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Sample records for adenine guanine cytosine

  1. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-07

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1.

  2. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides.

  3. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  4. Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Spectra of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine, and Uracil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using picosecond excitation at 1064 nm, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the nucleobases adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil with two different types of silver nanoparticles were obtained. Comparing the SEHRS spectra with SERS data from the identical samples excited at 532 nm and with known infrared spectra, the major bands in the spectra are assigned. Due to the different selection rules for the one- and two-photon excited Raman scattering, we observe strong variation in relative signal strengths of many molecular vibrations obtained in SEHRS and SERS spectra. The two-photon excited spectra of the nucleobases are found to be very sensitive with respect to molecule–nanoparticle interactions. Using both the SEHRS and SERS data, a comprehensive vibrational characterization of the interaction of nucleobases with silver nanostructures can be achieved. PMID:28077982

  5. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  6. Vacuum-Ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydrationof DNA bases (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine)

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, L.; Wilson, K.R.; Leone, S.R.; Musahid, Ahmed

    2007-01-22

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GW{sub n} (n = 1-3); C, CW{sub n} (n = 1-3); A, AW{sub n} (n = 1,2); and T, TW{sub n} (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 {+-} 0.1), GW (8.0 {+-} 0.1), GW{sub 2} (8.0 {+-} 0.1), and GW{sub 3} (8.0); C (8.65 {+-} 0.05), CW (8.45 {+-} 0.05), CW{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.1), and CW{sub 3} (8.3 {+-} 0.1); A (8.30 {+-} 0.05), AW (8.20 {+-} 0.05), and AW{sub 2} (8.1 {+-} 0.1); T (8.90 {+-} 0.05); and TW (8.75 {+-} 0.05), TW{sub 2} (8.6 {+-} 0.1), and TW{sub 3} (8.6 {+-} 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution.

  7. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  8. Geometrical Characterization of Adenine And Guanine on Cu(110) By NEXAFS, XPS, And DFT Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Katano, S.; Kawai, M.; Ogasawara, H.; Nilsson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stockholm U.

    2009-04-30

    Adsorption of purine DNA bases (guanine and adenine) on Cu(1 1 0) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and density-functional theory (DFT) calculation. At coverages near 0.2 monolayers, Angular-resolved NEXAFS analysis revealed that adenine adsorbates lie almost flat and that guanine adsorbates are tilted up on the surface with the purine ring parallel to the atom rows of Cu(1 1 0). Referring to the previous studies on pyrimidine DNA bases [M. Furukawa, H. Fujisawa, S. Katano, H. Ogasawara, Y. Kim, T. Komeda, A. Nilsson, M. Kawai, Surf. Sci. 532-535 (2003) 261], the isomerization of DNA bases on Cu(1 1 0) was found to play an important role in the adsorption geometry. Guanine, thymine and cytosine adsorption have an amine-type nitrogen next to a carbonyl group, which is dehydrogenated into imine nitrogen on Cu(1 1 0). These bases are bonded by the inherent portion of - NH-CO - altered by conversion into enolic form and dehydrogenation. Adenine contains no CO group and is bonded to Cu(1 1 0) by participation of the inherent amine parts, resulting in nearly flatly-lying position.

  9. Density Functional Study of the Influence of C5 Cytosine Substitution in Base Pairs with Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Adam; Guza, Rebecca; Tretyakova, Natalia; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study employs density-functional electronic structure methods to investigate the effect of chemical modification at the C5 position of cytosine. A series of experimentally motivated chemical modifications are considered, including alkyl, halogen, aromatic, fused ring, and strong σ and π withdrawing functional groups. The effect of these modifications on cytosine geometry, electronic structure, proton affinities, gas phase basicities, cytosine-guanine base-pair hydrogen bond network and corresponding nucleophilicity at guanine are examined. Ultimately, these results play a part in dissecting the effect of endogenous cytosine methylation on the reactivity of neighboring guanine toward carcinogens and DNA alkylating agents. PMID:19890472

  10. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  11. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  12. Electrochemical studies on the oxidation of guanine and adenine at cyclodextrin modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Noori, Abolhassan

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemical sensor for guanine and adenine using cyclodextrin-modified poly(N-acetylaniline) (PNAANI) on a carbon paste electrode has been developed. The oxidation mechanism of guanine and adenine on the surface of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrode processes are irreversible, pH dependent, and involve several reaction products. The electron transfer process occurs in consecutive steps with the formation of a strongly adsorbed intermediate on the electrode surface. Also, a new method for estimating the apparent formation constants of guanine and adenine with the immobilized cyclodextrins, through the change of surface coverage of studied analytes has been reported. Both guanine and adenine showed linear concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 microM by using differential pulse voltammetry, with an experimental limit of detection down to 0.05 microM. Linear concentration ranges of 2-150 microM for guanine and 6-104 microM for adenine have been found when cyclic voltammetry was used for determination of both analytes.

  13. The electrochemical reduction of the purines guanine and adenine at platinum electrodes in several room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Rogers, Emma I; Hardacre, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2010-02-05

    The reduction of guanine was studied by microelectrode voltammetry in the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-hexyltriethylammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [N(6,2,2,2)][N(Tf)(2)], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorosphosphate [C(4)mim][PF(6)], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C(4)mpyrr][N(Tf)(2)], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C(4)mim][N(Tf)(2)], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium dicyanamide [C(4)mpyrr][N(NC)(2)] and tris(P-hexyl)-tetradecylphosphonium trifluorotris(pentafluoroethyl)phosphate [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP] on a platinum microelectrode. In [N(6,2,2,2)][NTf(2)] and [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP], but not in the other ionic liquids studied, guanine reduction involves a one-electron, diffusion-controlled process at very negative potential to produce an unstable radical anion, which is thought to undergo a dimerization reaction, probably after proton abstraction from the cation of the ionic liquid. The rate of this subsequent reaction depends on the nature of the ionic liquid, and it is faster in the ionic liquid [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP], in which the formation of the resulting dimer can be voltammetrically monitored at less negative potentials than required for the reduction of the parent molecule. Adenine showed similar behaviour to guanine but the pyrimidines thymine and cytosine did not; thymine was not reduced at potentials less negative than required for solvent (RTIL) decomposition while only a poorly defined wave was seen for cytosine. The possibility for proton abstraction from the cation in [N(6,2,2,2)][NTf(2)] and [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP] is noted and this is thought to aid the electrochemical dimerization process. The resulting rapid reaction is thought to shift the reduction potentials for guanine and adenine to lower values than observed in RTILs where the scope for proton abstraction is not present. Such shifts are characteristic of so-called EC processes where reversible electron transfer

  14. Design and synthesis of novel adenine fluorescence probe based on Eu(III) complexes with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengyun; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Dou, Xuekai; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2017-02-24

    A novel adenine (Ad) fluorescence probe (Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine)) was designed and synthesized by improving experimental method based on the Eu(III) complex and dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. The dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand was first synthesized by the acylation action between dtpaa and guanine (Gu), and the corresponding Eu(III) complex was successfully prepared through heat-refluxing method with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. As a novel fluorescence probe, the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) complex can detect adenine (Ad) with characteristics of strong targeting, high specificity and high recognition ability. The detection mechanism of the adenine (Ad) using this probe in buffer solution was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy. When the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) was introduced to the adenine (Ad) solution, the fluorescence emission intensity was significantly enhanced. However, adding other bases such as guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) with similar composition and structure to that of adenine (Ad) to the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) solution, the fluorescence emission intensities are nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the interference of guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) on the detection of the adenine using Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) probe was also studied. It was found that presence of these bases does not affect the detection of adenine (Ad). A linear response of fluorescence emission intensities of Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) at 570nm as a function of adenine (Ad) concentration in the range of 0.00-5.00×10(-5)molL(-1) was observed. The detection limit is about 4.70×10(-7)molL(-1).

  15. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  16. Solution structures of oligonucleotides containing either a guanine or a cytosine in front of a gap of one nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Y.; Faibis, V.; Fazakerley, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    We report NMR and molecular modelling studies on two DNA duplexes containing a gap of one nucleotides. The difference between the two oligonucleotides lies in the central base face to the gap, a guanine or a cytosine. For the gapG, we observed in solution a B-form conformation where the guanine stacks in the helix. For the gapC, we reveal the existence of two species, one majority where the cytosine is inside the helix and a second for which the cytosine is extrahelical. Nous présentons une étude par RMN et modélisation moléculaire sur deux duplexes d'ADN contenant une lacune de un nucléotide. La différence entre les deux oligonucléotides réside dans la base centrale en face de la lacune, une guanine ou une cytosine. Pour le duplex appelé gapG, nous observons en solution une hélice de type B dans laquelle la guanine est empilée à l'intérieur de l'hélice. Dans le cas du duplex gapC, nous montrons l'existence de deux formes, l'une où la cytosine est à l'intérieur de l'hélice; la seconde où la cytosine est extra hélicale.

  17. Solvent effect on the anharmonic vibrational frequencies in guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, A.; Muntean, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    We present an ab initio study of the vibrational properties of cytosine and guanine in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations. The results are obtained by considering the DFT method together with the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) using PBE and B3PW91 exchange-correlation functionals and triple-ζ valence basis set. We investigate the importance of anharmonic corrections for the vibrational modes taking into account the solvent effect of the water environment. In particular, the unusual anharmonic effect of the H+ vibration in the case of the Hoogsteen base pair configuration is discussed.

  18. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine.

  19. Major and minor groove conformations of DNA trimers modified on guanine or adenine by 4-aminobiphenyl: Adenine adducts favor the minor groove

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.; Ellis, S.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the conformational effects of 4-aminobiphenyl modification at C-8 of guanine or adenine on double-stranded DNA trimers. We used sequences with the modified purine at the central base pair and all 16 possible neighboring sequences at the outer pairs. Minimized potential energy calculations were carried out using the molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to survey the conformation space of these adducts, using a total of 1280 starting structures both in the modified guanine series and in the modified adenine series. Conformer families in which the bound 4-aminobiphenyl was located in the DNA major groove, and in the minor groove, were located for both adenine and guanine modification. In the modified guanine series, the major and minor groove families were roughly comparable in energy, and the sequence context determined which was more stable in a particular case. In the modified adenine series, however, the minor groove structure was more that 10 kcal/mol more stable than the major groove for all sequences. As a result, minor groove adducts provided most of the global minima in the adenine-modified series. This result may be relevant to a previous mutagenesis study [Lasko et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15429-15435] in which the hot spot of most frequent occurrence was located at an adenine, in the sequence GAT. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  1. Particular behavior of the adenine and guanine ring-breathing modes upon the DNA conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Taillandier, E

    1988-06-01

    Harmonic dynamics calculations performed on the deoxyguanosine (dG) and deoxyadenosine (dA) residues, based on a reliable force field, show that the breathing motions of both guanine and adenine residues are involved in two different vibration modes (750-500 cm-1 spectral region). The calculated results reveal a strong coupling of these modes with the sugar pucker motions. This effect has been verified for the dG residue by the Raman spectra of polyd(G-C). As far as the dA residue is concerned, the particular behavior of the adenine residue breathing mode predicted by these calculations, has been confirmed by Raman spectra of polyd(A-T) undergoing a B----Z conformational transition.

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions.

  3. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  4. Adenine and guanine 8CH exchange in nucleic acids: resolution and measurement by Raman optical multichannel analysis.

    PubMed

    Lamba, O P; Becka, R; Thomas, G J

    Deuterium exchange of 8C protons of adenine and guanine in nucleic acids is conveniently monitored by laser Raman spectrophotometry, and the average exchange rate so determined [kA + kG] can be exploited as a dynamic probe of the secondary structure of DNA or RNA [J. M. Benevides and G. J. Thomas, Jr. (1985) Biopolymers 24, 667-682]. The present work describes a rapid Raman procedure, based upon optical multichannel analysis, which permits discrimination of the different 8CH exchange rates, kA of adenine and kG of guanine, in a single experimental protocol. For this procedure, simultaneous measurements are made of the intensity decay or frequency shift in separately resolved Raman bands of adenine and guanine, each of which is sensitive only to 8C deuteration of its respective purine. Resolution of the rates kA and kG is demonstrated for the mononucleotide mixtures, 5'-rAMP + 5'-rGMP and 5'-dAMP + 5'-dGMP, for the polynucleotides poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), for calf thymus DNA, and for the 17 base-pair operator OR3. We show that the different exchange rates of adenine and guanine, in nucleotide mixtures and in DNA, may also be calculated independently from intensity decay of the composite 1481-cm-1 band, comprising overlapped adenine and guanine components, over a time domain that encompasses two distinct regimes: (1) a relatively more rapid exchange of guanine, and (2) a concurrent slower exchange of adenine. Both methods developed here yield consistent results. We find, first, that exchange of guanine is approximately twofold more rapid than that of adenine when both purines are present in the same structure and solvent environment, presumably a consequence of the greater basicity of the 7N site of guanine. Second, we find that adenine suffers greater retardation of exchange than guanine when both purines are incorporated into a "classical" B-DNA secondary structure, such as that of calf thymus DNA. This finding suggests different

  5. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair.

  6. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen transfer mechanism in the guanine cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the quantum-dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the guanine-cytosine base pair. Due to the position of hydrogen atoms, different tautomers are possible: the stable Watson-Crick G-C, the imino-enol G*-C*, the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # and some zwitterionic structures. The common idea in the literature is that only the G-C and the G*-C* tautomers are stable with an estimate of G-C → G*-C* transition probability of 10 -6-10 -9 by the help of Boltzmann statistics. Here we show a detailed quantum theoretical study that suggests the following conclusion: G-C is the stablest tautomer, some partially charged systems (due to the movement of only one hydrogen atom) are important and a large amount of the imino-enol G*-C* (and less of the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # structure) tautomer is present at any time. The corresponding transition probabilities from different tautomers are not due to thermal passage, but they are a pure quantum phenomenon. These large probabilities definitively disprove the idea of these tautomers as mutation points. The mechanisms of passage from the G-C tautomer to the others have also been investigated.

  7. DNA duplex stability of the thio-iso-guanine•methyl-iso-Cytosine base pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkye; Switzer, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, incorporation into oligonucleotides, and base-pairing properties of the 2-thio-variant of iso-guanine. Iso-guanine is the purine component of a nonstandard base pair with 5-methyl-iso-cytosine. The 2-thio-iso-guanine • 5-methyl-iso-cytosine base pair is found to have similar stability to an adenine • thymine pair.

  8. Highly sensitive and synergistic detection of guanine and adenine based on poly(xanthurenic acid)-reduced graphene oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Kong, Qianqian; Li, Qianhe; Wang, Xinxing; Chen, Lihua; Jiao, Kui

    2014-07-23

    In order to achieve the large direct electrochemical signals of guanine and adenine, an urgent request to explore novel electrode materials and interfaces has been put forward. In this paper, a poly(xanthurenic acid, Xa)-reduced graphene oxide (PXa-ERGNO) interface, which has rich negatively charged active sites and accelerated electron transfer ability, was fabricated for monitoring the positively charged guanine and adenine. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and differential pulse voltammetry were adopted to characterize the morphology and prove the electrochemical properties of the prepared interface. The PXa-ERGNO interface with rich negative charge and large electrode surface area was an excellent sensing platform to prompt the adsorption of the positively charged guanine and adenine via strong π-π* interaction or electrostatic adsorption. The PXa-ERGNO interface exhibited prominent synergistic effect and good electrocatalytic activity for sensitive determination of guanine and adenine compared with sole PXa or ERGNO modified electrode. The sensing platform we built could be further applied in the adsorption and detection of other positively charged biomolecules or aromatic molecules.

  9. Structural and thermodynamic studies on the adenine.guanine mismatch in B-DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, G A; Booth, E D; Brown, T

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the synthetic dodecamer d(CGCAAATTGGCG) has been shown by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods to be that of a B-DNA helix containing two A(anti).G(syn) base pairs. The refinement, based on data to a resolution of 2.25 A shows that the mismatch base pairs are held together by two hydrogen bonds. The syn-conformation of the guanine base of the mismatch is stabilised by hydrogen bonding to a network of solvent molecules in both the major and minor grooves. A pH-dependent ultraviolet melting study indicates that the duplex is stabilised by protonation, suggesting that the bases of the A.G mispair are present in their most common tautomeric forms and that the N(1)-atom of adenine is protonated. The structure refinement shows that there is some disorder in the sugar-phosphate backbone. PMID:2216754

  10. Simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in ruminant bacterial pellets by ion-pair HPLC.

    PubMed

    García del Moral, Pilar; Arín, María Jesús; Resines, José Antonio; Díez, María Teresa

    2005-11-05

    An ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection was used to measure adenine (A) and guanine (G) in lyophilized bacterial pellets from ruminants using allopurinol as internal standard. The separation was performed on a Symmetry C18 column and the detection was monitored at 280 nm. Calibration curves were found to be linear in the concentration range from 5 to 50 mg/l with correlation coefficients (r2)>0.999. Mean recoveries of A and G standards added to bacterial samples were 102.2 and 98.2, respectively. The method proposed yielded sharp, well-resolved peaks within 25 min and was successfully applied for the determination of A and G in bacterial pellets.

  11. Double proton transfer in the isolated and DNA-embedded guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoete, Vincent; Meuwly, Markus

    2004-09-01

    The energetics and dynamics of double proton transfer (DPT) is investigated theoretically for the Watson-Crick conformation of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair. Using semiempirical density functional theory the isolated and DNA-embedded GC pair is considered. Differences in the energetics and dynamics of DPT thus addresses the question of how relevant studies of isolated base pairs are for the understanding of processes occurring in DNA. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces involving the transferring hydrogen atoms and the proton donors and acceptors are presented for both systems. The DPT reaction is accompanied by a contraction of the distance between the two bases with virtually identical energetic barriers being 18.8 and 18.7 kcal/mol for the isolated and DNA-embedded system, respectively. However, the transition state for DPT in the DNA-embedded GC pair is offset by 0.1 Å to larger N-H separation compared to the isolated GC pair. Using activated ab initio molecular dynamics, DPT is readily observed for the isolated base pair with a minimal amount of 21.4 kcal/mol of initial average kinetic energy along the DPT normal mode vector. On a time scale of ≈100 fs DPT has occurred and the excess energy is redistributed. For the DNA-embedded GC pair considerably more kinetic energy is required (30.0 kcal/mol) for DPT and the process is completed within one hydrogen vibration. The relevance of studies of isolated base pairs and base pair analogs in regard of reactions or properties involving DNA is discussed.

  12. The effects of tautomerization and protonation on the adenine-cytosine mismatches: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Hamid Reza; Bagheri, Sotoodeh; Abareghi, Mahsa

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the results of a theoretical study concerned with the question how tautomerization and protonation of adenine affect the various properties of adenine-cytosine mismatches. The calculations, in gas phase and in water, are performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In gas phase, it is observed that any tautomeric form of investigated mismatches is more stabilized when adenine is protonated. As for the neutral mismatches, the mismatches containing amino form of cytosine and imino form of protonated adenine are more stable. The role of aromaticity on the stability of tautomeric forms of mismatches is investigated by NICS(1)ZZ index. The stability of mispairs decreases by going from gas phase to water. It can be explained using dipole moment parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonds on the stability of mismatches is examined by atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. In addition to geometrical parameters and binding energies, the study of the topological properties of electron charge density aids in better understanding of these mispairs.

  13. Combined Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics study of the hydration of the guanine-cytosine base pair.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Kaline; Ludwig, Valdemir; Canuto, Sylvio

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of the hydration of the guanine-cytosine (GC) hydrogen-bonded complex. Using first principles density-functional theory, with gradient-corrected exchange-correlation and Monte Carlo simulation, we include thermal contribution, structural effects, solvent polarization, and the water-water and water-GC hydrogen bond interaction to show that the GC interaction in an aqueous environment is weakened to about 70% of the value obtained for an isolated complex. We also analyze in detail the preferred hydration sites of the GC pair and show that on the average it makes around five hydrogen bonds with water.

  14. Proton transfer in guanine-cytosine radical anion embedded in B-form DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Hsu, Sodio C N

    2009-11-04

    The electron-attachment-induced proton transfer in the guanine-cytosine (G:C) base pair is thought to be relevant to the issues of charge transport and radiation damage in DNA. However, our understanding on the reaction mainly comes from the data of isolated bases and base pairs, and the behavior of the reaction in the DNA duplex is not clear. In the present study, the proton-transfer reaction in reduced G:C stacks is investigated by quantum mechanical calculations with the aim to clarify how each environmental factor affects the proton transfer in G:C(*-). The calculations show that while the proton transfer in isolated G:C(*-) is exothermic with a small energetic barrier, it becomes endothermic with a considerably enhanced energetic barrier in G:C stacks. The substantial effect of G:C stacking is proved to originate from the electrostatic interactions between the dipole moments of outer G:C base pairs and the middle G:C(*-) base-pair radical anion; the extent of charge delocalization is very small and plays little role in affecting the proton transfer in G:C(*-). On the basis of the electrostatic model, the sequence dependence of the proton transfer in the ionized G:C base pair is predicted. In addition, the water molecules in the first hydration shell around G:C(*-) display a pronounced effect that facilitates the proton-transfer reaction; further consideration of bulk hydration only slightly lowers the energetic barrier and reaction energy. We also notice that the water arrangement around an embedded G:C(*-) is different from that around an isolated G:C(*-), which could result in a very different solvent effect on the energetics of the proton transfer. In contrast to the important influences of base stacking and hydration, the effects of sugar-phosphate backbone and counterions are found to be minor. Our calculations also reveal that a G:C base pair embedded in DNA is capable of accommodating two excess electrons only in bulk hydration; the resultant G(N1-H

  15. IR Vibrational spectra of H-bonded complexes of adenine, 2-aminopurine and 2-aminopurine+ with cytosine and thymine: Quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', O. O.; Hovorun, D. M.

    2011-11-01

    Using theoretical study on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, we have compared vibrational spectra of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protonated at N1 atom species) with adenine and H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protoned at N1 atom species) · cytosine or 2-aminopurine · thymine with adenine · cytosine and adenine · thymine base pairs. The nature of the base pairing between adenine, 2-aminopurine, 2-aminopurine+ and cytosine or thymine have been investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculations. We have investigated the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the vibrational spectra of the investigated base pairs. The main differences in the vibrational spectra as for bases so for base pairs have been observed in the high-frequency region.

  16. Overoxidized polypyrrole/graphene nanocomposite with good electrochemical performance as novel electrode material for the detection of adenine and guanine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Sha; Xu, Jing-Kun; Lu, Li-Min; Wu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Kai-Xin; Nie, Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Yao

    2014-12-15

    Most conducting polymer/graphene composites have excellent electrical conductivity. However, the background currents of these composites modified electrodes are much larger. In order to improve the sensitivities of these methods, it is necessary to decrease the background signal. In this paper, porous structure films of overoxidized polypyrrole/graphene (PPyox/GR) have been electrochemically coated onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and successfully utilized as an efficient electrode material for the quantitive detection of adenine and guanine, two of the most important components of DNA and RNA. The permselective polymer coatings with low background current could improve the selectivity and sensitivity of microelectrodes for the electropositive purine bases. The GRs into these polymers would further improve sensitivity by increasing the electroactive surface area. The electrochemical sensor can be applied to the quantification of adenine and guanine with a linear range covering 0.06-100 µM and 0.04-100 µM, and a low detection limit of 0.02 μM and 0.01 μM, respectively. More importantly, the proposed method was applied to quantify adenine and guanine in calf thymus DNA with satisfactory results.

  17. Electrochemical biosensor based on silver nanoparticles-polydopamine-graphene nanocomposite for sensitive determination of adenine and guanine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hai-Bo; Gan, Tian; Wu, Ying-Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2013-09-30

    A multifunctional Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs)-polydopamine (Pdop)@graphene (Gr) composite was prepared by a simple and mild procedure. Gr was easily coated with Pdop at room temperature and then AgNPs was deposited by mildly stirring. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Guanine and adenine as model moleculars were employed to study their electrochemical responses at the Ag-Pdop@Gr composite modified electrode, which showed more favorable electron transfer kinetics than Gr modified glassy carbon and AgNPs modified glassy carbon electrodes. The Ag-Pdop@Gr modified electrode exhibited linear ranges of 0.04-50 μM and 0.02-40 μM with detection limits of 4.0 nM and 2.0 nM for guanine and adenine, respectively. The developed method was applied for simultaneous determination of trace-level adenine and guanine in fish sperm. The results demonstrated that the AgNPs-Pdop@Gr nanocomposite was a promising substrate for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing.

  18. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  19. Following Ultrafast Radiationless Relaxation Dynamics With Strong Field Dissociative Ionization: A Comparison Between Adenine, Uracil, and Cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2011-03-22

    We present the application of ultrafast time- and mass-resolved ion yield laser spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations to track molecular excited-state dynamics. We discuss how molecular fragment ions can be associated with conformations the molecule assumes during its relaxation, and how various features of the pump-probe signal for those fragments can be used to infer details of the excited state dynamics. We present results for radiationless relaxation in DNA and RNA bases adenine, cytosine, and uracil in the gas phase, pumped near a one-photon resonance transition to an excited state, and probed via strong-field near-IR dissociative ionization.

