Science.gov

Sample records for adenine dinucleotide nad

  1. EPR and potentiometric studies of copper(II) binding to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) in water solution.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Stanisław K; Goslar, Janina; Lijewski, Stefan; Basiński, Kamil; Gąsowska, Anna; Łomozik, Lechosław

    2012-06-01

    Coordination of Cu(II) by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) molecule has been studied in water solutions of various pH by potentiometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy. Potentiometric results indicate Cu(II) coordination by protonated NAD(+) at low pH and by deprotonated NAD(+) at high pH. At medium pH value (around pH=7) NAD(+) is not able to coordinate Cu(II) ions effectively and mainly the Cu(H(2)O)(6) complexes exist in the studied solution. This has been confirmed by EPR results. Electronic structure of Cu(II)-NAD complex and coordination sites is determined from EPR and ESE measurements in frozen solutions (at 77K and 6K). EPR spectra exclude coordination with nitrogen atoms. Detailed analysis of EPR parameters (g(||)=2.420, g(perpendicular)==2.080, A(||)=-131×10(-4)cm(-1) and A(perpendicular)=8×10(-4)cm(-1)) performed in terms of molecular orbital (MO) theory shows that Cu(II)NAD complex has elongated axial octahedral symmetry with a relatively strong delocalization of unpaired electron density on in-plane and axial ligands. The distortion of octahedron is analyzed using A(||) vs. g(||) diagram for various CuO(x) complexes. Electron spin echo decay modulation excludes the coordination by oxygen atoms of phosphate groups. We postulate a coordination of Cu(II) by two hydroxyl oxygen atoms of two ribose moieties of the NAD molecules and four solvated water molecules both at low and high pH values with larger elongation of the octahedron at higher pH.

  2. Novel concept of enzyme selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-modified inhibitors based on enzyme taxonomy from the diphosphate conformation of NAD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuyuki; Iida, Shui; Kato, Keisuke; Ono, Machiko

    2015-11-15

    The dihedral angle θ of the diphosphate part of NAD(P) were investigated to distinguish the differences in the binding-conformation of NAD(P) to enzymes and to create an enzyme taxonomy. Furthermore, new inhibitors with fixed dihedral angles showed that enzymes could recognize the differences in the dihedral angle θ. We suggest the taxonomy and the dihedral angle θ are important values for chemists to consider when designing inhibitors and drugs that target enzymes.

  3. Mutants of Neurospora deficient in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R E; Selitrennikoff, C P; Siegel, R W

    1975-01-01

    A new screening technique has been developed for the rapid identification of Neurospora crassa mutants that are deficient in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase (NADase) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate glycohydrolase (NADPase) activities. Using this procedure, five single-gene mutants were isolated whose singular difference from wild type appeared to be the absence of NAD(P)ase (EC 3.2.2.6). All five mutants were found to be genetically allelic and did not complement in heterocaryons. This gene, nada [NAD(P)ase], was localized in linkage group IV. One of the nada alleles was found to specify an enzyme that was critically temperature sensitive and had altered substrate affinity. Mutations at the nada locus did not affect the genetic program for the expression of NAD(P)ase during cell differentiation, nor did they have a general effect on NAD catabolism. Nada mutations did not have simultaneous effects on other glycohydrolase activities. Tests of dominance (in heterocaryons) and in vitro mixing experiments did not provide evidence that nada mutations alter activators or inhibitors of NAD(P)ase. Thus, the nada gene appears to specify only the structure of N. crassa NAD(P)ase. Images PMID:165174

  4. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-independent lactate dehydrogenases in homofermentative and heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doelle, H W

    1971-12-01

    Three homofermentative (Lactobacillus plantarum B38, L. plantarum B33, Pediococcus pentosaceus B30) and three heterofermentative (Leuconostoc mesenteroides 39, L. oenos B70, Lactobacillus brevis) lactic acid bacteria were examined for the presence or absence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent and NAD-independent d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases. Two of the six strains investigated, P. pentosaceus and L. oenos, did not exhibit an NAD-independent enzyme activity capable of reducing dichlorophenol indophenol. The pH optima of the lactic dehydrogenases were determined. The NAD-dependent enzymes from homofermentative strains exhibited optima at pH 7.8 to 8.8, whereas values from 9.0 to 10.0 were noted for these enzymes from heterofermentative organisms. The optima for the NAD-independent enzymes were between 5.8 and 6.6. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants determined for both NAD and the substrates demonstrated the existence of a greater affinity for d- than l-lactic acid. A comparison of the specific NAD-dependent and NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenase activities revealed a direct correlation of the d/l ratios of these activities with the type of lactic acid produced during the growth of the organism.

  5. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of azido-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Samrat; Rock, William; Cook, Richard J.; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2011-08-01

    Mid-IR active analogs of enzyme cofactors have the potential to be important spectroscopic reporters of enzyme active site dynamics. Azido-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which has been recently synthesized in our laboratory, is a mid-IR active analog of NAD+, a ubiquitous redox cofactor in biology. In this study, we measure the frequency-frequency time correlation function for the antisymmetric stretching vibration of the azido group of azido-NAD+ in water. Our results are consistent with previous studies of pseudohalides in water. We conclude that azido-NAD+ is sensitive to local environmental fluctuations, which, in water, are dominated by hydrogen-bond dynamics of the water molecules around the probe. Our results demonstrate the potential of azido-NAD+ as a vibrational probe and illustrate the potential of substituted NAD+-analogs as reporters of local structural dynamics that could be used for studies of protein dynamics in NAD-dependent enzymes.

  6. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Based Therapeutics, Update.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, K W; Petrelli, R; Singh, R; Felczak, K

    2015-01-01

    About 500 NAD (P)-dependent enzymes in the cell use NAD (P) as a cofactor or a substrate. This family of broadly diversified enzymes is crucial for maintaining homeostasis of all living organisms. The NAD binding domain of these enzymes is conserved and it was believed that NAD mimics would not be of therapeutic value due to lack of selectivity. Consequently, only mycophenolic acid which selectively binds at the cofactor pocket of NAD-dependent IMP-dehydrogenase (IMPDH) has been approved as an immunosuppressant. Recently, it became clear that the NAD (P)-binding domain was structurally much more diversified than anticipated and numerous highly potent and selective inhibitors of NAD (P) dependent enzymes have been reported. It is likely, that as in the case of protein kinases inhibitors, inhibitors of NAD (P)-dependent enzymes would find soon their way to the clinic. In this review, recent developments of selective inhibitors of NAD-dependent human IMPDH, as well as inhibitors of IMPDHs from parasites, and from bacterial sources are reported. Therapies against Cryptosporidium parvum and the development of new antibiotics that are on the horizon will be discussed. New inhibitors of bacterial NAD-ligases, NAD-kinases, NMN-adenylyl transferases, as well as phosphoribosyl transferases are also described. Although none of these compounds has yet to be approved, the progress in revealing and understanding crucial factors that might allow for designing more potent and efficient drug candidates is enormous and highly encouraging. PMID:26295463

  7. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: An essential factor in preserving hearing in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Pandit, Arpana; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Song, Jeho; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-08-01

    Ototoxicity is an important issue in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses, are closely associated with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Although much attention has been directed at identifying ways to protect the inner ear from cisplatin-induced damage, the precise underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has emerged as an important regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. NAD(+) acts as a cofactor for various enzymes including sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), and therefore, maintaining adequate NAD(+) levels has therapeutic benefits because of its effect on NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. Recent studies demonstrated that disturbance in intracellular NAD(+) levels is critically involved in cisplatin-induced cochlear damage associated with oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the importance of NAD(+) in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and discuss potential strategies for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity with a particular focus on NAD(+)-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:25891352

  8. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Barry, S; O'Carra, P

    1973-12-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD(+) through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD(+) (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm-agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD(+) derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD(+). Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD(+)-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  9. Studies of yeast cell oxygenation and energetics by laser fluorometry of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fu-shih; Chen, Stephen; Mintzer, Robert A.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Schumacker, Paul

    1991-03-01

    It is of fundamental importance for biological scientists to assess cellular energetics. Under aerobic conditions, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is coupled with the mitochondrial electron cascade pathway to provide the cell with energy. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-conjugated pair (NAD and NADH) is the coenzyme in numerous important biomedical reactions which include several important dehydrogenase reactions in the TCA cycle. Based on Le Chatelier's principle, NADH will accumulate when this energy production mechanism is impaired. The relative amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell are defined as the redox state of the cell (Williamson et.al. 1967) which provides a valuable index of cellular energetics. The sum of the amounts of NAD and NADH in a cell may be assumed to be constant during a finite time; therefore, a reliable means of measuring the NADH concentration would provide us with a useful indicator of tissue viability. Traditionally, the quantities of NADH and NAD may be measured by chemical assay methods. We can avoid these tediois analyses by exploiting the significant difference between the ultraviolet absorption spectra of this redox pair. However, because of the opacity of biological samples and the interference of other biochemicals that also absorb ultraviolet radiation, measurement of NADH and NAD+ concentrations in vivo by absorption spectroscopy is not feasible.

  10. Reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by pyruvate:lipoate oxidoreductase in anaerobic, dark-grown Rhodospirillum rubrum mutant C.

    PubMed Central

    Gorrell, T E; Uffen, R L

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts from fermentatively grown Rhodospirillum rubrum reduced about 80 nmol of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) per mg of protein per min under anaerobic conditions with sodium pyruvate. The reaction was specific for pyruvate and NAD; NAD phosphate was not reduced. Results indicated that pyruvate-linked NAD reduction occurred via pyruvate:lipoate oxidoreductase. The reaction required catalytic amounts of both coenzyme A and thiamine pyrophosphate. Addition of sodium arsenite inhibited enzyme activity by 90%. Pyruvate:lipoate oxidoreductase was the only system detected in anaerobic, dark-grown R. rubrum cell extracts which operated to produce reduced NAD. The low activity of the enzyme system suggested that it was not quantitatively important in ATP formation. PMID:207677

  11. Molecular beacon based bioassay for highly sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and the activity of alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiwen; Liu, Pei; Ma, Changbei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Lv, Xiaoyuan

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a new approach to detect nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) with high specificity and sensitivity using molecular beacons (MBs) and employed it in the investigation of NAD(+) related biological processes, such as calorie restriction and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activation. The E. coli DNA ligase would catalyze the ligation of two short oligonucleotides that complement with an MB only in the presence of NAD(+), resulting in the opening of the MB and the restoration of fluorescent signal. Thanks to the high sensitivity of the MB probe and the fidelity of E. coli DNA ligase toward its substrates, this approach can detect 0.3 nM NAD(+) with high selectivity against other NAD(+) analogs. This novel assay can also provide a convenient and robust way to analyze NAD(+) in biological samples such as cell lysate. As NAD(+) plays an essential role in many biochemical processes, this method can be used to investigate NAD(+) related life processes. For instance, the effect of calorie restriction on the intracellular NAD(+) level in MCF7 cells has been studied using this new assay. Moreover, this approach was also successfully used to analyze the activity of ALT. Therefore, this novel NAD(+) assay holds wide applicability as an analytical tool in biochemical and biomedical research.

  12. NAD

    PubMed Central

    Pétriacq, Pierre; de Bont, Linda; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Gakière, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Many metabolic processes that occur in living cells involve oxido-reduction (redox) chemistry underpinned by redox compounds such as glutathione, ascorbate and/or pyridine nucleotides. Among these redox carriers, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is the cornerstone of cellular oxidations along catabolism and is therefore essential for plant growth and development. In addition to its redox role, there is now compelling evidence that NAD is a signal molecule controlling crucial functions like primary and secondary carbon metabolism. Recent studies using integrative -omics approaches combined with molecular pathology have shown that manipulating NAD biosynthesis and recycling lead to an alteration of metabolites pools and developmental processes, and changes in the resistance to various pathogens. NAD levels should now be viewed as a potential target to improve tolerance to biotic stress and crop improvement. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the key role of NAD (and its metabolism) in plant responses to pathogen infections. PMID:23104110

  13. ß-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide is an enteric inhibitory neurotransmitter in human and non-human primate colons

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Jin; Durnin, Leonie; Dwyer, Laura; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M.; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims An important component of enteric inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated by a purine neurotransmitter, such as adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP), binding to P2Y1 receptors and activating small conductance K+ channels. In murine colon ß-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (ß-NAD) is released with ATP and mimics the pharmacology of inhibitory neurotransmission better than ATP. Here ß-NAD and ATP were compared as possible inhibitory neurotransmitters in human and monkey colons. Methods A small-volume superfusion assay and HPLC with fluorescence detection were used to evaluate spontaneous and nerve-evoked overflow of ß-NAD, ATP and metabolites. Postjunctional responses to nerve stimulation, ß-NAD and ATP were compared using intracellular membrane potential and force measurements. Effects of ß-NAD on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were recorded by patch clamp. P2Y receptor transcripts and proteins were assayed by RT-PCR. Results In contrast to ATP, overflow of ß-NAD evoked by electrical field stimulation correlated with stimulation frequency and was diminished by neurotoxins, tetrodotoxin and ω-conotoxin GVIA. Inhibitory junction potentials and responses to exogenous ß-NAD, but not ATP, were blocked by P2Y receptor antagonists suramin, PPADS, MRS2179 and MRS2500. ß-NAD activated non-selective cation currents in SMCs, but failed to activate outward currents. Conclusions ß-NAD meets the criteria for a neurotransmitter better than ATP in human and monkey colons and therefore may contribute to neural regulation of colonic motility. SMCs are unlikely targets for inhibitory purine neurotransmitters because dominant responses of SMCs were activation of net inward, rather than outward, current. PMID:20875415

  14. Electrochemical detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on molecular beacon-like DNA and E. coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxiao; Ni, Xiaoqi; Wang, Yonghong; Wang, Kemin; Jian, Lixin

    2011-01-15

    An electrochemical method for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) detection with high sensitivity and selectivity has been developed by using molecular beacon (MB)-like DNA and Escherichia coli DNA ligase. In this method, MB-like DNA labeled with 5'-SH and 3'-biotin was self-assembled onto a gold electrode in its duplex form by means of facile gold-thiol chemistry, which resulted in blockage of electronic transmission. It was eT OFF state. In the presence of NAD(+), E. coli DNA ligase was activated, and the two nucleotide fragments which were complementary to the loop of the MB-like DNA could be ligated by the NAD(+)-dependent E. coli DNA ligase. Hybridization of the ligated DNA with the MB-like DNA induced a large conformational change in this surface-confined DNA structure, which in turn pushed the biotin away from the electrode surface and made the electrons exchange freely with the electrode. Then the generated electrochemical signals can be measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimized conditions, a linear response to logarithmic concentration of NAD(+) range from 3 nM to 5 μM and a detection limit of 1.8 nM were obtained. Furthermore, the proposed strategy had sufficient selectivity to discriminate NAD(+) from its analogues.

  15. Photoaffinity Labeling of High Affinity Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP)-Binding Proteins in Sea Urchin Egg*♦

    PubMed Central

    Walseth, Timothy F.; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Jain, Pooja; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Marchant, Jonathan S.; Slama, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a messenger that regulates calcium release from intracellular acidic stores. Recent studies have identified two-pore channels (TPCs) as endolysosomal channels that are regulated by NAADP; however, the nature of the NAADP receptor binding site is unknown. To further study NAADP binding sites, we have synthesized and characterized [32P-5-azido]nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate ([32P-5N3]NAADP) as a photoaffinity probe. Photolysis of sea urchin egg homogenates preincubated with [32P-5N3]NAADP resulted in specific labeling of 45-, 40-, and 30-kDa proteins, which was prevented by inclusion of nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled NAADP or 5N3-NAADP, but not by micromolar concentrations of structurally related nucleotides such as NAD, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, nicotinic acid, or nicotinamide. [32P-5N3]NAADP binding was saturable and displayed high affinity (Kd ∼10 nm) in both binding and photolabeling experiments. [32P-5N3]NAADP photolabeling was irreversible in a high K+ buffer, a hallmark feature of NAADP binding in the egg system. The proteins photolabeled by [32P-5N3]NAADP have molecular masses smaller than the sea urchin TPCs, and antibodies to TPCs do not detect any immunoreactivity that comigrates with either the 45-kDa or the 40-kDa photolabeled proteins. Interestingly, antibodies to TPC1 and TPC3 were able to immunoprecipitate a small fraction of the 45- and 40-kDa photolabeled proteins, suggesting that these proteins associate with TPCs. These data suggest that high affinity NAADP binding sites are distinct from TPCs. PMID:22117077

  16. Oxidation of Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate by Isolated Corn Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Koeppe, D. E.; Miller, Raymond J.

    1972-01-01

    Isolated corn (Zea mays L.) mitochondria were found to oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in a KCl reaction medium. This oxidation was dependent on the presence of calcium or phosphate or both. Strontium and manganese substituted for calcium, but magnesium or barium did not. The oxidation of NADPH produced contraction of mitochondria swollen in KCl. Further evidence that the oxidation of NADPH was coupled was observed in respiratory control and adenosine diphosphate-oxygen ratios that were comparable to those reported for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The pathways of electron flow from NADH and NADPH were compared through the addition of electron transport inhibitors. The only difference between the two dinucleotides was that amytal was found to inhibit almost totally the state 3 oxidation of NADPH, but had little effect on the state 3 oxidation of NADH. The hypothetical pathways for electron flow from NADPH are discussed, as are the possible sites of calcium and phosphate stimulation. PMID:16657960

  17. Binding of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotides to diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, L.; Sperti, Simonetta

    1967-01-01

    1. Changes in protein fluorescence have been utilized in determining the stoicheiometry and dissociation constants of the complexes of diphtheria toxin with NADH2, NAD, NADPH2 and NADP. 2. The binding stoicheiometry is 2moles of NADH2 and 1mole of NADPH2/mole of diphtheria toxin. The binding sites for NADH2 appear to be equivalent and independent. 3. The toxin shows a higher affinity for the reduced than for the oxidized forms of the nucleotides. 4. Dissociation constants at 0·01I, pH7 and 25° are 0·7×10−6m for NADH2 and 0·45×10−6m for NADPH2. Dissociation constants increase with increasing ionic strength, indicating that the binding is mainly electrostatic. 5. Bound NADH2 and NADPH2 may be activated to fluoresce by the transfer of energy from the excited aromatic amino acids of the toxin. Activation and emission spectra of bound and free nucleotides are compared. 6. Since NAD and NADH2 are cofactors specifically required for the inhibition of protein synthesis by diphtheria toxin, the possible role of toxin–nucleotide complexes is discussed in this regard. PMID:4384596

  18. Is Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate an Obligatory Intermediate in Photosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Amotz, Ami; Avron, Mordhay

    1972-01-01

    The site of action of the inhibitors disalicylidenepropanediamine and pyrophosphate was more closely defined as acting on ferredoxin. Three inhibitors which act on the electron transport path between ferredoxin and NADP: disalicylidenepropanediamine, pyrophosphate, and phosphoadenosinediphosphate ribose, had no effect on photosynthesis in cell free preparations of Dunaliela parva at concentrations which completely inhibited the enzymic activity on which each inhibitor acts. The addition of disalicylidenepropanediamine to dark-grown Euglena gracilis cells prevented the light-induced formation of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not of photosynthesis, chlorophyll synthesis, or NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The above results are interpreted as indicating that, at least under some conditions, a reduced product of photosystem I preceding ferredoxin in the electron transport path can serve as the reductant of CO2 in photosynthesis. PMID:16657933

  19. Regulation of Enzymes Involved in the Conversion of Tryptophan to Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide in a Colorless Strain of Xanthomonas pruni1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Albert T.; Wagner, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A colorless strain of Xanthomonas pruni was isolated which is capable of converting tryptophan to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The enzymes responsible for the conversion of tryptophan to quinolinic acid were shown to be present. Nicotinic acid-requiring mutants were isolated, and it was found that the growth of these mutants can be supported by various intermediates on the pathway from tryptophan to NAD. The first three enzymes on this pathway are induced coordinately by l-tryptophan. Gratuitous inducers of these enzymes include d-tryptophan, α-methyl-dl-tryptophan, and 4-methyl-dl-tryptophan; formyl-l-kynurenine and l-kynurenine were not effective as inducers. These data suggest that at least the first three enzymes in the pathway from tryptophan to NAD are under common regulatory control. PMID:4313053

  20. Eliciting the mitochondrial unfolded protein response by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide repletion reverses fatty liver disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gariani, Karim; Menzies, Keir J.; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wegner, Casey J.; Wang, Xu; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Moullan, Norman; Zhang, Hongbo; Perino, Alessia; Lemos, Vera; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young‐Ki; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pham, Tho X.; Yang, Yue; Ku, Chai Siah; Koo, Sung I.; Fomitchova, Anna; Cantó, Carlos; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    With no approved pharmacological treatment, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries and its worldwide prevalence continues to increase along with the growing obesity epidemic. Here, we show that a high‐fat high‐sucrose (HFHS) diet, eliciting chronic hepatosteatosis resembling human fatty liver, lowers hepatic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels driving reductions in hepatic mitochondrial content, function, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, in conjunction with robust increases in hepatic weight, lipid content, and peroxidation in C57BL/6J mice. To assess the effect of NAD+ repletion on the development of steatosis in mice, nicotinamide riboside, a precursor of NAD+ biosynthesis, was added to the HFHS diet, either as a preventive strategy or as a therapeutic intervention. We demonstrate that NR prevents and reverts NAFLD by inducing a sirtuin (SIRT)1‐ and SIRT3‐dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response, triggering an adaptive mitohormetic pathway to increase hepatic β‐oxidation and mitochondrial complex content and activity. The cell‐autonomous beneficial component of NR treatment was revealed in liver‐specific Sirt1 knockout mice (Sirt1hep−/−), whereas apolipoprotein E‐deficient mice (Apoe −/−) challenged with a high‐fat high‐cholesterol diet affirmed the use of NR in other independent models of NAFLD. Conclusion: Our data warrant the future evaluation of NAD+ boosting strategies to manage the development or progression of NAFLD. (Hepatology 2016;63:1190–1204) PMID:26404765

  1. Facile synthesis of near infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters with tunable emission for 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and ethanol sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyu; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-07-30

    A facile chemical synthetic route was developed to prepare near-infrared fluorescent trypsin-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (Try-Ag NCs). The fluorescence emission wavelength of the produced Try-Ag NCs is tunable by simple adjusting pH value of the synthesis system, and the Try-Ag NCs offer a symmetric fluorescent excitation and emission peak. The fluorescence of Try-Ag NCs remains constant in the presence of various ions and molecules, and it can be effectively quenched by 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) instead of its oxidized forms nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This property enables the Try-Ag NCs to be a novel analytical platform to monitor biological reaction involved with NADH. In this work, the Try-Ag NCs was also applied to analyze ethanol based on the generation of NADH which was the product of NAD(+) and ethanol in the catalysis of alcohol dehydrogenase. And the proposed platform allowed ethanol to be determined in the range from 10 to 300 μmol/L with 5 μmol/L detection limit.

  2. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  3. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions.

  4. Development of an enzymatic chromatography strip with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-tetrazolium coupling reactions for quantitative l-lactate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Feng; Lan, Min-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lai, Wei-Shiang; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Hsiung, Kuang-Pin; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2015-02-15

    In this study, a dry assay of l-lactate via the enzymatic chromatographic test (ECT) was developed. An l-lactate dehydrogenase plus a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) regeneration reaction were applied simultaneously. Various tetrazolium salts were screened to reveal visible color intensities capable of determining the lactate concentrations in the sample. The optimal analysis conditions were as follows. The diaphorase (0.5 μl, 2(-6)U/μl) was immobilized in the test line of the ECT strip. Nitrotetrazolium blue chloride (5 μl, 12 mM), l-lactate dehydrogenase (1 μl, 0.25U/μl), and NAD(+) (2μl, 1.5×10(-5)M) were added into the mobile phase (100 μl) composed of 0.1% (w/w) Tween 20 in 10mM phosphate buffer (pH 9.0), and the process was left to run for 10 min. This detection had a linear range of 0.039 to 5mM with a detection limit of 0.047 mM. This quantitative analysis process for l-lactate was easy to operate with good stability and was proper for the point-of-care testing applications. PMID:25454507

  5. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  6. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs. PMID:26454831

  7. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    PubMed

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described.

  8. Production and characterization of reduced NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Thuring, Jan W; Conway, Stuart J; Packman, Len; Holmes, Andrew B; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate) has been shown to act as a Ca2+-releasing intracellular messenger in a wide variety of systems from invertebrates to mammals and has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. NAADP is structurally very similar to its precursor, the endogenous coenzyme NADP and while much is known about the reduced form of NADP, NADPH, it is not known whether NAADP can also exist in a reduced state. Here we report that NAADP can be reduced to NAADPH by endogenous cellular enzymes and that NAADPH is functionally inert at the NAADP receptor. These data suggest that NAADPH could represent a mechanism for rapidly inactivating NAADP in cells. PMID:14606955

  9. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-05-05

    The /sup 13/C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO/sub 2/ with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources.

  10. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  11. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  12. Magnitude of malate-aspartate reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide shuttle activity in intact respiring tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Greenhouse, W V; Lehninger, A L

    1977-11-01

    Measurements of respiration, CO2 and lactate production, and changes in the levels of various key metabolites of the glycolytic sequence and tricarboxylic acid cycle were made on five lines of rodent ascites tumor cells (two strains of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, Krebs II carcinoma, AS-30D carcinoma, and L1210 cells) incubated aerobically in the presence of uniformly labeled D-[14C]glucose. From these data, as well as earlier evidence demonstrating that the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) shuttle in these cells requires a transaminase step and is thus identified as the malate-aspartate shuttle (W.V.V. Greenhouse and A.L. Lehninger, Cancer Res., 36: 1392-1396, 1976), metabolic flux diagrams were constructed for the five cell lines. These diagrams show the relative rates of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and the malate-aspartate shuttle in these tumors. Large amounts of cytosolic NADH were oxidized by the mitochondrial respiratory chain via the NADH shuttle, comprising anywhere from about 20 to 80% of the total flow of reducing equivalents to oxygen in these tumors. Calculations of the sources of energy for adenosine triphosphate synthesis indicated that on the average about one-third of the respiratory adenosine triphosphate is generated by electron flow originating from cytosolic NADH via the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  13. Preclinical evidence of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as an effective alarm parameter under hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Sun, Nannan; Mayevsky, Avraham; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of tissue hypoxia in the intensive care unit is essential for effective treatment. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been suggested to be the most sensitive indicator of tissue oxygenation at the mitochondrial level. However, no experimental evidence comparing the kinetics of changes in NADH and other physiological parameters has been provided. The aim of this study is to obtain the missing data in a systematic and reliable manner. We constructed four acute hypoxia models, including hypoxic hypoxia, hypemic hypoxia, circulatory hypoxia, and histogenous hypoxia, and measured NADH fluorescence, tissue reflectance, cerebral blood flow, respiration, and electrocardiography simultaneously from the induction of hypoxia until death. We found that NADH was not always the first onset parameter responding to hypoxia. The order of responses was mainly affected by the cause of hypoxia. However, NADH reached its alarm level earlier than the other monitored parameters, ranging from several seconds to >10 min. As such, we suggest that the NADH can be used as a hypoxia indicator, although the exact level that should be used must be further investigated. When the NADH alarm is detected, the body still has a chance to recover if appropriate and timely treatment is provided.

  14. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of isolated cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Lynch, R M; Balaban, R S

    1989-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) plays a critical role in oxidative phosphorylation as the primary source of reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain. Using a modified fluorescence microscope, we have obtained spectra and images of the blue autofluorescence from single rat cardiac myocytes. The optical setup permitted rapid acquisition of fluorescence emission spectra (390-595 nm) or intensified digital video images of individual myocytes. The spectra showed a broad fluorescence centered at 447 +/- 0.2 nm, consistent with mitochondrial NADH. Addition of cyanide resulted in a 100 +/- 10% increase in fluorescence, while the uncoupler FCCP resulted in a 82 +/- 4% decrease. These two transitions were consistent with mitochondrial NADH and implied that the myocytes were 44 +/- 6% reduced under the resting control conditions. Intracellular fluorescent structures were observed that correlated with the distribution of a mitochondrial selective fluorescent probe (DASPMI), the mitochondrial distribution seen in published electron micrographs, and a metabolic digital subtraction image of the cyanide fluorescence transition. These data are consistent with the notion that the blue autofluorescence of rat cardiac myocytes originates from mitochondrial NADH. Images FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 11 PMID:2720061

  15. Kinetic properties of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A A; Mezna, M; Summerhill, R J; Galione, A; Michelangeli, F

    1997-03-21

    Three endogenous molecules have now been shown to release Ca2+ in the sea urchin egg: inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a derivative of NADP. While the mechanism through which the first two molecules are able to release Ca2+ is established and well characterized with InsP3 and cADPR-activating InsP3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, the newly described NAADP has been shown to release Ca2+ via an entirely different mechanism. The most striking feature of this novel Ca2+ release mechanism is its inactivation, since subthreshold concentrations of NAADP are able to fully and irreversibly desensitize the channel. In the present study we have investigated the fast kinetics of activation and inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release. NAADP was found to release Ca2+ in a biphasic manner, and such release was preceded by a pronounced latent period, which was inversely dependent on concentration. Moreover, the kinetic features of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release were not altered by pretreatment with low concentrations of NAADP, although the extent of Ca2+ release was greatly affected. Our data suggest that the inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release is an all-or-none phenomenon, and while some receptors have been fully inactivated, those that remain sensitive to NAADP do so without any change in kinetic features. PMID:9065423

  16. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-activated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Pseudomonas MA: potential regulation between carbon assimilation and energy production.

    PubMed Central

    Newaz, S S; Hersh, L B

    1975-01-01

    Comparison of enzyme activities in crude extracts of methylamine-grown Pseudomonas MA (ATCC 23319) to those in succinate-grown cells indicates the involvement of an acetyl coenzyme A-independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in one-carbon metabolism. The purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is activated specifically by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (KA = 0.2 mM). The regulatory properties of this enzyme suggests that phosphoenolpyruvate serves as a focal point for both carbon assimilation and energy metabolism. PMID:171253

  17. RESPIRATORY PATHWAYS IN THE MYCOPLASMA. II. PATHWAY OF ELECTRON TRANSPORT DURING OXIDATION OF REDUCED NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE BY MYCOPLASMA HOMINIS.

    PubMed

    VANDEMARK, P J; SMITH, P F

    1964-07-01

    VanDemark, P. J. (University of South Dakota, Vermillion), and P. F. Smith. Respiratory pathways in the Mycoplasma. II. Pathway of electron transport during oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by Mycoplasma hominis. J. Bacteriol. 88:122-129. 1964.-Unlike the flavin-terminated respiratory pathway of the fermentative Mycoplasma, the respiratory chain of the nonfermentative M. hominis strain 07 appears to be more complex, involving quinones and cytochromes in addition to flavins. In addition to reduction by reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and reduced nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate, nonpyridine nucleotide-linked reduction of the respiratory chain of this organism occurred with succinate, lactate, and short-chained acyl coenzyme A derivatives as electron donors. Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of NADH included an NADH oxidase, a diaphorase, a quinone reductase, and a cytochrome c reductase. The oxidation of NADH was sensitive to a variety of inhibitors, including 10(-4)m Atabrine, 10(-3)m sodium amytal, 10(-5)mp-chloromercuribenzoate, 10(-4)m antimycin A, and 10(-4)m potassium cyanide. The oxidase was resolved by the addition of 5% trichloroacetic acid and reactivated by the addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide but not flavin mononucleotide. The M. hominis sonic extract contained an NADH-coenzyme Q reductase. The oxidation of NADH was stimulated by the addition of either menadione or vitamin K(2) (C(35)). The oxidase was inactivated by extraction with ether or irradiation at 360 mmu. The ether-inactivated enzyme was partially reactivated by the addition of "lipid" extract of the enzyme and coenzyme Q(6). Difference spectra of the cell extracts revealed the presence of "b" and "a" type cytochromes. These cell extracts were found to contain a cyanide-and azide-sensitive cytochrome oxidase and catalase. PMID:14197876

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Favela, Carlos A; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) substantially lower the overpotential necessary for dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation compared to nondoped CNTs or traditional carbon electrodes such as glassy carbon (GC). We observe a 370 mV shift in the peak potential (Ep) from GC to CNTs and another 170 mV shift from CNTs to 7.4 atom % N-CNTs in a sodium phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0) with 2.0 mM NADH (scan rate 10 mV/s). The sensitivity of 7.4 atom % N-CNTs to NADH was measured at 0.30 ± 0.04 A M(-1) cm(-2), with a limit of detection at 1.1 ± 0.3 μM and a linear range of 70 ± 10 μM poised at a low potential of -0.32 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4). NADH fouling, known to occur to the electrode surface during NADH oxidation, was investigated by measuring both the change in Ep and the resulting loss of electrode sensitivity. NADH degradation, known to occur in phosphate buffer, was characterized by absorbance at 340 nm and correlated with the loss of NADH electroactivity. N-CNTs are further demonstrated to be an effective platform for dehydrogenase-based biosensing by allowing glucose dehydrogenase to spontaneously adsorb onto the N-CNT surface and measuring the resulting electrode's sensitivity to glucose. The glucose biosensor had a sensitivity of 0.032 ± 0.003 A M(-1) cm(-2), a limit of detection at 6 ± 1 μM, and a linear range of 440 ± 50 μM.

  19. The responses of isolated plant mitochondria to external nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Soole, K L; Dry, I B; Wiskich, J T

    1986-06-01

    The effects of added NAD on substrate oxidation by turnip (Brassica rapa L.) and beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) mitochondria were investigated. State 3 malate and 2-oxoglutarate oxidation rates with turnip mitochondria were stimulated 25 to 40% by external NAD. Following NAD-depletion this stimulation by NAD was increased to 70 to 80%. With purified beetroot mitochondria, state 3 malate and 2-oxoglutarate oxidation rates were only marginally increased (10-15%) by the addition of NAD but after NAD-depletion treatments this stimulation increased to 55%. The effect of added NAD on oxidation rates could be reduced by preloading mitochondria with NAD in the presence of succinate. Oxidation rates were found to be most sensitive to the addition of external NAD when rotenone was present. The uptake of external NAD into beetroot mitochondria appeared to be composed of both an active and a diffusive component. The active component displayed saturation kinetics with an approximate K(m) of 0.105 +/- 0.046 millimolar. These results provide further evidence, reported previously with potato mitochondria, that NAD can move across the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. They are particularly significant with respect to beetroot mitochondria which in contrast to other plant mitochondria, have not demonstrated any response to added NAD.

  20. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  1. The activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase with nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate as coenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Dalziel, K.; Dickinson, F. M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The separation of nucleotide impurities from commercial NADP preparations by chromatography is described. All the preparations studied contained 0·1–0·2% of NAD. 2. The activity of pure crystalline liver alcohol dehydrogenase with NADP as coenzyme has been confirmed. Initial-rate data are reported for the reaction at pH 6·0 and 7·0 with ethanol and acetaldehyde as substrates. With NADP and NADPH2 of high purity, the maximal specific rates were similar to those obtained with NAD and NADH2, but the Michaelis constants for the former coenzymes were much greater than those for the latter. 3. The oxidation of ethanol by NADP is greatly inhibited by NADH2, and this accounts for low values of certain initial-rate parameters obtained with commercial NADP preparations containing NAD. The kinetics of the inhibition are consistent with competitive inhibition in a compulsory-order mechanism. 4. Initial-rate data with NAD and NADPH2 do not conform to the requirements of the mechanism proposed by Theorell & Chance (1951), in contrast with results previously obtained with NAD and NADH2. The possibility that the deviations are due to competing nucleotide impurity in the oxidized coenzyme cannot be excluded. The data show that the enzyme reacts more slowly with, and has a smaller affinity for, NADP and NADPH2 than NAD and NADH2. 5. Phosphate behaves as a competitive inhibitor towards NADP. PMID:14340079

  2. Inactivation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by alkylperoxyl radicals. Characteristics and influence of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Videla, L A; Salim-Hanna, M; Lissi, E A

    1992-10-01

    The study of the interaction of alkylperoxyl radicals generated by the aerobic thermolysis of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) (AAP) with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) revealed a high reactivity of the enzyme, with an average of about 20 radicals per added YADH tetramer being needed to elicit its total inactivation. NAD+ enhanced YADH inactivation at NAD+/YADH molar ratios from 0.25 to 1, decreasing the rate of the process when added in excess to the enzyme concentration. At NADH/YADH molar ratios greater than 1, NADH exhibited a protective effect characterized by a poorly defined induction time and lower inactivation rates, which progressively increased during the reaction period. These changes occurred concomitantly with the oxidation of NADH into NAD+, which might counteract the protective effect of NADH. Under similar conditions, NADP+ did not modify AAP-induced YADH inactivation, while NADPH exhibited a modest protection at NADPH/YADH molar ratios greater than 1. It is concluded that YADH inactivation by alkylperoxyl radicals is strongly dependent on the redox state of the NADH-NAD+ couple, as the rates of the process at different time intervals inversely correlate with the respective NADH/NAD+ ratios.

  3. Biochemical characterization of a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase, ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggests a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2007-10-23

    Pyoverdin is the hydroxamate siderophore produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the iron-limiting conditions of the human host. This siderophore includes derivatives of ornithine in the peptide backbone that serve as iron chelators. PvdA is the ornithine hydroxylase, which performs the first enzymatic step in preparation of these derivatives. PvdA requires both flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for activity; it was found to be a soluble monomer most active at pH 8.0. The enzyme demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics in an NADPH oxidation assay, but a hydroxylation assay indicated substrate inhibition at high ornithine concentration. PvdA is highly specific for both substrate and coenzyme, and lysine was shown to be a nonsubstrate effector and mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to ornithine. Chloride is a mixed inhibitor of PvdA with respect to ornithine but a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, and a bulky mercurial compound (p-chloromercuribenzoate) is a mixed inhibitor with respect to ornithine. Steady-state experiments indicate that PvdA/FAD forms a ternary complex with NADPH and ornithine for catalysis. PvdA in the absence of ornithine shows slow substrate-independent flavin reduction by NADPH. Biochemical comparison of PvdA to p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH, from Pseudomonas fluorescens) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and hog liver microsomes) leads to the hypothesis that PvdA catalysis proceeds by a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:17900176

  4. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cahn, J K B; Baumschlager, A; Brinkmann-Chen, S; Arnold, F H

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  5. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Analogs Substituted on the Nicotinic Acid and Adenine Ribosides. Effects on Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Trabbic, Christopher J.; Zhang, Fan; Walseth, Timothy F.; Slama, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca2+ releasing intracellular second messenger in both mammals and echinoderms. We report that large functionalized substituents introduced at the nicotinic acid 5-position are recognized by the sea urchin receptor, albeit with a 20–500 fold loss in agonist potency. 5-(3-Azidopropyl)-NAADP was shown to release Ca2+ with an EC50 of 31 µM and to compete with NAADP for receptor binding with an IC50 of 56 nM. Attachment of charged groups to the nicotinic acid of NAADP is associated with loss of activity, suggesting that the nicotinate riboside moiety is recognized as a neutral zwitterion. Substituents (Br- and N3-) can be introduced at the 8-adenosyl position of NAADP while preserving high potency and agonist efficacy and an NAADP derivative substituted at both the 5-position of the nicotinic acid and at the 8-adenosyl position was also recognized although the agonist potency was significantly reduced. PMID:25826221

  6. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  7. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  8. Application of nicotin amide-adenine dinucleotide analogs for clinical enzymology: alcohol dehydrogenase activity in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Kimura, A; Minato, S; Tamaoki, H; Mizushima, H

    1976-06-01

    The activities of alcohol dehydrogease(ADH) in serum and in the subcellular fractions of rat liver were determined with n-amyl alcohol or ethanol as substrate and thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme. It was found that the enzyme's activity ratio on the amyl alcohol and ethanol(A/E value) of serum and on the particulate fractions of the liver were different, but the A/E value of the soluble fraction was similar to that of serum. The A/E value of the particulate fractions were higher than that of the soluble fraction. From the results of experimental liver damage in the rat, it seems that estimation of the A/E value of ADH activity in serum is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of active liver injury. Since the A/E values of patients' sera differed from those of the normal subjects, the estimation of the A/E value of serum may give diagnostic information on liver injury, especially in chronic liver injury. PMID:179739

  9. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration.

  10. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration. PMID:22091984

  11. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  12. Unique kinetics of nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) binding enhance the sensitivity of NAADP receptors for their ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S; Churchill, G C; Galione, A

    2000-01-01

    Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a novel and potent Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent in sea urchin eggs and other cell types. Little is known, however, concerning the properties of the putative intracellular NAADP receptor. In the present study we have characterized NAADP binding sites in sea urchin egg homogenates. [(32)P]NAADP bound to a single class of high-affinity sites that were reversibly inhibited by NaCl but insensitive to pH and Ca(2+). Binding of [(32)P]NAADP was lost in preparations that did not mobilize Ca(2+) in response to NAADP, indicating that [(32)P]NAADP probably binds to a receptor mediating Ca(2+) mobilization. Addition of excess unlabelled NAADP, at various times after initiation of [(32)P]NAADP binding, did not result in displacement of bound [(32)P]NAADP. These data show that NAADP becomes irreversibly bound to its receptor immediately upon association. Accordingly, incubation of homogenates with low concentrations of NAADP resulted in maximal labelling of NAADP binding sites. This unique property renders NAADP receptors exquisitely sensitive to their ligand, thereby allowing detection of minute changes in NAADP levels. PMID:11104679

  13. Boosting NAD(+) for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Djouder, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide yet has limited therapeutic options. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) synthesis is responsible for DNA damage, thereby initiating hepatocarcinogenesis. We propose that boosting NAD(+) levels might be used as a prophylactic or therapeutic approach in HCC. PMID:27308492

  14. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  15. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor. PMID:26802007

  16. Electrochemical behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide adsorbed onto carbon nanotube and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-11-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a cofactor for many enzymes, but also an informative redox active surface probe for electrode materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nitrogen-doped CNTs (N-CNTs). FAD spontaneously adsorbs onto the surface of CNTs and N-CNTs, displaying Langmuir adsorption characteristics. The Langmuir adsorption model provides a means of calculating the electroactive surface area (ESA), the equilibrium constant for the adsorption and desorption processes (K), and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption (ΔG°). Traditional ESA measurements based on the diffusional flux of a redox active molecule to the electrode surface underestimate the ESA of porous materials because pores are not penetrated. Techniques such as gas adsortion (BET) overestimate the ESA because it includes both electroactive and inactive areas. The ESA determined by extrapolation of the Langmuir adsorption model with the electroactive surface probe FAD will penetrate pores and only include electroactive areas. The redox activity of adsorbed FAD also displays a strong dependency on pH, which provides a means of determining the pKa of the surface confined species. The pKa of FAD decreases as the nitrogen content in the CNTs increases, suggesting a decreased hydrophobicity of the N-CNT surface. FAD desorption at N-CNTs slowly transforms the main FAD surface redox reaction with E1/2 at -0.84 V into two new, reversible, surface confined redox reactions with E1/2 at -0.65 and -0.76 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4), respectively (1.0 M sodium phosphate buffer pH = 6.75). This is the first time these redox reactions have been observed. The new surface confined redox reactions were not observed during FAD desorption from nondoped CNTs.

  17. Real-time measurements of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in live human trabecular meshwork cells: effects of acute oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A; Lei, Tim C; Gibson, Emily A; Kahook, Malik Y

    2011-09-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) region of the eye is exposed to a constant low-level of oxidative insult. The cumulative damage may be the reason behind age-dependent risk for developing primary open angle glaucoma. Chronic and acute effects of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on TM endothelial cells include changes in viability, protein synthesis, and cellular adhesion. However, little if anything is known about the immediate effect of H(2)O(2) on the biochemistry of the TM cells and the initial response to oxidative stress. In this report, we have used two-photon excitation autofluorescence (2PAF) to monitor changes to TM cell nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH). 2PAF allows non-destructive, real-time analysis of concentration of intracellular NADPH. Coupled to reduced glutathione, NADPH, is a major component in the anti-oxidant defense of TM cells. Cultured human TM cells were monitored for over 30 min in control and H(2)O(2)-containing solutions. Peroxide caused both a dose- and time-dependent decrease in NADPH signal. NADPH fluorescence in control and in 4 mM H(2)O(2) solutions showed little attenuation of NADPH signal (4% and 9% respectively). TM cell NADPH fluorescence showed a linear decrease with exposure to 20 mM H(2)O(2) (-29%) and 100 mM H(2)O(2) (37%) after a 30 min exposure. Exposure of TM cells to 500 mM H(2)O(2) caused an exponential decrease in NADPH fluorescence to a final attenuation of 46% of starting intensity. Analysis of individual TM cells indicates that cells with higher initial NADPH fluorescence are more refractive to the apparent loss of viability caused by H(2)O(2) than weakly fluorescing TM cells. We conclude that 2PAF of intracellular NADPH is a valuable tool for studying TM cell metabolism in response to oxidative insult. PMID:21354135

  18. Morphological features, distribution and compartmental organization of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced-diaphorase interneurons in the human striatum.

