate Complex of UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Poised for Covalent Catalysis by Flavin

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Westler, William M.; Kiessling, Laura L.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2009-11-04

    The flavoenzyme uridine 5'-diphosphate galactopyranose mutase (UGM or Glf) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. The latter is a key building block for cell wall construction in numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanistic studies of UGM suggested a novel role for the flavin, and we previously provided evidence that the catalytic mechanism proceeds through a covalent flavin-galactose iminium. Here, we describe 2.3 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structures of the substrate-bound enzyme in oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. In the latter, C1 of the substrate is 3.6 {angstrom} from the nucleophilic flavin N5 position. This orientation is consistent with covalent catalysis by flavin.

  8. Characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence of Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase and Vibrio fischeri NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Vetrova, E V; Kudryasheva, N S; Visser, A J W G; van Hoek, A

    2005-01-01

    The bioluminescent bacterial enzyme system NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase-luciferase has been used as a test system for ecological monitoring. One of the modes to quench bioluminescence is the interaction of xenobiotics with the enzymes, which inhibit their activity. The use of endogenous flavin fluorescence for investigation of the interactions of non-fluorescent compounds with the bacterial luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri has been proposed. Fluorescence spectroscopy methods have been used to study characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence (fluorophore lifetime, the rotational correlation time). The fluorescence anisotropy behaviour of FMN has been analysed and compared to that of the enzyme-bound flavin. The fluorescence characteristics of endogenous flavin of luciferase and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase have been shown to be applicable in studying enzymes' interactions with non-fluorescent compounds.

  9. Malic enzyme: Tritium isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karsten, W.E.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. )

    1992-01-01

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to yield pyruvate, carbon dioxide and NADH. Multiple isotope effect studies suggest a stepwise chemical mechanism with hydride transfer from L-malate to NAD occurring first to form oxalacetate, followed by decarboxylation. Utilizing L-malate-2-T, tritium V/K isotope effects have been determined for the hydride transfer step using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions. Combination of these data with deuterium isotope effects data and previously determined [sup 13]C isotope effects has allowed the calculation of intrinsic isotope effects for the malic enzyme catalyzed reaction. The identity of both the dinucleotide substrate and divalent metal ion has an effect of the size of the intrinsic isotope effect for hydride transfer.

  10. A Highly Reactive Imidazolium-Bridged Dinucleotide Intermediate in Nonenzymatic RNA Primer Extension.

    PubMed

    Walton, Travis; Szostak, Jack W

    2016-09-14

    Because of its importance for the origin of life, the nonenzymatic copying of RNA templates has been the subject of intense study for several decades. Previous characterizations of template-directed primer extension using 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazole-activated nucleotides (2-MeImpNs) as substrates have assumed a classical in-line nucleophilic substitution mechanism, in which the 3'-hydroxyl of the primer attacks the phosphate of the incoming monomer, displacing the 2-methylimidazole leaving group. However, we have found that the initial rate of primer extension depends on the pH and concentration at which the activated monomer is maintained prior to the primer extension reaction. These and other results suggest an alternative mechanism, in which two monomers react with each other to form an imidazolium-bridged dinucleotide intermediate, which then binds to the template. Subsequent attack of the 3'-hydroxyl of the primer displaces an activated nucleotide as the leaving group and results in extension of the primer by one nucleotide. Analysis of monomer solutions by NMR indicates formation of the proposed imidazolium-bridged dinucleotide in the expected pH-dependent manner. We have used synthetic methods to prepare material that is enriched in this proposed intermediate and show that it is a highly reactive substrate for primer extension. The formation of an imidazolium-bridged dinucleotide intermediate provides a mechanistic interpretation of previously observed catalysis by an activated nucleotide located downstream from the site of primer extension.

  11. Progress in Understanding the Molecular Basis Underlying Functional Diversification of Cyclic Dinucleotide Turnover Proteins.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Dow, J Maxwell

    2017-03-01

    Cyclic di-GMP was the first cyclic dinucleotide second messenger described, presaging the discovery of additional cyclic dinucleotide messengers in bacteria and eukaryotes. The GGDEF diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and EAL and HD-GYP phosphodiesterase (PDE) domains conduct the turnover of cyclic di-GMP. These three unrelated domains belong to superfamilies that exhibit significant variations in function, and they include both enzymatically active and inactive members, with a subset involved in synthesis and degradation of other cyclic dinucleotides. Here, we summarize current knowledge of sequence and structural variations that underpin the functional diversification of cyclic di-GMP turnover proteins. Moreover, we highlight that superfamily diversification is not restricted to cyclic di-GMP signaling domains, as particular DHH/DHHA1 domain and HD domain proteins have been shown to act as cyclic di-AMP phosphodiesterases. We conclude with a consideration of the current limitations that such diversity of action places on bioinformatic prediction of the roles of GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domain proteins.

  12. Effects of spinally administered adenine on dorsal horn neuronal responses in a rat model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2004-02-19

    A novel G-protein-coupled receptor with adenine identified as the endogenous ligand has recently been described. In vivo electrophysiological techniques in the rat were used to record the response of dorsal horn neurones in response to transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the hindpaw receptive field. Spinal adenine (1-1000 microg) exerted facilitatory effects on the electrically-evoked neuronal responses, in a mildly dose-related manner. After establishment of carrageenan-induced inflammation to the hindpaw this excitatory effect of adenine was still apparent, yet reduced. C-fibre-evoked responses and other nociceptive related measures were most susceptible to the effects of adenine, whereas non-nociceptive Abeta-fibre evoked activity remained unaffected. Thus, activation of the adenine receptor site, via spinally applied adenine, suggests a pronociceptive role in nociceptive sensory transmission.

  13. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  14. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  15. Distortion of flavin geometry is linked to ligand binding in cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Heard, Kathryn; Tang, Hui; Sampson, Nicole S.; Vrielink, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors. PMID:18029419

  16. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T.

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  17. Distortion of Flavin Geometry Is Linked to Ligand Binding in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, A.Y.; Heard, K.; Tang, H.; Sampson, N.S.; Vrielink, A.

    2009-06-03

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors.

  18. Mechanistic insights into energy conservation by flavin-based electron bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Carolyn E; Jennings, David P; Mulder, David W; Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Hoben, John P; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Berry, Luke; Nguyen, Diep M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Bothner, Brian; Jones, Anne K; Miller, Anne-Frances; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael W W; Peters, John W

    2017-04-10

    The recently realized biochemical phenomenon of energy conservation through electron bifurcation provides biology with an elegant means to maximize utilization of metabolic energy. The mechanism of coordinated coupling of exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions by a single enzyme complex has been elucidated through optical and paramagnetic spectroscopic studies revealing unprecedented features. Pairs of electrons are bifurcated over more than 1 volt of electrochemical potential by generating a low-potential, highly energetic, unstable flavin semiquinone and directing electron flow to an iron-sulfur cluster with a highly negative potential to overcome the barrier of the endergonic half reaction. The unprecedented range of thermodynamic driving force that is generated by flavin-based electron bifurcation accounts for unique chemical reactions that are catalyzed by these enzymes.

  19. Flavin reductase: sequence of cDNA from bovine liver and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, K S; Hultquist, D E

    1994-01-01

    Flavin reductase catalyzes electron transfer from reduced pyridine nucleotides to methylene blue or riboflavin, and this catalysis is the basis of the therapeutic use of methylene blue or riboflavin in the treatment of methemoglobinemia. A cDNA for a mammalian flavin reductase has been isolated and sequenced. Degenerate oligonucleotides, with sequences based on amino acid sequences of peptides derived from bovine erythrocyte flavin reductase, were used as primers in PCR to selectively amplify a partial cDNA that encodes the bovine reductase. The template used in the PCR was first strand cDNA synthesized from bovine liver total RNA using oligo(dT) primers. A PCR product was used as a specific probe to screen a bovine liver cDNA library. The sequence determined from two overlapping clones contains an open reading frame of 621 nucleotides and encodes 206 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the bovine liver flavin reductase cDNA matches the amino acid sequences determined for erythrocyte reductase-derived peptides, and the predicted molecular mass of 22,001 Da for the liver reductase agrees well with the molecular mass of 21,994 Da determined for the erythrocyte reductase by electrospray mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence at the N terminus of the reductase has homology to sequences of pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes, and the predicted secondary structure, beta alpha beta, resembles the common nucleotide-binding structural motif. RNA blot analysis indicates a single 1-kilobase reductase transcript in human heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, placenta, and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:7937764

  20. LuxG is a functioning flavin reductase for bacterial luminescence.

    PubMed

    Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Wongratana, Janewit; Suadee, Chutintorn; Entsch, Barrie; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2008-03-01

    The luxG gene is part of the lux operon of marine luminous bacteria. luxG has been proposed to be a flavin reductase that supplies reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for bacterial luminescence. However, this role has never been established because the gene product has not been successfully expressed and characterized. In this study, luxG from Photobacterium leiognathi TH1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in both native and C-terminal His6-tagged forms. Sequence analysis indicates that the protein consists of 237 amino acids, corresponding to a subunit molecular mass of 26.3 kDa. Both expressed forms of LuxG were purified to homogeneity, and their biochemical properties were characterized. Purified LuxG is homodimeric and has no bound prosthetic group. The enzyme can catalyze oxidation of NADH in the presence of free flavin, indicating that it can function as a flavin reductase in luminous bacteria. NADPH can also be used as a reducing substrate for the LuxG reaction, but with much less efficiency than NADH. With NADH and FMN as substrates, a Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed a series of convergent lines characteristic of a ternary-complex kinetic model. From steady-state kinetics data at 4 degrees C pH 8.0, Km for NADH, Km for FMN, and kcat were calculated to be 15.1 microM, 2.7 microM, and 1.7 s(-1), respectively. Coupled assays between LuxG and luciferases from P. leiognathi TH1 and Vibrio campbellii also showed that LuxG could supply FMNH- for light emission in vitro. A luxG gene knockout mutant of P. leiognathi TH1 exhibited a much dimmer luminescent phenotype compared to the native P. leiognathi TH1, implying that LuxG is the most significant source of FMNH- for the luminescence reaction in vivo.

  1. Structure of a flavin-binding plant photoreceptor domain: Insights into light-mediated signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Sean; Moffat, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Phototropin, a major blue-light receptor for phototropism in seed plants, exhibits blue-light-dependent autophosphorylation and contains two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains and a serine/threonine kinase domain. The LOV domains share homology with the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) superfamily, a diverse group of sensor proteins. Each LOV domain noncovalently binds a single FMN molecule and exhibits reversible photochemistry in vitro when expressed separately or in tandem. We have determined the crystal structure of the LOV2 domain from the phototropin segment of the chimeric fern photoreceptor phy3 to 2.7-Å resolution. The structure constitutes an FMN-binding fold that reveals how the flavin cofactor is embedded in the protein. The single LOV2 cysteine residue is located 4.2 Å from flavin atom C(4a), consistent with a model in which absorption of blue light induces formation of a covalent cysteinyl-C(4a) adduct. Residues that interact with FMN in the phototropin segment of the chimeric fern photoreceptor (phy3) LOV2 are conserved in LOV domains from phototropin of other plant species and from three proteins involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis and Neurospora. This conservation suggests that these domains exhibit the same overall fold and share a common mechanism for flavin binding and light-induced signaling. PMID:11248020

  2. Bioluminophore and Flavin Mononucleotide Fluorescence Quenching of Bacterial Bioluminescence-A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanling; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-11-02

    Bacterial bioluminescence with continuous glow has been applied to the fields of environmental toxin monitoring, drug screening, and in vivo imaging. Nonetheless, the chemical form of the bacterial bioluminophore is still a bone of contention. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN), one of the light-emitting products, and 4a-hydroxy-5-hydro flavin mononucleotide (HFOH), an intermediate of the chemical reactions, have both been assumed candidates for the light emitter because they have similar molecular structures and fluorescence wavelengths. The latter is preferred in experiments and was assigned in our previous density functional study. HFOH displays weak fluorescence in solutions, but exhibits strong bioluminescence in the bacterial luciferase. FMN shows the opposite behavior; its fluorescence is quenched when it is bound to the luciferase. This is the first example of flavin fluorescence quenching observed in bioluminescent systems and is merely an observation, both the quenching mechanism and quencher are still unclear. Based on theoretical analysis of high-level quantum mechanics (QM), combined QM and molecular mechanics (QM/MM), and molecular dynamics (MD), this paper confirms that HFOH in its first singlet excited state is the bioluminophore of bacterial bioluminescence. More importantly, the computational results indicate that Tyr110 in the luciferase quenches the FMN fluorescence via an electron-transfer mechanism.

  3. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterization of an NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bruchhaus, I; Richter, S; Tannich, E

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Eh34) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant protein (recEh34) has a molecular mass of about 35 kDa upon SDS/PAGE analysis, exhibits a flavoprotein-like absorption spectrum and contains 1 mol of non-covalently bound FMN per mol of protein. RecEh34 reveals two different enzymic activities. It catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well as of disulphides such as 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and cystine. The disulphide reductase but not the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity is inhibitable by sulphydryl-active compounds, indicating that a thiol component is part of the active site for the disulphide reductase activity, whereas for the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity only the flavin is required. Compared with the recombinant protein, similar activities are present in amoebic extracts. Native Eh34 is active in a monomeric as well as in a dimeric state. In contrast to recEh34, no flavin was associated with the native protein. However, both NADPH oxidase as well as DTNB reductase activity were found to be dependent on the addition of FAD or FMN. PMID:9494088

  4. Modifying the collagen framework of costal cartilage under the impact of UV and a flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Zakharkina, O. L.; Semchishen, V. A.; Molchanov, M. D.; Lunin, V. V.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    Modifications of the matrix of the tissue of costal cartilage under the impact of UV (λ = 365 nm) and a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is studied. The changes in the macroscopic properties of the tissue are detected by means of differential scanning calorimetry and under the conditions of uniaxial compression during mechanical testing. The endothermic effects of the denaturation of the collagen framework of the tissue and the Young's modulus are determined. It is shown that the presence of a flavin mononucleotide in the interstitial fluid leads lowers the temperature of collagen denaturation by 2.5°C and doubles the Young's modulus. It is found that the temperature of denaturation and the Young's modulus grow gradually after treating the tissue with the UV radiation, and their values ultimately exceed by far the corresponding values for intact samples. It is concluded that the obtained data indicate the possibility of stabilizing the framework of the matrix of costal cartilage under the impact of UV radiation and a flavin mononucleotide.

  5. HYDROGEN-BONDED DIMERS OF ADENINE AND URACIL DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    HAMLIN, R M; LORD, R C; RICH, A

    1965-06-25

    In concentrated solutions of either 9-ethyladenine or 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform, absorption bands in the infrared spectrum demonstrate hydrogen bonding of the adenine and uracil derivatives with themselves. In dilute solutions, there is very little hydrogen bonding. However, when dilute solutions of 9-ethyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil are mixed, a series of bands appear which show that these molecules are hydrogen-bonding with each other much more strongly than with themselves. A study of the stoichiometry of this association indicates formation of 1:1 hydrogen-bonded pairs in solution.

  6. Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Michal J

    2010-08-01

    The Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine meeting, held in Tarragona, Spain, included topics covering new findings in the field of purinergic signaling and the development of purine-based drugs. This conference report highlights selected presentations on developments in purinerigic signaling, medicinal chemistry, the therapeutic potential of purine-based drugs, and the role of purines and adenosine receptors in neurodegenerative disorders, sickle cell disease, bone homeostasis, pulmonary fibrosis and pain. Investigational drugs discussed include CF-101 (Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd/NIH/Kwang Dong Pharmaceutical Co Ltd/Seikagaku Corp) and denufosol tetrasodium (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Inc/Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  7. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana . E-mail: apinkassaraf@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Markova, N.G. . E-mail: nmarkova@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Simon, M. . E-mail: marsimon@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-10-21

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides.

  8. Investigation of coordination properties of isolated adenine to copper metal: a systematic spectroscopic and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2013-08-01

    The coordination properties of copper with adenine have been studied by the analyzing the changes in Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectra of adenine and adenine-copper complex. The geometry of adenine and adenine copper complex were optimized and theoretical Infra-red and Raman spectra of the optimized structures were calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT). During synthesis of adenine-copper complex specific procedure was adopted to attach the Cu atom with particular N-atom of adenine (N9). The results of Raman and DFT confirmed the attachment. The Raman bands at 625, 330 and 230 cm(-1) of adenine-copper complex contain significant contribution of the vibrational motions of Cu metal coordinated to N9 and Cl atoms. The DFT calculations give additional vibrational modes containing the Cu, N9 and N9* atoms, which are not observed in FTIR and Raman spectra. The Raman, IR and DFT study confirm that Cu metal has good binding affinity to the isolated adenine base.

  9. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  10. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  11. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  12. A9145, a new adenine-containing antifungal antibiotic: fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boeck, L D; Clem, G M; Wilson, M M; Westhead, J E

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co(2+), PO(4) (3-), and CaCO(3), were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O(2) level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 x 10(-2) to 4.5 x 10(-2) mumole of O(2)/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels.

  13. On the deactivation mechanisms of adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, João Paulo; Saurí, Vicenta; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2012-04-05

    In this contribution, the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory method based on a complete active space reference wave function (CASSCF/CASPT2) is applied to study all possible single and double proton/hydrogen transfers between the nucleobases in the adenine-thymine (AT) base pair, analyzing the role of excited states with different nature [localized (LE) and charge transfer (CT)], and considering concerted as well as step-wise mechanisms. According to the findings, once the lowest excited states, localized in adenine, are populated during UV irradiation of the Watson-Crick base pair, the proton transfer in the N-O bridge does not require high energy in order to populate a CT state. The latter state will immediately relax toward a crossing with the ground state, which will funnel the system to either the canonical structure or the imino-enol tautomer. The base pair is also capable of repairing itself easily since the imino-enol species is unstable to thermal conversion.

  14. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  15. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs.

  16. Renoprotective effects of aliskiren on adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy: possible underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Malek, Hala Abdel; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible renoprotective effect of direct renin inhibitor (aliskiren) on renal dysfunctions, as well as its underlying mechanisms in rat model of adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups; normal group, aliskiren group (normal rats received 10 mg/kg aliskiren), adenine group (animals received high-adenine diet for 4 weeks and saline for 12 weeks), and adenine + aliskiren group (animals received adenine for 4 weeks and aliskiren 10 mg/kg for 12 weeks). It was found that adenine caused significant decrease in body mass, Hb, HR, serum Ca(2+), eNOS and nrf2 expression, GSH, and catalase in kidney tissues with significant increase in arterial blood pressure (ABP), serum creatinine, BUN, plasma renin activity (PRA), K(+) and P, urinary albumin excretion (UAE), caspase-3, and MDA (lipid peroxidation marker) in kidney tissues compared to normal group (p < 0.05). Administration of aliskiren caused significant improvement in all studied parameters compared to adenine group (p < 0.05). We concluded that aliskiren has renoprotective effect against adenine-induced nephropathy. This might be due to inhibition of PRA, attenuation of oxidative stress, activation of Nrf2 and eNOS genes, and suppression of caspase-3.