  20. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds’ vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field. PMID:26999445

  1. A new rapid amplification of cDNA ends method for extremely guanine plus cytosine-rich genes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-09-15

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely used to determine the 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none addresses the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely guanine plus cytosine (GC)-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5' or 3' end of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first-strand cDNA synthesis at 70 degrees C with Thermo-X reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98 degrees C denaturation steps and Phusion DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The use of these conditions yielded 5'- and 3'-RACE products that were approximately 80% GC over 213 and 162bp, respectively, and included shorter internal regions of 82 to 89% GC.

  2. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  3. Metal-organic frameworks and β-cyclodextrin-based composite electrode for simultaneous quantification of guanine and adenine in a lab-on-valve manifold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Huanhuan; Wu, Yichun; Ge, Huali; Ye, Guiqin; Hu, Xiaoya

    2014-12-07

    In this work, a novel chemically modified electrode is constructed based on metal-organic frameworks and β-cyclodextrin (Cu3(BTC)2/β-CD, BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) composite material. The electrode was used for simultaneous determination of guanine and adenine in a sequential injection lab-on-valve format and exhibited sensitive responses to guanine and adenine oxidation due to the π-π stacking interaction of Cu3(BTC)2 and the inclusion behavior of β-CD. The analytical performance was assessed with respect to the supporting electrolyte and its pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential, and the fluid flow rates. Under optimal conditions, linear calibration ranges for both guanine and adenine were from 1.0 × 10(-7) to 1.0 × 10(-5) mol L(-1), and detection limits (S/N = 3) were found to be 5.2 × 10(-8) and 2.8 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The proposed sensor showed advantages of high sensitivity, simple sample preparation protocol, enhanced throughput and good reproducibility. Finally, the practical application of the proposed sensor has been performed for the determination of guanine and adenine in real samples with satisfactory results.

  4. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation and energy transfer in guanine-cytosine DNA double helices.

    PubMed

    Miannay, François-Alexandre; Bányász, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2007-11-28

    The DNA double helix poly(dGdC).poly(dGdC) is studied by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with femtosecond resolution. It is shown that the excited-state relaxation of the duplex is faster than that of the monomeric components dGMP and dCMP. This contrasts with the behavior of duplexes composed exclusively of adenine-thymine base pairs, for which an overall lengthening of the fluorescence lifetimes with respect to that of an equimolar mixture of dAMP and TMP was reported previously. Despite the difference in the excited-state deactivation rate between the two types of duplexes, the signature of ultrafast energy transfer is present in both of them. It is attested by the decrease of fluorescence anisotropy decay of the duplexes on the subpicosecond time scale, where molecular motions are inhibited, and is corroborated by the fact that their steady-state fluorescence spectra do not change with the excitation wavelength. Energy transfer involves excited states delocalized over at least two bases, whose existence is revealed by the UV absorption spectrum of the duplex, clearly different from that of an equimolar spectrum of dGMP and dCMP.

  5. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Baocheng; Xiong, Yong; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2010-11-22

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3{prime} end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5{prime}-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5{prime}-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3{prime} hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  6. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    B Pan; Y Xiong; T Steitz

    2011-12-31

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3' end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5'-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3' hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  7. Theoretical study of the protonation of the one-electron-reduced guanine-cytosine base pair by water.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sodio C N; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2013-02-21

    Prototropic equilibria in ionized DNA play an important role in charge transport and radiation damage of DNA and, therefore, continue to attract considerable attention. Although it is well-established that electron attachment will induce an interbase proton transfer from N1 of guanine (G) to N3 of cytosine (C), the question of whether the surrounding water in the major and minor grooves can protonate the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair still remains open. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the energetics and mechanism for the protonation of the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair by water. Through the calculations of thermochemical cycles, the protonation free energies were estimated to be in the range of 11.6-14.2 kcal/mol. The calculations for the models of C(•-)(H(2)O)(8) and G(-H1)(-)(H(2)O)(16), which were used to simulate the detailed processes of protonation by water before and after the interbase proton transfer, respectively, revealed that the protonation proceeds through a concerted double proton transfer involving the water molecules in the first and second hydration shells. Comparing the present results with the rates of interbase proton transfer and charge transfer along DNA suggests that protonation on the C(•-) moiety is not competitive with interbase proton transfer, but the possibility of protonation on the G(-H1)(-) moiety after interbase proton transfer cannot be excluded. Electronic-excited-state calculations were also carried out by the time-dependent DFT approach. This information is valuable for experimental identification in the future.

  8. DNA-directed aniline mustards with high selectivity for adenine or guanine bases: mutagenesis in a variety of Salmonella typhimurium strains differing in DNA-repair capability.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Denny, W A; Boritzki, T J

    1994-04-01

    Two closely-related aniline monomustards (1 and 2), linked to a DNA-targeting acridine chromophore by a linker chain of different length, show high selectivity for alkylation of polymer DNA. The shorter-chain derivative (2) alkylates mainly at guanine N7 sites, while the longer-chain analogue (1) reacts almost exclusively at adenine N1. The biological effects of these compounds have been studied in standard Ames Salmonella typhimurium strains in order to determine the mutagenic consequences of such well-defined DNA lesions, and the effect of DNA-repair systems on them. Both compounds caused detectable mutations in strains TA1537, TA98 or TA100 and some related strains. Mutation rates were greatly enhanced in strains carrying either a uvrB deletion or the plasmid pKM101. Frameshift mutagenesis by both compounds was completely eliminated by recA deletion, in both the presence or absence of the plasmid. The adenine-selective compound (1) appeared more sensitive to the DNA-repair defects than the guanine-selective derivative (2). Additionally, only the adenine-selective compound (1) caused statistically significant levels of detectable mutation in the repair-proficient strains TA102, TA4001 or TA4006. The bacterial mutagenesis evidence suggests that a bulky, major groove-residing adenine lesion may be more readily recognised by DNA-repair systems, and more likely to lead to a wider range of mutagenic events, than a similar guanine lesion.

  9. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-14

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  10. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  11. Electron transfer from aromatic amino acids to guanine and adenine radical cations in pi stacked and T-shaped complexes.

    PubMed

    Butchosa, Cristina; Simon, Sílvia; Voityuk, Alexander A

    2010-04-21

    Similar redox properties of the natural nucleobases and aromatic amino acids make it possible for electron transfer (ET) to occur between these sites in protein-nucleic acid complexes. Using DFT calculations, we estimate the ET rate from aromatic amino acid X (X = Phe, His, Tyr and Trp) to radical cations of guanine (G) and adenine (A) in dimers G-X and A-X with different arrangement of the subunits. We show that irrespective of the mutual orientation of the aromatic rings, the electronic interaction in the systems is strong enough to ensure effective ET from X to G(+) or A(+). Surprisingly, relatively high ET rates are found in T-shaped dimers. This suggests that pi stacking of nucleobases and aromatic amino acids is not required for feasible ET. In most complexes [G-X](+) and [A-X](+), we find the excess charge to be confined to a single site, either the nucleobase or amino acid X. Then, conformational changes may initiate migration of the radical cation state from the nucleobase to X and back. The ET process from Trp and Tyr to G(+) is found to be faster than deprotonation of G(+). Because the last reaction may lead to the formation of highly mutagenic species, the efficient repair of G(+) may play an important role in the protection of genomic DNA from oxidative damage.

  12. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene) 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Parveen, Shamima

    2006-01-01

    The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene) 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2), was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH(4). Cu(II) (3) and Zn(II) (4) complexes of (2) were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5) and (6). All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu(II) atom, while the Sn(IV) atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5) exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N(7) position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k(obs), values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5) in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E(pa) and E(pc) values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5) with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E(1/2) has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  13. Universal 1/f noise, crossovers of scaling exponents, and chromosome-specific patterns of guanine-cytosine content in DNA sequences of the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentian; Holste, Dirk

    2005-04-01

    Spatial fluctuations of guanine and cytosine base content (GC%) are studied by spectral analysis for the complete set of human genomic DNA sequences. We find that (i) 1/fα decay is universally observed in the power spectra of all 24 chromosomes, and (ii) the exponent α≈1 extends to about 107 bases, one order of magnitude longer than has previously been observed. We further find that (iii) almost all human chromosomes exhibit a crossover from α1≈1 (1/fα1) at lower frequency to α2<1 (1/fα2) at higher frequency, typically occurring at around 30 000-100 000 bases, while (iv) the crossover in this frequency range is virtually absent in human chromosome 22. In addition to the universal 1/fα noise in power spectra, we find (v) several lines of evidence for chromosome-specific correlation structures, including a 500 000 base long oscillation in human chromosome 21. The universal 1/fα spectrum in the human genome is further substantiated by a resistance to reduction in variance of guanine and cytosine content when the window size is increased.

  14. Excess-electron injection and transfer in terthiophene-modified DNA: terthiophene as a photosensitizing electron donor for thymine, cytosine, and adenine.

    PubMed

    Park, Man Jae; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-02-13

    Excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has attracted wide attention owing to its close relation to DNA repair and nanowires. To clarify the dynamics of EET in DNA, a photosensitizing electron donor that can donate an excess electron to a variety of DNA sequences has to be developed. Herein, a terthiophene (3T) derivative was used as the photosensitizing electron donor. From the dyad systems in which 3T was connected to a single nucleobase, it was revealed that (1) 3T* donates an excess electron efficiently to thymine, cytosine, and adenine, despite adenine being a well-known hole conductor. The free-energy dependence of the electron-transfer rate was explained on the basis of the Marcus theory. From the DNA hairpins, it became clear that (1) 3T* can donate an excess electron not only to the adjacent nucleobase but also to the neighbor one nucleobase further along and so on. From the charge-injection rate, the possibilities of smaller β value and/or charge delocalization were discussed. In addition, EET through consecutive cytosine nucleobases was suggested.

  15. Structural dynamics and cation interactions of DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed guanine/cytosine quartets revealed by large-scale MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Spacková, N; Berger, I; Sponer, J

    2001-04-11

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study G-DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed GCGC and all-guanine GGGG quartet layers. Incorporation of mixed GCGC quartets into G-DNA stems substantially enhances their sequence variability. The mixed quadruplexes form rigid assemblies that require integral monovalent cations for their stabilization. The interaction of cations with the all-guanine quartets is the leading contribution for the stability of the four-stranded assemblies, while the mixed quartets are rather tolerated within the structure. The simulations predict that two cations are preferred to stabilize a four-layer quadruplex stem composed of two GCGC and two all-guanine quartets. The distribution of cations in the structure is influenced by the position of the GCGC quartets within the quadruplex, the presence and arrangement of thymidine loops connecting the guanine/cytosine stretches forming the stems, and the cation type present (Na(+) or K(+)). The simulations identify multiple nanosecond-scale stable arrangements of the thymidine loops present in the molecules investigated. In these thymidine loops, several structured pockets are identified capable of temporarily coordinating cations. However, no stable association of cations to a loop has been observed. The simulations reveal several paths through the thymidine loop regions that can be followed by the cations when exchanging between the central ion channel in the quadruplex stem and the surrounding solvent. We have carried out 20 independent simulations while the length of simulations reaches a total of 90 ns, rendering this study one of the most extensive MD investigations carried out on nucleic acids so far. The trajectories provide a largely converged characterization of the structural dynamics of these four-stranded G-DNA molecules.

  16. Refinement of DNA structures through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis: applications on guanine and cytosine nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hua, Weijie; Gao, Bin; Li, Shuhua; Agren, Hans; Luo, Yi

    2010-10-21

    In this work we highlight the potential of NEXAFS—near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure—analysis to perform refinements of hydrogen-bond structure in DNA. For this purpose we have carried out first-principle calculations of the N1s NEXAFS spectra of the guanine and cytosine nucleobases and their tautomers, nucleosides, and nucleotides in the gas phase, as well as for five crystal structures of guanine, cytosine, or guanosine. The spectra all clearly show imine (π1*) and amine (π2*) nitrogen absorption bands with a characteristic energy difference (Δ). Among all of the intramolecule covalent connections, the tautomerism of hydrogens makes the largest influence, around ±0.4−0.5 eV change of Δ, to the spectra due to a switch of single−double bonds. Deoxyribose and ribose sugars can cause at most 0.2 eV narrowing of Δ, while the phosphate groups have nearly negligible effects on the spectra. Two kinds of intermolecule interactions are analyzed, the hydrogen bonds and the stacking effect, by comparing “compressed” and “expanded” models or by comparing models including or excluding the nearest stacking molecules. The shortening of hydrogen-bond length by 0.2−0.3 Å can result in the reduction of Δ by 0.2−0.8 eV. This is because the hydrogen bonds make the electrons more delocalized, and the amine and imine nitrogens become less distinguishable. Moreover, the hydrogen bond has a different ability to influence the spectra of different crystals, with guanine crystals as the largest (change by 0.8 eV) and the guanosine crystal as the smallest (change by 0.2 eV). The stacking has negligible effects on the spectra in all studied systems. A comparison of guanosine to guanine crystals shows that the sugars in the crystal could create “blocks” in the π-and hydrogen bonds network of bases and thus makes the imine and amine nitrogens more distinguishable with a larger Δ. Our theoretical calculations offer a good match with experimental findings

  17. cis-[Pt(NH 3) 2] 2+ coordination to the N7 and O6 sites of a guanine-cytosine pair: disruption of the Watson-Crick H-bonding pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelmenschikov, Alexander; Zilberberg, Igor; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Famulari, Antonino; Sironi, Maurizio; Raimondi, Mario

    1999-12-01

    The coordination of cis-[Pt(NH 3) 2] 2+ to the N7 and O6 sites of guanine of the guanine-cytosine (GC) nucleic base pair is studied at the SCF, DFT and MP2 levels of theory, and by an ab initio BSSE-free optimization algorithm, concerning the possible mechanisms of the antitumor activity of cis-[Pt(NH 3) 2Cl 2]. The calculations show that the cis-[Pt(NH 3) 2] 2+ coordination results in the breakage of the (cytosine)N4-H-O6(guanine) H-bond and a substantial non-planarity of the GC moiety. From an analysis of the electrostatic potential at the O6, N1-H and N2-H sites of cis-[Pt(NH 3) 2G] 2+ we can explain the predicted changes in geometry and binding energy of the GC complex.

  18. Photoinduced electron detachment and proton transfer: the proposal for alternative path of formation of triplet states of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) pair.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-02-12

    A viable pathway is proposed for the formation of the triplet state of the GC Watson-Crick base pair. It includes the following steps: (a) a low-energy electron is captured by cytosine in the GC pair, forming the cytosine base-centered radical anion GC(-•); and (b) photoradiation with energy around 5 eV initiates the electron detachment from either cytosine (in the gas phase) or guanine (in aqueous solutions). This triggers interbase proton transfer from G to C, creating the triplet state of the GC pair. Double proton transfer involving the triplet state of GC pair leads to the formation of less stable tautomer G(N2-H)(•)C(O2H)(•). Tautomerization is accomplished through a double proton transfer process in which one proton at the N3 of C(H)(•) migrates to the N1 of G(-H)(•); meanwhile, the proton at the N2 of G transfers to the O2 of C. This process is energetically viable; the corresponding activation energy is around 12-13 kcal/mol. The base-pairing energy of the triplet is found to be ∼3-5 kcal/mol smaller than that of the singlet state. Thus, the formation of the triplet state GC pair in DNA double strand only slightly weakens its stability. The obtained highly reactive radicals are expected to cause serious damage in the DNA involved in biochemical processes, such as DNA replication where radicals are exposed in the single strands.

  19. Mapping structurally defined guanine oxidation products along DNA duplexes: influence of local sequence context and endogenous cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Xun; Matter, Brock; Song, Matthew; Veliath, Elizabeth; Shanley, Ryan; Jones, Roger; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2014-03-19

    DNA oxidation by reactive oxygen species is nonrandom, potentially leading to accumulation of nucleobase damage and mutations at specific sites within the genome. We now present the first quantitative data for sequence-dependent formation of structurally defined oxidative nucleobase adducts along p53 gene-derived DNA duplexes using a novel isotope labeling-based approach. Our results reveal that local nucleobase sequence context differentially alters the yields of 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxal-5-one (Z) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (OG) in double stranded DNA. While both lesions are overproduced within endogenously methylated (Me)CG dinucleotides and at 5' Gs in runs of several guanines, the formation of Z (but not OG) is strongly preferred at solvent-exposed guanine nucleobases at duplex ends. Targeted oxidation of (Me)CG sequences may be caused by a lowered ionization potential of guanine bases paired with (Me)C and the preferential intercalation of riboflavin photosensitizer adjacent to (Me)C:G base pairs. Importantly, some of the most frequently oxidized positions coincide with the known p53 lung cancer mutational "hotspots" at codons 245 (GGC), 248 (CGG), and 158 (CGC) respectively, supporting a possible role of oxidative degradation of DNA in the initiation of lung cancer.

  20. Toward electrochemical resolution of two genes on one electrode: using 7-deaza analogues of guanine and adenine to prepare PCR products with differential redox activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ivana V; Ropp, Patricia A; Thorp, H Holden

    2002-01-15

    The 7-deaza analogues of guanine and adenine were incorporated into polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products by substitution of the appropriate nucleotide triphosphates into the reaction. These PCR products can be immobilized on ITO electrodes and detected by catalytic cyclic voltammetry with ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. Immobilization on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes of 330- and 1200-base pair (bp) PCR amplicons from the E. coli dacA gene containing one or both of the 7-deazapurines was effected by precipitation from a 9:1 DMF/acetate solution. Amplicons containing the 7-deazaguanine base were detected by observing current enhancement in the cyclic voltammogram of Ru(dmb)3(3)+/2+ (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) due to the selective oxidation of the modified base by this mediator. Oxidation of incorporated 7-deazaadenine bases in addition to native guanines gives rise to a higher current enhancement in the cyclic voltammogram of Ru(bpy)3(3)+/2+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) compared to the enhancement observed in the presence of guanine only. This strategy was employed to simultaneously detect the 330-bp sequence containing 7-deazaadenine and the 1200-bp sequence containing 7-deazaguanine on the same ITO electrode. Such a strategy may provide a means for detecting multiple genes on a single microlocation and may thereby lead to more highly multiplexed gene assays.

  1. Higher order structural effects stabilizing the reverse Watson-Crick Guanine-Cytosine base pair in functional RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Mohit; Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Oliva, Romina; Cavallo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The G:C reverse Watson-Crick (W:W trans) base pair, also known as Levitt base pair in the context of tRNAs, is a structurally and functionally important base pair that contributes to tertiary interactions joining distant domains in functional RNA molecules and also participates in metabolite binding in riboswitches. We previously indicated that the isolated G:C W:W trans base pair is a rather unstable geometry, and that dicationic metal binding to the Guanine base or posttranscriptional modification of the Guanine can increase its stability. Herein, we extend our survey and report on other H-bonding interactions that can increase the stability of this base pair. To this aim, we performed a bioinformatics search of the PDB to locate all the occurencies of G:C trans base pairs. Interestingly, 66% of the G:C trans base pairs in the PDB are engaged in additional H-bonding interactions with other bases, the RNA backbone or structured water molecules. High level quantum mechanical calculations on a data set of representative crystal structures were performed to shed light on the structural stability and energetics of the various crystallographic motifs. This analysis was extended to the binding of the preQ1 metabolite to a preQ1-II riboswitch.

  2. Analysis of peroxynitrite reactions with guanine, xanthine, and adenine nucleosides by high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection: C8-nitration and -oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sodum, R S; Fiala, E S

    2001-04-01

    Peroxynitrite, the reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide anion, and a powerful oxidant, was found to nitrate as well as oxidize adenine, guanine, and xanthine nucleosides. A highly sensitive reverse-phase HPLC method with a dual-mode electrochemical detector, which reduces the nitro product at the first electrode and detects the reduced product by oxidation at the second electrode, was applied to detect femtomole levels of 8-nitroguanine and 8-nitroxanthine. This method was used to separate and identify the products of nitration and oxidation from the reactions of nucleosides with peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite nitrates deoxyguanosine at neutral pH to give the very unstable 8-nitrodeoxyguanosine, in addition to 8-nitroguanine. 8-Nitrodeoxyguanosine, with a half-life of approximately 10 min at room temperature and guanine nucleosides, adenine nucleosides undergo peroxynitrite-mediated C8 oxidation even at neutral pH to give the corresponding 8-oxoadenine nucleosides in approximately 0.3% yield. Adenine nitration, though minor compared to C8-oxidation, appears to occur at both C2 and C8 positions of the adenine ring. Lowering the

  3. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 9 by chronic intraventricular unmethylated cytosine-guanine DNA infusion causes neuroinflammation and impaired spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Ebert, Sandra; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Reich, Arno; Nau, Roland; Gerber, Joachim

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial DNA contains a high frequency of unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs that have strong immunostimulatory properties; they are recognized by mammalian Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Because accumulating data suggest that chronic inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, we hypothesized that inflammatory responses stimulated by CpG DNA might contribute to neurodegeneration and brain dysfunction. To assess the effects of continuous CpG DNA exposure in the brain, C57BL/6 (n = 21) and TLR9-deficient mice (n = 15) were given intracerebroventricular infusions of CpG DNA or saline for 28 days. Spatial memory assessed weekly by Morris water maze demonstrated impairment in CpG-treated wild-type mice but not in TLR9-deficient or control-treated mice. Motor function was not affected. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed marked microglial activation and acute axonal damage surrounding the ventricles, ependymal disruption, and reactive astrogliosis within the hippocampal formation in the CpG-treated wild-type but not TLR9-deficient mice or saline-infused controls. These results suggest that the unfavorable effects of CpG DNA are dependent on TLR9 signaling and that exposure to bacterial DNA may contribute to impaired neural function, neuroinflammation, and subsequent neurodegeneration.

  4. The influence of anharmonic and solvent effects on the theoretical vibrational spectra of the guanine-cytosine base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations.

    PubMed

    Bende, Attila; Muntean, Cristina M

    2014-03-01

    The theoretical IR and Raman spectra of the guanine-cytosine DNA base pairs in Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations were computed using DFT method with M06-2X meta-hybrid GGA exchange-correlation functional, including the anharmonic corrections and solvent effects. The results for harmonic frequencies and their anharmonic corrections were compared with our previously calculated values obtained with the B3PW91 hybrid GGA functional. Significant differences were obtained for the anharmonic corrections calculated with the two different DFT functionals, especially for the stretching modes, while the corresponding harmonic frequencies did not differ considerable. For the Hoogtseen case the H⁺ vibration between the G-C base pair can be characterized as an asymmetric Duffing oscillator and therefore unrealistic anharmonic corrections for normal modes where this proton vibration is involved have been obtained. The spectral modification due to the anharmonic corrections, solvent effects and the influence of sugar-phosphate group for the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations, respectively, were also discussed. For the Watson-Crick case also the influence of the stacking interaction on the theoretical IR and Raman spectra was analyzed. Including the anharmonic correction in our normal mode analysis is essential if one wants to obtain correct assignments of the theoretical frequency values as compared with the experimental spectra.

  5. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  6. Electrocatalytic activity of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets enhanced by self-doped polyaniline for highly sensitive and synergistic determination of adenine and guanine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Yang, Ruirui; Chen, Huaiyin; Nan, Fuxin; Ge, Tong; Jiao, Kui

    2015-02-04

    Recently, easy, green, and low-cost liquild exfoliation of bulk materials to obtain thin-layered nanostructure significantly emerged. In this work, thin-layered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets were fabricated through intercalation of self-doped polyaniline (SPAN) to layer space of bulk MoS2 by ultrasonic exfoliating method to effectively prevent reaggregation of MoS2 nanosheets. The obtained hybrid showed specific surface area, a large number of electroactive species, and open accessible space, accompanied by rich negative charged and special conjugated structure, which was applied to adopt positively charged guanine and adenine, based on their strong π-π* interactions and electrostatic adsorption. Also, the SPAN-MoS2 interface exhibited the synergistic effect and good electrocatalytic activity compared with the sole SPAN or MoS2 modified electrode.

  7. Photophysical properties of pyrrolocytosine, a cytosine fluorescent base analogue†

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh L.; Spata, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    The photophysical behavior of pyrrolocytosine (PC), a fluorescent base analogue of cytosine, has been investigated using theoretical approaches. The similarities between the PC and cytosine structures allow PC to maintain the pseudo-Watson–Crick base-pairing arrangement with guanine. Cytosine, similar to the other natural nucleobases, is practically non-fluorescent, because of ultrafast radiationless decay occurring through conical intersections. PC displays a much higher fluorescence quantum yield than cytosine, making it an effective fluorescent marker to study the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA/RNA complexes. Similar to 2-aminopurine, a constitutional isomer of adenine that base-pairs with thymine, PC's fluorescence is quenched when it is incorporated into a dinucleotide or a trinucleotide. In this work we examine the photophysical properties of isolated PC, microhydrated PC, as well as, complexes where PC is either base-stacked or hydrogen-bonded with guanine. Our results indicate that hydration affects the radiationless decay pathways in PC by destabilizing conical intersections. The calculations of dimers and trimers show that the radiative decay is affected by π stacking, while the presence of charge transfer states between PC and guanine may contribute to radiationless decay. PMID:27251599

  8. Purine metabolite and energy charge analysis of Trypanosoma brucei cells in different growth phases using an optimized ion-pair RP-HPLC/UV for the quantification of adenine and guanine pools.