    PubMed

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2005-08-29

    Striatal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced-diaphorase (NADPH-d)-positive (+) cells are one of the major classes of striatal interneurons. The present study analyzes their somatodendritic morphology, distribution pattern, and compartmental organization in the caudate nucleus (CN) and putamen (Put) of nine normal human brains. The following striatal territories are examined: 1) the precommissural head of the CN; 2) the postcommissural head of the CN; 3) the body of the CN; 4) the gyrus of the CN; 5) the tail of the CN; 6) the precommissural Put; and 7) the postcommissural Put. Three morphologically distinct types of NADPH-d+ neurons were found in each of these territories. The two most common NADPH-d+ neurons displayed an ovoid or triangular perikaryon from which several thick primary dendrites emerged, although much less numerous, bipolar-shaped NADPH-d+ cells were also observed. The highest density of NADPH-d+ neurons was found in the gyrus of the CN, followed by the body of the CN, tail of the CN, postcommissural head of the CN, postcommissural Put, precommissural head of the CN, and precommissural Put. The matrix was the striatal compartment with the densest NADPH-d+ neuronal population. Some of these cells also occurred in the center and peripheral regions of the striosomes located in the head of the CN and in the Put. In the body and gyrus of the CN, the striosomes were largely devoid of these striatal interneurons. Knowledge of the density and distribution of these interneurons should advance our understanding of the organization of the normal human striatum and help to evaluate the effects of neurodegenerative processes on cell density.

  19. Real-time measurements of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in live human trabecular meshwork cells: Effects of acute oxidative stress✩

    PubMed Central

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Lei, Tim C.; Gibson, Emily A.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2016-01-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) region of the eye is exposed to a constant low-level of oxidative insult. The cumulative damage may be the reason behind age-dependent risk for developing primary open angle glaucoma. Chronic and acute effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on TM endothelial cells include changes in viability, protein synthesis, and cellular adhesion. However, little if anything is known about the immediate effect of H2O2 on the biochemistry of the TM cells and the initial response to oxidative stress. In this report, we have used two-photon excitation autofluorescence (2PAF) to monitor changes to TM cell nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH). 2PAF allows non-destructive, real-time analysis of concentration of intracellular NADPH. Coupled to reduced glutathione, NADPH, is a major component in the anti-oxidant defense of TM cells. Cultured human TM cells were monitored for over 30 min in control and H2O2-containing solutions. Peroxide caused both a dose- and time-dependent decrease in NADPH signal. NADPH fluorescence in control and in 4 mM H2O2 solutions showed little attenuation of NADPH signal (4% and 9% respectively). TM cell NADPH fluorescence showed a linear decrease with exposure to 20 mM H2O2 (−29%) and 100 mM H2O2 (37%) after a 30 min exposure. Exposure of TM cells to 500 mM H2O2 caused an exponential decrease in NADPH fluorescence to a final attenuation of 46% of starting intensity. Analysis of individual TM cells indicates that cells with higher initial NADPH fluorescence are more refractive to the apparent loss of viability caused by H2O2 than weakly fluorescing TM cells. We conclude that 2PAF of intracellular NADPH is a valuable tool for studying TM cell metabolism in response to oxidative insult. PMID:21354135

  20. Evidence for the Degradation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Candida utilis During Rapid Enzyme Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, Brian A.

    1978-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) from the food yeast Candida utilis was found to be rapidly inactivated when cultures were starved of a carbon source. The addition of glutamate or alanine to the starvation medium stimulated the rate of inactivation. Loss of enzyme activity was irreversible since the reappearance of enzyme activity, following the addition of glucose to carbon-starved cultures, was blocked by cycloheximide. A specific rabbit antibody was prepared against the NADP-GDH from C. utilis and used to quantitate the enzyme during inactivation promoted by carbon starvation. The amount of precipitable antigenic material paralleled the rapid decrease of enzyme activity observed after transition of cells from NH4+-glucose to glutamate medium. No additional small-molecular-weight protein was precipitated by the antibody as a result of the inactivation, suggesting that the enzyme is considerably altered during the primary steps of the inactivation process. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of the reappearance of enzyme activity after enzyme inactivation showed that increase of NADP-GDH activity was almost totally due to de novo synthesis, ruling out the possibility that enzyme activity modulation is achieved by reversible covalent modification. Enzyme degradation was also measured during steady-state growth and other changes in nitrogen and carbon status of the culture media. In all instances so far estimated, the enzyme was found to be very stable and not normally subject to high rates of degradation. Therefore, the possibility that inactivation was caused by a change in the ratio of synthesis to degradation can be excluded. Images PMID:24041

  1. A functional role for nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in oxytocin-mediated contraction of uterine smooth muscle from rat.

    PubMed

    Aley, Parvinder K; Noh, Hyun J; Gao, Xin; Tica, Andrei A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Churchill, Grant C

    2010-06-01

    Conventionally, G protein-coupled receptors are thought to increase calcium via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)). More recent evidence shows that an alternative second messenger, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), also has a role to play, causing researchers to question established calcium releasing pathways. With the recent development, by our group, of cell-permeant NAADP (NAADP-aceteoxymethyl ester) and a selective NAADP receptor antagonist (Ned-19; 1-(3-((4-(2-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carboxylic acid),the ability to investigate this signaling pathway has improved. Therefore, we investigated a role for NAADP in oxytocin-mediated responses in the rat uterus. Oxytocin- and NAADP-mediated effects were investigated by using contractile measurements of whole uterine strips from rat in organ baths. Responses were correlated to calcium release in cultured rat uterine smooth muscle cells measured by fluorescence microscopy. Inhibition of both oxytocin-induced contraction and calcium release by the traditional NAADP-signaling disrupter bafilomycin and the NAADP receptor antagonist Ned-19 clearly demonstrated a role for NAADP in oxytocin-induced signaling. A cell-permeant form of NAADP was able to produce both uterine contractions and calcium release. This response was unaffected by depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum stores with thapsigargin, but was abolished by both bafilomycin and Ned-19. Crucially, oxytocin stimulated an increase in NAADP in rat uterine tissue. The present study demonstrates directly that NAADP signaling plays a role in rat uterine contractions. Moreover, investigation of this signaling pathway highlights yet another component of oxytocin-mediated signaling, stressing the need to consider the action of new components as they are discovered, even in signaling pathways that are thought to be well established.

  2. Interaction of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with an antifreeze protein from Dendroides canadensis: mechanistic implication of antifreeze activity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xin; Wang, Sen; Amornwittawat, Natapol; Houghton, Eric A.; Sacco, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) found in many organisms can noncolligatively lower the freezing point of water without altering the melting point. The difference between the depressed freezing point and the melting point, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is usually a measure of the antifreeze activity of AFPs. Certain low molecular mass molecules and proteins can further enhance the antifreeze activity of AFPs. Interaction between an enhancer and arginine is known to play an important role in enhancing the antifreeze activity of an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis (DAFP-1). Here, we examined the enhancement effects of several prevalent phosphate-containing coenzymes on the antifreeze activity of DAFP-1. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) (NADH) is identified as the most efficient enhancer of DAFP-1, which increases the antifreeze activity of DAFP-1 by around 10 times. Examination of the enhancement abilities of a series of NADH analogs and various molecular fragments of NADH reveals that the modifications of nicotinamide generate a series of highly efficient enhancers, though none as effective as NADH itself, and the whole molecular structure of NADH is necessary for its highly efficient enhancement effect. We also demonstrated a 1:1 binding between DAFP-1 and NADH. The binding was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. The data analysis suggests binding between DAFP-1 and NADH with a dissociation constant in the micromolar range. Interactions between DAFP-1 and NADH are discussed along with molecular mechanisms of enhancer action. PMID:22038809

  3. The regulation of respiration of guinea pig taenia coli in high-K medium: the role of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate and Ca++.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Urakawa, N; Saito, Y; Fukami, J

    1975-10-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the regulation mechanism of respiration in the smooth muscle cell, we investigated the roles of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and Ca++ in the muscle respiration using the tissues and subcellular fractions from guinea pig taenia coli. The tension in the strips of taenia coli increased with a concomitant increase in O2 consumption in high-K medium (40 mM K) containing 2.5 mM Ca. 10(-3) M amytal and 10(-5)M ouabain decreased the high-K induced tension and O2 consumption of the muscle. 10(-4)M 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) relieved the decreased respiration induced by ouabain, but not that with amytal. From these data it is suggested that NADH-linked respiration plays an important role in the respiration of the muscle. Ca++ in concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mM in the high-K medium resulted in an increase in tension and in O2 concumption progressively. In spectrophotometric observations of subcellular fractions of the taenia coli, ADP increased in absorbance change at 340 m mu. Such occurred in mitochondrial fractions and was initiated by the addition of NADH. Therefore it is deduced that the increase in ADP level of the cytoplasm is primarily due to a contraction triggered by Ca++ thus stimulating respiration. On the other hand, at 0.1 mM of Ca++ concentration, the muscle strip increased O2 consumption without tension development in high-K medium. In the spectrophotometric observations, Ca++ and Sr++ increased the absorbance change in the homogenate and in the mitochondrial fraction. Hence, it seems that one part of the Ca++ entering into the smooth muscle treated with the high-K increased O2 consumption in mitochondia independent of an increase in muscle tension. From these results it is concluded that NADH-linked respiration plays an important role in the smooth muscle respiration in high-K medium and that ADP and Ca++ also play a role in regulating respiration. PMID:176493

  4. NAD+ and sirtuins in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD(+) also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD(+) levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles' heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD(+) by supplementing NAD(+) intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD(+) intermediate supplementation may be an effective antiaging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide. PMID:24786309

  5. Urea induced unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD): spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation studies from femto-second to nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Singh, Reman K; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Mukherjee, Arnab; Hazra, Partha

    2014-02-20

    Here, we investigate the effect of urea in the unfolding dynamics of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), an important enzymatic cofactor, through steady state, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. Steady state results indicate the possibility of urea induced unfolding of FAD, inferred from increasing emission intensity of FAD with urea. The TCSPC and up-conversion results suggest that the stack-unstack dynamics of FAD severely gets affected in the presence of urea and leads to an increase in the unstack conformation population from 15% in pure water to 40% in 12 M urea. Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to understand the nature of the interaction between FAD and urea at the molecular level. Results depict that urea molecules replace many of the water molecules around adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD. However, the major driving force for the stability of this unstack conformations arises from the favorable stacking interaction of a significant fraction of the urea molecules with adenine and isoalloxazine rings of FAD, which overcomes the intramolecular stacking interaction between themselves observed in pure water.

  6. An investigation of the nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-induced 'tightening' of the structure of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, H H; Hollaway, M R

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of NAD+ analogues on subunit interactions in yeast and rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases by using the subunit exchange (hybridization) method described previously [e.g. see Osborne & Hollaway (1975) Biochem. J. 151, 37-45]. The ligands ATP, ITP, ADP, AMP, cyclic AMP and ADP-ribose like NADH, all caused an apparent weakening of intramolecular subunit interactions, whereas NAD+ caused an apparent increase in the stability of the tetrameric enzyme molecules. A mixture of NMN and AMP, although it did not simulate completely the NAD+-induced 'tightening' of the enzyme structure, did result in a more than 20-fold decrease in the rate of subunit exchange compared with that in the presence of AMP alone. These results show that occupancy of the NMN subsite of the enzyme NAD+-binding site is insufficient in itself to give the marked tightening of the enzyme structure induced by NAD+. The 'tightening' effect is specific in that it seems to require a phosphodiester link between NMN and ADP-ribose. These effects are discussed in terms of the detailed X-ray structure of the lobster holoenzyme [Buehner et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 90, 25-49]. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:183744

  7. Syntheses of nicotinamide riboside and derivatives: effective agents for increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianle; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Sauve, Anthony A

    2007-12-27

    A new two-step methodology achieves stereoselective synthesis of beta-nicotinamide riboside and a series of related amide, ester, and acid nucleosides. Compounds were prepared through a triacetylated-nicotinate ester nucleoside, via coupling of either ethylnicotinate or phenylnicotinate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-ribofuranose. Nicotinamide riboside, nicotinic acid riboside, O-ethylnicotinate riboside, O-methylnicotinate riboside, and several N-alkyl derivatives increased NAD+ concentrations from 1.2-2.7-fold in several mammalian cell lines. These findings establish bioavailability and potent effects of these nucleosides in stimulating the increase of NAD+ concentrations in mammalian cells. PMID:18052316

  8. Enzymatic production by tissue extracts of a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide with calcium-releasing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Tich, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigated the occurrence and characterization of the metabolite in mammalian tissues. In all mammalian tissues tested, including rabbit liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain, the factor to convert NAD into its active metabolite was present. The conversion exhibited many characteristics of an enzymatic process such as temperature sensitivity, concentration dependence and protease sensitivity. Production of the NAD metabolite occurred within a time frame of 15-45 minutes at 37{degree}C, depending upon the particular preparation. The metabolite was isolated using high performance liquid chromatography from all mammalian tissues. This purified metabolite was then tested for its effectiveness in releasing intracellular calcium in an intact cell by microinjecting it into unfertilized sea urchin eggs. These eggs undergo a massive morphological change upon fertilization which is dependent upon the release of calcium from inside the cell. Upon injection of the NAD metabolite into unfertilized eggs, this same morphological change was observed showing indirectly that the metabolite released intracellular calcium from an intact, viable cell. In addition, radioactive studies using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} loaded into permeabilized hepatocytes, indicated in preliminary studies that the NAD metabolite could also release calcium from intracellular stores of mammalian cells.

  9. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  10. The synthesis of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide and poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) in various classes of rat liver nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Haines, M. E.; Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Ridge, D.

    1969-01-01

    1. The activities of NMN adenylyltransferase and an enzyme that synthesizes poly (ADP-ribose) from NAD were investigated in the various classes of rat liver nuclei fractionated by zonal centrifugation. 2. The highest specific activities of these two nuclear enzymes occur in different classes of nuclei. In very young and in mature rats it was shown that a correlation exists between DNA synthesis and NMN adenylyltransferase activity, but in rats of intermediate age this correlation is less evident. The highest activities of the enzyme that catalyses formation of poly (ADP-ribose) are in the nuclei involved in the synthesis of RNA. 3. The significance of these results in relation to NAD metabolism is discussed. PMID:4311824

  11. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3. PMID:27181414

  12. Diabetic complications within the context of aging: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide redox, insulin C-peptide, sirtuin 1-liver kinase B1-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase positive feedback and forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo

    2016-07-01

    Recent research in nutritional control of aging suggests that cytosolic increases in the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and decreasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism plays a central role in controlling the longevity gene products sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3). High nutrition conditions, such as the diabetic milieu, increase the ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide through cascades including the polyol pathway. This redox change is associated with insulin resistance and the development of diabetic complications, and might be counteracted by insulin C-peptide. My research and others' suggest that the SIRT1-liver kinase B1-AMPK cascade creates positive feedback through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthesis to help cells cope with metabolic stress. SIRT1 and AMPK can upregulate liver kinase B1 and FOXO3, key factors that help residential stem cells cope with oxidative stress. FOXO3 directly changes epigenetics around transcription start sites, maintaining the health of stem cells. 'Diabetic memory' is likely a result of epigenetic changes caused by high nutritional conditions, which disturb the quiescent state of residential stem cells and impair tissue repair. This could be prevented by restoring SIRT1-AMPK positive feedback through activating FOXO3.

  13. Accumulation of DNA damage and reduced levels of nicotine adenine dinucleotide in the brains of Atm-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Stern, Nora; Hochman, Ayala; Zemach, Naty; Weizman, Nir; Hammel, Ilan; Shiloh, Yosef; Rotman, Galit; Barzilai, Ari

    2002-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a human genetic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the ATM gene. A-T patients display a pleiotropic phenotype, in which a major neurological feature is progressive ataxia due to degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje and granule neurons. Disruption of the mouse Atm locus creates a murine model of A-T that exhibits most of the clinical and cellular features of the human disease, but the neurological phenotype is barely expressed. We present evidence for the accumulation of DNA strand breaks in the brains of Atm(-/-), supporting the notion that ATM plays a major role in maintaining genomic stability. We also show a perturbation of the steady state levels of pyridine nucleotides. There is a significant decrease in both the reduced and the oxidized forms of NAD and in the total levels of NADP(T) and NADP(+) in the brains of Atm(-/-) mice. The changes in NAD(T), NADH, NAD(+), NADP(T), and NADP(+) were progressive and observed primarily in the cerebellum of 4-month-old Atm(-/-) mice. Higher rates of mitochondrial respiration were also recorded in 4-month-old Atm(-/-) cerebella. Taken together, our findings support the hypothesis that absence of functional ATM results in continuous stress, which may be an important cause of the degeneration of cerebellar neurons in A-T. PMID:11679583

  14. NAD+-dependent deacetylase Hst1p controls biosynthesis and cellular NAD+ levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bedalov, Antonio; Hirao, Maki; Posakony, Jeffrey; Nelson, Melisa; Simon, Julian A

    2003-10-01

    Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) performs key roles in electron transport reactions, as a substrate for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases. In the latter two processes, NAD(+) is consumed and converted to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. NAD(+) levels can be maintained by regeneration of NAD(+) from nicotinamide via a salvage pathway or by de novo synthesis of NAD(+) from tryptophan. Both pathways are conserved from yeast to humans. We describe a critical role of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase Hst1p as a sensor of NAD(+) levels and regulator of NAD(+) biosynthesis. Using transcript arrays, we show that low NAD(+) states specifically induce the de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes while the genes in the salvage pathway remain unaffected. The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase activity of Hst1p represses de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes in the absence of new protein synthesis, suggesting a direct effect. The known Hst1p binding partner, Sum1p, is present at promoters of highly inducible NAD(+) biosynthesis genes. The removal of HST1-mediated repression of the NAD(+) de novo biosynthesis pathway leads to increased cellular NAD(+) levels. Transcript array analysis shows that reduction in cellular NAD(+) levels preferentially affects Hst1p-regulated genes in comparison to genes regulated with other NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (Sir2p, Hst2p, Hst3p, and Hst4p). In vitro experiments demonstrate that Hst1p has relatively low affinity toward NAD(+) in comparison to other NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. These findings suggest that Hst1p serves as a cellular NAD(+) sensor that monitors and regulates cellular NAD(+) levels. PMID:12972620

  15. Influence of surface adsorption on the interfacial electron transfer of flavin adenine dinucleotide and glucose oxidase at carbon nanotube and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Mantilla, Sandra M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and glucose oxidase (GOx) onto carbon nanotube (CNT) and nitrogen-doped CNT (N-CNT) electrodes was investigated and found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm characteristics. The amount adsorbed and adsorption maximum are dependent on exposure time, the concentration of adsorbate, and the ionic strength of the solution. The formal potentials measured for FAD and GOx are identical, indicating that the observed electroactivity is from FAD, the redox reaction center of GOx. When glucose is added to GOx adsorbed onto CNT/N-CNT electrodes, direct electron transfer (DET) from enzyme-active FAD is not observed. However, efficient mediated electron transfer (MET) occurs if an appropriate electron mediator is placed in solution, or the natural electron mediator oxygen is used, indicating that GOx is adsorbed and active on CNT/N-CNT electrodes. The observed surface-confined redox reaction at both CNT and N-CNT electrodes is from FAD that either specifically adsorbs from solution or adsorbs from the holoprotein subsequently inactivating the enzyme. The splitting of cathodic and anodic peak potentials as a function of scan rate provides a way to measure the heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant (k(s)) using Laviron's method. However, the measured k(s) was found to be under ohmic control, not under the kinetic control of an electron-transfer reaction, suggesting that k(s) for FAD on CNTs is faster than the measured value of 7.6 s(-1).

  16. Role of key residues at the flavin mononucleotide (FMN):adenylyltransferase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) Synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2012-11-08

    In mammals and in yeast the conversion of Riboflavin (RF) into flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is catalysed by the sequential action of two enzymes: an ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) and an ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT). However, most prokaryotes depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, FAD synthetase (FADS), which folds into two modules: the C-terminal associated with RFK activity and the N-terminal associated with FMNAT activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that the 28-HxGH-31, 123-Gx(D/N)-125 and 161-xxSSTxxR-168 motifs from FADS must be involved in ATP stabilisation for the adenylylation of FMN, as well as in FAD stabilisation for FAD phyrophosphorolysis. Mutants were produced at these motifs in the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS). Their effects on the kinetic parameters of CaFADS activities (RFK, FMNAT and FAD pyrophosphorilase), and on substrates and product binding properties indicate that H28, H31, N125 and S164 contribute to the geometry of the catalytically competent complexes at the FMNAT-module of CaFADS.

  17. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Endolysosomal Two-pore Channels Modulate Membrane Excitability and Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in Mouse Pancreatic β Cells.

    PubMed

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Ruas, Margarida; Collins, Stephan C; Parkesh, Raman; Clough, Frederick; Pillinger, Toby; Coltart, George; Rietdorf, Katja; Royle, Andrew; Johnson, Paul; Braun, Matthias; Zhang, Quan; Sones, William; Shimomura, Kenju; Morgan, Anthony J; Lewis, Alexander M; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Tunn, Ruth; Gadea, Joaquin; Teboul, Lydia; Heister, Paula M; Tynan, Patricia W; Bellomo, Elisa A; Rutter, Guy A; Rorsman, Patrik; Churchill, Grant C; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony

    2015-08-28

    Pancreatic β cells are electrically excitable and respond to elevated glucose concentrations with bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials due to the activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs), which leads to the exocytosis of insulin granules. We have examined the possible role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores during stimulus-secretion coupling in primary mouse pancreatic β cells. NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) release channels, likely two-pore channels (TPCs), have recently been shown to be a major mechanism for mobilizing Ca(2+) from the endolysosomal system, resulting in localized Ca(2+) signals. We show here that NAADP-mediated Ca(2+) release from endolysosomal Ca(2+) stores activates inward membrane currents and depolarizes the β cell to the threshold for VDCC activation and thereby contributes to glucose-evoked depolarization of the membrane potential during stimulus-response coupling. Selective pharmacological inhibition of NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release or genetic ablation of endolysosomal TPC1 or TPC2 channels attenuates glucose- and sulfonylurea-induced membrane currents, depolarization, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, and insulin secretion. Our findings implicate NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release from acidic Ca(2+) storage organelles in stimulus-secretion coupling in β cells. PMID:26152717

  18. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Calcium Signaling and Arrhythmias in the Heart Evoked by β-Adrenergic Stimulation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Merle; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Warszta, Dominik; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Limbrock, Ann-Christin; Swarbrick, Joanna M.; Fliegert, Ralf; Weber, Karin; Bruhn, Sören; Hohenegger, Martin; Geisler, Anne; Herich, Lena; Schlegel, Susan; Carrier, Lucie; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Potter, Barry V. L.; Ehmke, Heimo; Guse, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is the most potent Ca2+-releasing second messenger known to date. Here, we report a new role for NAADP in arrhythmogenic Ca2+ release in cardiac myocytes evoked by β-adrenergic stimulation. Infusion of NAADP into intact cardiac myocytes induced global Ca2+ signals sensitive to inhibitors of both acidic Ca2+ stores and ryanodine receptors and to NAADP antagonist BZ194. Furthermore, in electrically paced cardiac myocytes BZ194 blocked spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ transients caused by high concentrations of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Ca2+ transients were recorded both as increases of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and as decreases of the sarcoplasmic luminal Ca2+ concentration. Importantly, NAADP antagonist BZ194 largely ameliorated isoproterenol-induced arrhythmias in awake mice. We provide strong evidence that NAADP-mediated modulation of couplon activity plays a role for triggering spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ transients in isolated cardiac myocytes and arrhythmias in the intact animal. Thus, NAADP signaling appears an attractive novel target for antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:23564460

  19. New insights into the analysis of the electrode kinetics of flavin adenine dinucleotide redox center of glucose oxidase immobilized on carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Grosse, Willo; Mashkina, Elena A; Bethwaite, Blair; Tan, Jeff; Abramson, David; Wallace, Gordon G; Moulton, Simon E; Bond, Alan M

    2014-03-25

    New insights into electrochemical kinetics of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) redox center of glucose-oxidase (GlcOx) immobilized on reduced graphene oxide (rGO), single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SW and MWCNT), and combinations of rGO and CNTs have been gained by application of Fourier transformed AC voltammetry (FTACV) and simulations based on a range of models. A satisfactory level of agreement between experiment and theory, and hence establishment of the best model to describe the redox chemistry of FAD, was achieved with the aid of automated e-science tools. Although still not perfect, use of Marcus theory with a very low reorganization energy (≤0.3 eV) best mimics the experimental FTACV data, which suggests that the process is gated as also deduced from analysis of FTACV data obtained at different frequencies. Failure of the simplest models to fully describe the electrode kinetics of the redox center of GlcOx, including those based on the widely employed Laviron theory is demonstrated, as is substantial kinetic heterogeneity of FAD species. Use of a SWCNT support amplifies the kinetic heterogeneity, while a combination of rGO and MWCNT provides a more favorable environment for fast communication between FAD and the electrode. PMID:24571209

  20. Ordered carbohydrate-derived porous carbons immobilized gold nanoparticles as a new electrode material for electrocatalytical oxidation and determination of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hadi; Behbahani, Mohammad; Mahyari, Mojtaba; Kazerooni, Hanif; Bagheri, Akbar; Shaabani, Ahmad

    2014-09-15

    The ordered carbohydrate-derived porous carbons (OC-DPCs) were first functionalized with thiol groups (-SH) and then immobilized with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The Au-SH-OC-DPCs were characterized by CHN analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The Au-SH-OC-DPCs were applied for the fabrication of a new electrochemical sensor. The electrocatalytic capabilities of the new sensor were tested by the oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in a 0.1 M Robinson buffer solution (pH 7.0) using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The Au-SH-OC-DPCs showed a good voltammetric performance in the electrochemical detection of NADH with a low detection limit (1.0 nM), high sensitivity (4.934 μA/μM), and wide linear concentration range (5.0 nM-10 µM).

  1. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Endolysosomal Two-pore Channels Modulate Membrane Excitability and Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in Mouse Pancreatic β Cells.

    PubMed

    Arredouani, Abdelilah; Ruas, Margarida; Collins, Stephan C; Parkesh, Raman; Clough, Frederick; Pillinger, Toby; Coltart, George; Rietdorf, Katja; Royle, Andrew; Johnson, Paul; Braun, Matthias; Zhang, Quan; Sones, William; Shimomura, Kenju; Morgan, Anthony J; Lewis, Alexander M; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Tunn, Ruth; Gadea, Joaquin; Teboul, Lydia; Heister, Paula M; Tynan, Patricia W; Bellomo, Elisa A; Rutter, Guy A; Rorsman, Patrik; Churchill, Grant C; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony

    2015-08-28

    Pancreatic β cells are electrically excitable and respond to elevated glucose concentrations with bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials due to the activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs), which leads to the exocytosis of insulin granules. We have examined the possible role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores during stimulus-secretion coupling in primary mouse pancreatic β cells. NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) release channels, likely two-pore channels (TPCs), have recently been shown to be a major mechanism for mobilizing Ca(2+) from the endolysosomal system, resulting in localized Ca(2+) signals. We show here that NAADP-mediated Ca(2+) release from endolysosomal Ca(2+) stores activates inward membrane currents and depolarizes the β cell to the threshold for VDCC activation and thereby contributes to glucose-evoked depolarization of the membrane potential during stimulus-response coupling. Selective pharmacological inhibition of NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release or genetic ablation of endolysosomal TPC1 or TPC2 channels attenuates glucose- and sulfonylurea-induced membrane currents, depolarization, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, and insulin secretion. Our findings implicate NAADP-evoked Ca(2+) release from acidic Ca(2+) storage organelles in stimulus-secretion coupling in β cells.

  2. Autocrine/paracrine function of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) for glucose homeostasis in pancreatic β-cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Ju; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a second messenger for mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular stores in various cell types. Extracellular application of NAADP has been shown to elicit intracellular Ca(2+) signals, indicating that it is readily transported into cells. However, little is known about the functional role of this NAADP uptake system. Here, we show that NAADP is effectively transported into selected cell types involved in glucose homeostasis, such as adipocytes and pancreatic β-cells, but not the acinar cells, in a high glucose-dependent manner. NAADP uptake was inhibitable by Ned-19, a NAADP mimic; dipyridamole, a nucleoside inhibitor; or NaN3, a metabolic inhibitor or under Ca(2+)-free conditions. Furthermore, NAADP was found to be released from pancreatic islets upon stimulation by high glucose. Consistently, administration of NAADP to type 2 diabetic mice improved glucose tolerance. We propose that NAADP is functioning as an autocrine/paracrine hormone important in glucose homeostasis. NAADP is thus a potential antidiabetic agent with therapeutic relevance.

  3. Increase of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime precedes mitochondrial dysfunction in staurosporine-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Sin; Guo, Han-Wen; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-03-01

    In vivo noninvasive detection of apoptosis represents a new tool that may yield a more definite diagnosis, a more accurate prognosis, and help improve therapies for human diseases. The intrinsic fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be a potential optical biomarker for the apoptosis detection because NADH is involved in the respiration for the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) formation and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, and the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP level is the hallmark of apoptosis. We have previously observed the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with staurosporine (STS)-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. However, its relationship with mitochondrial functions such as ΔΨ, ATP, and oxygen consumption rate is not clear. In this study, we investigated this relationship. Our results indicate that the NADH fluorescence lifetime increased when ΔΨ and ATP levels were equal to or higher than their values of controls and decreased before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP, and the oxygen consumption rate did not change. These findings suggest that the increased NADH fluorescence lifetime in STS-induced cell death occurred before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP and activation of caspase 3, and was not simply caused by cellular metabolic change. Furthermore, the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with the pace of apoptosis.

  4. Differential regulation of nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cADP-ribose production by cAMP and cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, H L; Galione, A

    1998-01-01

    The sea urchin egg has been used as a system to study calcium-release mechanisms induced by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), cADP-ribose (cADPR), and more recently, nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). In order that cADPR and NAADP may be established as endogenous messengers for calcium release, the existence of intracellular enzymes capable of metabolizing these molecules must be demonstrated. In addition, intracellular levels of cADPR and NAADP should be under the control of extracellular stimuli. It has been shown that cGMP stimulates the synthesis of cADPR in the sea urchin egg. The present study shows that the sea urchin egg is capable of synthesizing and degrading NAADP. cADPR and NAADP synthetic activities appear to be separate, with different cellular localizations, pH and temperature optima. We suggest that in the sea urchin egg, cADPR and NAADP production may be differentially regulated by receptor-coupled second messengers, with cADPR production being regulated by cGMP and NAADP production modulated by cAMP. PMID:9560312

  5. Differential effect of pH upon cyclic-ADP-ribose and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release systems.

    PubMed Central

    Chini, E N; Liang, M; Dousa, T P

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the pH dependence and the effects of thimerosal and dithiothreitol (DTT) upon the Ca2+ release induced by cADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in sea urchin egg homogenates. Both Ca2+ release triggered by cADPR and the binding of [3H]cADPR to sea urchin egg homogenates were decreased by alkalization of the assay media from pH 7.2 to 8.9. In contrast, NAADP-triggered Ca2+ release was not influenced by changes in pH. The Ca2+ release induced by cADPR was potentiated by thimerosal and inhibited by DTT, but neither thimerosal nor DTT had any effect upon the Ca2+ release induced by NAADP. We conclude that cADPR-sensitive Ca2+-release mechanisms are dependent on pH of the assay media and are sensitive to thiol group modification. On the other hand, these functional properties are not shared by NAADP-regulated Ca2+ channels. PMID:9794787

  6. Stimulation of the thiol-dependent ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD glycohydrolase activities of Bordetella pertussis toxin by adenine nucleotides, phospholipids, and detergents.

    PubMed

    Moss, J; Stanley, S J; Watkins, P A; Burns, D L; Manclark, C R; Kaslow, H R; Hewlett, E L

    1986-05-01

    Pertussis toxin catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of the guanyl nucleotide binding protein transducin was stimulated by adenine nucleotide and either phospholipids or detergents. To determine the sites of action of these agents, their effects were examined on the transducin-independent NAD glycohydrolase activity. Toxin-catalyzed NAD hydrolysis was increased synergistically by ATP and detergents or phospholipids; the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) was more effective than the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 greater than lysophosphatidylcholine greater than phosphatidylcholine. The A0.5 for ATP in the presence of CHAPS was 2.6 microM; significantly higher concentrations of ATP were required for maximal activation in the presence of cholate or lysophosphatidylcholine. In CHAPS, NAD hydrolysis was enhanced by ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP greater than adenosine; ATP was more effective than MgATP or the nonhydrolyzable analogue adenyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate. GTP and guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate were less active than the corresponding adenine nucleotides. Activity in the presence of CHAPS and ATP was almost completely dependent on dithiothreitol; the A0.5 for dithiothreitol was significantly decreased by CHAPS alone and, to a greater extent, by CHAPS and ATP. To determine the site of action of ATP, CHAPS, and dithiothreitol, the enzymatic (S1) and binding components (B oligomer) were resolved by chromatography. The purified S1 subunit catalyzed the dithiothreitol-dependent hydrolysis of NAD; activity was enhanced by CHAPS but not ATP. The studies are consistent with the conclusion that adenine nucleotides, dithiothreitol, and CHAPS act on the toxin itself rather than on the substrate; adenine nucleotides appear to be involved in the activation of toxin but not the isolated catalytic unit.

  7. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles and their use as a platform for flavin adenine dinucleotide immobilization and efficient electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, S.; Lo, Po-Hsun; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Here, we report the electrochemical synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) using the potentiostat method. Synthesized particles have been characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the TiO2 film produced was mainly composed of rutile and that the particles are of a size in the range of 100 ± 50 nm. TiO2 NPs were used for the modification of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE). The resulting TiO2 film coated SPE was used to immobilize flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The flavin enzyme firmly attached onto the metal oxide surface and this modified electrode showed promising electrocatalytic activities towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological conditions. The electrochemistry of FAD confined in the oxide film was investigated. The immobilized FAD displayed a pair of redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.42 V in pH 7.0 oxygen-free phosphate buffers at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1. The FAD in the nanostructured TiO2 film retained its bioactivity and exhibited excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, based on which a mediated biosensor for H2O2 was achieved. The linear range for the determination of H2O2 was from 0.15 × 10-6 to 3.0 × 10-3 M with the detection limit of 0.1 × 10-6 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The stability and repeatability of the biosensor is also discussed.

  8. Ryanodine receptor type I and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors mediate Ca2+ release from insulin-containing vesicles in living pancreatic beta-cells (MIN6).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kathryn J; Lai, F Anthony; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-03-28

    We have demonstrated recently (Mitchell, K. J., Pinton, P., Varadi, A., Tacchetti, C., Ainscow, E. K., Pozzan, T., Rizzuto, R., and Rutter, G. A. (2001) J. Cell Biol. 155, 41-51) that ryanodine receptors (RyR) are present on insulin-containing secretory vesicles. Here we show that pancreatic islets and derived beta-cell lines express type I and II, but not type III, RyRs. Purified by subcellular fractionation and membrane immuno-isolation, dense core secretory vesicles were found to possess a similar level of type I RyR immunoreactivity as Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes but substantially less RyR II than the latter. Monitored in cells expressing appropriately targeted aequorins, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR I channels, elevated free Ca(2+) concentrations in the secretory vesicle compartment from 40.1 +/- 6.7 to 90.4 +/- 14.8 microm (n = 4, p < 0.01), while having no effect on ER Ca(2+) concentrations. Furthermore, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a novel Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent, decreased dense core secretory vesicle but not ER free Ca(2+) concentrations in permeabilized MIN6 beta-cells, and flash photolysis of caged NAADP released Ca(2+) from a thapsigargin-insensitive Ca(2+) store in single MIN6 cells. Because dantrolene strongly inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (from 3.07 +/- 0.51-fold stimulation to no significant glucose effect; n = 3, p < 0.01), we conclude that RyR I-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from secretory vesicles, possibly potentiated by NAADP, is essential for the activation of insulin secretion.

  9. Amelioration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase mediated stress reduces cell death after blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Naser, Zachary J; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Smith, Kelly E; Robson, Matthew J; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2015-12-01

    A total of 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur each year in the United States, but available pharmacologic options for the treatment of acute neurotrauma are limited. Oxidative stress is an important secondary mechanism of injury that can lead to neuronal apoptosis and subsequent behavioral changes. Using a clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model, we investigated how nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) expression and associated oxidative stress contribute to cellular apoptosis after single and repeat blast injuries. Nox4 forms a complex with p22phox after injury, forming free radicals at neuronal membranes. Using immunohistochemical-staining methods, we found a visible increase in Nox4 after single blast injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, Nox4 was also increased in postmortem human samples obtained from athletes diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Nox4 activity correlated with an increase in superoxide formation. Alpha-lipoic acid, an oxidative stress inhibitor, prevented the development of superoxide acutely and increased antiapoptotic markers B-cell lymphoma 2 (t = 3.079, P < 0.05) and heme oxygenase 1 (t = 8.169, P < 0.001) after single blast. Subacutely, alpha-lipoic acid treatment reduced proapoptotic markers Bax (t = 4.483, P < 0.05), caspase 12 (t = 6.157, P < 0.001), and caspase 3 (t = 4.573, P < 0.01) after repetitive blast, and reduced tau hyperphosphorylation indicated by decreased CP-13 and paired helical filament staining. Alpha-lipoic acid ameliorated impulsive-like behavior 7 days after repetitive blast injury (t = 3.573, P < 0.05) compared with blast exposed animals without treatment. TBI can cause debilitating symptoms and psychiatric disorders. Oxidative stress is an ideal target for neuropharmacologic intervention, and alpha-lipoic acid warrants further investigation as a therapeutic for prevention of chronic neurodegeneration.

  10. A Novel Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Correction Method for Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Measurement with FURA-2-FF in Single Permeabilized Ventricular Myocytes of Rat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Ha, Jeong Mi; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-07-01

    Fura-2 analogs are ratiometric fluoroprobes that are widely used for the quantitative measurement of [Ca(2+)]. However, the dye usage is intrinsically limited, as the dyes require ultraviolet (UV) excitation, which can also generate great interference, mainly from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) autofluorescence. Specifically, this limitation causes serious problems for the quantitative measurement of mitochondrial [Ca(2+)], as no available ratiometric dyes are excited in the visible range. Thus, NADH interference cannot be avoided during quantitative measurement of [Ca(2+)] because the majority of NADH is located in the mitochondria. The emission intensity ratio of two different excitation wavelengths must be constant when the fluorescent dye concentration is the same. In accordance with this principle, we developed a novel online method that corrected NADH and Fura-2-FF interference. We simultaneously measured multiple parameters, including NADH, [Ca(2+)], and pH/mitochondrial membrane potential; Fura-2-FF for mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] and TMRE for Ψm or carboxy-SNARF-1 for pH were used. With this novel method, we found that the resting mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] concentration was 1.03 µM. This 1 µM cytosolic Ca(2+) could theoretically increase to more than 100 mM in mitochondria. However, the mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] increase was limited to ~30 µM in the presence of 1 µM cytosolic Ca(2+). Our method solved the problem of NADH signal contamination during the use of Fura-2 analogs, and therefore the method may be useful when NADH interference is expected.

  11. Effect of telmisartan on the expression of adiponectin receptors and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in the heart and aorta in type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic cardiovascular disease is associated with decreased adiponectin and increased oxidative stress. This study investigated the effect of telmisartan on the expression of adiponectin receptor 2 (adipoR2) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits in the heart and the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) in aorta in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods Type 2 diabetes was induced by high-fat and high-sugar diet and intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ). Heart function, adipoR2, p22phox, NOX4, glucose transporter 4(GLUT4), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)in the heart, and adipoR1, MCP-1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in aorta were analyzed in controls and diabetic rats treated with or without telmisartan (5mg/kg/d) by gavage for 12 weeks. Results Heart function, plasma and myocardial adiponectin levels, the expression of myocardial adipoR2 and GLUT4 were significantly decreased in diabetic rats (P <0.05). The expression of myocardial p22phox, NOX4, MCP-1, and CTGF was significantly increased in diabetic rats (P <0.05). The expression of adipoR1 was decreased and the expression of MCP-1 and NF-κB was increased in the abdominal aorta in diabetic rats (P <0.05). Telmisartan treatment significantly attenuated these changes in diabetic rats (P <0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that telmisartan upregulates the expression of myocardial adiponectin, its receptor 2 and GLUT4. Simultaneously, it downregulates the expression of myocardial p22phox, NOX4, MCP-1, and CTGF, contributing so to the improvement of heart function in diabetic rats. Telmisartan also induces a protective role on the vascular system by upregulating the expression of adipoR1 and downregulating the expression of MCP-1 and NF-κB in the abdominal aorta in diabetic rats. PMID:22873349

  12. Fabrication and characterization of Meldola's blue/zinc oxide hybrid electrodes for efficient detection of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at low potential.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Ashok; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2007-05-29

    We report the synthesis and the electrochemical properties of hybrid films made of zinc oxide (ZnO) and Meldola's blue dye (MB) using cyclic voltammetry (CV). MB/ZnO hybrid films were electrochemically deposited onto glassy carbon, gold and indium tin oxide-coated glass (ITO) electrodes at room temperature (25+/-2 degrees C) from the bath solution containing 0.1 M Zn(NO3)2, 0.1 M KNO3 and 1x10(-4) MMB. The surface morphology and deposition kinetics of MB/ZnO hybrid films were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques, respectively. SEM and AFM images of MB/ZnO hybrid films have revealed that the surfaces are well crystallized, porous and micro structured. MB molecules were immobilized and strongly fixed in a transparent inorganic matrix. MB/ZnO hybrid films modified glassy carbon electrode (MB/ZnO/GC) showed one reversible redox couple centered at formal potential (E0') -0.12 V (pH 6.9). The surface coverage (gamma) of the MB immobilized on ZnO/GC was about 9.86x10(-12) mol cm(-2) and the electron transfer rate constant (ks) was determined to be 38.9 s(-1). The MB/ZnO/GC electrode acted as a sensor and displayed an excellent specific electrocatalytic response to the oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The linear response range between 50 and 300 microM NADH concentration at pH 6.9 was observed with a detection limit of 10 microM (S/N=3). The electrode was stable during the time it was used for the full study (about 1 month) without a notable decrease in current. Indeed, dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA), acetaminophen (AP) and uric acid (UA) did not show any interference during the detection of NADH at this modified electrode.

  13. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase–Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Katie Y.; Montezano, Augusto C.; Harvey, Adam P.; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)–induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen–Nox–dependent processes was studied in female Nox1−/− and Nox4−/− mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2–regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1−/− but not Nox4−/− mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1−/− mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid–related factor 2

  14. Effect of Exogenous Extracellular Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD⁺) on Bioelectric Activity of the Pacemaker and Conduction System of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, K B; Kuz'min, V S; Sukhova, G S

    2015-06-01

    In rat sinoatrial node, NAD(+) (10 μM) reduced the rate of spontaneous action potentials, duration of action potentials, and the velocity of slow diastolic depolarization, but the rate of action potential front propagation increases. In passed rabbit Purkinje fibers, NAD(+) (10 μM) reduced the duration of action potentials. Under conditions of spontaneous activity of Purkinje fibers, NAD(+) reduced the fi ring rate and the rate of slow diastolic depolarization. The effects of extracellular NAD(+) on bioelectric activity of the pacemaker (sinoatrial node) and conduction system of the heart (Purkinje fibers) are probably related to activation of P1 and P2 purinoceptors.

  15. Genetic linkage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa of algT and nadB: mutation in nadB does not affect NAD biosynthesis or alginate production.

    PubMed

    DeVries, C A; Hassett, D J; Flynn, J L; Ohman, D E

    1995-04-14

    The 68-min region of the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) contains the gene algT, encoding a putative alternate sigma factor similar to sigma E in Escherichia coli, that is required for the expression of several genes in the alginate biosynthetic regulon. Sequences immediately upstream from algT were found to contain a divergently expressed open reading frame encoding a 60-kDa protein with 64 and 36% identity to the nadB gene products of E. coli and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. The nadB gene encodes L-aspartate oxidase and has been shown in several bacteria to be essential for de novo nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Pa nadB complemented the growth requirement for nicotinic acid in a nadB mutant strain of E. coli, suggesting that this gene encodes a functional homologue of L-aspartate oxidase. A nadB::Tn501 mutant was constructed by gene replacement in the alginate-producing strain, Pa FRD. This NadB- mutant still produced alginate and appeared normal with respect to the regulation of alginate synthesis. Interestingly, the NadB- mutant did not have an auxotrophic phenotype for nicotinic acid, indicating that this nadB was not essential for NAD biosynthesis in Pa. These results suggest the possibility that Pa has an alternate mechanism for de novo NAD biosynthesis.

  16. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  17. Dual emission fluorescent silver nanoclusters for sensitive detection of the biological coenzyme NAD+/NADH.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yufeng; Huang, Kehan; Chang, Mengfang; Qin, Cuifang; Zhang, Sanjun; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) displaying dual-excitation and dual-emission properties have been developed for the specific detection of NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form). With the increase of NAD(+) concentrations, the longer wavelength emission (with the peak at 550 nm) was gradually quenched due to the strong interactions between the NAD(+) and Ag NCs, whereas the shorter wavelength emission (peaking at 395 nm) was linearly enhanced. More important, the dual-emission intensity ratio (I395/I550), fitting by a single-exponential decay function, can efficiently detect various NAD(+) levels from 100 to 4000 μM, as well as label NAD(+)/NADH (reduced form of NAD) ratios in the range of 1-50.

  18. The activity of uridine diphosphate-D-glucose: Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase in cambial tissue and differentiating xylem isolated from sycamore trees.

    PubMed

    Rubery, P H

    1972-06-01

    The activity of UDPGlc: NAD oxidoreductase is measured in enzyme preparations obtained from sycamore cambium and xylem tissue. The activity of this enzyme is greater in xylem than in cambium whether expressed on a specific activity basis or on a per-cell basis. It is suggested that, in developing xylem, direct oxidation of UDPGlc may contribute significantly to the biosynthesis of polysaccharide precursors.