  17. Major and minor groove conformations of DNA trimers modified on guanine or adenine by 4-aminobiphenyl: Adenine adducts favor the minor groove

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.; Ellis, S.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the conformational effects of 4-aminobiphenyl modification at C-8 of guanine or adenine on double-stranded DNA trimers. We used sequences with the modified purine at the central base pair and all 16 possible neighboring sequences at the outer pairs. Minimized potential energy calculations were carried out using the molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to survey the conformation space of these adducts, using a total of 1280 starting structures both in the modified guanine series and in the modified adenine series. Conformer families in which the bound 4-aminobiphenyl was located in the DNA major groove, and in the minor groove, were located for both adenine and guanine modification. In the modified guanine series, the major and minor groove families were roughly comparable in energy, and the sequence context determined which was more stable in a particular case. In the modified adenine series, however, the minor groove structure was more that 10 kcal/mol more stable than the major groove for all sequences. As a result, minor groove adducts provided most of the global minima in the adenine-modified series. This result may be relevant to a previous mutagenesis study [Lasko et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15429-15435] in which the hot spot of most frequent occurrence was located at an adenine, in the sequence GAT. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of human STING can affect innate immune response to cyclic dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Brendel, Volker P; Shu, Chang; Li, Pingwei; Palanathan, Satheesh; Cheng Kao, C

    2013-01-01

    The STING (stimulator of interferon genes) protein can bind cyclic dinucleotides to activate the production of type I interferons and inflammatory cytokines. The cyclic dinucleotides can be bacterial second messengers c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP, 3'5'-3'5' cyclic GMP-AMP (3'3' cGAMP) produced by Vibrio cholerae and metazoan second messenger 2'5'-3'5' Cyclic GMP-AMP (2'3' cGAMP). Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the 1000 Genome Project revealed that R71H-G230A-R293Q (HAQ) occurs in 20.4%, R232H in 13.7%, G230A-R293Q (AQ) in 5.2%, and R293Q in 1.5% of human population. In the absence of exogenous ligands, the R232H, R293Q and AQ SNPs had only modest effect on the stimulation of IFN-β and NF-κB promoter activities in HEK293T cells, while HAQ had significantly lower intrinsic activity. The decrease was primarily due to the R71H substitution. The SNPs also affected the response to the cyclic dinucleotides. In the presence of c-di-GMP, the R232H variant partially decreased the ability to activate IFN-βsignaling, while it was defective for the response to c-di-AMP and 3'3' cGAMP. The R293Q dramatically decreased the stimulatory response to all bacterial ligands. Surprisingly, the AQ and HAQ variants maintained partial abilities to activate the IFN-β signaling in the presence of ligands due primarily to the G230A substitution. Biochemical analysis revealed that the recombinant G230A protein could affect the conformation of the C-terminal domain of STING and the binding to c-di-GMP. Comparison of G230A structure with that of WT revealed that the conformation of the lid region that clamps onto the c-di-GMP was significantly altered. These results suggest that hSTING variation can affect innate immune signaling and that the common HAQ haplotype expresses a STING protein with reduced intrinsic signaling activity but retained the ability to response to bacterial cyclic dinucleotides.

  19. Vectorette PCR isolation of microsatellite repeat sequences using anchored dinucleotide repeat primers.

    PubMed Central

    Lench, N J; Norris, A; Bailey, A; Booth, A; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a vectorette PCR approach to provide an improved method for isolation of microsatellite repeats. The modified procedure relies on PCR amplification using a vectorette-specific primer in combination with one of a panel of anchored dinucleotide repeat primers. The target DNA to be screened for microsatellite sequences can be from YAC, P1, cosmid, bacteriophage or plasmid clones. We have used this technique to isolate novel, polymorphic microsatellite repeats from clones containing the amelogenin gene (AMGX) located on human chromosome Xp22.3. PMID:8668553

  20. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  1. Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer modified electrode developed for monitoring of adenine.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Filiz; Erdem, Arzum; Abacı, Serdar; Ozyörük, Haluk

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer for monitoring of adenine was described in this study using poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF(+)) modified platinum (Pt) electrode. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used for the surface characterization. The electrochemical behaviors of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In order to obtain more sensitive and improved electrochemical signals, analytical parameters such as the effects of polymeric film thickness, immobilization time of adenine, pH and adenine concentration were examined on the response of the polymer modified electrode. Alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy was used for the characterization of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes. The effect of possible interferents on the response of the electrode was examined.

  2. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-05

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  3. Gender differences in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications in rats.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Small, David; Kauter, Kate; Gobe, Glenda C; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Gender contributes to differences in incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease. To induce kidney damage in male and female Wistar rats (n = 12/group), a 0.25% adenine diet for 16 wk was used. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, proteinuria) and structure (glomerular damage, tubulointerstitial atrophy, fibrosis, inflammation); cardiovascular function (blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, vascular responses, echocardiography) and structure (cardiac fibrosis); plasma testosterone and estrogen concentrations; and protein expression for oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1, inflammation (TNF-α), fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β), ERK1/2, and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α)] were compared in males and females. Adenine-fed females had less decline in kidney function than adenine-fed males, although kidney atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis were similar. Plasma estrogen concentrations increased and plasma testosterone concentrations decreased in adenine-fed males, with smaller changes in females. CKD-associated molecular changes in kidneys were more pronounced in males than females except for expression of ER-α in the kidney, which was completely suppressed in adenine-fed males but unchanged in adenine-fed females. Both genders showed increased blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, and cardiac fibrosis with the adenine diet. Cardiovascular changes with adenine were similar in males and females, except males developed concentric, and females eccentric cardiac hypertrophy. In hearts from adenine-fed male and female rats, expression of ER-α and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway were increased, in part explaining changes in cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, adenine-induced kidney damage may be increased in males due to the suppression of ER-α.

  4. Fabrication of submicron proteinaceous structures by direct laser writing

    SciTech Connect

    Serien, Daniela; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-07-06

    In this paper, we provide a characterization of truly free-standing proteinaceous structures with submicron feature sizes depending on the fabrication conditions by model-based analysis. Protein cross-linking of bovine serum albumin is performed by direct laser writing and two-photon excitation of flavin adenine dinucleotide. We analyze the obtainable fabrication resolution and required threshold energy for polymerization. The applied polymerization model allows prediction of fabrication conditions and resulting fabrication size, alleviating the application of proteinaceous structure fabrication.

  5. Structure-Function Analysis of Escherichia coli MnmG (GidA), a Highly Conserved tRNA-Modifying Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Rong; Villarroya, Magda; Ruiz-Partida, Rafael; Li, Yunge; Proteau, Ariane; Prado, Silvia; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Lomas, Rodrigo; Wagner, John; Matte, Allan; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Armengod, M.-Eugenia; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2010-01-12

    The MnmE-MnmG complex is involved in tRNA modification. We have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnmG at 2.4-{angstrom} resolution, mutated highly conserved residues with putative roles in flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or tRNA binding and MnmE interaction, and analyzed the effects of these mutations in vivo and in vitro. Limited trypsinolysis of MnmG suggests significant conformational changes upon FAD binding.

  6. Oxygenase-Catalyzed Biodegradation of Emerging Water Contaminants: 1,4-Dioxane and N-Nitrosodimethylamine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    dichloroethene Dioxane 1,4-dioxane ECF extracytoplasmic function EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAD flavin adenine dinucleotide FID flame...the substrate (50). A variety of cytochrome P-450s have been identified from prokaryotes, yeast, fungi , plants, insects, and mammals (103). In...Sales, J. C. LeBlanc, J. Liu, T. K. Wood , L. D. Eltis, W. W. Mohn, and L. Alvarez-Cohen. 2007. An inducible propane monooxygenase is responsible for N

  7. Structure-function Analysis of Escherichia coli MnmG (GidA) a Highly Conserved tRNA-modifying Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    R Shi; M Villarroya; R Ruiz-Partida; Y Li; A Proteau; S prado; I Moukafiri; A Benatez-Paez; R Lomas; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The MnmE-MnmG complex is involved in tRNA modification. We have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnmG at 2.4-{angstrom} resolution, mutated highly conserved residues with putative roles in flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or tRNA binding and MnmE interaction, and analyzed the effects of these mutations in vivo and in vitro. Limited trypsinolysis of MnmG suggests significant conformational changes upon FAD binding.

  8. Spectroscopic study of intermolecular complexes between FAD and some β-carboline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codoñer, Armando; Monzó, Isidro S.; Tomás, Francisco; Valero, Rosa

    The formation of molecular complexes between flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and some β-carboline derivatives [antidepressant drugs that have a pronounced inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO)] has been studied by using electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Thermodynamic parameters have been determined from the values of association constants for the molecular complexes at various temperatures. The influence of substituents in the β-carboline molecule on the stability of the complexes formed was also investigated.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  10. The structure of flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenase RebH

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Huang, Yu; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Enzyme catalyzed regio- and stereo-specific halogenations influence the biological activity of a diverse array of therapeutically important natural products, including the antibiotics vancomycin and chloramphenicol as well as the anticancer agents calicheamicin and rebeccamycin. The major class of enzymes responsible for this challenging synthetic reaction, the flavin-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the formation of carbon-halogen bonds using flavin, a halide ion (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} or I{sup -}), and O{sub 2}. Recent mechanistic and structural advances achieved with the model flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases PrnA and RebH have greatly enhanced the level of understanding of this unique reaction. According to these studies, the mechanism for tryptophan halogenation proceeds via FAD(C4a)-OOH activation of a chloride ion into the transient chlorinating species HOCl. The key evidence for the requirement of a transient chlorinating species is the discovery that a {approx}10-{angstrom}-long tunnel separates FAD and tryptophan in the ligand-bound form of PrnA. In a recent compelling study to elucidate the strategy by which RebH controls this highly reactive and indiscriminant oxidant, a Lys79-{var_epsilon}NH-Cl chloramine intermediate was implicated as the actual chlorinating species within RebH and a structural investigation of RebH was reported. Here we report our independent structural analysis of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes RebH (Uni-Prot accession number Q8KHZ8, 530 amino acids) in its apo-form as well as in a complex with both tryptophan and FAD.

  11. The Biochemical Mechanism of Auxin Biosynthesis by an Arabidopsis YUCCA Flavin-containing Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinhua; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Chen, Qingguo; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Ojha, Sunil; DuBois, Jennifer; Ballou, David; Zhao, Yunde

    2013-01-01

    Auxin regulates every aspect of plant growth and development. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that YUCCA (YUC) flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze a rate-limiting step in auxin biosynthesis and that YUCs are essential for many developmental processes. We proposed that YUCs convert indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) to indole-3-acetate (IAA). However, the exact biochemical mechanism of YUCs has remained elusive. Here we present the biochemical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis YUC6. Expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, YUC6 contains FAD as a cofactor, which has peaks at 448 nm and 376 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. We show that YUC6 uses NADPH and oxygen to convert IPA to IAA. The first step of the YUC6-catalyzed reaction is the reduction of the FAD cofactor to FADH− by NADPH. Subsequently, FADH− reacts with oxygen to form a flavin-C4a-(hydro)peroxy intermediate, which we show has a maximum absorbance at 381 nm in its UV-visible spectrum. The final chemical step is the reaction of the C4a-intermediate with IPA to produce IAA. Although the sequences of the YUC enzymes are related to those of the mammalian FMOs, which oxygenate nucleophilic substrates, YUC6 oxygenates an electrophilic substrate (IPA). Nevertheless, both classes of enzymes form quasi-stable C4a-(hydro)peroxyl FAD intermediates. The YUC6 intermediate has a half-life of ∼20 s whereas that of some FMOs is >30 min. This work reveals the catalytic mechanism of the first known plant flavin monooxygenase and provides a foundation for further investigating how YUC activities are regulated in plants. PMID:23188833

  12. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ˜500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  13. Aspergillus fumigatus SidA is a highly specific ornithine hydroxylase with bound flavin cofactor.

    PubMed

    Chocklett, Samuel W; Sobrado, Pablo

    2010-08-10

    Ferrichrome is a hydroxamate-containing siderophore produced by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus under iron-limiting conditions. This siderophore contains N(5)-hydroxylated l-ornithines essential for iron binding. A. fumigatus siderophore A (Af SidA) catalyzes the flavin- and NADPH-dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine in ferrichrome biosynthesis. Af SidA was recombinantly expressed and purified as a soluble tetramer and is the first member of this class of flavin monooxygenases to be isolated with a bound flavin cofactor. The enzyme showed typical saturation kinetics with respect to l-ornithine while substrate inhibition was observed at high concentrations of NADPH and NADH. Increasing amounts of hydrogen peroxide were measured as a function of reduced nicotinamide coenzyme concentration, indicating that inhibition was caused by increased uncoupling. Af SidA is highly specific for its amino acid substrate, only hydroxylating l-ornithine. An 8-fold preference in the catalytic efficiency was determined for NADPH compared to NADH. In the absence of substrate, Af SidA can be reduced by NADPH, and a C4a-(hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate is observed. The decay of this intermediate is accelerated by l-ornithine binding. This intermediate was only stabilized by NADPH and not by NADH, suggesting a role for NADP(+) in the stabilization of intermediates in the reaction of Af SidA. NADP(+) is a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, demonstrating that Af SidA forms a ternary complex with NADP(+) and l-ornithine during catalysis. The data suggest that Af SidA likely proceeds by a sequential kinetic mechanism.

  14. Evolutionary mechanism and biological functions of 8-mers containing CG dinucleotide in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yue; Meng, Hu; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Xiaoqing

    2017-02-09

    The rules of k-mer non-random usage and the biological functions are worthy of special attention. Firstly, the article studied human 8-mer spectra and found that only the spectra of cytosine-guanine (CG) dinucleotide classification formed independent unimodal distributions when the 8-mers were classified into three subsets under 16 dinucleotide classifications. Secondly, the distribution rules were reproduced by other seven species including yeast, which showed that the evolution phenomenon had species universality. It followed that we proposed two theoretical conjectures: (1) CG1 motifs (8-mers including 1 CG) are the nucleosome-binding motifs. (2) CG2 motifs (8-mers including two or more than two CG) are the modular units of CpG islands. Our conjectures were confirmed in yeast by the following results: a maximum of average area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) resulted from CG1 information during nucleosome core sequences, and linker sequences were distinguished by three CG subsets; there was a one-to-one relationship between abundant CG1 signal regions and histone positions; the sequence changing of squeezed nucleosomes was relevant with the strength of CG1 signals; and the AUC value of 0.986 was based on CG2 information when CpG islands and non-CpG islands were distinguished by the three CG subsets.

  15. CG dinucleotide clustering is a species-specific property of the genome.

    PubMed

    Glass, Jacob L; Thompson, Reid F; Khulan, Batbayar; Figueroa, Maria E; Olivier, Emmanuel N; Oakley, Erin J; Van Zant, Gary; Bouhassira, Eric E; Melnick, Ari; Golden, Aaron; Fazzari, Melissa J; Greally, John M

    2007-01-01

    Cytosines at cytosine-guanine (CG) dinucleotides are the near-exclusive target of DNA methyltransferases in mammalian genomes. Spontaneous deamination of methylcytosine to thymine makes methylated cytosines unusually susceptible to mutation and consequent depletion. The loci where CG dinucleotides remain relatively enriched, presumably due to their unmethylated status during the germ cell cycle, have been referred to as CpG islands. Currently, CpG islands are solely defined by base compositional criteria, allowing annotation of any sequenced genome. Using a novel bioinformatic approach, we show that CG clusters can be identified as an inherent property of genomic sequence without imposing a base compositional a priori assumption. We also show that the CG clusters co-localize in the human genome with hypomethylated loci and annotated transcription start sites to a greater extent than annotations produced by prior CpG island definitions. Moreover, this new approach allows CG clusters to be identified in a species-specific manner, revealing a degree of orthologous conservation that is not revealed by current base compositional approaches. Finally, our approach is able to identify methylating genomes (such as Takifugu rubripes) that lack CG clustering entirely, in which it is inappropriate to annotate CpG islands or CG clusters.

  16. Identification of a Soybean Protein That Interacts with GAGA Element Dinucleotide Repeat DNA1

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Indu; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Dinucleotide repeat DNA with the pattern (GA)n/(TC)n, so-called GAGA elements, control gene expression in animals, and are recognized by a specific regulatory protein. Here, a yeast one-hybrid screen was used to isolate soybean (Glycine max) cDNA encoding a GAGA-binding protein (GBP) that binds to (GA)n/(CT)n DNA. Soybean GBP was dissimilar from the GAGA factor of Drosophila melanogaster. Recombinant GBP protein did not bind to dinucleotide repeat sequences other than (GA)n/(CT)n. GBP bound to the promoter of the heme and chlorophyll synthesis gene Gsa1, which contains a GAGA element. Removal of that GAGA element abrogated binding of GBP to the promoter. Furthermore, insertion of the GAGA element to a nonspecific DNA conferred GBP-binding activity on that DNA. Thus, the GAGA element of the Gsa1 promoter is both necessary and sufficient for GBP binding. Gbp mRNA was expressed in leaves and was induced in symbiotic root nodules elicited by the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In addition, Gbp transcripts were much higher in leaves of dark-treated etiolated plantlets than in those exposed to light for 24 h. Homologs of GBP were found in other dicots and in the monocot rice (Oryza sativa), as well. We suggest that interaction between GAGA elements and GBP-like proteins is a regulatory feature in plants. PMID:12177492

  17. The tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains sequence motifs characteristic for enzymes containing molybdopterin dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Schmitz, R A; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1995-12-15

    Formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases are molybdenum or tungsten iron-sulfur proteins containing a pterin dinucleotide cofactor. We report here on the primary structures of the four subunits FwdABCD of the tungsten enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum which were determined by cloning and sequencing the encoding genes fwdABCD. FwdB was found to contain sequence motifs characteristic for molybdopterin-dinucleotide-containing enzymes indicating that this subunit harbors the active site. FwdA, FwdC and FwdD showed no significant sequence similarity to proteins in the data bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the four fwd genes form a transcription unit together with three additional genes designated fwdE, fwdF and fwdG. A 17.8-kDa protein and an 8.6-kDa protein, both containing two [4Fe-4S] cluster binding motifs, were deduced from fwdE and fwdG. The open reading frame fwdF encodes a 38.6-kDa protein containing eight binding motifs for [4Fe-4S] clusters suggesting the gene product to be a novel polyferredoxin. All seven fwd genes were expressed in Escherichia coli yielding proteins of the expected size. The fwd operon was found to be located in a region of the M. thermoautotrophicum genome encoding molybdenum enzymes and proteins involved in molybdopterin biosynthesis.