    PubMed

    Graven, Patricia; Tambalo, Margherita; Scapozza, Leonardo; Perozzo, Remo

    2014-06-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Although trypanosomes are well-studied model organisms, only little is known about their adenine and guanine nucleotide pools. Besides being building blocks of RNA and DNA, these nucleotides are also important modulators of diverse biochemical cellular processes. Adenine nucleotides also play an important role in the regulation of metabolic energy. The energetic state of cells is evaluated by the energy charge which gives information about how much energy is available in form of high energy phosphate bonds of adenine nucleotides. A sensitive and reproducible ion-pair RP-HPLC/UV method was developed and optimized, allowing the quantification of guanine and adenine nucleosides/nucleotides in T. brucei. With this method, the purine levels and their respective ratios were investigated in trypanosomes during logarithmic, stationary and senescent growth phases. Results of this study showed that all adenine and guanine purines under investigation were in the low mM range. The energy charge was found to decrease from logarithmic to static and to senescent phase whereas AMP/ATP, ADP/ATP and GDP/GTP ratios increased in the same order. In addition, the AMP/ATP ratio varied as the square of the ADP/ATP ratio, indicating AMP to be the key energy sensor molecule in trypanosomes.

  9. Binding effects of Mn²⁺ and Zn²⁺ ions on the vibrational properties of guanine-cytosine base pairs in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations.

    PubMed

    Morari, Cristian; Bogdan, Diana; Muntean, Cristina M

    2012-11-01

    The binding effects of Mn²⁺ and Zn²⁺ ions on the vibrational properties of guanine-cytosine base pairs have been performed using density functional theory investigations. The calculations were carried out on Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations of the base pairs. We have found, that in Watson-Crick configuration, the metal is coordinated to N7 atom of guanine while, in the case of Hoogsteen configuration, the coordination is at N3 atom of guanine. We have pointed out the vibrational bands that can be used to detect the presence of metallic ions in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen structures. Our results show that the vibrational amplitudes of metallic atoms are strong for wavenumbers lower than 600 cm⁻¹. Also, we predict that the distinction between Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen configurations can be seen around 85, 170 and 310 cm⁻¹.

  10. Cloning and characterization of two tandemly arranged DNA methyltransferase genes of Neisseria lactamica: an adenine-specific M.NlaIII and a cytosine-type methylase.

    PubMed

    Labbé, D; Höltke, H J; Lau, P C

    1990-10-01

    The gene encoding the Neisseria lactamica III DNA methyltransferase (M.NlaIII) which recognizes the sequence CATG has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequencing of a 3.125 kb EcoRI-PstI fragment localizes the M. NlaIII gene to a 334 codon open reading frame (ORF) and identifies, 468 bp downstream, a second ORF of 313 amino acids, which is referred to as M.NlaX. Both proteins are detectable in the E. coli coupled in vitro transcription-translation system; they are apparently expressed from separate N. lactamica promoters. The N-terminal half of the previously characterized M.FokI, which methylates adenine in one of the DNA strands with its asymmetric recognition sequence (GGATG), is found to have 41% sequence identity and a further 11.7% sequence similarity with M.NlaIII. Among the conserved amino acids is the wellknown DPPY sequence motif. With one exception, analysis of the nucleotides coding for the DP dipeptide in all known DPPY sequences shows the presence of an inherent DNA adenine methylation (dam) recognition site of GATC. A low level of expression of M.NlaX in E. coli prevents the elucidation of its sequence recognition specificity. Sequence analysis of M.NlaX shows that it is closely related to the group of monospecific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoRII, Dcm, M.HpaII and M.HhaI) which all have a modified cytosine at the second position of the recognition sequences. Both M.EcoRII and Dcm amino acid sequences are about 50% identical with M.NlaX; a considerable degree of sequence identity is found in the so-called variable region which is believed to be responsible for sequence recognition specificity. M.NlaX is probably the counterpart to the E. coli Dcm in N. lactamica.

  11. Cytosine-Phosphorothionate-Guanine Oligodeoxynucleotides Exacerbates Hemophagocytosis by Inducing Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Production in Mice after Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Guo, Yong-Mei; Onai, Nobuyuki; Ohyagi, Hideaki; Hirokawa, Makoto; Takahashi, Naoto; Tagawa, Hiroyuki; Ubukawa, Kumi; Kobayashi, Isuzu; Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Sawada, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is treated with some benefit derived from TNF-α inhibitors. However, the mechanisms of how HPS occurs and how a TNF-α inhibitor exerts some benefit to HPS management have remained unclear. We evaluated the effect of toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, especially focusing on cytosine-phosphorothionate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG), a TLR9 ligand, on HPS in mice that underwent transplantation with syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells (Syn-BMT, Allo-BMT), or with allogeneic BM cells plus splenocytes to promote graft-versus-host disease (GVHD mice). Hemophagocytosis was a common feature early after all BMT, but it subsided in Syn-BMT and Allo-BMT mice. In GVHD mice, however, hemophagocytosis persisted and was accompanied by upregulated production of IFN-γ but not TNF-α, and it was suppressed by blockade of IFN-γ but not TNF-α. A single injection of the TLR9 ligand CpG promoted HPS in all BMT mice and was lethal in GVHD mice, accompanied by greatly upregulated production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ. Blocking of TNF-α, but not IL-6 or IFN-γ, suppressed CpG-induced HPS in all BMT mice and rescued GVHD mice from CpG-induced mortality. Thus, TLR9 signaling mediates TNF-α-driven HPS in BMT mice and is effectively treated through TNF-α inhibition.

  12. Determination of guanine and adenine by high-performance liquid chromatography with a self-fabricated wall-jet/thin-layer electrochemical detector at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaping; Yan, Hongling; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive wall-jet/thin-layer amperometric electrochemical detector (ECD) coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for simultaneous determination of guanine (G) and adenine (A). The analytes were detected at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the HPLC-ECD calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.997) under optimized conditions. Limits of detection for G and A are 0.6 nM and 1.4 nM (S/N=3), respectively, which are lower than those obtained with an UV-vis detector and a commercial electrochemical detector. We have successfully applied this HPLC-ECD to assess the contents of G and A in hydrochloric acid-digested calf thymus double-stranded DNA. In addition, we compared in detail the analysis of G and A by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and by the HPLC-ECD system on both bare GCE and electroreduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified GCE. We found that the adsorption of G and A on the electrode surfaces can vary their anodic CV peaks and the competitive adsorption of G and A on the limited sites of the electrode surfaces can cause crosstalk effects on their anodic CV peak signals, but the HPLC-ECD system is insensitive to such electrode-adsorption and can give more reliable analytical results.

  13. Expression and Function of Different Guanine-Plus-Cytosine Content 16S rRNA Genes in Haloarcula hispanica at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yu; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica harbors three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons (rrnA, rrnB, and rrnC) that contain the 16S rRNA genes rrsA, rrsB, and rrsC, respectively. Although rrsB and rrsC (rrsBC) have almost identical sequences, the rrsA and rrsBC sequences differ by 5.4%, and they differ by 2.5% with respect to guanine-plus-cytosine content (PGC). The strong correlation between the typical growth temperatures of archaea and PGC of their 16S rRNA genes suggests that H. hispanica may harbor different 16S rRNA genes having different PGC to maintain rapid growth in a wide range of temperatures. We therefore performed reverse transcription-coupled quantitative PCR to assess expression levels of rrsA (PGC, 58.9%) and rrsBC (PGC, 56.4–56.5%) at various temperatures. The expression ratio of rrsA to rrsBC increased with culture temperature. Mutants with complete deletions of one or two of the three rRNA operons were constructed and their growth rates at different temperatures compared to that of the wild-type. The growth characteristics of the rRNA operon single-mutant strains were indistinguishable from the wild-type. The rRNA operon double-mutant strains maintained the same temperature range as wild-type but displayed reduced growth rates. In particular, the double-mutant strains grew much slower than wild-type at low temperature related to minimum growth temperature of the wild-type. On the other hand, at physiologically high temperatures the wild-type and the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnA with high-PGC rrsA grew significantly faster than the double-mutant strain which harbors only rrnC with low-PGC rrsC. These findings suggest the importance of 16S rRNAs transcribed from rrsA with high-PGC in maintaining rapid growth of this halophilic archaeon at raised growth temperatures.

  14. APOBEC3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both sequence context and single-stranded DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Colleen M; Sadler, Holly A; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-07-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3G (i.e., APOBEC3G or A3G) is an evolutionarily conserved cytosine deaminase that potently restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), retrotransposons and other viruses. A3G has a nucleotide target site specificity for cytosine dinucleotides, though only certain cytosine dinucleotides are 'hotspots' for cytosine deamination, and others experience little or no editing by A3G. The factors that define these critical A3G hotspots are not fully understood. To investigate how A3G hotspots are defined, we used an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based oligonucleotide assay to probe the site specificity of A3G. Our findings strongly suggest that the target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) secondary structure as well as the bases directly 3' and 5' of the cytosine dinucleotide are critically important A3G recognition. For instance, A3G cannot readily deaminate a cytosine dinucleotide in ssDNA stem structures or in nucleotide base loops composed of three bases. Single-stranded nucleotide loops up to seven bases in length were poor targets for A3G activity unless cytosine residues flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Furthermore, we observed that A3G favors adenines, cytosines and thymines flanking the cytosine dinucleotide target in unstructured regions of ssDNA. Low cytosine deaminase activity was detected when guanines flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Taken together, our findings provide the first demonstration that A3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both the sequence context of the cytosine dinucleotide target as well as the ssDNA secondary structure. This knowledge can be used to better trace the origins of mutations to A3G activity, and illuminate its impact on processes such as HIV-1 genetic variation.

  15. IPPP-CLOPPA Analysis of the Influence of the Methylation on the Potential Energy and the Molecular Polarizability of the Hydrogen Bonds in the Cytosine-Guanine Base Pair.

    PubMed

    Giribet, Claudia G; Ruiz de Azua, Martin C

    2017-03-28

    The IPPP-CLOPPA method is applied to investigate the influence of a methyl group on the energy of the hydrogen bonds and the potential energy curve of the bridge protons in model compounds which mimic the methylated and unmethylated cytosine guanine base pairs. On the same grounds, this influence on the polarizability of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds of these compounds is also addressed, in order to determine if this linear response property provides a significant proof of the electronic mechanisms that affect the stabilization of the hydrogen bonds. Results obtained show that the methyl electronic system delocalizes on the hydrogen bond region, and changes of these intermolecular hydrogen bonds are due to this effect of delocalization.

  16. pH-Modulated Watson-Crick duplex-quadruplex equilibria of guanine-rich and cytosine-rich DNA sequences 140 base pairs upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site.

    PubMed

    Bucek, Pavel; Jaumot, Joaquim; Aviñó, Anna; Eritja, Ramon; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2009-11-23

    Guanine-rich regions of DNA are sequences capable of forming G-quadruplex structures. The formation of a G-quadruplex structure in a region 140 base pairs (bp) upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site was recently proposed (Fernando et al., Biochemistry, 2006, 45, 7854). In the present study, the acid-base equilibria and the thermally induced unfolding of the structures formed by a guanine-rich region and by its complementary cytosine-rich strand in c-kit were studied by means of circular dichroism and molecular absorption spectroscopies. In addition, competition between the Watson-Crick duplex and the isolated structures was studied as a function of pH value and temperature. Multivariate data analysis methods based on both hard and soft modeling were used to allow accurate quantification of the various acid-base species present in the mixtures. Results showed that the G-quadruplex and i-motif coexist with the Watson-Crick duplex over the pH range from 3.0 to 6.5, approximately, under the experimental conditions tested in this study. At pH 7.0, the duplex is practically the only species present.

  17. A new microplatform based on titanium dioxide nanofibers/graphene oxide nanosheets nanocomposite modified screen printed carbon electrode for electrochemical determination of adenine in the presence of guanine.

    PubMed

    Arvand, Majid; Ghodsi, Navid; Zanjanchi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-15

    The current techniques for determining adenine have several shortcomings such as high cost, high time consumption, tedious pretreatment steps and the requirements for highly skilled personnel often restrict their use in routine analytical practice. This paper describes the development and utilization of a new nanocomposite consisting of titanium dioxide nanofibers (TNFs) and graphene oxide nanosheets (GONs) for screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modification. The synthesized GONs and TNFs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The modified electrode (TNFs/GONs/SPCE) was used for electrochemical characterization of adenine. The TNFs/GONs/SPCE exhibited an increase in peak current and the electron transfer kinetics and decrease in the overpotential for the oxidation reaction of adenine. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), the prepared sensor showed good sensitivity for determining adenine in two ranges from 0.1-1 and 1-10 μM, with a detection limit (DL) of 1.71 nM. Electrochemical studies suggested that the TNFs/GONs/SPCE provided a synergistic augmentation on the voltammetric behavior of electrochemical oxidation of adenine, which was indicated by the improvement of anodic peak current and a decrease in anodic peak potential. The amount of adenine in pBudCE4.1 plasmid was determined via the proposed sensor and the result was in good compatibility with the sequence data of pBudCE4.1 plasmid.

  18. Binding of an organo-osmium(II) anticancer complex to guanine and cytosine on DNA revealed by electron-based dissociations in high resolution Top-Down FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Christopher A; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Liu, Hong-Ke; Barrow, Mark P; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-02-28

    The Os(II) arene anticancer complex [(η(6)-bip)Os(en)Cl](+) (Os1-Cl; where bip = biphenyl, and en = ethylenediamine) binds strongly to DNA. Here we investigate reactions between Os1-Cl and the self-complementary 12-mer oligonucleotide 5'-TAGTAATTACTA-3' (DNA12) using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Identification of the specific sites of DNA osmiation with {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) was made possible by the use of Electron Detachment Dissociation (EDD) which produced a wide range of assignable osmiated MS/MS fragments. In contrast, the more commonly used CAD and IRMPD techniques produced fragments which lose the bound osmium. These studies reveal that not only is guanine G3 a strong binding site for {(η(6)-bip)Os(en)}(2+) but, unexpectedly, so too is cytosine C10. Interestingly, the G3/C10 di-osmiated adduct of DNA12 also formed readily but did not undergo such facile fragmentation by EDD, perhaps due to folding induced by van der Waal's interactions of the bound osmium arene species. These new insights into osmium arene DNA adducts should prove valuable for the design of new organometallic drugs and contribute to understanding the lack of cross resistance of this organometallic anticancer complex with cisplatin.

  19. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-09-03

    We report the first low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are models for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and a knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for characterizing their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra, consistent with complexes where the Pt(CN)4(2-) moiety is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four dianion-nucleobase complexes and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine]* and [Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the delayed electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine but not for Pt(CN)4(2-)·uracil and Pt(CN)4(2-)·cytosine to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion in the clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase displays a long-lived excited state.

  20. Methylation of cytosine at C5 in a CpG sequence context causes a conformational switch of a benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-N2-guanine adduct in DNA from a minor groove alignment to intercalation with base displacement.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.; Lin, C.; Huang, X.; Kolbanovskiy, A.; Hingerty, Brian E; Amin, S.; Broyde, S.; Geactinov, N. E.; Patel, D. J.

    2005-03-01

    It is well known that CpG dinucleotide steps in DNA, which are highly methylated at the 5-position of cytosine (meC) in human tissues, exhibit a disproportionate number of mutations within certain codons of the p53 gene. There is ample published evidence indicating that the reactivity of guanine with anti-B[a]PDE (a metabolite of the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene) at CpG mutation hot spots is enhanced by the methylation of the cytosine residue flanking the target guanine residue on the 5'-side. In this work we demonstrate that such a methylation can also dramatically affect the conformational characteristics of an adduct derived from the reaction of one of the two enantiomers of anti-B[a]PDE with the exocyclic amino group of guanine ([BP]G adduct). A detailed NMR study indicates that the 10R (-)-trans-anti-[BP]G adduct undergoes a transition from a minor groove-binding alignment of the aromatic BP ring system in the unmethylated C-[BP]G sequence context, to an intercalative BP alignment with a concomitant displacement of the modified guanine residue into the minor groove in the methylated meC-[BP]G sequence context. By contrast, a minor groove-binding alignment was observed for the stereoisomeric 10S (+)-trans-anti-[BP]G adduct in both the C-[BP]G and meC-[BP]G sequence contexts. This remarkable conformational switch resulting from the presence of a single methyl group at the 5-position of the cytosine residue flanking the lesion on the 5'-side, is attributed to the hydrophobic effect of the methyl group that can stabilize intercalated adduct conformations in an adduct stereochemistry-dependent manner. Such conformational differences in methylated and unmethylated CpG sequences may be significant because of potential alterations in the cellular processing of the [BP]G adducts by DNA transcription, replication, and repair enzymes.

  1. Characterization of the Dominant and Rare Members of a Young Hawaiian Soil Bacterial Community with Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplified from DNA Fractionated on the Basis of Its Guanine and Cytosine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Nüsslein, Klaus; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The small-subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity was found to be very high in a Hawaiian soil community that might be expected to have lower diversity than the communities in continental soils because the Hawaiian soil is geographically isolated and only 200 years old, is subjected to a constant climate, and harbors low plant diversity. Since an underlying community structure could not be revealed by analyzing the total eubacterial rDNA, we first fractionated the DNA on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) content by using bis-benzimidazole and equilibrium centrifugation and then analyzed the bacterial rDNA amplified from a fraction with a high biomass (63% G+C fraction) and a fraction with a low biomass (35% G+C fraction). The rDNA clone libraries were screened by amplified rDNA restriction analysis to determine phylotype distribution. The dominant biomass reflected by the 63% G+C fraction contained several dominant phylotypes, while the community members that were less successful (35% G+C fraction) did not show dominance but there was a very high diversity of phylotypes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed taxa belonging to the groups expected for the G+C contents used. The dominant phylotypes in the 63% G+C fraction were members of the Pseudomonas, Rhizobium-Agrobacterium, and Rhodospirillum assemblages, while all of the clones sequenced from the 35% G+C fraction were affiliated with several Clostridium assemblages. The two-step rDNA analysis used here uncovered more diversity than can be detected by direct rDNA analysis of total community DNA. The G+C separation step is also a way to detect some of the less dominant organisms in a community. PMID:9546163

  2. Supramolecular polymeric chemosensor for biomedical applications: design and synthesis of a luminescent zinc metallopolymer as a chemosensor for adenine detection.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2012-11-01

    Adenine is an important bio-molecule that plays many crucial roles in food safety and biomedical diagnostics. Differentiating adenine from a mixture of adenosine and other nucleic bases (guanine, thymine, cytosine, and uracil) is particularly important for both biological and clinical applications. A neutral Zn(II) metallosupramolecular polymer based on acyl hydrazone derived coordination centres (P1) were generated through self-assembly polymerization. It is a linear coordination polymer that behaves like self-standing film. The synthesis, (1)H-NMR characterization, and spectroscopic properties of this supramolecular material are reported. P1 was found to be a chemosensor specific to adenine, with a luminescent enhancement. The binding properties of P1 with common nucleic bases and nucleosides reveal that this supramolecular polymer is very selective to adenine molecules (~20 to 420 times more selectivity than other nucleic bases). The formation constant (K) of P1 to adenine was found to be log K = 4.10 ± 0.02. This polymeric chemosensor produces a specific response to adenine down to 90 ppb. Spectrofluorimetric and (1)H-NMR titration studies showed that the P1 polymer allows each Zn(II) coordination centre to bind to two adenine molecules through hydrogen bonding with their imine and hydrazone protons.

  3. Double proton transfer mechanism in the adenine-uracil base pair and spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Perpète, Eric A.; Michaux, Catherine; Jacquemin, Denis

    2009-12-01

    We study the mechanism of double proton transfer (DPT) in the adenine-uracil (AU) base pair, both in gas phase and under the influence of surrounding water molecules. According to our ab initio calculations, no stable proton transfer product exists in gas phase, while in solution, the DPT process may occur only through the catalysis of water molecules. Nevertheless, a thermodynamic analysis confirms that AU does not contribute to spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex, and thus guanine-cytosine (GC) would be the only base pair contributing to spontaneous mutation.

  4. Camptothecins guanine interactions: mechanism of charge transfer reaction upon photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, K.; Guiot, E.; Tfibel, F.; Pernot, P.; Mérola, F.; Georges, P.; Fontaine-Aupart, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The potent activity exhibited by the antitumoral camptothecin (CPT) and its analog irinotecan (CPT-11) is known to be related to a close contact between the drug and the nucleic acid base guanine. This specificity of interaction between these two chromophores was examined by following changes in the photophysical properties of the drug using steady-state as well as time-resolved absorption and fluorescence methods. The observed effects on absorption, fluorescence emission and singlet excited state lifetimes give evidence for the occurrence of a stacking complex formation restricted to the quinoline part of CPT or CPT-11 and the guanine base but also with the adenine base. The triplet excited state properties of the drugs have been also characterized in absence and in presence of guanosine monophosphate and reveal the occurrence of an electron transfer from the guanine base to the drug. Support for this conclusion was obtained from the studies of a set of biological targets of various oxido-reduction potentials, adenosine monophosphate, cytidine, cytosine, tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine. This finding gives an interpretation of the CPT-induced guanine photolesions previously reported in the literature. These data taken together are discussed in connection with the drug activity. The stacking complex CPT/guanine is necessary but not sufficient to explain the role of the chirality and of the lactone structure in the function of the drug. A stereospecific interaction with the enzyme topoisomerase I seems necessary to stabilize the stacking complex. The first experiments using time-resolved fluorescence by two-photon excitation confirms that CPT does not bind to the isolated enzyme.

  5. Is the DPT tautomerization of the long A·G Watson-Crick DNA base mispair a source of the adenine and guanine mutagenic tautomers? A QM and QTAIM response to the biologically important question.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-03-05

    Herein, we first address the question posed in the title by establishing the tautomerization trajectory via the double proton transfer of the adenine·guanine (A·G) DNA base mispair formed by the canonical tautomers of the A and G bases into the A*·G* DNA base mispair, involving mutagenic tautomers, with the use of the quantum-mechanical calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). It was detected that the A·G ↔ A*·G* tautomerization proceeds through the asynchronous concerted mechanism. It was revealed that the A·G base mispair is stabilized by the N6H···O6 (5.68) and N1H···N1 (6.51) hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and the N2H···HC2 dihydrogen bond (DH-bond) (0.68 kcal·mol(-1) ), whereas the A*·G* base mispair-by the O6H···N6 (10.88), N1H···N1 (7.01) and C2H···N2 H-bonds (0.42 kcal·mol(-1) ). The N2H···HC2 DH-bond smoothly and without bifurcation transforms into the C2H···N2 H-bond at the IRC = -10.07 Bohr in the course of the A·G ↔ A*·G* tautomerization. Using the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds, it was observed that the N6H···O6 H-bond is anticooperative to the two others-N1H···N1 and N2H···HC2 in the A·G base mispair, while the latters are significantly cooperative, mutually strengthening each other. In opposite, all three O6H···N6, N1H···N1, and C2H···N2 H-bonds are cooperative in the A*·G* base mispair. All in all, we established the dynamical instability of the А*·G* base mispair with a short lifetime (4.83·10(-14) s), enabling it not to be deemed feasible source of the A* and G* mutagenic tautomers of the DNA bases. The small lifetime of the А*·G* base mispair is predetermined by the negative value of the Gibbs free energy for the A*·G* → A·G transition. Moreover, all of the six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations cannot develop during this lifetime that additionally confirms the aforementioned results. Thus, the A*·G* base mispair cannot be

  6. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  7. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine and Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-08-05

    We report the first low-temperature photodetachment photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are model systems for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for understanding their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra consistent with the complexes where the Pt(CN)42- moiety is largely intact. The adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be between 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)42- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photodetachment spectra of the four nucleobase-dianion complexes, and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)42-∙thymine and Pt(CN)42-∙adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)42-∙T]* and [Pt(CN)42-∙A]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the resonant electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)42-∙T and Pt(CN)42-∙A but not for Pt(CN)42-∙U and Pt(CN)42-∙C to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)42- dianion in the Pt(CN)42-∙M clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase disaplys a long-lived excited state.

  8. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  9. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-24

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  10. Production of guanine from NH(4)CN polymerizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis of adenine from the polymerization of concentrated ammonium cyanide solutions is well known. We show here that guanine is also produced by this reaction but at yields ranging from 10 to 40 times less than that of adenine. This synthesis is effective at both +80 and -20 degrees C. Since high concentrations of NH(4)CN are obtainable only by freezing, this prebiotic synthesis would be applicable to frozen regions of the primitive Earth, the Jovian satellite Europa and other icy satellites, and the parent body of the Murchison meteorite.