  19. The Importance of NAD in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, W. Todd; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown but it manifests as a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system (CNS). During chronic CNS inflammation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) concentrations are altered by (T helper) Th1-derived cytokines through the coordinated induction of both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the ADP cyclase CD38 in pathogenic microglia and lymphocytes. While IDO activation may keep auto-reactive T cells in check, hyper-activation of IDO can leave neuronal CNS cells starving for extracellular sources of NAD. Existing data indicate that glia may serve critical functions as an essential supplier of NAD to neurons during times of stress. Administration of pharmacological doses of non-tryptophan NAD precursors ameliorates pathogenesis in animal models of MS. Animal models of MS involve artificially stimulated autoimmune attack of myelin by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or by viral-mediated demyelination using Thieler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). The WldS mouse dramatically resists razor axotomy mediated axonal degeneration. This resistance is due to increased efficiency of NAD biosynthesis that delays stress-induced depletion of axonal NAD and ATP. Although the WldS genotype protects against EAE pathogenesis, TMEV-mediated pathogenesis is exacerbated. In this review, we contrast the role of NAD in EAE versus TMEV demyelinating pathogenesis to increase our understanding of the pharmacotherapeutic potential of NAD signal transduction pathways. We speculate on the importance of increased SIRT1 activity in both PARP-1 inhibition and the potentially integral role of neuronal CD200 interactions through glial CD200R with induction of IDO in MS pathogenesis. A comprehensive review of immunomodulatory control of NAD biosynthesis and degradation in MS pathogenesis is presented. Distinctive pharmacological approaches designed for NAD-complementation or targeting NAD

  20. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  1. A regulatory role of NAD redox status on flavin cofactor homeostasis in S. cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Locato, Vittoria; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD(+) and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  2. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  3. The lactate dehydrogenase--reduced nicotinamide--adenine dinucleotide--pyruvate complex. Kinetics of pyruvate binding and quenching of coeznyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Südi, J

    1974-04-01

    The stopped-flow kinetic studies described in this and the following paper (Südi, 1974) demonstrate that a Haldane-type description of the reversible lactate dehydrogenase reaction presents an experimentally feasible task. Combined results of these two papers yield numerical values for the six rate constants defined by the following equilibrium scheme, where E represents lactate dehydrogenase: [Formula: see text] The experiments were carried out at pH8.4 at a relatively low temperature (6.3 degrees C) with the pig heart enzyme. Identification of the above two intermediates and determination of the corresponding rate constants actually involve four series of independent observations in these studies, since (a) the reaction can be followed in both directions, and (b) both the u.v. absorption and the fluorescence of the coenzymes are altered in the reaction, and it is shown that these two spectral changes do not occur simultaneously. Kinetic observations made in the reverse direction are reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence of NADH can no longer be observed in the ternary complex E(NADH) (Pyr). Even though the oxidation-reduction reaction rapidly follows the formation of this complex, the numerical values of k(-4) (8.33x10(5)m(-1).s(-1)) and k(+4) (222s(-1)) are easily obtained from a directly observed second-order reaction step in which fluorescent but not u.v.-absorbing material is disappearing. U.v.-absorption measurements do not clearly resolve the subsequent oxidation-reduction step from the dissociation of lactate. It is shown that this must be due partly to the instrumental dead time, and partly to a low transient concentration of E(NAD+) (Lac) in the two-step sequential reaction in which the detectable disappearance of u.v.-absorbing material takes place. It is estimated that about one-tenth of the total change in u.v. absorption is due to a ;burst reaction' in which E(NAD+) (Lac) is produced, and this estimation yields, from k

  4. Enhanced Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide electrocatalysis onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes-decorated gold nanoparticles and their use in hybrid biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino Neto, S.; Almeida, T. S.; Belnap, D. M.; Minteer, S. D.; De Andrade, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of Au nanoparticles synthetized by different protocols and supported on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes containing different functional groups, focusing on their electrochemical performance towards NADH oxidation, ethanol bioelectrocatalysis, and ethanol/O2 biofuel cell. We describe four different synthesis protocols: microwave-assisted heating, water-in-oil, and dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles using acid or thiol species in the extraction step. The physical characterization of the metallic nanoparticles indicated that both the synthetic protocol as well as the type of functional groups on the carbon nanotubes affect the final particle size (varying from 13.4 to 2.4 nm) and their distribution onto the carbon surface. Moreover, the electrochemical data indicated that these two factors also influence their performance toward the electrooxidation of NADH. We observed that the samples containing Au nanoparticles with smaller size leads to higher catalytic currents and also shifts the oxidation potential of the targeted reaction, which varied from 0.13 to -0.06 V vs Ag/AgCl. Ethanol/O2 biofuel cell tests indicated that the hybrid bioelectrodes containing smaller and better distributed Au nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes generates higher power output, confirming that the electrochemical regeneration of NAD+ plays an important role in the overall biofuel cell performance.

  5. Ruling out pyridine dinucleotides as true TRPM2 channel activators reveals novel direct agonist ADP-ribose-2′-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs; Iordanov, Iordan

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2), a Ca2+-permeable cation channel implicated in postischemic neuronal cell death, leukocyte activation, and insulin secretion, is activated by intracellular ADP ribose (ADPR). In addition, the pyridine dinucleotides nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD), nicotinic acid–adenine-dinucleotide (NAAD), and NAAD-2′-phosphate (NAADP) have been shown to activate TRPM2, or to enhance its activation by ADPR, when dialyzed into cells. The precise subset of nucleotides that act directly on the TRPM2 protein, however, is unknown. Here, we use a heterologously expressed, affinity-purified–specific ADPR hydrolase to purify commercial preparations of pyridine dinucleotides from substantial contaminations by ADPR or ADPR-2′-phosphate (ADPRP). Direct application of purified NAD, NAAD, or NAADP to the cytosolic face of TRPM2 channels in inside-out patches demonstrated that none of them stimulates gating, or affects channel activation by ADPR, indicating that none of these dinucleotides directly binds to TRPM2. Instead, our experiments identify for the first time ADPRP as a true direct TRPM2 agonist of potential biological interest. PMID:25918360

  6. Protective effects of Guanxin Shutong capsule drug-containing serum on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial dysfunction through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and the nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    CAO, YANJUN; LIU, FENG; HUANG, ZHUANGZHUANG; ZHANG, YANMIN

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese medicinal formula Guanxin Shutong capsule (GXSTC) has been used for almost 10 years as a clinical treatment for chest pain, depression, palpitation and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GXSTC drug-containing serum on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay, and nitric oxide (NO) levels and NO synthase (NOS) activity were measured as standards of endothelial dysfunction. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were evaluated using commercial kits. In addition, the protein expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS), AKT and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits was examined to evaluate the effect of GXSTC drug-containing serum on ECV304 cells. GXSTC significantly reversed the decrease in NO production induced by TNF-α (5 ng/ml) in ECV304 cells. The expression of NADPH oxidase subunits was increased by TNF-α treatment, but markedly inhibited by treatment with GXSTC in TNF-α-stimulated cells. In summary, GXSTC increased the production of NO in ECV304 cells and exerted a protective effect on ECV304 cells stimulated with TNF-α by upregulating the mRNA and protein expression of eNOS. This was accompanied by increased SOD activity and reduced MDA levels. These results suggested that GXSTC protects the endothelium via the NO pathway and exhibits antioxidant effects. PMID:25120637

  7. Molecular characterization of Fasciola hepatica and phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) genes from the North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Reaghi, Saber; Haghighi, Ali; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Spotin, Adel; Arzamani, Kourosh; Rouhani, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Fascioliasis is one of the most zoonotic diseases with global extension. As the epidemiological distribution of Fasciola may lead to various genetic patterns of the parasite, the aim of this study is to identify Fasciola hepatica based on spermatogenesis, and phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial (nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit I [ND1] and cytochrome oxidase subunit I) gene marker. Materials and Methods: In this study, 90 F. hepatica collected from 30 cattle at slaughterhouse located in three different geographical locations in the North-East of Iran were evaluated based on spermatogenetic ability and internal transcribed spacer 1 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship using mtDNA gene marker for the isolates from the North-East of Iran, and other countries were then analyzed. Results: Partial sequences of mtDNA showed eight haplotypes in both genes. The phylogenic analysis using neighbor joining as well as maximum likelihood methods showed similar topologies of trees. Pairwise fixation index between different F. hepatica populations calculated from the nucleotide data set of ND1 gene are statistically significant and show the genetic difference. Conclusion: F. hepatica found in this region of Iran has different genetic structures through the other Fasciola populations in the world. PMID:27733809

  8. Role of the C-terminal extension stacked on the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group in ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Asano, Tomoya; Komori, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2014-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase [EC 1.18.1.2] from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is homologous to the bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase, but possesses a unique C-terminal extension that covers the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) prosthetic group. In this report, we utilize BsFNR mutants depleted of their C-terminal residues to examine the importance of the C-terminal extension in reactions with NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis by spectroscopic and steady-state reaction analyses. The depletions of residues Y313 to K332 (whole C-terminal extension region) and S325 to K332 (His324 intact) resulted in significant increases in the catalytic efficiency with NADPH in diaphorase assay with ferricyanide, whereas Km values for ferricyanide were increased. In the cytochrome c reduction assay in the presence of B. subtilis ferredoxin, the S325-K332 depleted mutant displayed a significant decrease in the turnover rate with an Fd concentration range of 1-10 μM. The Y313-K332 depleted mutant demonstrated an increase in the rate of the direct reduction of horse heart cytochrome c in the absence of Fd. These data indicated that depletion of the C-terminal extension plays an important role in the reaction of BsFNR with ferredoxin.

  9. The Tuberculosis Necrotizing Toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb utilizes the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT) that induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Expression or injection of a non-catalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or zebrafish zygotes, respectively, demonstrating that the NAD+-glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a novel NAD+-glycohydrolase fold of TNT, which constitutes the founding member of a toxin family wide-spread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  10. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection. PMID:17725566

  11. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research. PMID:18429699

  12. Alkaloid cluster gene ccsA of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea encodes chanoclavine I synthase, a flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing oxidoreductase mediating the transformation of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan to chanoclavine I.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Nicole; Olsovská, Jana; Sulc, Miroslav; Tudzynski, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole-derived secondary metabolites synthesized by the phytopathogenic ascomycete Claviceps purpurea. In wild-type strains, they are exclusively produced in the sclerotium, a hibernation structure; for biotechnological applications, submerse production strains have been generated by mutagenesis. It was shown previously that the enzymes specific for alkaloid biosynthesis are encoded by a gene cluster of 68.5 kb. This ergot alkaloid cluster consists of 14 genes coregulated and expressed under alkaloid-producing conditions. Although the role of some of the cluster genes in alkaloid biosynthesis could be confirmed by a targeted knockout approach, further functional analyses are needed, especially concerning the early pathway-specific steps up to the production of clavine alkaloids. Therefore, the gene ccsA, originally named easE and preliminarily annotated as coding for a flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing oxidoreductase, was deleted in the C. purpurea strain P1, which is able to synthesize ergot alkaloids in axenic culture. Five independent knockout mutants were analyzed with regard to alkaloid-producing capability. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), ultrapressure liquid chromatography (UPLC), and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed accumulation of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan (Me-DMAT) and traces of dimethylallyltryptophan (DMAT), the first pathway-specific intermediate. Since other alkaloid intermediates could not be detected, we conclude that deletion of ccsA led to a block in alkaloid biosynthesis beyond Me-DMAT formation. Complementation with a ccsA/gfp fusion construct restored alkaloid biosynthesis. These data indicate that ccsA encodes the chanoclavine I synthase or a component thereof catalyzing the conversion of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan to chanoclavine I. PMID:20118373

  13. Emerging therapeutic roles for NAD(+) metabolism in mitochondrial and age-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sarika

    2016-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a central metabolic cofactor in eukaryotic cells that plays a critical role in regulating cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis. NAD(+) in its reduced form (i.e. NADH) serves as the primary electron donor in mitochondrial respiratory chain, which involves adenosine triphosphate production by oxidative phosphorylation. The NAD(+)/NADH ratio also regulates the activity of various metabolic pathway enzymes such as those involved in glycolysis, Kreb's cycle, and fatty acid oxidation. Intracellular NAD(+) is synthesized de novo from L-tryptophan, although its main source of synthesis is through salvage pathways from dietary niacin as precursors. NAD(+) is utilized by various proteins including sirtuins, poly ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs) and cyclic ADP-ribose synthases. The NAD(+) pool is thus set by a critical balance between NAD(+) biosynthetic and NAD(+) consuming pathways. Raising cellular NAD(+) content by inducing its biosynthesis or inhibiting the activity of PARP and cADP-ribose synthases via genetic or pharmacological means lead to sirtuins activation. Sirtuins modulate distinct metabolic, energetic and stress response pathways, and through their activation, NAD(+) directly links the cellular redox state with signaling and transcriptional events. NAD(+) levels decline with mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced NAD(+)/NADH ratio is implicated in mitochondrial disorders, various age-related pathologies as well as during aging. Here, I will provide an overview of the current knowledge on NAD(+) metabolism including its biosynthesis, utilization, compartmentalization and role in the regulation of metabolic homoeostasis. I will further discuss how augmenting intracellular NAD(+) content increases oxidative metabolism to prevent bioenergetic and functional decline in multiple models of mitochondrial diseases and age-related disorders, and how this knowledge could be translated to the clinic for human relevance. PMID

  14. Nicotinamide mononucleotide synthetase is the key enzyme for an alternative route of NAD biosynthesis in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Leonardo; Martynowski, Dariusz; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Eyobo, Yvonne; Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Magni, Giulio; Zhang, Hong; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the last 2 steps of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) cofactor biosynthesis, which catalyze the adenylylation of the nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) precursor to nicotinic acid dinucleotide (NaAD) followed by its amidation to NAD, constitute promising drug targets for the development of new antibiotics. These enzymes, NaMN adenylyltransferase (gene nadD) and NAD synthetase (gene nadE), respectively, are indispensable and conserved in nearly all bacterial pathogens. However, a comparative genome analysis of Francisella tularensis allowed us to predict the existence of an alternative route of NAD synthesis in this category A priority pathogen, the causative agent of tularaemia. In this route, the amidation of NaMN to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) occurs before the adenylylation reaction, which converts this alternative intermediate to the NAD cofactor. The first step is catalyzed by NMN synthetase, which was identified and characterized in this study. A crystal structure of this enzyme, a divergent member of the NadE family, was solved at 1.9-Å resolution in complex with reaction products, providing a rationale for its unusual substrate preference for NaMN over NaAD. The second step is performed by NMN adenylyltransferase of the NadM family. Here, we report validation of the predicted route (NaMN → NMN → NAD) in F. tularensis including mathematical modeling, in vitro reconstitution, and in vivo metabolite analysis in comparison with a canonical route (NaMN → NaAD → NAD) of NAD biosynthesis as represented by another deadly bacterial pathogen, Bacillus anthracis. PMID:19204287

  15. NAD(P)H-Independent Asymmetric C=C Bond Reduction Catalyzed by Ene Reductases by Using Artificial Co-substrates as the Hydrogen Donor

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Christoph K; Clay, Dorina; Entner, Marcello; Plank, Markus; Faber, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    To develop a nicotinamide-independent single flavoenzyme system for the asymmetric bioreduction of C=C bonds, four types of hydrogen donor, encompassing more than 50 candidates, were investigated. Six highly potent, cheap, and commercially available co-substrates were identified that (under the optimized conditions) resulted in conversions and enantioselectivities comparable with, or even superior to, those obtained with traditional two-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-recycling systems. PMID:24382795

  16. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:26881219

  17. [Enzymes related with NAD synthesis promote conversion of 1,4-butanediol to 4-hydroxybutyrate].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Guoqiang

    2011-12-01

    Besides medical application, 4-hydroxybutyrate (4-HB) is a precursor of P3HB4HB, a bioplastic showing excellent physical properties and degradability. Escherichia coli S17-1 (pZL-dhaT-aldD) can transform 1, 4-butanediol (1,4-BD) into 4HB with participation of cofactor NAD. To enhance productivity, nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (PncB) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase (NadE) were overexpressed to increase intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentration and promote reaction process. The shake flask fermentation result showed that the conversion rate increased by 13.03% with help of PncB-NadE, leading to 4.87 g/L 4HB from 10 g/L 1,4-BD, and productivity was increased by 40.91% to 1.86 g/g. These results demonstrated that expression of PncB and NadE is beneficial for conversion of 1,4-BD to 4HB. PMID:22506415

  18. Permeability of Rickettsia prowazekii to NAD

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, W.H.; Winkler, H.H.

    1989-02-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii accumulated radioactivity from (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD but not from (nicotinamide-4-3H)NAD, which demonstrated that NAD was not taken up intact. Extracellular NAD was hydrolyzed by rickettsiae with the products of hydrolysis, nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP, appearing in the incubation medium in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The particulate (membrane) fraction contained 90% of this NAD pyrophosphatase activity. Rickettsiae which had accumulated radiolabel after incubation with (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD were extracted, and the intracellular composition was analyzed by chromatography. The cells contained labeled AMP, ADP, ATP, and NAD. The NAD-derived intracellular AMP was transported via a pathway distinct from and in addition to the previously described AMP translocase. Exogenous AMP (1 mM) inhibited uptake of radioactivity from (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD and hydrolysis of extracellular NAD. AMP increased the percentage of intracellular radiolabel present as NAD. Nicotinamide mononucleotide was not taken up by the rickettsiae, did not inhibit hydrolysis of extracellular NAD, and was not a good inhibitor of the uptake of radiolabel from (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD. Neither AMP nor ATP (both of which are transported) could support the synthesis of intracellular NAD. The presence of intracellular (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD within an organism in which intact NAD could not be transported suggested the resynthesis from AMP of (adenine-2,8-3H)NAD at the locus of NAD hydrolysis and translocation.

  19. Inhibition of de novo NAD(+) synthesis by oncogenic URI causes liver tumorigenesis through DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Krishna S; Gomes, Ana L; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Graña, Osvaldo; Bakiri, Latifa; Ruppen, Isabel; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Sheshappanavar, Vinayata; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Pisano, David G; Wagner, Erwin F; Djouder, Nabil

    2014-12-01

    Molecular mechanisms responsible for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that hepatocyte-specific expression of unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI) leads to a multistep process of HCC development, whereas its genetic reduction in hepatocytes protects against diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. URI inhibits aryl hydrocarbon (AhR)- and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated transcription of enzymes implicated in L-tryptophan/kynurenine/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) metabolism, thereby causing DNA damage at early stages of tumorigenesis. Restoring NAD(+) pools with nicotinamide riboside (NR) prevents DNA damage and tumor formation. Consistently, URI expression in human HCC is associated with poor survival and correlates negatively with L-tryptophan catabolism pathway. Our results suggest that boosting NAD(+) can be prophylactic or therapeutic in HCC. PMID:25453901

  20. Monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt-dependent biosynthesis of NAD+ protects the heart against pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masamichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Toru; Yabumoto, Chizuru; Kudo-Sakamoto, Yoko; Kamo, Takehiro; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Lee, Jong-Kook; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis, and thereby regulates the deacetylase activity of sirtuins. Here we show accommodative regulation of myocardial NAD+ by monocyte-derived extracellular Nampt (eNampt), which is essential for hemodynamic compensation to pressure overload. Although intracellular Nampt (iNampt) expression was decreased in pressure-overloaded hearts, myocardial NAD+ concentration and Sirt1 activity were preserved. In contrast, iNampt was up-regulated in spleen and monocytes, and circulating eNampt protein and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a key precursor of NAD+, were significantly increased. Pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by FK866 or depletion of monocytes/macrophages by clodronate liposomes disrupted the homeostatic mechanism of myocardial NAD+ levels and NAD+-dependent Sirt1 activity, leading to susceptibility to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac decompensation in pressure-overloaded mice. These biochemical and hemodynamic defects were prevented by systemic administration of NMN. Our studies uncover a crucial role of monocyte-derived eNampt in myocardial adaptation to pressure overload, and highlight a potential intervention controlling myocardial NAD+ against heart failure. PMID:26522369

  1. NAD+ metabolism, a therapeutic target for age-related metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a central metabolic cofactor by virtue of its redox capacity, and as such regulates a wealth of metabolic transformations. However, the identification of the longevity protein Sir2, the founding member of the sirtuin protein family, as being NAD+-dependent reignited interest in this metabolite. The sirtuins (SIRT1-7 in mammals) utilize NAD+ to deacetylate proteins in different subcellular compartments with a variety of functions, but with a strong convergence on optimizing mitochondrial function. Since cellular NAD+ levels are limiting for sirtuin activity, boosting its levels is a powerful means to activate sirtuins as a potential therapy for mitochondrial, often age-related, diseases. Indeed, supplying excess precursors, or blocking its utilization by PARP enzymes or CD38/CD157, boosts NAD+ levels, activates sirtuins and promotes healthy aging. Here, we discuss the current state of knowledge of NAD+ metabolism, primarily in relation to sirtuin function. We highlight how NAD+ levels change in diverse physiological conditions, and how this can be employed as a pharmacological strategy. PMID:23742622

  2. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  3. ARTD1 (PARP1) activation and NAD+ in DNA repair and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fouquerel, Elise; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD+, is a small metabolite coenzyme that is essential for the progress of crucial cellular pathways including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and mitochondrial respiration. These processes consume and produce both oxidative and reduced forms of NAD (NAD+ and NADH). NAD+ is also important for ADP(ribosyl)ation reactions mediated by the ADP-ribosyltransferase enzymes (ARTDs) or deacetylation reactions catalysed by the sirtuins (SIRTs) which use NAD+ as a substrate. In this review, we highlight the significance of NAD+ catabolism in DNA repair and cell death through its utilization by ARTDs and SIRTs. We summarize the current findings on the involvement of ARTD1 activity in DNA repair and most specifically its involvement in the trigger of cell death mediated by energy depletion. By sharing the same substrate, the activities of ARTDs and SIRTs are tightly linked and dependent on each other and are thereby involved in the same cellular processes that play an important role in cancer biology, inflammatory diseases and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25283336

  4. Isolation and characterization of an NAD+-degrading bacterium PTX1 and its role in chromium biogeochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Puzon, Geoffrey J.; Huang, Yan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xun, Luying

    2008-06-01

    Microorganisms can reduce toxic chromate to less toxic trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. Besides Cr(OH)3 precipitates, some soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes are readily formed upon microbial, enzymatic, and chemical reduction of chromate. However, the biotransformation of the organo-Cr(III) complexes has not been characterized. We have previously reported the formation of a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-Cr(III) complex after enzymatic reduction of chromate. Although the NAD+-Cr(III) complex was stable under sterile conditions, microbial cells were identified as precipitates in a non-sterile NAD+-Cr(III) solution after extended incubation. The most dominant bacterium PTX1 was isolated and assigned to Leifsonia genus by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. PTX1 grew slowly on NAD+ with a doubling time of 17 h, and even more slowly on the NAD+-Cr(III) complex with an estimated doubling time of 35 days. The slow growth suggests that PTX1 passively grew on trace NAD+ dissociated from the NAD+-Cr(III) complex, facilitating further dissociation of the complex and formation of Cr(III) precipitates. Thus, organo-Cr(III) complexes might be an intrinsic link of the chromium biogeochemical cycle; they can be produced during chromate reduction and then further mineralized by microorganisms.

  5. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis.

  6. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:27683589

  7. Treatment with NAD(+) inhibited experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by activating AMPK/SIRT1 signaling pathway and modulating Th1/Th17 immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jueqiong; Zhao, Congying; Kong, Peng; Sun, Huanhuan; Sun, Zhe; Bian, Guanyun; Sun, Yafei; Guo, Li

    2016-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) plays vital roles in mitochondrial functions, cellular energy metabolism and calcium homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effect of NAD(+) administration for the treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. EAE, a classical animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), was induced by subcutaneous injection of myelin oligodendrocyteglycoprotein (MOG). The mice were treated with 250mg/kg (body weight) NAD(+) in PBS administered intraperitoneally once daily. We observed that NAD(+) treatment could lessen the severity of EAE. Additionally, NAD(+) treatment attenuated pathological injuries of EAE mice. We also found that the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/silent mating-type information regulation 2 homolog 1(SIRT1) pathway was activated in the NAD(+)-treated mice and NAD(+) treatment suppressed pro-inflammatory T cell responses. Our findings demonstrated that NAD(+) could be an effective and promising agent to treat multiple sclerosis and its effects on other autoimmune diseases should be explored. PMID:27500459

  8. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS. PMID:27002158

  9. Unprecedented head-to-head right-handed cross-links between the antitumor bis(mu-N,N'-di-p-tolylformamidinate) dirhodium(II,II) core and the dinucleotide d(ApA) with the adenine bases in the rare imino form.

    PubMed

    Chifotides, Helen T; Dunbar, Kim R

    2007-10-17

    Reactions of the anticancer active compound cis-[Rh2(DTolF)2(CH3CN)6](BF4)2 with 9-ethyladenine (9-EtAdeH) or the dinucleotide d(ApA) proceed with bridging adenine bases in the rare imino form (A*), spanning the Rh-Rh bond at equatorial positions via N7/N6. The inflection points for the pH-dependent H2 and H8 NMR resonance curves of cis-[Rh2(DTolF)2(9-EtAdeH)2](BF4)2 correspond to N1H deprotonation of the metal-stabilized rare imino tautomer, which takes place at pKa approximately 7.5 in CD3CN-d3, a considerably reduced value as compared to that of the imino form of 9-EtAdeH. Similarly, coordination of the metal atoms to the N7/N6 adenine sites in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} induces formation of the rare imino tautomer of the bases with a concomitant substantial decrease in the basicity of the N1H sites (pKa approximately 7.0 in CD3CN-d3), as compared to the imino form of the free dinucleotide. The presence of the adenine bases in the rare imino form, due to bidentate metalation of the N6/N7 sites, is further corroborated by DQF-COSY H2/N1H and ROE N1H/N6H cross-peaks in the 2D NMR spectra of Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} in CD3CN-d3 at -38 degrees C. Due to the N7/N6 bridging mode of the adenine bases in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)}, only the anti orientation of the imino tautomer is possible. The imino form A* of adenine in DNA may result in AT-->CG transversions or AT-->GC transitions, which can eventually lead to lethal mutations. The HH arrangement of the bases in Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} is indicated by the H8/H8 NOE cross-peaks in the 2D ROESY NMR spectrum, whereas the formamidinate bridging groups dictate the presence of one right-handed conformer HH1R in solution. Complete characterization of Rh2(DTolF)2{d(ApA)} by 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling supports the presence of the HH1R conformer, anti orientation of both sugar residues about the glycosyl bonds, and N-type conformation for the 5'-A base.

  10. Structural Basis for NADH/NAD+ Redox Sensing by a Rex Family Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, K.J.; Soares, A.; Strain-Damerell, C. M.; Xie, K.; Brekasis, D.; Pagent, M. S. B.; Kielkopf, C. L.

    2010-05-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides have emerged as key signals of the cellular redox state. Yet the structural basis for allosteric gene regulation by the ratio of reduced NADH to oxidized NAD{sup +} is poorly understood. A key sensor among Gram-positive bacteria, Rex represses alternative respiratory gene expression until a limited oxygen supply elevates the intracellular NADH:NAD{sup +} ratio. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism for NADH/NAD{sup +} sensing among Rex family members by determining structures of Thermus aquaticus Rex bound to (1) NAD{sup +}, (2) DNA operator, and (3) without ligand. Comparison with the Rex/NADH complex reveals that NADH releases Rex from the DNA site following a 40{sup o} closure between the dimeric subunits. Complementary site-directed mutagenesis experiments implicate highly conserved residues in NAD-responsive DNA-binding activity. These rare views of a redox sensor in action establish a means for slight differences in the nicotinamide charge, pucker, and orientation to signal the redox state of the cell.

  11. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sporty, Jennifer L.; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2009-01-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH3CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV–Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  12. Physiology-based kinetic modeling of neuronal energy metabolism unravels the molecular basis of NAD(P)H fluorescence transients

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Kann, Oliver; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the cellular fluorescence of the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) is one of the few metabolic readouts that enable noninvasive and time-resolved monitoring of the functional status of mitochondria in neuronal tissues. Stimulation-induced transient changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity frequently display a biphasic characteristic that is influenced by various molecular processes, e.g., intracellular calcium dynamics, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, the malate–aspartate shuttle, the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, oxygen supply or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand. To evaluate the relative impact of these processes, we developed and validated a detailed physiologic mathematical model of the energy metabolism of neuronal cells and used the model to simulate metabolic changes of single cells and tissue slices under different settings of stimulus-induced activity and varying nutritional supply of glucose, pyruvate or lactate. Notably, all experimentally determined NAD(P)H responses could be reproduced with one and the same generic cellular model. Our computations reveal that (1) cells with quite different metabolic status may generate almost identical NAD(P)H responses and (2) cells of the same type may quite differently contribute to aggregate NAD(P)H responses recorded in brain slices, depending on the spatial location within the tissue. Our computational approach reconciles different and sometimes even controversial experimental findings and improves our mechanistic understanding of the metabolic changes underlying live-cell NAD(P)H fluorescence transients. PMID:25899300

  13. Phosphate-responsive signaling pathway is a novel component of NAD+ metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin, Su-Ju

    2011-04-22

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor involved in various cellular biochemical reactions. To date the signaling pathways that regulate NAD(+) metabolism remain unclear due to the dynamic nature and complexity of the NAD(+) metabolic pathways and the difficulty of determining the levels of the interconvertible pyridine nucleotides. Nicotinamide riboside (NmR) is a key pyridine metabolite that is excreted and re-assimilated by yeast and plays important roles in the maintenance of NAD(+) pool. In this study we establish a NmR-specific reporter system and use it to identify yeast mutants with altered NmR/NAD(+) metabolism. We show that the phosphate-responsive signaling (PHO) pathway contributes to control NAD(+) metabolism. Yeast strains with activated PHO pathway show increases in both the release rate and internal concentration of NmR. We further identify Pho8, a PHO-regulated vacuolar phosphatase, as a potential NmR production factor. We also demonstrate that Fun26, a homolog of human ENT (equilibrative nucleoside transporter), localizes to the vacuolar membrane and establishes the size of the vacuolar and cytosolic NmR pools. In addition, the PHO pathway responds to depletion of cellular nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and mediates nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) catabolism, thereby contributing to both NmR salvage and phosphate acquisition. Therefore, NaMN is a putative molecular link connecting the PHO signaling and NAD(+) metabolic pathways. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis and regulation of NAD(+) metabolism in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21349851

  14. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-01

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+. PMID:17914902

  15. Exogenous NAD(+) decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-Ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-Li; Wang, Yi-Xiao; Zhao, Pei-Quan; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2016-05-31

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD(+) administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD(+) administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD(+) administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD(+) against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD(+) administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD(+) administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD.

  16. Exogenous NAD+ decreases oxidative stress and protects H2O2-treated RPE cells against necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Ke-ke; Tong, Yao; Zhou, Ya-li; Wang, Yi-xiao; Zhao, Pei-quan; Wang, Zhao-yang

    2016-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, which can lead to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell death by inducing ATP depletion and DNA repair, is believed to be a prominent pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study, we showed that and 0.1 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) administration significantly blocked RPE cell death induced by 300 μM H2O2. Further investigation showed that H2O2 resulted in increased intracellular ROS level, activation of PARP-1 and subsequently necrotic death of RPE cells. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly decreased intracellular and intranuclear ROS levels in H2O2-treated RPE cells. In addition, NAD+ administration to H2O2-treated RPE cells inhibited the activation of PARP-1 and protected the RPE cells against necrotic death. Moreover, exogenous NAD+ administration up-regulated autophagy in the H2O2-treated RPE cells. Inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 blocked the decrease of intracellular and intranuclear ROS level. Besides, inhibition of autophagy by LY294002 abolished the protection of exogenous NAD+ against H2O2-induced cell necrotic death. Taken together, our findings indicate that that exogenous NAD+ administration suppresses H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protects RPE cells against PARP-1 mediated necrotic death through the up-regulation of autophagy. The results suggest that exogenous NAD+ administration might be potential value for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27240523

  17. Quantitation of NAD+ biosynthesis from the salvage pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Lin, S; Kato, M; Ognibene, T; Stewart, B; Turteltaub, K; Bench, G

    2009-02-18

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) is synthesized via two major pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems: the de novo biosynthesis pathway from tryptophan precursors, or by the salvage biosynthesis pathway from either extracellular nicotinic acid or various intracellular NAD{sup +} decomposition products. NAD{sup +} biosynthesis via the salvage pathway has been linked to an increase in yeast replicative lifespan under calorie restriction (CR). However, the relative contribution of each pathway to NAD{sup +} biosynthesis under both normal and CR conditions is not known. Here, we have performed lifespan, NAD{sup +} and NADH (the reduced form of NAD{sup +}) analyses on BY4742 wild type, NAD+ salvage pathway knockout (npt1{Delta}), and NAD+ de novo pathway knockout (qpt1{Delta}) yeast strains cultured in media containing either 2% glucose (normal growth) or 0.5% glucose (CR). We have utilized {sup 14}C labeled nicotinic acid in the culture media combined with HPLC speciation and both UV and {sup 14}C detection to quantitate the total amounts of NAD{sup +} and NADH and the amounts derived from the salvage pathway. We observe that wild type and qpt1{Delta} yeast exclusively utilize extracellular nicotinic acid for NAD{sup +} and NADH biosynthesis under both the 2% and 0.5% glucose growth conditions suggesting that the de novo pathway plays little role if a functional salvage pathway is present. We also observe that NAD{sup +} concentrations decrease in all three strains under CR. However, unlike the wild type strain, NADH concentrations do not decrease and NAD{sup +}:NADH ratios do not increase under CR for either knockout strain. Lifespan analyses reveal that CR results in a lifespan increase of approximately 25% for the wild type and qpt1{Delta} strains, while no increase in lifespan is observed for the npt1{Delta} strain. In combination these data suggest that having a functional salvage pathway is more important than the absolute levels of NAD

  18. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD+-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 Å resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  19. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  20. Replacement of Tyr50 stacked on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group modulates Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase activity toward NADPH.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Naito, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Erika; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductases ([EC 1.18.1.2], [EC 1.18.1.3], FNRs) from green sulfur bacteria, purple non-sulfur bacteria and most of Firmicutes, such as Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) are homo-dimeric flavoproteins homologous to bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. These FNRs contain two unique aromatic residues stacked on the si- and re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the FAD prosthetic group whose configurations are often found among other types of flavoproteins including plant-type FNR and flavodoxin, but not in bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. To investigate the role of the si-face Tyr50 residue in BsFNR, we replaced Tyr50 with Gly, Ser, and Trp and examined its spectroscopic properties and enzymatic activities in the presence of NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis (BsFd). The replacement of Tyr50 to Gly (Y50G), Ser (Y50S), and Trp (Y50W) in BsFNR resulted in a blue shift of the FAD transition bands. The Y50G and Y50S mutations enhanced the FAD fluorescence emission, whereas those of the wild type and Y50W mutant were quenched. All three mutants decreased thermal stabilities compared to wild type. Using a diaphorase assay, the k cat values for the Y50G and Y50S mutants in the presence of NADPH and ferricyanide were decreased to less than 5 % of the wild type activity. The Y50W mutant retained approximately 20 % reactivity in the diaphorase assay and BsFd-dependent cytochrome c reduction assay relative to wild type. The present results suggest that Tyr50 modulates the electronic properties and positioning of the prosthetic group.

  1. Metabolic Response to NAD Depletion across Cell Lines Is Highly Variable

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yang; Kwong, Mandy; Daemen, Anneleen; Belvin, Marcia; Liang, Xiaorong; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor involved in a wide range of cellular metabolic processes and is a key metabolite required for tumor growth. NAMPT, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, which converts nicotinamide (NAM) to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the immediate precursor of NAD, is an attractive therapeutic target as inhibition of NAMPT reduces cellular NAD levels and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. However, there is limited understanding of the metabolic response to NAD depletion across cancer cell lines and whether all cell lines respond in a uniform manner. To explore this we selected two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines that are sensitive to the NAMPT inhibitor GNE-617 (A549, NCI-H1334), one that shows intermediate sensitivity (NCI-H441), and one that is insensitive (LC-KJ). Even though NAD was reduced in all cell lines there was surprising heterogeneity in their metabolic response. Both sensitive cell lines reduced glycolysis and levels of di- and tri-nucleotides and modestly increased oxidative phosphorylation, but they differed in their ability to combat oxidative stress. H1334 cells activated the stress kinase AMPK, whereas A549 cells were unable to activate AMPK as they contain a mutation in LKB1, which prevents activation of AMPK. However, A549 cells increased utilization of the Pentose Phosphate pathway (PPP) and had lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than H1334 cells, indicating that A549 cells are better able to modulate an increase in oxidative stress. Inherent resistance of LC-KJ cells is associated with higher baseline levels of NADPH and a delayed reduction of NAD upon NAMPT inhibition. Our data reveals that cell lines show heterogeneous response to NAD depletion and that the underlying molecular and genetic framework in cells can influence the metabolic response to NAMPT inhibition. PMID:27711204

  2. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance.

  3. Single sample extraction and HPLC processing for quantification of NAD and NADH levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Kabir, M M; Turteltaub, K; Ognibene, T; Lin, S; Bench, G

    2008-01-10

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, approximately 10{sup 8} yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under non-oxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50-mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH{sub 3}CN + 50-mM ammonium acetate (3:1; v:v) was added to the cell lysates. After sample centrifugation to pellet precipitated proteins, organic solvent removal was performed on supernatants by chloroform extraction. The remaining aqueous phase was dried and resuspended in 50-mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-VIS absorbance detection. Applicability of this procedure for quantifying NAD and NADH levels was evaluated by culturing yeast under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. NAD and NADH contents are similar to previously reported levels in yeast obtained using enzymatic assays performed separately on acid (for NAD) and alkali (for NADH) extracts. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (1) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in mammalian and bacterial cell cultures; and (2) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

  4. PGC1α drives NAD biosynthesis linking oxidative metabolism to renal protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mei T; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K; Berg, Anders H; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bhasin, Manoj K; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B; Stillman, Isaac E; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-24

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischaemia. Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients. Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α, is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis. Following renal ischaemia, Pgc1α(-/-) (also known as Ppargc1a(-/-)) mice develop local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (NAM, also known as nicotinamide), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Notably, exogenous NAM improves local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischaemic Pgc1α(-/-) mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulate the effects of NAM supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischaemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulates the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuates the de novo pathway. NAM enhances NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augments production of the fat breakdown product β-hydroxybutyrate, leading to increased production of prostaglandin PGE2 (ref. 5), a secreted autacoid that maintains renal function. NAM treatment reverses established ischaemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-hydroxybutyrate signalling or prostaglandin production similarly abolishes PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in ageing and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate NAM and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  5. The structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo NAD(+) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) for reducing chicken embryo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) content in OPI-induced teratogenesis and compare them with those needed for OPI inhibition of yolk sac membrane kynurenine formamidase (KFase), the proposed primary target for OPI teratogens in chicken embryos. The comparative molecular field analysis (COMFA) of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) revealed the electrostatic and steric fields as good predictors of OPI structural requirements to reduce NAD(+) content in chicken embryos. The dominant electrostatic interactions were localized at nitrogen-1, nitrogen-3, nitrogen of 2-amino substituent of the pyrimidinyl of pyrimidinyl phosphorothioates, and at the oxygen of crotonamide carbonyl in crotonamide phosphates. Bulkiness of the substituents at carbon-6 of the pyrimidinyls and/or N-substituents of crotonamides was the steric structural component that contributed to superiority of those OPI for reducing embryonic NAD(+) levels. Both electrostatic and steric requirements are similar to those defined in our previous study for OPI inhibition of chicken embryo yolk sac membrane KFase. The findings of this study provide another piece of evidence for the cause-and-effect relationship between yolk sac membrane KFase inhibition and reduced embryo NAD(+) content in NAD-associated OPI-induced teratogenesis in chickens.

  6. Gene transfers shaped the evolution of de novo NAD+ biosynthesis in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ternes, Chad M; Schönknecht, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    NAD(+) is an essential molecule for life, present in each living cell. It can function as an electron carrier or cofactor in redox biochemistry and energetics, and serves as substrate to generate the secondary messenger cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Although de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis is essential, different metabolic pathways exist in different eukaryotic clades. The kynurenine pathway starting with tryptophan was most likely present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and is active in fungi and animals. The aspartate pathway, detected in most photosynthetic eukaryotes, was probably acquired from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to chloroplasts. An evolutionary analysis of enzymes catalyzing de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis resulted in evolutionary trees incongruent with established organismal phylogeny, indicating numerous gene transfers. Endosymbiotic gene transfers probably introduced the aspartate pathway into eukaryotes and may have distributed it among different photosynthetic clades. In addition, several horizontal gene transfers substituted eukaryotic genes with bacterial orthologs. Although horizontal gene transfer is accepted as a key mechanism in prokaryotic evolution, it is supposed to be rare in eukaryotic evolution. The essential metabolic pathway of de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis in eukaryotes was shaped by numerous gene transfers.

  7. NAD+-Metabolizing Ectoenzymes in Remodeling Tumor–Host Interactions: The Human Myeloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L.; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zito, Andrea; Roato, Ilaria; Morandi, Fabio; Marimpietri, Danilo; Bolzoni, Marina; Toscani, Denise; Oldham, Robert J.; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Sasser, A. Kate; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-enzyme reported to operate both intra- and extracellularly. In the extracellular space, NAD+ can elicit signals by binding purinergic P2 receptors or it can serve as the substrate for a chain of ectoenzymes. As a substrate, it is converted to adenosine (ADO) and then taken up by the cells, where it is transformed and reincorporated into the intracellular nucleotide pool. Nucleotide-nucleoside conversion is regulated by membrane-bound ectoenzymes. CD38, the main mammalian enzyme that hydrolyzes NAD+, belongs to the ectoenzymatic network generating intracellular Ca2+-active metabolites. Within this general framework, the extracellular conversion of NAD+ can vary significantly according to the tissue environment or pathological conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor cells exploit such a network for migrating and homing to protected areas and, even more importantly, for evading the immune response. We report on the experience of this lab to exploit human multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic expansion of plasma cells, as a model to investigate these issues. MM cells express high levels of surface CD38 and grow in an environment prevalently represented by closed niches hosted in the bone marrow (BM). An original approach of this study derives from the recent use of the clinical availability of therapeutic anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in perturbing tumor viability and enzymatic functions in conditions mimicking what happens in vivo. PMID:26393653

  8. Gene Transfers Shaped the Evolution of De Novo NAD+ Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ternes, Chad M.; Schönknecht, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    NAD+ is an essential molecule for life, present in each living cell. It can function as an electron carrier or cofactor in redox biochemistry and energetics, and serves as substrate to generate the secondary messenger cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Although de novo NAD+ biosynthesis is essential, different metabolic pathways exist in different eukaryotic clades. The kynurenine pathway starting with tryptophan was most likely present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and is active in fungi and animals. The aspartate pathway, detected in most photosynthetic eukaryotes, was probably acquired from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to chloroplasts. An evolutionary analysis of enzymes catalyzing de novo NAD+ biosynthesis resulted in evolutionary trees incongruent with established organismal phylogeny, indicating numerous gene transfers. Endosymbiotic gene transfers probably introduced the aspartate pathway into eukaryotes and may have distributed it among different photosynthetic clades. In addition, several horizontal gene transfers substituted eukaryotic genes with bacterial orthologs. Although horizontal gene transfer is accepted as a key mechanism in prokaryotic evolution, it is supposed to be rare in eukaryotic evolution. The essential metabolic pathway of de novo NAD+ biosynthesis in eukaryotes was shaped by numerous gene transfers. PMID:25169983

  9. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  10. Augmentation of NAD+ by NQO1 attenuates cisplatin-mediated hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-J; Oh, G-S; Shen, A; Lee, S-B; Choe, S-K; Kwon, K-B; Lee, S; Seo, K-S; Kwak, T H; Park, R; So, H-S

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum-II) is an extensively used chemotherapeutic agent, and one of its most adverse effects is ototoxicity. A number of studies have demonstrated that these effects are related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the precise mechanism underlying cisplatin-associated ototoxicity is still unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that, in cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity, the levels and activities of SIRT1 are suppressed by the reduction of intracellular NAD+ levels. We provide evidence that the decrease in SIRT1 activity and expression facilitated by increasing poly(ADP-ribose) transferase (PARP)-1 activation and microRNA-34a through p53 activation aggravates cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. Moreover, we show that the induction of cellular NAD+ levels using β-lapachone (β-Lap), whose intracellular target is NQO1, prevents the toxic effects of cisplatin through the regulation of PARP-1 and SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD+ levels by pharmacological agents could be a promising therapeutic approach for protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:24922076

  11. Properties of NAD (P) H azoreductase from alkaliphilic red bacteria Aquiflexum sp. DL6.

    PubMed

    Misal, Santosh A; Lingojwar, Devendra P; Gawai, Kachru R

    2013-12-01

    Azoreductase plays a key role in bioremediation and biotransformation of azo dyes. It initializes the reduction of azo bond in azo dye metabolism under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. In the present study, we isolated an alkaliphilic red-colored Aquiflexum sp. DL6 bacterial strain and identified by 16S rRNA method. We report nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent azoreductase purified from Aquiflexum sp. DL6 by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography methods. The azoreductase was purified up to 30-fold with 37 % recovery. The molecular weight was found to be 80 kDa. The optimum activity was observed at pH 7.4 and temperature 60 °C with amaranth azo dye as a substrate. The thermal stability of azoreductase was up to 80 °C. The azoreductase has shown a wide range of substrate specificity, including azo dyes and nitro aromatic compounds. Metal ions have no significant inhibitory action on azoreductase activity. The apparent K m and V max values for amaranth azo dye were 1.11 mM and 30.77 U/mg protein respectively. This NAD (P) H azoreductase represents the first azoreductase to be characterized from alkaliphilic bacteria.