  18. Base-boronated dinucleotides: synthesis and effect of N7-cyanoborane substitution on the base protons.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, A; Li, H; Tomasz, J; Shaw, B R

    1996-01-01

    Boron-modified nucleic acids comprise a new set of DNA mimics that have potential biological and therapeutic applications. A series of nine dinucleotides containing N7-cyanoborane-2'-deoxyguanosine ((7b)dG) at the 3', 5' or both positions of the phosphodiester linkage have been synthesized using solution phase phosphoramidite chemistry. Fmoc was used as the 5'-protecting group because of incompatibility of the cyanoborane moiety with 5'-DMT cations generated during the deprotection step. The presence of the cyanoborane group was confirmed on the basis of Fab-MS and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The H-8 proton of (7b)dG in the dinucleotides shifted 0.35-0.80 p.p.m. downfield relative to that of unmodified dG. A comparison of the D20 exchange kinetics of the H-8 proton at 60 degrees C showed that H-8 of (7b)dG is very labile relative to unmodified dG, indicating that the N7-cyanoborane modification increases the acidity of the H-8 proton of (7b)dG. These studies illustrate the feasibility of synthesizing boron-containing oligonucleotides which are modified at the N7-guanine to block Hoogsteen pairing in the DNA major groove. PMID:8668548

  19. Structure-guided reprogramming of human cGAS dinucleotide linkage specificity.

    PubMed

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Lee, Amy S Y; Wilson, Stephen C; Solovykh, Mikhail S; Vance, Russell E; Berger, James M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-08-28

    Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) play central roles in bacterial pathogenesis and innate immunity. The mammalian enzyme cGAS synthesizes a unique cyclic dinucleotide (cGAMP) containing a 2'-5' phosphodiester linkage essential for optimal immune stimulation, but the molecular basis for linkage specificity is unknown. Here, we show that the Vibrio cholerae pathogenicity factor DncV is a prokaryotic cGAS-like enzyme whose activity provides a mechanistic rationale for the unique ability of cGAS to produce 2'-5' cGAMP. Three high-resolution crystal structures show that DncV and human cGAS generate CDNs in sequential reactions that proceed in opposing directions. We explain 2' and 3' linkage specificity and test this model by reprogramming the human cGAS active site to produce 3'-5' cGAMP, leading to selective stimulation of alternative STING adaptor alleles in cells. These results demonstrate mechanistic homology between bacterial signaling and mammalian innate immunity and explain how active site configuration controls linkage chemistry for pathway-specific signaling.

  20. Light-activated cryptochrome reacts with molecular oxygen to form a flavin-superoxide radical pair consistent with magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Müller, Pavel; Ahmad, Margaret

    2011-06-17

    Cryptochromes are flavin-based photoreceptors occurring throughout the biological kingdom, which regulate growth and development in plants and are involved in the entrainment of circadian rhythms of both plants and animals. A number of recent theoretical works suggest that cryptochromes might also be the receptors responsible for the sensing of the magnetic field of the earth (e.g. in insects, migratory birds, or migratory fish). Cryptochromes undergo forward light-induced reactions involving electron transfer to excited state flavin to generate radical intermediates, which correlate with biological activity. Here, we give evidence of a mechanism for the reverse reaction, namely dark reoxidation of protein-bound flavin in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome (AtCRY1) by molecular oxygen that involves formation of a spin-correlated FADH(•)-superoxide radical pair. Formation of analogous radical pairs in animal cryptochromes might enable them to function as magnetoreceptors.

  1. Phagocyte NADPH-oxidase. Studies with flavin analogues as active site probes in triton X-100-solubilized preparations.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, J F; Gabig, T G

    1988-06-25

    NADPH-oxidase of stimulated human neutrophil membranes was solubilized in Triton X-100 and activity reconstituted with FAD, 8-F-FAD, 8-phenyl-S-FAD, and 8-S-FAD. The enzyme had similar affinities for all the flavins with Km values in the 60-80 nM range. Vmax was found to increase 4-fold with increasing redox midpoint potential of the flavin. 8-F-FAD reconstituted with the enzyme was reactive toward thiophenol, suggesting exposure of the 8-position to solvent, a finding supported by unsuccessful attempts to label the enzyme with the photoaffinity probe 8-N3-[32P]FAD. Solubilized oxidase stabilized the red thiolate form of 8-S-FAD, a characteristic of flavoproteins of the dehydrogenase/electron transferase classes which stabilize the blue neutral form of the flavin semiquinone radical.

  2. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Recombinant Flavin Reductase from the Luminescent Marine Bacterium "Photobacterium Leiognathi": A Set of Exercises for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    In "Photobacterium," the flavin reductase encoded by "lux"G regenerates the reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Reduced FMN is one of the substrates of the luciferase enzyme that catalyzes a light-emitting reaction. A set of experiments, that employs a "lux"G-expression plasmid construct (pGhis) and is suitable for an undergraduate…

  3. In-Planta Expression: Searching for the Genuine Chromophores of Cryptochrome-3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Göbel et al. present in this issue an exemplary study of identification of chromophores from Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-3. Usually taken for granted, proteins and cofactors, respective chromophores, from heterologous expression are considered identical to material isolated from their genuine host. Cryptochromes carry two chromophores, an antenna cofactor and a functional flavin chromophore, both noncovalently embedded into the protein. In particular the antenna chromophore is loosely bound and often lost during protein purification. The authors identify from plant-extracted Cry3 unambiguously N(5) ,N(10) -methenyltetrahydrofolate as antenna chromophore and flavin adenine dinucleotide as the functional chromophore.

  4. Elucidation of the Mechanisms and Environmental Relevance of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride Biodegradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    flavin adenine dinucleotide FID flame -ionization detector FMO flavin-containing monooxygenase GC gas chromatograph or gas chromatography GST...flow at 13 mL minute-1 (min-1), the flame ionization detector (FID) was maintained at 275°C with hydrogen gas (H2) and air flow at 40 and 460 mL min-1...injected (using a locking gas-tight syringe, VICI Pressure-Lok® Series A) into a gas chromatograph (Perkin-Elmer Autosystem) equipped with a flame

  5. Crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger flavin-containing monooxygenase from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA strain MU50.

    PubMed

    Hwang, William C; Xu, Qingping; Wu, Bainan; Godzik, Adam

    2014-08-05

    Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (FMO) catalyzed the oxygenation of broad spectrum of substrates. FMO can also serve as biocatalysts in the Baeyer-Villiger reaction in organic synthesis. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (BVFMO) from methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain MU50. The structure of S. aureus FMO should facilitate further development of BVFMO as biocatalysts. A possible role of S. aureus FMO in methicillin and vancomycin resistance is discussed. Proteins 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Thermodynamics of the quasi-epitaxial flavin assembly around various-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Roholah; Samaraweera, Milinda; Gascón, José A; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2014-05-21

    Establishing methods to accurately assess and model the binding strength of surfactants around a given-chirality single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) are crucial for selective enrichment, targeted functionalization, and spectrally sharp nanodevices. Unlike surfactant exchange, which is subject to interferences from the second surfactant, we herein introduce a thermal dissociation method based on reversible H(+)/O2 doping to determine SWNT/surfactant thermodynamic stability values with greater fidelity. Thermodynamic values were reproduced using molecular mechanics augmented by ab initio calculations in order to better assess π-π interactions. This afforded detailed quantification of the flavin binding strength in terms of π-π stacking (55-58%), with the remaining portion roughly split 3:1 between electrostatic plus van der Waals flavin mononucleotide (FMN) interdigitation and H-bonding interactions, respectively. Quasi-epitaxial π-π alignment between the near-armchair FMN helix and the underlying nanotube lattice plays a crucial role in stabilizing these assemblies. The close resemblance of the thermal dissociation method to helix-coil and ligand-binding transitions of DNA opens up a unique insight into the molecular engineering of self-organizing surfactants around various-chirality nanotubes.

  7. Solving Blue Light Riddles: New Lessons from Flavin-binding LOV Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Detection of blue light (BL) via flavin-binding photoreceptors (Fl-Blues) has evolved throughout all three domains of life. Although the main BL players, that is light, oxygen and voltage (LOV), blue light sensing using flavins (BLUF) and Cry (cryptochrome) proteins, have been characterized in great detail with respect to structure and function, still several unresolved issues at different levels of complexity remain and novel unexpected findings were reported. Here, we review the most prevailing riddles of LOV-based photoreceptors, for example: the relevance of water and/or small metabolites for the dynamics of the photocycle; molecular details of light-to-signal transduction events; the interplay of BL sensing by LOV domains with other environmental stimuli, such as BL plus oxygen-mediating photodamage and its impact on microbial lifestyles; the importance of the cell or chromophore redox state in determining the fate of BL-driven reactions; the evolutionary pathways of LOV-based BL sensing and associated functions through the diverse phyla. We will discuss major novelties emerged during the last few years on these intriguing aspects of LOV proteins by presenting paradigmatic examples from prokaryotic photosensors that exhibit the largest complexity and richness in associated functions.

  8. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 although none of the H-bonds directly engage N5, and solution NMR detected only a 4 ppm increase in the isotropic chemical shift (δiso). Moreover SSNMR responded differently to different H-bonding environments as H-bonding with water caused δ11 to decrease by 6 ppm whereas δiso increased by less than 1 ppm. Our density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations reproduce the observations, validating the use of computed electronic structures to understand how H-bonds modulate the flavin’s reactivity. PMID:21619002

  9. The role of threonine 37 in flavin reactivity of the old yellow enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Kohli, Rahul M.; Massey, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Threonine 37 is conserved among all the members of the old yellow enzyme (OYE) family. The hydroxyl group of this residue forms a hydrogen bond with the C-4 oxygen atom of the FMN reaction center of the enzyme [Fox, K. M. & Karplus, P. A. (1994) Structure 2, 1089–1105]. The position of Thr-37 and its interaction with flavin allow for speculations about its role in enzyme activity. This residue was mutated to alanine and the mutant enzyme was studied and compared with the wild-type OYE1 to evaluate its mechanistic function. The mutation has different effects on the two separate half-reactions of the enzyme. The mutant enzyme has enhanced activity in the oxidative half-reaction but the reductive half-reaction is slowed down by more than one order of magnitude. The peaks of the absorption spectra for enzyme bound with phenolic compounds are shifted toward shorter wavelengths than those of wild-type OYE1, consistent with its lower redox potential. It is suggested that Thr-37 in the wild-type OYE1 increases the redox potential of the enzyme by stabilizing the negative charge of the reduced flavin through hydrogen bonding with it. PMID:10097075

  10. NADH and flavin fluorescence responses of starved yeast cultures to substrate additions.

    PubMed

    Siano, S A; Mutharasan, R

    1989-08-20

    Model experiments were performed with starved yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultures in a batch reactor in order to develop a better understanding of NAD(P)H and flavin culture fluorescence. Fluorescence was monitored during aerobic-anaerobic-aerobic transitions and ethanol and glucose substrate addition experiments. Interpretations of the fluorescence responses obtained are provided, with consideration given to redox compartmentation and the formation of ethanol shortly after a glucose addition. An analytical spectrofluorophotometer was interfaced to a personal computer and adapted to measure fluorescence in a bioreactor. This was achieved by the use of quartz fiber-optic waveguides to convert the right-angle cuvette geometry of the analytical spectrofluorophotometer to an open-ended fluorescence probe geometry, resulting in a flexible culture fluorescence apparatus. Features of the apparatus include variable excitation and emission wavelengths, allowing for detection of NAD(P)H or flavin fluorescence, as well as small slit widths, a variable sampling rate, excitation and emission scanning capabilities, and good sensitivity.

  11. A flavin binding cryptochrome photoreceptor responds to both blue and red light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Beel, Benedikt; Prager, Katja; Spexard, Meike; Sasso, Severin; Weiss, Daniel; Müller, Nico; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Ikoma, Danielle; Grossman, Arthur R; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that act as sensory blue light receptors in insects, plants, fungi, and bacteria. We have investigated a cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with sequence homology to animal cryptochromes and (6-4) photolyases. In response to blue and red light exposure, this animal-like cryptochrome (aCRY) alters the light-dependent expression of various genes encoding proteins involved in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, light-harvesting complexes, nitrogen metabolism, cell cycle control, and the circadian clock. Additionally, exposure to yellow but not far-red light leads to comparable increases in the expression of specific genes; this expression is significantly reduced in an acry insertional mutant. These in vivo effects are congruent with in vitro data showing that blue, yellow, and red light, but not far-red light, are absorbed by the neutral radical state of flavin in aCRY. The aCRY neutral radical is formed following blue light absorption of the oxidized flavin. Red illumination leads to conversion to the fully reduced state. Our data suggest that aCRY is a functionally important blue and red light-activated flavoprotein. The broad spectral response implies that the neutral radical state functions as a dark form in aCRY and expands the paradigm of flavoproteins and cryptochromes as blue light sensors to include other light qualities.

  12. Characteristic analysis of the luxG gene encoding the probable flavin reductase that resides in the lux operon of Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1998-05-19

    Nucleotide sequence of the luxG gene (GenBank Accession No. AF053227) from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 has been determined, and the encoded probable flavin reductase is deduced. The probable flavin reductase encoded by the luxG gene has a calculated M(r) 26,544 and comprises 235 amino acid residues. The probable flavin reductase like the NAD(P)H-flavin reductase might catalyze the reduction of flavins. Alignment and comparison of the probable flavin reductases from P. leiognathi PL741, ATCC 25521, P. phosphoreum, Vibrio fischeri, and V. harveyi show that they are homologous; there is 66% homologous (29.4% identity and 36.6% similarity). Also, the probable flavin reductase is homologous to the NAD(P)H-flavin reductase; it is perceived that the probable flavin reductase and the NAD(P)H-flavin reductase could be enzyme isoforms encoded by two genes of a multigene family for differential response functions. Functional analysis illustrates that the specific segment sequence lay inside and behind the luxG gene might form the potential hairpin loops omega gI, omega gII, omega o, and omega oT as mRNA stability loop or/and as the attenuator-like loop or the dynamic terminator-like block for sub-regulation in the lux operon. The gene order of the luxG gene in the lux operon and the lum operon is <--ter-lumQ-lumP-R&R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB-+ ++luxN-luxE-luxG--> (R&R: regulatory region; ter: transcriptional terminator), whereas the R&R is the regulatory region for the lum operon and the lux operon, and ter is the transcriptional terminator for the lum operon.

  13. Slow deactivation channels in UV-photoexcited adenine DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai; Wang, Haobin

    2014-03-07

    The molecular mechanism for removing the excess energy in DNA bases is responsible for the high photostability of DNA and is thus the subject of intense theoretical/computational investigation. To understand why the excited state decay of the stacked bases is significantly longer than that of the monomers, we carried out electronic structure calculations on an adenine monomer and an aqueous (dA)5 oligonucleotide employing the CASPT2//CASSCF and CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER levels of theory. The newly-found bright excited state pair Sstack1((1)ππ*) and Sstack2((1)ππ*) of d(A)5, originated from base stacking, is of intra-base charge transfer nature and occurs in different stacked bases with charge transfer along opposite directions. Two slow deactivation channels of d(A)5 were proposed as a result of the sizable barriers along the relaxation paths starting from the FC point of the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state. The SN1P((1)nπ*) state of d(A)5 serves as an intermediate state in one relaxation channel, to which a nonadiabatic decay from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state occurs in an energy degeneracy region. A relatively high barrier in this state is found and attributed to the steric hindrance of the DNA environment due to the large NH2 group twisting, which gives a weak and red-shifted fluorescence. Another direct relaxation channel, induced by the C2-H2 bond twisting motion, is found to go through a conical intersection between the Sstack1((1)ππ*) and the ground state. The barrier found here enables fluorescence from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state and may explain the bright state emission observed in the fluorescence upconversion measurements. The inter-molecular SCT((1)ππ*) state may be involved in the slow relaxation process of the photoexcited adenine oligomers through efficient internal conversion to the intra-base Sstack1((1)ππ*) state.

  14. Design of laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H bond of adenine and adenine-thymine base pair using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sitansh; Sharma, Purshotam; Singh, Harjinder; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    Time dependent quantum dynamics and optimal control theory are used for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H (amino N-H) bond in free adenine and in the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair. For the N6-H bond in free adenine we have used a one dimensional model while for the hydrogen bond, N6-H(A)...O4(T), present in the A-T base pair, a two mathematical dimensional model is employed. The conjugate gradient method is used for the optimization of the field dependent cost functional. Optimal laser fields are obtained for selective population transfer in both the model systems, which give virtually 100% excitation probability to preselected vibrational levels. The effect of the optimized laser field on the other hydrogen bond, N1(A)...H-N3(T), present in A-T base pair is also investigated.

  15. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  16. Radiolysis of aqueous adenine (vitamin B4) and 8-hydroxyadenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.; Quint, R. M.; Getoff, N.

    2007-05-01

    The radiolysis of adenine (vitamin B4) was studied in aqueous solution (pH˜7.4) saturated either with argon (operating radicals: 44% e -aq, 46% OH, 10% H) or with air (46% OH, 54% O 2rad - ) and with N 2O (90% OH, 10% H), respectively. The obtained initial Gi-values are: 0.88, 1.16 and 1.45. As main radiolytic product was determined 8-hydroxyadenine (8-HOA), whose yield depends on the OH concentration in the reacting media. Hence, under the same experimental conditions the Gi-values are in media saturated with argon: 0.1, in air: 0.15 and in N 2O: 0.29. In aerated solution also a mixture of aldehydes as well as of carboxylic acids were formed, but they were not identified. 8-HOA is of some biological interest; therefore, its radiolysis was also investigated under the same conditions. The determined Gi(-8HOA)-values were in airfree solution negligible, in aerated solutions: 3.1 and in the presence of N 2O: 4.0. For explanation of the product formation some probable reaction mechanisms were given.

  17. Flavin-derived self-organization and chirality separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sang-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Formed by rolling up a two-dimensional sheet of one or more layer of graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are the marvel materials of modern materials science. They are phenomenally strong and stiff, and have the unusual property of being excellent conductors of heat along the tube's axis, but good thermal insulators across it. But it is their electrical characteristics that excite the most interest. Especially, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs), formed by one layer of cylindrical graphene, has better physical properties over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) having over two layer of graphene. Depending on the precise way they are rolled up, which is defined by ( n,m) vector, SWNTs can be made into either metals or semiconductors. So far, SWNTs can generally only be fabricated in batches that vary widely, both in the diameter of the individual tubes and in the orientation of their graphene lattice relative to the tube axis, the property known as chirality. Separating out these various conformations is a challenging, but one that must be solved if nanotubes are ever to fulfill their electrifying potential in devices. This thesis presents that flavin-based helical self-assembly can impart multi degrees of SWNTs separation (i.e., metallicity, diameter, chirality, and handedness). As opening chapters for carbon nanotube and flavin derivative, Chapter 1 provide the introduction of carbon nanotubes, especially single-walled tubes, and the current state-of-the-art nanotube separation. Also, Chapter 1 presents a variety of naturally-occurring flavin derivatives, their redox behavior, and their biological utilization as cofactors for various proteins. Motivated by chemoluminescence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) with bacterial luciferase, Chapter 2 discuss about the synthesis and covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) analogue to oxidized SWNTs. Along with nine step synthesis

  18. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  19. Formation and function of flavin anion radical in cryptochrome 1 blue-light photoreceptor of monarch butterfly.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Hun; Oztürk, Nuri; Denaro, Tracy R; Arat, N Ozlem; Kao, Ya-Ting; Zhu, Haisun; Zhong, Dongping; Reppert, Steven M; Sancar, Aziz

    2007-06-15

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) cryptochrome 1 (DpCry1) belongs in the class of photosensitive insect cryptochromes. Here we purified DpCry1 expressed in a bacterial host and obtained the protein with a stoichiometric amount of the flavin cofactor in the two-electron oxidized, FAD(ox), form. Exposure of the purified protein to light converts the FAD(ox) to the FAD*(-) flavin anion radical by intraprotein electron transfer from a Trp residue in the apoenzyme. To test whether this novel photoreduction reaction is part of the DpCry1 physiological photocycle, we mutated the Trp residue that acts as the ultimate electron donor in flavin photoreduction. The mutation, W328F, blocked the photoreduction entirely but had no measurable effect on the light-induced degradation of DpCry1 in vivo. In light of this finding and the recently published action spectrum of this class of Crys, we conclude that DpCry1 and similar insect cryptochromes do not contain flavin in the FAD(ox) form in vivo and that, most likely, the [see text] photoreduction reaction is not part of the insect cryptochrome photoreaction that results in proteolytic degradation of the photopigment.