  11. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  12. The Cytosine Water Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, A. M.; Mata, S.; Bermudez, C.; Berdakin, M.; Pena, I.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    A multi FID system has been adapted into the operation sequence of the LA-MB-FTMW spectrometer. Thanks to the reached sensitivity, one monohydrate of cytosine (A= 3725.61 (26) MHz, B=980.385 (76) MHz, C=777.231 (46) MHz) has been detected in the supersonic expansion. J. --U. Grabow, W. Stahl, H. Dreizler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1996, 67, 4072 -- 4084. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2009, 11, 617 -- 627.

  13. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  14. Elimination and utilization of oxidized guanine nucleotides in the synthesis of RNA and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Ito, Riyoko; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2013-03-22

    Reactive oxygen species are produced as side products of oxygen utilization and can lead to the oxidation of nucleic acids and their precursor nucleotides. Among the various oxidized bases, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine seems to be the most critical during the transfer of genetic information because it can pair with both cytosine and adenine. During the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides, GMP is formed first, and it is converted to GDP by guanylate kinase. This enzyme hardly acts on an oxidized form of GMP (8-oxo-GMP) formed by the oxidation of GMP or by the cleavage of 8-oxo-GDP and 8-oxo-GTP by MutT protein. Although the formation of 8-oxo-GDP from 8-oxo-GMP is thus prevented, 8-oxo-GDP itself may be produced by the oxidation of GDP by reactive oxygen species. The 8-oxo-GDP thus formed can be converted to 8-oxo-GTP because nucleoside-diphosphate kinase and adenylate kinase, both of which catalyze the conversion of GDP to GTP, do not discriminate 8-oxo-GDP from normal GDP. The 8-oxo-GTP produced in this way and by the oxidation of GTP can be used for RNA synthesis. This misincorporation is prevented by MutT protein, which has the potential to cleave 8-oxo-GTP as well as 8-oxo-GDP to 8-oxo-GMP. When (14)C-labeled 8-oxo-GTP was applied to CaCl2-permeabilized cells of a mutT(-) mutant strain, it could be incorporated into RNA at 4% of the rate for GTP. Escherichia coli cells appear to possess mechanisms to prevent misincorporation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine into RNA.

  15. Hole wave functions and transport with deazaadenines replacing adenines in DNA.

    PubMed

    Breindel, Alexander J; Stuart, Rachel E; Bock, William J; Stelter, David N; Kravec, Shane M; Conwell, Esther M

    2013-03-21

    Transport of a hole along the base stack of DNA is relatively facile for a series of adenines (As) paired with thymines (Ts) or for a series of guanines (Gs) paired with cytosines (Cs). However, the speed at which a hole was found to travel was much too small to make useful semiconductor-type devices. Quite recently it was found that replacing one of the electronegative nitrogens (N3 or N7) with a carbon and a hydrogen, thus turning A into deazaadenine, increased the hole speed in what was A/T by a factor 30. To study the effect of the substitution we have carried out simulations for the wave function of a hole on an A/T oligomer with As modified by replacing N3 or N7, or both, with C-H's. The simulations were carried out using QM/MM and the code CP2K. We find, for either N, or both, replaced, the wave function of the hole behaves similarly to that of a hole on A/T in being delocalized immediately after hole insertion for up to ∼20 fs, and then becoming localized on one of the modified As. The time for localization could be decreased by placing additional water within ∼1.8 Å of N3 or N7, encouraging the formation of hydrogen bonds with these nitrogens. Because of their positive charge the hydrogen bonds tend to repel holes. However, these bonds were found to decay on a femtosecond time scale, thus unlikely to affect the hole hopping, which occurs on approximately a nanosecond scale in A/T. Replacement with a C-H of one or both of the electronegative Ns, along with the structural changes that result, is expected to decrease the activation energy and thus account for the larger hole hopping rate in the deaza-modified DNA.

  16. Adenine formation without HCN.

    PubMed

    Merz, Kenneth M; Aguiar, Eduardo C; da Silva, Joao Bosco P

    2014-05-22

    From a historic point of view adenine was always presumed to be the product of HCN pentamerization. In this work a new mechanism for adenine synthesis in the gas phase without HCN is proposed. The concept of retrosynthetic analysis was employed to create a tautomer of adenine, which can be reached from previously observed interstellar molecules C3NH and HNCNH and its isomer H2NCN. MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations were performed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of the minimum and the transition state (TS) structures involved in the six step mechanism. This new mechanism requires a smaller number of steps, the reaction energy is twice as exergonic, and the rate determining TS is lower in energy than the corresponding ones proposed elsewhere in the literature.

  17. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  18. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  19. A three-state model for the photophysics of guanine.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2008-02-27

    The nonadiabatic photochemistry of the guanine molecule (2-amino-6-oxopurine) and some of its tautomers has been studied by means of the high-level theoretical ab initio quantum chemistry methods CASSCF and CASPT2. Accurate computations, based by the first time on minimum energy reaction paths, states minima, transition states, reaction barriers, and conical intersections on the potential energy hypersurfaces of the molecules lead to interpret the photochemistry of guanine and derivatives within a three-state model. As in the other purine DNA nucleobase, adenine, the ultrafast subpicosecond fluorescence decay measured in guanine is attributed to the barrierless character of the path leading from the initially populated 1(pi pi* L(a)) spectroscopic state of the molecule toward the low-lying methanamine-like conical intersection (gs/pi pi* L(a))CI. On the contrary, other tautomers are shown to have a reaction energy barrier along the main relaxation profile. A second, slower decay is attributed to a path involving switches toward two other states, 1(pi pi* L(b)) and, in particular, 1(n(O) pi*), ultimately leading to conical intersections with the ground state. A common framework for the ultrafast relaxation of the natural nucleobases is obtained in which the predominant role of a pi pi*-type state is confirmed.

  20. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception induced by spinal administration of inosine or guanine in mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Enderson D; Schallenberger, Cristhine; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; Hansel, Gisele; Fagundes, Aécio C; Milman, Michael; Silva, Marcos D P; Oses, Jean P; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Portela, Luís V; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Souza, Diogo O; Schmidt, André P

    2016-02-05

    It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. Recently, we have demonstrated that guanine-based purines may produce some antinociceptive effects against chemical and thermal pain in mice. The present study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of intrathecal (i.t.) administration of inosine or guanine in mice. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of these purines, their general toxicity and measurements of CSF purine levels were performed. Animals received an i.t. injection of vehicle (30mN NaOH), inosine or guanine (up to 600nmol) and submitted to several pain models and behavioural paradigms. Guanine and inosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the tail-flick, hot-plate, intraplantar (i.pl.) glutamate, i.pl. capsaicin and acetic acid pain models. Additionally, i.t. inosine inhibited the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of capsaicin and i.t. guanine reduced the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of glutamate or AMPA. Intrathecal administration of inosine (200nmol) induced an approximately 115-fold increase on CSF inosine levels. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of extracellular guanine and inosine presenting antinociceptive effects following spinal administration. These effects seem to be related, at least partially, to the modulation of A1 adenosine receptors.

  1. Photoirradiation products of flavin derivatives, and the effects of photooxidation on guanine.

    PubMed

    Kino, Katsuhito; Kobayashi, Teruhiko; Arima, Eiji; Komori, Rie; Kobayashi, Takanobu; Miyazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    Photoirradiation in the presence of riboflavin led to guanine oxidation and the formation of imidazolone. Meanwhile, riboflavin itself was degraded by ultraviolet light A (UV-A) and visible light (VIS) radiation, and the end product was lumichrome. VIS radiation in the presence of riboflavin oxidized guanine similarly to UV-A radiation. Although UV-A radiation with lumichrome oxidized guanine, VIS radiation with lumichrome did not. Thus, UV-A radiation with riboflavin can oxidize guanine even if riboflavin is degraded to lumichrome. In contrast, following VIS radiation degradation of riboflavin to lumichrome, VIS radiation with riboflavin is hardly capable of oxidizing guanine. The consequences of riboflavin degradation and guanine photooxidation can be extended to flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide. In addition, we report advanced synthesis; carboxymethylflavin was obtained by oxidation of formylmethylflavin with chlorite and hydrogen peroxide; lumichrome was obtained by heating of formylmethylflavin in 50% AcOH; lumiflavin was obtained by incubation of formylmethylflavin in 2 M NaOH, followed by isolation by step-by-step concentration.

  2. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-05-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science.

  3. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag(+)-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints.

    PubMed

    Swasey, Steven M; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-05-14

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag(+) is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg(2+). In contrast to prior studies of Ag(+) incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag(+)-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag(+) bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag(+)-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science.

  4. Silver (I) as DNA glue: Ag+-mediated guanine pairing revealed by removing Watson-Crick constraints

    PubMed Central

    Swasey, Steven M.; Leal, Leonardo Espinosa; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Pavlovich, James; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with DNA have far-reaching implications in biochemistry and DNA nanotechnology. Ag+ is uniquely interesting because it binds exclusively to the bases rather than the backbone of DNA, without the toxicity of Hg2+. In contrast to prior studies of Ag+ incorporation into double-stranded DNA, we remove the constraints of Watson-Crick pairing by focusing on homo-base DNA oligomers of the canonical bases. High resolution electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry reveals an unanticipated Ag+-mediated pairing of guanine homo-base strands, with higher stability than canonical guanine-cytosine pairing. By exploring unrestricted binding geometries, quantum chemical calculations find that Ag+ bridges between non-canonical sites on guanine bases. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Ag+-mediated structuring of guanine homobase strands persists to at least 90 °C under conditions for which canonical guanine-cytosine duplexes melt below 20 °C. These findings are promising for DNA nanotechnology and metal-ion based biomedical science. PMID:25973536

  5. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  6. Extracellular conversion of guanine-based purines to guanosine specifically enhances astrocyte glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Frizzo, Marcos Emílio dos Santos; Antunes Soares, Félix Alexandre; Dall'Onder, Leonara Patrícia; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Swanson, Raymond A; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2003-05-16

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to stimulate glutamate uptake in primary astrocyte cultures. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect and specificity of guanine- or adenine-based purines on glutamate and GABA uptake in cultured astrocytes. Stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake was observed with GUO, GMP or GTP. Simultaneous exposure with these guanine-based purines did not show an additive effect. We also investigated a possible interconversion of guanine-based purines during incubation time. Action by GTP was excluded since the hydrolysis resistant GTP analog, GMP-PNP did not stimulate glutamate uptake. Addition of an ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitor abolished GMP-stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake, without affecting GUO action. Taken together, these results suggest that GUO is the guanine-based purines responsible for glutamate uptake activation. In addition, the stimulatory effect on glutamate uptake was not observed with adenine-based purines. Moreover, GABA uptake was not activated by GUO. These results point to specificity in the interaction between GUO and the astrocyte glutamate uptake system.

  7. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  8. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures.

  9. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guanine. 73.1329 Section 73.1329 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guanine. 73.1329 Section 73.1329 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guanine. 73.1329 Section 73.1329 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guanine. 73.1329 Section 73.1329 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive guanine shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.1329 (a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures of guanine may contain the following diluents: (i)...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1329 Guanine. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive guanine is... derived. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with guanine may contain only those diluents...

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of an N(2)-guanine DNA adduct derived from the potent tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene: intercalation from the minor groove with ruptured Watson-Crick base pairing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yijin; Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Lin, Chin H; Cai, Yuqin; Rodriguez, Fabian A; Sayer, Jane M; Jerina, Donald M; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2012-12-04

    The most potent tumorigen identified among the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is the nonplanar fjord region dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). It is metabolically activated in vivo through the widely studied diol epoxide (DE) pathway to form covalent adducts with DNA bases, predominantly guanine and adenine. The (+)-11S,12R,13R,14S DE enantiomer forms adducts via its C14 position with the exocyclic amino group of guanine. Here, we present the first nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of a DB[a,l]P-derived adduct, the 14R-(+)-trans-anti-DB[a,l]P-N(2)-dG (DB[a,l]P-dG) lesion in double-stranded DNA. In contrast to the stereochemically identical benzo[a]pyrene-derived N(2)-dG adduct (B[a]P-dG) in which the B[a]P rings reside in the B-DNA minor groove on the 3'-side of the modifed deoxyguanosine, in the DB[a,l]P-derived adduct the DB[a,l]P rings intercalate into the duplex on the 3'-side of the modified base from the sterically crowded minor groove. Watson-Crick base pairing of the modified guanine with the partner cytosine is broken, but these bases retain some stacking with the bulky DB[a,l]P ring system. This new theme in PAH DE-DNA adduct conformation differs from (1) the classical intercalation motif in which Watson-Crick base pairing is intact at the lesion site and (2) the base-displaced intercalation motif in which the damaged base and its partner are extruded from the helix. The structural considerations that lead to the intercalated conformation of the DB[a,l]P-dG lesion in contrast to the minor groove alignment of the B[a]P-dG adduct, and the implications of the DB[a,l]P-dG conformational motif for the recognition of such DNA lesions by the human nucleotide excision repair apparatus, are discussed.

  16. Protein modification by adenine propenal.

    PubMed

    Shuck, Sarah C; Wauchope, Orrette R; Rose, Kristie L; Kingsley, Philip J; Rouzer, Carol A; Shell, Steven M; Sugitani, Norie; Chazin, Walter J; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A; Galligan, James J; Beavers, William N; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2014-10-20

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. N(ε)-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine-lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is N(ε)-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA's ability to bind to a DNA substrate.

  17. Properties of pseudo-complementary DNA substituted with weakly pairing analogs of guanine or cytosine.

    PubMed

    Lahoud, Georges; Timoshchuk, Victor; Lebedev, Alexandre; Arar, Khalil; Hou, Ya-Ming; Gamper, Howard

    2008-12-01

    A straightforward enzymatic protocol for converting regular DNA into pseudo-complementary DNA could improve the performance of oligonucleotide microarrays by generating readily hybridizable structure-free targets. Here we screened several highly destabilizing analogs of G and C for one that could be used with 2-aminoadenine (nA) and 2-thiothymine (sT) to generate structure-free DNA that is fully accessible to complementary probes. The analogs, which included bioactive bases such as 6-thioguanine (sG), 5-nitrocytosine (NitroC), 2-pyrimidinone (P; the free base of zebularine) and 6-methylfuranopyrimidinone (MefP), were prepared as dNTPs and evaluated as substrates for T7 and Phi29 DNA polymerases that lacked editor function. Pairing properties of the analogs were characterized by solution hybridization assays using modified oligonucleotides or primer extension products. P and MeP did not support robust primer extension whereas sG and NitroC did. In hybridization assays, however, sG lacked discrimination and NitroC paired too strongly to C. The dNTPs of two other base analogs, 7-nitro-7-deazahypoxanthine (NitrocH) and 2-thiocytosine (sC), exhibited the greatest promise. Either analog could be used with nA and sT to generate DNA that was nearly structure-free. Hybridization of probes to these modified DNAs will require the development of base analogs that pair strongly to NitrocH or sC.

  18. Trypanosoma brucei adenine-phosphoribosyltransferases mediate adenine salvage and aminopurinol susceptibility but not adenine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Alexandra; Lamprea-Burgunder, Estelle; Graf, Fabrice E; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    African trypanosomes, like all obligate parasitic protozoa, cannot synthesize purines de novo and import purines from their hosts to build nucleic acids. The purine salvage pathways of Trypanosoma brucei being redundant, none of the involved enzymes is likely to be essential. Nevertheless they can be of pharmacological interest due to their role in activation of purine nucleobase or nucleoside analogues, which only become toxic when converted to nucleotides. Aminopurine antimetabolites, in particular, are potent trypanocides and even adenine itself is toxic to trypanosomes at elevated concentrations. Here we report on the T. brucei adenine phosphoribosyltransferases TbAPRT1 and TbAPRT2, encoded by the two genes Tb927.7.1780 and Tb927.7.1790, located in tandem on chromosome seven. The duplication is syntenic in all available Trypanosoma genomes but not in Leishmania. While TbAPRT1 is cytosolic, TbAPRT2 possesses a glycosomal targeting signal and co-localizes with the glycosomal marker aldolase. Interestingly, the distribution of glycosomal targeting signals among trypanosomatid adenine phosphoribosyltransferases is not consistent with their phylogeny, indicating that the acquisition of adenine salvage to the glycosome happened after the radiation of Trypanosoma. Double null mutant T. brucei Δtbaprt1,2 exhibited no growth phenotype but no longer incorporated exogenous adenine into the nucleotide pool. This, however, did not reduce their sensitivity to adenine. The Δtbaprt1,2 trypanosomes were resistant to the adenine isomer aminopurinol, indicating that it is activated by phosphoribosyl transfer. Aminopurinol was about 1000-fold more toxic to bloodstream-form T. brucei than the corresponding hypoxanthine isomer allopurinol. Aminopurinol uptake was not dependent on the aminopurine permease P2 that has been implicated in drug resistance.

  19. A DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for label-free, turn-on fluorescence-based screening of homo-adenine binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-02-15

    A novel, label-free, turn-on fluorescence strategy to detect molecules that bind to adenine-rich DNA sequences has been developed. The probe employs DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the key detection component. The new strategy relies on the formation of non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex, triggered by strong interactions with homo-adenine binding molecules, which brings a guanine-rich sequence in one strand close to DNA-AgNCs located on the opposite strand. This phenomenon transforms weakly fluorescent AgNCs into highly emissive species that display bright red fluorescence. Finally, we have shown that the new fluorescence turn-on strategy can be employed to detect coralyne, the most representative homo-adenine binding molecule that triggers formation of a non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex.

  20. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  1. Alkylation by propylene oxide of deoxyribonucleic acid, adenine, guanosine and deoxyguanylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P. D.; Jarman, M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Propylene oxide reacts with DNA in aqueous buffer solution at about neutral pH to yield two principal products, identified as 7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)adenine, which hydrolyse out of the alkylated DNA at neutral pH values at 37°C. 2. These products were obtained in quantity by reactions between propylene oxide and guanosine or adenine respectively. 3. The reactions between propylene oxide and adenine in acetic acid were parallel to those between dimethyl sulphate and adenine in neutral aqueous solution; the alkylated positions in adenine in order of decreasing reactivity were N-3, N-1 and N-9. A method for separating these alkyladenines is described. 4. Deoxyguanylic acid sodium salt was alkylated at N-7 by propylene oxide in neutral aqueous solution. 5. The nature of the side chain in the principal alkylation products was established by mass spectrometry, and the nature of the products is consistent with their formation by the bimolecular reaction mechanism. PMID:5073240

  2. Was adenine the first purine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Bakker, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Oligomerization of HCN (1 molar) in the presence of added formaldehyde (0.5 molar) produced an order of magnitude more 8-hydroxymethyladenine than adenine or any other biologically significant purine. This result suggests that on the prebiotic earth, nucleoside analogs may have been synthesized directly in more complex mixtures of HCN with other aldehydes.

  3. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  4. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing Anantram, M. P.; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  5. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  6. Onset of chiral adenine surface growth.

    PubMed

    Capitán, María Jose; Álvarez, Jesús; Wang, Yang; Otero, Roberto; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2013-10-07

    The structure and stability of adenine crystals and thin layers has been studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations. We have found that adenine crystals can be grown in two phases that are energetically quasi-degenerate, the structure of which can be described as a pile-up of 2D adenine planes. In each plane, the structure can be described as an aggregation of adenine dimers. Under certain conditions, kinetic effects can favor the growth of the less stable phase. These results have been used to understand the growth of adenine thin films on gold under ultra-high vacuum conditions. We have found that the grown phase corresponds to the α-phase, which is composed of stacked prochiral planes. In this way, the adenine nanocrystals exhibit a surface that is enantiopure. These results could open new insight into the applications of adenine in biological, medical, and enantioselective or pharmaceutical fields.

  7. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  8. Energetics of the lattice: packing elements in crystals of four-stranded intercalated cytosine-rich DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, I.; Cai, L.; Chen, L.; Rich, A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation of single molecules from solution into crystals represents a transition between distinct energetic states. In solution, the atomic interactions within the molecule dominate. In the crystalline state, however, a set of additional interactions are formed between molecules in close contact in the lattice--these are the packing interactions. The crystal structures of d(CCCT), d(TAACCC), d(CCCAAT), and d(AACCCC) have in common a four-stranded intercalated cytosine segment, built by stacked layers of cytosine.cytosine+ (C.C+) base pairs coming from two parallel duplexes that intercalate into each other with opposite polarity. The intercalated cytosine segments in these structures are similar in their geometry, even though the sequences crystallized in different space groups. In the crystals, adenine and thymine residues of the sequences are used to build the three-dimensional crystal lattice by elaborately interacting with symmetry-related molecules. The packing elements observed provide novel insight about the copious ways in which nucleic acid molecules can interact with each other--for example, when folded in more complicated higher order structures, such as mRNA and chromatin.

  9. Bacterial Ammeline Metabolism via Guanine Deaminase ▿

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Dodge, Anthony G.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Bumpus, John A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    Melamine toxicity in mammals has been attributed to the blockage of kidney tubules by insoluble complexes of melamine with cyanuric acid or uric acid. Bacteria metabolize melamine via three consecutive deamination reactions to generate cyanuric acid. The second deamination reaction, in which ammeline is the substrate, is common to many bacteria, but the genes and enzymes responsible have not been previously identified. Here, we combined bioinformatics and experimental data to identify guanine deaminase as the enzyme responsible for this biotransformation. The ammeline degradation phenotype was demonstrated in wild-type Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas strains, including E. coli K12 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Bioinformatics analysis of these and other genomes led to the hypothesis that the ammeline deaminating enzyme was guanine deaminase. An E. coli guanine deaminase deletion mutant was deficient in ammeline deaminase activity, supporting the role of guanine deaminase in this reaction. Two guanine deaminases from disparate sources (Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and Homo sapiens) that had available X-ray structures were purified to homogeneity and shown to catalyze ammeline deamination at rates sufficient to support bacterial growth on ammeline as a sole nitrogen source. In silico models of guanine deaminase active sites showed that ammeline could bind to guanine deaminase in a similar orientation to guanine, with a favorable docking score. Other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily that are not guanine deaminases were assayed in vitro, and none had substantial ammeline deaminase activity. The present study indicated that widespread guanine deaminases have a promiscuous activity allowing them to catalyze a key reaction in the bacterial transformation of melamine to cyanuric acid and potentially contribute to the toxicity of melamine. PMID:20023034

  10. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding.

  11. Identification of the major lesion from the reaction of an acridine-targeted aniline mustard with DNA as an adenine N1 adduct.

    PubMed

    Boritzki, T J; Palmer, B D; Coddington, J M; Denny, W A

    1994-01-01

    DNA adducts of two acridine-linked aniline half-mustards have been isolated and identified. The compound where the half-mustard is attached to the DNA-targeting acridine moiety by a short linker chain alkylates both double- and single-stranded DNA exclusively at guanine N7, as do the majority of known aromatic and aliphatic nitrogen mustards. The longer-chain analogue, also containing a more reactive half-mustard, shows a strikingly different pattern, alkylating double-stranded DNA to yield primarily (> 90%) the adenine N1 adduct, together with < 10% of the adenine N3 adduct and only trace amounts of the guanine N7 adduct. In the presence of MgCl2 (which is known not to inhibit the interaction of drugs at minor groove sites), the adenine N3 adduct is the major product. The latter compound is the first known aniline mustard (and apparently the first known alkylating agent of any type) to preferentially alkylate adenine at the N1 position in duplex DNA. These results are consistent with previous work [Prakash et al. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9799-9807], which showed that the preferred site of DNA alkylation by the corresponding long-chain acridine-linked aniline bis-mustards in general was at major groove sites of adenines and identifies the major site of alkylation as adenine N1 and not N7. This selectivity for adenine N1 alkylation is suggested to result from a preference for the acridine mustard side chain of these compounds to project into the major groove following intercalation of the acridine, coupled with structural distortion of the DNA helix to make the N1 positions of adenines adjacent to the intercalation sites more accessible.

  12. A simple method for N-15 labelling of exocyclic amino groups in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Acedo, Montse; Fàbrega, Carme; Aviño, Anna; Goodman, Myron; Fagan, Patricia; Wemmer, David; Eritja, Ramon

    1994-01-01

    The use of the ammonia deprotection step to introduce 15N labels at specific exocyclic amino positions of adenine, cytosine, guanine or 2-aminopurine of oligodeoxynucleotides is described. PMID:8065910

  13. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... AHK-see-rye-bow-noo-klee-ik) acid (DNA). DNA contains four chemicals (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine — ... in your body contains about 6 feet of DNA thread, for a total of about 3 billion ...

  14. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  15. Cytosine modifications in neurodevelopment and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bing; Jin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation has been studied comprehensively and linked to both normal neurodevelopment and neurological diseases. The recent identification of several new DNA modifications, including 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), has given us a new perspective on the previously observed plasticity in 5mC-dependent regulatory processes. Here we review the latest research into these cytosine modifications, focusing mainly on their roles in neurodevelopment and diseases. PMID:23912899

  16. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  17. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  18. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  19. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling.