  12. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  13. Dynamic conformations of the CD38-mediated NAD cyclization captured in a single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HongMin; Graeff, Richard; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, LiangRen; Zhang, LiHe; Lee, HonCheung; Hao, Quan

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular domain of human CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme involved in the metabolism of two Ca2+ messengers, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). When NAD is used as a substrate, CD38 predominantly hydrolyzes it to ADP-ribose with a trace mount of cADPR produced through cyclization of the substrate. However, a mutation of a key residue at the active site, E146A, inhibits the hydrolysis activity of CD38 but greatly increases its cyclization activity. To understand the role of the residue, E146, in the catalytic process, we determined the crystal structure of the E146A mutant protein with a substrate analogue, ara-2’F-NAD. The structure captured the enzymatic reaction intermediates in six different conformations in a crystallographic asymmetric unit. The structural results indicate a folding-back process for the adenine ring of the substrate and provides the first multiple snap shots of the process. Our approach of utilizing multiple molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit should be generally applicable for capturing the dynamic nature of enzymatic catalysis. PMID:21134381

  14. Plastidial NAD-Dependent Malate Dehydrogenase Is Critical for Embryo Development and Heterotrophic Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Seraina; Liu, Hung-Chi; Stadler, Martha; Schreier, Tina; Eicke, Simona; Lue, Wei-Ling; Truernit, Elisabeth; Zeeman, Samuel C.; Chen, Jychian; Kötting, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    In illuminated chloroplasts, one mechanism involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis is the malate-oxaloacetate (OAA) shuttle. Excess electrons from photosynthetic electron transport in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced are used by NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) to reduce OAA to malate, thus regenerating the electron acceptor NADP. NADP-MDH is a strictly redox-regulated, light-activated enzyme that is inactive in the dark. In the dark or in nonphotosynthetic tissues, the malate-OAA shuttle was proposed to be mediated by the constitutively active plastidial NAD-specific MDH isoform (pdNAD-MDH), but evidence is scarce. Here, we reveal the critical role of pdNAD-MDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. A pdnad-mdh null mutation is embryo lethal. Plants with reduced pdNAD-MDH levels by means of artificial microRNA (miR-mdh-1) are viable, but dark metabolism is altered as reflected by increased nighttime malate, starch, and glutathione levels and a reduced respiration rate. In addition, miR-mdh-1 plants exhibit strong pleiotropic effects, including dwarfism, reductions in chlorophyll levels, photosynthetic rate, and daytime carbohydrate levels, and disordered chloroplast ultrastructure, particularly in developing leaves, compared with the wild type. pdNAD-MDH deficiency in miR-mdh-1 can be functionally complemented by expression of a microRNA-insensitive pdNAD-MDH but not NADP-MDH, confirming distinct roles for NAD- and NADP-linked redox homeostasis. PMID:24453164

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of the effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on endogenous NAD(P)H in living cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Aneba, Swida; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan; Comte, Blandine

    2013-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major biochemical consequence of the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids in cell membranes and causes damage to membrane integrity and loss of protein function. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), one of the most reactive products of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation of membrane phospholipids, has been shown to be capable of affecting both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced [NAD(P)H] as well as NADH production. However, the understanding of its effects in living cardiac cells is still lacking. Our goal was to therefore investigate HNE effects on NAD(P)H noninvasively in living cardiomyocytes. Spectrally resolved lifetime detection of endogenous fluorescence, an innovative noninvasive technique, was employed. Individual fluorescence components were resolved by spectral linear unmixing approach. Gathered results revealed that HNE reduced the amplitude of both resolved NAD(P)H components in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, HNE increased flavoprotein fluorescence and responsiveness of the NAD(P)H component ratio to glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. HNE also increased the percentage of oxidized nucleotides and decreased maximal NADH production. Presented data indicate that HNE provoked an important cell oxidation by acting on NAD(P)H regulating systems in cardiomyocytes. Understanding the precise role of oxidative processes and their products in living cells is crucial for finding new noninvasive tools for biomedical diagnostics of pathophysiological states.

  16. Dietary proanthocyanidins boost hepatic NAD+ metabolism and SIRT1 expression and activity in a dose-dependent manner in healthy rats

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Gerard; Suárez, Manuel; Ardid-Ruiz, Andrea; Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Correig, Xavier; Arola, Lluís; Bladé, Cinta

    2016-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been reported to modulate multiple targets by simultaneously controlling many pivotal metabolic pathways in the liver. However, the precise mechanism of PAC action on the regulation of the genes that control hepatic metabolism remains to be clarified. Accordingly, we used a metabolomic approach combining both nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry analysis to evaluate the changes induced by different doses of grape-seed PACs in the liver of healthy rats. Here, we report that PACs significantly increased the hepatic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) content in a dose-dependent manner by specifically modulating the hepatic concentrations of the major NAD+ precursors as well as the mRNA levels of the genes that encode the enzymes involved in the cellular metabolism of NAD+. Notably, Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) gene expression was also significantly up-regulated in a dose-response pattern. The increase in both the NAD+ availability and Sirt1 mRNA levels, in turn, resulted in the hepatic activation of SIRT1, which was significantly associated with improved protection against hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Our data clearly indicates that PAC consumption could be a valid tool to enhance hepatic SIRT1 activity through the modulation of NAD+ levels. PMID:27102823

  17. N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels regulate differentially the release of noradrenaline, ATP and β-NAD in blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lisa M.; Yamboliev, Ilia A.; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.

    2009-01-01

    Using HPLC techniques we evaluated the electrical field stimulation-evoked overflow of noradrenaline (NA), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) in the presence of low nanomolar concentrations of ω-conotoxin GVIA or ω-agatoxin IVA in the canine mesenteric arteries and veins. ω-conotoxin GVIA abolished the evoked overflow of NA and β-NAD in artery and vein, whereas the evoked overflow of ATP remained unchanged in the presence of ω-conotoxin GVIA. ω-agatoxin IVA significantly reduced the evoked overflow of ATP and β-NAD. The overflow of NA remained largely unaffected by ω-agatoxin IVA, except at 16 Hz in the vein where the overflow of NA was reduced by about 50%. Artery and vein exhibited similar expression levels of the α1B (CaV2.2, N-type) subunit, whereas the vein showed greater levels of the α1A (CaV2.1, P/Q-type) subunit than artery. Therefore, there are at least two release sites for NA, β-NAD and ATP in the canine mesenteric artery and vein: an N-type-associated site releasing primarily NA, β-NAD and some ATP, and a P/Q-type-associated site releasing ATP, β-NAD and some NA. The N-type-mediated mechanisms are equally expressed in artery and vein, whereas the P/Q-type-mediated mechanisms are more pronounced in the vein and may ensure additional neurotransmitter release at higher levels of neural activity. In artery, β-NAD caused a dual effect consisting of vasodilatation or vasoconstriction depending on concentrations, whereas vein responded with vasodilatation only. In contrast, ATP caused vasoconstriction in both vessels. β-NAD and ATP may mediate disparate functions in the canine mesenteric resistive and capacitative circulations. PMID:18824011

  18. Enhanced Degradation of Dihydrofolate Reductase through Inhibition of NAD Kinase by Nicotinamide Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Tedeschi, Philip; AdeBisi Lawal, Rialnat; Banerjee, Debabrata; Scotto, Kathleen; Kerrigan, John E.; Lee, Kuo-Chieh; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Bertino, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), because of its essential role in DNA synthesis, has been targeted for the treatment of a wide variety of human diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. Methotrexate (MTX), a tight binding inhibitor of DHFR, is one of the most widely used drugs in cancer treatment and is especially effective in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and osteosarcoma. Limitations to its use in cancer include natural resistance and acquired resistance due to decreased cellular uptake and decreased retention due to impaired polyglutamylate formation and toxicity at higher doses. Here, we describe a novel mechanism to induce DHFR degradation through cofactor depletion in neoplastic cells by inhibition of NAD kinase, the only enzyme responsible for generating NADP, which is rapidly converted to NADPH by dehydrogenases/reductases. We identified an inhibitor of NAD kinase, thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPS), which led to accelerated degradation of DHFR and to inhibition of cancer cell growth. Of importance, combination treatment of NADPS with MTX displayed significant synergy in a metastatic colon cancer cell line and was effective in a MTX-transport resistant leukemic cell line. We suggest that NAD kinase is a valid target for further inhibitor development for cancer treatment. PMID:23197646

  19. Oxidation of NADPH by submitochondrial particles from beef heart in complete absence of transhydrogenase activity from NADPH to NAD.

    PubMed

    Djavadi-Ohaniance, L; Hatefi, H

    1975-12-25

    Treatment of submitochondrial particles (ETP) with trypsin at 0 degrees destroyed NADPH leads to NAD (or 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide, AcPyAD) transhydrogenase activity. NADH oxidase activity was unaffected; NADPH oxidase and NADH leads to AcPyAD transhydrogenase activities were diminished by less than 10%. When ETP was incubated with trypsin at 30 degrees, NADPH leads to NAD transhydrogenase activity was rapidly lost, NADPH oxidase activity was slowly destroyed, but NADH oxidase activity remained intact. The reduction pattern by NADPH, NADPH + NAD, and NADH of chromophores absorbing at 475 minus 510 nm (flavin and iron-sulfur centers) in complex I (NADH-ubiquinone reductase) or ETP treated with trypsin at 0 degrees also indicated specific destruction of transhydrogenase activity. The sensitivity of the NADPH leads to NAD transhydrogenase reaction to trypsin suggested the involvement of susceptible arginyl residues in the enzyme. Arginyl residues are considered to be positively charged binding sites for anionic substrates and ligands in many enzymes. Treatment of ETP with the specific arginine-binding reagent, butanedione, inhibited transhydrogenation from NADPH leads to NAD (or AcPyAD). It had no effect on NADH oxidation, and inhibited NADPH oxidation and NADH leads to AcPyAD transhydrogenation by only 10 to 15% even after 30 to 60 min incubation of ETP with butanedione. The inhibition of NADPH leads to NAD transhydrogenation was diminished considerably when butanedione was added to ETP in the presence of NAD or NADP. When both NAD and NADP were present, the butanedione effect was completely abolished, thus suggesting the possible presence of arginyl residues at the nucleotide binding site of the NADPH leads to NAD transhydrogenase enzyme. Under conditions that transhydrogenation from NADPH to NAD was completely inhibited by trypsin or butanedione, NADPH oxidation rate was larger than or equal to 220 nmol min-1 mg-1 ETP protein at pH 6.0 and 30 degrees

  20. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana . E-mail: apinkassaraf@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Markova, N.G. . E-mail: nmarkova@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Simon, M. . E-mail: marsimon@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    2005-10-21

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides.

  1. Inhibition of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of CD38 by carbocyclic NAD analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, K A; Klis, M; Kornet, J; Coyle, D; Amé, J C; Jacobson, M K; Slama, J T

    1998-01-01

    Carba-NAD and pseudocarba-NAD are carbocyclic analogues of NAD+ in which a 2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the beta-d-ribonucleotide ring of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+ [Slama and Simmons (1988) Biochemistry 27, 183-193]. These carbocyclic NAD+ analogues, related to each other as diastereomers, have been tested as inhibitors of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38, dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, mouse CD38 and Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase. Pseudocarba-NAD, the carbocyclic dinucleotide in which l-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the d-ribose of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+, was found to be the more potent inhibitor. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to inhibit the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38 competitively, with Ki=148 microM determined for the recombinant extracellular protein domain and Ki=180 microM determined for the native protein expressed as a cell-surface enzyme on cultured Jurkat cells. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of the purified dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, with Kis=47 miroM and Kii=198 microM. Neither pseudocarba-NAD nor carba-NAD inhibited mouse CD38 or Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase significantly at concentrations up to 1 mM. The results underscore significant species differences in the sensitivity of these enzymes to inhibition, and indicate that pseudocarba-NAD will be useful as an inhibitor of the enzymic activity of human but not mouse CD38 in studies using cultured cells. PMID:9794804

  2. The mechanism of RNA 5′ capping with NAD+, NADH and desphospho-CoA.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jeremy G; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Yuan; Panova, Natalya; Barvík, Ivan; Greene, Landon; Liu, Min; Buckley, Brian; Krásný, Libor; Lee, Jeehiun K; Kaplan, Craig D; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2016-07-21

    The chemical nature of the 5′ end of RNA is a key determinant of RNA stability, processing, localization and translation efficiency, and has been proposed to provide a layer of ‘epitranscriptomic’ gene regulation. Recently it has been shown that some bacterial RNA species carry a 5′-end structure reminiscent of the 5′ 7-methylguanylate ‘cap’ in eukaryotic RNA. In particular, RNA species containing a 5′-end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or 3′-desphospho-coenzyme A (dpCoA) have been identified in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. It has been proposed that NAD+, reduced NAD+ (NADH) and dpCoA caps are added to RNA after transcription initiation, in a manner analogous to the addition of 7-methylguanylate caps. Here we show instead that NAD+, NADH and dpCoA are incorporated into RNA during transcription initiation, by serving as non-canonical initiating nucleotides (NCINs) for de novo transcription initiation by cellular RNA polymerase (RNAP). We further show that both bacterial RNAP and eukaryotic RNAP II incorporate NCIN caps, that promoter DNA sequences at and upstream of the transcription start site determine the efficiency of NCIN capping, that NCIN capping occurs in vivo, and that NCIN capping has functional consequences. We report crystal structures of transcription initiation complexes containing NCIN-capped RNA products. Our results define the mechanism and structural basis of NCIN capping, and suggest that NCIN-mediated ‘ab initio capping’ may occur in all organisms. PMID:27383794

  3. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  4. Antidepressants may lead to a decrease in niacin and NAD in patients with poor dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Margaretha; Swanepoel, Annie; Bipath, Priyesh

    2015-03-01

    The term niacin is the generic name for the two compounds nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, the major dietary precursors for two important coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its phosphorylated form, NADP. Niacin is important for the maintenance of cellular integrity and energy production and is involved in more than 500 intracellular reactions. Deficiencies of niacin may contribute to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Patients who develop nutritional deficiencies as a result of poor dietary intake, especially inadequate intake of proteins and vitamins, could potentially suffer from niacin deficiency and NAD depletion. However, de novo synthesis of niacin and NAD in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism may compensate for impaired dietary intake. The rate of synthesis of NAD and niacin from tryptophan oxidation depends on the induction of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma. Niacin synthesis is not limited by a decrease in tryptophan and excessive IDO activity may therefore lead to a decline in tryptophan levels. Antidepressants have an anti-inflammatory effect, including reduction of interferon-gamma and therefore inhibition of IDO, the rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway. In theory, this could account for increased serotonin as more tryptophan becomes available for serotonin synthesis. However, the downside may be that less NAD and niacin are synthesised downstream, which could exacerbate common psychiatric problems. It is our hypothesis that patients with poor dietary intake, who are treated with antidepressants, are at risk of developing niacin/NAD deficiency with possible development of associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. We therefore propose that niacin supplementation be considered in patients with inadequate diets who are treated with antidepressants. We believe that if this does not happen, a subclinical niacin deficiency may result

  5. Identification of novel components of NAD-utilizing metabolic pathways and prediction of their biochemical functions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Robson Francisco; Aravind, L

    2012-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a ubiquitous cofactor participating in numerous redox reactions. It is also a substrate for regulatory modifications of proteins and nucleic acids via the addition of ADP-ribose moieties or removal of acyl groups by transfer to ADP-ribose. In this study, we use in-depth sequence, structure and genomic context analysis to uncover new enzymes and substrate-binding proteins in NAD-utilizing metabolic and macromolecular modification systems. We predict that Escherichia coli YbiA and related families of domains from diverse bacteria, eukaryotes, large DNA viruses and single strand RNA viruses are previously unrecognized components of NAD-utilizing pathways that probably operate on ADP-ribose derivatives. Using contextual analysis we show that some of these proteins potentially act in RNA repair, where NAD is used to remove 2'-3' cyclic phosphodiester linkages. Likewise, we predict that another family of YbiA-related enzymes is likely to comprise a novel NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation system for proteins, in conjunction with a previously unrecognized ADP-ribosyltransferase. A similar ADP-ribosyltransferase is also coupled with MACRO or ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase domain proteins in other related systems, suggesting that all these novel systems are likely to comprise pairs of ADP-ribosylation and ribosylglycohydrolase enzymes analogous to the DraG-DraT system, and a novel group of bacterial polymorphic toxins. We present evidence that some of these coupled ADP-ribosyltransferases/ribosylglycohydrolases are likely to regulate certain restriction modification enzymes in bacteria. The ADP-ribosyltransferases found in these, the bacterial polymorphic toxin and host-directed toxin systems of bacteria such as Waddlia also throw light on the evolution of this fold and the origin of eukaryotic polyADP-ribosyltransferases and NEURL4-like ARTs, which might be involved in centrosomal assembly. We also infer a novel biosynthetic pathway that

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of inflammation, oxidative stress and NAD+ are linked to differences in plasma carotenoid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The consumption of foods rich in carotenoids that possess significant antioxidant and inflammatory modulating properties has been linked to reduced risk of neuropathology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentrations and plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) in an essentially healthy human cohort. Methods Thirty-eight matched CSF and plasma samples were collected from consenting participants who required a spinal tap for the administration of anaesthetic. Plasma concentrations of carotenoids and both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of NAD(H) and markers of inflammation (IL-6, TNF-α) and oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes, 8-OHdG and total antioxidant capacity) were quantified. Results The average age of participants was 53 years (SD = 20, interquartile range = 38). Both α-carotene (P = 0.01) and β-carotene (P < 0.001) correlated positively with plasma total antioxidant capacity. A positive correlation was observed between α-carotene and CSF TNF-α levels (P = 0.02). β-cryptoxanthin (P = 0.04) and lycopene (P = 0.02) inversely correlated with CSF and plasma IL-6 respectively. A positive correlation was also observed between lycopene and both plasma (P < 0.001) and CSF (P < 0.01) [NAD(H)]. Surprisingly no statistically significant associations were found between the most abundant carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin and either plasma or CSF markers of oxidative stress. Conclusion Together these findings suggest that consumption of carotenoids may modulate inflammation and enhance antioxidant defences within both the central nervous system (CNS) and systemic circulation. Increased levels of lycopene also appear to moderate decline in the essential pyridine nucleotide [NAD(H)] in both the plasma and the CSF. PMID:24985027

  7. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B.; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kohn, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  8. The NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell viability via p73.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T; Ahn, D-G; Liu, R-Z; Pringle, E; Martell, E; Dai, C; Nunokawa, A; Kwak, M; Clements, D; Murphy, J P; Dean, C; Marcato, P; McCormick, C; Godbout, R; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-04-01

    The involvement of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) salvage pathway in cancer cell survival is poorly understood. Here we show that the NAD(+) salvage pathway modulates cancer cell survival through the rarely mutated tumour suppressor p73. Our data show that pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD(+) salvage pathway, enhances autophagy and decreases survival of cancer cells in a p53-independent manner. Such NAMPT inhibition stabilizes p73 independently of p53 through increased acetylation and decreased ubiquitination, resulting in enhanced autophagy and cell death. These effects of NAMPT inhibition can be effectively reversed using nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzymatic product of NAMPT. Similarly, knockdown of p73 also decreases NAMPT inhibition-induced autophagy and cell death, whereas overexpression of p73 alone enhances these effects. We show that the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468) harbour significantly higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 than does the normal cell line (MCF-10A), and that NAMPT inhibition is cytotoxic exclusively to the cancer cells. Furthermore, data from 176 breast cancer patients demonstrate that higher levels of NAMPT and lower levels of p73 correlate with poorer patient survival, and that high-grade tumours have significantly higher NAMPT/p73 mRNA ratios. Therefore, the inverse relationship between NAMPT and p73 demonstrable in vitro is also reflected from the clinical data. Taken together, our studies reveal a new NAMPT-p73 nexus that likely has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  9. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  10. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD+ Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Golam M.; Youngson, Neil A.; Sinclair, David A.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Recent studies have shown that NAD+ levels can be increased by using the NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD+ levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD+ only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver. PMID:27594836

  11. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. PMID:26867495

  12. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD(+) Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Golam M; Youngson, Neil A; Sinclair, David A; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). Recent studies have shown that NAD(+) levels can be increased by using the NAD(+) precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD(+) levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD(+) only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver. PMID:27594836

  13. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD+ Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Golam M.; Youngson, Neil A.; Sinclair, David A.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Recent studies have shown that NAD+ levels can be increased by using the NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD+ levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD+ only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver.

  14. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  15. The high-resolution crystal structure of periplasmic Haemophilus influenzae NAD nucleotidase reveals a novel enzymatic function of human CD73 related to NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Silvia; Bruzzone, Santina; Cassani, Camilla; Canella, Laura; Allegrone, Gianna; Sturla, Laura; Mannino, Elena; Millo, Enrico; De Flora, Antonio; Rizzi, Menico

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a major pathogen of the respiratory tract in humans that has developed the capability to exploit host NAD(P) for its nicotinamide dinucleotide requirement. This strategy is organized around a periplasmic enzyme termed NadN (NAD nucleotidase), which plays a central role by degrading NAD into adenosine and NR (nicotinamide riboside), the latter being subsequently internalized by a specific permease. We performed a biochemical and structural investigation on H. influenzae NadN which determined that the enzyme is a Zn2+-dependent 5'-nucleotidase also endowed with NAD(P) pyrophosphatase activity. A 1.3 Å resolution structural analysis revealed a remarkable conformational change that occurs during catalysis between the open and closed forms of the enzyme. NadN showed a broad substrate specificity, recognizing either mono- or di-nucleotide nicotinamides and different adenosine phosphates with a maximal activity on 5'-adenosine monophosphate. Sequence and structural analysis of H. influenzae NadN led us to discover that human CD73 is capable of processing both NAD and NMN, therefore disclosing a possible novel function of human CD73 in systemic NAD metabolism. Our data may prove to be useful for inhibitor design and disclosed unanticipated fascinating evolutionary relationships. PMID:21933152

  16. Nmnat1-Rbp7 Is a Conserved Fusion-Protein That Combines NAD+ Catalysis of Nmnat1 with Subcellular Localization of Rbp7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Babino, Darwin; Schoenbichler, Stefan A.; Arkhipova, Valeryia; Töchterle, Sonja; Martin, Fabian; Huck, Christian W.; von Lintig, Johannes; Meyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding proteins (Rbps) are known as carriers for transport and targeting of retinoids to their metabolizing enzymes. Rbps are also reported to function in regulating the homeostatic balance of retinoid metabolism, as their level of retinoid occupancy impacts the activities of retinoid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used zebrafish as a model to study rbp7a function and regulation. We find that early embryonic rbp7a expression is negatively regulated by the Nodal/FoxH1-signaling pathway and we show that Nodal/FoxH1 activity has the opposite effect on aldh1a2, which encodes the major enzyme for early embryonic retinoic acid production. The data are consistent with a Nodal-dependent coordination of the allocation of retinoid precursors to processing enzymes with the catalysis of retinoic acid formation. Further, we describe a novel nmnat1-rbp7 transcript encoding a fusion of Rbp7 and the NAD+ (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) synthesizing enzyme Nmnat1. We show that nmnat1-rbp7 is conserved in fish, mouse and chicken, and that in zebrafish regulation of nmnat1-rbp7a is distinct from that of rbp7a and nmnat1. Injection experiments in zebrafish further revealed that Nmnat1-Rbp7a and Nmnat1 have similar NAD+ catalyzing activities but a different subcellular localization. HPLC measurements and protein localization analysis highlight Nmnat1-Rbp7a as the only known cytoplasmic and presumably endoplasmic reticulum (ER) specific NAD+ catalyzing enzyme. These studies, taken together with previously documented NAD+ dependent interaction of RBPs with ER-associated enzymes of retinal catalysis, implicate functions of this newly described NMNAT1-Rbp7 fusion protein in retinol oxidation. PMID:26618989

  17. Spectrally and time-resolved study of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in cardiac myocytes from human biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Chorvat, D., Jr.; Poirier, N.; Miró, J.; Dahdah, N.; Chorvatova, A.

    2007-09-01

    Rejection of transplanted hearts remains an important reason for death of transplanted children. Finding diagnostic tools for its detection can therefore improve the prognosis in this population of patients. Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) by cardiac catheterization is currently accepted as the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of rejection. Here, we investigate new approach to monitor mitochondrial metabolic state of cardiac cells using spectrally-resolved autofluorescence lifetime detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), or NAD(P)H, the principal electron donor in mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism responsible for vital ATP supply of cardiomyocytes. NAD(P)H autofluorescence is long used for non-invasive fluorescent probing the metabolic state of the heart. In this contribution we report dynamic characteristics of NAD(P)H fluorescence decays in living human cardiomyocytes from EMB, following excitation by UV-pulsed laser diode and detection by spectrally-resolved time-correlated single photon counting. At least a 3-exponential decay model, with 0.5-0.7 ns, 1.9-2.4 ns and 9.0-15.0 ns lifetimes, is necessary to describe cardiomyocyte autofluorescence in human cells. When gathered data were compared to those recorded under same conditions in rats, autofluorescence in human hearts was found significantly lower in comparison to rat ones. Rotenone, the inhibitor of the Complex I of the respiratory chain, increased the fluorescence in human cardiac cells, making them more comparable to experimental rat model. These results suggest that human cardiac cells are more metabolically active than the rat ones in the same conditions. Presented work proposes a new tool for evaluation of oxidative metabolism changes in transplanted hearts.

  18. MNADK, a Long-Awaited Human Mitochondrion-Localized NAD Kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its phosphorylated form, NADP, play essential roles in numerous cellular processes in all organisms. NADP maintains a pool of its reducing equivalent, NADPH, which regenerates cellular oxidative defense systems to counteract oxidative damages. Mitochondria represent a major source of oxidative stress, because the majority of superoxide, a reactive oxygen species, is generated from the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Therefore, as universal electron carriers in cellular electron transfer reactions, the pyridine nucleotides are required by mitochondria for both antioxidant protection and biosynthetic pathways. The NAD kinase (NADK) is the sole NADP biosynthetic enzyme. Because NADP is membrane-impermeable, eukaryotes need compartment-specific NADKs for different organelles. Consistently, in both yeast and plants, three compartment-specific NADKs have been identified. In contrast, even though the first human NADK, a cytosolic one, was identified in 2001, the identity of a hypothesized mitochondrial NADK remained elusive, until a recent discovery that the uncharacterized human gene C5ORF33 encodes a mitochondrion-localized NADK, referred to as MNADK. Three groups have characterized MNADK functions based on distinct systems involving yeast, mouse, and human studies, from aspects of both in vitro and in vivo evidence. MNADK is a mitochondrial NADK that is enriched and nutritionally-regulated in mouse liver, and a MNADK-deficient patient exhibits symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial disease. The identification of MNADK provides a key clue to the mechanism involved in mitochondrial NADPH production and the maintenance of redox balance in mammalian cells. The roles of MNADK in physiological and pathological processes have yet to be discovered.

  19. Evolution probabilities and phylogenetic distance of dinucleotides.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2007-11-21

    We develop here an analytical evolution model based on a dinucleotide mutation matrix 16 x 16 with six substitution parameters associated with the three types of substitutions in the two dinucleotide sites. It generalizes the previous models based on the nucleotide mutation matrices 4 x 4. It determines at some time t the exact occurrence probabilities of dinucleotides mutating randomly according to these six substitution parameters. Furthermore, several properties and two applications of this model allow to derive 16 evolutionary analytical solutions of dinucleotides and also a dinucleotide phylogenetic distance. Finally, based on this mathematical model, the SED (Stochastic Evolution of Dinucleotides) web server has been developed for deriving evolutionary analytical solutions of dinucleotides.

  20. One-step fabrication of integrated disposable biosensor based on ADH/NAD+/meldola's blue/graphitized mesoporous carbons/chitosan nanobiocomposite for ethanol detection.

    PubMed

    Hua, Erhui; Wang, Li; Jing, Xiaoying; Chen, Changtao; Xie, Guoming

    2013-07-15

    A novel strategy to simplify the dehydrogenase-based electrochemical biosensor fabrication through one-step drop-coating nanobiocomposite on a screen printed electrode (SPE) was developed. The nanobiocomposite was prepared by successively adding graphitized mesoporous carbons (GMCs), meldola's blue (MDB), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) in chitosan (CS) solution. MDB/GMCs/CS film was prepared. Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that MDB was strongly adsorbed on GMCs. After optimizing the concentration of MDB and the working potential, the MDB/GMCs/CS film presented a fast amperometric response (5s), excellent sensitivity (10.36 nA μM(-1)), wide linear range (10-410 μM) toward NADH and without any other interference signals (such as AA, UA, DA, H2O2 and metal ions). Furthermore, concentrations of ADH and NAD(+) in nanobiocomposite and the detection conditions (temperature and pH) were also optimized. The constructed disposable ethanol biosensor showed an excellent linear response ranged from 0.5 to 15 mM with high sensitivity (67.28 nA mM(-1)) and a low limit of detection (80 μM) and a remarkable long-term stability (40 days). The intra-batch and inter-batch variation coefficients were both less than 5% (n=5). The ethanol recovery test demonstrated that the proposed biosensor offered a remarkable and accurate method for ethanol detection in the real blood samples.

  1. Photodissociation of dinucleotide ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Andersen, Inge Hald; Andersen, Jens Ulrik; Holm, Anne I. S.; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Støchkel, Kristian

    2007-04-01

    The decay of protonated DNA dinucleotides, dA2+ , dG2+ , dT2+ , dC2+ and deprotonated ones, dA2- and dT2- , after 260nm photon absorption was measured in an electrostatic ion storage ring (A denotes adenine, G guanine, T thymine, and C cytosine). Fragmentation on the microsecond time scale was observed and assigned to statistical dissociation. Good fits to the decay spectra were obtained with a model based on microcanonical rate constants of the Arrhenius type with activation energies and preexponential factors for the dissociation that agree well with literature values. In accordance with results from other groups, dT2+ was found to have the longest lifetime among the cations. The importance of decay processes faster than the microsecond time scale is elucidated by a comparison between the total ion beam depletion and that due to the observed statistical decay. We find that such processes play a major role for all of the dinucleotides, being more than 25 times more probable than the microsecond statistical dissociation for dA2+ , dG2+ , and dC2+ , about 10 times for dT2+ , and between 2 and 6 times for dA2- and dT2- . For the cations, we ascribe these processes to nonstatistical dissociation prior to randomization of the excitation energy among all degrees of freedom whereas direct photoelectron detachment may play a role for the anions. Thus, our data indicate that the propensity for nonstatistical dissociation increases upon nucleobase protonation. Consistent with this trend, the propensity is less for dT2+ than for the other dinucleotide cations because the phosphoric acid group competes with thymine for the proton.

  2. Enzymology of mammalian NAD metabolism in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Magni, Giulio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffelli, Nadia; Ruggieri, Silverio

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence attests to the paramount importance of the non-redox NAD functions. Indeed, NAD homeostasis is related to the free radicals-mediated production of reactive oxygen species responsible for irreversible cellular damage in infectious disease, diabetes, inflammatory syndromes, neurodegeneration and cancer. Because the cellular redox status depends on both the absolute concentration of pyridine dinucleotides and their respective ratios of oxidized and reduced forms (i.e., NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH), it is conceivable that an altered regulation of the synthesis and degradation of NAD impairs the cell redox state and likely contributes to the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of the above mentioned diseases. Taking into account the recent appearance in the literature of comprehensive reviews covering different aspects of the significance of NAD metabolism, with particular attention to the enzymes involved in NAD cleavage, this monograph includes the most recent results on NAD biosynthesis in mammals and humans. Due to recent findings on nicotinamide riboside as a nutrient, its inclusion under "niacins" is proposed. Here, the enzymes involved in the de novo and reutilization pathways are overviewed. PMID:18508649

  3. Alteration of hydrogen metabolism of ldh-deleted Enterobacter aerogenes by overexpression of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Wu, Xi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2010-03-01

    The NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase FDH1 gene (fdh1), cloned from Candida boidinii, was expressed in the ldh-deleted mutant of Enterobacter aerogenes IAM1183 strain. The plasmid of pCom10 driven by the PalkB promoter was used to construct the fdh1 expression system and thus introduce a new dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) regeneration pathway from formate in the ldh-deleted mutant. The knockout of NADH-consuming lactate pathway affected the whole cellular metabolism, and the hydrogen yield increased by 11.4% compared with the wild strain. Expression of fdh1 in the ldh-deleted mutant caused lower final cell concentration and final pH after 16 h cultivation, and finally resulted in 86.8% of increase in hydrogen yield per mole consumed glucose. The analysis of cellular metabolites and estimated redox state balance in the fdhl-expressed strain showed that more excess of reducing power was formed by the rewired NADH regeneration pathway, changing the metabolic distribution and promoting the hydrogen production.

  4. Hypercholesterolemia-induced erectile dysfunction: endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the mouse penis by NAD(P)H oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Strong, Travis D.; Sezen, Sena F.; Johnson, Justin M.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hypercholesterolemia induces erectile dysfunction (ED) mostly by increasing oxidative stress and impairing endothelial function in the penis, but the mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are not understood. AIMS We evaluated whether hypercholesterolemia activates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase in the penis, providing an initial source of ROS to induce endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and endothelial dysfunction resulting in ED. METHODS Low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)–null mice were fed Western diet for 4 weeks to induce early-stage hyperlipidemia. Wild type (WT) mice fed regular chow served as controls. Mice received NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Markers of endothelial function (phospho [P]-vasodilator-stimulated-protein [VASP]-Ser-239), oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NAD[P]H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), P-eNOS-Ser-1177, and eNOS were measured by Western blot in penes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Molecular mechanisms of ROS generation and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia-induced ED. RESULTS Erectile response was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in hypercholesterolemic LDLR-null mice compared to WT mice. Relative to WT mice, hypercholesterolemia increased (P<0.05) protein expressions of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox and gp91phox, eNOS uncoupling, and 4-HNE-modified proteins, and reduced (P<0.05) P-VASP-Ser-239 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of LDLR-null mice preserved (P<0.05) maximal intracavernosal pressure, and reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of gp67phox and gp47phox, 4-HNE, P-VASP-Ser-239, and eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters

  5. NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent intracellular and extracellular O2·- production in coronary arterial myocytes from CD38 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Min; Li, Xiao-Xue; Ritter, Joseph K; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase has been reported to produce superoxide (O2 ·-) extracellularly as an autocrine/paracrine regulator or intracellularly as a signaling messenger in a variety of mammalian cells. However, it remains unknown how the activity of NAD(P)H oxidase is regulated in arterial myocytes. Recently, CD38-associated ADP-ribosylcyclase has been reported to use NAD(P)H oxidase product, NAD+ or NADP+ to produce cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) or nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), which mediates intracellular Ca2+ signaling. The present study was designed to test a hypothesis that CD38/cADPR pathway as a downstream event exerts feedback regulatory action on the NAD(P)H oxidase activity in production of extra- or intracellular O2 ·-in mouse coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs). By fluorescent microscopic imaging, we simultaneously monitored extra- and intracellular O2 ·-production in wild-type (CD38+/+) and CD38 knockout (CD38-/-) CAMs in response to oxotremorine (OXO), a muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptor agonist. It was found that CD38 deficiency prevented OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·-production in CAMs. Consistently, the OXO-induced intracellular O2 ·-production was markedly inhibited by CD38 shRNA or CD38 inhibitor nicotinamide in CD38+/+ CAMs. Further, Nox4 siRNA inhibited OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·- production, whereas Nox1 siRNA attenuated both intracellular and extracellular O2 ·-production in CD38+/+ CAMs. Direct delivery of exogenous cADPR into CAMs markedly elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and restored intracellular O2 ·-production in CD38-/- CAMs. Functionally, CD38 deficiency or Nox1 siRNA and Nox4 siRNA prevented OXO-induced contraction in isolated perfused coronary arteries in CD38 WT mice. These results provide direct evidence that CD38/cADPR pathway importantly controls Nox4-mediated intracellular O2 ·-production and that CD38-dependent intracellular O2

  6. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases. PMID:26975537

  7. Vertical Ionization Energies of Adenine and 9-Methyl Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2009-07-01

    Vertical ionization energies of 9-H adenine and 9-methyl adenine have been calculated with the following, ab initio, electron propagator methods: the outer valence Green's function (OVGF), partial third-order theory (P3), and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction, or ADC(3). Basis set effects have been systematically examined. All methods predict near degeneracy in the π2-n1 and π3-n2 pairs of cationic, adenine final states and larger splittings of the corresponding, cationic states of 9-methyl adenine. P3 results for adenine predict the following order of the first six final states: π1, n1, π2, n2, π3, n3. Coupled-cluster calculations on the first three cationic states of adenine confirm these predictions. OVGF and ADC(3) calculations reverse the order of the second and third states and of the fourth and fifth states. All results confirm previous interpretations of experiments in which the second and third spectral bands correspond to the aforementioned pairs of final states and disagree with a recent reassignment based on time-resolved photoelectron spectra. Lower ionization energies and larger splittings in the methylated molecule are interpreted in terms of phase relationships in the Dyson orbitals. ADC(3) results confirm the qualitative validity of the one-electron approximation for the first six final states of both molecules and disclose its inadequacies for higher ionization energies.

  8. Protein Modification by Adenine Propenal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. Nε-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine–lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is Nε-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA’s ability to bind to a DNA substrate. PMID:25211669

  9. Increased expression of gp91phox homologues of NAD(P)H oxidase in the aortic media during chronic hypertension: involvement of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Akasaki, Takashi; Ohya, Yusuke; Kuroda, Junya; Eto, Kimika; Abe, Isao; Sumimoto, Hideki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2006-10-01

    Although vascular cells express multiple members of the Nox family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) oxidase, including gp91phox, Nox1, and Nox4, the reasons for the different expressions and specific roles of these members in vascular injury in chronic hypertension have remained unclear. Thus, we quantified the mRNA expressions of these NAD(P)H oxidase components by real-time polymerase chain reaction and evaluated superoxide production and morphological changes in the aortas of 32-week-old stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) and age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The aortic media of SHRSP had an approximately 2.5-fold greater level of Nox4 mRNA and an approximately 10-fold greater level of Nox1 mRNA than WKY. The mRNA expressions of gp91phox and p22phox in SHRSP and WKY were comparable. SHRSP were treated from 24 weeks of age for 8 weeks with either high or low doses of candesartan (4 mg/kg/day or 0.2 mg/kg/day), or a combination of hydralazine (30 mg/kg/day) and hydrochlorothiazide (4.5 mg/kg/day). The high-dose candesartan or the hydralazine plus hydrochlorothiazide decreased the blood pressure of SHRSP to that of WKY, whereas the low-dose candesartan exerted no significant antihypertensive action. Media thickening and fibrosis, as well as the increased production of superoxide in SHRSP, were nearly normalized with high-dose candesartan and partially corrected with low-dose candesartan or hydralazine plus hydrochlorothiazide. These changes by antihypertensive treatment paralleled the decrease in mRNA expression of Nox4 and Nox1. These results suggest that blood pressure and angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation are involved in the up-regulation of Nox1 and Nox4 expression, which could contribute to vascular injury during chronic hypertension. PMID:17283869

  10. Antimutagenic activity of oxidase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Agabeili, R.A.

    1986-11-01

    By means of a cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in plant cells (Welsh onion, wheat) it was found that the cofactors nicotinamide adenine phosphate (NAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), and riboflavin possess antimutagenic activity.

  11. Dynamics of NAD in cortical nephron segments: Effect of nicotinamide and of dietary phosphate intake

    SciTech Connect

    Yusufi, A.N.K.; Kiebzak, G.M.; Kusano, E.; Werness, J.L.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P. )

    1987-08-01

    NAD content and the rate of NAD hydrolysis were determined in proximal convoluted tubules (PCT), proximal straight tubules (PST), and adjacent cortical nephron segments microdissected from kidneys of tyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) rats. In the basal state, rats fed a normal phosphate diet had an NAD content higher in PCT, PST, and in cortical ascending limb (CAL) than in glomeruli. After intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide, the NAD content increased significantly in all nephron segments except CAL. In experiments conducted on TPTX rats stabilized on a low-phosphorus diet, NAD content increased in response to a nicotinamide injection in PCT, but did not change significantly in PST. The catabolism of NAD was determined by generation of ({sup 3}H)adenosine, a major metabolite of (adenine-2,8-{sup 3}H)NAD. The rate of ({sup 3}H)adenosine generation from ({sup 3}H)NAD was significantly higher in PST than in PCT. The authors conclude that, in response to nicotinamide administration in vivo, the NAD content increases more in PCT than in PST and that this difference may be, at least partly, due to a lower rate of NAD breakdown in PCT. In a state of dietary phosphate deprivation, NAD also increases significantly in response to intraperitoneal nicotinamide in PCT, but it does not increase significantly in PST. The nicotinamide-elicited increase of NAD content in proximal tubules, mainly in PCT, may be related to inhibition of Na{sup +}-gradient-dependent inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) reabsorption across the brush-border membrane proximal tubules and to the phosphaturic effect of nicotinamide in rats red normal-P{sub i} diet.

  12. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  13. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  14. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  15. Structure of adenosine-5'-mononicotinate (AMN) trihydrate: an analog of NAD for testing intramolecular stacking.

    PubMed

    Ramasubbu, N; Parthasarathy, R

    1988-12-15

    C16H16N6O5.3H2O, Mr = 426.4, monoclinic, P21, a = 9.535 (2), b = 13.932 (2), c = 7.138 (2) A, beta = 93.13 (2) degrees, V = 946.85 A3, Z = 2, Dx = 1.495 g cm-3, lambda (Cu K alpha) = 1.5418 A, mu = 9.93 cm-1, F(000) = 428, T = 294 K, R = 0.045 and wR = 0.059 for 1460 observed reflections [I greater than 3 sigma (I)]. The AMN molecules, unlike NAD or other model structures of NAD, are not charged and exhibit intra- as well as intermolecular stacking of pyridine ring over adenine ring. There is extensive hydrogen bonding in the crystal involving the pyridine and adenine rings and the three water molecules. Rather surprisingly, the ester carbonyl O atom is not involved in the hydrogen bonding.

  16. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  17. Boosting NAD to spare hearing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Ex vivo experiments have strangely shown that inhibition or stimulation of NAD metabolism can be neuroprotective. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Brown et al. (2014) demonstrate that cochlear NAD is diminished by deafening noise but protected by nicotinamide riboside or WldS mutation. Hearing protection by nicotinamide riboside depends on Sirt3. PMID:25470539

  18. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS)

    PubMed Central

    Widom, Julia R.; Johnson, Neil P.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) – a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy – to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes. PMID:24223491

  19. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  20. Human CD38 is an authentic NAD(P)+ glycohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Berthelier, V; Tixier, J M; Muller-Steffner, H; Schuber, F; Deterre, P

    1998-01-01

    The leucoyte surface antigen CD38 has been shown to be an ecto-enzyme with multiple catalytic activities. It is principally a NAD+ glycohydrolase that transforms NAD+ into ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. CD38 is also able to produce small amounts of cyclic ADP-ribose (ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity) and to hydrolyse this cyclic metabolite into ADP-ribose (cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase activity). To classify CD38 among the enzymes that transfer the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD+ to a variety of acceptors, we have investigated its substrate specificity and some characteristics of its kinetic and molecular mechanisms. We find that CD38-catalysed cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribose bond results in the formation of an E.ADP-ribosyl intermediary complex, which is common to all reaction pathways; this intermediate reacts (1) with acceptors such as water (hydrolysis), methanol (methanolysis) or pyridine (transglycosidation), and (2) intramolecularly, yielding cyclic ADP-ribose with a low efficiency. This reaction scheme is also followed when using nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide as an alternative substrate; in this case, however, the cyclization process is highly favoured. The results obtained here are not compatible with the prevailing model for the mode of action of CD38, according to which this enzyme produces first cyclic ADP-ribose which is then immediately hydrolysed into ADP-ribose (i.e. sequential ADP-ribosyl cyclase and cyclic ADP-ribose hydrolase activities). We show instead that the cyclic metabolite was a reaction product of CD38 rather than an obligatory reaction intermediate during the glycohydrolase activity. Altogether our results lead to the conclusion that CD38 is an authentic 'classical' NAD(P)+ glycohydrolase (EC 3.2.2.6). PMID:9494110

  1. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  2. The role of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in the supply of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide phosphate for steroidogenesis in the superovulated rat ovary

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. P. F.; Denton, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    1. Superovulated rat ovary was found to contain high activities of NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase. The activity of each enzyme was approximately four times that of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and equalled or exceeded the activities reported to be present in other mammalian tissues. Fractionation of a whole tissue homogenate of superovulated rat ovary indicated that both enzymes were exclusively cytoplasmic. The tissue was also found to contain pyruvate carboxylase (exclusively mitochondrial), NAD–malate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic) and ATP–citrate lyase (exclusively cytoplasmic). 2. The kinetic properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NADP–malate dehydrogenase and NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase were determined and compared with the whole-tissue concentrations of their substrates and NADPH; NADPH is a competitive inhibitor of all three enzymes. The concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate, malate and isocitrate in incubated tissue slices were raised at least tenfold by the addition of glucose to the incubation medium, from the values below to values above the respective Km values of the dehydrogenases. Glucose doubled the tissue concentration of NADPH. 3. Steroidogenesis from acetate is stimulated by glucose in slices of superovulated rat ovary incubated in vitro. It was found that this stimulatory effect of glucose can be mimicked by malate, isocitrate, lactate and pyruvate. 4. It is concluded that NADP–malate dehydrogenase or NADP–isocitrate dehydrogenase or both may play an important role in the formation of NADPH in the superovulated rat ovary. It is suggested that the stimulatory effect of glucose on steroidogenesis from acetate results from an increased rate of NADPH formation through one or both dehydrogenases, brought about by the increases in the concentrations of malate, isocitrate or both. Possible pathways involving the two enzymes are discussed. PMID:4393612

  3. DiProDB: a database for dinucleotide properties.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Maik; Nikolajewa, Swetlana; Sühnel, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    DiProDB (http://diprodb.fli-leibniz.de) is a database of conformational and thermodynamic dinucleotide properties. It includes datasets both for DNA and RNA, as well as for single and double strands. The data have been shown to be important for understanding different aspects of nucleic acid structure and function, and they can also be used for encoding nucleic acid sequences. The database is intended to facilitate further applications of dinucleotide properties. A number of property datasets is highly correlated. Therefore, the database comes with a correlation analysis facility. Authors having determined new sets of dinucleotide property values are invited to submit these data to DiProDB.