  20. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  1. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.). In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV) emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of linear dinucleotide analogs bound to the c-di-GMP-I aptamer†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn D.; Lipchock, Sarah V.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP regulates lifestyle transitions in many bacteria, such as the change from a free motile state to a biofilm-forming community. Riboswitches that bind this second messenger are important downstream targets in this bacterial signaling pathway. The breakdown of c-di-GMP in the cell is accomplished enzymatically and results in the linear dinucleotide pGpG. The c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches must be able to discriminate between their cognate cyclic ligand and linear dinucleotides in order to be selective biological switches. It has been reported that the cdi-GMP-I riboswitch binds c-di-GMP five orders of magnitude better than the linear pGpG, but the cause of this large energetic difference in binding is unknown. Here we report binding data and crystal structures of several linear c-di-GMP analogs in complex with the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch. These data reveal the parameters for phosphate recognition and the structural basis of linear dinucleotide binding to the riboswitch. Additionally, the pH dependence of binding shows that exclusion of pGpG is not due to the additional negative charge on the ligand. These data reveal principles that, along with published work, will contribute to the design of c-di-GMP analogs with properties desirable for use as chemical tools and potential therapeutics. PMID:22148472

  3. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in a triphasic rat model of adenine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amnon; Brod, Vera; Awad, Hoda; Heyman, Samuel N; Abassi, Zaid; Frajewicki, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether NGAL, given its advantages over traditional biomarkers, can be used to describe the dynamic characteristics of the renal tubulointerstitial insult caused by adenine. Subsequently, it will be possible to assess NGAL as a biomarker of any acute kidney injury, on top of chronic interstitial disease, if NGAL levels are stable through the chronic phase of our adenine model. Study group rats were fed an adenine diet, and control group rats were fed a regular diet only. Blood and urine samples for urea, creatinine and NGAL were drawn from each rat at the beginning of the study and after 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 weeks. Kidney slices from these rats were stained with Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and β-actin stainings. Serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio in the study group were higher than baseline and than in the control group; these differences were statistically significant in some of the intervals. Tubulointerstitial changes and adenine crystals were evident in the study group rats. In the rats fed adenine, serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio followed a triphasic pattern of kidney injury: an acute phase while on the adenine diet, a partial recovery phase after switching to the regular diet and a chronic kidney disease phase after stabilization of renal function. NGAL can serve a biomarker for acute kidney injury and possibly for chronic kidney disease in the tubulointerstitial rat model.

  4. Improved growth and stress tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 mutant triggered by altered adenine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sukrong, Suchada; Yun, Kil-Young; Stadler, Patrizia; Kumar, Charan; Facciuolo, Tony; Moffatt, Barbara A; Falcone, Deane L

    2012-11-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses. A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1, a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions. Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1), an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), indicating a link between purine metabolism, whole-plant growth responses, and stress acclimation. The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity. Correspondingly, oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine. Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1. The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge. Finally, it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth, leading to increases in plant biomass. The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  5. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  6. Directed evolution of bright mutants of an oxygen-independent flavin-binding fluorescent protein from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescent reporter proteins have revolutionized our understanding of cellular bioprocesses by enabling live cell imaging with exquisite spatio-temporal resolution. Existing fluorescent proteins are predominantly based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related analogs. However, GFP-family proteins strictly require molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which precludes their application for investigating biological processes in low-oxygen environments. A new class of oxygen-independent fluorescent reporter proteins was recently reported based on flavin-binding photosensors from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. However, flavin-binding fluorescent proteins show very limited brightness, which restricts their utility as biological imaging probes. Results In this work, we report the discovery of bright mutants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein from P. putida using directed evolution by site saturation mutagenesis. We discovered two mutations at a chromophore-proximal amino acid (F37S and F37T) that confer a twofold enhancement in brightness relative to the wild type fluorescent protein through improvements in quantum yield and holoprotein fraction. In addition, we observed that substitution with other aromatic amino acids at this residue (F37Y and F37W) severely diminishes fluorescence emission. Therefore, we identify F37 as a key amino acid residue in determining fluorescence. Conclusions To increase the scope and utility of flavin-binding fluorescent proteins as practical fluorescent reporters, there is a strong need for improved variants of the wild type protein. Our work reports on the application of site saturation mutagenesis to isolate brighter variants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein, which is a first-of-its-kind approach. Overall, we anticipate that the improved variants will find pervasive use as fluorescent reporters for biological studies in low-oxygen environments. PMID:23095243

  7. Switching from adduct formation to electron transfer in a light-oxygen-voltage domain containing the reactive cysteine.

    PubMed

    Magerl, Kathrin; Stambolic, Ivan; Dick, Bernhard

    2017-03-08

    LOV (light-, oxygen- or voltage-sensitive) domains act as photosensory units of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. Upon blue light excitation they undergo a photocycle via the excited triplet state of their flavin chromophore yielding the flavin-cysteinyl adduct. Adduct formation is highly conserved among all LOV domains and constitutes the primary step of LOV domain signaling. But recently, it has been shown that signal propagation can also be triggered by flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone offering new prospects for protein engineering. This, however, requires mutation of the photo-active Cys. Here, we report on LOV1 mutants of C. reinhardtii phototropin in which adduct formation is suppressed although the photo-active Cys is present. Introduction of a Tyr into the LOV core induces a proton coupled electron transfer towards the flavin chromophore. Flavin radical species are formed via either the excited flavin singlet or triplet state depending on the geometry of donor and acceptor. This photoreductive pathway resembles the photoreaction observed in other blue light photoreceptors, e.g. blue-light sensors using flavin adenine dinucleotide (BLUF) domains or cryptochromes. The ability to tune the photoreactivity of the flavin chromophore inside the LOV core has implications for the mechanism of adduct formation in the wild type and may be of use for protein engineering.

  8. Enhanced energy transfer in respiratory-deficient endothelial cells probed by microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Bauer, Manfred; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-12-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction may be concomitant with changes of the redox states of the coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH), as well as flavin.mononucleotide or dinucleotide. The intrinsic fluorescence of these coenzymes was therefore proposed to be a measure of malfunction. Since mitochondrial fluorescence is strongly superposed by autofluorescence from various cytoplasmatic fluorophores, cultivated endothelial cells were incubated with the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123), and after excitation of flavin molecules, energy transfer to R123 was investigated. Due to spectral overlap of flavin and R123 fluorescence, energy transfer flavin yields R123 could not be detected from their emission spectra. Therefore, the method of microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy was established. When detecting R123 fluorescence, excitation maxima at 370 - 390 nm and 420-460 nm were assigned to flavins, whereas a pronounced excitation band at 465 - 490 nm was attributed to R123. Therefore, excitation at 475 nm reflected the intracellular concentration of R123, whereas excitation at 385 nm reflected flavin excitation with a subsequent energy transfer to R123 molecules. An enhanced energy transfer after inhibition of specific enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain is discussed in the present article.

  9. Flavin Binding to the Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrC: Insights from Computational Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen

    2015-12-15

    Certain dissimilatory bacteria have the remarkable ability to use extracellular metal oxide minerals instead of oxygen as terminal electron sinks, using a process known as "extracellular respiration". Specialized multiheme cytochromes located on the outer membrane of the microbe were shown to be crucial for electron transfer from the cell surface to the mineral. This process is facilitated by soluble, biogenic flavins secreted by the organism for the purpose of acting as an electron shuttle. However, their interactions with the outer-membrane cytochromes are not established on a molecular scale. Here, we study the interaction between the outer-membrane deca-heme cytochrome MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis and flavin mononucleotide (FMN in fully oxidized quinone form) using computational docking. We find that interaction of FMN with MtrC is significantly weaker than with known FMN-binding proteins, but identify a mildly preferred interaction site close to heme 2 with a dissociation constant (Kd) = 490 μM, in good agreement with recent experimental estimates, Kd = 255 μM. The weak interaction with MtrC can be qualitatively explained by the smaller number of hydrogen bonds that the planar headgroup of FMN can form with this protein compared to FMN-binding proteins. Molecular dynamics simulation gives indications for a possible conformational switch upon cleavage of the disulphide bond of MtrC, but without concomitant increase in binding affinities according to this docking study. Overall, our results suggest that binding of FMN to MtrC is reversible and not highly specific, which may be consistent with a role as redox shuttle that facilitates extracellular respiration.

  10. Fullerene-Assisted Photoinduced Charge Transfer of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through a Flavin Helix.

    PubMed

    Mollahosseini, Mehdi; Karunaratne, Erandika; Gibson, George N; Gascón, Jose A; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2016-05-11

    One of the greatest challenges with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photovoltaics and nanostructured devices is maintaining the nanotubes in their pristine state (i.e., devoid of aggregation and inhomogeneous doping) so that their unique spectroscopic and transport characteristics are preserved. To this effect, we report on the synthesis and self-assembly of a C60-functionalized flavin (FC60), composed of PCBM and isoalloxazine moieties attached on either ends of a linear, C-12 aliphatic spacer. Small amounts of FC60 (up to 3 molar %) were shown to coassembly with an organic soluble derivative of flavin (FC12) around SWNTs and impart effective dispersion and individualization. A key annealing step was necessary to perfect the isoalloxazine helix and expel the C60 moiety away from the nanotubes. Steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy illustrate that 1% or higher incorporation of FC60 allows for an effective photoinduced charge transfer quenching of the encased SWNTs through the seamless helical encase. This is enabled via the direct π-π overlap between the graphene sidewalls, isoalloxazine helix, and the C60 cage that facilitates SWNT exciton dissociation and electron transfer to the PCBM moiety. Atomistic molecular simulations indicate that the stability of the complex originates from enhanced van der Waals interactions of the flexible spacer wrapped around the fullerene that brings the C60 in π-π overlap with the isoalloxazine helix. The remarkable spectral purity (in terms of narrow E(S)ii line widths) for the resulting ground-state complex signals a new class of highly organized supramolecular nanotube architecture with profound importance for advanced nanostructured devices.

  11. Kinetic Mechanism of the Dechlorinating Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase HadA.

    PubMed

    Pimviriyakul, Panu; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2017-03-24

    The accumulation of chlorophenols (CPs) in the environment, due to their wide use as agrochemicals, has become a serious environmental problem. These organic halides can be degraded by aerobic microorganisms, where the initial steps of various biodegradation pathways include an oxidative dechlorinating process in which chloride is replaced by a hydroxyl substituent. Harnessing these dechlorinating processes could provide an opportunity for environmental remediation, but detailed catalytic mechanisms for these enzymes are not yet known. To close this gap, we now report transient kinetics and product analysis of the dechlorinating flavin-dependent monooxygenase, HadA, from the aerobic organism Ralstonia pickettii DTP0602, identifying several mechanistic properties that differ from other enzymes in the same class. We first overexpressed and purified HadA to homogeneity. Analyses of the products from single and multiple turnover reactions demonstrated that HadA prefers 4-CP and 2-CP over CPs with multiple substituents. Stopped-flow and rapid-quench flow experiments of HadA with 4-CP show the involvement of specific intermediates (C4a-hydroperoxy-FAD and C4a-hydroxy-FAD) in the reaction, define rate constants and the order of substrate binding, and demonstrate that the hydroxylation step occurs prior to chloride elimination. The data also identify the non-productive and productive paths of the HadA reactions and demonstrate that product formation is the rate-limiting step. This is the first elucidation of the kinetic mechanism of a two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase that can catalyze oxidative dechlorination of various CPs, and as such it will serve as the basis for future investigation of enzyme variants that will be useful for applications in detoxifying chemicals hazardous to human health.

  12. Flavin Binding to the Deca-heme Cytochrome MtrC: Insights from Computational Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Certain dissimilatory bacteria have the remarkable ability to use extracellular metal oxide minerals instead of oxygen as terminal electron sinks, using a process known as “extracellular respiration”. Specialized multiheme cytochromes located on the outer membrane of the microbe were shown to be crucial for electron transfer from the cell surface to the mineral. This process is facilitated by soluble, biogenic flavins secreted by the organism for the purpose of acting as an electron shuttle. However, their interactions with the outer-membrane cytochromes are not established on a molecular scale. Here, we study the interaction between the outer-membrane deca-heme cytochrome MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis and flavin mononucleotide (FMN in fully oxidized quinone form) using computational docking. We find that interaction of FMN with MtrC is significantly weaker than with known FMN-binding proteins, but identify a mildly preferred interaction site close to heme 2 with a dissociation constant (Kd) = 490 μM, in good agreement with recent experimental estimates, Kd = 255 μM. The weak interaction with MtrC can be qualitatively explained by the smaller number of hydrogen bonds that the planar headgroup of FMN can form with this protein compared to FMN-binding proteins. Molecular dynamics simulation gives indications for a possible conformational switch upon cleavage of the disulphide bond of MtrC, but without concomitant increase in binding affinities according to this docking study. Overall, our results suggest that binding of FMN to MtrC is reversible and not highly specific, which may be consistent with a role as redox shuttle that facilitates extracellular respiration. PMID:26682818

  13. Thiaminylated adenine nucleotides. Chemical synthesis, structural characterization and natural occurrence.

    PubMed

    Frédérich, Michel; Delvaux, David; Gigliobianco, Tiziana; Gangolf, Marjorie; Dive, Georges; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Elias, Benjamin; De Pauw, Edwin; Angenot, Luc; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2009-06-01

    Thiamine and its three phosphorylated derivatives (mono-, di- and triphosphate) occur naturally in most cells. Recently, we reported the presence of a fourth thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate, produced in Escherichia coli in response to carbon starvation. Here, we show that the chemical synthesis of adenosine thiamine triphosphate leads to another new compound, adenosine thiamine diphosphate, as a side product. The structure of both compounds was confirmed by MS analysis and 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR, and some of their chemical properties were determined. Our results show an upfield shifting of the C-2 proton of the thiazolium ring in adenosine thiamine derivatives compared with conventional thiamine phosphate derivatives. This modification of the electronic environment of the C-2 proton might be explained by a through-space interaction with the adenosine moiety, suggesting U-shaped folding of adenosine thiamine derivatives. Such a structure in which the C-2 proton is embedded in a closed conformation can be located using molecular modeling as an energy minimum. In E. coli, adenosine thiamine triphosphate may account for 15% of the total thiamine under energy stress. It is less abundant in eukaryotic organisms, but is consistently found in mammalian tissues and some cell lines. Using HPLC, we show for the first time that adenosine thiamine diphosphate may also occur in small amounts in E. coli and in vertebrate liver. The discovery of two natural thiamine adenine compounds further highlights the complexity and diversity of thiamine biochemistry, which is not restricted to the cofactor role of thiamine diphosphate.

  14. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  15. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  16. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  17. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  18. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  19. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all p<0.05). Glibenclamide decreased infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys.

  20. Evolution of hypervariable microsatellites in apomictic polyploid lineages of Ranunculus carpaticola: directional bias at dinucleotide loci.

    PubMed

    Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites are widely used in genetic and evolutionary analyses, but their own evolution is far from simple. The mechanisms maintaining the mutational patterns of simple repeats and the typical stable allele-frequency distributions are still poorly understood. Asexual lineages may provide particularly informative models for the indirect study of microsatellite evolution, because their genomes act as complete linkage groups, with mutations being the only source of genetic variation. Here, we study the direction of accumulated dinucleotide microsatellite mutations in wild asexual lineages of hexaploid Ranunculus carpaticola. Whereas the overall number of contractions is not significantly different from that of expansions, the within-locus frequency of contractions, but not of expansions, significantly increases with allele length. Moreover, within-locus polymorphism is positively correlated with allele length, but this relationship is due solely to the influence of contraction mutations. Such asymmetries may explain length constraints generally observed with microsatellites and are consistent with stable, bell-shaped allele-frequency distributions. Although apomictic and allohexaploid, the R. carpaticola lineages show mutational patterns resembling the trends observed in a broad range of organisms, including sexuals and diploids, suggesting that, even if not of germline origin, the mutations in these apomicts may be the consequence of similar mechanisms.

  1. Detection of mercury-TpT dinucleotide binding by Raman spectra: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Benda, Ladislav; Straka, Michal; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Bouř, Petr; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-16

    The Hg(2+) ion stabilizes the thymine-thymine mismatched base pair and provides new ways of creating various DNA structures. Recently, such T-Hg-T binding was detected by the Raman spectroscopy. In this work, detailed differences in vibrational frequencies and Raman intensity patterns in the free TpT dinucleotide and its metal-mediated complex (TpT·Hg)(2) are interpreted on the basis of quantum chemical modeling. The computations verified specific marker Raman bands indicating the effect of mercury binding to DNA. Although the B3LYP functional well-describes the Raman frequencies, a dispersion correction had to be added for all atoms including mercury to obtain realistic geometry of the (TpT·Hg)(2) dimer. Only then, the DFT complex structure agreed with those obtained with the wave function-based MP2 method. The aqueous solvent modeled as a polarizable continuum had a minor effect on the dispersion interaction, but it stabilized conformations of the sugar and phosphate parts. A generalized definition of internal coordinate force field was introduced to monitor covalent bond mechanical strengthening and weakening upon the Hg(2+) binding. Induced vibrational frequency shifts were rationalized in terms of changes in electronic structure. The simulations thus also provided reliable insight into the complex structure and stability.

  2. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-22

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named "DeepMethyl" to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  3. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  4. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  5. Diabetes and the control of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria by concentration ratios of adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate, of reduced/oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide and of acetyl-coenzyme A/coenzyme A.