  20. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling. PMID:28102315

  1. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  2. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  3. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  4. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  5. 21 CFR 73.2329 - Guanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2329 Guanine. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The... coloring cosmetics generally, only those diluents listed under § 73.1001(a)(1); (ii) For coloring externally applied cosmetics, only those diluents listed in § 73.1001(b) and, in addition, nitrocellulose....

  6. Canonical Watson-Crick base pair interactions in π* type triplet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, M.; Blancafort, L.; Sodupe, M.; Bertran, J.

    2006-03-01

    Ground state and triplet π → π* states of canonical Watson-Crick base pairs have been studied at the B3LYP level of theory. Excited states were found to be localized at either of the monomers forming the base pair (guanine, cytosine, adenine and thymine), geometry relaxation of the excited base pair being similar to that occurring in the isolated nucleobase. For thymine and cytosine, triplet π → π* excitation produces a significant elongation of the C5-C6 bond whereas for guanine and adenine there is a significant increase of the N3-C2 bond and pyramidalization of the NH2 group. Adenine-thymine energy pairing remains almost unaffected by triplet excitation. However, for guanine-cytosine, with excitation localized at the guanine moiety, base pairing energy decreases about 5 kcal/mol due to pyramidalization of the amino group of guanine.

  7. Inhibitory and Restorative Effects of Adenine Nucleotides on Rickettsial Adsorption and Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Herbert H.

    1974-01-01

    The adenine nucleotides, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, (ATP), and the methylene-bridge analogues are inhibitors of rickettsial adsorption to and the hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes. Other nucleotides, adenosine monophosphate, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cytosine triphosphate, and guanosine triphosphate, are without effect. Adsorption and hemolysis require the generation of energy by the rickettsiae which is usually derived from glutamate. When the generation of energy from the metabolism of glutamate is inhibited by arsenite or cyanide, the addition of ATP can supply the energy to restore hemolysis. However, in the presence of the uncouplers, ATP can not restore hemolysis. Even when functioning in a restorative role, ATP still has its inhibitory properties. These results suggest that a high-energy intermediate (X ∼ I), rather than ATP itself, is the energy source. The interactions of inhibitory nucleotides suggest that these compounds share a common transport system. PMID:4357933

  8. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion.

  9. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background (“noise”) induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer’s principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do

  10. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background ("noise") induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer's principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do current

  11. Prebiotic synthesis of adenine and amino acids under Europa-like conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Brinton, K.; Bada, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites, we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 years at -20 and -78 degrees C. In addition, the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20 degrees C. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be wider than previously thought.

  12. Prebiotic Synthesis of Adenine and Amino Acids Under Europa-like Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Matthew; Miller, Stanley L.; Brinton, Karen; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites. we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 year at -20 and -78 C. In addition the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20%. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be m der than previously thought.

  13. [Quantum-chemical investigation of tautomerization ways of Watson-Crick DNA base pair guanine-cytosine].

    PubMed

    Brovarets', O O; Hovorun, D M

    2010-01-01

    A novel physico-chemical mechanism of the Watson-Crick DNA base pair Gua.Cyt tautomerization Gua.Cyt*<---->Gua.Cyt<---->Gua*.Cyt (mutagenic tautomers of bases are marked by asterisks) have been revealed and realized in a pathway of single proton transfer through two mutual isoenergetic transition states with Gibbs free energy of activation 30.4 and 30.6 kcal/mol and they are ion pairs stabilized by three (N2H...N3, N1H...N4- and O6+H...N4-) and five (N2H...O2, N1H...O2, N1H...N3, O6+H...N4- and 06+H...N4-) H-bonds accordingly. Stable base pairs Gua-Cyt* and Gua*.Cyt which dissociate comparably easy into monomers have acceptable relative Gibbs energies--12.9 and 14.3 kcal/mol--for the explanation of the nature of the spontaneous transitions of DNA replication. Results are obtained at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-31 1++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum approach.

  14. Cloning and expression of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, T E; Ullman, B

    1993-01-01

    The hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) enzyme of Trypanosoma brucei and related parasites provides a rational target for the treatment of African sleeping sickness and several other parasitic diseases. To characterize the T. brucei HGPRT enzyme in detail, the T. brucei hgprt was isolated within a 4.2 kb SalI-KpnI genomic insert and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 630 bp that encoded a protein of 210 amino acids with a M(r) = 23.4 kd. After gap alignment, the T. brucei HGPRT exhibited 21-23% amino acid sequence identity, mostly in three clustered regions, with the HGPRTs from human, S. mansoni, and P falciparum, indicating that the trypanosome enzyme was the most divergent of the group. Surprisingly, the T. brucei HGPRT was more homologous to the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) from the prokaryote V. harveyi than to the eukaryotic HGPRTs. Northern blot analysis revealed two trypanosome transcripts of 1.4 and 1.9 kb, each expressed to equivalent degrees in insect vector and mammalian forms of the parasite. The T. brucei hgprt was inserted into an expression plasmid and transformed into S phi 606 E. coli that are deficient in both HPRT and xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activities. Soluble, enzymatically active recombinant T. brucei HGPRT was expressed to high levels and purified to homogeneity by GTP-agarose affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant enzyme recognized hypoxanthine, guanine, and allopurinol, but not xanthine or adenine, as substrates and was inhibited by a variety of nucleotide effectors. The availability of a molecular clone encoding the T. brucei hgprt and large quantities of homogeneous recombinant HGPRT enzyme provides an experimentally manipulable molecular and biochemical system for the rational design of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of African sleeping sickness and other diseases of parasitic origin. Images PMID:8265360

  15. Guanine nucleotide regulation of receptor binding of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in rat brain regions, retina and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Sharif, N A; Burt, D R

    1987-10-29

    Guanine nucleotides inhibited the specific binding of [3H](3-Me-His2)thyrotropin-releasing hormone ([3H]MeTRH) to receptors for TRH in washed homogenates of rat anterior pituitary gland in a dose-related manner. The order of potency (at 100 and 500 microM final) was Gpp(NH)p (a stable analog of GTP) greater than GTP much greater than GDP much greater than cGMP (with the adenine nucleotides being inactive) in the pituitary and various brain regions. Gpp(NH)p at 1 mM caused 17-35% inhibition of [3H]MeTRH binding to different tissues including the pituitary, hypothalamus, retina and nucleus accumbens. A statistically significant nucleotide effect was not observed, however, in the olfactory bulb and medulla/pons membranes. Gpp(NH)p (1 mM) increased the dissociation constants for [3H]MeTRH binding by 1.9- to 2.4-fold in the pituitary, n. accumbens and retinal preparations without altering the apparent binding capacity. These data suggest that TRH receptor binding can be allosterically regulated by guanine nucleotides and provide further evidence for the existence of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) coupled to the TRH receptor.

  16. Influence of C-5 substituted cytosine and related nucleoside analogs on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-dG adducts at CG base pairs of DNA.

    PubMed

    Guza, Rebecca; Kotandeniya, Delshanee; Murphy, Kristopher; Dissanayake, Thakshila; Lin, Chen; Giambasu, George Madalin; Lad, Rahul R; Wojciechowski, Filip; Amin, Shantu; Sturla, Shana J; Hudson, Robert H E; York, Darrin M; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Jones, Roger; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2011-05-01

    Endogenous 5-methylcytosine ((Me)C) residues are found at all CG dinucleotides of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, including the mutational 'hotspots' for smoking induced lung cancer. (Me)C enhances the reactivity of its base paired guanine towards carcinogenic diolepoxide metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in cigarette smoke. In the present study, the structural basis for these effects was investigated using a series of unnatural nucleoside analogs and a representative PAH diolepoxide, benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE). Synthetic DNA duplexes derived from a frequently mutated region of the p53 gene (5'-CCCGGCACCC GC[(15)N(3),(13)C(1)-G]TCCGCG-3', + strand) were prepared containing [(15)N(3), (13)C(1)]-guanine opposite unsubstituted cytosine, (Me)C, abasic site, or unnatural nucleobase analogs. Following BPDE treatment and hydrolysis of the modified DNA to 2'-deoxynucleosides, N(2)-BPDE-dG adducts formed at the [(15)N(3), (13)C(1)]-labeled guanine and elsewhere in the sequence were quantified by mass spectrometry. We found that C-5 alkylcytosines and related structural analogs specifically enhance the reactivity of the base paired guanine towards BPDE and modify the diastereomeric composition of N(2)-BPDE-dG adducts. Fluorescence and molecular docking studies revealed that 5-alkylcytosines and unnatural nucleobase analogs with extended aromatic systems facilitate the formation of intercalative BPDE-DNA complexes, placing BPDE in a favorable orientation for nucleophilic attack by the N(2) position of guanine.

  17. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  18. Human repair endonuclease incises DNA at cytosine photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Weiss, R.B.; Brent, T.P.; Duker, N.J.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of DNA damage by uvB and uvC irradiation was investigated using a defined sequence of human DNA. A UV-irradiated, 3'-end-labeled, 92 base pair sequence from the human alphoid segment was incubated with a purified human lymphoblast endonuclease that incises DNA at non-dimer photoproducts. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified all sites of endonucleolytic incision as cytosines. These were found in regions of the DNA sequence lacking adjacent pyrimidines and therefore are neither cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers nor 6-4'-pyrimidines. Incision at cytosine photoproducts was not detected at loci corresponding to alkali-labile sites in either control or irradiated substrates. This demonstrates that the bands detected after the enzymic reactions were not the result of DNA strand breaks, base loss sites or ring-opened cytosines. The optimal wavelengths for formation of cytosine photoproducts are 270-295 nm, similar to those associated with maximal tumor yields in animal ultraviolet carcinogenesis studies. Irradiation by monochromatic 254 nm light resulted in reduced cytosine photoproduct formation. This human UV endonuclease has an apparently identical substrate specificity to E. coli endonuclease III. Both the human and bacterial enzymes incise cytosine moieties in UV irradiated DNA and modified thymines in oxidized DNA.

  19. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  20. Calculation of the stabilization energies of oxidatively damaged guanine base pairs with guanine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masayo; Kino, Katsuhito; Morikawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takanobu; Komori, Rie; Miyazawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stresses. Damaged DNA can cause mutations, which may increase the risk of developing cancer and other diseases. G:C-C:G transversions are caused by various oxidative stresses. 2,2,4-Triamino-5(2H)-oxazolone (Oz), guanidinohydantoin (Gh)/iminoallantoin (Ia) and spiro-imino-dihydantoin (Sp) are known products of oxidative guanine damage. These damaged bases can base pair with guanine and cause G:C-C:G transversions. In this study, the stabilization energies of these bases paired with guanine were calculated in vacuo and in water. The calculated stabilization energies of the Ia:G base pairs were similar to that of the native C:G base pair, and both bases pairs have three hydrogen bonds. By contrast, the calculated stabilization energies of Gh:G, which form two hydrogen bonds, were lower than the Ia:G base pairs, suggesting that the stabilization energy depends on the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, the Sp:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G base pairs. Furthermore, calculations showed that the Oz:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G, Gh:G and Sp:G base pairs, even though experimental results showed that incorporation of guanine opposite Oz is more efficient than that opposite Gh/Ia and Sp.

  1. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  2. Profiling cytosine oxidation in DNA by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Samson-Thibault, Francois; Madugundu, Guru S; Gao, Shanshan; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2012-09-17

    Spontaneous and oxidant-induced damage to cytosine is probably the main cause of CG to TA transition mutations in mammalian genomes. The reaction of hydroxyl radical (·OH) and one-electron oxidants with cytosine derivatives produces numerous oxidation products, which have been identified in large part by model studies with monomers and short oligonucleotides. Here, we developed an analytical method based on LC-MS/MS to detect 10 oxidized bases in DNA, including 5 oxidation products of cytosine. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the measurement of base damage in isolated calf thymus DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in aerated aqueous solutions (0-200 Gy) and to well-known Fenton-like reactions (Fe(2+) or Cu(+) with H(2)O(2) and ascorbate). The following cytosine modifications were quantified as modified 2'-deoxyribonucleosides upon exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation in aqueous aerated solution: 5-hydroxyhydantoin (Hyd-Ura) > 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra) > 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt) > 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (Ura-Gly) > 1-carbamoyl-4,5-dihydroxy-2-oxoimidazolidine (Imid-Cyt). The total yield of cytosine oxidation products was comparable to that of thymine oxidation products (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (Thy-Gly), 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantotin (Hyd-Thy), 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HmUra), and 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra)) as well as the yield of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). The major oxidation product of cytosine in DNA was Hyd-Ura. In contrast, the formation of Imid-Cyt was a minor pathway of DNA damage, although it is the major product arising from irradiation of the monomers, cytosine, and 2'-deoxycytidine. The reaction of Fenton-like reagents with DNA gave a different distribution of cytosine derived products compared to ionizing radiation, which likely reflects the reaction of metal ions with intermediate peroxyl radicals or hydroperoxides. The analysis of the main cytosine oxidation products will help elucidate the complex

  3. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  5. Chlorophyll fluorescence control in microalgae by biogenic guanine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yuito; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Endo, Hirotoshi

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields were applied to water suspensions of guanine crystals to induce changes in light scattering as a possible way to control photosynthesis in microalgae. The effect of guanine microcrystals with and without an applied magnetic field on the photosynthesis of a unicellular microalgae (plant), Pleurochrysis. carterae (P. carterae), was investigated by examining chlorophyll fluorescence. The fluorescence intensity at 600-700 nm of the photosynthetic cells increased remarkably when the concentration ratio of guanine microcrystals was 10 times larger than that of the cells. This increase in fluorescence occurred reproducibly and was proportional to the amount of guanine microcrystals added. It is speculated that the guanine microcrystals enhance the intensity of the excitation light on the cells by concentrating the excitation light or prolonging the time of light exposure to the cells. Moreover, applying a 500-mT magnetic field allowed modulation of the fluorescence intensity, depending on the direction of the fluorescence light.

  6. Identification, expression, and characterization of Escherichia coli guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Maynes, J T; Yuan, R G; Snyder, F F

    2000-08-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a K(m) of 15 microM with guanine and a k(cat) of 3.2 s(-1). The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3' from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease.

  7. Identification, Expression, and Characterization of Escherichia coli Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Maynes, Jason T.; Yuan, Richard G.; Snyder, Floyd F.

    2000-01-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a Km of 15 μM with guanine and a kcat of 3.2 s−1. The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3′ from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease. PMID:10913105

  8. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  9. Kinetics of the proton-deuteron exchange at position H8 of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, R; Ehrenberg, A

    1986-01-01

    Proton-NMR has been used to determine the activation energies and pre-exponential factors for the deuterium exchange of AH8 in poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), and for GH8 in poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC). No simple relationship between the kinetic parameters and molecular conformation was found. By addition of 4.5 M NaCl a transition from the B to the Z conformation was induced for poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), and an increased exchange rate was observed. The exchange rate for poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) also increased below 64 degrees C, and a significant decrease in activation energy on addition of 4.5 M NaCl was observed. The exchange rates at T = 55.8 degrees C were also measured for the AH8 and GH8 in random sequence calf thymus DNA. From the difference in exchange rates, a method of preferential labeling of either the AH8 or the GH8 in high molecular weight DNA is evaluated. PMID:3025816

  10. 2-Thiouracil deprived of thiocarbonyl function preferentially base pairs with guanine rather than adenine in RNA and DNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacka, Elzbieta; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Cypryk, Marek; Sobczak, Milena; Janicka, Magdalena; Kraszewska, Karina; Bartos, Paulina; Chwialkowska, Anna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    2-Thiouracil-containing nucleosides are essential modified units of natural and synthetic nucleic acids. In particular, the 5-substituted-2-thiouridines (S2Us) present in tRNA play an important role in tuning the translation process through codon–anticodon interactions. The enhanced thermodynamic stability of S2U-containing RNA duplexes and the preferred S2U-A versus S2U-G base pairing are appreciated characteristics of S2U-modified molecular probes. Recently, we have demonstrated that 2-thiouridine (alone or within an RNA chain) is predominantly transformed under oxidative stress conditions to 4-pyrimidinone riboside (H2U) and not to uridine. Due to the important biological functions and various biotechnological applications for sulfur-containing nucleic acids, we compared the thermodynamic stabilities of duplexes containing desulfured products with those of 2-thiouracil-modified RNA and DNA duplexes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that upon 2-thiouracil desulfuration to 4-pyrimidinone, the preferred base pairing of S2U with adenosine is lost, with preferred base pairing with guanosine observed instead. Therefore, biological processes and in vitro assays in which oxidative desulfuration of 2-thiouracil-containing components occurs may be altered. Moreover, we propose that the H2U-G base pair is a suitable model for investigation of the preferred recognition of 3′-G-ending versus A-ending codons by tRNA wobble nucleosides, which may adopt a 4-pyrimidinone-type structural motif. PMID:25690900

  11. New ribose-modified fluorescent analogs of adenine and guanine nucleotides available as substrates for various enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, T

    1983-02-15

    The synthesis of fluorescent derivatives of nucleosides and nucleotides, by reaction with isatoic anhydride in aqueous solution at mild pH and temperature, yielding their 3'-O-anthraniloyl derivatives, is here described. The N-methylanthraniloyl derivatives were also synthesized by reaction with N-methylisatoic anhydride. Upon excitation at 330-350 nm these derivatives exhibited maximum fluorescence emission at 430-445 nm in aqueous solution with quantum yields of 0.12-0.24. Their fluorescence was sensitive to the polarity of the solvent; in N,N-dimethylformamide the quantum yields were 0.83-0.93. The major differences between the two fluorophores were the longer wavelength of the emission maximum of the N-methylanthraniloyl group and its greater quantum yield in water. All anthraniloyl derivatives, as well as the N-methylanthraniloyl ones, had virtually identical fluorescent properties, regardless of their base structures. The ATP derivatives showed considerable substrate activity as a replacement of ATP with adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase, glutamine synthetase, myosin ATPase and sodium-potassium transport ATPase. The ADP derivatives were good substrates for creatine kinase and glutamine synthetase (gamma-glutamyl transfer activity). The GMP and adenosine derivatives were substrates for guanylate kinase and adenosine deaminase, respectively. All derivatives had only slightly altered Km values for these enzymes. While more fluorescent in water, the N-methylanthraniloyl derivatives were found to show relatively low substrate activities against some of these enzymes. The results indicate that these ribose-modified nucleosides and nucleotides can be versatile fluorescent substrate analogs for various enzymes.

  12. 2-Thiouracil deprived of thiocarbonyl function preferentially base pairs with guanine rather than adenine in RNA and DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Elzbieta; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Cypryk, Marek; Sobczak, Milena; Janicka, Magdalena; Kraszewska, Karina; Bartos, Paulina; Chwialkowska, Anna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2015-03-11

    2-Thiouracil-containing nucleosides are essential modified units of natural and synthetic nucleic acids. In particular, the 5-substituted-2-thiouridines (S2Us) present in tRNA play an important role in tuning the translation process through codon-anticodon interactions. The enhanced thermodynamic stability of S2U-containing RNA duplexes and the preferred S2U-A versus S2U-G base pairing are appreciated characteristics of S2U-modified molecular probes. Recently, we have demonstrated that 2-thiouridine (alone or within an RNA chain) is predominantly transformed under oxidative stress conditions to 4-pyrimidinone riboside (H2U) and not to uridine. Due to the important biological functions and various biotechnological applications for sulfur-containing nucleic acids, we compared the thermodynamic stabilities of duplexes containing desulfured products with those of 2-thiouracil-modified RNA and DNA duplexes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that upon 2-thiouracil desulfuration to 4-pyrimidinone, the preferred base pairing of S2U with adenosine is lost, with preferred base pairing with guanosine observed instead. Therefore, biological processes and in vitro assays in which oxidative desulfuration of 2-thiouracil-containing components occurs may be altered. Moreover, we propose that the H2U-G base pair is a suitable model for investigation of the preferred recognition of 3'-G-ending versus A-ending codons by tRNA wobble nucleosides, which may adopt a 4-pyrimidinone-type structural motif.

  13. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dispensability of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in novel homologues of adenine glycosylase MutY.

    PubMed

    Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Lopez-Castillo, Laura M; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    7,8-Dihydro-8-deoxyguanine (8oG) is one of the most common oxidative lesions in DNA. DNA polymerases misincorporate an adenine across from this lesion. Thus, 8oG is a highly mutagenic lesion responsible for G:C→T:A transversions. MutY is an adenine glycosylase, part of the base excision repair pathway that removes adenines, when mispaired with 8oG or guanine. Its catalytic domain includes a [4Fe-4S] cluster motif coordinated by cysteinyl ligands. When this cluster is absent, MutY activity is depleted and several studies concluded that the [4Fe-4S] cluster motif is an indispensable component for DNA binding, substrate recognition and enzymatic activity. In the present study, we identified 46 MutY homologues that lack the canonical cysteinyl ligands, suggesting an absence of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. A phylogenetic analysis groups these novel MutYs into two different clades. One clade is exclusive of the order Lactobacillales and another clade has a mixed composition of anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria and species from the protozoan genus Entamoeba. Structural modeling and sequence analysis suggests that the loss of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is compensated by a convergent solution in which bulky amino acids substitute the [4Fe-4S] cluster. We functionally characterized MutYs from Lactobacillus brevis and Entamoeba histolytica as representative members from each clade and found that both enzymes are active adenine glycosylases. Furthermore, chimeric glycosylases, in which the [4Fe-4S] cluster of Escherichia coli MutY is replaced by the corresponding amino acids of LbY and EhY, are also active. Our data indicates that the [4Fe-4S] cluster plays a structural role in MutYs and evidences the existence of alternative functional solutions in nature.

  15. Exploration of Excited State Deactivation Pathways of Adenine Monohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri; Sapunar, Marin; Ponzi, Aurora; Decleva, Piero; Došlić, Nađa

    2015-10-29

    Binding of a single water molecule has a dramatic effect on the excited state lifetime of adenine. Here we report a joint nonadiabatic dynamics and reaction paths study aimed at understanding the sub-100 fs lifetime of adenine in the monohydrates. Our nonadiabatic dynamics simulations, performed using the ADC(2) electronic structure method, show a shortening of the excited state lifetime in the monohydrates with respect to bare adenine. However, the computed lifetimes were found to be significantly longer that the observed one. By comparing the reaction pathways of several excited state deactivation processes in adenine and adenine monohydrates, we show that electron-driven proton transfer from water to nitrogen atom N3 of the adenine ring may be the process responsible for the observed ultrafast decay. The inaccessibility of the electron-driven proton transfer pathway to trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics simulation is discussed.

  16. Experimental observation of guanine tautomers with VUV photoionization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Nicolas, Christophe; Tang, Xiaonan; Belau, Leonid; de Vries, Mattanjah S; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-04-30

    Two methods of preparing guanine in the gas phase, thermal vaporization and laser desorption, have been investigated. The guanine generated by each method is entrained in a molecular beam, single-photon ionized with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation, and analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. The recorded photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves show a dramatic difference for experiments performed via thermal vaporization compared to that with laser desorption. The calculated vertical and adiabatic ionization energies for the eight lowest-lying tautomers of guanine suggest that the experimental observations arise from different tautomers being populated in the two different experimental methods.

  17. Guanine oxidation: one- and two-electron reactions.

    PubMed

    Pratviel, Geneviève; Meunier, Bernard

    2006-08-07

    Guanine bases in DNA are the most sensitive to oxidation. A lot of effort has been devoted to the understanding of the chemical modifications of guanine under different oxidizing conditions, the final goal being to know which lesions in DNA can be expected in vivo and their biological consequences. This article analyses the mechanisms underlying guanine oxidation by the comparison between one- and two-electron transfer processes. The different oxidants used in vitro give complementary answers. This overview presents a choice of some key intermediates and the predictive description of G-oxidation products that can be generated from these intermediates depending on the reaction conditions.

  18. Experimental observation of guanine tautomers with VUV photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Nicolas, Christophe; Tang, Xiaonan; Belau, Leonid; de Vries, Mattanjah S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-01

    Two methods of preparing guanine in the gas phase, thermal vaporization and laser desorption, have been investigated. The guanine generated by each method is entrained in a molecular beam, single photon ionized with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation, and analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. The recorded photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves show a dramatic difference for experiments performed via thermal vaporization compared to laser desorption. The calculated vertical and adiabatic ionization energies for the eight lowest lying tautomers of guanine suggest the experimental observations arise from different tautomers being populated in the two different experimental methods.

  19. Assemblies of cytosine within H-bonded network of adipic acid and citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-08-01

    Adipic acid binds to cytosine to form H-bonded discrete cytosine-cytosinium assemblies embedded in 1D infinite chain of adipic acid, whereas citric acid stabilizes trimeric cytosine-cytosinium assemblies having length of 19.44 Å stabilized between layered structures of citric acid molecules.