  4. Formation of the imidazolides of dinucleotides under potentially prebiotic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, H. L.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Imidazolides of dinucleotides such as ImpApA can be formed from the corresponding dinucleotides in a two-stage process, which gives up to 15% yields under potentially prebiotic conditions. First a solution of the dinucleotide and sodium trimetaphosphate is dried out at constant temperature and humidity. This produces polyphosphates such as p(n)ApA in excellent yield (greater than or equal to 80%). The products are dissolved in water, imidazole is added, and the solution is dried out again. This yields the 5'-phosphorimidazolides.

  5. Evaluation of equilibrium constants for the interaction of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes with reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Brinkworth, R I; Masters, C J; Winzor, D J

    1975-01-01

    Rabbit muscle lactate dehydrogenase was subjected to frontal affinity chromatography on Sepharose-oxamate in the presence of various concentrations of NADH and sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 M, pH 6.8) containing 0.5 M-NaCl. Quantitative interpretation of the results yields an intrinsic association constant of 9.0 x 10 (4)M-1 for the interaction of enzyme with NADH at 5 degrees C, a value that is confirmed by equilibrium-binding measurements. In a second series of experiments, zonal affinity chromatography of a mouse tissue extract under the same conditions was used to evaluate assoication constants of the order 2 x 10(5)M-1, 3 x 10(5)M-1, 4 x 10(5)M-1, 7 x 10(5)M-1 and 2 x 10(6)M-1 for the interaction of NADH with the M4, M3H, M2H2, MH3 and H4 isoenzymes respectively of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:175784

  6. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase (NOX) in Experimental Liver Fibrosis: GKT137831 as a Novel Potential Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Tomonori; Paik, Yong-Han; Watanabe, Sumio; Laleu, Benoît; Gaggini, Francesca; Fioraso-Cartier, Laetitia; Molango, Sophie; Heitz, Freddy; Merlot, Cédric; Szyndralewiez, Cédric; Page, Patrick; Brenner, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims NADPH oxidase (NOX) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) during liver fibrosis. In response to fibrogenic agonists, such as angiotensin II (Ang II), the NOX1 components form an active complex including Rac1. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) interacts with the NOX-Rac1 complex to stimulate NOX activity. NOX4 is also induced in activated HSCs/myofibroblast by increased gene expression. Here, we investigate the role of an enhanced activity SOD1 G37R mutation (SODmu) and the effects of GKT137831, a dual NOX1/4 inhibitor, on HSCs and liver fibrosis. Methods To induce liver fibrosis, wild-type (WT) and SOD1mu mice were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or bile duct ligation (BDL). Then, to address the role of NOX-SOD1-mediated ROS production in HSC activation and liver fibrosis, mice were treated with a NOX1/4 inhibitor. Fibrosis and ROS generation was assessed by histology and measurement of TBARS and NOX related genes. Primary cultured HSCs isolated from WT, SODmu, and NOX1 knock-out (KO) mice were assessed for ROS production, Rac1 activity, and NOX gene expression. Results Liver fibrosis was increased in SOD1mu mice, and ROS production and Rac1 activity were increased in SOD1mu HSCs. The NOX1/4 inhibitor GKT137831 attenuated liver fibrosis and ROS production in both SOD1mu and WT mice as well as mRNA expression of fibrotic and NOX genes. Treatment with GKT137831 suppressed ROS production and NOX and fibrotic gene expression, but not Rac1 activity, in SOD1mut and WT HSCs. Both Ang II and TGFb upregulated NOX4, but AngII required NOX1. Conclusions SOD1mu induces excessive NOX1 activation through Rac1 in HSCs, causing enhanced NOX4 upregulation, ROS generation, and liver fibrosis. Treatment targeting NOX1/4 may be a new therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:22806357

  7. The ascorbic acid-dependent oxidation of reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide by ciliary and retinal microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Heath, H.; Fiddick, Rosemary

    1965-01-01

    1. The presence of an ascorbic acid-dependent NADH oxidation in ocular tissues has been established. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the enzyme is localized in the microsomes. The distribution of the enzyme in some ocular tissues has been determined; microsomes from the ciliary processes and the retina have comparable activities, which are much higher than those from the cornea or lens. 2. NADPH cannot replace NADH, and cysteine, reduced glutathione, ergothioneine and dehydroascorbic acid cannot be substituted for ascorbic acid in the reaction. The rate of NADH oxidation was greatly increased in the presence of cucumber ascorbate oxidase, and the enzyme appears to be NADH–monodehydroascorbate transhydrogenase. 3. Cytochrome b5 is present in retinal microsomes. 4. The enzyme is inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and iodoacetate, but not by cyanide, Amytal or malonate. 5. High concentrations of chloroquine cause a partial inhibition of the reaction, probably owing to interaction of this compound with the enzyme thiol groups. Low concentrations of Diamox, comparable with those attained in tissues during therapy with this drug, bring about partial inhibition of the reaction. Eserine, cortisone, hydrocortisone, 11-deoxycorticosterone and dexamethasone have no effect on the rate of oxidation. 6. The possible role of ascorbic acid and NADH–monodehydroascorbate transhydrogenase in the formation of aqueous humour and secretory mechanisms is discussed. PMID:14345883

  8. The purification and properties of the respiratory-chain reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase of Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Ragan, C. I.

    1971-01-01

    1. An NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity has been isolated from the respiratory chain of Torulopsis utilis by using detergents. The isolated enzyme contains non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide and FMN in the molar proportions 27.5:28.4:1. The preparation is free of FAD and largely free of cytochrome. 2. The enzyme catalyses ferricyanide reduction by NADPH at about 1% of the rate with NADH, and reacts poorly with acceptors other than ferricyanide. The rates of reduction of some acceptors are, as percentages of the rate with ferricyanide: menadione, 0.35%; lipoate, 0.01%; cytochrome c, 0.065%; dichlorophenolindophenol, 0.35%; ubiquinone-1, 0.08%. 3. Several properties of submitochondrial particles of T. utilis (non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide, FMN and an NADH-reducible electron-paramagnetic-resonance signal) were found to co-purify with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity. Thus about 70% of the FMN and, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments, 100% of the non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide of submitochondrial particles derived from T. utilis cells grown under conditions of glycerol limitation (but relatively low iron availability) can be attributed to the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 4. It was also shown that the component of submitochondrial particles specifically bleached at 460nm by NADH [species 1 of Ragan & Garland (1971)] co-purifies with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 5. This successful purification of an NADH dehydrogenase from T. utilis forms a starting point for investigating the molecular properties of phenotypically modified mitochondrial NADH oxidation pathways that lack energy conservation between NADH and the cytochromes. PMID:4399788

  9. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  10. Converting molecular information of redox coenzymes via self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2012-11-21

    β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its reduced form NADH specifically interact with a cyanine dye in aqueous media, giving distinct spectral and nanostructural characteristics to which molecular information of constituent coenzymes are converted via self-assembly.

  11. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  12. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  13. Microbial NAD metabolism: lessons from comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, Francesca; Stebbins, Rebecca; Chang, Sheila Z; McPeek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-09-01

    NAD is a coenzyme for redox reactions and a substrate of NAD-consuming enzymes, including ADP-ribose transferases, Sir2-related protein lysine deacetylases, and bacterial DNA ligases. Microorganisms that synthesize NAD from as few as one to as many as five of the six identified biosynthetic precursors have been identified. De novo NAD synthesis from aspartate or tryptophan is neither universal nor strictly aerobic. Salvage NAD synthesis from nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside, and nicotinic acid riboside occurs via modules of different genes. Nicotinamide salvage genes nadV and pncA, found in distinct bacteria, appear to have spread throughout the tree of life via horizontal gene transfer. Biochemical, genetic, and genomic analyses have advanced to the point at which the precursors and pathways utilized by a microorganism can be predicted. Challenges remain in dissecting regulation of pathways. PMID:19721089

  14. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  15. The Nature's Clever Trick for Making Cyclic Dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min

    2015-05-01

    Ever since their initial discovery few years ago, cyclic dinucleotides (cDNs), their biosynthesis, and their biological function have been in focus of intense research efforts. In this issue, Kato et al. (2015) present strong evidence that the key enzyme in cDN biosynthesis, DncV, is poised on a tipping point such that, given a nudge, the enzyme, can link the nucleotides into a distinct cyclic loop, leading to a specific innate immune response.

  16. Background correction using dinucleotide affinities improves the performance of GCRMA

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Fodor, Anthony A; Gibas, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Background High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data, which can have serious implications for the interpretation of the generated data if not estimated correctly. Results We introduce an approach to calculate probe affinity based on sequence composition, incorporating nearest-neighbor (NN) information. Our model uses position-specific dinucleotide information, instead of the original single nucleotide approach, and adds up to 10% to the total variance explained (R2) when compared to the previously published model. We demonstrate that correcting for background noise using this approach enhances the performance of the GCRMA preprocessing algorithm when applied to control datasets, especially for detecting low intensity targets. Conclusion Modifying the previously published position-dependent affinity model to incorporate dinucleotide information significantly improves the performance of the model. The dinucleotide affinity model enhances the detection of differentially expressed genes when implemented as a background correction procedure in GeneChip preprocessing algorithms. This is conceptually consistent with physical models of binding affinity, which depend on the nearest-neighbor stacking interactions in addition to base-pairing. PMID:18947404

  17. Cyclic Dinucleotide-Controlled Regulatory Pathways in Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotides cyclic 3′,5′-diguanylate (c-di-GMP) and cyclic 3′,5′-diadenylate (c-di-AMP) have emerged as key components of bacterial signal transduction networks. These closely related second messengers follow the classical general principles of nucleotide signaling by integrating diverse signals into regulatory pathways that control cellular responses to changing environments. They impact distinct cellular processes, with c-di-GMP having an established role in promoting bacterial adhesion and inhibiting motility and c-di-AMP being involved in cell wall metabolism, potassium homeostasis, and DNA repair. The involvement of c-dinucleotides in the physiology of the filamentous, nonmotile streptomycetes remained obscure until recent discoveries showed that c-di-GMP controls the activity of the developmental master regulator BldD and that c-di-AMP determines the level of the resuscitation-promoting factor A(RpfA) cell wall-remodelling enzyme. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of c-dinucleotide signaling in Streptomyces species and highlight the important roles of c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP in the biology of these antibiotic-producing, multicellular bacteria. PMID:26216850

  18. Association of bone mineral density with a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the calcitonin (CT) locus.

    PubMed

    Miyao, M; Hosoi, T; Emi, M; Nakajima, T; Inoue, S; Hoshino, S; Shiraki, M; Orimo, H; Ouchi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT), a calcium-regulating hormone, lowers the calcium level in serum by inhibiting bone resorption. Because CT may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, genetic variations in or adjacent to the CT gene may be associated with variations in bone mineral density (BMD). The present study examined the correlation between a dinucleotide (cytosine-adenine; CA) repeat polymorphism at the CT locus and BMD in 311 Japanese postmenopausal women (mean age, 64.1 years). Seven alleles were present in this population; each allele contained 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 19, or 20 CA repeats. Thus, we designated the respective genotypes A10, A11, A16, A17, A18, A19, and A20. The A10 and A17 alleles were the predominant alleles in the population studied. Z scores (a parameter representing deviation from the age-specific weight-adjusted average BMD) were compared between individuals that possessed one or two alleles of each genotype and those that did not possess the allele. Subjects who possessed one or two A10 alleles had lower BMD Z scores than those who did not (lumbar 2-4 BMD Z score; -0.148 +/- 1.23 vs 0.182 +/- 1.54; P = 0.04). No significant relationships were observed between allelic status and background data or biochemical parameters. The significant association observed between BMD and genetic variations at the CT locus implies that polymorphism at this locus may be a useful marker for the genetic study of osteoporosis. PMID:11185743

  19. Vitamins and aging: pathways to NAD+ synthesis.

    PubMed

    Denu, John M

    2007-05-01

    Recent genetic evidence reveals additional salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis. In this issue, Belenky et al. (2007) report that nicotinamide riboside, a new NAD(+) precursor, regulates Sir2 deacetylase activity and life span in yeast. The ability of nicotinamide riboside to enhance life span does not depend on calorie restriction. PMID:17482537

  20. Why NAD(+) Declines during Aging: It's Destroyed.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Michael B; Sinclair, David A

    2016-06-14

    NAD(+) is required not only for life but for a long life. In this issue, Camacho-Pereira et al. (2016) implicate CD38 in the decline of NAD(+) during aging, with implications for combating age-related diseases. PMID:27304496

  1. Identification of the NAD(P)H binding site of eukaryotic UDP-galactopyranose mutase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Solano, Luis M; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Robinson, Reeder M; Ellerbrock, Jacob F; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-10-31

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) plays an essential role in galactofuranose biosynthesis in microorganisms by catalyzing the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose. The enzyme has gained attention recently as a promising target for the design of new antifungal, antitrypanosomal, and antileishmanial agents. Here we report the first crystal structure of UGM complexed with its redox partner NAD(P)H. Kinetic protein crystallography was used to obtain structures of oxidized Aspergillus fumigatus UGM (AfUGM) complexed with NADPH and NADH, as well as reduced AfUGM after dissociation of NADP(+). NAD(P)H binds with the nicotinamide near the FAD isoalloxazine and the ADP moiety extending toward the mobile 200s active site flap. The nicotinamide riboside binding site overlaps that of the substrate galactopyranose moiety, and thus NADPH and substrate binding are mutually exclusive. On the other hand, the pockets for the adenine of NADPH and uracil of the substrate are distinct and separated by only 6 Å, which raises the possibility of designing novel inhibitors that bind both sites. All 12 residues that contact NADP(H) are conserved among eukaryotic UGMs. Residues that form the AMP pocket are absent in bacterial UGMs, which suggests that eukaryotic and bacterial UGMs have different NADP(H) binding sites. The structures address the longstanding question of how UGM binds NAD(P)H and provide new opportunities for drug discovery. PMID:23036087

  2. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John J

    2013-11-26

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  3. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John J.

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  4. Methods for detection of methyl-CpG dinucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides methods for enriching methyl-CpG sequences from a DNA sample. The method makes use of conversion of cytosine residues to uracil under conditions in which methyl-cytosine residues are preserved. Additional methods of the invention enable to preservation of the context of me-CpG dinucleotides. The invention also provides a recombinant, full length and substantially pure McrA protein (rMcrA) for binding and isolation of DNA fragments containing the sequence 5'-C.sup.MeCpGG-3'. Methods for making and using the rMcrA protein, and derivatives thereof are provided.

  5. Detection and characterisation of NAD(P)H-diaphorase activity in Dictyostelium discoideum cells (Protozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Amaroli, A.; Chessa, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum (D. discoideum), compounds generating nitric oxide (NO) inhibit its aggregation and differentiation without altering cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. They do it by preventing initiation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pulses. Furthermore, these compounds stimulate adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation of a 41 kDa cytosolic protein and regulate the glyceraldehyde-3-phospate dehydrogenase activity. Yet, although D. discoideum cells produce NO at a relatively constant rate at the onset of their developmental cycle, there is still no evidence of the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. In this work, we detect the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) activity in D. discoideum and we characterise it by specific inhibitors and physical-chemical conditions that allegedly distinguish between NOS-related and -unrelated NADPH-d activity. PMID:23361243

  6. Adenine nucleotide transporters in organelles: novel genes and functions.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; del Arco, Araceli

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, cellular energy in the form of ATP is produced in the cytosol via glycolysis or in the mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation and, in photosynthetic organisms, in the chloroplast via photophosphorylation. Transport of adenine nucleotides among cell compartments is essential and is performed mainly by members of the mitochondrial carrier family, among which the ADP/ATP carriers are the best known. This work reviews the carriers that transport adenine nucleotides into the organelles of eukaryotic cells together with their possible functions. We focus on novel mechanisms of adenine nucleotide transport, including mitochondrial carriers found in organelles such as peroxisomes, plastids, or endoplasmic reticulum and also mitochondrial carriers found in the mitochondrial remnants of many eukaryotic parasites of interest. The extensive repertoire of adenine nucleotide carriers highlights an amazing variety of new possible functions of adenine nucleotide transport across eukaryotic organelles.

  7. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  8. NMR spectra and potentiometry studies of aluminum(III) binding with coenzyme NAD+ in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Bi, Shuping; Yang, Xiaoliang; Yang, Li; Hu, Jun; Liu, Jian; Yang, Zhengbiao

    2003-06-01

    Complexation and conformational studies of coenzyme NAD+ with aluminum were conducted in acidic aqueous solutions (pH 2-5) by means of potentiometry as well as multinuclear (1H, 13C, 31P, 27Al) and two-dimensional (1H, 1H-NOESY) NMR spectroscopy. These led to the following results: (1) Al could coordinate with NAD+ through the following binding sites: N7' of adenine and pyrophosphate free oxygen (O(A)1, O(N)1,O(A)2) to form various mononuclear 1:1 (AlLH23+, AlLH2+) and 2:1 (AlL2-) species, and dinuclear 2:2 (Al2L22+) species. (2) The conformations of NAD+ and Al-NAD+ depended on the solvents and different species in the complexes. The results suggest the occurrence of an Al-linked complexation, which causes structural changes at the primary recognition sites and secondary conformational alterations for coenzymes. This finding will help us to understand role of Al in biological enzyme reaction systems.

  9. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  10. Effect of ouabain on metabolic oxidative state in living cardiomyocytes evaluated by time-resolved spectroscopy of endogenous NAD(P)H fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Elzwiei, Fathia; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan

    2012-10-01

    Time-resolved spectrometry of endogenous nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence is a useful method to evaluate metabolic oxidative state in living cells. Ouabain is a well-known pharmaceutical drug used in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, the effects of which on myocardial metabolism were recently demonstrated. Mechanisms implicated in these actions are still poorly understood. We investigate the effect of ouabain on the metabolic oxidative state of living cardiac cells identified by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of mitochondrial NAD(P)H. Spectral unmixing is used to resolve individual NAD(P)H fluorescence components. Ouabain decreased the integral intensity of NAD(P)H fluorescence, leading to a reduced component amplitudes ratio corresponding to a change in metabolic state. We also noted that lactate/pyruvate, affecting the cytosolic NADH gradient, increased the effect of ouabain on the component amplitudes ratio. Cell oxidation levels, evaluated as the percentage of oxidized NAD(P)H, decreased exponentially with rising concentrations of the cardiac glycoside. Ouabain also stimulated the mitochondrial NADH production. Our study sheds a new light on the role that ouabain plays in the regulation of metabolic state, and presents perspective on a noninvasive, pharmaceutical approach for testing the effect of drugs on the mitochondrial metabolism by means of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in living cells.

  11. CpG dinucleotide frequencies reveal the role of host methylation capabilities in parvovirus evolution.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vasaikar, Suhas; Biswas, Banhi; Gomes, James; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Parvoviruses are rapidly evolving viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including vertebrates and invertebrates. Extensive methylation of the parvovirus genome has been recently demonstrated. A global pattern of methylation of CpG dinucleotides is seen in vertebrate genomes, compared to "fractional" methylation patterns in invertebrate genomes. It remains unknown if the loss of CpG dinucleotides occurs in all viruses of a given DNA virus family that infect host species spanning across vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the link between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion among autonomous parvoviruses and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We demonstrate major differences in the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides among autonomous parvoviruses which share similar genome organization and common ancestry, depending on the infected host species. Parvoviruses infecting vertebrate hosts had significantly lower relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides than parvoviruses infecting invertebrate hosts. The strong correlation of CpG dinucleotide depletion with the gain in TpG/CpA dinucleotides and the loss of TpA dinucleotides among parvoviruses suggests a major role for CpG methylation in the evolution of parvoviruses. Our data present evidence that links the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides in parvoviruses to the methylation capabilities of the infected host. In sum, our findings support a novel perspective of host-driven evolution among autonomous parvoviruses.

  12. Hepatitis C virus RNA: dinucleotide frequencies and cleavage by RNase L.

    PubMed

    Washenberger, Christopher L; Han, Jian-Qiu; Kechris, Katherina J; Jha, Babal Kant; Silverman, Robert H; Barton, David J

    2007-12-01

    Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endoribonuclease that cleaves hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA at single-stranded UA and UU dinucleotides throughout the open reading frame (ORF). To determine whether RNase L exerts evolutionary pressure on HCV we examined the frequencies of UA and UU dinucleotides in 162 RNA sequences from the Los Alamos National Labs HCV Database (http://hcv.lanl.gov). Considering the base composition of the HCV ORFs, both UA and UU dinucleotides were less frequent than predicted in each of 162 HCV RNAs. UA dinucleotides were significantly less frequent than predicted at each of the three codon positions while UU dinucleotides were less frequent than predicted predominantly at the wobble position of codons. UA and UU dinucleotides were among the least abundant dinucleotides in HCV RNA ORFs. Furthermore, HCV genotype 1 RNAs have a lower frequency of UA and UU dinucleotides than genotype 2 and 3 RNAs, perhaps contributing to increased resistance of HCV genotype 1 infections to interferon therapy. In vitro, RNase L cleaved both HCV genotype 1 and 2 RNAs efficiently. Thus, RNase L can cleave HCV RNAs efficiently and variably reduced frequencies of UA and UU dinucleotides in HCV RNA ORFs are consistent with the selective pressure of RNase L.

  13. Binding of NAD+ to pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Irons, L I; van Heyningen, S

    1991-06-24

    The equilibrium dissociation constant of NAD+ and pertussis toxin was determined by equilibrium dialysis and by the quenching of the protein's intrinsic fluorescence on titration with NAD+. A binding constant, Kd, of 24 +/- 2 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained from equilibrium dialysis, consistent with the previously determined value for the Michaelis constant, Km, of 30 +/- 5 microM for NAD+ (when the toxin is catalysing the ADP-ribosylation of water and of dithiothreitol). The intrinsic fluorescence of pertussis toxin was quenched by up to 60% on titration with NAD+, and after correction for dilution and inner filter effects, a Kd value of 27 microM at 30 degrees C was obtained, agreeing well with that found by equilibrium dialysis. The binding constants were measured at a number of temperatures using both techniques, and from this the enthalpy of binding of NAD+ to toxin was determined to be 30 kJ.mol-1, a typical value for a protein-ligand interaction. There is one binding site for NAD+ per toxin molecule. PMID:1648404

  14. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD(+) or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD(+)/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD(+) and NADH contents and the NAD(+)/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD(+), total NAD contents, and NAD(+)/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ.

  15. Genetic structure of the nadA and nadB antivirulence loci in Shigella spp.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Anne-Laure; Schuch, Raymond; Fernández, Reinaldo E; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2007-09-01

    Comparison of nadA and nadB in 14 Shigella strains and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli versus E. coli showed that at least one locus is altered in all strains. These observations explain the characteristic nicotinic acid auxotrophy of Shigella organisms and are consistent with the previously identified antivirulence nature of these genes for these pathogens.

  16. What is adenine doing in photolyase?

    PubMed

    Acocella, Angela; Jones, Garth A; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2010-03-25

    The short answer to the title question is that it acts as an electrostatic bouncer that shoves the charge flow from flavin toward the DNA lesion that photolyase repairs. This explanation is provided by an explicit time-dependent quantum mechanical approach, which is used to investigate the electron transfer process that triggers the repair mechanism. The transfer occurs from the flavin photolyase cofactor to the cyclobutane ring of DNA, previously formed by light-induced cycloaddition of adjacent pyrimidine bases. The electron wave function dynamics accurately accounts for the previously proposed mechanism of transfer via the terminal methyl group of the flavin moiety present in the catalytic electron-donor cofactor, FADH(-), which also contains adenine. This latter moiety, which has often been assumed to be present mainly for structural reasons, instantaneously modifies the interaction between acceptor and donor by a variation of the electrostatic interactions so that the presence of its local atomic charges is necessary to trigger the transfer. In principle, knowledge of the details of the electron transfer dynamics and of the important role of polarization effects can be exploited to improve the efficiency of the repair mechanism in artificial systems.

  17. Ultraviolet Photostability of Adenine on Gold and Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo-Martí, Eva; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Martín-Gago, Jose-Angel

    2009-08-01

    The adenine molecule is a DNA nucleobase, an essential component of genetic material. Because of the important role of DNA nucleobases in terrestrial biochemistry, we have studied the molecular adsorption, orientation, and chemical binding of adenine on metallic and semiconducting surfaces, such as gold and silicon, respectively, and their stability toward ultraviolet radiation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) techniques. We have exposed the adenine surface system to UV radiation (200-400 nm) under a high-vacuum environment (10-7 mbar) to study the photostability and photochemistry of adenine on different surfaces. After 10 or 24 hours of exposure under interplanetary space conditions, UV radiation induces desorption and partial dissociation of the molecule, which is dependant on the nature of the surface. The electronic excitations, induced in the material by UV absorption, play a major role in the photodestruction of the absorbed molecules on the solid surfaces.

  18. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  19. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Cyclic ADP-Ribose (cADPR) Mediate Ca2+ Signaling in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Im, Soo-Yeul; Nam, Tae-Sik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Ko, Jae-Ki; Jang, Kyu Yoon; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a fundamental role in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers, NAADP and cADPR, in the cardiac hypertrophy induced by β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. Isoproterenol induced an initial Ca2+ transients followed by sustained Ca2+ rises. Inhibition of the cADPR pathway with 8-Br-cADPR abolished only the sustained Ca2+ increase, whereas inhibition of the NAADP pathway with bafilomycin-A1 abolished both rapid and sustained phases of the isoproterenol-mediated signal, indicating that the Ca2+ signal is mediated by a sequential action of NAADP and cADPR. The sequential production of NAADP and cADPR was confirmed biochemically. The isoproterenol-mediated Ca2+ increase and cADPR production, but not NAADP production, were markedly reduced in cardiomyocytes obtained from CD38 knockout mice. CD38 knockout mice were rescued from chronic isoproterenol infusion-induced myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and decrease in fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Thus, our findings indicate that β-adrenergic stimulation contributes to the development of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy via Ca2+ signaling mediated by NAADP-synthesizing enzyme and CD38 that produce NAADP and cADPR, respectively. PMID:26959359

  20. The role of Val-265 for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding in pyruvate oxidase: FTIR, kinetic, and crystallographic studies on the enzyme variant V265A.

    PubMed

    Wille, Georg; Ritter, Michaela; Weiss, Manfred S; König, Stephan; Mäntele, Werner; Hübner, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    In pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, valine 265 participates in binding the cofactor FAD and is responsible for the strained conformation of its isoalloxazine moiety that is visible in the crystal structure of POX. The contrasting effects of the conservative amino acid exchange V265A on the enzyme's catalytic properties, cofactor affinity, and protein structure were investigated. The most prominent effect of the exchange was observed in the 2.2 A crystal structure of the mutant POX. While the overall structures of the wild-type and the variant are similar, flavin binding in particular is clearly different. Local disorder at the isoalloxazine binding site prevents modeling of the complete FAD cofactor and two protein loops of the binding site. Only the ADP moiety shows well-defined electron density, indicating an "anchor" function for this part of the molecule. This notion is corroborated by competition experiments where ADP was used to displace FAD from the variant enzyme. Despite the fact that the affinity of FAD binding in the variant is reduced, the catalytic properties are very similar to the wild-type, and the redox potential of the bound flavin is the same for both proteins. The rate of electron transfer toward the flavin during turnover is reduced to one-third compared to the wild-type, but k(cat) remains unchanged. Redox-triggered FTIR difference spectroscopy of free FAD shows the nu(C(10a)=N(1)) band at 1548 cm(-)(1). In POX-V265A, this band is found at 1538 cm(-)(1) and thus shifted less strongly than in wild-type POX where it is found at 1534 cm(-)(1). Taking these observations together, the conservative exchange V265A in POX has a surprisingly small effect on the catalytic properties of the enzyme, whereas the effect on the three-dimensional structure is rather big.

  1. Induction of hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis through activation of the JNK-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-ROS self-driven death signal circuit.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Song, Fang-Jiao; Wang, Ying-Hong; Li, Ning; Yu, Qian; Liao, Li-Xi; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-10-28

    As an efficient method for inducing tumor cell apoptosis, ROS can be constantly formed and accumulated in NADPH oxidase overactivated-cells, resulting in further mitochondrial membrane damage and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (JNK MAPK) signal also acts as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial death pathway. However, the relationship between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK signal still remains unclear. Here, we discovered a novel self-driven signal circuit between NADPH oxidase-ROS and JNK MAPK, which was induced by a cytotoxic steroidal saponin (ASC) in hepatoma carcinoma cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production was markedly activated by ASC and directly led to JNK MAPK activation. Moreover, antioxidant, NADPH oxidase inhibitor and specific knock-out for p47 subunit of NADPH oxidase could effectively block NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent JNK activation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an upstream regulator of JNK MAPK. Conversely, a specific JNK inhibitor could inhibit ASC-induced NADPH oxidase activation and down-regulate ROS levels as well, indicating that JNK might also regulate NADPH oxidase activity to some extent. These observations indicate that NADPH oxidase and JNK MAPK activate each other as a signal circuit. Furthermore, drug pretreatment experiments with ASC showed this signal circuit operated continuously via a self-driven mode and finally induced apoptosis in hepatoma carcinoma cells. Taken together, we provide a proof for inducing hepatoma carcinoma cell apoptosis by activating the JNK-NADPH oxidase-ROS-dependent self-driven signal circuit pathway. PMID:25064608

  2. Towards understanding the origins of the different specificities of binding the reduced (NADPH) and oxidised (NADP +) forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate coenzyme to dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshakov, Vladimir I.; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Birdsall, Berry; Feeney, James

    2002-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) binds more than a thousand times tighter to NADPH than to NADP +. The origins of the difference in binding affinity to DHFR between NADPH and NADP + are investigated in the present study using experimental NMR data and hybrid density functional, B3LYP, calculations. Certain protein residues (Ala 6, Gln 7, Ile 13 and Gly 14) that are directly involved in hydrogen bonding with the nicotinamide carboxamide group show consistent differences in 1H and 15N chemical shift between NADPH and NADP + in a variety of ternary complexes. B3LYP calculations in model systems of protein-coenzyme interactions show differences in the H-bond geometry and differences in charge distribution between the oxidised and reduced forms of the nicotinamide ring. GIAO isotropic nuclear shieldings calculated for nuclei in these systems reproduce the experimentally observed trends in magnitudes and signs of the chemical shifts. The experimentally observed reduction in binding of NADP + compared with NADPH results partly from NADP + having to change its nicotinamide amide group from a cis- to a trans-conformation on binding and partly from the oxidised nicotinamide ring of NADP + being unable to take up its optimal hydrogen bonding geometry in its interactions with protein residues.

  3. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  4. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-01

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  5. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan.

    PubMed

    Otero, José M; Noël, Ann Josée; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L; Wende, Wolfgang; Schierling, Benno; Pingoud, Alfred; van Raaij, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD(+) and bound to NAD(+) plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR.

  6. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Otero, José M.; Noël, Ann-Josée; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Wende, Wolfgang; Schierling, Benno; Pingoud, Alfred; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD+ and bound to NAD+ plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR. PMID:23027736

  7. Plant Defensins NaD1 and NaD2 Induce Different Stress Response Pathways in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Dracatos, Peter M; Payne, Jennifer; Di Pietro, Antonio; Anderson, Marilyn A; Plummer, Kim M

    2016-09-03

    Nicotiana alata defensins 1 and 2 (NaD1 and NaD2) are plant defensins from the ornamental tobacco that have antifungal activity against a variety of fungal pathogens. Some plant defensins interact with fungal cell wall O-glycosylated proteins. Therefore, we investigated if this was the case for NaD1 and NaD2, by assessing the sensitivity of the three Aspergillus nidulans (An) O-mannosyltransferase (pmt) knockout (KO) mutants (An∆pmtA, An∆pmtB, and An∆pmtC). An∆pmtA was resistant to both defensins, while An∆pmtC was resistant to NaD2 only, suggesting NaD1 and NaD2 are unlikely to have a general interaction with O-linked side chains. Further evidence of this difference in the antifungal mechanism was provided by the dissimilarity of the NaD1 and NaD2 sensitivities of the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) signalling knockout mutants from the cell wall integrity (CWI) and high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HOG pathway mutants were sensitive to both NaD1 and NaD2, while CWI pathway mutants only displayed sensitivity to NaD2.

  8. Plant Defensins NaD1 and NaD2 Induce Different Stress Response Pathways in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Dracatos, Peter M.; Payne, Jennifer; Di Pietro, Antonio; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Plummer, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana alata defensins 1 and 2 (NaD1 and NaD2) are plant defensins from the ornamental tobacco that have antifungal activity against a variety of fungal pathogens. Some plant defensins interact with fungal cell wall O-glycosylated proteins. Therefore, we investigated if this was the case for NaD1 and NaD2, by assessing the sensitivity of the three Aspergillus nidulans (An) O-mannosyltransferase (pmt) knockout (KO) mutants (An∆pmtA, An∆pmtB, and An∆pmtC). An∆pmtA was resistant to both defensins, while An∆pmtC was resistant to NaD2 only, suggesting NaD1 and NaD2 are unlikely to have a general interaction with O-linked side chains. Further evidence of this difference in the antifungal mechanism was provided by the dissimilarity of the NaD1 and NaD2 sensitivities of the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) signalling knockout mutants from the cell wall integrity (CWI) and high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HOG pathway mutants were sensitive to both NaD1 and NaD2, while CWI pathway mutants only displayed sensitivity to NaD2. PMID:27598152

  9. Plant Defensins NaD1 and NaD2 Induce Different Stress Response Pathways in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Dracatos, Peter M; Payne, Jennifer; Di Pietro, Antonio; Anderson, Marilyn A; Plummer, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana alata defensins 1 and 2 (NaD1 and NaD2) are plant defensins from the ornamental tobacco that have antifungal activity against a variety of fungal pathogens. Some plant defensins interact with fungal cell wall O-glycosylated proteins. Therefore, we investigated if this was the case for NaD1 and NaD2, by assessing the sensitivity of the three Aspergillus nidulans (An) O-mannosyltransferase (pmt) knockout (KO) mutants (An∆pmtA, An∆pmtB, and An∆pmtC). An∆pmtA was resistant to both defensins, while An∆pmtC was resistant to NaD2 only, suggesting NaD1 and NaD2 are unlikely to have a general interaction with O-linked side chains. Further evidence of this difference in the antifungal mechanism was provided by the dissimilarity of the NaD1 and NaD2 sensitivities of the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) signalling knockout mutants from the cell wall integrity (CWI) and high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. HOG pathway mutants were sensitive to both NaD1 and NaD2, while CWI pathway mutants only displayed sensitivity to NaD2. PMID:27598152

  10. Insights into the Mechanism of Bovine CD38/NAD+Glycohydrolase from the X-Ray Structures of Its Michaelis Complex and Covalently-Trapped Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Egea, Pascal F.; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Kuhn, Isabelle; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Oppenheimer, Norman J.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kellenberger, Esther; Schuber, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD+glycohydrolase (bCD38) catalyses the hydrolysis of NAD+ into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). We solved the crystal structures of the mono N-glycosylated forms of the ecto-domain of bCD38 or the catalytic residue mutant Glu218Gln in their apo state or bound to aFNAD or rFNAD, two 2′-fluorinated analogs of NAD+. Both compounds behave as mechanism-based inhibitors, allowing the trapping of a reaction intermediate covalently linked to Glu218. Compared to the non-covalent (Michaelis) complex, the ligands adopt a more folded conformation in the covalent complexes. Altogether these crystallographic snapshots along the reaction pathway reveal the drastic conformational rearrangements undergone by the ligand during catalysis with the repositioning of its adenine ring from a solvent-exposed position stacked against Trp168 to a more buried position stacked against Trp181. This adenine flipping between conserved tryptophans is a prerequisite for the proper positioning of the N1 of the adenine ring to perform the nucleophilic attack on the C1′ of the ribofuranoside ring ultimately yielding cADPR. In all structures, however, the adenine ring adopts the most thermodynamically favorable anti conformation, explaining why cyclization, which requires a syn conformation, remains a rare alternate event in the reactions catalyzed by bCD38 (cADPR represents only 1% of the reaction products). In the Michaelis complex, the substrate is bound in a constrained conformation; the enzyme uses this ground-state destabilization, in addition to a hydrophobic environment and desolvation of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond, to destabilize the scissile bond leading to the formation of a ribooxocarbenium ion intermediate. The Glu218 side chain stabilizes this reaction intermediate and plays another important role during catalysis by polarizing the 2′-OH of the substrate NAD+. Based on our structural analysis and data on active site mutants

  11. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  12. Possible prebiotic catalysts formed from adenine and aldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Dumas, L.; Décout, J.-L.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2000-09-01

    Careful examination of the present metabolism and in vitro selection of various catalytic RNAs strongly support the "RNA World" hypothesis of the origin of life. However, in this scenario, the difficult prebiotic synthesis of ribose and consequently of nucleotides remain a major problem. In order to overcome this problem and obtain nucleoside analogs, we are investigating reactions of the nucleic acid base, adenine 1, with different aldehydes under presumably prebiotic conditions. In the reaction of adenine and pyruvaldehyde 2 in water, we report here the formation in high yield of two isomeric products. These compounds possessing alcohols functions as nucleosides result from condensation of two molecules of pyruvaldehyde on the 6-amino group of one adenine molecule. Their catalytic activities in the model hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylesters appeared interesting in the search of prebiotic catalysts.

  13. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  14. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  15. Mature Microsatellites: Mechanisms Underlying Dinucleotide Microsatellite Mutational Biases in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D.; Krasilnikova, Maria M.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans. PMID:23450065

  16. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  17. Thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Ziora, Zyta M; Coles, Daniel J; Lin, I-Chun; Toth, Istvan

    2010-05-14

    A novel class of thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based non-viral carriers for gene delivery has been developed. Their ability to bind to DNA by hydrogen bonding was confirmed by NMR diffusion, isothermal titration calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  18. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity.

  19. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  20. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  1. NADS - Nuclear and Atomic Data System

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, Michael S.; Beck, Bret; McNabb, Dennis

    2005-05-24

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations of the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V, and ENDF/B-VI, as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  2. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  3. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  4. NadA diversity and carriage in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Caugant, Dominique A; Mora, Marirosa; Brunelli, Brunella; Capecchi, Barbara; Ciucchi, Laura; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2004-07-01

    NadA is a novel vaccine candidate recently identified in Neisseria meningitidis and involved in adhesion to host tissues. The nadA gene has been found in approximately 50% of the strains isolated from patients and in three of the four hypervirulent lineages of non-serogroup A strains. Here we investigated the presence of the nadA gene in 154 meningococcal strains isolated from healthy people (carrier strains). Only 25 (16.2%) of the 154 carrier isolates harbored the nadA gene. The commensal species Neisseria lactamica was also found not to have the nadA gene. Eighteen of the carrier strains belonged to the ET-5 and ET-37 hypervirulent clusters, indicating that only the 5.1% of the genuine carrier population actually harbored nadA (7 of 136 strains). Five of the seven strains harbored a novel allele of the nadA gene that was designated nadA4. The NadA4 protein was present on the bacterial surface as heat-stable high-molecular-weight oligomers. Antibodies against the recombinant NadA4 protein were bactericidal against homologous strains, whereas the activity against other NadA alleles was weak. In conclusion, the nadA gene segregates differently in the population of strains isolated from healthy individuals and in the population of strains isolated from patients. The presence of NadA can therefore be used as a tool to study the dynamics of meningococcal infections and understand why this bacterium, which is mostly a commensal, can become a severe pathogen.

  5. Dinucleotide Weight Matrices for Predicting Transcription Factor Binding Sites: Generalizing the Position Weight Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Siddharthan, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in silico is key in understanding gene regulation. TFBS are string patterns that exhibit some variability, commonly modelled as “position weight matrices” (PWMs). Though convenient, the PWM has significant limitations, in particular the assumed independence of positions within the binding motif; and predictions based on PWMs are usually not very specific to known functional sites. Analysis here on binding sites in yeast suggests that correlation of dinucleotides is not limited to near-neighbours, but can extend over considerable gaps. Methodology/Principal Findings I describe a straightforward generalization of the PWM model, that considers frequencies of dinucleotides instead of individual nucleotides. Unlike previous efforts, this method considers all dinucleotides within an extended binding region, and does not make an attempt to determine a priori the significance of particular dinucleotide correlations. I describe how to use a “dinucleotide weight matrix” (DWM) to predict binding sites, dealing in particular with the complication that its entries are not independent probabilities. Benchmarks show, for many factors, a dramatic improvement over PWMs in precision of predicting known targets. In most cases, significant further improvement arises by extending the commonly defined “core motifs” by about 10bp on either side. Though this flanking sequence shows no strong motif at the nucleotide level, the predictive power of the dinucleotide model suggests that the “signature” in DNA sequence of protein-binding affinity extends beyond the core protein-DNA contact region. Conclusion/Significance While computationally more demanding and slower than PWM-based approaches, this dinucleotide method is straightforward, both conceptually and in implementation, and can serve as a basis for future improvements. PMID:20339533

  6. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-05-11

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins.

  7. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-01-01

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins. PMID:21589930

  8. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25770681

  9. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  10. Phosphorescence maxima and triplet state lifetimes of NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ in ternary complexes with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rousslang, K; Allen, L; Ross, J B

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the phosphorescence emission and decay times of NAD+ and its fluorescent etheno derivative, epsilon-NAD+, in the pyrazole ternary complex with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We show that the epsilon-NAD+ triplet state, as well as the tryptophan triplet state, can be utilized to monitor the coenzyme-enzyme interaction. The decays of NAD+ and AMP are single exponential, and the lifetimes are the same within experimental error. The phosphorescence lifetimes, evaluated as single exponentials, are slightly shorter in epsilon-NAD+ than they are in epsilon-AMP. Whereas the decay of epsilon-AMP was adequately fit by a single exponential with a time constant of very close to 0.5 s, it was necessary to fit the decay of epsilon-NAD+ to a double exponential. Ternary complexes with NAD+ excited at 297 nm exhibit decay kinetics nearly identical to those of ADH by itself. On the other hand, when excitation of the epsilon-NAD+ ternary complex is provided at 313 nm, where there is very little absorption by either tryptophan residue, the decay law of the ternary complex is similar to that of epsilon-NAD+ in solution. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ and epsilon-NAD+ quench tryptophan phosphorescence in ADH. Normalizing the phosphorescence intensity to the 0-0 vibronic band assigned to Trp-15 (blue-edge), we calculate a 21% decrease in the phosphorescence associated with Trp-314 at stoichiometric saturation of the coenzyme binding sites with NAD+ in the ternary complex. When the active sites are saturated with epsilon-NAD+, the relative phosphorescence due to Trp-314 decreases by 63%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  12. NADP+ and NAD+ binding to the dual coenzyme specific enzyme Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: different interdomain hinge angles are seen in different binary and ternary complexes.

    PubMed

    Naylor, C E; Gover, S; Basak, A K; Cosgrove, M S; Levy, H R; Adams, M J

    2001-05-01

    The reduced coenzymes NADH and NADPH only differ by one phosphate, but in the cell NADH provides reducing power for catabolism while NADPH is utilized in biosynthetic pathways. Enzymes almost invariably discriminate between the coenzymes, but glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides is rare in being functionally dual specific. In order to elucidate the coenzyme selectivity, the structures of NADP(+)- and NAD(+)-complexed L. mesenteroides G6PD have been determined including data to 2.2 and 2.5 A resolution, respectively, and compared with unliganded G6PD crystallized in the same space groups. Coenzyme binding is also compared with that in a ternary complex of a mutant in which Asp177 in the active site has been mutated to asparagine. There are no gross structural differences between the complexes. In both binary complexes, the enzyme interdomain hinge angle has opened. NADP(+) binds to the furthest open form; of the residues within the coenzyme domain, only Arg46 moves, interacting with the 2'-phosphate and adenine. NAD(+) is less well defined in the binding site; smaller hinge opening is seen but larger local changes: Arg46 is displaced, Thr14 bonds the 3'-hydroxyl and Gln47 bonds the 2'-hydroxyl. In the ternary complex, the hinge angle has closed; only the adenine nucleotide is ordered in the binding site. Arg46 again provides most binding interactions.

  13. Critical role for NAD glycohydrolase in regulation of erythropoiesis by hematopoietic stem cells through control of intracellular NAD content.