    PubMed Central

    Kerbey, A L; Radcliffe, P M; Randle, P J

    1977-01-01

    1. The proportion of active (dephosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria was correlated with total concentration ratios of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and acetyl-CoA/CoA. These metabolites were measured with ATP-dependent and NADH-dependent luciferases. 2. Increase in the concentration ratio of NADH/NAD+ at constant [ATP]/[ADP] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA] was associated with increased phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. This was based on comparison between mitochondria incubated with 0.4mM- or 1mM-succinate and mitochondria incubated with 0.4mM-succinate+/-rotenone. 3. Increase in the concentration ratio acetyl-CoA/CoA at constant [ATP]/[ADP] and [NADH][NAD+] was associated with increased phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. This was based on comparison between incubations in 50 micrometer-palmitotoyl-L-carnitine and in 250 micrometer-2-oxoglutarate +50 micrometer-L-malate. 4. These findings are consistent with activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction by high ratios of [NADH]/[NAD+] and of [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA]. 5. Comparison between mitochondria from hearts of diabetic and non-diabetic rats shows that phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase is enhanced in alloxan-diabetes by some factor other than concentration ratios of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ or acetyl-CoA/CoA. PMID:196589

  6. The metabolic fate of the products of citrate cleavage. Adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase and nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked malate dehydrogenase in foetal and adult liver from ruminants and non-ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R. W.; Ballard, F. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Foetal rat liver slices incorporate the C-3 of aspartate and C-2 of glutamate into fatty acids at rates equal to those observed with adult rat liver slices. Incorporation of either of these labelled carbon atoms into fatty acids would require a functioning citrate-cleavage pathway which consists of the enzymes ATP–citrate lyase, NAD–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–malate dehydrogenase. However, NADP–malate dehydrogenase is present in foetal rat liver at only 5% of the activity detectable in adult rat liver. 2. From these findings and the effect of cofactors on the formation of 14CO2 from [1,5-14C2]citrate in liver supernatant fractions (100000g), it is suggested that NADP–malate dehydrogenase limits the citrate-cleavage sequence. 3. Measurement of the citrate-cleavage pathway by incorporation studies with [3-14C]aspartate and [U-14C]glucose and by determining the activities of ATP–citrate lyase and NADP–malate dehydrogenase have shown that this sequence of reactions is present in the liver of the bovine foetus but not in the adult. However, C-2 of glutamate is not incorporated into fatty acids or non-saponifiable lipid by bovine liver slices. This finding as well as those presented above for the adult and foetal rat liver are interpreted on the basis of a competition between phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and NAD–malate dehydrogenase for oxaloacetate produced by the cleavage of citrate in the cytosol. PMID:4386407

  7. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens: substrate-like inhibitors both stimulate flavin reduction and stabilize the flavin-peroxo intermediate yet result in the production of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Crozier-Reabe, Karen R; Phillips, Robert S; Moran, Graham R

    2008-11-25

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a flavin-dependent hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of l-kynurenine (l-Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3OHKyn) in the pathway for tryptophan catabolism. KMO inhibition has been widely suggested as an early treatment for stroke and other neurological disorders that involve ischemia. We have investigated the reductive and the oxidative half-reactions of a stable form of KMO from Pseudomonas fluorescens (KMO). The binding of l-Kyn by the enzyme is relatively slow and involves at least two reversible steps. The rate constant for reduction of the flavin cofactor by NADPH increases by a factor of approximately 2.5 x 10(3) when l-Kyn is bound. The rate of reduction of the KMO.l-Kyn complex is 160 s(-1), and the K(d) for the NADPH complex is 200 microM with charge-transfer absorption bands for the KMO(RED).l-Kyn.NADP(+) complex accumulating after reduction. The reduction potential of KMO is -188 mV and is unresponsive to the addition of l-Kyn or other inhibitory ligands. KMO inhibitors whose structures are reminiscent of l-Kyn such as m-nitrobenzoylalanine and benzoylalanine also stimulate reduction of flavin by NADPH and, in the presence of dioxygen, result in the stoichiometric liberation of hydrogen peroxide, diminishing the perceived therapeutic potential of inhibitors of this type. In the presence of the native substrate, the oxidative half-reaction exhibits triphasic absorbance data. A spectrum consistent with that of a peroxyflavin species accumulates and then decays to yield the oxidized enzyme. This species then undergoes minor spectral changes that, based on flavin difference spectra defined in the presence of 3OHKyn, can be correlated with product release. The oxidative half-reaction observed in the presence of saturating benzoylalanine or m-nitrobenzoylalanine also shows the accumulation of a peroxyflavin species that then decays to yield hydrogen peroxide without hydroxylation.

  8. One-pot synthesis of fluorescent polysaccharides: adenine grafted agarose and carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Oza, Mihir D; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K

    2012-08-01

    New fluorescent polysaccharides were synthesized by grafting the nucleobase adenine on to the backbones of agarose and κ-carrageenan, which were characterized by FT-IR, (13)C NMR, TGA, XRD, UV, and fluorescence properties. The synthesis involved a rapid water based potassium persulfate (KPS) initiated method under microwave irradiation. The emission spectra of adenine grafted agarose and κ-carrageenan were recorded in aqueous (5×10(-5) M) solution, exhibiting λ(em,max) 347 nm by excitation at 261 nm, affording ca. 30% and 40% enhanced emission intensities, respectively compared to that of pure adenine solution in the same concentration. Similar emission intensity was recorded in the pure adenine solution at its molar equivalent concentrations present in the 5×10(-5) M solution of the agarose and carrageenan grafted products, that is, 3.28×10(-5) M and 4.5×10(-5) M respectively. These fluorescent adenine grafted products may have potential utility in various sensor applications.

  9. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-15

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-05

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  12. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Marie E.; Cherney, Maia M.; Marcato, Paola; Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D.; James, Michael N. G.

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Electrochemical studies on the oxidation of guanine and adenine at cyclodextrin modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Noori, Abolhassan

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemical sensor for guanine and adenine using cyclodextrin-modified poly(N-acetylaniline) (PNAANI) on a carbon paste electrode has been developed. The oxidation mechanism of guanine and adenine on the surface of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrode processes are irreversible, pH dependent, and involve several reaction products. The electron transfer process occurs in consecutive steps with the formation of a strongly adsorbed intermediate on the electrode surface. Also, a new method for estimating the apparent formation constants of guanine and adenine with the immobilized cyclodextrins, through the change of surface coverage of studied analytes has been reported. Both guanine and adenine showed linear concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 microM by using differential pulse voltammetry, with an experimental limit of detection down to 0.05 microM. Linear concentration ranges of 2-150 microM for guanine and 6-104 microM for adenine have been found when cyclic voltammetry was used for determination of both analytes.

  15. Alkylation by propylene oxide of deoxyribonucleic acid, adenine, guanosine and deoxyguanylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P. D.; Jarman, M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Propylene oxide reacts with DNA in aqueous buffer solution at about neutral pH to yield two principal products, identified as 7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)adenine, which hydrolyse out of the alkylated DNA at neutral pH values at 37°C. 2. These products were obtained in quantity by reactions between propylene oxide and guanosine or adenine respectively. 3. The reactions between propylene oxide and adenine in acetic acid were parallel to those between dimethyl sulphate and adenine in neutral aqueous solution; the alkylated positions in adenine in order of decreasing reactivity were N-3, N-1 and N-9. A method for separating these alkyladenines is described. 4. Deoxyguanylic acid sodium salt was alkylated at N-7 by propylene oxide in neutral aqueous solution. 5. The nature of the side chain in the principal alkylation products was established by mass spectrometry, and the nature of the products is consistent with their formation by the bimolecular reaction mechanism. PMID:5073240

  16. Ascorbate-synthesizing system in rat liver microsomes. II. A peptide-bound flavin as the prosthetic group of L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Asano, A; Sato, R

    1975-01-01

    L-Gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase [EC 1.1.3.8] was purified 80-fold from rat liver microsomes. In confirmation of our previous finding with a cruder preparation, the purified enzyme was shown to contain an L-gulono-gamma-lactone-reducible pigment as a prosthetic group. This pigment was not liberated from the protein by acid ammonium sulfate, 10% trichloroacetic acid or 2 M area, but was effectively released by proteolytic digestion. The pigment thus released showed a reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectrum characteristic of a flavin compound. The pigment was liberated from a trichloroacetic acid-treated preparation of the enzyme by pronase digestion and purified by Florisil column chromatography and paper chromatography. The absorption spectrum as well as the fluorescence emission and excitation spectra of the purified pigment indicated that it was actually a flavin peptide. It was, however, different not only from FMN but also from flavin peptides isolated from other sources such as succinate dehydrogenase [EC 1.3.99.1] and monoamine oxidase [EC 1.4.3.4] as regards the pH dependence of fluorescence intensity and the Rf value on thin-layer chromatography. A preliminary analysis showed that the purified flavin compound contained several amino acid residues. Alkaline photolysis of the purified flavin peptide suggested that the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin is involved in its binding to the peptide. The hypsochromic shift of the absorption peak in the near-ultraviolet region suggested further that the linkage between the flavin and the peptide may be mediated by the 8-methyl group of the isoalloxazine nucleus. It can be concluded that the prosthetic group of gulonolactone oxidase is a flavin which is covalently bound to the enzyme protein.

  17. Flavin-induced photodecomposition of sulfur-containing amino acids is decisive in the formation of beer lightstruck flavor.

    PubMed

    Huvaere, Kevin; Andersen, Mogens L; Storme, Michael; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Skibsted, Leif H; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2006-10-01

    Photooxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and derivatives readily occurs upon visible-light irradiation in the presence of flavins. The sulfur moiety seems pivotal for interaction, as was determined from kinetic analyses using laser flash photolysis spectroscopy. After photooxidation, the resulting radical intermediates were characterized by addition to a spin trap, followed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluation of the coupling constants. The presence of the proposed radical intermediates was strongly supported by the identification of the reaction products using mass spectrometry. Accordingly, feasible degradation pathways for various sulfur-containing amino acids and derivatives were proposed. It was finally proven that flavin-induced photoproduction of sulfhydryl radicals and recombination with a 3-methylbut-2-enyl radical, derived from the photodegradation of hop-derived isohumulones, are decisive in the formation of beer lightstruck flavor.

  18. Flavin fluorescence lifetime imaging of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells on micro and nano-structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplicky, T.; Horilova, J.; Bruncko, J.; Gladine, C.; Lajdova, I.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricated micro- and nano-structured surfaces were evaluated for use with living cells. Metabolic state was tested by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) positioned on a coverslip, non-covered, or covered with micro- or nano-structured surfaces (OrmoComp polymer structures produced by 2-photon photopolymerisation, or Zinc Oxide (ZnO) layer fabricated by pulsed laser deposition). Confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) were employed to gather flavin fluorescence lifetime images of living PBMC on structured surfaces. Gathered data are the first step towards monitoring of the live cell interaction with different micro/nano-structured surfaces and thus evaluate their potential applicability in the biomedical field.

  19. An extended N-H bond, driven by a conserved second-order interaction, orients the flavin N5 orbital in cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Emily; Yu, Li-Juan; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Duff, Anthony P.; Karton, Amir; Vrielink, Alice

    2017-01-01

    The protein microenvironment surrounding the flavin cofactor in flavoenzymes is key to the efficiency and diversity of reactions catalysed by this class of enzymes. X-ray diffraction structures of oxidoreductase flavoenzymes have revealed recurrent features which facilitate catalysis, such as a hydrogen bond between a main chain nitrogen atom and the flavin redox center (N5). A neutron diffraction study of cholesterol oxidase has revealed an unusual elongated main chain nitrogen to hydrogen bond distance positioning the hydrogen atom towards the flavin N5 reactive center. Investigation of the structural features which could cause such an unusual occurrence revealed a positively charged lysine side chain, conserved in other flavin mediated oxidoreductases, in a second shell away from the FAD cofactor acting to polarize the peptide bond through interaction with the carbonyl oxygen atom. Double-hybrid density functional theory calculations confirm that this electrostatic arrangement affects the N-H bond length in the region of the flavin reactive center. We propose a novel second-order partial-charge interaction network which enables the correct orientation of the hydride receiving orbital of N5. The implications of these observations for flavin mediated redox chemistry are discussed. PMID:28098177

  20. An extended N-H bond, driven by a conserved second-order interaction, orients the flavin N5 orbital in cholesterol oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Emily; Yu, Li-Juan; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Duff, Anthony P.; Karton, Amir; Vrielink, Alice

    2017-01-01

    The protein microenvironment surrounding the flavin cofactor in flavoenzymes is key to the efficiency and diversity of reactions catalysed by this class of enzymes. X-ray diffraction structures of oxidoreductase flavoenzymes have revealed recurrent features which facilitate catalysis, such as a hydrogen bond between a main chain nitrogen atom and the flavin redox center (N5). A neutron diffraction study of cholesterol oxidase has revealed an unusual elongated main chain nitrogen to hydrogen bond distance positioning the hydrogen atom towards the flavin N5 reactive center. Investigation of the structural features which could cause such an unusual occurrence revealed a positively charged lysine side chain, conserved in other flavin mediated oxidoreductases, in a second shell away from the FAD cofactor acting to polarize the peptide bond through interaction with the carbonyl oxygen atom. Double-hybrid density functional theory calculations confirm that this electrostatic arrangement affects the N-H bond length in the region of the flavin reactive center. We propose a novel second-order partial-charge interaction network which enables the correct orientation of the hydride receiving orbital of N5. The implications of these observations for flavin mediated redox chemistry are discussed.

  1. [1H NMR analysis of the complex formation of aromatic molecules of antibiotic and vitamin in aqueous solution: heteroassociation of actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide].

    PubMed

    Veselkov, A N; Evstigneev, M P; Rozvadovskaia, A O; Mukhina, Iu V; Rybakova, K A

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the combined action of antibiotic and vitamin was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The heteroassociation of the antitumor antibiotic actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide was investigated as a function of concentration and temperature by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium association constant, the thermodynamic parameters (deltaH, deltaS) of heteroassociation of actinomycin D with flavin mononucleotide, and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts in the heterocomplex were determined from the concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts of molecules. The most favorable structure of the 1:1 actinomycin D-flavin mononucleotide heteroassociation complex was determined using both the molecular mechanics methods (X-PLOR software) and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules. In the calculated structure, the planes of the chromophores of actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide molecules in the 1:1 heterocomplex are parallel and separated from each other by a distance of about 0.34 nm. At the same time, there is a probability of formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the calculated structure of 1:1 actinomycin D-flavin mononucleotide complex. The analysis of the results obtained suggests that aromatic molecules of vitamins, e.g., flavin mononucleotide, can form energetically favorable heterocomplexes with aromatic antitumor antibiotics in aqueous solution, modulating thereby the efficacy of their medical and biological action.

  2. The TP0796 Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum Is a Bimetal-dependent FAD Pyrophosphatase with a Potential Role in Flavin Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, an obligate parasite of humans and the causative agent of syphilis, has evolved the capacity to exploit host-derived metabolites for its survival. Flavin-containing compounds are essential cofactors that are required for metabolic processes in all living organisms, and riboflavin is a direct precursor of the cofactors FMN and FAD. Unlike many pathogenic bacteria, Treponema pallidum cannot synthesize riboflavin; we recently described a flavin-uptake mechanism composed of an ABC-type transporter. However, there is a paucity of information about flavin utilization in bacterial periplasms. Using a discovery-driven approach, we have identified the TP0796 lipoprotein as a previously uncharacterized Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase within the ApbE superfamily. TP0796 probably plays a central role in flavin turnover by hydrolyzing exogenously acquired FAD, yielding AMP and FMN. Biochemical and structural investigations revealed that the enzyme has a unique bimetal Mg2+ catalytic center. Furthermore, the pyrophosphatase activity is product-inhibited by AMP, indicating a possible role for this molecule in modulating FMN and FAD levels in the treponemal periplasm. The ApbE superfamily was previously thought to be involved in thiamine biosynthesis, but our characterization of TP0796 prompts a renaming of this superfamily as a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein (Ftp). TP0796 is the first structurally and biochemically characterized FAD pyrophosphate enzyme in bacteria. This new paradigm for a bacterial flavin utilization pathway may prove to be useful for future inhibitor design. PMID:23447540

  3. Arg279 is the key regulator of coenzyme selectivity in the flavin-dependent ornithine monooxygenase SidA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder; Franceschini, Stefano; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Ellerbrock, Jacob; Romero, Elvira; Echandi, Maria Paulina; Martin Del Campo, Julia S; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Siderophore A (SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the NAD(P)H- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine in the biosynthesis of siderophores in Aspergillus fumigatus and is essential for virulence. SidA can utilize both NADPH or NADH for activity; however, the enzyme is selective for NADPH. Structural analysis shows that R279 interacts with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. To probe the role of electrostatic interactions in coenzyme selectivity, R279 was mutated to both an alanine and a glutamate. The mutant proteins were active but highly uncoupled, oxidizing NADPH and producing hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated ornithine. For wtSidA, the catalytic efficiency was 6-fold higher with NADPH as compared to NADH. For the R279A mutant the catalytic efficiency was the same with both coenyzmes, while for the R279E mutant the catalytic efficiency was 5-fold higher with NADH. The effects are mainly due to an increase in the KD values, as no major changes on the kcat or flavin reduction values were observed. Thus, the absence of a positive charge leads to no coenzyme selectivity while introduction of a negative charge leads to preference for NADH. Flavin fluorescence studies suggest altered interaction between the flavin and NADP⁺ in the mutant enzymes. The effects are caused by different binding modes of the coenzyme upon removal of the positive charge at position 279, as no major conformational changes were observed in the structure for R279A. The results indicate that the positive charge at position 279 is critical for tight binding of NADPH and efficient hydroxylation.

  4. Excited-state lifetime of adenine near the first electronic band origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyuk; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-10-01

    The excited-state lifetime of supersonically cooled adenine was measured in the gas phase by femtosecond pump-probe transient ionization as a function of excitation energy between 36 100 and 37 500 cm-1. The excited-state lifetime of adenine is ˜2 ps around the 0-0 band of the L1b ππ ∗ state (36 105 cm-1). The lifetime drops to ˜1 ps when adenine is excited to the L1a ππ ∗ state with the pump energy at 36 800 cm-1 and above. The excited-state lifetimes of L1a and L1b ππ∗ states are differentiated in accordance with previous frequency-resolved and computational studies.

  5. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease.