  20. High-Resolution Analysis of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cropley, Jennifer E.; Cooper, Alan; Suter, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes to gene expression can result in heritable phenotypic characteristics that are not encoded in the DNA itself, but rather by biochemical modifications to the DNA or associated chromatin proteins. Interposed between genes and environment, these epigenetic modifications can be influenced by environmental factors to affect phenotype for multiple generations. This raises the possibility that epigenetic states provide a substrate for natural selection, with the potential to participate in the rapid adaptation of species to changes in environment. Any direct test of this hypothesis would require the ability to measure epigenetic states over evolutionary timescales. Here we describe the first single-base resolution of cytosine methylation patterns in an ancient mammalian genome, by bisulphite allelic sequencing of loci from late Pleistocene Bison priscus remains. Retrotransposons and the differentially methylated regions of imprinted loci displayed methylation patterns identical to those derived from fresh bovine tissue, indicating that methylation patterns are preserved in the ancient DNA. Our findings establish the biochemical stability of methylated cytosines over extensive time frames, and provide the first direct evidence that cytosine methylation patterns are retained in DNA from ancient specimens. The ability to resolve cytosine methylation in ancient DNA provides a powerful means to study the role of epigenetics in evolution. PMID:22276161

  1. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  2. Strand-biased cytosine deamination at the replication fork causes cytosine to thymine mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Ashok S; Hao, Weilong; Townes, Jesse P; Lee, Heewook; Tang, Haixu; Foster, Patricia L

    2016-02-23

    The rate of cytosine deamination is much higher in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) than in double-stranded DNA, and copying the resulting uracils causes C to T mutations. To study this phenomenon, the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G (A3G-CTD), an ssDNA-specific cytosine deaminase, was expressed in an Escherichia coli strain defective in uracil repair (ung mutant), and the mutations that accumulated over thousands of generations were determined by whole-genome sequencing. C:G to T:A transitions dominated, with significantly more cytosines mutated to thymine in the lagging-strand template (LGST) than in the leading-strand template (LDST). This strand bias was present in both repair-defective and repair-proficient cells and was strongest and highly significant in cells expressing A3G-CTD. These results show that the LGST is accessible to cellular cytosine deaminating agents, explains the well-known GC skew in microbial genomes, and suggests the APOBEC3 family of mutators may target the LGST in the human genome.

  3. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  4. Application of Markov chain to the pattern of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    This research explains how Markov chain used to model the pattern of deoxyribonucleic acid mutations in mitochondrial (mitochondrial DNA). First, sign test was used to see a pattern of nucleotide bases that will appear at one position after the position of mutated nucleotide base. Results obtained from the sign test showed that for most cases, there exist a pattern of mutation except in the mutation cases of adenine to cytosine, adenine to thymine, and cytosine to guanine. Markov chain analysis results on data of mutations that occur in mitochondrial DNA indicate that one and two positions after the position of mutated nucleotide bases tend to be occupied by particular nucleotide bases. From this analysis, it can be said that the adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine will mutate if the nucelotide base at one and/or two positions after them is cytosine.

  5. Excess electron trapping in duplex DNA: long range transfer via stacked adenines.

    PubMed

    Black, Paul J; Bernhard, William A

    2012-11-08

    An understanding of charge transfer (CT) in DNA lies at the root of assessing the risks and benefits of exposure to ionizing radiation. Energy deposition by high-energy photons and fast-charged particles creates holes and excess electrons (EEs) in DNA, and the subsequent reactions determine the complexity of DNA damage and ultimately the risk of disease. Further interest in CT comes from the possibility that hole transfer, excess electron transfer (EET), or both in DNA might be used to develop nanoscale circuits. To study EET in DNA, EPR spectroscopy was used to determine the distribution of EE trapping by oligodeoxynucleotides irradiated and observed at 4 K. Our results indicate that stretches of consecutive adenine bases on the same strand serve as an ideal conduit for intrastrand EET in duplex DNA at 4 K. Specifically, we show that A is an efficient trap for EE at 4 K if, and only if, the A strand of the duplex does not contain one of the other three bases. If there is a T, C, or G on the A strand, then trapping occurs at T or C instead of A. This holds true for stretches up to 32 A's. Whereas T competes effectively against A for the EE, it does not compete effectively against C. Long stretches of T pass the majority of EE to C. Our results show that AT stretches channel EE to cytosine, an end point with significance to both radiation damage and the photochemical repair of pyrimidine dimers.

  6. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  7. Studies on guanine deaminase and its inhibitors in rat tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Josan, V.; Sanger, K. C. S.; Tewari, K. K.; Krishnan, P. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. In kidney, but not in rat whole brain and liver, guanine-deaminase activity was localized almost exclusively in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, as in brain and liver, the enzymic activity recovered in the supernatant was higher than that in the whole homogenate. The particulate fractions of kidney, especially the heavy mitochondria, brought about powerful inhibition of the supernatant guanine-deaminase activity. 2. In spleen, as in kidney, guanine-deaminase activity was localized in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, the particulate fractions did not inhibit the activity of the supernatant. 3. Guanine-deaminase activity in rat brain was absent from the cerebellum and present only in the cerebral hemispheres. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was located exclusively in the cerebellum, where it was associated with the particles sedimenting at 5000g from sucrose homogenates. 4. Homogenates of cerebral hemispheres, the separated cortex or the remaining portion of the hemispheres had significantly higher guanine-deaminase activity than homogenates of whole brain. The enzymic activity of the subcellular particulate fractions was nearly the same. 5. Guanine deaminase was purified from the 15000g supernatant of sucrose homogenates of whole brain. The enzyme separated as two distinct fractions, A and B, on DEAE-cellulose columns. 6. The guanine-deaminase activity of the light-mitochondrial fraction of whole brain was fully exposed and solubilized by treatment with Triton X-100, and partially purified. 7. Tested in the form of crude preparations, the inhibitor from kidney did not act on the brain and liver supernatant enzymes and the inhibitor from cerebellum did not act on kidney enzyme, but the inhibitor from liver acted on both brain and kidney enzyme. 8. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was purified from the heavy mitochondria of whole brain and liver and the 5000g residue of

  8. Cloning of the BssHII restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli : BssHII methyltransferase contains circularly permuted cytosine-5 methyltransferase motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Xiao, J; Posfai, J; Maunus, R; Benner, J

    1997-01-01

    BssHII restriction endonuclease cleaves 5'-GCGCGC-3' on double-stranded DNA between the first and second bases to generate a four base 5'overhang. BssHII restriction endonuclease was purified from the native Bacillus stearothermophilus H3 cells and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify the first 20 codons of the BssHII restriction endonuclease gene. The BssHII restriction endonuclease gene (bssHIIR) and the cognate BssHII methyltransferase gene (bssHIIM) were cloned in Escherichia coli by amplification of Bacillus stearothermophilus genomic DNA using PCR and inverse PCR. BssHII methyltransferase (M.BssHII) contains all 10 conserved cytosine-5 methyltransferase motifs, but motifs IX and X precede motifs I-VIII. Thus, the conserved motifs of M. BssHII are circularly permuted relative to the motif organizations of other cytosine-5 methyltransferases. M.BssHII and the non-cognate multi-specific phiBssHII methyltransferase, M.phiBss HII [Schumann,J. et al . (1995) Gene, 157, 103-104] share 34% identity in amino acid sequences from motifs I-VIII, and 40% identity in motifs IX-X. A conserved arginine is located upstream of a TV dipeptide in the N-terminus of M.BssHII that may be responsible for the recognition of the guanine 5' of the target cytosine. The BssHII restriction endonuclease gene was expressed in E.coli via a T7 expression vector. PMID:9321648

  9. Adenine oxidation by pyrite-generated hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Corey A; Fisher, Shawn C; Brownawell, Bruce J; Schoonen, Martin Aa

    2010-04-26

    Cellular exposure to particulate matter with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidization of biomolecules may lead to negative health outcomes. Evaluating the particle-induced formation of ROS and the oxidation products from reaction of ROS with biomolecules is useful for gaining a mechanistic understanding of particle-induced oxidative stress. Aqueous suspensions of pyrite particles have been shown to form hydroxyl radicals and degrade nucleic acids. Reactions between pyrite-induced hydroxyl radicals and nucleic acid bases, however, remain to be determined. Here, we compared the oxidation of adenine by Fenton-generated (i.e., ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide) hydroxyl radicals to adenine oxidation by hydroxyl radicals generated in pyrite aqueous suspensions. Results show that adenine oxidizes in the presence of pyrite (without the addition of hydrogen peroxide) and that the rate of oxidation is dependent on the pyrite loading. Adenine oxidation was prevented by addition of either catalase or ethanol to the pyrite/adenine suspensions, which implies that hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are causing the adenine oxidation. The adenine oxidation products, 8-oxoadenine and 2-hydroxyadenine, were the same whether hydroxyl radicals were generated by Fenton or pyrite-initiated reactions. Although nucleic acid bases are unlikely to be directly exposed to pyrite particles, the formation of ROS in the vicinity of cells may lead to oxidative stress.

  10. Three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-07

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K(i) of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pK(a) of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pK(a) of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  11. An efficient prebiotic synthesis of cytosine and uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the purines, the routes that have been proposed for the prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidines from simple precursors give only low yields. Cytosine can be synthesized from cyanoacetylene and cyanate; the former precursor is produced from a spark discharge in a CH4/N2 mixture and is an abundant interstellar molecule. But this reaction requires relatively high concentrations of cyanate (> 0.1 M), which are unlikely to occur in aqueous media as cyanate is hydrolysed rapidly to CO2 and NH3. An alternative route that has been explored is the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde (formed by hydrolysis of cyanoacetylene) with urea. But at low concentrations of urea, this reaction produces no detectable quantities of cytosine. Here we show that in concentrated urea solution--such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon or in pools on drying beaches on the early Earth--cyanoacetaldehyde reacts to form cytosine in yields of 30-50%, from which uracil can be formed by hydrolysis. These reactions provide a plausible route to the pyrimidine bases required in the RNA world.

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  13. Detection of Modified Forms of Cytosine Using Sensitive Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Abakir, Abdulkadir; Wheldon, Lee; Johnson, Andrew D.; Laurent, Patrick; Ruzov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine bases (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) occurring in vertebrate genomes is usually associated with transcriptional silencing. 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) are the recently discovered modified cytosine bases produced by enzymatic oxidation of 5mC, whose biological functions remain relatively obscure. A number of approaches ranging from biochemical to antibody based techniques have been employed to study the genomic distribution and global content of these modifications in various biological systems. Although some of these approaches can be useful for quantitative assessment of these modified forms of 5mC, most of these methods do not provide any spatial information regarding the distribution of these DNA modifications in different cell types, required for correct understanding of their functional roles. Here we present a highly sensitive method for immunochemical detection of the modified forms of cytosine. This method permits co-detection of these epigenetic marks with protein lineage markers and can be employed to study their nuclear localization, thus, contributing to deciphering their potential biological roles in different experimental contexts. PMID:27585398

  14. A 2-iminohydantoin from the oxidation of guanine.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenjie; Sangaiah, R; Degen, Diana E; Gold, Avram; Jayaraj, K; Koshlap, Karl M; Boysen, Gunnar; Williams, Jason; Tomer, Kenneth B; Ball, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    The nucleobase guanine was oxidized with dimethyldioxirane (DMDO) to explore the role of epoxidizing agents in oxidative DNA damage. Treatment of guanine with 10% molar excess DMDO in aqueous solution at 0 degrees C and pH 7.5 followed by workup under mild conditions gave 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (1) as the sole isolable product in 71% yield. The structure of 1 was established on the basis of mass spectrometry and NMR studies on 1 and its isotopomers generated by the oxidation of [4-(13)C] and [7-(15)N]guanine, which yield [5-(13)C]1 and [7-(15)N]1. The distribution of 13C and 15N labels in the isotopomeric products supports initial epoxidation of the C4-C5 bond of guanine followed by a 1,2-acyl migration of guanine C6. Compound 1 is suggested as a possible primary DNA lesion from putative epoxidizing agents, including hydroperoxides present during biological processes such as lipid peroxidation.

  15. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  16. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR.

  17. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives.

  18. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  19. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  20. Intermolecular band dispersion in quasi-one-dimensional adenine assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Fleurence, Antoine; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko; Friedlein, Rainer

    2011-12-07

    Highly-ordered, hydrated adenine multilayer films grown on the surface of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite, HOPG(0001), display extended electronic states, affording anisotropic band-like charge transport along the π-π stacking direction.

  1. A three-state model for the photophysics of adenine.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2006-08-25

    An ab initio theoretical study at the CASPT2 level is reported on minimum energy reaction paths, state minima, transition states, reaction barriers, and conical intersections on the potential energy hypersurfaces of two tautomers of adenine: 9H- and 7H-adenine. The obtained results led to a complete interpretation of the photophysics of adenine and derivatives, both under jet-cooled conditions and in solution, within a three-state model. The ultrafast subpicosecond fluorescence decay measured in adenine is attributed to the low-lying conical intersection (gs/pipi* La)(CI), reached from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) state along a path which is found to be barrierless only in 9H-adenine, while for the 7H tautomer the presence of an intermediate plateau corresponding to an NH2-twisted conformation may explain the absence of ultrafast decay in 7-substituted compounds. A secondary picosecond decay is assigned to a path involving switches towards two other states, 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*), ultimately leading to another conical intersection with the ground state, (gs/npi*), with a perpendicular disposition of the amino group. The topology of the hypersurfaces and the state properties explain the absence of secondary decay in 9-substituted adenines in water in terms of the higher position of the 1(npi*) state and also that the 1(pipi* Lb) state of 7H-adenine is responsible for the observed fluorescence in water. A detailed discussion comparing recent experimental and theoretical findings is given. As for other nucleobases, the predominant role of a pipi*-type state in the ultrafast deactivation of adenine is confirmed.

  2. The Shizosaccharomyces pombe homolog (SpMYH) of the Escherichia coli MutY is required for removal of guanine from 8-oxoguanine/guanine mispairs to prevent G:C to C:G transversions.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takashi; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Tano, Keizo; Yasuhira, Shinji; Yonei, Shuji; Zhang, Qiu-Mei

    2005-06-01

    The frequency of G:C-->C:G transversions significantly increases upon exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or reactive oxygen species. Transversions can be prevented by base excision repair, which removes the causative modified bases from DNA. Our previous studies revealed that MutY is responsible for removing guanine from 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine/guanine mispairs (8-oxoG/G) and prevents the generation of G:C-->C:G transversions in E. coli. SpMYH, a homolog of E. coli MutY, had been identified and characterized in the fission yeast S. pombe. Purified SpMYH has adenine DNA glycosylase activity on A/8-oxoG and A/G mismatch-containing oligonucleotides. In this study, we examined whether SpMYH has a similar activity allowing it to remove G from 8-oxoG/G in DNA. The purified SpMYH tightly bound to duplex oligonucleotides containing 8-oxoG/G and removed the unmodified G from 8-oxoG/G as efficiently as A from 8-oxoG/A. The activity was absent in the cell extract prepared from an SpMYH-knockout strain of S. pombe. The expression of SpMYH markedly reduced the frequency of spontaneous G:C-->C:G transversions in the E. coli mutY mutant. These results demonstrate that SpMYH is involved in the repair of 8-oxoG/G, by which it prevents mutations induced by oxidative stress in S. pombe.

  3. Global deformation facilitates flipping of damaged 8-oxo-guanine and guanine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Giuseppe; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of guanine (Gua) to form 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG) is a frequent mutagenic DNA lesion. DNA repair glycosylases such as the bacterial MutM can effciently recognize and eliminate the 8oxoG damage by base excision. The base excision requires a 8oxoG looping out (flipping) from an intrahelical base paired to an extrahelical state where the damaged base is in the enzyme active site. It is still unclear how the damage is identified and flipped from an energetically stable stacked and paired state without any external energy source. Free energy simulations have been employed to study the flipping process for globally deformed DNA conformational states. DNA deformations were generated by systematically untwisting the DNA to mimic its conformation in repair enzyme encounter complex. The simulations indicate that global DNA untwisting deformation toward the enzyme bound form alone (without protein) significantly reduces the penalty for damage flipping to about half of the penalty observed in regular DNA. The finding offers a mechanistic explanation how binding free energy that is transformed to binding induced DNA deformation facilitates flipping and helps to rapidly detect a damaged base. It is likely of general relevance since repair enzyme binding frequently results in significant deformation of the target DNA. PMID:27651459

  4. Low temperature FTIR spectroscopy and hydrogen bonding in cytosine polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, M.; Shoham, G.; Reva, I.; Fausto, R.

    2004-01-01

    The FTIR spectra of both the pure NH and isotopically substituted ND (<10% and >90% D) polycrystalline cytosine were recorded in the range 400-4000 cm -1 as a function of temperature (10-300 K). For the first time, uncoupled NH(D) stretching mode bands of amine and imine groups were observed in the spectra of isotopically diluted cytosine at low temperatures. These bands correspond to the three distinct H-bonds that are present in the crystal, in agreement with the available data obtained by structural methods. At least nine bands were observed below 1000 cm -1 and, in consonance with their temperature and isotopic exchange behavior, were assigned to the NH proton out-of-the-plane bending modes. Six of these bands were found to correspond to additional "disordered" H-bonds, which could not be observed by structural methods. Empirical correlations of spectral and thermodynamic parameters enabled to estimate the contribution of the H-bonds to the sublimation enthalpy of the crystal, in agreement with independent experimental data.

  5. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Taccone, Martín I.; Berdakin, Matías; Pino, Gustavo A.; Féraud, Geraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag{sup +}) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg{sup +} complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt{sup +}) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag{sup +}, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag{sup +} could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  6. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Sch. Agustsdottir, Inger M.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Edvardsson, Vidar O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. Study Design An observational cohort study. Setting & Participants All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Outcomes Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD and kidney failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in eGFR. Measurements Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Results Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were female and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6–67.9) years. The median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0–31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 patients (55%) and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3–5, including 11 patients (21%) with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 patients (62%) had had kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stage 3–5. Of the 14 (26%) patients with CKD stage 5, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 patients (55%). The median eGFR slope was −0.38 (range, −21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in patients receiving treatment with xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and −5.74 (range, −75.8 to −0.10) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (p=0.001). Limitations Use of observational registry data. Conclusions Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, while nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. PMID:26724837

  7. [Study of some pharmacological properties of a new adenine derivative].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov; Ozerov, A A; Motin, V G; Iasnetsov, Vik V; Karsanova, S K; Ivanov, Iu V; Chel'naia, N A

    2014-01-01

    It is established that the new compound, 9-[2-(4-isopropylphenoxy)ethyl]adenine (9-IPE-adenine) in a dose of 10 mg/kg per day produces neuroprotective effect in rats with brain ischemia model. 9-IPE-adenine decreased the neurologic deficiency 1.2 times more effectively (p < 0.05) than the reference drug mexidol in analogous dose, and had equal effect with this drug at 25 mg/kg per day on the neurologic deficiency and survival of animals. Electrophysiological studies in hippocampal slices in rats showed that 9-IPE-adenine depressed orthodromic population spikes in CA1 area by 42 ± 4%. Non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor complex MK-801, in contrast to D-AP5 (competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) and CNQX (competitive AMPA receptor antagonist), enhanced the depressive effect of the new drug more than two times. These ese results are indicative of the ability of 9-IPE-adenine to modulate the ion channel of NMDA receptor complex.

  8. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-03

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  9. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  10. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound homodimers determined by guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry: application to cytosine and 5-substituted cytosines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2013-11-19

    Base-pairing interactions in proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)·C) are the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Permethylation of cytosine in extended (CCG)·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats has been shown to cause fragile-X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. Oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo- or 5-fluorocytosine can bind to proteins that selectively bind methylated DNA, suggesting that halogenated cytosine damage products can potentially mimic methylation signals. However, the influence of methylation or halogenation on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of proton-bound dimers of cytosine and their impact on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations is presently unknown. To address this, proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and 5-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo-, and 5-iodocytosine are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The BPEs of proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and the modified cytosines are measured by threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. 5-Methylation of cytosine is found to increase the BPE and would therefore tend to stabilize DNA i-motif conformations. In contrast, 5-halogenation lowers the BPE. However, the BPEs of the proton-bound 5-halocytosine homodimers examined here still significantly exceed that of Watson-Crick G·C base pairs, such that DNA i-motif conformations should be preserved in the presence of these modifications. Excellent agreement between TCID measured and B3LYP calculated BPEs is found, suggesting that B3LYP calculations can be used to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  11. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  12. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  13. Adenine and 2-aminopurine: paradigms of modern theoretical photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio C

    2006-06-06

    Distinct photophysical behavior of nucleobase adenine and its constitutional isomer, 2-aminopurine, has been studied by using quantum chemical methods, in particular an accurate ab initio multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory. After light irradiation, the efficient, ultrafast energy dissipation observed for nonfluorescent 9H-adenine is explained here by the nonradiative internal conversion process taking place along a barrierless reaction path from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) excited state toward a low-lying conical intersection (CI) connected with the ground state. In contrast, the strong fluorescence recorded for 2-aminopurine at 4.0 eV with large decay lifetime is interpreted by the presence of a minimum in the 1(pipi* La) hypersurface lying below the lowest CI and the subsequent potential energy barrier required to reach the funnel to the ground state. Secondary deactivation channels were found in the two systems related to additional CIs involving the 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*) states. Although in 9H-adenine a population switch between both states is proposed, in 7H-adenine this may be perturbed by a relatively larger barrier to access the 1(npi*) state, and, therefore, the 1(pipi* Lb) state becomes responsible for the weak fluorescence measured in aqueous adenine at approximately 4.5 eV. In contrast to previous models that explained fluorescence quenching in adenine, unlike in 2-aminopurine, on the basis of the vibronic coupling of the nearby 1(pipi*) and 1(npi*) states, the present results indicate that the 1(npi*) state does not contribute to the leading photophysical event and establish the prevalence of a model based on the CI concept in modern photochemistry.

  14. Selective inhibitory effect of (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine and 2'-nor-cyclic GMP on adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baba, M; Mori, S; Shigeta, S; De Clercq, E

    1987-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of 20 selected antiviral compounds on the replication of adenoviruses (types 1 to 8) in vitro were investigated. While 18 compounds were ineffective, 2 compounds, namely (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA] and 9-[(2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)oxymethyl]guanine P-oxide (2'-nor-cyclic GMP), were highly effective against all adenovirus types assayed in human embryonic fibroblast cultures. Their 50% inhibitory doses were 1.1 microgram/ml for (S)-HPMPA and 4.1 micrograms/ml for 2'-nor-cyclic GMP. They were nontoxic for the host cells at the effective antiviral doses.

  15. Selective inhibitory effect of (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine and 2'-nor-cyclic GMP on adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; Mori, S; Shigeta, S; De Clercq, E

    1987-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of 20 selected antiviral compounds on the replication of adenoviruses (types 1 to 8) in vitro were investigated. While 18 compounds were ineffective, 2 compounds, namely (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA] and 9-[(2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)oxymethyl]guanine P-oxide (2'-nor-cyclic GMP), were highly effective against all adenovirus types assayed in human embryonic fibroblast cultures. Their 50% inhibitory doses were 1.1 microgram/ml for (S)-HPMPA and 4.1 micrograms/ml for 2'-nor-cyclic GMP. They were nontoxic for the host cells at the effective antiviral doses. PMID:3566256

  16. Negative ion formation in potassium-adenine collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; García, G.; Limáo Vieira, P.

    2016-09-01

    We have devoted experimental studies to time-of-flight negative ion formation in electron transfer experiments from neutral potassium atoms with neutral adenine molecules1. Total partial cross sections have been obtained as a function of the collision energy, together with branching ratios for the most relevant fragment anions. Additional set of measurements in adenine derivatives have been performed in order to probe the role of negative ions as well as to probe whether site- and bond-selective excision is also a prevalent mechanism within electron transfer in atom-molecule collision experiments.

  17. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L.; Muresan, L. M.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (R{sub s}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), Warburg impedance (Z{sub W}) and double layer capacitance (C{sub dl})

  18. Guanine is a growth factor for Legionella species.

    PubMed Central

    Pine, L; Franzus, M J; Malcolm, G B

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of previously described chemically defined media for the growth of Legionella pneumophila showed that these media supported poor growth of several strains of L. pneumophila and did not support growth of certain of the Legionella species described later. Growth was stimulated by the dialysate from yeast extract but not by the nondialyzable fraction. Further investigations indicated that the active factors from the yeast extract dialysate were purine or pyrimidine derivatives, and certain known purines and pyrimidines were found to stimulate growth. Of these, guanine universally stimulated growth of all Legionella strains and was a growth requirement for several of the species tested. A balanced, N-(2-acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid-buffered, chemically defined medium having guanine or a purine-pyrimidine mix is presented for the general growth of Legionella species. PMID:3700600

  19. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5′–5′ manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5′–5′ and 3′–3′ stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  20. Photodynamic therapy-driven induction of suicide cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Bil, Jacek; Wlodarski, Pawel; Winiarska, Magdalena; Kurzaj, Zuzanna; Issat, Tadeusz; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Wegiel, Barbara; Dulak, Jozef; Golab, Jakub

    2010-04-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors is associated with induction of hypoxia that results in activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Several observations indicate that increased HIFs transcriptional activity in tumor cells is associated with cytoprotective responses that limit cytotoxic effectiveness of PDT. Therefore, we decided to examine whether this cytoprotective mechanism could be intentionally used for designing more efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity. To this end we transfected tumor cells with a plasmid vector carrying a suicide cytosine deaminase gene driven by a promoter containing hypoxia response elements (HRE). The presence of such a genetic molecular beacon rendered tumor cells sensitive to cytotoxic effects of a non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The results of this study provides a proof of concept that inducible cytoprotective mechanisms can be exploited to render tumor cells more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of prodrugs activated by products of suicide genes.