    PubMed

    Nam, Tae-Sik; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Byung-Ju; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kim, Youngho; Moss, Joel; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    NAD glycohydrolases (NADases) catalyze the hydrolysis of NAD to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. Although many members of the NADase family, including ADP-ribosyltransferases, have been cloned and characterized, the structure and function of NADases with pure hydrolytic activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the structural and functional characterization of a novel NADase from rabbit reticulocytes. The novel NADase is a glycosylated, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface protein exclusively expressed in reticulocytes. shRNA-mediated knockdown of the NADase in bone marrow cells resulted in a reduction of erythroid colony formation and an increase in NAD level. Furthermore, treatment of bone marrow cells with NAD, nicotinamide, or nicotinamide riboside, which induce an increase in NAD content, resulted in a significant decrease in erythroid progenitors. These results indicate that the novel NADase may play a critical role in regulating erythropoiesis of hematopoietic stem cells by modulating intracellular NAD. PMID:24759100

  14. Capillary zone electrophoresis with field enhanced sample stacking as a tool for targeted metabolome analysis of adenine nucleotides and coenzymes in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Jindra; Sedlácek, Vojtech; Kucera, Igor; Glatz, Zdenek

    2009-07-01

    The main aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of capillary zone electrophoresis in combination with field enhanced sample stacking in targeted metabolome analyses of adenine nucleotides--AMP, ADP, ATP, coenzymes NAD(+), NADP(+) and their reduced forms in Paracoccus denitrificans. Sodium carbonate/hydrogencarbonate buffer (100 mM, pH 9.6) with the addition of beta-CD at a concentration of 10 mM was found to be an effective BGE for their separation within 20 min. Besides this, special attention was paid to the development of the procedure for the extraction of specific metabolites from the bacterium P. denitrificans. This procedure was not only optimised to achieve the highest metabolite yields but also to obtain a sample that was fully compatible with the online preconcetration strategy used. The developed methodology was finally applied in a study of the bacterium P. denitrificans at various stages of the active respiratory chain.

  15. Cyclic (di)nucleotides: the common language shared by microbe and host.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juyi; Tao, Jianli; Liang, Weili; Jiang, Zhengfan

    2016-04-01

    Fluency in a common language allows individuals to convey information and carry out complex activities that otherwise would be difficult or even impossible without the benefit of shared communication. Cyclic (di)nucleotides have recently been recognized as such an accessible language understood by both microbe and the host, ever since remarkable progresses have revealed the molecular details of these nucleotide second messengers used in cellular communication systems. Though undergoing separate evolutionary pathways in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, cyclic (di)nucleotides enable microbes to influence host cells immediately and fiercely by modulating a variety of cellular activities. Here we highlight recent insights in cyclic (di)nucleotides and focus on the balancing of these indispensable signaling molecules by synthases and phosphodiesterases.

  16. Typing dinucleotide repeat loci using microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Santiago; Chen, Xiao-He; Day, Ian N M

    2004-04-01

    Polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci ('microsatellite markers') are found in varying abundance throughout the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively used for genetic studies, but conventional techniques used for their genotyping require sophisticated equipment. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) has previously been extended to economical high-throughput genotyping of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite amplicons. However, the capability of this technique to resolve the alleles of dinucleotide repeat loci has not been explored previously. Here we show that a modified microsatellite-MADGE approach can provide sufficient resolution for dinucleotide repeat typing. This enables economical and convenient set up for analysis of single markers in many samples in parallel, suitable, for example, for population association studies.

  17. NAD⁺ in aging, metabolism, and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Verdin, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It serves both as a critical coenzyme for enzymes that fuel reduction-oxidation reactions, carrying electrons from one reaction to another, and as a cosubstrate for other enzymes such as the sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases. Cellular NAD(+) concentrations change during aging, and modulation of NAD(+) usage or production can prolong both health span and life span. Here we review factors that regulate NAD(+) and discuss how supplementation with NAD(+) precursors may represent a new therapeutic opportunity for aging and its associated disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26785480

  18. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  19. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  20. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1. PMID:25869111

  1. Agents for replacement of NAD+/NADH system in enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.; Kerr, John B.; Lo, Christine H.

    2004-04-06

    Novel agents acting as co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H co-enzyme systems in enzymatic oxido-reductive reactions. Agents mimicking the action of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system in enzymatic oxidation/reduction of substrates into reduced or oxidized products. A method for selection and preparation of the mimicking agents for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system and a device comprising co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system.

  2. NAD+ and vitamin B3: from metabolism to therapies.

    PubMed

    Sauve, Anthony A

    2008-03-01

    The role of NAD(+) metabolism in health and disease is of increased interest as the use of niacin (nicotinic acid) has emerged as a major therapy for treatment of hyperlipidemias and with the recognition that nicotinamide can protect tissues and NAD(+) metabolism in a variety of disease states, including ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, a growing body of evidence supports the view that NAD(+) metabolism regulates important biological effects, including lifespan. NAD(+) exerts potent effects through the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, and the recently characterized sirtuin enzymes. These enzymes catalyze protein modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation and deacetylation, leading to changes in protein function. These enzymes regulate apoptosis, DNA repair, stress resistance, metabolism, and endocrine signaling, suggesting that these enzymes and/or NAD(+) metabolism could be targeted for therapeutic benefit. This review considers current knowledge of NAD(+) metabolism in humans and microbes, including new insights into mechanisms that regulate NAD(+) biosynthetic pathways, current use of nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as pharmacological agents, and opportunities for drug design that are directed at modulation of NAD(+) biosynthesis for treatment of human disorders and infections. PMID:18165311

  3. Reassessing the role of NAD as a prosurvival factor

    PubMed Central

    Preyat, Nicolas; Leo, Oberdan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms regulating the choice of cell demise remain largely unknown. NAD+, a key metabolite with well-known roles in cell metabolism, has been shown to counteract apoptosis while promoting necroptosis, a form of proinflammatory cell death. This observation identifies NAD+ availability as an important parameter with contrasting roles in the regulation of distinct regulated cell death programs. PMID:27308572

  4. Converting NAD-specific inositol dehydrogenase to an efficient NADP-selective catalyst, with a surprising twist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongyan; Bertwistle, Drew; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2013-08-27

    myo-Inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis converts myo-inositol to scyllo-inosose and is strictly dependent on NAD for activity. We sought to alter the coenzyme specificity to generate an NADP-dependent enzyme in order to enhance our understanding of coenzyme selectivity and to create an enzyme capable of recycling NADP in biocatalytic processes. Examination of available structural information related to the GFO/MocA/IDH family of dehydrogenases and precedents for altering coenzyme selectivity allowed us to select residues for substitution, and nine single, double, and triple mutants were constructed. Mutagenesis experiments with B. subtilis IDH proved extremely successful; the double mutant D35S/V36R preferred NADP to NAD by a factor of 5. This mutant is an excellent catalyst with a second-order rate constant with respect to NADP of 370 000 s⁻¹ M⁻¹, and the triple mutant A12K/D35S/V36R had a value of 570 000 s⁻¹ M⁻¹, higher than that of the wild-type IDH with NAD. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the double mutant A12K/D35S was solved in complex with NADP. Surprisingly, the binding of the coenzyme is altered such that although the nicotinamide ring maintains the required position for catalysis, the coenzyme has twisted by nearly 90°, so the adenine moiety no longer binds to a hydrophobic cleft in the Rossmann fold as in the wild-type enzyme. This change in binding conformation has not previously been observed in mutated dehydrogenases.

  5. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality.

  6. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  7. Examination of tyrosine/adenine stacking interactions in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kari L; Pellock, Samuel J; Cox, James R; Cafiero, Mauricio L; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2013-11-14

    The π-stacking interactions between tyrosine amino acid side chains and adenine-bearing ligands are examined. Crystalline protein structures from the protein data bank (PDB) exhibiting face-to-face tyrosine/adenine arrangements were used to construct 20 unique 4-methylphenol/N9-methyladenine (p-cresol/9MeA) model systems. Full geometry optimization of the 20 crystal structures with the M06-2X density functional theory method identified 11 unique low-energy conformations. CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limit interaction energies were estimated for all of the structures to determine the magnitude of the interaction between the two ring systems. CCSD(T) computations with double-ζ basis sets (e.g., 6-31G*(0.25) and aug-cc-pVDZ) indicate that the MP2 method overbinds by as much as 3.07 kcal mol(-1) for the crystal structures and 3.90 kcal mol(-1) for the optimized structures. In the 20 crystal structures, the estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy ranges from -4.00 to -6.83 kcal mol(-1), with an average interaction energy of -5.47 kcal mol(-1), values remarkably similar to the corresponding data for phenylalanine/adenine stacking interactions. Geometry optimization significantly increases the interaction energies of the p-cresol/9MeA model systems. The average estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy of the 11 optimized structures is 3.23 kcal mol(-1) larger than that for the 20 crystal structures.

  8. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  9. NAD+ Auxotrophy is Bacteriocidal for the Tubercle Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Weinrick, Brian; Wong, Ka-Wing; Chen, Bing; Jacobs, William R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The human tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis can synthesize NAD+ using the de novo biosynthesis pathway or the salvage pathway. The salvage pathway of the bovine tubercle bacillus M. bovis was reported defective due to a mutation in the nicotinamidase PncA. This defect prevents nicotinic acid secretion, which is the basis for the niacin test that clinically distinguishes M. bovis from M. tuberculosis. Surprisingly, we found that the NAD+ de novo biosynthesis pathway (nadABC) can be deleted from M. bovis, demonstrating a functioning salvage pathway. M. bovis ΔnadABC fails to grow in mice, whereas M. tuberculosis ΔnadABC grows normally in mice, suggesting that M. tuberculosis can acquire nicotinamide from its host. The introduction of M. tuberculosis pncA into M. bovis ΔnadABC is sufficient to fully restore growth in a mouse, proving that the functional salvage pathway enables nicotinamide acquisition by the tubercle bacilli. This study demonstrates that NAD+ starvation is a cidal event in the tubercle bacilli and confirms that enzymes common to the de novo and salvage pathways may be good drug targets. PMID:20199601

  10. A comparison of adenine and some derivatives on pig isolated tracheal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Dieterle, Y.; Holden, W. E.; Junod, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    We studied the muscle relaxation induced by adenine and several adenine derivatives in strips of tracheal smooth muscle from pigs; in addition their metabolism by the tissue was examined. Adenine relaxed tissue which was contracted by carbachol, histamine, or KCl. Adenine's potency was similar to that of adenosine and ATP (threshold about 4 X 10(-5)M). In tissues with carbachol-induced tone, the adenine effect differed from adenosine and ATP by being slower in onset and in 'washout' time. Furthermore, neither dipyridamole nor theophylline modified the response to adenine. The relationship was examined between pharmacological effects and the metabolism of [3H]-adenosine and [3H]-adenine. Both substrates were taken up by the tissue and converted to nucleotides, but relaxation correlated with nucleotide accumulation only in the case of [3H]-adenine. We conclude that the site and mechanism of adenine-induced relaxation is different from that of adenosine and ATP in porcine tracheal muscle. PMID:6571222

  11. Studies on the de novo biosynthesis of NAD in Escherichia coli. The separation of the nadB gene product from the nadA gene product and its purification.

    PubMed

    Griffith, G R; Chandler, J L; Gholson, R K

    1975-05-01

    Quinolinic acid (pyridine 2,3-dicarboxylic acid) which is an immediate precursor of the pyridine nucleotides, is synthesised from L-asparate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate in Escherichia coli. Extracts from certain nadB mutants complement the extracts prepared from all nadA mutants for the enzymic synthesis of quinolinate. Using the complementation assay, the quinolinate synthetase B protein has been purified more than 300-fold. The quinolinate synthetase B protein exists in all nadA and nadC mutants examined. The quinolinate synthetase A protein was present in all nadC mutants and most (but not all) nadB mutants. The facile separation of the wild-type quinolinate synthetase A and B proteins out of a nadC mutant suggests that quinolinate synthetase does not exists as a tightly bound complex. The partially purified quinolinate synthetase is inhibited by physiological concetrations of NAD and NADH but not by NADP or NADPH.

  12. Immune-Stimulatory Dinucleotide at the 5′-End of Oligodeoxynucleotides Is Critical for TLR9-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a CpG or certain synthetic dinucleotides, referred to as immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, induce Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated immune responses. Chemical modifications such as 2′-O-methylribonucleotides incorporated adjacent to the immune-stimulatory dinucleotide on the 5′-side abrogate TLR9-mediated immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the location of immune-stimulatory dinucleotides in ODNs on TLR9-mediated immune responses. We designed and synthesized ODNs with two immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, one placed toward the 5′-end region and the other toward the 3′-end region, incorporated 2′-O-methylribonucleotides selectively preceding the 5′- or 3′-immune-stimulatory dinucleotide or both, and studied TLR9-mediated immune responses of these compounds in cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. These studies showed that an immune-stimulatory dinucleotide located closer to the 5′-end is critical for and dictates TLR9-mediated immune responses. These studies provide insights for the use of ODNs when employed as TLR9 agonists and antagonists or antisense agents. PMID:24900663

  13. Modelling proton tunnelling in the adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Godbeer, A D; Al-Khalili, J S; Stevenson, P D

    2015-05-21

    The energies of the canonical (standard, amino-keto) and tautomeric (non-standard, imino-enol) charge-neutral forms of the adenine-thymine base pair (A-T and A*-T*, respectively) are calculated using density functional theory. The reaction pathway is then computed using a transition state search to provide the asymmetric double-well potential minima along with the barrier height and shape, which are combined to create the potential energy surface using a polynomial fit. The influence of quantum tunnelling on proton transfer within a base pair H-bond (modelled as the DFT deduced double-well potential) is then investigated by solving the time-dependent master equation for the density matrix. The effect on a quantum system by its surrounding water molecules is explored via the inclusion of a dissipative Lindblad term in the master equation, in which the environment is modelled as a heat bath of harmonic oscillators. It is found that quantum tunnelling, due to transitions to higher energy eigenstates with significant amplitudes in the shallow (tautomeric) side of the potential, is unlikely to be a significant mechanism for the creation of adenine-thymine tautomers within DNA, with thermally assisted coupling of the environment only able to boost the tunnelling probability to a maximum of 2 × 10(-9). This is barely increased for different choices of the starting wave function or when the geometry of the potential energy surface is varied.

  14. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  15. Pleiotropic effects of the sirtuin inhibitor sirtinol involves concentration-dependent modulation of multiple nuclear receptor-mediated pathways in the androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell LNCaP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sirtinol, a purported specific inhibitor of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent type III histone deacetylase (also known as sirtuin), has been used extensively to identify chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agents that modulate the activity of this group of enzymes. However, the mole...

  16. SIRT2 deacetylates FOXO3a in response to oxidative stress and caloric restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sirtuin family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent (NAD) deacetylases plays an important role in aging and metabolic regulation. In yeast, the Sir2 gene and its homolog Hst2 independently mediate the action of caloric restriction on lifespan extension. The mammalian Sir2 ortholog, SIR...

  17. Metabolic precursors in astrophysical ice analogs: implications for meteorites and comets.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen E; Gerakines, Perry A; Callahan, Michael P

    2015-07-28

    We report the synthesis of complex organic compounds including nicotinic and quinolinic acid, two members involved in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthetic pathway, in irradiated astrophysical ice analogs. If delivered to Earth by meteorites and comets, these compounds may have contributed to the origin and early evolution of life. PMID:26107786

  18. Metabolic precursors in astrophysical ice analogs: implications for meteorites and comets.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen E; Gerakines, Perry A; Callahan, Michael P

    2015-07-28

    We report the synthesis of complex organic compounds including nicotinic and quinolinic acid, two members involved in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthetic pathway, in irradiated astrophysical ice analogs. If delivered to Earth by meteorites and comets, these compounds may have contributed to the origin and early evolution of life.

  19. NAD+/NADH and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to exercise

    PubMed Central

    White, Amanda T.

    2012-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotides, NAD+ and NADH, are coenzymes that provide oxidoreductive power for the generation of ATP by mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, exercise perturbs the levels of NAD+, NADH, and consequently, the NAD+/NADH ratio, and initial research in this area focused on the contribution of redox control to ATP production. More recently, numerous signaling pathways that are sensitive to perturbations in NAD+(H) have come to the fore, as has an appreciation for the potential importance of compartmentation of NAD+(H) metabolism and its subsequent effects on various signaling pathways. These pathways, which include the sirtuin (SIRT) proteins SIRT1 and SIRT3, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins PARP1 and PARP2, and COOH-terminal binding protein (CtBP), are of particular interest because they potentially link changes in cellular redox state to both immediate, metabolic-related changes and transcriptional adaptations to exercise. In this review, we discuss what is known, and not known, about the contribution of NAD+(H) metabolism and these aforementioned proteins to mitochondrial adaptations to acute and chronic endurance exercise. PMID:22436696

  20. NMNAT expression and its relation to NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, H N; Kusumanchi, P; Yalowitz, J A

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferease (NMNAT), a rate-limiting enzyme present in all organisms, reversibly catalyzes the important step in the biosynthesis of NAD from ATP and NMN. NAD and NADP are used reversibly in anabolic and catabolic reactions. NAD is necessary for cell survival in oxidative stress and DNA damage. Based on their localization, three different NMNAT's have been recognized, NMNAT-1 (homohexamer) in the nucleus (chromosome 1 p32-35), NMNAT-2 (homodimer) in the cytoplasm (chromosome 1q25) and NMNAT-3 (homotetramer) in the mitochondria. NMNAT also catalyzes the metabolic conversion of potent antitumor prodrugs like tiazofurin and benzamide riboside to their active forms which are analogs of NAD. NAD synthase-NMNAT acts as a chaperone to protect against neurodegeneration, injury-induced axonal degeneration and also correlates with DNA synthesis during cell cycle. Since its activity is rather low in tumor cells it can be exploited as a source for therapeutic targeting. Steps involved in NAD synthesis are being utilized as targets for chemoprevention, radiosensitization and therapy of wide range of diseases, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration and Huntington's disease. PMID:21517776

  1. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of pea seed glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Knight, T J; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-08-15

    The effects of adenine nucleotides on pea seed glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) activity were examined as a part of our investigation of the regulation of this octameric plant enzyme. Saturation curves for glutamine synthetase activity versus ATP with ADP as the changing fixed inhibitor were not hyperbolic; greater apparent Vmax values were observed in the presence of added ADP than the Vmax observed in the absence of ADP. Hill plots of data with ADP present curved upward and crossed the plot with no added ADP. The stoichiometry of adenine nucleotide binding to glutamine synthetase was examined. Two molecules of [gamma-32P]ATP were bound per subunit in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. These ATP molecules were bound at an allosteric site and at the active site. One molecule of either [gamma-32P]ATP or [14C]ADP bound per subunit in the absence of methionine sulfoximine; this nucleotide was bound at an allosteric site. ADP and ATP compete for binding at the allosteric site, although ADP was preferred. ADP binding to the allosteric site proceeded in two kinetic phases. A Vmax value of 1.55 units/mg was measured for glutamine synthetase with one ADP tightly bound per enzyme subunit; a Vmax value of 0.8 unit/mg was measured for enzyme with no adenine nucleotide bound at the allosteric site. The enzyme activation caused by the binding of ADP to the allosteric sites was preceded by a lag phase, the length of which was dependent on the ADP concentration. Enzyme incubated in 10 mM ADP bound approximately 4 mol of ADP/mol of native enzyme before activation was observed; the activation was complete when 7-8 mol of ADP were bound per mol of the octameric, native enzyme. The Km for ATP (2 mM) was not changed by ADP binding to the allosteric sites. ADP was a simple competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.05 mM) of ATP for glutamine synthetase with eight molecules of ADP tightly bound to the allosteric sites of the octamer. Binding of ATP to the allosteric sites led to marked

  2. Major and minor groove conformations of DNA trimers modified on guanine or adenine by 4-aminobiphenyl: Adenine adducts favor the minor groove

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.; Ellis, S.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the conformational effects of 4-aminobiphenyl modification at C-8 of guanine or adenine on double-stranded DNA trimers. We used sequences with the modified purine at the central base pair and all 16 possible neighboring sequences at the outer pairs. Minimized potential energy calculations were carried out using the molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to survey the conformation space of these adducts, using a total of 1280 starting structures both in the modified guanine series and in the modified adenine series. Conformer families in which the bound 4-aminobiphenyl was located in the DNA major groove, and in the minor groove, were located for both adenine and guanine modification. In the modified guanine series, the major and minor groove families were roughly comparable in energy, and the sequence context determined which was more stable in a particular case. In the modified adenine series, however, the minor groove structure was more that 10 kcal/mol more stable than the major groove for all sequences. As a result, minor groove adducts provided most of the global minima in the adenine-modified series. This result may be relevant to a previous mutagenesis study [Lasko et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15429-15435] in which the hot spot of most frequent occurrence was located at an adenine, in the sequence GAT. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Parp mutations protect against mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in a PARKIN model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, S; Costa, A C; Celardo, I; Loh, S H Y; Martins, L M

    2016-01-01

    The co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential co-factor for cellular energy generation in mitochondria as well as for DNA repair mechanisms in the cell nucleus involving NAD+-consuming poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Mitochondrial function is compromised in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) associated with PARKIN mutations. Here, we uncovered alterations in NAD+ salvage metabolism in Drosophila parkin mutants. We show that a dietary supplementation with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide rescues mitochondrial function and is neuroprotective. Further, by mutating Parp in parkin mutants, we show that this increases levels of NAD+ and its salvage metabolites. This also rescues mitochondrial function and suppresses dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We conclude that strategies to enhance NAD+ levels by administration of dietary precursors or the inhibition of NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as PARP, that compete with mitochondria for NAD+ could be used to delay neuronal death associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031963

  4. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  5. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  6. Loss of NAD Homeostasis Leads to Progressive and Reversible Degeneration of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Loro, Emanuele; Liu, Ling; Davila, Antonio; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Silverman, Ian M; Quinn, William J; Gosai, Sager J; Tichy, Elisia D; Davis, James G; Mourkioti, Foteini; Gregory, Brian D; Dellinger, Ryan W; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie E; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Khurana, Tejvir S; Baur, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    NAD is an obligate co-factor for the catabolism of metabolic fuels in all cell types. However, the availability of NAD in several tissues can become limited during genotoxic stress and the course of natural aging. The point at which NAD restriction imposes functional limitations on tissue physiology remains unknown. We examined this question in murine skeletal muscle by specifically depleting Nampt, an essential enzyme in the NAD salvage pathway. Knockout mice exhibited a dramatic 85% decline in intramuscular NAD content, accompanied by fiber degeneration and progressive loss of both muscle strength and treadmill endurance. Administration of the NAD precursor nicotinamide riboside rapidly ameliorated functional deficits and restored muscle mass despite having only a modest effect on the intramuscular NAD pool. Additionally, lifelong overexpression of Nampt preserved muscle NAD levels and exercise capacity in aged mice, supporting a critical role for tissue-autonomous NAD homeostasis in maintaining muscle mass and function. PMID:27508874

  7. Structure and function of NAD kinase and NADP phosphatase: key enzymes that regulate the intracellular balance of NAD(H) and NADP(H).

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2008-04-01

    The functions of NAD(H) (NAD(+) and NADH) and NADP(H) (NADP(+) and NADPH) are undoubtedly significant and distinct. Hence, regulation of the intracellular balance of NAD(H) and NADP(H) is important. The key enzymes involved in the regulation are NAD kinase and NADP phosphatase. In 2000, we first succeeded in identifying the gene for NAD kinase, thereby facilitating worldwide studies of this enzyme from various organisms, including eubacteria, archaea, yeast, plants, and humans. Molecular biological study has revealed the physiological function of this enzyme, that is to say, the significance of NADP(H), in some model organisms. Structural research has elucidated the tertiary structure of the enzyme, the details of substrate-binding sites, and the catalytic mechanism. Research on NAD kinase also led to the discovery of archaeal NADP phosphatase. In this review, we summarize the physiological functions, applications, and structure of NAD kinase, and the way we discovered archaeal NADP phosphatase.

  8. Identification and characterization of a human mitochondrial NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuto; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2012-01-01

    NAD kinase is the sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme. Despite the great significance of NADP(+), to date no mitochondrial NAD kinase has been identified in human, and the source of human mitochondrial NADP(+) remains elusive. Here we present evidence demonstrating that a human protein of unknown function, C5orf33, is a human mitochondrial NAD kinase; this protein likely represents the missing source of human mitochondrial NADP(+). The C5orf33 protein exhibits NAD kinase activity, utilizing ATP or inorganic polyphosphate, and is localized in the mitochondria of human HEK293A cells. C5orf33 mRNA is more abundant than human cytosolic NAD kinase mRNA in almost all tissues examined. We further show by database searches that some animals and protists carry C5orf33 homologues as their sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme, whereas plants and fungi possess no C5orf33 homologue. These observations provide insights into eukaryotic NADP(+) biosynthesis, which has pivotal roles in cells and organelles.

  9. Association of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) containing nucleobase multiple hydrogen bonding of adenine for DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Chen, Jem-Kun; Cheng, Chih-Chia; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this study we used the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a medium to generate PNIPAAm-adenine supramolecular complexes. A nucleobase-like hydrogen bonding (NLHB) between PNIPAAm and adenine was found that changed the morphology, crystalline structure, and temperature responsiveness of PNIPAAm microgels relatively to the adenine concentrations. With increasing the adenine concentration, the PNIPAAm-adenine supramolecular complexes gradually altered their morphologies from microgel particles to thin film structures and suppressed the thermodynamical coil-to-globule transition of PNIPAAm because of the NLHB existed between the PNIPAAm amide and ester groups and the adenine amide groups (Cdbnd O⋯Hsbnd N and Nsbnd H⋯Nsbnd R), verified by FTIR spectral analysis. NLHB was also diverse and extensive upon increasing the temperature; therefore, the thermoresponsive behavior of the complexes was altered with the NLBH intensity, evaluated by the inter-association equilibrium constant (Ka) above and below their LCST. Therefore, PNIPAAm can be as a medium to recognize adenine in various concentrations, which could potentially be applied in DNA recognition.

  10. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  11. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model.

  12. Isolation and characterization of dinucleotide microsatellite loci in the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Kongrit, C; Siripunkaw, C; Brockelman, W Y; Akkarapatumwong, V; Wright, T F; Eggert, L S

    2008-01-01

    The endangered Asian elephant is found today primarily in protected areas. We characterized 18 dinucleotide microsatellite loci in this species. Allelic diversity ranged from three to eight per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.200 to 0.842 in a wild population. All loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but linkage disequilibrium was detected between two loci in the wild, but not in the zoo elephants. These loci will be useful for the population-level studies of this species.

  13. N6-methyl-adenine: an epigenetic signal for DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Wion, Didier; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-03-01

    N(6)-methyl-adenine is found in the genomes of bacteria, archaea, protists and fungi. Most bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferases are part of restriction-modification systems. Certain groups of Proteobacteria also harbour solitary DNA adenine methyltransferases that provide signals for DNA-protein interactions. In gamma-proteobacteria, Dam methylation regulates chromosome replication, nucleoid segregation, DNA repair, transposition of insertion elements and transcription of specific genes. In Salmonella, Haemophilus, Yersinia and Vibrio species and in pathogenic Escherichia coli, Dam methylation is required for virulence. In alpha-proteobacteria, CcrM methylation regulates the cell cycle in Caulobacter, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium, and has a role in Brucella abortus infection.

  14. Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Plant Tissues: Some Effects of Kinetin on Enzymic Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. B.; Murray, A. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity was measured in extracts of soybean (Glycine max var. Acme) callus and of senescing barley leaves (Hordeum distichon c.v. Prior). The enzyme from soybean callus had Michaelis constants for adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate of 1.5 and 7.5 μm respectively and was inhibited by AMP and stimulated by ATP. The presence of kinetin was found to considerably increase the activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in extracts of soybean callus and senescing barley leaves. PMID:16656820

  15. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  16. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  17. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  18. Topography, purification and characterization of thyroidal NAD+ glycohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    De Wolf, Marc J. S.; Van Dessel, Guido A. F.; Lagrou, Albert R.; Hilderson, Herwig J. J.; Dierick, Wilfried S. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation of bovine thyroid tissue by differential pelleting and isopycnic gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor indicated that NAD+ glycohydrolase is predominantly located and rather uniformly distributed in the plasma membrane. Comparison of NAD+ glycohydrolase activities of intact thyroid tissue slices, functional rat thyroid cells in culture (FRTl) and their respective homogenates indicated that most if not all of the enzyme (catalytic site) is accessible to extracellular NAD+. The reaction product nicotinamide was predominantly recovered from the extracellular medium. The diazonium salt of sulphanilic acid, not penetrating into intact cells, was able to decrease the activity of intact thyroid tissue slices to the same extent as in the homogenate. Under the same conditions this reagent almost completely abolished NAD+ glycohydrolase activity associated with intact thyroid cells in culture. The triazine dye Cibacron Blue F3GA and its high-Mr derivative Blue Dextran respectively completely eliminated or caused a severe depression in the NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of FRTl cells. The enzyme could be readily solubilized from bovine thyroid membranes by detergent extraction, and was further purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography on Blue Sepharose CL-6B. The overall procedure resulted in a 1940-fold purification (specific activity 77.6μmol of nicotinamide released/h per mg). The purified enzyme displays a Km of 0.40mm for β-NAD+, a broad pH optimum around pH7.2 (0.1 m-potassium phosphate buffer) and an apparent Mr of 120000. Nicotinamide is an inhibitor (Ki 1.9mm) of the non-competitive type. The second reaction product ADP-ribose acts as a competitive inhibitor (Ki 2.7mm). The purified enzyme splits β-NAD+, β-NADP+, β-NADH and α-NAD+ at rates in the relative proportions 1:0.75:<0.02:<0.02 and exhibits transglycosidase (pyridine-base exchange) activity. Anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine

  19. Coordinated regulation of accessory genetic elements produces cyclic di-nucleotides for V. cholerae virulence.

    PubMed

    Davies, Bryan W; Bogard, Ryan W; Young, Travis S; Mekalanos, John J

    2012-04-13

    The function of the Vibrio 7(th) pandemic island-1 (VSP-1) in cholera pathogenesis has remained obscure. Utilizing chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing to map the regulon of the master virulence regulator ToxT, we identify a TCP island-encoded small RNA that reduces the expression of a previously unrecognized VSP-1-encoded transcription factor termed VspR. VspR modulates the expression of several VSP-1 genes including one that encodes a novel class of di-nucleotide cyclase (DncV), which preferentially synthesizes a previously undescribed hybrid cyclic AMP-GMP molecule. We show that DncV is required for efficient intestinal colonization and downregulates V. cholerae chemotaxis, a phenotype previously associated with hyperinfectivity. This pathway couples the actions of previously disparate genomic islands, defines VSP-1 as a pathogenicity island in V. cholerae, and implicates its occurrence in 7(th) pandemic strains as a benefit for host adaptation through the production of a regulatory cyclic di-nucleotide.

  20. Separation and characterization of oxaliplatin dinucleotides from DNA using HPLC-ESI ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mowaka, Shereen; Linscheid, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum complex, and has a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. Such platinum complexes with the DACH carrier ligand have recently received increasing attention since they show efficacy against cisplatin-resistant cell lines. As the foremost indication of antitumor activity of platinum drugs is the formation of adducts with genomic DNA, calf thymus DNA-oxaliplatin adducts were the major target in this study. Calf thymus DNA was incubated with oxaliplatin, resulting in the formation of a large number of platinum-DNA adducts. Treated DNA was digested into the dinucleotides with a combination of enzymes, namely, benzonase, alkaline phosphatase, and nuclease S1. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography, we carried out the separation of individual platinum-DNA adducts which were concurrently identified using electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). Both 1,2-intrastrand and 1,2-interstrand cross-linked adducts were found; however, those of the intrastrand nature have a considerably higher abundance than those of the interstrand cross-links. Among them, d(GpG)-oxaliplatin was the most abundant bifuctional adduct. To a lesser extent, a few monofunctional adducts were detected as well. MS(n) experiments served to ascertain the detailed structures of oxaliplatin adducts of dinucleoside monophosphates and of dinucleotides.

  1. Base-boronated dinucleotides: synthesis and effect of N7-cyanoborane substitution on the base protons.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, A; Li, H; Tomasz, J; Shaw, B R

    1996-01-01

    Boron-modified nucleic acids comprise a new set of DNA mimics that have potential biological and therapeutic applications. A series of nine dinucleotides containing N7-cyanoborane-2'-deoxyguanosine ((7b)dG) at the 3', 5' or both positions of the phosphodiester linkage have been synthesized using solution phase phosphoramidite chemistry. Fmoc was used as the 5'-protecting group because of incompatibility of the cyanoborane moiety with 5'-DMT cations generated during the deprotection step. The presence of the cyanoborane group was confirmed on the basis of Fab-MS and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The H-8 proton of (7b)dG in the dinucleotides shifted 0.35-0.80 p.p.m. downfield relative to that of unmodified dG. A comparison of the D20 exchange kinetics of the H-8 proton at 60 degrees C showed that H-8 of (7b)dG is very labile relative to unmodified dG, indicating that the N7-cyanoborane modification increases the acidity of the H-8 proton of (7b)dG. These studies illustrate the feasibility of synthesizing boron-containing oligonucleotides which are modified at the N7-guanine to block Hoogsteen pairing in the DNA major groove. PMID:8668548

  2. Structural Flexibility and Conformation Features of Cyclic Dinucleotides in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Che, Xing; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yanyu; Yang, Lijiang; Quan, Hui; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-17

    Cyclic dinucleotides are able to trigger the innate immune system by activating STING. It was found that the binding affinity of asymmetric 2'3'-cGAMP to symmetric dimer of STING is 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of the symmetric 3'3'-cyclic dinucleotides. Such a phenomenon has not been understood yet. Here we show that the subtle changes in phosphodiester linkage of CDNs lead to their distinct structural properties which correspond to the varied binding affinities. 2'-5' and/or 3'-5' linked CDNs adopt specific while different types of ribose puckers and backbone conformations. That ribose conformations and base types have different propensities for anti or syn glycosidic conformations further affects the overall flexibility of CDNs. The counterbalance between backbone ring tension and electrostatic repulsion, both affected by the ring size, also contributes to the different flexibility of CDNs. Our calculations reveal that the free energy cost for 2'3'-cGAMP to adopt the STING-bound structure is smaller than that for 3'3'-cGAMP and cyclic-di-GMP. These findings may serve as a reference for design of CDN-analogues as vaccine adjuvants. Moreover, the cyclization pattern of CDNs closely related to their physiological roles suggests the importance of understanding structural properties in the study of protein-ligand interactions.

  3. A cluster of highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeats in intron 17b of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zielenski, J; Markiewicz, D; Rininsland, F; Rommens, J; Tsui, L C

    1991-01-01

    A cluster of highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeats has been detected in intron 17b of the CFTR gene, 200 bp downstream from the preceding exon. At least 24 alleles, with sizes ranging from 7 to 56 units of a TA repeat, have been identified in a panel of 92 unrelated carriers of cystic fibrosis (CF). The common ones are those with 7, 30, and 31 dinucleotide units, with frequencies of .22, .19, and .12, respectively, among the non-CF chromosomes. Mendelian, codominant segregation of the alleles has been demonstrated in family studies, as expected. A less polymorphic dinucleotide (CA repeat) cluster has also been detected in a region 167 bp downstream from the TA repeat. The length of the CA repeat cluster varies from 11 to 17 dinucleotide units, and it appears to have an inverse relationship to that of the TA repeats. These dinucleotide repeats should be useful in genetic linkage studies, in counseling for CF families with unknown mutations, and in tracing the origins of the various mutant CF alleles. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1720926

  4. NAD+ metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis - a balancing act between mitochondria and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD+ metabolism revived interest in NAD+ boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD+ metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26118927

  5. NAD(+) Metabolism and the Control of Energy Homeostasis: A Balancing Act between Mitochondria and the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-07-01

    NAD(+) has emerged as a vital cofactor that can rewire metabolism, activate sirtuins, and maintain mitochondrial fitness through mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This improved understanding of NAD(+) metabolism revived interest in NAD(+)-boosting strategies to manage a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer. In this review, we summarize how NAD(+) metabolism links energy status with adaptive cellular and organismal responses and how this knowledge can be therapeutically exploited.

  6. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  7. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  8. Nicotinamide riboside is uniquely and orally bioavailable in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A. J.; Schmidt, Mark S.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Redpath, Philip; Jaksch, Frank; Dellinger, Ryan W.; Li, Zhonggang; Abel, E. Dale; Migaud, Marie E.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is in wide use as an NAD+ precursor vitamin. Here we determine the time and dose-dependent effects of NR on blood NAD+ metabolism in humans. We report that human blood NAD+ can rise as much as 2.7-fold with a single oral dose of NR in a pilot study of one individual, and that oral NR elevates mouse hepatic NAD+ with distinct and superior pharmacokinetics to those of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide. We further show that single doses of 100, 300 and 1,000 mg of NR produce dose-dependent increases in the blood NAD+ metabolome in the first clinical trial of NR pharmacokinetics in humans. We also report that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NAAD), which was not thought to be en route for the conversion of NR to NAD+, is formed from NR and discover that the rise in NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of effective NAD+ repletion. PMID:27721479

  9. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  10. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  11. Phosphonate analogues of dinucleotides as substrates for DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli in primed abortive initiation reaction.

    PubMed

    Cvekl, A; Horská, K; Sebesta, K; Rosenberg, I; Holý, A

    1989-02-01

    Dinucleotides (3'-5')-ApU and UpA and their 3'-O-phosphonylmethyl and 5'-O-phosphonylmethyl analogues were studied as substrates in the primed abortive synthesis catalysed by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase on poly[d(A-T)] template. All phosphonate analogues of dinucleotides containing the anomalous sugar-phosphate backbone are substrates for the holoenzyme as verified by RNase A and RNase T2 digestion of the trinucleotide analogues obtained. The finding that phosphonate dinucleotides act as primers for transcription indicates that steric requirements at the initiation site are not as specific as previously supposed. Analysis of kinetic constants of ordered bibi reaction Kia, KmA, KmB and Vmax suggests that the instability of short RNA-DNA hybrids contributes to the abortive release of trinucleotides formed.

  12. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox) processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity. PMID:26942863

  13. NadA, a novel vaccine candidate of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Brunelli, Brunella; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Aricò, Beatrice; Capecchi, Barbara; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Masignani, Vega; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Granoff, Dan M; Caugant, Dominique A; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mora, Marirosa

    2002-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen, which, in spite of antibiotic therapy, is still a major cause of mortality due to sepsis and meningitis. Here we describe NadA, a novel surface antigen of N. meningitidis that is present in 52 out of 53 strains of hypervirulent lineages electrophoretic types (ET) ET37, ET5, and cluster A4. The gene is absent in the hypervirulent lineage III, in N. gonorrhoeae and in the commensal species N. lactamica and N. cinerea. The guanine/cytosine content, lower than the chromosome, suggests acquisition by horizontal gene transfer and subsequent limited evolution to generate three well-conserved alleles. NadA has a predicted molecular structure strikingly similar to a novel class of adhesins (YadA and UspA2), forms high molecular weight oligomers, and binds to epithelial cells in vitro supporting the hypothesis that NadA is important for host cell interaction. NadA induces strong bactericidal antibodies and is protective in the infant rat model suggesting that this protein may represent a novel antigen for a vaccine able to control meningococcal disease caused by three hypervirulent lineages. PMID:12045242

  14. TEMPOL increases NAD(+) and improves redox imbalance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Mayumi; Kawano, Kimika; Yamanaka, Yuki; Saiga, Misako; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) processes. NAD(+) and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD(+) production in the ascorbic acid-glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD(+)/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity. PMID:26942863

  15. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  16. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  17. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Vasily A; Artiukhov, Artem V; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V; Lukashev, Nikolay V; Bunik, Victoria I

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  18. NMNAT1 inhibits axon degeneration via blockade of SARM1-mediated NAD+ depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yo; Nakagawa, Takashi; Mao, Xianrong; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1 leads to preservation of injured axons. While increased NAD+ or decreased NMN levels are thought to be critical to this process, the mechanism(s) of this axon protection remain obscure. Using steady-state and flux analysis of NAD+ metabolites in healthy and injured mouse dorsal root ganglion axons, we find that rather than altering NAD+ synthesis, NMNAT1 instead blocks the injury-induced, SARM1-dependent NAD+ consumption that is central to axon degeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19749.001 PMID:27735788

  19. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of 'conformational selection' by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  20. Molecular Basis of Ligand-Dependent Regulation of NadR, the Transcriptional Repressor of Meningococcal Virulence Factor NadA

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Alessia; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Fagnocchi, Luca; Cantini, Francesca; Haag, Andreas F.; Brier, Sébastien; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Delany, Isabel; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is present on the meningococcal surface and contributes to adhesion to and invasion of human cells. NadA is also one of three recombinant antigens in the recently-approved Bexsero vaccine, which protects against serogroup B meningococcus. The amount of NadA on the bacterial surface is of direct relevance in the constant battle of host-pathogen interactions: it influences the ability of the pathogen to engage human cell surface-exposed receptors and, conversely, the bacterial susceptibility to the antibody-mediated immune response. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms which regulate nadA expression levels, which are predominantly controlled by the transcriptional regulator NadR (Neisseria adhesin A Regulator) both in vitro and in vivo. NadR binds the nadA promoter and represses gene transcription. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA), a catabolite present in human saliva both under physiological conditions and during bacterial infection, the binding of NadR to the nadA promoter is attenuated and nadA expression is induced. NadR also mediates ligand-dependent regulation of many other meningococcal genes, for example the highly-conserved multiple adhesin family (maf) genes, which encode proteins emerging with important roles in host-pathogen interactions, immune evasion and niche adaptation. To gain insights into the regulation of NadR mediated by 4-HPA, we combined structural, biochemical, and mutagenesis studies. In particular, two new crystal structures of ligand-free and ligand-bound NadR revealed (i) the molecular basis of ‘conformational selection’ by which a single molecule of 4-HPA binds and stabilizes dimeric NadR in a conformation unsuitable for DNA-binding, (ii) molecular explanations for the binding specificities of different hydroxyphenylacetate ligands, including 3Cl,4-HPA which is produced during inflammation, (iii) the presence of a leucine residue essential for dimerization and conserved in

  1. Detecting horizontally transferred and essential genes based on dinucleotide relative abundance.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert H; Ko, Hanseok

    2008-10-01

    Various methods have been developed to detect horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, based on anomalous nucleotide composition, assuming that compositional features undergo amelioration in the host genome. Evolutionary theory predicts the inevitability of false positives when essential sequences are strongly conserved. Foreign genes could become more detectable on the basis of their higher order compositions if such features ameliorate more rapidly and uniformly than lower order features. This possibility is tested by comparing the heterogeneities of bacterial genomes with respect to strand-independent first- and second-order features, (i) G + C content and (ii) dinucleotide relative abundance, in 1 kb segments. Although statistical analysis confirms that (ii) is less inhomogeneous than (i) in all 12 species examined, extreme anomalies with respect to (ii) in the Escherichia coli K12 genome are typically co-located with essential genes.

  2. NAD+ accumulation during pollen maturation in Arabidopsis regulating onset of germination.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Kentaro; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Shoji, Kazuhiro; Goto, Fumiyuki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Although the nicotinamide nucleotides NAD(H) and NADP(H) are essential for various metabolic reactions that play major roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, the significance of NAD biosynthesis is not well understood. Here, we investigated the dynamics of pollen nicotinamide nucleotides in response to imbibition, a representative germination cue. Metabolic analysis with capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that excess amount of NAD+ is accumulated in freshly harvested dry pollen, whereas it dramatically decreased immediately after contact with water. Importantly, excess of NAD+ impaired pollen tube growth. Moreover, NAD+ accumulation was retained after pollen was imbibed in the presence of NAD+-consuming reaction inhibitors and pollen germination was greatly retarded. Pollen deficient in the nicotinate/nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyltransferase (NMNAT) gene, encoding a key enzyme in NAD biosynthesis, and a lack of NAD+ accumulation in the gametophyte, showed precocious pollen tube germination inside the anther locule and vigorous tube growth under high-humidity conditions. Hence, the accumulation of excess NAD+ is not essential for pollen germination, but instead participates in regulating the timing of germination onset. These results indicate that NAD+ accumulation acts to negatively regulate germination and a decrease in NAD+ plays an important role in metabolic state transition.

  3. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:25411251

  4. Increasing NAD synthesis in muscle via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is not sufficient to promote oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frederick, David W; Davis, James G; Dávila, Antonio; Agarwal, Beamon; Michan, Shaday; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Baur, Joseph A

    2015-01-16

    The NAD biosynthetic precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside are reported to confer resistance to metabolic defects induced by high fat feeding in part by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Similar effects are obtained by germ line deletion of major NAD-consuming enzymes, suggesting that the bioavailability of NAD is limiting for maximal oxidative capacity. However, because of their systemic nature, the degree to which these interventions exert cell- or tissue-autonomous effects is unclear. Here, we report a tissue-specific approach to increase NAD biosynthesis only in muscle by overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that converts nicotinamide to NAD (mNAMPT mice). These mice display a ∼50% increase in skeletal muscle NAD levels, comparable with the effects of dietary NAD precursors, exercise regimens, or loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases yet surprisingly do not exhibit changes in muscle mitochondrial biogenesis or mitochondrial function and are equally susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat feeding. We further report that chronic elevation of muscle NAD in vivo does not perturb the NAD/NADH redox ratio. These studies reveal for the first time the metabolic effects of tissue-specific increases in NAD synthesis and suggest that critical sites of action for supplemental NAD precursors reside outside of the heart and skeletal muscle.