  6. The basal proton conductance of mitochondria depends on adenine nucleotide translocase content

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The basal proton conductance of mitochondria causes mild uncoupling and may be an important contributor to metabolic rate. The molecular nature of the proton-conductance pathway is unknown. We show that the proton conductance of muscle mitochondria from mice in which isoform 1 of the adenine nucleotide translocase has been ablated is half that of wild-type controls. Overexpression of the adenine nucleotide translocase encoded by the stress-sensitive B gene in Drosophila mitochondria increases proton conductance, and underexpression decreases it, even when the carrier is fully inhibited using carboxyatractylate. We conclude that half to two-thirds of the basal proton conductance of mitochondria is catalysed by the adenine nucleotide carrier, independently of its ATP/ADP exchange or fatty-acid-dependent proton-leak functions. PMID:16076285

  7. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  8. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  9. Relevance of the flavin binding to the stability and folding of engineered cholesterol oxidase containing noncovalently bound FAD

    PubMed Central

    Caldinelli, Laura; Iametti, Stefania; Barbiroli, Alberto; Fessas, Dimitrios; Bonomi, Francesco; Piubelli, Luciano; Molla, Gianluca; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2008-01-01

    The flavoprotein cholesterol oxidase (CO) from Brevibacterium sterolicum is a monomeric flavoenzyme containing one molecule of FAD cofactor covalently linked to His69. The elimination of the covalent link following the His69Ala substitution was demonstrated to result in a significant decrease in activity, in the midpoint redox potential of the flavin, and in stability with respect to the wild-type enzyme, but does not modify the overall structure of the enzyme. We used CO as a model system to dissect the changes due to the elimination of the covalent link between the flavin and the protein (by comparing the wild-type and H69A CO holoproteins) with those due to the elimination of the cofactor (by comparing the holo- and apoprotein forms of H69A CO). The apoprotein of H69A CO lacks the characteristic tertiary structure of the holoprotein and displays larger hydrophobic surfaces; its urea-induced unfolding does not occur by a simple two-state mechanism and is largely nonreversible. Minor alterations in the flavin binding region are evident between the native and the refolded proteins, and are likely responsible for the low refolding yield observed. A model for the equilibrium unfolding of H69A CO that also takes into consideration the effects of cofactor binding and dissociation, and thus may be of general significance in terms of the relationships between cofactor uptake and folding in flavoproteins, is presented. PMID:18218720

  10. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the (1-14C)glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis.

  11. Efficacy of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Kuffer, M; Balzarini, J; Naesens, L; Goldberg, M; Erfle, V; Goebel, F D; De Clercq, E; Jindrich, J; Holy, A; Bischofberger, N; Kraft, W

    1998-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) were evaluated for their efficacy and side effects in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial using naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. This natural retrovirus animal model is considered highly relevant for the pathogenesis and chemotherapy of HIV in humans. Both PMEA and FPMPA proved effective in ameliorating the clinical symptoms of FIV-infected cats, as measured by several clinical parameters including the incidence and severity of stomatitis, Karnofsky's score, immunologic parameters such as relative and absolute CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and virologic parameters including proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of drug-treated animals. In contrast with PMEA, FPMPA showed no hematologic side effects at a dose that was 2.5-fold higher than PMEA.

  12. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  13. Ricin Activity Assay by Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry Detection of Adenine Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry. The release of adenine from the inhomo- geneous substrate herring sperm DNA by ricin was determined to...chain catalyzes cleavage at adenosine 4324 (in rat RNA) of 28S rRNA to release adenine.10 This action inhibits protein synthesis, leading to cell...death. In addition to RNA, herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) is a substrate for ricin.11 We chose to employ hsDNA for this assay because it is relatively stable

  14. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes.

  15. The Evolution and Functional Role of Flavin-based Prokaryotic Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Mandalari, Carmen; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-based photoreceptor proteins of the LOV (light, oxygen and voltage) superfamily are ubiquitous and appear to be essential blue-light sensing systems not only in plants, algae and fungi, but also in prokaryotes, where they are represented in more than 10% of known species. Despite their broad occurrence, only in few cases LOV proteins have been correlated with important phenomena such as bacterial infectivity, selective growth patterns or/and stress responses; nevertheless these few known roles are helping us understand the multiple ways by which prokaryotes can exploit these soluble blue-light photoreceptors. Given the large number of sequences now deposited in databases, it becomes meaningful to define a signature for bona fide LOV domains, a procedure that facilitates identification of proteins with new properties and phylogenetic analysis. The latter clearly evidences that a class of LOV proteins from alpha-proteobacteria is the closest prokaryotic relative of eukaryotic LOV domains, whereas cyanobacterial sequences cluster with the archaeal and the other bacterial LOV domains. Distance trees built for LOV domains suggest complex evolutionary patterns, possibly involving multiple horizontal gene transfer events. Based on available data, the in vivo relevance and evolution of prokaryotic LOV is discussed.

  16. Oxygen-dependent photochemistry and photophysics of "miniSOG," a protein-encased flavin.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Frederico M; Jensen, Rasmus L; Breitenbach, Thomas; Etzerodt, Michael; Ogilby, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Selected photochemical and photophysical parameters of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) have been examined under conditions in which FMN is (1) solvated in a buffered aqueous solution, and (2) encased in a protein likewise solvated in a buffered aqueous solution. The latter was achieved using the so-called "mini Singlet Oxygen Generator" (miniSOG), an FMN-containing flavoprotein engineered from Arabidopsis thaliana phototropin 2. Although FMN is a reasonably good singlet oxygen photosensitizer in bulk water (ϕΔ = 0.65 ± 0.04), enclosing FMN in this protein facilitates photoinitiated electron-transfer reactions (Type-I chemistry) at the expense of photosensitized singlet oxygen production (Type-II chemistry) and results in a comparatively poor yield of singlet oxygen (ϕΔ = 0.030 ± 0.002). This observation on the effect of the local environment surrounding FMN is supported by a host of spectroscopic and chemical trapping experiments. The results of this study not only elucidate the behavior of miniSOG but also provide useful information for the further development of well-characterized chromophores suitable for use as intracellular sensitizers in mechanistic studies of reactive oxygen species.

  17. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  18. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  19. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J. Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J.; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  20. Emerging Roles of Flavin Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) in Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schugar, Rebecca C.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease (CVD) still remain the largest cause of mortality worldwide. Several recent studies have discovered that metabolism of common nutrients by gut microbes can produce a proatherogenic metabolite called trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). The goal of this review is to discuss emerging evidence that the hepatic enzyme that generates TMAO, flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), plays a regulatory role in maintaining whole body cholesterol balance and atherosclerosis development. Recent Findings Several independent studies have recently uncovered a link between either FMO3 itself or its enzymatic product TMAO with atherosclerosis and hepatic insulin resistance. These recent studies show that inhibition of FMO3 stimulates macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis in mice. Summary A growing body of work demonstrates that nutrients present in high fat foods (phosphatidylcholine, choline, and L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the gut microbial enzymes to generate trimethylamine (TMA), which is then further metabolized by the host enzyme FMO3 to produce proatherogenic TMAO. Here we discuss emerging evidence that the TMAO producing enzyme FMO3 is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by regulating cholesterol metabolism and insulin resistance, and how these new insights provide exciting new avenues for CVD therapies. PMID:26218418

  1. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  2. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed Central

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes. PMID:26389123

  3. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; ...

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  5. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  6. Affinity of a galactose-specific legume lectin from Dolichos lablab to adenine revealed by X-ray cystallography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kartika N; Latha, Vakada Lavanya; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-07-01

    Crystal structure analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from a leguminous food crop Dolichos lablab (Indian lablab beans) has been carried out to obtain insights into its quaternary association and lectin-carbohydrate interactions. The analysis led to the identification of adenine binding sites at the dimeric interfaces of the heterotetrameric lectin. Structural details of similar adenine binding were reported in only one legume lectin, Dolichos biflorus, before this study. Here, we present the structure of the galactose-binding D. lablab lectin at different pH values in the native form and in complex with galactose and adenine. This first structure report on this lectin also provides a high resolution atomic view of legume lectin-adenine interactions. The tetramer has two canonical and two DB58-like interfaces. The binding of adenine, a non-carbohydrate ligand, is found to occur at four hydrophobic sites at the core of the tetramer at the DB58-like dimeric interfaces and does not interfere with the carbohydrate-binding site. To support the crystallographic observations, the adenine binding was further quantified by carrying out isothermal calorimetric titration. By this method, we not only estimated the affinity of the lectin to adenine but also showed that adenine binds with negative cooperativity in solution.

  7. Synthesis, cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine and its hydrochloride salt.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, Kamal H; Abramian, Lara; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Usher, Karyn; Vladimirov, Nikolay

    2012-11-08

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl) adenine. We evaluated two different synthetic routes starting with adenine where the optimal route was achieved through coupling of 9-(2-chloroethyl)adenine with diallylamine. The cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine hydrochloride salt resulted in low molecular weight oligomers in low yields. In contrast, 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine failed to cyclopolymerize, however, it formed a copolymer with SO₂ in relatively good yields. The molecular weights of the cyclopolymers were around 1,700-6,000 g/mol, as estimated by SEC. The cyclo-copolymer was stable up to 226 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a free-radical cyclo-copolymerization of a neutral alkyldiallylamine derivative with SO₂. These polymers represent a novel class of carbocyclic polynucleotides.

  8. Caffeine biosynthesis and adenine metabolism in transgenic Coffea canephora plants with reduced expression of N-methyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Katahira, Riko; Morimoto, Masayuki; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sano, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    In anti-sense and RNA interference transgenic plants of Coffea canephora in which the expression of CaMXMT1 was suppressed, caffeine biosynthesis from [8-(14)C]adenine was investigated, together with the overall metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine. Compared with wild type control plants, total purine alkaloid biosynthesis from adenine and conversion of theobromine to caffeine were both reduced in the transgenic plants. As found previously, [8-(14)C]adenine was metabolised to salvage products (nucleotides and RNA), to degradation products (ureides and CO(2)) and to purine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine). In the transgenic plants, metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine shifted from purine alkaloid synthesis to purine catabolism or salvage for nucleotides. HPLC analysis revealed a significantly reduced caffeine content in the transgenic plants. A small quantity (less than 20 nmol g(-1) fresh weight) of xanthosine had accumulated in at least one of the transgenic plants.

  9. The NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1983-05-25

    A subcellular particulate fraction from normal neutrophils that was enriched in NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating activity (Gabig, T. G., Schervish, E. W., and Santinga, J. T. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4114-4119) has been further characterized. This preparation contained 0.25 +/- 0.02 nmol of flavin adenine dinucleotide/mg of protein and 0.28 +/- 0.01 nmol of cytochrome b/mg of protein. Measurable amounts of riboflavin or flavin mononucleotide were not present. The flavoprotein was completely resolved from the cytochrome b by selective bile salt extraction of the particulate oxidase fraction. The identical subcellular particulate fraction was studied in the neutrophils from two male patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from one of the chronic granulomatous disease patients had a cytochrome b component that was spectrally abnormal, but a normal content of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from this patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had fluorescence excitation and emission spectra that were identical to the normal flavoprotein. The neutrophil oxidase fraction from the second chronic granulomatous disease patient had a quantitatively and spectrally normal cytochrome b but less than 8% of the normal amount of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The fraction from the latter patient's neutrophils corresponding to the resolved flavoprotein from normal cells had no detectable flavoprotein by fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. It is postulated that these two patients represent distinct mutants in two separate components of the neutrophil NADPH-dependent O-.2-generating oxidase system, flavoprotein and cytochrome b.

  10. Diminution in adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by platelets and serum from rats submitted to Walker 256 tumour.

    PubMed

    Buffon, Andréia; Ribeiro, Vanessa B; Schanoski, Alessandra S; Sarkis, João J F

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in the circulation is mediated by the action of an NTPDase (CD39, apyrase) and of a 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), presenting as a final product, adenosine. Among other properties described for adenine nucleotides, an anti-cancer activity is suggested, since ATP is considered a cytotoxic molecule in several tumour cell systems. Conversely, some studies demonstrate that adenosine presents a tumour-promoting activity. In this study, we evaluated the pattern of adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by serum and platelets from rats submitted to the Walker 256 tumour model. Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by blood serum and platelets obtained from rats at, 6, 10 and 15 days after the subcutaneous Walker 256 tumour inoculation, was evaluated. Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum at 6, 10 and 15 days after tumour induction. In platelets, a significant reduction in ATP and AMP hydrolysis was observed at 10 and 15 days after tumour induction, while an inhibition of ADP hydrolysis was observed at all times studied. Based on these results, it is possible to suggest a physiologic protection mechanism against the tumoral process in circulation. The inhibition in nucleotide hydrolysis observed probably maintains ATP levels elevated (cytotoxic compound) and, at the same time, reduces the adenosine production (tumour-promoting molecule) in the circulation.

  11. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  12. Ameliorative effect of chrysin on adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Adham, Sirin A; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine - induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered.

  13. Effect of atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Liu, C; Zhou, Q; Xie, Y C; Qiu, X M; Feng, X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the therapeutic effects of Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided in to 5 groups (n=10 rats per group): The normal control group, the chronic renal failure pathological control group, the dexamethasone treatment group and two Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide treatment groups, treated with two different concentrations of the polysaccharide, the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group. All the rats, except those in the normal control group were fed adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 3 weeks. After being fed with adenine, the dexamethasone treatment group, Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group rats were administered the drug orally for 2 weeks. On day 35, the kidney coefficient of the rats and the serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein and hemalbumin were determined. Subsequent to experimentation on a model of chronic renal failure in rats, the preparation was proven to be able to reduce serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and hemalbumin levels (P<0.05) and improve renal function. Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide had reversed the majority of the indices of chronic renal failure in rats.

  14. The Effect of Adenine Repeats on G-quadruplex/hemin Peroxidase Mimicking DNAzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jielin; Guo, Yuehua; Zhou, Jun; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-03-23

    The catalytic activity of G-quadruplex/hemin is much lower than that of proteinous enzymes, so it is very important to increase its activity. Very recently, flanking sequences, which can be regarded as an external part of G-quadruplexes, were found to enhance the activity of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme. However, little is known about the effect of internal parts, such as loop sequences and linkers, on the activity. In the present study, adenine repeats were incorporated into several designed G-quadruplex structures either in the loops, bulges, or linkers, and the constructed G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme exhibit about fivefold improvement in peroxidase-mimicking activity in some cases. The enhancement effect may result from the formation of compound I, protoporphyrin⋅Fe(IV) =O(.+) , accelerated by dA repeats, which was demonstrated by H2 O2 decay kinetics and pH dependency analysis. The novel enhancement methods described here may help in the development of high-activity DNAzymes, illustrated by a dimer G-quadruplex with flanking adenine at one end, a relatively long adenine run in one loop, and another adenine run in the linker.

  15. Macrophage Trafficking as Key Mediator of Adenine-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; da Silva, João Santana; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a special role in the onset of several diseases, including acute and chronic kidney injuries. In this sense, tubule interstitial nephritis (TIN) represents an underestimated insult, which can be triggered by different stimuli and, in the absence of a proper regulation, can lead to fibrosis deposition. Based on this perception, we evaluated the participation of macrophage recruitment in the development of TIN. Initially, we provided adenine-enriched food to WT and searched for macrophage presence and action in the kidney. Also, a group of animals were depleted of macrophages with the clodronate liposome while receiving adenine-enriched diet. We collected blood and renal tissue from these animals and renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis were evaluated. We observed higher expression of chemokines in the kidneys of adenine-fed mice and a substantial protection when macrophages were depleted. Then, we specifically investigated the role of some key chemokines, CCR5 and CCL3, in this TIN experimental model. Interestingly, CCR5 KO and CCL3 KO animals showed less renal dysfunction and a decreased proinflammatory profile. Furthermore, in those animals, there was less profibrotic signaling. In conclusion, we can suggest that macrophage infiltration is important for the onset of renal injury in the adenine-induced TIN. PMID:25132730

  16. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  17. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  18. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Pacheco e Silva Filho, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-06-18

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration.

  19. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  20. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  1. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  2. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  3. Characterization of an NADH oxidase of the flavin-dependent disulfide reductase family from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Case, Christopher L; Rodriguez, Jason R; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2009-01-01

    Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, a deeply rooted hyperthermophilic anaerobic methanarchaeon from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, carries an NADH oxidase (Nox) homologue (MJ0649). According to the characteristics described here, MJ0649 represents an unusual member within group 3 of the flavin-dependent disulfide reductase (FDR) family. This FDR group comprises Nox, NADH peroxidases (Npx) and coenzyme A disulfide reductases (CoADRs); each carries a Cys residue that forms Cys-sulfenic acid during catalysis. A sequence analysis identified MJ0649 as a CoADR homologue. However, recombinant MJ0649 (rMJNox), expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity an 86 kDa homodimer with 0.27 mol FAD (mol subunit)(-1), showed Nox but not CoADR activity. Incubation with FAD increased FAD content to 1 mol (mol subunit)(-1) and improved NADH oxidase activity 3.4-fold. The FAD-incubated enzyme was characterized further. The optimum pH and temperature were > or =10 and > or =95 degrees C, respectively. At pH 7 and 83 degrees C, apparent Km values for NADH and O2 were 3 microM and 1.9 mM, respectively, and the specific activity at 1.4 mM O2 was 60 micromol min(-1) mg(-1); 62 % of NADH-derived reducing equivalents were recovered as H2O2 and the rest probably generated H2O. rMjNox had poor NADPH oxidase, NADH peroxidase and superoxide formation activities. It reduced ferricyanide, plumbagin and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), but not disulfide coenzyme A and disulfide coenzyme M. Due to a high Km, O2 is not a physiologically relevant substrate for MJ0649; its true substrate remains unknown.

  4. Plant activation of aromatic amines mediated by cytochromes P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Chiapella, C; Radovan, R D; Moreno, J A; Casares, L; Barbé, J; Llagostera, M

    2000-10-31

    To know the mechanisms involved in the activation of promutagenic aromatic amines mediated by plants, we used Persea americana S117 system (S117) for the activation of 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and m-phenylenediamine (m-PDA) in Ames assays. In these assays, the effect of the diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), of the 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), an inhibitor of cytochromes P450 (cyt-P450s) and of the methimazole, a high-affinity substrate for FMOs, was studied. The efficacy of both inhibitors and of the methimazole was verified to find that they did partially inhibit the mutagenesis of both aromatic amines, activated with rat liver S9. Similarly, both inhibitors and methimazole did produce a significant decrease in 2-AF and m-PDA mutagenesis, when the activation system was S117, indicating that, similar to what occurs in mammalian systems, plant FMOs and cyt-P450s can metabolize aromatic amines to mutagenic product(s). However, the affinity of both FMOs and cyt-P450s of plant for 2-AF and m-PDA was different. Data obtained indicate that the activities of plant FMOs must be the main enzymatic system of m-PDA activation while, in 2-AF activation, plant cyt-P450s have the most relevant activities. In addition, peroxidases of the S117 system must contribute to 2-AF activation and some isoforms of FMOs and/or cyt-P450s of the S117 system, uninhibited by the inhibitors used, must be the responsible for a partial activation of m-PDA.