  1. `Guanigma': the revised structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Anna; Gur, Dvir; Polishchuk, Iryna; Levy, Davide; Pokroy, Boaz; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Addadi, Lia; Kronik, Leeor; Leiserowitz, Leslie

    Living organisms display a spectrum of colors, produced by pigmentation, structural coloration, or both. A relatively well-studied system, which produces colors via an array of alternating anhydrous guanine crystals and cytoplasm, is responsible for the metallic luster of many fish. The structure of biogenic anhydrous guanine was believed to be the same as that of the synthetic one - a monoclinic polymorph. Here we re-examine the structure of biogenic guanine, using experimental X-ray and electron diffraction (ED) data exposing troublesome inconsistencies - namely, a 'guanigma'. To address this, we sought alternative candidate polymorphs using symmetry and packing considerations, then used first principles calculations to determine whether the selected candidates could be energetically stable. We identified theoretically a different monoclinic polymorph, were able to synthesize it, and to confirm using X-ray diffraction that it is this polymorph that occurs in biogenic samples. However, the ED data were still not consistent with this polymorph, but rather with a theoretically generated orthorhombic polymorph. This apparent inconsistency was resolved by showing how the ED pattern could be affected by crystal structural faults composed of offset molecular layers.

  2. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines: implications for the stability of DNA i-motif conformations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-01-08

    The DNA i-motif conformation was discovered in (CCG)•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats, which are associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The DNA i-motif is a four-stranded structure whose strands are held together by proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)•C). The stronger base-pairing interactions in C(+)•C proton-bound dimers as compared to Watson-Crick G•C base pairs are the major forces responsible for stabilization of i-motif conformations. Methylation of cytosine results in silencing of the FMR1 gene and causes fragile X syndrome. However, the influence of methylation or other modifications such as halogenation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) in the i-motif remains elusive. To address this, proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, 5-bromocytosine, and 5-iodocytosine are probed in detail. Experimentally, the BPEs of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines are determined using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. All modifications at the 5-position of cytosine are found to lower the BPE and therefore would tend to destabilize DNA i-motif conformations. However, the BPEs in these proton-bound heterodimers still significantly exceed those of the Watson-Crick G•C and neutral C•C base pairs, suggesting that C(+)•C mismatches are still energetically favored such that i-motif conformations are preserved. Excellent agreement between TCID measured BPEs and B3LYP calculated values is found with the def2-TZVPPD and 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis sets, suggesting that calculations at these levels of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  3. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification.

  4. Internucleotide J-couplings and chemical shifts of the N-H···N hydrogen-bonds in the radiation-damaged guanine-cytosine base pairs.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Laibin; Han, Li; Sun, Wenming; Bu, Yuxiang

    2011-04-30

    Internucleotide (2h)J(NN) spin-spin couplings and chemical shifts (δ((1)H) and Δδ((15)N)) of N-H···N H-bond units in the natural and radiation-damaged G-C base pairs were predicted using the appropriate density functional theory calculations with a large basis set. Four possible series of the damaged G-C pairs (viz., dehydrogenated and deprotonated G-C pairs, GC(•-) and GC(•+) radicals) were discussed carefully in this work. Computational NMR results show that radicalization and anionization of the base pairs can yield strong effect on their (2h)J(NN) spin scalar coupling constants and the corresponding chemical shifts. Thus, variations of the NMR parameters associated with the N-H···N H-bonds may be taken as an important criterion for prejudging whether the natural G-C pair is radiation-damaged or not. Analysis shows that (2h)J(NN) couplings are strongly interrelated with the energy gaps (ΔE(LP→σ*)) and the second-order interaction energies (E(2)) between the donor N lone-pair (LP(N)) and the acceptor σ*(N-H) localized NBO orbitals, and also are sensitive to the electron density distributions over the σ*(N-H) orbital, indicating that (2h)J(NN) couplings across the N-H···N H-bonds are charge-transfer-controlled. This is well supported by variation of the electrostatic potential surfaces and corresponding charge transfer amount between G and C moieties. It should be noted that although the NMR spectra for the damaged G-C pair radicals are unavailable now and the states of the radicals are usually detected by the electron spin resonance, this study provides a correlation of the properties of the damaged DNA species with some of the electronic parameters associated with the NMR spectra for the understanding of the different state character of the damaged DNA bases.

  5. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  6. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  7. Surface study of gallium- and aluminum- doped graphenes upon adsorption of cytosine: DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali; Zareyee, Daryoush; Peyravi, Majid; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of cytosine molecule on Al- and Ga- doped graphenes is studied using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The energetically most stable geometries of cytosine on both Al- and Ga- doped graphenes are determined and the adsorption energies are calculated. The net charge of transfer as well as local charge of doped atoms upon adsorption of cytosine are studied by natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. Orbital hybridizing of complexes was searched by frontier molecular orbital theory (FMO), and density of states (DOS). Depending on the side of cytosine, there are four possible sites for its adsorption on doped graphene; denoted as P1, P2, P3, and P4, respectively. The order of binding energy in the case of Al-doped graphene is found as P1 ˃ P4 ˃ P3 ˃ P2. Interestingly, the order in the case of Ga-doped graphene changes to: P4 ∼ P1˃ P3˃ P2. Both surfaces show superior adsorbent property, resulting chemisorption of cytosine, especially at P1 and P4 position configurations. The NBO charge analysis reveals that the charge transfers from Al- and Ga- doped graphene sheets to cytosine. The electronic properties of both surfaces undertake important changes after cytosine adsorption, which indicates notable change in its electrical conductivity.

  8. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  9. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  10. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  11. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  12. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  13. Hydrogen bonding in proton-transfer complexes of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Reji; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2008-02-01

    Protons-transfer complexes (1:1) of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids have been crystallized and single crystal structures have been solved by X-ray crystallography. Both cocrystals exhibit layered structures, each layer containing a plethora of N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the proton-transfer duplets. The cytosine-trimesic acid complex exhibits a bilayered structure (2.87 Å) in contrast to the commonly observed layered structure seen in the cytosine-pyromellitic acid complex (3.98 Å). Another layered system, an adduct of pyromellitic acid and 1,4-dihydroxy benzene, has also been studied.

  14. In vitro adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zietara, Marek S; Słomińska, Ewa; Rurangwa, Eugene; Ollevier, Frans; Swierczyński, Julian; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2004-08-01

    It has been shown recently that African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) spermatozoa possess relatively low ATP content and low adenylate energy charge (AEC). One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the spermatozoa actively catabolize adenine nucleotides. A relatively high rate of such catabolism could then contribute to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in the spermatozoa in vitro. To check this hypothesis, we investigated ATP content and adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa stored at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine as an energetic substrate. Our results indicate that the storage of African catfish sperm at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine causes time-dependent ATP depletion. In contrast to ATP, the AMP content increases significantly during the same period of sperm storage, while the ADP increases only slightly. Moreover, a significant increase of inosine and hypoxanthine content was also found. Hypoxanthine was accumulated in the storage medium, but xanthine was found neither in spermatozoa nor in the storage medium. It indicates that hypoxanthine is not converted to xanthine, probably due to lack of xanthine oxidase activity in catfish spermatozoa. Present results suggest that adenine nucleotides may be converted to hypoxanthine according to the following pathway: ATP-->ADP-->AMP (adenosine/IMP)-->inosine-->hypoxanthine. Moreover, hypoxanthine seems to be the end product of adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa. In conclusion, our results suggest that a relatively high rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism contributes to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in African catfish spermatozoa in vitro.

  15. Guanine oxidation by electron transfer: one- versus two-electron oxidation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kupan, Adam; Saulière, Aude; Broussy, Sylvain; Seguy, Christel; Pratviel, Geneviève; Meunier, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The degeneracy of the guanine radical cation, which is formed in DNA by oxidation of guanine by electron transfer, was studied by a detailed analysis of the oxidation products of guanine on oligonucleotide duplexes and by labeling experiments. It was shown that imidazolone, the major product of guanine oxidation, is formed through a one-electron oxidation process and incorporates one oxygen atom from O2. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine by a two-electron oxidation process was a minor pathway. The two-electron oxidation mechanism was also evidenced by the formation of a tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane adduct.

  16. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-03

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  17. Study on the oxidation form of adenine in phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zhi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Feng-Xia; Ye, Yong; Xie, Ji-Min

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of adenine in phosphate buffer solution is investigated using square-wave voltammetry and in situ UV spectroelectrochemistry. The geometry of adenine and the derivatives optimized at DFTB3LYP-6-31G (d, p)-PCM level is in agreement with the crystal structure, and the imitated UV spectra of adenine and the product at electrode are consistent with the in situ UV spectra. The relationship between the electrochemical property and the molecular structure is also discussed. The experimental and theoretical results show that the adenine oxidation origins from the neutral adenine.

  18. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  19. Cytosine-to-uracil deamination by SssI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stier, Ildikó; Kiss, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase M.SssI shares the specificity of eukaryotic DNA methyltransferases (CG) and is an important model and experimental tool in the study of eukaryotic DNA methylation. Previously, M.SssI was shown to be able to catalyze deamination of the target cytosine to uracil if the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) was missing from the reaction. To test whether this side-activity of the enzyme can be used to distinguish between unmethylated and C5-methylated cytosines in CG dinucleotides, we re-investigated, using a sensitive genetic reversion assay, the cytosine deaminase activity of M.SssI. Confirming previous results we showed that M.SssI can deaminate cytosine to uracil in a slow reaction in the absence of SAM and that the rate of this reaction can be increased by the SAM analogue 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine. We could not detect M.SssI-catalyzed deamination of C5-methylcytosine ((m5)C). We found conditions where the rate of M.SssI mediated C-to-U deamination was at least 100-fold higher than the rate of (m5)C-to-T conversion. Although this difference in reactivities suggests that the enzyme could be used to identify C5-methylated cytosines in the epigenetically important CG dinucleotides, the rate of M.SssI mediated cytosine deamination is too low to become an enzymatic alternative to the bisulfite reaction. Amino acid replacements in the presumed SAM binding pocket of M.SssI (F17S and G19D) resulted in greatly reduced methyltransferase activity. The G19D variant showed cytosine deaminase activity in E. coli, at physiological SAM concentrations. Interestingly, the C-to-U deaminase activity was also detectable in an E. coli ung (+) host proficient in uracil excision repair.

  20. Roles, and establishment, maintenance and erasing of the epigenetic cytosine methylation marks in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumari, Renu; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay

    2013-12-01

    Heritable information in plants consists of genomic information in DNA sequence and epigenetic information superimposed on DNA sequence. The latter is in the form of cytosine methylation at CG, CHG and CHH elements (where H = A, T orC) and a variety of histone modifications in nucleosomes. The epialleles arising from cytosine methylation marks on the nuclear genomic loci have better heritability than the epiallelic variation due to chromatin marks. Phenotypic variation is increased manifold by epiallele comprised methylomes. Plants (angiosperms) have highly conserved genetic mechanisms to establish, maintain or erase cytosine methylation from epialleles. The methylation marks in plants fluctuate according to the cell/tissue/organ in the vegetative and reproductive phases of plant life cycle. They also change according to environment. Epialleles arise by gain or loss of cytosine methylation marks on genes. The changes occur due to the imperfection of the processes that establish and maintain the marks and on account of spontaneous and stress imposed removal of marks. Cytosine methylation pattern acquired in response to abiotic or biotic stress is often inherited over one to several subsequent generations.Cytosine methylation marks affect physiological functions of plants via their effect(s) on gene expression levels. They also repress transposable elements that are abundantly present in plant genomes. The density of their distribution along chromosome lengths affects meiotic recombination rate, while their removal increases mutation rate. Transposon activation due to loss of methylation causes rearrangements such that new gene regulatory networks arise and genes for microRNAs may originate. Cytosine methylation dynamics contribute to evolutionary changes. This review presents and discusses the available evidence on origin, removal and roles of cytosine methylation and on related processes, such as RNA directed DNA methylation, imprinting, paramutation and

  1. Structure-Based Design of Trna-Guanine Transglycosylase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    Taking the development of inhibitors for the tRNA-modifying enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) as an example, the scope of a structure-based drug development project will be demonstrated, performed via several cycles of iterative design. The described example is based on studies, performed at ETH-Zurich and University of Marburg in joint collaboration. As these studies have been executed in an academic environment, different tools of structure-based design have been applied and several issues of more fundamental interest to the methodological background of the project could be addressed.

  2. The CHH motif in sugar beet satellite DNA: a modulator for cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schubert, Veit; Viehoever, Prisca; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Methylation of DNA is important for the epigenetic silencing of repetitive DNA in plant genomes. Knowledge about the cytosine methylation status of satellite DNAs, a major class of repetitive DNA, is scarce. One reason for this is that arrays of tandemly arranged sequences are usually collapsed in next-generation sequencing assemblies. We applied strategies to overcome this limitation and quantified the level of cytosine methylation and its pattern in three satellite families of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) which differ in their abundance, chromosomal localization and monomer size. We visualized methylation levels along pachytene chromosomes with respect to small satellite loci at maximum resolution using chromosome-wide fluorescent in situ hybridization complemented with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. Only reduced methylation of many satellite arrays was obtained. To investigate methylation at the nucleotide level we performed bisulfite sequencing of 1569 satellite sequences. We found that the level of methylation of cytosine strongly depends on the sequence context: cytosines in the CHH motif show lower methylation (44-52%), while CG and CHG motifs are more strongly methylated. This affects the overall methylation of satellite sequences because CHH occurs frequently while CG and CHG are rare or even absent in the satellite arrays investigated. Evidently, CHH is the major target for modulation of the cytosine methylation level of adjacent monomers within individual arrays and contributes to their epigenetic function. This strongly indicates that asymmetric cytosine methylation plays a role in the epigenetic modification of satellite repeats in plant genomes.

  3. Electron attachment to the cytosine-centered DNA single strands: does base stacking matter?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-02-02

    Electron attachment to the trimer of nucleotide, dGpdCpdG, has been investigated by a quantum mechanical approach at a reliable level of theory. The study of the electron attached dGpdCpdG species demonstrates that cytosine contained DNA single strands have a strong tendency to capture low-energy electrons and to form electronically stable cytosine-centered radical anions. The comparative study of the model molecules pdCpdG and dGpdCp reveals that base stacking has little contribution to the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of cytosine in DNA single strands. Additionally, the base-base stacking does not affect the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the cytosine-centered radicals. Intrastrand H-bonding is found to be critical in increasing the values of the AEA and VDE. However, base-base stacking is revealed to be important in enlarging the vertical electron affinity (VEA) of cytosine. The electron attachment to the cytosine moiety intensifies the intrastrand H-bonding between the neighboring G and C bases. This process disrupts the base-base stacking interaction in the radical anion of dGpdCpdG.

  4. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  5. TET proteins: on the frenetic hunt for new cytosine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic genome marking and chromatin regulation are central to establishing tissue-specific gene expression programs, and hence to several biological processes. Until recently, the only known epigenetic mark on DNA in mammals was 5-methylcytosine, established and propagated by DNA methyltransferases and generally associated with gene repression. All of a sudden, a host of new actors—novel cytosine modifications and the ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes—has appeared on the scene, sparking great interest. The challenge is now to uncover the roles they play and how they relate to DNA demethylation. Knowledge is accumulating at a frantic pace, linking these new players to essential biological processes (e.g. cell pluripotency and development) and also to cancerogenesis. Here, we review the recent progress in this exciting field, highlighting the TET enzymes as epigenetic DNA modifiers, their physiological roles, and their functions in health and disease. We also discuss the need to find relevant TET interactants and the newly discovered TET–O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) pathway. PMID:23625996

  6. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine).

  7. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  8. The nucleobase adenine as a signalling molecule in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Thimm, D; Schiedel, A C; Peti-Peterdi, J; Kishore, B K; Müller, C E

    2015-04-01

    In 2002, the first receptor activated by the nucleobase adenine was discovered in rats. In the past years, two adenine receptors (AdeRs) in mice and one in Chinese hamsters, all of which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), were cloned and pharmacologically characterized. Based on the nomenclature for other purinergic receptor families (P1 for adenosine receptors and P2 for nucleotide, e.g. ATP, receptors), AdeRs were designated P0 receptors. Pharmacological data indicate the existence of G protein-coupled AdeRs in pigs and humans as well; however, those have not been cloned so far. Current data suggest a role for adenine and AdeRs in renal proximal tubules. Furthermore, AdeRs are suggested to be functional counterplayers of vasopressin in the collecting duct system, thus exerting diuretic effects. We are only at the beginning of understanding the significance of this new class of purinergic receptors, which might become future drug targets.

  9. Guanine binding to gold nanoparticles through nonbonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Sun, Chang Q; Hirao, Hajime

    2013-11-28

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used as nanocarriers in gene delivery. However, the binding mechanism between gold nanoparticles and DNA bases remains a puzzle. We performed density functional theory calculations with and without dispersion correction on Au(N)( (N = 13, 55, or 147) nanoparticles in high-symmetry cuboctahedral structures to understand the mechanism of their binding with guanine at the under-coordinated sites. Our study verified that: (i) negative charges transfer from the inner area to the surface of a nanoparticle as a result of the surface quantum trapping effect; and (ii) the valence states shift up toward the Fermi level, and thereby participate more actively in the binding to guanine. These effects are more prominent in a smaller nanoparticle, which has a larger surface-to-volume ratio. Additional fragment orbital analysis revealed that: (i) electron donation from the lone-pair orbital of N to the unoccupied orbital of the Au cluster occurs in all complexes; (ii) π back-donation occurs from the polarized Au d(yz) orbital to the N p(y)-π* orbital when there is no Au···H-N hydrogen bond, and, (iii) depending on the configuration, Au···H-N hydrogen bonding can also exist, to which the Au occupied orbital and the H-N unoccupied orbital contribute.

  10. Regulation of the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide- and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two distinct l-glutamate dehydrogenases. These enzymes are affected in a reciprocal fashion by growth on ammonia or dicarboxylic amino acids as the nitrogen source. The specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) (anabolic) enzyme is highest in ammonia-grown cells and is reduced in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate. Conversely, the specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) (catabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase is highest in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate and is much lower in cells grown on ammonia. The specific activity of both enzymes is very low in nitrogen-starved yeast. Addition of the ammonia analogue methylamine to the growth medium reduces the specific activity of the NAD-dependent enzyme and increases the specific activity of the NADP-dependent enzyme. PMID:4147647

  11. Translesion synthesis by human DNA polymerase eta across oxidative products of guanine.

    PubMed

    Kino, Katuhito; Ito, Nobutoshi; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Guanine is the most oxidizable base among natural bases. 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is the typical oxidative product, but the amount of 8-oxoG does not directly reflect the strength of oxidative stress. Imidazolone, oxazolone and guanidinohydantoin are oxidative products of guanine and 8-oxoG. Here, we investigated enzymatic reactions with human DNA polymerase eta on these lesions.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  13. Adenine versus guanine DNA adducts of aristolochic acids: role of the carcinogen-purine linkage in the differential global genomic repair propensity.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Preetleen; Sharma, Purshotam; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2015-09-03

    Computational modeling is employed to provide a plausible structural explanation for the experimentally-observed differential global genome repair (GGR) propensity of the ALII-N(2)-dG and ALII-N(6)-dA DNA adducts of aristolochic acid II. Our modeling studies suggest that an intrinsic twist at the carcinogen-purine linkage of ALII-N(2)-dG induces lesion site structural perturbations and conformational heterogeneity of damaged DNA. These structural characteristics correlate with the relative repair propensities of AA-adducts, where GGR recognition occurs for ALII-N(2)-dG, but is evaded for intrinsically planar ALII-N(6)-dA that minimally distorts DNA and restricts the conformational flexibility of the damaged duplex. The present analysis on the ALII adduct model systems will inspire future experimental studies on these adducts, and thereby may extend the list of structural factors that directly correlate with the propensity for GGR recognition.

  14. Mutation from guanine to adenine in 25S rRNA at the position equivalent to E. coli A2058 does not confer erythromycin sensitivity in Sacchromyces cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Bommakanti, Ananth S.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    The macrolide erythromycin binds to the large subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome near the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) and inhibits elongation of new peptide chains beyond a few amino acids. Nucleotides A2058 and A2059 (E. coli numbering) in 23S rRNA play a crucial role in the binding of erythromycin, and mutation of nucleotide A2058 confers erythromycin resistance in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. There are high levels of sequence and structural similarity in the PTC of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. However, eukaryotic ribosomes are resistant to erythromycin and the presence of a G at the position equivalent to E. coli nucleotide A2058 is believed to be the reason. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a G to A mutation at this position of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 25S rRNA and analyzed sensitivity toward erythromycin. Neither growth studies nor erythromycin binding assays on mutated yeast ribosomes indicated any erythromycin sensitivity in mutated yeast strains. These results suggest that the identity of nucleotide 2058 is not the only determinant responsible for the difference in erythromycin sensitivity between yeast and prokaryotes. PMID:18218702

  15. Mobility enhancement of organic field-effect transistor based on guanine trap-neutralizing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yifan; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D.; Katz, Howard E.

    2016-10-01

    We introduced a nucleic acid component guanine as a trap-neutralizing layer between silicon dioxide gate dielectric and a pentacene semiconducting layer to obtain increased field-effect mobility in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). A tripling of the field-effect mobility, from 0.13 to 0.42 cm2/V s, was achieved by introducing a 2 nm guanine layer. By characterizing the surface morphology of pentacene films grown on guanine, we found that the effect of guanine layer on the topography of pentacene film was not responsible for the mobility enhancement of the OFETs. The increased field-effect mobility was mainly attributed to the hydrogen bonding capacity of otherwise unassociated guanine molecules, which enabled them to neutralize trapping sites on the silicon dioxide surface.

  16. The synergism of nucleoside antibiotics combined with guanine 7-N-oxide against a rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Hasobe, M; Saneyoshi, M; Isono, K

    1986-09-01

    Guanine 7-N-oxide was shown to have synergistic activity in combination with neplanocin A against a rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), as reported previously. We examined further the antiviral activity of guanine 7-N-oxide in combination with other nucleoside antibiotics against IHNV. Synergism was seen between guanine 7-N-oxide and D-eritadenine or cordycepin. It is considered that compounds inhibiting RNA methylation show synergism with guanine 7-N-oxide.

  17. In vivo methylation of guanine by the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Zayed, S M; Mostafa, I Y; Adam, Y; Hegazi, B

    1983-12-01

    The in vivo methylating capability of the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos, assayed by the formation of 7-methyl-guanine in mouse liver, was investigated. Following intraperitoneal injection of male mice with different doses of the 14C-insecticide, labelled at the OCH3 groups, the total and specific radioactivity of nucleic acids and protein were determined. The 14C-labelling in the isolated macromolecules reached its maximum 24 hours following administration of the insecticide. Analysis of the acid hydrolysate of DNA and of RNA on Dowex-50 WX-12 revealed the presence of (7-14C) methylguanine. At maximum 14C-labelling, the amount of radioactive 7-MeGu, calculated as fraction of total dose, was around 9 X 10(-5) and 39 X 10(-5) for DNA and RNA, respectively.

  18. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia.

  19. Cytosine deaminase MX cassettes as positive/negative selectable markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartzog, Phillip E; Nicholson, Bradly P; McCusker, John H

    2005-07-30

    We describe positive/negative selectable cytosine deaminase MX cassettes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of positive selection for cytosine deaminase (Fcy1) activity is that (a) fcy1 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as a sole nitrogen source and (b) fcy1 ura3 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as the sole pyrimidine source. Conversely, as 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) is toxic to cytosine deaminase-producing cells, fcy1 strains are resistant to 5FC. FCY1MX and FCA1MX cassettes, containing open reading frames (ORFs) of S. cerevisiae FCY1 and Candida albicans FCA1, respectively, were constructed and used to disrupt targeted genes in S. cerevisiae fcy1 strains. In addition, new direct repeat cassettes, kanPR, FCA1PR, FCY1PR and CaURA3PR, were developed to allow efficient deletion of target genes in cells containing MX3 repeats. Finally, the FCY1- and FCA1MX3 or PR direct repeat cassettes can be readily recycled after 5FC counter-selection on both synthetic and rich media.