  5. Genetic characterization and regulation of the nadB locus of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, B T; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1987-01-01

    The nadB locus encodes the first enzyme of NAD synthesis. It has been reported that this gene and nadA are regulated by a positive regulatory protein encoded in the nadB region. In pursuing this regulatory mechanism, we constructed a fine-structure genetic map of the nadB gene. The region appears to include a single complementation group; no evidence for a positive regulatory element was found. Several mutations causing resistance to the analog 6-aminonicotinamide mapped within the structural gene and probably cause resistance to feedback inhibition. Regulatory mutations for nadB were isolated. These mutants mapped far from nadB near the pnuA gene, which encodes a function required for nicotinamide mononucleotide transport. The regulatory mutations appear to affect a distinct function encoded in the same operon as pnuA. PMID:3305482

  6. Sequence-dependent dynamics of duplex DNA: the applicability of a dinucleotide model.

    PubMed Central

    Okonogi, T M; Alley, S C; Reese, A W; Hopkins, P B; Robinson, B H

    2002-01-01

    The short-time (submicrosecond) bending dynamics of duplex DNA were measured to determine the effect of sequence on dynamics. All measurements were obtained from a single site on duplex DNA, using a single, site-specific modified base containing a rigidly tethered, electron paramagnetic resonance active spin probe. The observed dynamics are interpreted in terms of single-step sequence-dependent bending force constants, determined from the mean squared amplitude of bending relative to the end-to-end vector using the modified weakly bending rod model. The bending dynamics at a single site are a function of the sequence of the nucleotides constituting the duplex DNA. We developed and examined several dinucleotide-based models for flexibility. The models indicate that the dominant feature of the dynamics is best explained in terms of purine- and pyrimidine-type steps, although distinction is made among all 10 unique steps: It was found that purine-purine steps (which are the same as pyrimidine-pyrimidine steps) were near average in flexibility, but the pyrimidine-purine steps (5' to 3') were nearly twice as flexible, whereas purine-pyrimidine steps were more than half as flexible as average DNA. Therefore, the range of stepwise flexibility is approximately fourfold and is characterized by both the type of base pair step (pyrimidine/purine combination) and the identity of the bases within the pair (G, A, T, or C). All of the four models considered here underscore the complexity of the dependence of dynamics on DNA sequence with certain sequences not satisfactorily explainable in terms of any dinucleotide model. These findings provide a quantitative basis for interpreting the dynamics and kinetics of DNA-sequence-dependent biological processes, including protein recognition and chromatin packaging. PMID:12496111

  7. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  8. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  9. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  10. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  11. Active mammalian replication origins are associated with a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Rein, T; Zorbas, H; DePamphilis, M L

    1997-01-01

    ori-beta is a well-characterized origin of bidirectional replication (OBR) located approximately 17 kb downstream of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in hamster cell chromosomes. The approximately 2-kb region of ori-beta that exhibits greatest replication initiation activity also contains 12 potential methylation sites in the form of CpG dinucleotides. To ascertain whether DNA methylation might play a role at mammalian replication origins, the methylation status of these sites was examined with bisulfite to chemically distinguish cytosine (C) from 5-methylcytosine (mC). All of the CpGs were methylated, and nine of them were located within 356 bp flanking the minimal OBR, creating a high-density cluster of mCpGs that was approximately 10 times greater than average for human DNA. However, the previously reported densely methylated island in which all cytosines were methylated regardless of their dinucleotide composition was not detected and appeared to be an experimental artifact. A second OBR, located at the 5' end of the RPS14 gene, exhibited a strikingly similar methylation pattern, and the organization of CpG dinucleotides at other mammalian origins revealed the potential for high-density CpG methylation. Moreover, analysis of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled nascent DNA confirmed that active replication origins were methylated. These results suggest that a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides may play a role in either the establishment or the regulation of mammalian replication origins. PMID:8972222

  12. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  13. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  14. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  15. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. PMID:27274295

  16. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Zheng, Hong; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    NAD(+) is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD(+) can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD(+) can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD(+) as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD(+) as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD(+). Impairment of NAD(+) regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD(+) deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD(+) redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD(+) redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. PMID:27274295

  17. Niacin status, NAD distribution and ADP-ribose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, James B

    2009-01-01

    Dietary niacin deficiency, and pharmacological excesses of nicotinic acid or nicotinamide, have dramatic effects on cellular NAD pools, ADP-ribose metabolism, tissue function and health. ADP-ribose metabolism is providing new targets for pharmacological intervention, and it is important to consider how the supply of vitamin B3 may directly influence ADP-ribosylation reactions, or create interactions with other drugs designed to influence these pathways. In addition to its redox roles, NAD+ is used as a substrate for mono-, poly- and cyclic ADP-ribose formation. During niacin deficiency, not all of these processes can be maintained, and dramatic changes in tissue function and clinical condition take place. Conversely, these reactions may be differentially enhanced by pharmacological intakes of vitamin B3, and potentially by changing expression of specific NAD generating enzymes. A wide range of metabolic changes can take place following pharmacological supplementation of nicotinic acid or nicotinamide. As niacin status decreases towards a deficient state, the function of other types of pharmaceutical agents may be modified, including those that target ADP-ribosylation reactions, apoptosis and inflammation. This article will explore what is known and yet to be learned about the response of tissues, cells and subcellular compartments to excessive and limiting supplies of niacin, and will discuss the etiology of the resulting pathologies.

  18. Temperature-dependent self-assembly of adenine derivative on HOPG.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhongcheng; Rubner, Oliver; Bamler, Markus; Blömker, Tobias; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Heuer, Andreas; Fuchs, Harald; Chi, Lifeng

    2013-08-27

    Temperature-dependent self-assembly formed by the adsorption of the nucleobase adenine derivative on a graphite surface were investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The high-resolution STM images reveal two types of structures, α phase and β phase, which are mainly driven by either hydrogen bonding or aromatic π-π interactions between adenine bases, respectively, as well as the interactions of alkyl chains. α-Phase structures can be transformed into β-phase structures by increasing temperature. The reverse is true for decreasing temperature. This reflects structural stabilities resulting from the different interactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to characterize possible arrangements of adjacent adenine moieties systematically in terms of binding energies and structural properties. Via a systematic search algorithm, all possible network structures were determined on a microscopic level. In this way, it is possible to rationalize the structural parameters as found in the STM images.

  19. Deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of adenine on aluminum nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shankar K; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Agio, Mario; Ekinci, Yasin; Löffler, Jörg F

    2012-02-01

    We report the ultrasensitive detection of adenine using deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering on aluminum nanostructures. Well-defined Al nanoparticle arrays fabricated over large areas using extreme-UV interference lithography exhibited sharp and tunable plasmon resonances in the UV and deep-UV wavelength ranges. Theoretical modeling based on the finite-difference time-domain method was used to understand the near-field and far-field optical properties of the nanoparticle arrays. Raman measurements were performed on adenine molecules coated uniformly on the Al nanoparticle arrays at a laser excitation wavelength of 257.2 nm. With this technique, less than 10 amol of label-free adenine molecules could be detected reproducibly in real time. Zeptomole (~30,000 molecules) detection sensitivity was readily achieved proving that deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering is an extremely sensitive tool for the detection of biomolecules.

  20. Counterregulation of nuclear 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) binding by oxidized and reduced-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphates in the presence of cytosolic T3-binding protein in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, K.; Miyamoto, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Ohtsuka, H.; Sakurai, A.; Suzuki, S.; Yamada, T.

    1989-04-01

    The role of cytosolic T3-binding protein (CTBP) in the regulation of nuclear T3 binding was studied in vitro. Nuclear (125I)T3 binding was observed in the presence of 1.0 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). When the nuclei prepared from rat kidney were incubated with inactive form of CTBP which was also prepared from rat kidney, (125I)T3 binding to nuclei was not affected. When the nuclei were incubated with inactive form of CTBP in the presence of NADP, (125I)T3 binding to nuclei was increased, whereas binding was diminished when nuclei were incubated with CTBP in the presence of NADPH. The inactive form of CTBP was activated by NADPH. NADP also activated CTBP in the presence of DTT. Both active forms of CTBP were again inactivated by extraction with charcoal, and these inactive forms were reactivated by NADPH or by NADP and DTT, but not by NADP alone. Although the nuclei treated with 0.3 M NaCl lost the binding activity for (125I)T3 in the absence of NADP, the nuclei retained the binding activity for (125I)T3 in the presence of NADP and the inactive form of CTBP. Treatment of the nuclei with 0.5 M NaCl lost the binding activity for (125I)T3 not only in the absence but also in the presence of NADP and CTBP. These results suggested that NADP and NADPH play roles as counterregulatory factors for nuclear T3 binding in the presence of CTBP. Further, it was speculated that binding sites for the T3-CTBP complex, which is generated in the presence of NADP and DTT, are present in nuclei, and that binding sites for the complex are different from nuclear T3 receptors.

  1. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  2. DNA with adenine tracts contains poly(dA).poly(dT) conformational features in solution.

    PubMed

    Brahms, S; Brahms, J G

    1990-03-25

    The conformation of DNA's with adenine-thymine tracts exhibiting retardation in electrophoretic migration and considered as curved were investigated in solution by CD and RAMAN spectroscopy. The following curved multimers with adenine tracts but of different flanking sequences d(CA5TGCC)n, d(TCTCTA6TATATA5)n, d(GA4T4C)n yield CD spectroscopic features indicating a non-B structure of the dA.dT tract with similarities to polyd(A).polyd(T). We suggest that adenine-thymine bases in these multimers contain some of the distinctive conformational features of poly(A).polyd(T) probably with large propeller twist found by NMR (Behling and Kearns, 1987) and by X-ray diffraction on oligonucleotides containing a tract of adenines (Nelson et al. 1987, Coll et al; 1987; DiGabriele et al. 1989). Some elements of distinctive CD features of the contiguous adenines run are also observed in the straight multi-9-mer d(CA5GCC)n which lacks in-phase relation to the helical repeat. Despite the presence of the TpA step in the straight multimer d(GT4A4)n, the altered dA.dT conformation is not completely destroyed. Interruption of adenine tract by a guanine in d(CAAGAATGCC)n leads to a B-like conformation and to a normal electrophoretic mobility. The Raman spectra reveal a rearrangement of the sugar-phosphate backbone of dA.dT tract in the multimer d(CA5TGCC)n with respect to that of polydA.polydT. This is reflected in the presence of an unique Raman band associated to C2'-endo sugar with a predominant contribution of C1'-exo puckering which is exhibited by the multimer whereas two distinct Raman bands characterize poly(dA).poly(dT) backbone conformation.

  3. Activation of SIRT3 by the NAD⁺ precursor nicotinamide riboside protects from noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin D; Maqsood, Sadia; Huang, Jing-Yi; Pan, Yong; Harkcom, William; Li, Wei; Sauve, Anthony; Verdin, Eric; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-12-01

    Intense noise exposure causes hearing loss by inducing degeneration of spiral ganglia neurites that innervate cochlear hair cells. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) exhibits axon-protective effects in cultured neurons; however, its ability to block degeneration in vivo has been difficult to establish due to its poor cell permeability and serum instability. Here, we describe a strategy to increase cochlear NAD(+) levels in mice by administering nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described NAD(+) precursor. We find that administration of NR, even after noise exposure, prevents noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and spiral ganglia neurite degeneration. These effects are mediated by the NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT3, since SIRT3-overexpressing mice are resistant to NIHL and SIRT3 deletion abrogates the protective effects of NR and expression of NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes. These findings reveal that administration of NR activates a NAD(+)-SIRT3 pathway that reduces neurite degeneration caused by noise exposure.

  4. Activation of SIRT3 by the NAD⁺ precursor nicotinamide riboside protects from noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin D; Maqsood, Sadia; Huang, Jing-Yi; Pan, Yong; Harkcom, William; Li, Wei; Sauve, Anthony; Verdin, Eric; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-12-01

    Intense noise exposure causes hearing loss by inducing degeneration of spiral ganglia neurites that innervate cochlear hair cells. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) exhibits axon-protective effects in cultured neurons; however, its ability to block degeneration in vivo has been difficult to establish due to its poor cell permeability and serum instability. Here, we describe a strategy to increase cochlear NAD(+) levels in mice by administering nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described NAD(+) precursor. We find that administration of NR, even after noise exposure, prevents noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and spiral ganglia neurite degeneration. These effects are mediated by the NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT3, since SIRT3-overexpressing mice are resistant to NIHL and SIRT3 deletion abrogates the protective effects of NR and expression of NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes. These findings reveal that administration of NR activates a NAD(+)-SIRT3 pathway that reduces neurite degeneration caused by noise exposure. PMID:25470550

  5. Solution structure of a five-adenine bulge loop within a DNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Hillisch, A; Gollmick, F A; Fritzsche, H; Diekmann, S

    1999-09-28

    The three-dimensional solution structure of a DNA molecule of the sequence 5'-d(GCATCGAAAAAGCTACG)-3' paired with 5'-d(CGTAGCCGATGC)-3' containing a five-adenine bulge loop (dA(5)-bulge) between two double helical stems was determined by 2D (1)H and (31)P NMR, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy. The DNA in both stems adopt a classical B-form double helical structure with Watson-Crick base pairing and C2'-endo sugar conformation. In addition, the two dG/dC base pairs framing the dA(5)-bulge loop are formed and are stable at least up to 30 degrees C. The five adenine bases of the bulge loop are localized at intrahelical positions within the double helical stems. Stacking on the double helical stem is continued for the first four 5'-adenines in the bulge loop. The total rise (the height) of these four stacked adenines roughly equals the diameter of the double helical stem. The stacking interactions are broken between the last of these four 5'-adenines and the fifth loop adenine at the 3'-end. This 3'-adenine partially stacks on the other stem. The angle between the base planes of the two nonstacking adenines (A10 and A11) in the bulge loop reflects the kinking angle of the global DNA structure. The neighboring cytosines opposite the dA(5)-bulge (being parts of the bulge flanking base pairs) do not stack on one another. This disruption of stacking is characterized by a partial shearing of these bases, such that certain sequential NOEs for this base step are preserved. In the base step opposite the loop, an extraordinary hydrogen bond is observed between the phosphate backbone of the 5'-dC and the amino proton of the 3'-dC in about two-thirds of the conformers. This hydrogen bond probably contributes to stabilizing the global DNA structure. The dA(5)-bulge induces a local kink into the DNA molecule of about 73 degrees (+/-11 degrees ). This kinking angle and the mutual orientation of the two double helical stems agree well with results from fluorescence resonance energy

  6. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  7. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  8. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  9. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  10. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/. PMID:26797014

  11. Structural and Functional Analysis of DDX41: a bispecific immune receptor for DNA and cyclic dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Hiroki; Oikawa, Daisuke; Nakane, Takanori; Kato, Megumi; Ishii, Ryohei; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In the innate immune system, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) specifically recognize ligands derived from bacteria or viruses, to trigger the responsible downstream pathways. DEAD box protein 41 (DDX41) is an intracellular PRR that triggers the downstream pathway involving the adapter STING, the kinase TBK1, and the transcription factor IRF3, to activate the type I interferon response. DDX41 is unique in that it recognizes two different ligands; i.e., double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and cyclic dinucleotides (CDN), via its DEAD domain. However, the structural basis for the ligand recognition by the DDX41 DEAD domain has remained elusive. Here, we report two crystal structures of the DDX41 DEAD domain in apo forms, at 1.5 and 2.2 Å resolutions. A comparison of the two crystal structures revealed the flexibility in the ATP binding site, suggesting its formation upon ATP binding. Structure-guided functional analyses in vitro and in vivo demonstrated the overlapped binding surface for dsDNA and CDN, which is distinct from the ATP-binding site. We propose that the structural rearrangement of the ATP binding site is crucial for the release of ADP, enabling the fast turnover of DDX41 for the dsDNA/CDN-induced STING activation pathway. PMID:27721487

  12. bis-Molybdopterin Guanine Dinucleotide Is Required for Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monique J.; Shanley, Crystal A.; Zilavy, Andrew; Peixoto, Blas; Manca, Claudia; Kaplan, Gilla; Orme, Ian M.; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to synthesize molybdopterin cofactor (MoCo), which is utilized by numerous enzymes that catalyze redox reactions in carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. In bacteria, MoCo is further modified through the activity of a guanylyltransferase, MobA, which converts MoCo to bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (bis-MGD), a form of the cofactor that is required by the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family of enzymes, which includes the nitrate reductase NarGHI. In this study, the functionality of the mobA homolog in M. tuberculosis was confirmed by demonstrating the loss of assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reductase activity in a mobA deletion mutant. This mutant displayed no survival defects in human monocytes or mouse lungs but failed to persist in the lungs of guinea pigs. These results implicate one or more bis-MGD-dependent enzymes in the persistence of M. tuberculosis in guinea pig lungs and underscore the applicability of this animal model for assessing the role of molybdoenzymes in this pathogen. PMID:25404027

  13. bis-Molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide is required for persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monique J; Shanley, Crystal A; Zilavy, Andrew; Peixoto, Blas; Manca, Claudia; Kaplan, Gilla; Orme, Ian M; Mizrahi, Valerie; Kana, Bavesh D

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to synthesize molybdopterin cofactor (MoCo), which is utilized by numerous enzymes that catalyze redox reactions in carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. In bacteria, MoCo is further modified through the activity of a guanylyltransferase, MobA, which converts MoCo to bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (bis-MGD), a form of the cofactor that is required by the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family of enzymes, which includes the nitrate reductase NarGHI. In this study, the functionality of the mobA homolog in M. tuberculosis was confirmed by demonstrating the loss of assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reductase activity in a mobA deletion mutant. This mutant displayed no survival defects in human monocytes or mouse lungs but failed to persist in the lungs of guinea pigs. These results implicate one or more bis-MGD-dependent enzymes in the persistence of M. tuberculosis in guinea pig lungs and underscore the applicability of this animal model for assessing the role of molybdoenzymes in this pathogen.

  14. Neisseria meningitidis adhesin NadA targets beta1 integrins: functional similarity to Yersinia invasin.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Virginie; Heesemann, Jürgen; Schielke, Stephanie; Jiménez-Soto, Luisa F; Kurzai, Oliver; Ackermann, Nikolaus

    2011-06-10

    Meningococci are facultative-pathogenic bacteria endowed with a set of adhesins allowing colonization of the human upper respiratory tract, leading to fulminant meningitis and septicemia. The Neisseria adhesin NadA was identified in about 50% of N. meningitidis isolates and is closely related to the Yersinia adhesin YadA, the prototype of the oligomeric coiled-coil adhesin (Oca) family. NadA is known to be involved in cell adhesion, invasion, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Because of the enormous diversity of neisserial cell adhesins the analysis of the specific contribution of NadA in meningococcal host interactions is limited. Therefore, we used a non-invasive Y. enterocolitica mutant as carrier to study the role of NadA in host cell interaction. NadA was shown to be efficiently produced and localized in its oligomeric form on the bacterial surface of Y. enterocolitica. Additionally, NadA mediated a β1 integrin-dependent adherence with subsequent internalization of yersiniae by a β1 integrin-positive cell line. Using recombinant NadA(24-210) protein and human and murine β1 integrin-expressing cell lines we could demonstrate the role of the β1 integrin subunit as putative receptor for NadA. Subsequent inhibition assays revealed specific interaction of NadA(24-210) with the human β1 integrin subunit. Cumulatively, these results indicate that Y. enterocolitica is a suitable toolbox system for analysis of the adhesive properties of NadA, revealing strong evidence that β1 integrins are important receptors for NadA. Thus, this study demonstrated for the first time a direct interaction between the Oca-family member NadA and human β1 integrins.

  15. Measurement of liver adenine nucleotides and S-adenosyl amino acids by one-step high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, H; Lavoie, R; Grose, J H; Bélanger, L

    1986-10-01

    A reverse-phase isocratic HPLC method is described for direct simultaneous assay of ATP, ADP, AMP, S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, S-adenosylethionine, and other adenine derivatives in liver microbiopsies. The procedure was tested in conditions which alter the hepatic content of adenine nucleotides and sulfur-adenosyl amino acids in humans, rats, and guinea pigs.

  16. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  17. Effects of hydrogen peroxide upon nicotinamide nucleotide metabolism in Escherichia coli: changes in enzyme levels and nicotinamide nucleotide pools and studies of the oxidation of NAD(P)H by Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Brumaghim, Julia L; Li, Ying; Henle, Ernst; Linn, Stuart

    2003-10-24

    DNA is damaged in vivo by the Fenton reaction mediated by Fe2+ and cellular reductants such as NADH, which reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ and allow the recycling of iron. To study the response of Escherichia coli to such cycling, the activities of several enzymes involved in nicotinamide nucleotide metabolism were measured following an H2O2 challenge. NADPH-dependent peroxidase, NADH/NADP+ transhydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were most strongly induced, increasing 2.5-3-fold. In addition, the cellular ratios of NADPH to NADH increased 6- or 92-fold 15 min after exposure to 0.5 or 5 mm H2O2, respectively. In vitro, NADH was oxidized by Fe3+ up to 16-fold faster than NADPH, despite their identical reduction potentials. To understand this rate difference, the interactions of Fe3+ and Ga3+ with NAD(P)H were examined by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Association with NADH occurred primarily with adenine at N7 and the amino group, but for NADPH, strong metal interactions also occurred at the 2'-phosphate group. Interaction of M3+ (Fe3+ or Ga3+) with the adenine ring would bring it into close proximity to the redox-active nicotinamide ring in the folded form of NAD(P)H, but interaction of M3+ with the 2'-phosphate group would avoid this close contact. In addition, as determined by absorbance spectroscopy, the energy of the charge-transfer species was significantly higher for the Fe3+.NADPH complex than for the Fe3+.NADH complex. We therefore suggest that upon exposure to H2O2 the NADH pool is depleted, and NADPH, which is less reactive with Fe3+, functions as the major nicotinamide nucleotide reductant. PMID:12913009

  18. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  19. Controlling two-phase self-assembly of an adenine derivative on HOPG via kinetic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Jana, Pritam Kumar; Zhang, Haiming; Mu, Zhongcheng; Kehr, Gerald; Blömker, Tobias; Erker, Gerhard; Fuchs, Harald; Heuer, Andreas; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-08-21

    Large-area self-assembled structures of a nucleobase adenine derivative were successfully realized through vacuum deposition. STM images reveal two types of structures, which could be regulated by substrate temperature and the evaporation rate, indicating the relevance of kinetic effects. The results are supported by computer simulations.

  20. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  1. Effects of adenine arabinoside on lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, W C; Siegel, P J; Baer, J

    1978-01-01

    Low concentrations of adenine arabinoside inhibited growth of two Epstein-Barr virus producer cell lines in culture, while not significantly affecting a nonproducer cell line and a B-cell-negative line. These observations were extended to include freshly infected cells. Mitogen-stimulated human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were unaffected by the drug at concentration levels that inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated cells. DNA synthesis in Epstein-Barr virus-superinfected Raji cells was also adversely affected by adenine arabinoside. However, these same low concentrations of adenine arabinoside in the triphosphate form produced less effect on DNA synthesis in nuclear systems and DNA polymerase assays than on growth or DNA synthesis in whole cells. Therefore the effects reported here of low concentrations of the drug on whole cells may be only in part related to DNA polymerase inhibition. The work reported here suggests that adenine arabinoside has multiple sites of action in infected cells. PMID:212577

  2. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  3. Macrophage Trafficking as Key Mediator of Adenine-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; da Silva, João Santana; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a special role in the onset of several diseases, including acute and chronic kidney injuries. In this sense, tubule interstitial nephritis (TIN) represents an underestimated insult, which can be triggered by different stimuli and, in the absence of a proper regulation, can lead to fibrosis deposition. Based on this perception, we evaluated the participation of macrophage recruitment in the development of TIN. Initially, we provided adenine-enriched food to WT and searched for macrophage presence and action in the kidney. Also, a group of animals were depleted of macrophages with the clodronate liposome while receiving adenine-enriched diet. We collected blood and renal tissue from these animals and renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis were evaluated. We observed higher expression of chemokines in the kidneys of adenine-fed mice and a substantial protection when macrophages were depleted. Then, we specifically investigated the role of some key chemokines, CCR5 and CCL3, in this TIN experimental model. Interestingly, CCR5 KO and CCL3 KO animals showed less renal dysfunction and a decreased proinflammatory profile. Furthermore, in those animals, there was less profibrotic signaling. In conclusion, we can suggest that macrophage infiltration is important for the onset of renal injury in the adenine-induced TIN. PMID:25132730

  4. Structural and quantum chemical studies of 8-aryl-sulfanyl adenine class Hsp90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Kang, Yanlong; Chiosis, Gabriela; Gewirth, Daniel T

    2006-08-10

    Hsp90 chaperones play a critical role in modulating the activity of many cell signaling proteins and are an attractive target for anti-cancer therapeutics. We report here the structures of the water soluble 8-aryl-sulfanyl adenine class Hsp90 inhibitors, 1 (PU-H71) and 2 (PU-H64), in complex with the N-terminal domain of human Hsp90alpha. The conformation of 1 when bound to Hsp90 differs from previously reported 8-aryl adenine Hsp90 inhibitors including 3 (PU24FCl). While the binding mode for 3 places the 2'-halide of the 8-aryl group on top of the adenine ring, for 1 and 2, we show that the 2'-halide is rotated approximately 180 degrees away. This difference explains the opposing trends in Hsp90 inhibitory activity for the 2'-halo derivatives of the 3',4',5'-trimethoxy series where Cl > Br > I compared to the 4',5'-methylenedioxy series where I > Br > Cl. We also present quantum chemical calculations of 2 and its analogues that illuminate their basis for Hsp90 inhibition. The calculated conformation of 2 agreed well with the crystallographically observed conformations of 1 and 2. The predictive nature of the calculations has allowed the exploration of additional derivatives based on the 8-aryl adenine scaffold.

  5. SERS, XPS, and DFT Study of Adenine Adsorption on Silver and Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Marco; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Pratesi, Giovanni; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-19

    The adsorption of adenine on silver and gold surfaces has been investigated combining density functional theory calculations with surface-enhanced Raman scattering and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, obtaining useful insight into the orientation and interaction of the nucleobase with the metal surfaces.

  6. The membrane expression of Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA) increases the proimmune effects of MenB OMVs on human macrophages, compared with NadA- OMVs, without further stimulating their proinflammatory activity on circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavano, Regina; Franzoso, Susanna; Cecchini, Paola; Cartocci, Elena; Oriente, Francesca; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2009-07-01

    Hypervirulent MenB causing fatal human infections frequently display the oligomeric-coiled coil adhesin NadA, a 45-kDa intrinsic outer membrane protein implicated in binding to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. A recombinant soluble mutant lacking the 10-kDa COOH terminal membrane domain (NadA(Delta351-405)) also activates human monocytes/macrophages/DCs. As NadA is physiologically released during sepsis as part of OMVs, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that NadA(+) OMVs have an enhanced or modified proinflammatory/proimmune action compared with NadA(-) OMVs. To do this we investigated the activity of purified free NadA(Delta351-405) and of OMVs from MenB and Escherichia coli strains, expressing or not full-length NadA. NadA(Delta351-405) stimulated monocytes and macrophages to secrete cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-10) and chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, RANTES), and full-length NadA improved MenB OMV activity, preferentially on macrophages, and only increased cytokine release. NadA(Delta351-405) induced the lymphocyte costimulant CD80 in monocytes and macrophages, and NadA(+) OMVs induced a wider set of molecules supporting antigen presentation (CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and ICAM-1) more efficiently than NadA(-) OMVs only in macrophages. Moreover, membrane NadA effects, unlike NadA(Delta351-405) ones, were much less IFN-gamma-sensitive. The activity of NadA-positive E. coli OMVs was similar to that of control OMVs. NadA in MenB OMVs acted at adhesin concentrations approximately 10(6) times lower than those required to stimulate cells with free NadA(Delta351-405).

  7. Studies of Mg2+/Ca2+ complexes of naturally occurring dinucleotides: potentiometric titrations, NMR, and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stern, Noa; Major, Dan Thomas; Gottlieb, Hugo Emilio; Weizman, Daniel; Sayer, Alon Haim; Blum, Eliav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-08-01

    Dinucleotides (Np(n)N'; N and N' are A, U, G, or C, n = 2-7) are naturally occurring physiologically active compounds. Despite the interest in dinucleotides, the composition of their complexes with metal ions as well as their conformations and species distribution in living systems are understudied. Therefore, we investigated a series of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) complexes of Np(n)N's. Potentiometric titrations indicated that a longer dinucleotide polyphosphate (N is A or G, n = 3-5) linker yields more stable complexes (e.g., log K of 2.70, 3.27, and 3.73 for Ap(n)A-Mg(2+), n = 3, 4, 5, respectively). The base (A or G) or ion (Mg(2+) or Ca(2+)) has a minor effect on K(M)(ML) values. In a physiological medium, the longer Ap(n)As (n = 4, 5) are predicted to occur mostly as the Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes. (31)P NMR monitored titrations of Np(n)N's with Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) ions showed that the middle phosphates of the dinucleotides coordinate with Mg(2+)/Ca(2+). Multidimensional potential of mean force (PMF) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that Ap(2)A and Ap(4)A coordinate Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions in both inner-sphere and outer-sphere modes. The PMF MD simulations additionally provide a detailed picture of the possible coordination sites, as well as the cation binding process. Moreover, both NMR and MD simulations showed that the conformation of the nucleoside moieties in Np(n)N'-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes remains the same as that of free mononucleotides.

  8. Cyclic dinucleotides bind the C-linker of HCN4 to control channel cAMP responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Bucchi, Annalisa; Arrigoni, Cristina; Zucca, Stefano; Nardini, Marco; Schroeder, Indra; Simmons, Katie; Aquila, Marco; DiFrancesco, Dario; Bolognesi, Martino; Schwede, Frank; Kashin, Dmitry; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2014-06-01

    cAMP mediates autonomic regulation of heart rate by means of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which underlie the pacemaker current If. cAMP binding to the C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain enhances HCN open probability through a conformational change that reaches the pore via the C-linker. Using structural and functional analysis, we identified a binding pocket in the C-linker of HCN4. Cyclic dinucleotides, an emerging class of second messengers in mammals, bind the C-linker pocket (CLP) and antagonize cAMP regulation of the channel. Accordingly, cyclic dinucleotides prevent cAMP regulation of If in sinoatrial node myocytes, reducing heart rate by 30%. Occupancy of the CLP hence constitutes an efficient mechanism to hinder β-adrenergic stimulation on If. Our results highlight the regulative role of the C-linker and identify a potential drug target in HCN4. Furthermore, these data extend the signaling scope of cyclic dinucleotides in mammals beyond their first reported role in innate immune system. PMID:24776929

  9. Catalases are NAD(P)H-dependent tellurite reductases.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Iván L; Arenas, Felipe A; Pérez, José Manuel; Fuentes, Derie E; Araya, Manuel A; Saavedra, Claudia P; Tantaleán, Juan C; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Youderian, Philip A; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(P)H is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(P)H protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3)(2-)) to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o)), in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical. PMID:17183702

  10. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  11. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  12. Engineering NAD+ availability for Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalysis: a case study for dihydroxyacetone production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole-cell redox biocatalysis has been intensively explored for the production of valuable compounds because excellent selectivity is routinely achieved. Although the cellular cofactor level, redox state and the corresponding enzymatic activity are expected to have major effects on the performance of the biocatalysts, our ability remains limited to predict the outcome upon variation of those factors as well as the relationship among them. Results In order to investigate the effects of cofactor availability on whole-cell redox biocatalysis, we devised recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) catalyzed by the NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GldA). In this model system, a water-forming NAD+ oxidase (NOX) and a NAD+ transporter (NTT4) were also co-expressed for cofactor regeneration and extracellular NAD+ uptake, respectively. We found that cellular cofactor level, NAD+/NADH ratio and NOX activity were not only strain-dependent, but also growth condition-dependent, leading to significant differences in specific DHA titer among different whole-cell biocatalysts. The host E. coli DH5α had the highest DHA specific titer of 0.81 g/gDCW with the highest NAD+/NADH ratio of 6.7 and NOX activity of 3900 U. The biocatalyst had a higher activity when induced with IPTG at 37°C for 8 h compared with those at 30°C for 8 h and 18 h. When cells were transformed with the ntt4 gene, feeding NAD+ during the cell culture stage increased cellular NAD(H) level by 1.44 fold and DHA specific titer by 1.58 fold to 2.13 g/gDCW. Supplementing NAD+ during the biotransformation stage was also beneficial to cellular NAD(H) level and DHA production, and the highest DHA productivity reached 0.76 g/gDCW/h. Cellular NAD(H) level, NAD+/NADH ratio, and NOX and GldA activity dropped over time during the biotransformation process. Conclusions High NAD+/NADH ratio driving by NOX was very important for DHA production. Once cofactor was

  13. Biochemical Issues in Estimation of Cytosolic Free NAD/NADH Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Hu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio is fundamentally important in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis but current techniques cannot distinguish between protein-bound and free NAD/NADH. Williamson et al reported a method to estimate this ratio by cytosolic lactate/pyruvate (L/P) based on the principle of chemical equilibrium. Numerous studies used L/P ratio to estimate the cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio by assuming that the conversion in cells was at near-equilibrium but not verifying how near it was. In addition, it seems accepted that cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio was a dependent variable responding to the change of L/P ratio. In this study, we show (1) that the change of lactate/glucose (percentage of glucose that converts to lactate by cells) and L/P ratio could measure the status of conversion between pyruvate + NADH and lactate + NAD that tends to or gets away from equilibrium; (2) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH could be accurately estimated by L/P only when the conversion is at or very close to equilibrium otherwise a calculation error by one order of magnitude could be introduced; (3) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is stable and L/P is highly labile, that the highly labile L/P is crucial to maintain the homeostasis of NAD/NADH; (4) that cytosolic free NAD/NADH is dependent on oxygen levels. Our study resolved the key issues regarding accurate estimation of cytosolic free NAD/NADH ratio and the relationship between NAD/NADH and L/P. PMID:22570687

  14. Agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 containing synthetic dinucleotide motifs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Putta, Mallikarjuna R; Bhagat, Lakshmi; Li, Yukui; Zhu, Fugang; Wang, Daqing; Tang, Jimmy X; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir

    2007-12-13

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG motifs activate Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Our previous studies have shown that ODNs containing two 5'-ends are more immunostimulatory than those with one 5'-end. In the present study, to understand the role of functional groups in TLR9 recognition and subsequent immune response, we substituted C or G of a CpG dinucleotide with 5-OH-dC, 5-propyne-dC, furano-dT, 1-(2'-deoxy-beta- d-ribofuranosyl)-2-oxo-7-deaza-8-methyl-purine, dF, 4-thio-dU, N(3)-Me-dC, N (4)-Et-dC, Psi-iso-dC, and arabinoC or 7-deaza-dG, 7-deaza-8-aza-dG, 9-deaza-dG, N(1)-Me-dG, N(2)-Me-dG, 6-Thio-dG, dI, 8-OMe-dG, 8-O-allyl-dG, and arabinoG in ODN containing two 5'-ends. Agonists of TLR9 containing cytosine or guanine modification showed activity in HEK293 cells expressing TLR9, mouse spleen, and human cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. The results presented here provide insight into which specific chemical modifications at C or G of the CpG motif are recognized by TLR9 and the ability to modulate immune responses substituting natural C or G in immune modulatory oligonucleotides. PMID:17988082

  15. Rationale, progress and development of vaccines utilizing STING-activating cyclic dinucleotide adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kanne, David B.; Leong, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    A principal barrier to the development of effective vaccines is the availability of adjuvants and formulations that can elicit both effector and long-lived memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. Cellular immunity is the presumptive immune correlate of protection against intracellular pathogens: a group composed of bacteria, viruses and protozoans that is responsible for a staggering level of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. T-cell immunity is also correlated with clinical benefit in cancer, and the development of therapeutic strategies to harness the immune system to treat diverse malignancies is currently undergoing a renaissance. Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) are ubiquitous small molecule second messengers synthesized by bacteria that regulate diverse processes and are a relatively new class of adjuvants that have been shown to increase vaccine potency. CDNs activate innate immunity by directly binding the endoplasmic reticulum-resident receptor STING (stimulator of interferon genes), activating a signaling pathway that induces the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β) and also nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent inflammatory cytokines. The STING signaling pathway has emerged as a central Toll-like receptor (TLR) independent mediator of host innate defense in response to sensing cytosolic nucleic acids, either through direct binding of CDNs secreted by bacteria, or, as shown recently, through binding of a structurally distinct CDN produced by a host cell receptor in response to binding cytosolic double-stranded (ds)DNA. Although this relatively new class of adjuvants has to date only been evaluated in mice, newly available CDN-STING cocrystal structures will likely intensify efforts in this field towards further development and evaluation in human trials both in preventive vaccine and immunotherapy settings. PMID:24757520

  16. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  17. Detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activity with dynamic luminescence quenching of terbium complexes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroki; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Komatsu, Toru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-05-14

    We discovered that positively charged terbium complexes bearing 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane functionalized with amide ligands are highly sensitive to dynamic luminescence quenching by NAD(P)H. We exploited this phenomenon to establish a general time-resolved luminescence-based assay platform for sensitive detection of NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme activities.

  18. Exogenous NAD(+) administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD(+) can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD(+) can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD(+). We further found that the injection of NAD(+) can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD(+) administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD(+) administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD(+) can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD(+) may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27648125

  19. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  20. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  2. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  3. 33 CFR 110.235 - Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). 110.235 Section 110.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Pacific Ocean (Mamala Bay), Honolulu Harbor, Hawaii (Datum: NAD 83). (a) The anchorage...

  4. The Leishmania nicotinamidase is essential for NAD+ production and parasite proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gazanion, E; Garcia, D; Silvestre, R; Gérard, C; Guichou, J F; Labesse, G; Seveno, M; Cordeiro-Da-Silva, A; Ouaissi, A; Sereno, D; Vergnes, B

    2011-10-01

    NAD+ is a central cofactor that plays important roles in cellular metabolism and energy production in all living cells. Genomics-based reconstruction of NAD+ metabolism revealed that Leishmania protozoan parasites are NAD+ auxotrophs. Consequently, these parasites require assimilating NAD+ precursors (nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside) from their host environment to synthesize NAD+ by a salvage pathway. Nicotinamidase is a key enzyme of this salvage pathway that catalyses conversion of nicotinamide (NAm) to nicotinic acid (Na), and that is absent in higher eukaryotes. We present here the biochemical and functional characterizations of the Leishmania infantum nicotinamidase (LiPNC1). Generation of Lipnc1 null mutants leads to a decrease in NAD+ content, associated with a metabolic shutdown-like phenotype with an extensive lag phase of growth. Both phenotypes could be rescued by an add-back construct or by addition of exogenous Na. In addition, Lipnc1 null mutants were unable to establish a sustained infection in a murine experimental model. Altogether, these results illustrate that NAD+ homeostasis is a fundamental component of Leishmania biology and virulence, and that NAm constitutes its main NAD+ source in the mammalian host. The crystal structure of LiPNC1 we solved allows now the design of rational inhibitors against this new promising therapeutic target. PMID:21819459

  5. NAD(P) biosynthesis enzymes as potential targets for selective drug design.

    PubMed

    Magni, G; Di Stefano, M; Orsomando, G; Raffaelli, N; Ruggieri, S

    2009-01-01

    NAD(P) biosynthetic pathways can be considered a generous source of enzymatic targets for drug development. Key reactions for NAD(P) biosynthesis in all organisms, common to both de novo and salvage routes, are catalyzed by NMN/NaMN adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), NAD synthetase (NADS), and NAD kinase (NADK). These reactions represent a three-step pathway, present in the vast majority of living organisms, which is responsible for the generation of both NAD and NADP cellular pools. The validation of these enzymes as drug targets is based on their essentiality and conservation among a large variety of pathogenic microorganisms, as well as on their differential structural features or their differential metabolic contribution to NAD(P) homeostasis between microbial and human cell types. This review describes the structural and functional properties of eubacterial and human enzymes endowed with NMNAT, NADS, and NADK activities, as well as with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT) and nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) activities, highlighting the species-related differences, with emphasis on their relevance for drug design. In addition, since the overall NMNAT activity in humans is accounted by multiple isozymes differentially involved in the metabolic activation of antineoplastic compounds, their individual diagnostic value for early therapy optimization is outlined. The involvement of human NMNAT in neurodegenerative disorders and its role in neuroprotection is also discussed. PMID:19355893

  6. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD+ can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD+ can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD+. We further found that the injection of NAD+ can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD+ administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD+ administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD+ can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD+ may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27648125

  7. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD+ can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD+ can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD+. We further found that the injection of NAD+ can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD+ administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD+ administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD+ can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD+ may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury.

  8. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  9. Consideration of diurnal variations in human blood NAD and NADP concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2009-06-01

    The sum of the urinary excretion of nicotinamide and its catabolites, which are metabolites of NAD and NADP, were observed to have clear diurnal variations in human urine. Then, we examined whether NAD and NADP in blood also showed the diurnal variation. All subjects were housed in the same facility and given the same diet during the experiment. In addition, we examined whether diurnal variations were affected by the intakes of dietary nicotinamide or not. As a result, neither the NAD nor the NADP content of the blood shows the diurnal variation regardless of the administered amount of nicotinamide. The concentrations of NAD and NADP did not increase according to the intake of nicotinamide. The existence of a mechanism by which NAD and the NADP levels of the blood are constantly maintained by the adjustment of the amount of excretion to the urinary bladder, was suggested.

  10. NADS: A Web Applet for Manipulation and Graphical Viewing of Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B R; McNabb, D P

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a program called NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System) which provides a web-based, user-friendly interface for viewing nuclear data. NADS uses a client/server model. The client is a Java applet that runs in a web browser. The server is a Python code that delivers pointwise data to the applet per user request and then plots the data. The data is also stored in tables for viewing and modifying. NADS can display 2-D, 3-D and 4-D (time sliced) data in a powerful, user-friendly environment. Currently, evaluated nuclear data are available from ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL, JEF and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ENDL databases. LLNL's ENDL database has data for neutron, gamma and charged particles as projectiles. In addition to displaying and saving data, NADS has the capability to perform computations with the data. NADS is accessible over the Internet at http://nuclear.llnl.gov/.

  11. Hepatic NAD salvage pathway is enhanced in mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Penke, Melanie; Larsen, Per S; Schuster, Susanne; Dall, Morten; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Gorski, Theresa; Meusel, Andrej; Richter, Sandy; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD salvage and the abundance of Nampt has been shown to be altered in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It is, however, unknown how hepatic Nampt is regulated in response to accumulation of lipids in the liver of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD mice gained more weight, stored more hepatic lipids and had an impaired glucose tolerance compared with control mice. NAD levels as well as Nampt mRNA expression, protein abundance and activity were significantly increased in HFD mice. Enhanced NAD levels were associated with deacetylation of p53 and Nfκb indicating increased activation of Sirt1. Despite impaired glucose tolerance and increased hepatic lipid levels in HFD mice, NAD metabolism was significantly enhanced. Thus, improved NAD metabolism may be a compensatory mechanism to protect against negative impact of hepatic lipid accumulation.

  12. Analysis of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H cofactors by imprinted polymer membranes associated with ion-sensitive field-effect transistor devices and Au-quartz crystals.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, Svetlana P; Zayats, Maya; Bourenko, Tatyana; Kharitonov, Andrei B; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Katz, Eugenii; Willner, Itamar

    2003-02-01

    Specific recognition sites for the NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H cofactors are imprinted in a cross-linked acrylamide-acrylamidophenylboronic acid copolymer membrane. The imprinted membranes, associated with pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) or Au-quartz piezoelectric crystals, enable the potentiometric or microgravimetric analysis of the oxidized NAD(P)+ cofactors and the reduced NAD(P)H cofactors, respectively. The NAD+- and NADP+-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET allow the analysis of NAD+ and NADP+ with sensitivities that correspond to 15.0 and 18.0 mVdecade(-1) and detection limits of 4 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The NADH- and NADPH-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET device enable the analysis of NADH and NADPH with sensitivities that correspond to 24.2 and 21.8 mV x decade(-1) and lower detection limits that are 1 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The ISFET devices functionalized with the NADH and NADPH membranes are employed in the analysis of the biocatalyzed oxidation of lactic acid and ethanol in the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. PMID:12585477

  13. Deletion or overexpression of mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters cellular NAD and ATP contents and affects mitochondrial metabolism and the rate of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality.

  14. NAMPT-Mediated Salvage Synthesis of NAD+ Controls Morphofunctional Changes of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Gerda; Oerlemans, Frank T. J. J.; Willemse, Marieke; Wijers, Mietske; Fransen, Jack A. M.; Wieringa, Bé

    2014-01-01

    Functional morphodynamic behavior of differentiated macrophages is strongly controlled by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements, a process in which also metabolic cofactors ATP and NAD(H) (i.e. NAD+ and NADH) and NADP(H) (i.e. NADP+ and NADPH) play an essential role. Whereas the link to intracellular ATP availability has been studied extensively, much less is known about the relationship between actin cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular redox state and NAD+-supply. Here, we focus on the role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), found in extracellular form as a cytokine and growth factor, and in intracellular form as one of the key enzymes for the production of NAD+ in macrophages. Inhibition of NAD+ salvage synthesis by the NAMPT-specific drug FK866 caused a decrease in cytosolic NAD+ levels in RAW 264.7 and Maf-DKO macrophages and led to significant downregulation of the glycolytic flux without directly affecting cell viability, proliferation, ATP production capacity or mitochondrial respiratory activity. Concomitant with these differential metabolic changes, the capacity for phagocytic ingestion of particles and also substrate adhesion of macrophages were altered. Depletion of cytoplasmic NAD+ induced cell-morphological changes and impaired early adhesion in phagocytosis of zymosan particles as well as spreading performance. Restoration of NAD+ levels by NAD+, NMN, or NADP+ supplementation reversed the inhibitory effects of FK866. We conclude that direct coupling to local, actin-based, cytoskeletal dynamics is an important aspect of NAD+’s cytosolic role in the regulation of morphofunctional characteristics of macrophages. PMID:24824795

  15. Toxicity of oxygen radicals in cultured pulmonary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Autor, A.P.; Bonham, A.C.; Thies, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase and catalase, which catalytically remove superoxide radicals and hydrogen perioxide, respectively, each separately protected cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity after exposure to oxygen radicals generated either cellularly (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) or chemically (dihydroxyfumarate). Nicotinamide, a precursor of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and an inhibitor of ADP-ribose synthetase, also protected cultured endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity in a concentration-dependent manner after exposure to dihydroxyfumarate.