  5. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Sehlmeyer, Sven; Wang, Linzhu; Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-05-03

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  6. Contribution of flavin covalent linkage with histidine 99 to the reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Quaye, Osbourne; Cowins, Sharonda; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-06-19

    The FAD-dependent choline oxidase has a flavin cofactor covalently attached to the protein via histidine 99 through an 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage. The enzyme catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine, forming betaine aldehyde as an enzyme-bound intermediate. The variant form of choline oxidase in which the histidine residue has been replaced with asparagine was used to investigate the contribution of the 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage of FAD to the protein toward the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Decreases of 10-fold and 30-fold in the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values were observed as compared with wild-type choline oxidase at pH 10 and 25 degrees C, with no significant effect on k(cat)/K(O) using choline as substrate. Both the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values increased with increasing pH to limiting values at high pH consistent with the participation of an unprotonated group in the reductive half-reaction and the overall turnover of the enzyme. The pH independence of both (D)(k(cat)/K(m)) and (D)k(cat), with average values of 9.2 +/- 3.3 and 7.4 +/- 0.5, respectively, is consistent with absence of external forward and reverse commitments to catalysis, and the chemical step of CH bond cleavage being rate-limiting for both the reductive half-reaction and the overall enzyme turnover. The temperature dependence of the (D)k(red) values suggests disruption of the preorganization in the asparagine variant enzyme. Altogether, the data presented in this study are consistent with the FAD-histidyl covalent linkage being important for the optimal positioning of the hydride ion donor and acceptor in the tunneling reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

  7. Kinetic and mechanistic analysis of dinucleotide and oligonucleotide formation from the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine on Na(+)-montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The rate constants for the condensation reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine (ImpA) to form dinucleotides and oligonucleotides have been measured in the presence of Na(+)-volclay (a Na(+)-montmorillonite) in pH 8 aqueous solution at 25 degrees C. The rates of the reaction of ImpA with an excess of adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate (NH2pA), P1,P2-diadenosine 5',5'-pyrophosphate (A5'ppA), or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP or pA) in the presence of the montmorillonite to form NH2pA3'pA, A5'ppA3'pA, and pA3'pA, respectively, were measured. Only 3',5'-linked products were observed. The magnitude of the rate constants decrease in the order NH2pA3'pA > A5'-ppA3'pA > pA3'pA. The binding of ImpA to montmorillonite was measured, and the adsorption isotherm was determined. The binding of ImpA to montmorillonite and the formation of higher oligonucleotides is not observed in the absence of salts. Mg2+ enhances binding and oligonucleotide formation more than Ca2+ and Na+. The rate constants for the oligonucleotide formation were determined from the reaction products formed from 10 to 40 mM ImpA in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite using the computer program SIMFIT. The magnitudes of the rate constants for the formation of oligonucleotides increased in the order 2-mer < 3-mer < 4-mer ... 7-mer. The rate constants for dinucleotide and trinucleotide formation are more than 1000 times larger than those measured in the absence of montmorillonite. The rate constants for the formation of dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide are 41,2.6, and 3.7 times larger than those for the formation of oligo(G)s with a poly(C) template. The hydrolysis of ImpA was accelerated 35 times in the presence of the montmorillonite. The catalytic ability of montmorillonite to form dinucleotides and oligonucleotides is quantitatively evaluated and possible pathways for oligo(A) formation are proposed.

  8. Supramolecular polymeric chemosensor for biomedical applications: design and synthesis of a luminescent zinc metallopolymer as a chemosensor for adenine detection.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2012-11-01

    Adenine is an important bio-molecule that plays many crucial roles in food safety and biomedical diagnostics. Differentiating adenine from a mixture of adenosine and other nucleic bases (guanine, thymine, cytosine, and uracil) is particularly important for both biological and clinical applications. A neutral Zn(II) metallosupramolecular polymer based on acyl hydrazone derived coordination centres (P1) were generated through self-assembly polymerization. It is a linear coordination polymer that behaves like self-standing film. The synthesis, (1)H-NMR characterization, and spectroscopic properties of this supramolecular material are reported. P1 was found to be a chemosensor specific to adenine, with a luminescent enhancement. The binding properties of P1 with common nucleic bases and nucleosides reveal that this supramolecular polymer is very selective to adenine molecules (~20 to 420 times more selectivity than other nucleic bases). The formation constant (K) of P1 to adenine was found to be log K = 4.10 ± 0.02. This polymeric chemosensor produces a specific response to adenine down to 90 ppb. Spectrofluorimetric and (1)H-NMR titration studies showed that the P1 polymer allows each Zn(II) coordination centre to bind to two adenine molecules through hydrogen bonding with their imine and hydrazone protons.

  9. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  10. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linzhu; Beuerle, Till; Timbilla, James; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  11. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  12. Reduction Kinetics of a Flavin Oxidoreductase LuxG from Photobacterium leiognathi (TH1):Half Sites Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Ballou, David P.; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is a phenomenon resulting from the reaction of a two-component FMN-dependent aldehyde monooxygenase system, which comprises a bacterial luciferase and a flavin reductase. Bacterial luciferase (LuxAB) is one of the most extensively investigated two-component monooxygenases, while its reductase partner, the flavin reductase (LuxG) from the same operon, has only been recently expressed in a functional form. This work reports transient kinetics identification of intermediates in the LuxG reaction using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the overall reaction follows a sequential-ordered mechanism in which NADH binds first to the enzyme, followed by FMN, resulting in the formation of charge-transfer intermediate 1 (CT-1) typical of those between reduced pyridine nucleotides and oxidized flavins. The next step is the reduction of FMN as indicated by a large decrease in absorbance at 450 nm. The reduction of FMN is biphasic. The first phase of FMN reduction occurs concurrently with formation of charge-transfer intermediate 2 (CT-2), while the second phase is synchronous with the decay of CT-2. When the isotope-labeled substrate, 4(R) [2H]NADH, was used, the first reduction phase showed a primary kinetic isotope effect (Dkred) of ≥ 3.9 and resulted in greater accumulation of CT-1. These results are consistent with CT-1 being the FMNox:NADH complex, while CT-2 is the FMNred:NAD+ complex. Because CT-2 decays with a rate constant of 2.8 ± 0.2 s-1, while the turnover number obtained from the steady-steady state kinetics is 1.7 s-1, it is likely that the CT-2 decay step largely controls the overall reaction rate. All kinetic data are consistent with a half-sites reactivity model in which flavin reduction occurs at only at one subunit at a time. The first reduction phase is due to the reduction of FMN in first subunit, while the second phase is due to the reduction of FMN in the second subunit. The latter phase is limited by the

  13. Reduction kinetics of a flavin oxidoreductase LuxG from Photobacterium leiognathi (TH1): half-sites reactivity.

    PubMed

    Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-11-02

    Bacterial bioluminescence is a phenomenon resulting from the reaction of a two-component FMN-dependent aldehyde monooxygenase system, which comprises a bacterial luciferase and a flavin reductase. Bacterial luciferase (LuxAB) is one of the most extensively investigated two-component monooxygenases, while its reductase partner, the flavin reductase (LuxG) from the same operon, has only been recently expressed in a functional form. This work reports transient kinetics identification of intermediates in the LuxG reaction using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the overall reaction follows a sequential-ordered mechanism in which NADH binds first to the enzyme, followed by FMN, resulting in the formation of charge-transfer intermediate 1 (CT-1) typical of those between reduced pyridine nucleotides and oxidized flavins. The next step is the reduction of FMN as indicated by a large decrease in absorbance at 450 nm. The reduction of FMN is biphasic. The first phase of FMN reduction occurs concurrently with formation of charge-transfer intermediate 2 (CT-2), while the second phase is synchronous with the decay of CT-2. When the isotope-labeled substrate, 4(R)-[(2)H]NADH, was used, the first reduction phase showed a primary kinetic isotope effect ((D)k(red)) of ≥3.9 and resulted in greater accumulation of CT-1. These results are consistent with CT-1 being the FMN(ox):NADH complex, while CT-2 is the FMN(red):NAD(+) complex. Because CT-2 decays with a rate constant of 2.8 ± 0.2 s(-1), while the turnover number obtained from the steady-steady-state kinetics is 1.7 s(-1), it is likely that the CT-2 decay step largely controls the overall reaction rate. All kinetic data are consistent with a half-sites reactivity model in which flavin reduction occurs at only one subunit at a time. The first reduction phase is due to the reduction of FMN in the first subunit, while the second phase is due to the reduction of FMN in the second subunit. The latter phase

  14. Prediction of flavin mono-nucleotide binding sites using modified PSSM profile and ensemble support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Mi, Gang; Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Yongqing; Li, Juan; Guo, Yanzhi; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2012-11-01

    Flavin mono-nucleotide (FMN) closely evolves in many biological processes. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify FMN binding sites based on amino acid sequences of proteins only. A modified Position Specific Score Matrix was used to characterize the local environmental sequence information, and a visible improvement of performance was obtained. Also, the ensemble SVM was applied to solve the imbalanced data problem. Additionally, an independent dataset was built to evaluate the practical performance of the method, and a satisfactory accuracy of 87.87% was achieved. It demonstrates that the method is effective in predicting FMN-binding sites.

  15. Gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-07-01

    The transverse and longitudinal plasmon resonance in gold nanorods can be exploited to localize the photothermal therapy and influence the fluorescence to monitor the treatment outcome at the same time. While the longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect, the transverse peak can enhance fluorescence. After cells take in PEGylated nanorods through endocytosis, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the mitochondria is enhanced two times, which is a good indicator of the respiratory status of the cell. When cells are illuminated continuously with near infrared laser, the temperature reaches the hyperthermic region within the first four minutes, which demonstrates the efficiency of gold nanorods in photothermal therapy. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity show good correlation indicating the progress of cell death over time.

  16. N-Alkane oxidation enzymes of a pseudomonad.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, V R; Traxler, R W; Sobek, J M

    1977-01-01

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent n-alkane dehydrogenase and an NAD phosphate (reduced form)-dependent alkane hydroxylase have been purified from cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 196Aa grown anaerobically on n-alkane. The n-alkane dehydrogenase (fraction R-3), obtained as a single peak from Bio-Gel P-60, showed an overall 135-fold purification and was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography to convert n-decane to 1-decene. The alkene hydroxylase activity in the S-3 fraction, purified 167 times from diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, was shown by the same methodology to convert decene to decanol. Commercial ferredoxin has been shown to increase the alkane dehydrogenase activity. An NAD-, flavine adenine dinucleotide-, and iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase was demonstrated in the R-3 fraction. A mechanism for the anaerobic conversion of n-alkane to fatty acid has been proposed. PMID:869535

  17. Intracellular coenzymes as natural biomarkers for metabolic activities and mitochondrial anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, Ahmed A

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria play a pivotal role in energy metabolism, programmed cell death and oxidative stress. Mutated mitochondrial DNA in diseased cells compromises the structure of key enzyme complexes and, therefore, mitochondrial function, which leads to a myriad of health-related conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and aging. Early detection of mitochondrial and metabolic anomalies is an essential step towards effective diagnoses and therapeutic intervention. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) play important roles in a wide range of cellular oxidation–reduction reactions. Importantly, NADH and FAD are naturally fluorescent, which allows noninvasive imaging of metabolic activities of living cells and tissues. Furthermore, NADH and FAD autofluorescence, which can be excited using distinct wavelengths for complementary imaging methods and is sensitive to protein binding and local environment. This article highlights recent developments concerning intracellular NADH and FAD as potential biomarkers for metabolic and mitochondrial activities. PMID:20406068

  18. Progesterone reduces brain mitochondrial dysfunction after transient focal ischemia in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Gaignard, Pauline; Fréchou, Magalie; Schumacher, Michael; Thérond, Patrice; Mattern, Claudia; Slama, Abdelhamid; Guennoun, Rachida

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of intranasal administration of progesterone on the early brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and oxidative damage after transient middle cerebral occlusion in male and female mice. We showed that progesterone (8 mg/kg at 1 h post-middle cerebral occlusion) restored the mitochondrial reduced glutathione pool and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked respiration in both sexes. Progesterone also reversed the decrease of the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked respiration, which was only observed in females. Our findings point to a sex difference in stroke effects on the brain respiratory chain and suggest that the actions of progesterone on mitochondrial function may participate in its neuroprotective properties.

  19. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  20. Trp(359) regulates flavin thermodynamics and coenzyme selectivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Rajasekhar; Sabri, Muna; McLean, Kirsty J; Dunford, Adrian J; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David; Munro, Andrew W

    2008-05-01

    Mtb (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) FprA (flavoprotein reductase A) is an NAD(P)H-dependent FAD-binding reductase that is structurally related to mammalian adrenodoxin reductase, and which supports the catalytic function of Mtb cytochrome P450s. Trp(359), proximal to the FAD, was investigated in light of its potential role in controlling coenzyme interactions, as observed for similarly located aromatic residues in diflavin reductases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that a tryptophan residue corresponding to Trp(359) is conserved across FprA-type enzymes and in adrenodoxin reductases. W359A/H mutants of Mtb FprA were generated, expressed and the proteins characterized to define the role of Trp(359). W359A/H mutants exhibited perturbed UV-visible absorption/fluorescence properties. The FAD semiquinone formed in wild-type NADPH-reduced FprA was destabilized in the W359A/H mutants, which also had more positive FAD midpoint reduction potentials (-168/-181 mV respectively, versus the standard hydrogen electrode, compared with -230 mV for wild-type FprA). The W359A/H mutants had lower ferricyanide reductase k(cat) and NAD(P)H K(m) values, but this led to improvements in catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) with NADH as reducing coenzyme (9.6/18.8 muM(-1).min(-1) respectively, compared with 5.7 muM(-1).min(-1) for wild-type FprA). Stopped-flow spectroscopy revealed NAD(P)H-dependent FAD reduction as rate-limiting in steady-state catalysis, and to be retarded in mutants (e.g. limiting rate constants for NADH-dependent FAD reduction were 25.4 s(-1) for wild-type FprA and 4.8 s(-1)/13.4 s(-1) for W359A/H mutants). Diminished mutant FAD content (particularly in W359H FprA) highlighted the importance of Trp(359) for flavin stability. The results demonstrate that the conserved Trp(359) is critical in regulating FprA FAD binding, thermodynamic properties, catalytic efficiency and coenzyme selectivity.

  1. Oxidative Metabolism of Seleno-L-Methionine to L-Methionine Selenoxide by Flavin- Containing Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Renee J.; Glocke, Steven C.; Sicuri, Anna Rita; Ripp, Sharon L.; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2008-01-01

    The roles of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) in the oxidation of seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) to L-methionine selenoxide (MetSeO) were investigated using cDNA-expressed human FMOs, purified rat liver FMOs, and rat liver microsomes. MetSeO and the N-2,4-dinitrophenyl-derivatives of SeMet and MetSeO were synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR and ESI/MS. These reference compounds were then used to develop a sensitive HPLC assay to monitor SeMet oxidation to MetSeO. Formation of MetSeO in rat liver microsomes was time-, protein concentration-, SeMet concentration-, and NADPH-dependent. The microsomal activity exhibited a SeMet Km value (mean ±S.D.; n=4) of 0.91 ± 0.29 mM and a Vmax value of 44 ± 8.0 nmol MetSeO/mg protein/min. Inclusion of 1-benzylimidazole, superoxide dismutase or deferoxamine caused no inhibition of the rat liver microsomal activity. Because these results suggested the involvement of FMOs in the oxidation of SeMet in rat liver microsomes, formation of MetSeO was also examined using cDNA-expressed human and purified rat FMOs. The results showed that both rat and human FMO1 and FMO3 but not FMO5 can catalyze the reaction. The SeMet kinetic constants were obtained with purified rat liver FMO3 (Km = 0.11 mM, Vmax = 280 nmol/mg protein/min) and rat liver FMO1 (Km = 7.8 mM, Vmax = 1200 nmol/mg protein/min). Because SeMet has anti-cancer, chemopreventive, and toxic properties, the kinetic results suggest FMO3 is likely to play a role in the biological activities of SeMet at low exposure conditions. PMID:17173378

  2. Particular behavior of the adenine and guanine ring-breathing modes upon the DNA conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Taillandier, E

    1988-06-01

    Harmonic dynamics calculations performed on the deoxyguanosine (dG) and deoxyadenosine (dA) residues, based on a reliable force field, show that the breathing motions of both guanine and adenine residues are involved in two different vibration modes (750-500 cm-1 spectral region). The calculated results reveal a strong coupling of these modes with the sugar pucker motions. This effect has been verified for the dG residue by the Raman spectra of polyd(G-C). As far as the dA residue is concerned, the particular behavior of the adenine residue breathing mode predicted by these calculations, has been confirmed by Raman spectra of polyd(A-T) undergoing a B----Z conformational transition.

  3. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  4. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding.

  5. From formamide to adenine: a self-catalytic mechanism for an abiotic approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-11-14

    Mechanisms for abiotic reaction pathways from formamide (H2NCHO) to adenine are presented herein. Formamide is a simple C1 building block hypothesized to be a precursor to many protometabolic compounds. On the basis of a step-by-step mechanism of the reaction pathways, formamide is suggested to be more reactive in addition reactions than HCN. In addition to its simplicity, the formamide self-catalyzed mechanism is energetically (kinetically) more viable than either a water-catalyzed mechanism or noncatalyzed processes. Moreover, this self-catalyzed mechanism accounts for the yields of purine and adenine previously observed in experiments. This mechanism may elucidate processes that were vital for the emergence of life on the early earth.

  6. Critical appraisal of excited state nonadiabatic dynamics simulations of 9H-adenine.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Lan, Zhenggang; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Szymczak, Jaroslaw J; Lischka, Hans; Thiel, Walter

    2012-12-14

    In spite of the importance of nonadiabatic dynamics simulations for the understanding of ultrafast photo-induced phenomena, simulations based on different methodologies have often led to contradictory results. In this work, we proceed through a comprehensive investigation of on-the-fly surface-hopping simulations of 9H-adenine in the gas phase using different electronic structure theories (ab initio, semi-empirical, and density functional methods). Simulations that employ ab initio and semi-empirical multireference configuration interaction methods predict the experimentally observed ultrafast deactivation of 9H-adenine with similar time scales, however, through different internal conversion channels. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory with six different hybrid and range-corrected functionals fail to predict the ultrafast deactivation. The origin of these differences is analyzed by systematic calculations of the relevant reaction pathways, which show that these discrepancies can always be traced back to topographical features of the underlying potential energy surfaces.

  7. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  8. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Ding, Qing-Bao; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Yong-Li; Ou, Lin; Wang, Chang-Lu

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells of Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  9. Flavin-Dependent Redox Transfers by the Two-Component Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Camphor-Grown Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007

    PubMed Central

    Willetts, Andrew; Kelly, David

    2016-01-01

    The progressive titres of key monooxygenases and their requisite native donors of reducing power were used to assess the relative contribution of various camphor plasmid (CAM plasmid)- and chromosome-coded activities to biodegradation of (rac)-camphor at successive stages throughout growth of Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 on the bicylic monoterpenoid. A number of different flavin reductases (FRs) have the potential to supply reduced flavin mononucleotide to both 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase, the key isoenzymic two-component monooxygenases that delineate respectively the (+)- and (−)-camphor branches of the convergent degradation pathway. Two different constitutive chromosome-coded ferric reductases able to act as FRs can serve such as role throughout all stages of camphor-dependent growth, whereas Fred, a chromosome-coded inducible FR can only play a potentially significant role in the relatively late stages. Putidaredoxin reductase, an inducible CAM plasmid-coded flavoprotein that serves an established role as a redox intermediate for plasmid-coded cytochrome P450 monooxygenase also has the potential to serve as an important FR for both diketocamphane monooxygenases (DKCMOs) throughout most stages of camphor-dependent growth. PMID:27754389

  10. Determination of the distance between the two neutral flavin radicals in augmenter of liver regeneration by pulsed ELDOR.