  16. iRSpot-PseDNC: identify recombination spots with pseudo dinucleotide composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Peng-Mian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-04-01

    Meiotic recombination is an important biological process. As a main driving force of evolution, recombination provides natural new combinations of genetic variations. Rather than randomly occurring across a genome, meiotic recombination takes place in some genomic regions (the so-called 'hotspots') with higher frequencies, and in the other regions (the so-called 'coldspots') with lower frequencies. Therefore, the information of the hotspots and coldspots would provide useful insights for in-depth studying of the mechanism of recombination and the genome evolution process as well. So far, the recombination regions have been mainly determined by experiments, which are both expensive and time-consuming. With the avalanche of genome sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop automated methods for rapidly and effectively identifying the recombination regions. In this study, a predictor, called 'iRSpot-PseDNC', was developed for identifying the recombination hotspots and coldspots. In the new predictor, the samples of DNA sequences are formulated by a novel feature vector, the so-called 'pseudo dinucleotide composition' (PseDNC), into which six local DNA structural properties, i.e. three angular parameters (twist, tilt and roll) and three translational parameters (shift, slide and rise), are incorporated. It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test that the overall success rate achieved by iRSpot-PseDNC was >82% in identifying recombination spots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating the new predictor is promising or at least may become a complementary tool to the existing methods in this area. Although the benchmark data set used to train and test the current method was from S. cerevisiae, the basic approaches can also be extended to deal with all the other genomes. Particularly, it has not escaped our notice that the PseDNC approach can be also used to study many other DNA-related problems. As a user-friendly web-server, i

  17. Structures of Iridoid Synthase from Cantharanthus roseus with Bound NAD(+) , NADPH, or NAD(+) /10-Oxogeranial: Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yumei; Liu, Weidong; Malwal, Satish R; Zheng, Yingying; Feng, Xinxin; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Xu, Zhongxia; Liu, Meixia; Han, Xu; Gao, Jian; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Structures of the iridoid synthase nepetalactol synthase in the presence of NAD(+) , NADPH or NAD(+) /10-oxogeranial were solved. The 10-oxogeranial substrate binds in a transoid-O1-C3 conformation and can be reduced by hydride addition to form the byproduct S-10-oxo-citronellal. Tyr178 Oζ is positioned 2.5 Å from the substrate O1 and provides the second proton required for reaction. Nepetalactol product formation requires rotation about C1-C2 to form the cisoid isomer, leading to formation of the cis-enolate, together with rotation about C4-C5, which enables cyclization and lactol production. The structure is similar to that of progesterone-5β-reductase, with almost identical positioning of NADP, Lys146(147), Tyr178(179), and F342(343), but only Tyr178 and Phe342 appear to be essential for activity. The transoid 10-oxogeranial structure also serves as a model for β-face hydride attack in progesterone 5β-reductases and is of general interest in the context of asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26768532

  18. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding. PMID:26004863

  19. Role of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, E. A.; Simakov, M. B.; Mal'Ko, I. L.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Gontareva, N. B.

    With the use of high performance liquid chromatography the products of abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides in solid films were indentified and estimated quantitatively. The main products of photosynthesis appeared to be adenosine and deoxyadenosine monophosphates. Maximal yield of these products in case of adenosine has been 0.36 for 5'AMP, 0.41% for 2'(3')AMP, 0.20 for 2'3'cAMP in case of deoxyadenosine 0.13% for 5'dAMP, 0.15% for 3'dAMP, 0.24% for 3'5'cdAMP. The destruction of initial adenosine and deoxyadenosine by the end of the experiment was 10 and 15%, respectively. By the increasing of irradiation dose, 5'AMP and 5'dAMP synthesized in the cource of VUV photolysis were destructed up to adenine, its yield being 15% in both cases.

  20. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  1. Upcoming replacements for NAD83, NAVD88 and IGLD85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Snay, R.

    2009-05-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for defining, maintaining and providing access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) for the United States. The NSRS is the official system to which all civil federal mapping agencies should refer, and contains, amongst other things, the official geopotential (historically "vertical") datum of NAVD 88, the 3-D geometric reference system (historically "horizontal datum") of NAD 83 and great lakes datum (IGLD 85). Although part of the United States NSRS, all three of these datums have been created through international partnerships across North America. Unfortunately, time has shown both the systematic errors existent within these datums, as well as the inherent weaknesses of relying exclusively on passive monuments to define and provide access to these datums. In recognition of these issues, the National Geodetic Survey has issued a "10 year plan", available online, which outlines steps which will be taken to update NAD 83, NAVD 88 and IGLD 85 concurrently around the year 2018. The primary source of success will be in the refinement of the CORS network and the upcoming execution of the GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Re-definition of the American Vertical Datum). Conversations are ongoing with colleagues in Canada, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean in order to coordinate all of these efforts across the entire continent. The largest changes expected to occur are the removal of over 2 meters of non-geocentricity in NAD 83; the removal of decimeters of bias and over a meter of tilt in NAVD 88; the addition of the ability to track crustal motions (subsidence, tectonics, etc) in the datums; the removal of leveling as a tool for long-line height differencing; the use of a "best" geoid as the orthometric height reference surface; the addition of datum velocities (motions of the 3-D geometric reference system origin and motions of the geoid

  2. First prebiotic generation of a ribonucleotide from adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Baccolini, Graziano; Boga, Carla; Micheletti, Gabriele

    2011-03-28

    Adenosine monophosphate isomers are obtained by self-assembling of adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate in aqueous solution in good yields. This generation of a ribonucleotide from its three molecular components occurs in a one-pot reaction at room temperature for about 30-40 days and with high chemio-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity. Similar results are obtained with guanine. A mechanism is also proposed. PMID:21305098

  3. Protection of Chinese herbs against adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanqing; Han, Bing; Guo, Hongyang; Liu, Yanru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of Chinese herbs (Angelica sinensis, Ligusticum wallichii, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Rhodiola crenilata, Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis) on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. 30 age-matched male Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Rats in group A (n = 10), B (n = 10) and C (n = 10) were fed a standard laboratory chow and allowed tap water ad libitum. In group B and C, renal failure was induced by the administration of a diet containing 0.75% adenine for 28 days which began at day 0. Rats in group C were given Chinese herbs (40 ml/kg with drug concentration 1.75 g/ml) beginning at day 0. Urine albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were determined at days 0, 14 and 28. At day 28, the animals were killed and their kidneys removed for light microscope evaluation. Body weight in Group B decreased more significantly than that in Group C (p = 0.032) at day 28. The rats in group B demonstrated more severe proteinuria and higher Serum creatinine and BUN levels than group C at day 14 and day 28 (P < 0.05, 0.01). All rats given adenine developed marked structural renal damage involving the tubule and interstitium. The values were much less severe in group C than those in group B. In adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats, the protective effects of these Chinese herbs were of a significant nature. Our results do support the notion that these Chinese herbs are useful in deferring the advance of chronic renal failure. We recommend Chinese herbs as a beneficial treatment for pre-end stage chronic renal failure.

  4. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  5. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  6. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  7. Chemical evolution: The mechanism of the formation of adenine under prebiotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjani; Najafian, Katayoun; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental building blocks of life have been detected extraterrestrially, even in interstellar space, and are known to form nonenzymatically. Thus, the HCN pentamer, adenine (a base present in DNA and RNA), was first isolated in abiogenic experiments from an aqueous solution of ammonia and HCN in 1960. Although many variations of the reaction conditions giving adenine have been reported since then, the mechanistic details remain unexplored. Our predictions are based on extensive computations of sequences of reaction steps along several possible mechanistic routes. H2O- or NH3-catalyzed pathways are more favorable than uncatalyzed neutral or anionic alternatives, and they may well have been the major source of adenine on primitive earth. Our report provides a more detailed understanding of some of the chemical processes involved in chemical evolution, and a partial answer to the fundamental question of molecular biogenesis. Our investigation should trigger similar explorations of the detailed mechanisms of the abiotic formation of the remaining nucleic acid bases and other biologically relevant molecules. PMID:17951429

  8. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids.

  9. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-08

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  10. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life’s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum. PMID:22075932

  11. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  12. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine. PMID:25245205

  13. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine.

  14. Structure of STING bound to cyclic di-GMP reveals the mechanism of cyclic dinucleotide recognition by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Watts, Tylan; Kao, C Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2012-06-24

    STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an innate immune sensor of cyclic dinucleotides that regulates the induction of type I interferons. STING's C-terminal domain forms a V-shaped dimer and binds a cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) at the dimer interface by both direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds. Guanines of c-di-GMP stack against the phenolic rings of a conserved tyrosine, and mutations at the c-di-GMP binding surface reduce nucleotide binding and affect signaling.

  15. Kinetic and mechanistic analysis of dinucleotide and oligonucleotide formation from the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine on Na(+)-montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The rate constants for the condensation reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of adenosine (ImpA) to form dinucleotides and oligonucleotides have been measured in the presence of Na(+)-volclay (a Na(+)-montmorillonite) in pH 8 aqueous solution at 25 degrees C. The rates of the reaction of ImpA with an excess of adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate (NH2pA), P1,P2-diadenosine 5',5'-pyrophosphate (A5'ppA), or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP or pA) in the presence of the montmorillonite to form NH2pA3'pA, A5'ppA3'pA, and pA3'pA, respectively, were measured. Only 3',5'-linked products were observed. The magnitude of the rate constants decrease in the order NH2pA3'pA > A5'-ppA3'pA > pA3'pA. The binding of ImpA to montmorillonite was measured, and the adsorption isotherm was determined. The binding of ImpA to montmorillonite and the formation of higher oligonucleotides is not observed in the absence of salts. Mg2+ enhances binding and oligonucleotide formation more than Ca2+ and Na+. The rate constants for the oligonucleotide formation were determined from the reaction products formed from 10 to 40 mM ImpA in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite using the computer program SIMFIT. The magnitudes of the rate constants for the formation of oligonucleotides increased in the order 2-mer < 3-mer < 4-mer ... 7-mer. The rate constants for dinucleotide and trinucleotide formation are more than 1000 times larger than those measured in the absence of montmorillonite. The rate constants for the formation of dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide are 41,2.6, and 3.7 times larger than those for the formation of oligo(G)s with a poly(C) template. The hydrolysis of ImpA was accelerated 35 times in the presence of the montmorillonite. The catalytic ability of montmorillonite to form dinucleotides and oligonucleotides is quantitatively evaluated and possible pathways for oligo(A) formation are proposed.

  16. N-arylazido-. beta. -alanyl-NAD sup + , a new NAD sup + photoaffinity analogue. Synthesis and labeling of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, P.S.K.; Chen, S. ); Hatefi, Y. )

    1990-01-30

    N-Arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +}(N3{prime}-0-(3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propionyl)NAD{sup +}) has been prepared by alkaline phosphatase treatment of arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NADP{sup +} (N3{prime}-O-(3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propionyl)NADP{sup +}). This NAD{sup +} analogue was found to be a potent competitive inhibitor with respect to NADH for the purified bovine heart mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited as well as covalently labeled by this analogue upon photoirradiation. A stoichiometry of 1.15 mol of N-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} bound/mol of enzyme, at 100% inactivation, was determined from incorporation studies using tritium-labeled analogue. Among the three subunits, 0.85 mol of the analogue was bound to the M{sub r} = 51,000 subunit, and each of the two smaller subunits contained 0.15 mol of the analogue when the dehydrogenase was completely inhibited upon photolysis. Both the irreversible inactivation and the covalent incorporation could be prevented by the presence of NADH during photolysis. These results indicate that N-arylaziod-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} is an active-site-directed photoaffinity label for the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, and are further evidence that the M{sub r} = 51,000 subunit contain the NADH binding site. Results are also presented to show that N-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +} binds the dehydrogenase in a more effective manner than A-arylazido-{beta}-alanyl-NAD{sup +}.

  17. Structure of a NAD kinase from Thermotoga maritima at 2.3 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Huang, Candice; Adams, Paul D.; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao A.; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-07-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, and structure determination of NAD-kinase from T. maritima are reported. Similarity to other NAD-kinases as well as homo-oligomrization state of the enzyme from T. maritima are discussed. NAD kinase is the only known enzyme that catalyzes the formation of NADP, a coenzyme involved in most anabolic reactions and in the antioxidant defense system. Despite its importance, very little is known regarding the mechanism of catalysis and only recently have several NAD kinase structures been deposited in the PDB. Here, an independent investigation of the crystal structure of inorganic polyphosphate/ATP-NAD kinase, PPNK-THEMA, a protein from Thermotoga maritima, is reported at a resolution of 2.3 Å. The crystal structure was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) data collected at the Se absorption-peak wavelength in a state in which no cofactors or substrates were bound. It revealed that the 258-amino-acid protein is folded into two distinct domains, similar to recently reported NAD kinases. The N-terminal α/β-domain spans the first 100 amino acids and the last 30 amino acids of the polypeptide and has several topological matches in the PDB, whereas the other domain, which spans the middle 130 residues, adopts a unique β-sandwich architecture and only appreciably matches the recently deposited PDB structures of NAD kinases.

  18. Dimerization of Plant Defensin NaD1 Enhances Its Antifungal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fung T.; Mills, Grant D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Kirby, Nigel; Baxter, Amy A.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, is a member of a family of cationic peptides that displays growth inhibitory activity against several filamentous fungi, including Fusarium oxysporum. The antifungal activity of NaD1 has been attributed to its ability to permeabilize membranes; however, the molecular basis of this function remains poorly defined. In this study, we have solved the structure of NaD1 from two crystal forms to high resolution (1.4 and 1.58 Å, respectively), both of which contain NaD1 in a dimeric configuration. Using protein cross-linking experiments as well as small angle x-ray scattering analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation, we show that NaD1 forms dimers in solution. The structural studies identified Lys4 as critical in formation of the NaD1 dimer. This was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Lys4 that resulted in substantially reduced dimer formation. Significantly, the reduced ability of the Lys4 mutant to dimerize correlated with diminished antifungal activity. These data demonstrate the importance of dimerization in NaD1 function and have implications for the use of defensins in agribiotechnology applications such as enhancing plant crop protection against fungal pathogens. PMID:22511788

  19. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  20. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases.

  1. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    PubMed

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. PMID:25280628

  2. Adenine photodimerization in deoxyadenylate sequences: elucidation of the mechanism through structural studies of a major d(ApA) photoproduct.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Joshi, P C; Sharma, N D; Bose, S N; Jeremy, R; Davies, H; Takeda, N; McCloskey, J A

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of the photodimerization of adjacent adenine bases on the same strand of DNA has been elucidated by determining the structure of one of the two major photoproducts that are formed by UV irradiation of the deoxydinucleoside monophosphate d(ApA). The photoproduct, denoted d(ApA)*, corresponds to a species of adenine photodimer first described by Pörschke (Pörschke, D. (1973) J.Am.Chem.Soc. 95, 8440-8446). From a detailed examination of its chemical and spectroscopic properties, including comparisons with the model compound N-cyano-N1-(1-methylimidazol-5-yl)formamidine, it is deduced that d(ApA)* contains a deoxyadenosine unit covalently linked through its C(8) position to C(4) of an imidazole N(1) deoxyribonucleoside moiety bearing an N-cyanoformamidino substituent at C(5). On treatment with acid, d(ApA)* is degraded with high specificity to 8-(5-amino-imidazol-4-yl)adenine whose identity has been confirmed by independent chemical synthesis. It is concluded that the primary event in adenine photodimerization entails photoaddition of the N(7)-C(8) double bond of the 5'-adenine across the C(6) and C(5) positions of the 3'-adenine. The azetidine species thus generated acts as a common precursor to both types of d(ApA) photoproduct which are formed from it by competing modes of azetidine ring fission. PMID:2057348

  3. Movement and Metabolism of Kinetin-14C and of Adenine-14C in Coleus Petiole Segments of Increasing Age 1

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Henk; Jacobs, William P.

    1969-01-01

    To see if polar movement was typical of growth-regulators other than auxins, the movement of adenine-8-14C and of kinetin-8-14C was studied in segments cut from petioles of increasing age. No polarity was found. In time-course experiments lasting 24 hr, kinetin showed a progressive increase of radioactivity in receiver blocks, while adenine showed a maximum at 8 hr with a decline thereafter. More kinetin moved through older segments than through younger ones. There was no difference in net loss as far as the position of the donor block is concerned. However, the loss of radioactivity from adenine donor blocks was much higher than the loss of radioactivity from kinetin donor blocks. The radioactivity in receiver blocks after 24 hr treatment with kinetin-14C was still with kinetin, judging by location on chromatograms. By the same criterion, adenine and a smaller amount of some other compound were in receiver blocks after a 6 hr transport with adenine-14C in the donors. By contrast, more zones of radioactivity were extracted from petiole segments to which kinetin or adenine had been added. For both purine derivatives the original compound represented no more than 20% of the total radioactivity extracted from the tissue after a transport period of 24 hr. PMID:16657203

  4. NAD+-Carrying Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Can Prevent Oxidative Stress-Induced Energy Failures of Both Rodent Astrocytes and PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Jixi; Ma, Yingxin; Wang, Caixia; Zhou, Ying; Gu, Hongchen; Ying, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that NAD+-carrying mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs@NAD+) can effectively deliver NAD+ into cells to produce cytoprotective effects. Methods & Materials NAD+ was incorporated into M-MSNs. Primary rat astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells were treated with H2O2, followed by post-treatment with M-MSNs@NAD+. After various durations of the post-treatment, intracellular NAD+ levels, intracellular ATP levels and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were determined. Results & Discussion M-MSNs can be effectively loaded with NAD+. The M-MSNs@NAD+ can significantly attenuate H2O2-induced NAD+ and ATP decreases in both astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells. M-MSNs@NAD+ can also partially prevent the H2O2-induced LDH release from both astrocyte cultures and PC12 cells. In contrast, the NAD+ that is spontaneously released from the M-MSNs@NAD+ is insufficient to prevent the H2O2-induced damage. Conclusions Our study has suggested the first approach that can effectively deliver NAD+ into cells, which provides an important basis both for elucidating the roles of intracellular NAD+ in biological functions and for therapeutic applications of NAD+. Our study has also provided the first direct evidence demonstrating a key role of NAD+ depletion in oxidative stress-induced ATP decreases. PMID:24040179

  5. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  6. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  7. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  8. Two Very Precisely Instrumentally Documented Meteorite Falls: Zdar nad Sazavou and Stubenberg - Prediction and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurny, P.; Borovicka, J.; Haloda, J.; Shrbeny, L.; Heinlein, D.

    2016-08-01

    Recently two bright bolides Zdar nad Sazavou (Czechia) and Stubenberg (Germany) were recorded by the cameras of the Czech Fireball Network. Basic data and comparison of the predicted impact areas and real positions of the meteorites will be presented.

  9. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the chemolithotroph Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Ehara, Nagisa; Nishito, Akira; Nakayama, Yumi; Maekawa, Makiko; Imada, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Inagaki, Kenji

    2002-08-27

    An isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) with an unique coenzyme specificity from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned. The native enzyme was homodimeric with a subunit of M(r) 45000 and showed a 78-fold preference for NAD(+) over NADP(+). The cloned ICDH gene (icd) was expressed in an icd-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EB106; the activity was found in the cell extract. The gene encodes a 429-amino acid polypeptide and is located between open reading frames encoding a putative aconitase gene (upstream of icd) and a putative succinyl-CoA synthase beta-subunit gene (downstream of icd). A. thiooxidans ICDH showed high sequence similarity to bacterial NADP(+)-dependent ICDH rather than eukaryotic NAD(+)-dependent ICDH, but the NAD(+)-preference of the enzyme was suggested due to residues conserved in the coenzyme binding site of the NAD(+)-dependent decarboxylating dehydrogenase.

  10. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior... Ocean Energy Management. BILLING CODE 4310-MR-P...

  11. Stereospecificity of NAD+/NADH Reactions: A Project Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jonathan S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, materials needed, and experimental procedures to study enzymes dependent on pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD/NADH). The experiments, suitable for advanced organic or biochemistry courses, require approximately 10-15 hours to complete. (SK)

  12. Theophylline prevents NAD{sup +} depletion via PARP-1 inhibition in human pulmonary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, Harald J.J. . E-mail: h.moonen@grat.unimaas.nl; Geraets, Liesbeth; Vaarhorst, Anika; Bast, Aalt; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Hageman, Geja J.

    2005-12-30

    Oxidative DNA damage, as occurs during exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), highly activates the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). This can lead to cellular depletion of its substrate NAD{sup +}, resulting in an energy crisis and ultimately in cell death. Inhibition of PARP-1 results in preservation of the intracellular NAD{sup +} pool, and of NAD{sup +}-dependent cellular processes. In this study, PARP-1 activation by hydrogen peroxide decreased intracellular NAD{sup +} levels in human pulmonary epithelial cells, which was found to be prevented in a dose-dependent manner by theophylline, a widely used compound in the treatment of COPD. This enzyme inhibition by theophylline was confirmed in an ELISA using purified human PARP-1 and was found to be competitive by nature. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the therapeutic effect of theophylline in oxidative stress-induced lung pathologies.

  13. Differential activation of NAD kinase by plant calmodulin isoforms. The critical role of domain I.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Seo, H Y; Kim, J C; Heo, W D; Chung, W S; Lee, K J; Kim, M C; Cheong, Y H; Choi, J Y; Lim, C O; Cho, M J

    1997-04-01

    NAD kinase is a Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent enzyme capable of converting cellular NAD to NADP. The enzyme purified from pea seedlings can be activated by highly conserved soybean CaM, SCaM-1, but not by the divergent soybean CaM isoform, SCaM-4 (Lee, S. H., Kim, J. C., Lee, M. S., Heo, W. D., Seo, H. Y., Yoon, H. W., Hong, J. C., Lee, S. Y., Bahk, J. D., Hwang, I., and Cho, M. J. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 21806-21812). To determine which domains were responsible for this differential activation of NAD kinase, a series of chimeric SCaMs were generated by exchanging functional domains between SCaM-4 and SCaM-1. SCaM-4111, a chimeric SCaM-1 that contains the first domain of SCaM-4, was severely impaired (only 40% of maximal) in its ability to activate NAD kinase. SCaM-1444, a chimeric SCaM-4 that contains the first domain of SCaM-1 exhibited nearly full ( approximately 70%) activation of NAD kinase. Only chimeras containing domain I of SCaM-1 produced greater than half-maximal activation of NAD kinase. To define the amino acid residue(s) in domain I that were responsible for this differential activation, seven single residue substitution mutants of SCaM-1 were generated and tested for NAD kinase activation. Among these mutants, only K30E and G40D showed greatly reduced NAD kinase activation. Also a double residue substitution mutant, K30E/G40D, containing these two mutations in combination was severely impaired in its NAD kinase-activating potential, reaching only 20% of maximal activation. Furthermore, a triple mutation, K30E/M36I/G40D, completely abolished NAD kinase activation. Thus, our data suggest that domain I of CaM plays a key role in the differential activation of NAD kinase exhibited by SCaM-1 and SCaM-4. Further, the residues Lys30 and Glu40 of SCaM-1 are critical for this function.

  14. Specific binding of nucleotides and NAD+ to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Borriello, S P

    1992-02-24

    Binding of nucleotides, a tetrapolyphosphate, and NAD+ to purified toxin A of Clostridium difficile was determined by monitoring changes in intrinsic fluorescence following excitation at 280 nm, and recording emissions at 340 nm. Binding was specific for concentrations over the range 5 to 100 microM for ATP, GTP, and their respective non-hydrolysable analogues AMP-PNP and Gpp(NH)p, tetrapolyphosphate and NAD+. PMID:1544441

  15. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10-15 and 3.2 × 10-15 cm2, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10-18 and 7.6 × 10-18 cm2 at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  16. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  17. NF-κB activation mediates crystal translocation and interstitial inflammation in adenine overload nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Cristiene; Borges, Raquel Lerner; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Fanelli, Camilla; Barlette, Grasiela Pedreira; Machado, Flavia Gomes; Arias, Simone Costa Alarcon; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Zatz, Roberto; Fujihara, Clarice Kazue

    2013-07-15

    Adenine overload promotes intratubular crystal precipitation and interstitial nephritis. We showed recently that these abnormalities are strongly attenuated in mice knockout for Toll-like receptors-2, -4, MyD88, ASC, or caspase-1. We now investigated whether NF-κB activation also plays a pathogenic role in this model. Adult male Munich-Wistar rats were distributed among three groups: C (n = 17), receiving standard chow; ADE (n = 17), given adenine in the chow at 0.7% for 1 wk and 0.5% for 2 wk; and ADE + pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; n = 14), receiving adenine as above and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (120 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹ in the drinking water). After 3 wk, widespread crystal deposition was seen in tubular lumina and in the renal interstitium, along with granuloma formation, collagen accumulation, intense tubulointerstitial proliferation, and increased interstitial expression of inflammatory mediators. Part of the crystals were segregated from tubular lumina by a newly formed cell layer and, at more advanced stages, appeared to be extruded to the interstitium. p65 nuclear translocation and IKK-α increased abundance indicated activation of the NF-κB system. PDTC treatment prevented p65 migration and normalized IKK-α, limited crystal shift to the interstitium, and strongly attenuated interstitial fibrosis/inflammation. These findings indicate that the complex inflammatory phenomena associated with this model depend, at least in part, on NF-κB activation, and suggest that the NF-κB system may become a therapeutic target in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  18. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase as a novel target of tributyltin in human embryonic carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2014-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is known to cause developmental defects as endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs). At nanomoler concentrations, TBT actions were mediated by genomic pathways via PPAR/RXR. However, non-genomic target of TBT has not been elucidated. To investigate non-genomic TBT targets, we performed comprehensive metabolomic analyses using human embryonic carcinoma NT2/D1 cells. We found that 100 nM TBT reduced the amounts of α-ketoglutarate, succinate and malate. We further found that TBT decreased the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the TCA cycle. In addition, TBT inhibited cell growth and enhanced neuronal differentiation through NAD-IDH inhibition. Furthermore, studies using bacterially expressed human NAD-IDH and in silico simulations suggest that TBT inhibits NAD-IDH due to a possible interaction. These results suggest that NAD-IDH is a novel non-genomic target of TBT at nanomolar levels. Thus, a metabolomic approach may provide new insights into the mechanism of EDC action.

  19. The simultaneous determination of NAD(H) and NADP(H) utilization by glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2010-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from vertebrates is unusual among NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases in that it can use either NAD(H) or NADP(H) as cofactor. In this study, we measure the rate of cofactor utilization by bovine GDH when both cofactors are present. Methods for both reaction directions were developed, and for the first time, to our knowledge, the GDH activity has been simultaneously studied in the presence of both NAD(H) and NADP(H). Our data indicate that NADP(H) has inhibitory effects on the rate of NAD(H) utilization by GDH, a characteristic of GDH not previously recognized. The response of GDH to allosteric activators in the presence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) suggests that ADP and leucine moderate much of the inhibitory effect of NADP(H) on the utilization of NAD(H). These results illustrate that simple assumptions of cofactor preference by mammalian GDH are incomplete without an appreciation of allosteric effects when both cofactors are simultaneously present.

  20. NAMPT-Mediated NAD(+) Biosynthesis Is Essential for Vision In Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jonathan B; Kubota, Shunsuke; Ban, Norimitsu; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Santeford, Andrea; Sene, Abdoulaye; Nakamura, Rei; Zapata, Nicole; Kubota, Miyuki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Yoshino, Jun; Imai, Shin-Ichiro; Apte, Rajendra S

    2016-09-27

    Photoreceptor death is the endpoint of many blinding diseases. Identifying unifying pathogenic mechanisms in these diseases may offer global approaches for facilitating photoreceptor survival. We found that rod or cone photoreceptor-specific deletion of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), the rate-limiting enzyme in the major NAD(+) biosynthetic pathway beginning with nicotinamide, caused retinal degeneration. In both cases, we could rescue vision with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Significantly, retinal NAD(+) deficiency was an early feature of multiple mouse models of retinal dysfunction, including light-induced degeneration, streptozotocin-induced diabetic retinopathy, and age-associated dysfunction. Mechanistically, NAD(+) deficiency caused metabolic dysfunction and consequent photoreceptor death. We further demonstrate that the NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial deacylases SIRT3 and SIRT5 play important roles in retinal homeostasis and that NAD(+) deficiency causes SIRT3 dysfunction. These findings demonstrate that NAD(+) biosynthesis is essential for vision, provide a foundation for future work to further clarify the mechanisms involved, and identify a unifying therapeutic target for diverse blinding diseases. PMID:27681422

  1. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  2. The structure, stability, H-bonding pattern, and electrostatic potential of adenine tetrads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2001-03-01

    Two conformations of the adenine tetrad were investigated at the HF and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. Both conformations are predicted to be stable only in the nonplanar form. They adopt the bowl type structure. Since the planar form offers better geometry for stacking with the adjacent G-tetrad, both planar forms are expected to be important in the formation of the tetraplexes. Based on electrostatic potential map the positive electrostatic potential in the central area of both conformations is expected to reinforce the stacking between the A-tetrads and the G-tetrads in the tetraplexes.

  3. Strong coupling between adenine nucleobases in DNA single strands revealed by circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Holm, Anne I. S.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2008-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) experiments on DNA single strands (dAn) at the ASTRID synchrotron radiation facility reveal that eight adenine (A) bases electronically couple upon 190nm excitation. After n=8 , the CD signal increases linearly with n with a slope equal to the sum of the coupling terms. Nearest neighbor interactions account for only 24% of the CD signal whereas electronic communication is limited to nearest neighbors for two other exciton bands observed at 218 and 251nm (i.e., dimer excited states). Electronic coupling between bases in DNA is important for nonradiative deexcitation of electronically excited states since the hazardous energy is spread over a larger spatial region.

  4. Bioelectrochemical activity of an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pu; Zheng, Haitao; Nie, Pingping; Wei, Yaotian; Feng, Zhenchao; Sun, Tao

    2009-07-01

    As coenzyme utilized by more than hundreds of dehydrogenases, the efficient immobilization and regeneration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are of great importance and have practical applications in industrial, analytical and biomedical field. In this paper, an electroactive macromolecular weight coenzyme derivative (PEI-DHBNAD) was prepared by attaching both NAD+ and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3,4-DHB) to a water-soluble polyelectrolyte, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). The functional polymer exhibited both electrochemical properties of catechol unites and coenzymatic activity of NAD moieties. The macromolecular NAD analogue showed a substantial degree of efficiency relative to free NAD+ with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glucose-6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), and a litter higher Michaelis-Menton constant (Km) was obtained for the coenzyme derivative than free NAD+. The bioelectrochemical properties of PEI-DHB-NAD were investigated by using G6PDH as the model enzyme, and both of them were retained on electrode surface by ultrafiltration membrane. The modified electrode showed typical response to substrate without the addition of free coenzyme, which indicated that PEI-DHB-NAD can carry out the electron transfer between electrode and NAD-dependent dehydrogenase. The utilization of polymer-based PEI-DHB-NAD is convenient for the immobilization of both electron mediator and coenzyme, and offers a practical approach for the construction of reagentless biosensors.

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  6. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  7. The isolation and characterisation of a new type of dimeric adenine photoproduct in UV-irradiated deoxyadenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Sharma, N D; Davies, R J; Phillipson, D W; McCloskey, J A

    1987-01-01

    A new type of dimeric adenine photoproduct has been isolated from d(ApA) irradiated at 254 nm in neutral aqueous solution. It is formed in comparable amounts to another, quite distinct, adenine photoproduct first described by Pörschke (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1973), 95, 8440-8446). Results from high resolution mass spectrometry and 1H NMR indicate that the new photoproduct comprises a mixture of two stereoisomers whose formation involves covalent coupling of the adenine bases in d(ApA) and concomitant incorporation of the elements of one molecule of water. The photoproduct is degraded specifically by acid to 4,6-diamino-5-guanidinopyrimidine (DGPY) whose identity has been confirmed by independent chemical synthesis. Formation of the new photoproduct in UV-irradiated d(pA)2 and poly(dA), but not poly(rA), has been demonstrated by assaying their acid hydrolysates for the presence of DGPY. The properties of the photoproduct are consistent with it being generated by the hydrolytic fission of an azetidine photoadduct in which the N(7) and C(8) atoms of the 5'-adenine in d(ApA) are linked respectively to the C(6) and C(5) positions of the 3'-adenine. PMID:3822822

  8. Characterization of a pyridine nucleotide-nonspecific glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, T L; Hylemon, P B

    1980-01-01

    An oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADP+/NAD+) nonspecific L-glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was purified 40-fold (NADP+ or NAD+ activity) over crude cell extract by heat treatment, (NH4)2SO2 fractionation, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, Bio-Gel A 1.5m, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Both NADP+- and NAD+-dependent activities coeluted from all chromatographic treatments. Moreover, a constant ratio of NADP+/NAD+ specific activities was demonstrated at each purification step. Both activities also comigrated in 6% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. Affinity chromatography of the 40-fold-purified enzyme using Procion RED HE-3B gave a preparation containing both NADP+- and NAD+-linked activities which showed a single protein band of 48,5000 molecular weight after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The dual pyridine nucleotide nature of the enzyme was most readily apparent in the oxidative direction. Reductively, the enzyme was 30-fold more active with reduced NADP than with reduced NAD. Nonlinear concave 1/V versus 1/S plots were observed for reduced NADP and NH4Cl. Salts (0.1 M) stimulated the NADP+-linked reaction, inhibited the NAD+-linked reaction, and had little effect on the reduced NADP-dependent reaction. The stimulatory effect of salts (NADP+) was nonspecific, regardless of the anion or cation, whereas the degree of NAD+-linked inhibition decreased in the order to I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F-. Both NADP+ and NAD+ glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also detected in cell extracts from representative strains of other bacteroides deoxyribonucleic acid homology groups. Images PMID:7364728

  9. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of metabolic status in mesenchymal stem cell during adipogenic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshina, A. V.; Dudenkova, V. V.; Shirmanova, M. V.; Bystrova, A. S.; Zagaynova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of cell metabolism is a valuable approach to assess the efficacy of stem cell therapy and understand the tissue development. In this study we analyzed metabolic trajectory of the mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs) during differentiation into adipocytes by measuring fluorescence lifetimes of free and bound forms of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Undifferentiated MSCs and MSCs on the 5, 12, 19, 26 days of differentiation were imaged on a Zeiss 710 microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system B&H (Germany). Fluorescence of NAD(P)H and FAD was excited at 750 nm and 900 nm, respectively, by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and detected in a range 455-500 nm and 500-550 nm, correspondingly. We observed the changes in the NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetimes and their relative contributions in the differentiated adipocytes compare to undifferentiated MSCs. Increase of fluorescence lifetimes of the free and bound forms of NAD(P)H and the contribution of protein-bound NAD(P)H was registered, that can be associated with a metabolic switch from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation and/or synthesis of lipids in adipogenically differentiated MSCs. We also found that the contribution of protein-bound FAD decreased during differentiation. After carrying out appropriate biochemical measurements, the observed changes in cellular metabolism can potentially serve to monitor stem cell differentiation by FLIM.

  10. Accurate crystal molecular dynamics simulations using particle-mesh-Ewald: RNA dinucleotides — ApU and GpC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsing; Darden, Thomas; Pedersen, Lee

    1995-09-01

    Long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for two crystal RNA dinucleotides ApU (2.0 ns) and GpC (1.5 ns) were performed, starting from the crystallographic positions of all heavy atoms in the crystals. By employing the particle-mesh-Ewald algorithm [Darden et al., J. Chem. Phys. 98 (1993) 10089] to accommodate the long-range Coulomb interactions, highly accurate MD structures were obtained for both crystals. The instantaneous root-mean-square positional deviations of the heavy atoms equilibrate at approximately 0.4 Å for both systems, while the experimental and calculated temperature factors are comparable in size. These results describe the first successful crystal MD simulation of RNA molecules.

  11. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    PubMed

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  12. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features.

  13. Differentiation alters the unstable expression of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in mouse teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Turker, M S; Tischfield, J A; Rabinovitch, P; Stambrook, P J; Trill, J J; Smith, A C; Ogburn, C E; Martin, G M

    1986-01-01

    Three multipotent mouse teratocarcinoma stem lines, all exhibiting unstable expression for the purine salvage enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) were used for the isolation of differentiated cell lines from neoplasms developed in syngeneic mice. Two of the stem cell lines (DAP1B and DAP1C) exhibited homozygous deficiencies for APRT expression while the third stem cell line (E140) exhibited a heterozygous deficiency (Turker, M.S., Smith, A.C., and Martin, G.M.; Somat. Cell Mol. Genet.; 10:55-69; 1984). A total of 16 morphologically differentiated cell lines were established from these neoplasms; most were no longer tumorigenic. Differentiated cell lines derived from the E140-induced tumors segregated homozygous deficient mutants in a single step, consistent with their retention of the heterozygous deficient state. Differentiated homozygous deficient cell lines gave rise to phenotypic revertants at very high frequencies (10(-1) to 10(-2)). The majority of these putative revertants, however, yielded cell-free extracts with little or no detectable APRT activity. These putative revertants were capable of adenine salvage and were therefore termed APRT pseudorevertants. Since the APRT pseudorevertant phenotype was only observed in the differentiated progeny of the APRT deficient stem cell lines, we conclude that this change in the nature of the revertant phenotype was a consequence of cellular differentiation.

  14. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  15. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    PubMed Central

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (εΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs. PMID:26227585

  16. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  17. Probing ultrafast dynamics in adenine with mid-UV four-wave mixing spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2011-08-11

    Heterodyne-detected transient grating (TG) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectroscopies are extended to the mid-UV spectral range in this investigation of photoinduced relaxation processes of adenine in aqueous solution. These experiments are the first to combine a new method for generating 25 fs laser pulses (at 263 nm) with the passive phase stability afforded by diffractive optics-based interferometry. We establish a set of conditions (e.g., laser power density, solute concentration) appropriate for the study of dynamics involving the neutral solute. Undesired solute photoionization is shown to take hold at higher peak powers of the laser pulses. Signatures of internal conversion and vibrational cooling dynamics are examined using TG measurements with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 350 at short delay times. In addition, 2DPE line shapes reveal correlations between excitation and emission frequencies in adenine, which reflect electronic and nuclear relaxation processes associated with particular tautomers. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of techniques that will hold many advantages for the study of biomolecules whose lowest-energy electronic resonances are found in the mid-UV (e.g., DNA bases, amino acids).

  18. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  19. Ultraviolet photolysis of adenine: Dissociation via the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} state

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Michael G. D.; Devine, Adam L.; Cronin, Brid; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2007-03-28

    High resolution total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra of the H atom fragments resulting from photodissociation of jet-cooled adenine molecules at 17 wavelengths in the range 280>{lambda}{sub phot}>214 nm are reported. TKER spectra obtained at {lambda}{sub phot}>233 nm display broad, isotropic profiles that peak at low TKER ({approx}1800 cm{sup -1}) and are largely insensitive to the choice of excitation wavelength. The bulk of these products is attributed to unintended multiphoton dissociation processes. TKER spectra recorded at {lambda}{sub phot}{<=}233 nm display additional fast structure, which is attributed to N{sub 9}-H bond fission on the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} potential energy surface (PES). Analysis of the kinetic energies and recoil anisotropies of the H atoms responsible for the fast structure suggests excitation to two {sup 1}{pi}{pi}{sup *} excited states (the {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}B{sub b} states) at {lambda}{sub phot}{approx}230 nm, both of which dissociate to yield H atoms together with ground state adeninyl fragments by radiationless transfer through conical intersections with the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} PES. Parallels with the photochemistry exhibited by other, smaller heteroaromatics (pyrrole, imidazole, phenol, etc.) are highlighted, as are inconsistencies between the present conclusions and those reached in two other recent studies of excited state adenine molecules.

  20. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features. PMID:27409976

  1. A van der Waals density functional study of adenine on graphene: Single molecular adsorption and overlayer binding

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Kristian; Cooper, Valentino R; Langreth, David C.; Schroder, Prof. Elsebeth; Chakarova-Kack, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of an adenine molecule on graphene is studied using a first-principles van der Waals functional (vdW-DF) [Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)]. The cohesive energy of an ordered adenine overlayer is also estimated. For the adsorption of a single molecule, we determine the optimal binding configuration and adsorption energy by translating and rotating the molecule. The adsorption energy for a single molecule of adenine is found to be 711 meV, which is close to the calculated adsorption energy of the similar-sized naphthalene. Based on the single molecular binding configuration, we estimate the cohesive energy of a two-dimensional ordered overlayer. We find a significantly stronger binding energy for the ordered overlayer than for single-molecule adsorption.

  2. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  3. PGC1α-dependent NAD biosynthesis links oxidative metabolism to renal protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mei T.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Berg, Anders H.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischemia. Indeed, acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients.1,2 Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α,3,4 is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating NAD biosynthesis. Following renal ischemia, PGC1α−/− mice developed local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (Nam), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Remarkably, exogenous Nam improved local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischemic PGC1α−/− mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulated the effects of Nam supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulated the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuated the de novo pathway. Nam enhanced NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augmented production of the fat breakdown product beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), leading to increased prostaglandin PGE2, a secreted autocoid that maintains renal function.5 Nam treatment reversed established ischemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-OHB signaling or prostaglandins similarly abolished PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in aging and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate Nam and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  4. Do NAD and NAT form in liquid stratospheric aerosols by pseudoheterogeneous nucleation?

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A

    2006-05-01

    Laboratory data of the freezing of nitric acid hydrates (NAD, NAT) from HNO(3)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O solution droplets have been evaluated with respect to a "pseudoheterogeneous" (surface-induced) nucleation mechanism of NAD and NAT, which has been argued to possibly lead to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). In addition, a parametrization of pseudoheterogeneous nucleation of NAD and NAT suggested recently (Tabazadeh et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106, 10238-10246) has been analyzed, showing that this parametrization should not be used in stratospheric modeling studies. The analysis of several laboratory data sets yields an upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAD of 2.2 x 10(-5) cm(-2) s(-1). In contrast, the upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAT could not be constrained satisfactorily, since formation of NAT has not been observed at stratospheric conditions in laboratory experiments applying small droplets. Maximum NAD production rates of 9.6 x 10(-9) cm(-3) (air) h(-1) in the stratosphere have been estimated assuming a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism that is constrained by the experimental observations. If maximum NAD supersaturation persisted for 4 weeks in the polar stratosphere the corresponding NAD particle number densities are estimated to be about 6 x 10(-6) cm(-3). These particle number densities are 3 orders of magnitude lower than particle number densities recently observed in the stratosphere. In conclusion, on the basis of laboratory data it is found that a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism is not sufficient to explain recent observations of large nitric acid containing particles in the polar stratosphere.

  5. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors. PMID:26385918

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the nadA gene in Neisseria meningitidis impacts the prediction of coverage of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fagnocchi, Luca; Biolchi, Alessia; Ferlicca, Francesca; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Brunelli, Brunella; Brier, Sébastien; Norais, Nathalie; Chiarot, Emiliano; Bensi, Giuliano; Kroll, J Simon; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Donnelly, John; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Delany, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    The NadA adhesin is a major component of 4CMenB, a novel vaccine to prevent meningococcus serogroup B (MenB) infection. Under in vitro growth conditions, nadA is repressed by the regulator NadR and poorly expressed, resulting in inefficient killing of MenB strains by anti-NadA antibodies. Interestingly, sera from children infected with strains that express low levels of NadA in laboratory growth nevertheless recognize the NadA antigen, suggesting that NadA expression during infection may be different from that observed in vitro. In a strain panel covering a range of NadA levels, repression was relieved through deleting nadR. All nadR knockout strains expressed high levels of NadA and were efficiently killed by sera from subjects immunized with 4CMenB. A selected MenB strain, NGP165, mismatched for other vaccine antigens, is not killed by sera from immunized infants when the strain is grown in vitro. However, in an in vivo passive protection model, the same sera effectively protected infant rats from bacteremia with NGP165. Furthermore, we identify a novel hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA) derivative, reported by others to be produced during inflammation, which induces expression of NadA in vitro, leading to efficient antibody-mediated killing. Finally, using bioluminescent reporters, nadA expression in the infant rat model was induced in vivo at 3 h postinfection. Our results suggest that during infectious disease, NadR repression is alleviated due to niche-specific signals, resulting in high levels of NadA expression from any nadA-positive (nadA(+)) strain and therefore efficient killing by anti-NadA antibodies elicited by the 4CMenB vaccine.

  7. DFT Studies of the Extent of Hole Delocalization in One-electron Oxidized Adenine and Guanine base Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of hole delocalization in one-electron oxidized adenine (A)- and guanine (G)-stacks and shows