    PubMed

    Kay, Christopher W M; Elsässer, Celine; Bittl, Robert; Farrell, Scott R; Thorpe, Colin

    2006-01-11

    Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) has been used to obtain structural information from a FAD-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase, Augmenter of Liver Regeneration (ALR). ALR is a homodimer with each subunit containing a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor. Both FADs may be converted into the blue neutral radical form by aerobic treatment with DTT. From three-pulse and four-pulse ELDOR experiments, a distance of 26.1 +/- 0.8 A could be determined between the FAD cofactors in human ALR. Taking into account the electron spin density distribution in a neutral flavin radical obtained from density functional theory calculations, a distance of 26.9 A could be estimated for the separation of the spin centers in the X-ray structure of rat ALR. The good agreement confirms that rat ALR may be used as a model for mechanistic discussions of human ALR. The experiments also demonstrate that neutral flavin radicals have the appropriate properties to be used as intrinsic spin labels for distance determinations in proteins.

  11. Is the flavin-deficient red blood cell common in Maremma, Italy, an important defense against malaria in this area?

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Scattoni, M; Perry, G M; Galvan, P; Giuberti, M; Buonocore, G; Vullo, C

    1994-11-01

    There is a high prevalence of a familial flavin-deficient red blood cell in Ferrara province in the Po delta in northern Italy, believed to have been selected for by malaria which was endemic from the 12th century. In the present study, activities of FAD-dependent red-cell glutathione reductase (EGR) in the Grosseto area of Maremma on the west coast of Italy where malaria was endemic from 300 B.C. are compared both with activities in the Ferrara area and with activities where there was no history of endemic malaria--in the Florence area and in London in people of Anglo-Saxon origin. EGR activities were similar in Grosseto and Ferrara and were significantly lower than in Florence and London. As previously found in Ferrara, low EGR activity in Grosseto was shown to be unrelated to low dietary riboflavin intake. These findings in Grosseto, suggesting selection by malaria, are particularly interesting because, unlike the situation in Ferrara and most other malarial areas, the prevalence of thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is very low, and they do not appear to have been selected for in Maremma. It is possible that a flavin-deficient red cell, known to inhibit growth of the malaria parasite, was an important protecting factor in the population of this area over the centuries.

  12. Adenine Nucleotides Control Proliferation In Vivo of Rat Retinal Progenitors by P2Y1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Pereira, Luana; Magalhães, Camila Feitosa; Repossi, Marinna Garcia; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza Prates; Sholl-Franco, Alfred; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne

    2016-08-24

    Previous studies demonstrated that exogenous ATP is able to regulate proliferation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro possibly via P2Y1 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we evaluated the function of adenine nucleotides in vivo during retinal development of newborn rats. Intravitreal injection of apyrase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleotides, reduced cell proliferation in retinas at postnatal day 2 (P2). This decrease was reversed when retinas were treated together with ATPγ-S or ADPβ-S, two hydrolysis-resistant analogs of ATP and ADP, respectively. During early postnatal days (P0 to P5), an increase in ectonucleotidase (E-NTPDase) activity was observed in the retina, suggesting a decrease in the availability of adenine nucleotides, coinciding with the end of proliferation. Interestingly, intravitreal injection of the E-NTPDase inhibitor ARL67156 increased proliferation by around 60 % at P5 rats. Furthermore, immunolabeling against P2Y1 receptor was observed overall in retina layers from P2 rats, including proliferating Ki-67-positive cells in the neuroblastic layer (NBL), suggesting that this receptor could be responsible for the action of adenine nucleotides upon proliferation of RPCs. Accordingly, intravitreal injection of MRS2179, a selective antagonist of P2Y1 receptors, reduced cell proliferation by approximately 20 % in P2 rats. Moreover, treatment with MRS 2179 caused an increase in p57(KIP2) and cyclin D1 expression, a reduction in cyclin E and Rb phosphorylated expression and in BrdU-positive cell number. These data suggest that the adenine nucleotides modulate the proliferation of rat RPCs via activation of P2Y1 receptors regulating transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle.

  13. Geometric consequences of electron delocalization for adenine tautomers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Makowski, Mariusz

    2014-06-01

    Geometric consequences of electron delocalization were studied for all possible adenine tautomers in aqueous solution by means of ab initio methods {PCM(water)//DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)} and compared to those in the gas phase {DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)}. To measure the consequences of any type of resonance conjugation (π-π, n-π, and σ-π), the geometry-based harmonic oscillator model of electron delocalization (HOMED) index, recently extended to the isolated (DFT) and hydrated (PCM//DFT) molecules, was applied to the molecular fragments (imidazole, pyrimidine, 4-aminopyrimidine, and purine) and also to the whole tautomeric system. For individual tautomers, the resonance conjugations and consequently the bond lengths strongly depend on the position of the labile protons. The HOMED indices are larger for tautomers (or their fragments) possessing the labile proton(s) at the N rather than C atom. Solvent interactions with adenine tautomers slightly increase the resonance conjugations. Consequently, they slightly shorten the single bonds and lengthen the double bonds. When going from the gas phase to water solution, the HOMED indices increase (by less than 0.15 units). There is a good relation between the HOMED indices estimated in water solution and those in the gas phase for the neutral and ionized forms of adenine. Subtle effects, being a consequence of intramolecular interactions between the neighboring groups, are so strongly reduced by solvent that the relation between the HOMED indices and the relative energies for the neutral adenine tautomers seems to be better in water solution than in the gas phase.

  14. Synthesis of metal-adeninate frameworks with high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Nan; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    By introducing isophthalic acid or 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid to assemble with adenine and cadmium salt, two isostructural and anionic porous metal-organic frameworks (1 and 2) possessing the novel (4,8)-connected sqc topology are presented here. 1 shows permanent porosity with Langmuir surface area of 770.1 m2/g and exhibits high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons.

  15. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  16. Dietary L-lysine prevents arterial calcification in adenine-induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-09-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC.

  17. Synthesis of rigid homo- and heteroditopic nucleobase-terminated molecules incorporating adenine and/or thymine.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Mikkel F; Andersen, Casper S; Knudsen, Martin M; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2007-07-19

    A series of homo- and heteroditopic thymine- and/or adenine-terminated molecules incorporating rigid aryl or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) linkers has been efficiently synthesized. The key steps involved in the synthesis are the construction of the N-arylated nucleobases using the Chan-Lam-Evans-modified Ullman coupling and their further elaboration using the Sonogashira coupling. Furthermore, the synthesis of a rigid tripodal thymine derivative is reported.

  18. Dietary l-Lysine Prevents Arterial Calcification in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC. PMID:24652795

  19. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine.

  20. Adenine nucleotides stimulate migration in wounded cultures of kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, S; Toback, F G

    1992-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides speed structural and functional recovery when administered after experimental renal injury in the rat and stimulate proliferation of kidney epithelial cells. As cell migration is a component of renal regeneration after acute tubular necrosis, we have used an in vitro model of wound healing to study this process. High density, quiescent monkey kidney epithelial cultures were wounded by mechanically scraping away defined regions of the monolayer to simulate the effect of cell loss after tubular necrosis and the number of cells that migrated into the denuded area was counted. Migration was independent of cell proliferation. Provision of adenosine, adenine nucleotides, or cyclic AMP increased the number of migrating cells and accelerated repair of the wound. Other purine and pyrimidine nucleotides were not effective. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine peptide, which blocks the binding of extracellular fibronectin to its cell surface receptor, completely inhibited migration in the presence or absence of ADP. Very low concentrations of epidermal growth factor (K0.5 approximately 0.3 ng/ml) stimulated migration, whereas transforming growth factor-beta 2 was inhibitory (Ki approximately 0.2 ng/ml). Thus, adenosine and/or adenine nucleotides released from injured or dying renal cells, or administered exogenously, may stimulate surviving cells in the wounded nephron to migrate along the basement membrane, thereby rapidly restoring tubular structure and function. Images PMID:1634617

  1. Mechanism of charge separation in DNA by hole transfer through consecutive adenines.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Osakada, Yasuko; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of charge separation in DNA with consecutive adenines adjacent to a photosensitizer (Sens), a series of naphthalimide (NI) and 5-bromouracil ((br)U)-modified DNAs were prepared, and the quantum yields of formation of the charge-separated states (Phi) upon photo-excitation of the Sens NI in DNA were measured. The Phi was modulated by the incorporation site of (br)U, which changes the oxidation potential of its complementary A through hydrogen bonding and the hole-transfer rates between adenines. The results were interpreted as charge separation by means of the initial charge transfer between NI in the singlet excited state and the second- and third-nearest adenine to the NI. In addition, the oxidation of the A nearest to NI leads to the rapid charge recombination within a contact ion pair. This suggests that the charge-separation process can be refined to maximize the Phi by putting a redox-inactive spacer base pair between a photosensitizer and an A-T stretch.

  2. Identification of a Campylobacter coli methyltransferase targeting adenines at GATC sites.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Vikrant; Altermann, Eric; Crespo, Maria D; Olson, Jonathan W; Siletzky, Robin M; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-12-02

    Campylobacter coli can infect humans and colonize multiple other animals but its host-associated genes or adaptations are poorly understood. Adenine methylation at GATC sites, resulting in MboI resistance of genomic DNA, was earlier frequently detected among C. coli from swine but not among turkey-derived isolates. The underlying genetic basis has remained unknown. Comparative genome sequence analyses of C. coli 6461, a swine-derived strain with MboI-resistant DNA, revealed two chromosomal ORFs, 0059 and 0060, encoding a putative DNA methyltransferase and a conserved hypothetical protein, respectively, which were lacking from the genome of the turkey-derived C. coli strain 11601, which had MboI-susceptible DNA. To determine whether the ORF0059 mediated MboI resistance and hence encoded a putative N6-adenine DNA methyltransferase, the gene was cloned immediately upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance cassette (cat) and a PCR fragment harboring ORF0059-cat was transformed into C. coli 11601. The transformants had MboI-resistant DNA, suggesting a direct role of this gene in methylation of adenines at GATC sites. In-silico analyses suggested that the ORF0059-ORF0060 cassette was more frequent among C. coli from swine than certain other sources (e.g. cattle, humans). Potential impacts of ORF0059-mediated methylation on C. coli host preference and other adaptations remain to be elucidated.

  3. Absorption by DNA single strands of adenine isolated in vacuo: The role of multiple chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-02-01

    The degree of electronic coupling between DNA bases is a topic being up for much debate. Here we report on the intrinsic electronic properties of isolated DNA strands in vacuo free of solvent, which is a good starting point for high-level excited states calculations. Action spectra of DNA single strands of adenine reveal sign of exciton coupling between stacked bases from blueshifted absorption bands (˜3 nm) relative to that of the dAMP mononucleotide (one adenine base). The bands are blueshifted by about 10 nm compared to those of solvated strands, which is a shift similar to that for the adenine molecule and the dAMP mononucleotide. Desolvation has little effect on the bandwidth, which implies that inhomogenous broadening of the absorption bands in aqueous solution is of minor importance compared to, e.g., conformational disorder. Finally, at high photon energies, internal conversion competes with electron detachment since dissociation of the bare photoexcited ions on the microsecond time scale is measured.

  4. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  5. Geometrical Characterization of Adenine And Guanine on Cu(110) By NEXAFS, XPS, And DFT Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Katano, S.; Kawai, M.; Ogasawara, H.; Nilsson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stockholm U.

    2009-04-30

    Adsorption of purine DNA bases (guanine and adenine) on Cu(1 1 0) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and density-functional theory (DFT) calculation. At coverages near 0.2 monolayers, Angular-resolved NEXAFS analysis revealed that adenine adsorbates lie almost flat and that guanine adsorbates are tilted up on the surface with the purine ring parallel to the atom rows of Cu(1 1 0). Referring to the previous studies on pyrimidine DNA bases [M. Furukawa, H. Fujisawa, S. Katano, H. Ogasawara, Y. Kim, T. Komeda, A. Nilsson, M. Kawai, Surf. Sci. 532-535 (2003) 261], the isomerization of DNA bases on Cu(1 1 0) was found to play an important role in the adsorption geometry. Guanine, thymine and cytosine adsorption have an amine-type nitrogen next to a carbonyl group, which is dehydrogenated into imine nitrogen on Cu(1 1 0). These bases are bonded by the inherent portion of - NH-CO - altered by conversion into enolic form and dehydrogenation. Adenine contains no CO group and is bonded to Cu(1 1 0) by participation of the inherent amine parts, resulting in nearly flatly-lying position.

  6. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-08

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  7. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  8. White spot syndrome virus VP12 interacts with adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang-fang; Chou, Zhi-guang; Liu, Qing-hui; Guan, Guangkuo; Li, Chen; Huang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus VP12 contains cell attachment motif RGD which is considered to be critical for host cell binding. Until now, the function of this protein remains undefined. In this study, we explored the interaction of VP12 with host cells. A new shrimp protein (adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei, LvANT) is selected by far-western overlay assay. Tissue distribution of adenine nucleotide translocase mRNA showed that it was commonly spread in all the tissues detected. Cellular localization of LvANT in shrimp hemocytes showed that it was primarily located in the cytoplasm of hemocytes and colocalized with mitochondria. ELISA and far-western blot assay confirmed that VP12 interacted with LvANT. In vivo neutralization assay showed that anti-LvANT antibody can significantly reduce the mortality of shrimp challenged by WSSV at 48h post-treatment. Our results collectively showed that VP12 is involved in host cell binding via interaction with adenine nucleotide translocase.

  9. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  10. Adenine deaminase is encoded by Tad1 and participates in copper accumulation in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kehe; Fan, Lili; Yu, Chuangjing; Li, Yingying; Gao, Shigang; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-02-01

    We cloned a novel Tad1 gene and demonstrated that this gene is closely involved in copper bioaccumulation in Trichoderma reesei. Tad1 gene encodes a 510 amino acids protein of the amidohydrolase superfamily which belongs to COG0402. We found that adenine was the most efficient substrate of Tad1 protein among the substrates used in this study. Gene function was also investigated by overexpression and RNA interference. Results showed that copper accumulation increased in mutant cells when Tad1 was overexpressed; by contrast, copper accumulation significantly decreased when Tad1 was inhibited. To investigate the function of Tad1 in copper bioaccumulation, we determined adenine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine concentrations by reversed phase HPLC. Tad1 overexpression induced a substantial production of xanthine, which functions in binding numerous copper ions and reducing copper concentration. We further compared the gene expression profile of AT01 with that of a wild-type T. reesei strain grown in a medium containing 1.0mM Cu(2+) by performing DNA microarray. Several upregulated genes in the mutant were associated with adenine or copper metabolism.

  11. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    DOE PAGES

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; ...

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu7(μ2-OH2)6(μ3-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu2(μ2-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-clustermore » interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.« less

  12. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology.

    PubMed

    Anumukonda, Lakshmi N; Young, Avery; Lynn, David G; Buckley, Ragan; Warrayat, Amena; Graves, Christina L; Bean, Heather D; Hud, Nicholas V

    2011-12-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life's chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum.

  13. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life’s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum. PMID:22075932

  14. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; Gai, Z.; Cruz, C.; Reis, M. S.; Santos, T. M.; Félix, V.

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu72-OH2)63-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu22-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-cluster interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.

  15. Photoinduced formation of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine derivatives at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozinova, T. A.; Lobanov, A. V.; Lander, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The amount of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine (A), adenosine (Ado), cytidine (Cyt), and thymine (T) containing 0.1 M NaCl and irradiated with near-UV light at 77 K is determined. It is established by comparing the results to data obtained earlier that the amount of H2O2 detected in the defrosted samples following identical irradiation falls in the order Ado > adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) > A >> Cyt. The formation of H2O2 was not detected for T. The formation of H2O2 in solutions of adenine derivatives was observed when the samples were irradiated with light having wavelengths in the ranges λ = 240-400 nm and 290-450 nm. The latter covers only the long wave absorption range of these compounds. It is shown that the change in the intensity of irradiation that strongly affected the intensity of EPR signals of irradiated samples prior to defrosting affected the amount of detected H2O2 only slightly, and the effect was not unidirectional. The results from determining H2O2 in the samples of adenine derivatives are compared to estimates of the content of free peroxyl radicals, obtained by analyzing EPR spectra. Plausible mechanisms of the processes are discussed.

  16. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  17. Design and synthesis of novel adenine fluorescence probe based on Eu(III) complexes with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengyun; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Dou, Xuekai; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2017-02-24

    A novel adenine (Ad) fluorescence probe (Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine)) was designed and synthesized by improving experimental method based on the Eu(III) complex and dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. The dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand was first synthesized by the acylation action between dtpaa and guanine (Gu), and the corresponding Eu(III) complex was successfully prepared through heat-refluxing method with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. As a novel fluorescence probe, the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) complex can detect adenine (Ad) with characteristics of strong targeting, high specificity and high recognition ability. The detection mechanism of the adenine (Ad) using this probe in buffer solution was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy. When the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) was introduced to the adenine (Ad) solution, the fluorescence emission intensity was significantly enhanced. However, adding other bases such as guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) with similar composition and structure to that of adenine (Ad) to the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) solution, the fluorescence emission intensities are nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the interference of guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) on the detection of the adenine using Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) probe was also studied. It was found that presence of these bases does not affect the detection of adenine (Ad). A linear response of fluorescence emission intensities of Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) at 570nm as a function of adenine (Ad) concentration in the range of 0.00-5.00×10(-5)molL(-1) was observed. The detection limit is about 4.70×10(-7)molL(-1).

  18. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João P T; Nabeshima, Henrique S; da Costa, Marcello F; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2014-05-21

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr(2+) promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4=C5 and C6=O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310cm(-1) was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  19. Effect of gum arabic on oxidative stress and inflammation in adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Husseni, Isehaq; Beegam, Sumyia; Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schierling, Simone; Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease in humans, and in chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats. The aim of this work was to study the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in adenine-induced CRF and the effect thereon of the purported nephroprotective agent gum arabic (GA). Rats were divided into four groups and treated for 4 weeks as follows: control, adenine in feed (0.75%, w/w), GA in drinking water (15%, w/v) and adenine+GA, as before. Urine, blood and kidneys were collected from the rats at the end of the treatment for analysis of conventional renal function tests (plasma creatinine and urea concentration). In addition, the concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the oxidative stress markers glutathione and superoxide dismutase, renal apoptosis, superoxide formation and DNA double strand break frequency, detected by immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX, were measured. Adenine significantly increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine in plasma, significantly decreased the creatinine clearance and induced significant increases in the concentration of the measured inflammatory mediators. Further, it caused oxidative stress and DNA damage. Treatment with GA significantly ameliorated these actions. The mechanism of the reported salutary effect of GA in adenine-induced CRF is associated with mitigation of the adenine-induced inflammation and generation of free radicals.

  20. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João P. T.; Nabeshima, Henrique S.; da Costa, Marcello F.; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr2+ promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+ of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4dbnd C5 and C6dbnd O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310 cm-1 was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.