  20. Effects of spinally administered adenine on dorsal horn neuronal responses in a rat model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2004-02-19

    A novel G-protein-coupled receptor with adenine identified as the endogenous ligand has recently been described. In vivo electrophysiological techniques in the rat were used to record the response of dorsal horn neurones in response to transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the hindpaw receptive field. Spinal adenine (1-1000 microg) exerted facilitatory effects on the electrically-evoked neuronal responses, in a mildly dose-related manner. After establishment of carrageenan-induced inflammation to the hindpaw this excitatory effect of adenine was still apparent, yet reduced. C-fibre-evoked responses and other nociceptive related measures were most susceptible to the effects of adenine, whereas non-nociceptive Abeta-fibre evoked activity remained unaffected. Thus, activation of the adenine receptor site, via spinally applied adenine, suggests a pronociceptive role in nociceptive sensory transmission.

  1. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  2. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  3. Lifetimes and reaction pathways of guanine radical cations and neutral guanine radicals in an oligonucleotide in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2012-03-14

    The exposure of guanine in the oligonucleotide 5'-d(TCGCT) to one-electron oxidants leads initially to the formation of the guanine radical cation G(•+), its deptotonation product G(-H)(•), and, ultimately, various two- and four-electron oxidation products via pathways that depend on the oxidants and reaction conditions. We utilized single or successive multiple laser pulses (308 nm, 1 Hz rate) to generate the oxidants CO(3)(•-) and SO(4)(•-) (via the photolysis of S(2)O(8)(2-) in aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, respectively) at concentrations/pulse that were ∼20-fold lower than the concentration of 5'-d(TCGCT). Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements following single-pulse excitation show that the G(•+) radical (pK(a) = 3.9) can be observed only at low pH and is hydrated within 3 ms at pH 2.5, thus forming the two-electron oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoG). At neutral pH, and single pulse excitation, the principal reactive intermediate is G(-H)(•), which, at best, reacts only slowly with H(2)O and lives for ∼70 ms in the absence of oxidants/other radicals to form base sequence-dependent intrastrand cross-links via the nucleophilic addition of N3-thymidine to C8-guanine (5'-G*CT* and 5'-T*CG*). Alternatively, G(-H)(•) can be oxidized further by reaction with CO(3)(•-), generating the two-electron oxidation products 8-oxoG (C8 addition) and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih, by C5 addition). The four-electron oxidation products, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), appear only after a second (or more) laser pulse. The levels of all products, except 8-oxoG, which remains at a low constant value, increase with the number of laser pulses.

  4. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy.

  5. HYDROGEN-BONDED DIMERS OF ADENINE AND URACIL DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    HAMLIN, R M; LORD, R C; RICH, A

    1965-06-25

    In concentrated solutions of either 9-ethyladenine or 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform, absorption bands in the infrared spectrum demonstrate hydrogen bonding of the adenine and uracil derivatives with themselves. In dilute solutions, there is very little hydrogen bonding. However, when dilute solutions of 9-ethyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil are mixed, a series of bands appear which show that these molecules are hydrogen-bonding with each other much more strongly than with themselves. A study of the stoichiometry of this association indicates formation of 1:1 hydrogen-bonded pairs in solution.

  6. Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Michal J

    2010-08-01

    The Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine meeting, held in Tarragona, Spain, included topics covering new findings in the field of purinergic signaling and the development of purine-based drugs. This conference report highlights selected presentations on developments in purinerigic signaling, medicinal chemistry, the therapeutic potential of purine-based drugs, and the role of purines and adenosine receptors in neurodegenerative disorders, sickle cell disease, bone homeostasis, pulmonary fibrosis and pain. Investigational drugs discussed include CF-101 (Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd/NIH/Kwang Dong Pharmaceutical Co Ltd/Seikagaku Corp) and denufosol tetrasodium (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Inc/Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  7. Investigation of coordination properties of isolated adenine to copper metal: a systematic spectroscopic and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2013-08-01

    The coordination properties of copper with adenine have been studied by the analyzing the changes in Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectra of adenine and adenine-copper complex. The geometry of adenine and adenine copper complex were optimized and theoretical Infra-red and Raman spectra of the optimized structures were calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT). During synthesis of adenine-copper complex specific procedure was adopted to attach the Cu atom with particular N-atom of adenine (N9). The results of Raman and DFT confirmed the attachment. The Raman bands at 625, 330 and 230 cm(-1) of adenine-copper complex contain significant contribution of the vibrational motions of Cu metal coordinated to N9 and Cl atoms. The DFT calculations give additional vibrational modes containing the Cu, N9 and N9* atoms, which are not observed in FTIR and Raman spectra. The Raman, IR and DFT study confirm that Cu metal has good binding affinity to the isolated adenine base.

  8. AID enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the size of cytosine C5 orbital cloud.

    PubMed

    Rangam, Gopinath; Schmitz, Kerstin-Maike; Cobb, Alexander J A; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K

    2012-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil, which is required for a functional humoral immune system. Previous work demonstrated, that AID also deaminates 5-methylcytosine (5 mC). Recently, a novel vertebrate modification (5-hydroxymethylcytosine - 5 hmC) has been implicated in functioning in epigenetic reprogramming, yet no molecular pathway explaining the removal of 5 hmC has been identified. AID has been suggested to deaminate 5 hmC, with the 5 hmU product being repaired by base excision repair pathways back to cytosine. Here we demonstrate that AID's enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the electron cloud size of C5-cytosine - H > F > methyl > hydroxymethyl. This makes AID an unlikely candidate to be part of 5 hmC removal.

  9. Guanine and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-guanine-specific oxidation in DNA by chromium(V).

    PubMed

    Sugden, Kent D; Martin, Brooke D

    2002-10-01

    The hexavalent oxidation state of chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-established human carcinogen, although the mechanism of cancer induction is currently unknown. Intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) forms Cr(V), which is thought to play a fundamental role in the mechanism of DNA damage by this carcinogen. Two separate pathways of DNA damage, an oxidative pathway and a metal-binding pathway, have been proposed to account for the lesions observed in cell systems. We have used a model Cr(V) complex, N,N-ethylenebis(salicylidene-animato)oxochromium(V) [Cr(V)-Salen], to investigate the oxidative pathway of DNA damage and to elucidate the lesions generated from this oxidation process. Reaction of Cr(V)-Salen with synthetic oligonucleotides produced guanine-specific lesions that were not 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, based on the inability of iridium(IV) to further oxidize these sites. Oxidation products were identified using a 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) containing oligonucleotide to increase the yields of product for identification by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The guanine-based lesions observed by mass spectrometry corresponded to the lesions guanidinohydantoin and spiroiminodihydantoin. The effects of these Cr(V)-Salen-induced lesions on DNA replication fidelity was assayed using a polymerase-based misincorporation assay. These lesions produced G --> T transversion mutations and polymerase stops at levels greater than those observed for 8-oxo-G. These data suggest a model by which chromate can cause DNA damage leading to mutations and cancer.

  10. Guanine Oxidation in Double-stranded DNA by MnTMPyP/KHSO(5): At Least Three Independent Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lapi, A; Pratviel, G; Meunier, B

    2001-01-01

    In order to better define the mechanism and the products of guanine oxidation within DNA, we investigated the details of the mechanism of guanine oxidation by a metalloporphyrin, Mn-TMPyP, associated to KHSO(5) on oligonucleotides. We found that the three major products of guanine oxidation are formed by independent reaction routes. The oxidized guanidinohydantoin (1) and the proposed spiro compound 3 derivatives are not precursors of imidazolone lesion (Iz). These guanine lesions as well as their degradation products, may account for non-detected guanine oxidation products on oxidatively damaged DNA.

  11. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles A.; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5′-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH‡) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years. PMID:27382162

  12. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  13. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charles A; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-07-19

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5'-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years.

  14. Ultrafast internal conversion of excited cytosine via the lowest pipi electronic singlet state.

    PubMed

    Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2003-07-09

    Computational evidence at the CASPT2 level supports that the lowest excited state pipi* contributes to the S1/S0 crossing responsible for the ultrafast decay of singlet excited cytosine. The computed radiative lifetime, 33 ns, is consistent with the experimentally derived value, 40 ns. The nOpi* state does not play a direct role in the rapid repopulation of the ground state; it is involved in a S2/S1 crossing. Alternative mechanisms through excited states pisigma* or nNpi* are not competitive in cytosine.

  15. Theoretical Study of Oxidation of Guanine by Singlet Oxygen (¹Δg) and Formation of Guanine:Lysine Cross-Links.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Bishnu; Munk, Barbara H; Burrows, Cynthia J; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of guanine in the presence of lysine can lead to guanine-lysine cross-links. The ratio of the C-4, C-5 and C-8 crosslinks depends on the manner of oxidation. Type II photosensitizers such as Rose Bengal and methylene blue can generate singlet oxygen, which leads to a different ratio of products than oxidation by type I photosensitizers or by one electron oxidants. Modeling reactions of singlet oxygen can be quite challenging. Reactions have been explored using CASSCF, NEVPT2, DFT, CCSD(T), BD(T) calculations with SMD implicit solvation. The spin contaminations in open-shell calculations were corrected by Yamaguchi's approximate spin projection method. The addition of singlet oxygen to guanine to form guanine endoperoxide proceeds step-wise via a zwitterionic peroxyl intermediate. The subsequent barrier for ring closure is smaller than the initial barrier for singlet oxygen addition. Ring opening of the endoperoxide by protonation at C4-O is followed by loss of a proton from C-8 and dehydration to produce 8-oxoGox. The addition of lysine (modelled by methylamine) or water across the C5-N7 double bond of 8-oxoGox is followed by acyl migration to form the final spiro products. The barrier for methylamine addition is significantly lower than for water addition and should be the dominant reaction channel. These results are in good agreement with the experimental results for the formation of guanine-lysine cross-links via oxidation by type II photosensitizers.

  16. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  17. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  18. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  19. A9145, a new adenine-containing antifungal antibiotic: fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boeck, L D; Clem, G M; Wilson, M M; Westhead, J E

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co(2+), PO(4) (3-), and CaCO(3), were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O(2) level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 x 10(-2) to 4.5 x 10(-2) mumole of O(2)/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels.

  20. On the deactivation mechanisms of adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, João Paulo; Saurí, Vicenta; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2012-04-05

    In this contribution, the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory method based on a complete active space reference wave function (CASSCF/CASPT2) is applied to study all possible single and double proton/hydrogen transfers between the nucleobases in the adenine-thymine (AT) base pair, analyzing the role of excited states with different nature [localized (LE) and charge transfer (CT)], and considering concerted as well as step-wise mechanisms. According to the findings, once the lowest excited states, localized in adenine, are populated during UV irradiation of the Watson-Crick base pair, the proton transfer in the N-O bridge does not require high energy in order to populate a CT state. The latter state will immediately relax toward a crossing with the ground state, which will funnel the system to either the canonical structure or the imino-enol tautomer. The base pair is also capable of repairing itself easily since the imino-enol species is unstable to thermal conversion.

  1. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  2. Global DNA cytosine methylation as an evolving trait: phylogenetic signal and correlated evolution with genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Conchita; Pérez, Ricardo; Bazaga, Pilar; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is a widespread epigenetic mechanism in eukaryotes, and plant genomes commonly are densely methylated. Genomic methylation can be associated with functional consequences such as mutational events, genomic instability or altered gene expression, but little is known on interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation in plants. In this paper, we compare global cytosine methylation estimates obtained by HPLC and use a phylogenetically-informed analytical approach to test for significance of evolutionary signatures of this trait across 54 angiosperm species in 25 families. We evaluate whether interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation is statistically related to phylogenetic distance and also whether it is evolutionarily correlated with genome size (C-value). Global cytosine methylation varied widely between species, ranging between 5.3% (Arabidopsis) and 39.2% (Narcissus). Differences between species were related to their evolutionary trajectories, as denoted by the strong phylogenetic signal underlying interspecific variation. Global cytosine methylation and genome size were evolutionarily correlated, as revealed by the significant relationship between the corresponding phylogenetically independent contrasts. On average, a ten-fold increase in genome size entailed an increase of about 10% in global cytosine methylation. Results show that global cytosine methylation is an evolving trait in angiosperms whose evolutionary trajectory is significantly linked to changes in genome size, and suggest that the evolutionary implications of epigenetic mechanisms are likely to vary between plant lineages. PMID:25688257

  3. Direct oxidation of guanine and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine in DNA by a high-valent chromium complex: a possible mechanism for chromate genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sugden, K D; Campo, C K; Martin, B D

    2001-09-01

    Intracellular reductive activation of the human carcinogen chromate, Cr(VI), is a necessary step in the formation of DNA lesions that lead to cancer. Reductive activation forms the transient metastable high-valent oxidation state of Cr(V) as a precursor to the final intracellularly stable oxidation state, Cr(III). In this study, we have used a model high-valent Cr(V) complex, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneanimato)oxochromium(V), Cr(V)-Salen, to probe the mechanism of interaction between this oxidation state of chromium and DNA. This interaction was found to be specific toward the oxidation of the nucleic acid base guanine in unmodified single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides as measured by an increased level of DNA strand cleavage at these sites following piperidine treatment. Replacement of a single guanine residue in DNA with a more readily oxidized 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) base allowed for site-specific oxidation at this modified site within the DNA strand by the Cr(V)-Salen complex. HPLC and ESI-mass spectrometry were used to identify the modified guanine base lesions formed in the reaction of this high-valent chromium complex with the 8-oxo-G-containing DNA substrate. Two of these modified base lesions, identified as guanidinohydantoin and spiroiminodihydantoin, were found in the reaction of the Cr(V)-Salen complex with 8-oxo-G-modified DNA, while only one, spiroiminodihydantoin, was formed from oxidation of the 8-oxo-G nucleoside. A primer extension assay using the exo(-) Klenow fragment demonstrated polymerase arrest at the site of these base modifications as well as a high degree of misincorporation of adenine opposite the site of modification. These results suggest that mutations arising from G --> T transversions would predominate with these lesions. The mechanism of damage and base oxidation products for the interaction between high-valent chromium and DNA described herein may be relevant to the in vivo formation of DNA damage leading to

  4. Mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Cadet, Jean; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G(•+) in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G(•+) radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4(•-) radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O8(2-) anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4(•-) radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)(•) with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)(•) radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)(•) decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)(•) radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)(•) radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G(•+):C] base pair. This [G(-H)(•):H(+)C ⇆ G(•+):C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G(•+) followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G(•+) and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally.

  5. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs.

  6. G-quartet type self-assembly of guanine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Venkatesh, V.; Nagapradeep, N.; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy.The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis and characterization of the precursors and MWCNT conjugates. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11849a

  7. The intrinsic stabilities and structures of alkali metal cationized guanine quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Azargun, M; Jami-Alahmadi, Y; Fridgen, T D

    2017-01-04

    The structures and stabilities of self-assembled guanine quadruplexes, M(9eG)8(+) (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs; 9eG = 9-ethylguanine), have been studied in the gas phase by blackbody infrared radiative dissociation to determine the difference in the stabilizing effect of the alkali metal cations. The order of stabilities to decomposition was determined to be K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+) ≫ Na(+), which is consistent with the observation of K(+) being the ion of choice in guanine quadruplexes in nucleic acids. In the gas phase, the sodiated quadruplex was found to lose one 9eG at a time, whereas the quadruplexes of the heavier cations lost a neutral guanine tetrad. Vibrational spectroscopy on the gas-phase quadruplex ions was consistent with the structures in which the metal cations were sandwiched between two guanine tetrads. Electronic structure calculations are also used to compare with the observed stabilities and vibrational spectra.

  8. Analysis of guanine oxidation products in double-stranded DNA and proposed guanine oxidation pathways in single-stranded, double-stranded or quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Masayuki; Kino, Katsuhito; Oyoshi, Takanori; Suzuki, Masayo; Kobayashi, Takanobu; Miyazawa, Hiroshi

    2014-02-10

    Guanine is the most easily oxidized among the four DNA bases, and some guanine-rich sequences can form quadruplex structures. In a previous study using 6-mer DNA d(TGGGGT), which is the shortest oligomer capable of forming quadruplex structures, we demonstrated that guanine oxidation products of quadruplex DNA differ from those of single-stranded DNA. Therefore, the hotooxidation products of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) may also differ from that of quadruplex or single-stranded DNA, with the difference likely explaining the influence of DNA structures on guanine oxidation pathways. In this study, the guanine oxidation products of the dsDNA d(TGGGGT)/d(ACCCCA) were analyzed using HPLC and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). As a result, the oxidation products in this dsDNA were identified as 2,5-diamino-4H-imidazol-4-one (Iz), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG), dehydroguanidinohydantoin (Ghox), and guanidinohydantoin (Gh). The major oxidation products in dsDNA were consistent with a combination of each major oxidation product observed in single-stranded and quadruplex DNA. We previously reported that the kinds of the oxidation products in single-stranded or quadruplex DNA depend on the ease of deprotonation of the guanine radical cation (G•+) at the N1 proton. Similarly, this mechanism was also involved in dsDNA. Deprotonation in dsDNA is easier than in quadruplex DNA and more difficult in single-stranded DNA, which can explain the formation of the four oxidation products in dsDNA.

  9. Renoprotective effects of aliskiren on adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy: possible underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Malek, Hala Abdel; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible renoprotective effect of direct renin inhibitor (aliskiren) on renal dysfunctions, as well as its underlying mechanisms in rat model of adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups; normal group, aliskiren group (normal rats received 10 mg/kg aliskiren), adenine group (animals received high-adenine diet for 4 weeks and saline for 12 weeks), and adenine + aliskiren group (animals received adenine for 4 weeks and aliskiren 10 mg/kg for 12 weeks). It was found that adenine caused significant decrease in body mass, Hb, HR, serum Ca(2+), eNOS and nrf2 expression, GSH, and catalase in kidney tissues with significant increase in arterial blood pressure (ABP), serum creatinine, BUN, plasma renin activity (PRA), K(+) and P, urinary albumin excretion (UAE), caspase-3, and MDA (lipid peroxidation marker) in kidney tissues compared to normal group (p < 0.05). Administration of aliskiren caused significant improvement in all studied parameters compared to adenine group (p < 0.05). We concluded that aliskiren has renoprotective effect against adenine-induced nephropathy. This might be due to inhibition of PRA, attenuation of oxidative stress, activation of Nrf2 and eNOS genes, and suppression of caspase-3.

  10. Guanine nucleotides stimulate hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol bis phosphate in human myelin membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Boulias, C.; Moscarello, M.A. )

    1989-07-14

    Phosphodiesterase activity was stimulated in myelin membranes in the presence of guanine nucleotide analogues. This activity was reduced in myelin membranes which had been adenosine diphosphate ribosylated in the presence of cholera toxin which ADP-ribosylated three proteins of Mr 46,000, 43,000 and 18,500. Aluminum fluoride treatment of myelin had the same stimulatory effects on phosphodiesterase activity as did the guanine nucleotides.

  11. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Lane, B Josh; Mutchler, Charla; Al Khodor, Souhaila; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein). TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  12. Fluorescence enhancement of DNA-silver nanoclusters from guanine proximity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Hsin-chih; Sharma, Jaswinder; Yoo, Hyojong; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-templated, silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a versatile set of fluorophores and have already been used for live cell imaging, detection of specific metal ions, and single-nucleotide variation identification. Compared to commonly used organic dyes, these fluorescent nanoclusters have much better photostability and are often a few times brighter. Owing to their small size, simple preparation, and biocompatibility (i.e. made of nontoxic metals), DNA/Ag NCs should find more applications in biological imaging and chemical detection in the years to come. While clearly promising as new fluorophores, DNA/Ag NCs possess a unique and poorly understood dynamic process not shared by organic dyes or photoluminescent nanocrystals - the conversion among different NC species due to silver oxidation/reduction or NC regrouping. While this environmental sensitivity can be viewed as a drawback, in the appropriate context, it can be used as a sensor or reporter. Often reversible, conversions among different NC species have been found to depend upon a number of factors, including time, temperature, oxygen and salt content. In this communication, we report significant fluorescence enhancement of DNA/Ag NCs via interactions with guanine-rich DNA sequences. Moreover, we demonstrated this property can be used for sensitive detection of specific target DNA from a human oncogene (i.e. Braf gene).

  13. A molecular dynamics study of the ligand release path in yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2007-04-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase, a zinc metalloenzyme, catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to uracil. Experimental and computational evidence indicates that the rate-limiting step is product release, instead of the chemical reaction step. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to suggest ligand exit paths. Simulation at 300 K shows that the active site is well protected by the C-terminal helix (residues 150-158) and F-114 loop (residues 111-117) and that on the molecular dynamics timescale water does not flow in or out of the active site. In contrast, simulation at 320 K shows a significant increase in flexibility of the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop. The motions of these two regions at 320 K open the active site and permit water molecules to diffuse into and out of the active site through two paths with one much more favored than the other. Cytosine is pushed out of the active site by a restraint method in two directions specified by these two paths. In path 1 the required motion of the protein is local-involving only the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop-and two residues, F-114 and I-156, are identified that have to be moved away to let cytosine out; whereas in path 2, the protein has to rearrange itself much more extensively, and the changes are also much larger compared to the path 1 simulation.

  14. A molecular dynamics exploration of the catalytic mechanism of yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Sklenak, Stepan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-04-21

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD), a zinc metalloenzyme of significant biomedical interest, is investigated by a series of molecular dynamics simulations in its free form and complexed with its reactant (cytosine), product (uracil), several reaction intermediates, and an intermediate analogue. Quantum chemical calculations, used to construct a model for the catalytic Zn ion with its ligands (two cysteines, a histidine, and one water) show, by comparison with crystal structure data, that the cysteines are deprotonated and the histidine is monoprotonated. The simulations suggest that Glu64 plays a critical role in the catalysis by yCD. The rotation of the Glu64 side-chain carboxyl group that can be protonated or deprotonated permits it to act as a proton shuttle between the Zn-bound water and cytosine and subsequent reaction intermediates. Free energy methods are used to obtain the barriers for these rotations, and they are sufficiently small to permit rotation on a nanosecond time scale. In the course of the reaction, cytosine reorients to a geometry to favor nucleophilic attack by a Zn-bound hydroxide. A stable position for a reaction product, ammonia, was located in the active site, and the free energy of exchange with a water molecule was evaluated. The simulations also reveal small motions of the C-terminus and the loop that contains Phe114 that may be important for reactant binding and product release.

  15. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  16. Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer modified electrode developed for monitoring of adenine.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Filiz; Erdem, Arzum; Abacı, Serdar; Ozyörük, Haluk

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer for monitoring of adenine was described in this study using poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF(+)) modified platinum (Pt) electrode. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used for the surface characterization. The electrochemical behaviors of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In order to obtain more sensitive and improved electrochemical signals, analytical parameters such as the effects of polymeric film thickness, immobilization time of adenine, pH and adenine concentration were examined on the response of the polymer modified electrode. Alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy was used for the characterization of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes. The effect of possible interferents on the response of the electrode was examined.

  17. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-05

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  18. Gender differences in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications in rats.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Small, David; Kauter, Kate; Gobe, Glenda C; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Gender contributes to differences in incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease. To induce kidney damage in male and female Wistar rats (n = 12/group), a 0.25% adenine diet for 16 wk was used. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, proteinuria) and structure (glomerular damage, tubulointerstitial atrophy, fibrosis, inflammation); cardiovascular function (blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, vascular responses, echocardiography) and structure (cardiac fibrosis); plasma testosterone and estrogen concentrations; and protein expression for oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1, inflammation (TNF-α), fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β), ERK1/2, and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α)] were compared in males and females. Adenine-fed females had less decline in kidney function than adenine-fed males, although kidney atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis were similar. Plasma estrogen concentrations increased and plasma testosterone concentrations decreased in adenine-fed males, with smaller changes in females. CKD-associated molecular changes in kidneys were more pronounced in males than females except for expression of ER-α in the kidney, which was completely suppressed in adenine-fed males but unchanged in adenine-fed females. Both genders showed increased blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, and cardiac fibrosis with the adenine diet. Cardiovascular changes with adenine were similar in males and females, except males developed concentric, and females eccentric cardiac hypertrophy. In hearts from adenine-fed male and female rats, expression of ER-α and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway were increased, in part explaining changes in cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, adenine-induced kidney damage may be increased in males due to the suppression of ER-α.

  19. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  20. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  1. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a “stack” to a “close” conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the “solvation” effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  2. Impact of cytosine 5-halogens on the interaction of DNA with restriction endonucleases and methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Wu, Winnie; Liu, Pingfang; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicates that pyrimidine 5-methyl groups can have profound biological consequences that are mediated by the affinity of DNA-protein interactions. The presence of the 5-methyl group could potentially create a steric block preventing the binding of some proteins whereas the affinity of many other proteins is substantially increased by pyrimidine methylation. In this paper, we have constructed a series of oligonucleotides containing cytosine and a series of 5-substituted cytosine analogues including all halogens. This set of oligonucleotides has been used to probe the relationship between the size of the substituent and its capacity to modulate cleavage by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases MspI and HpaII. Additionally, we have examined the impact of the halogen substitution on the corresponding bacterial methyltransferase (M.HpaII). We observed that MspI cleavage is only subtly affected by substituted cytosine analogues at the inner position of the CCGG recognition site. In contrast, HpaII cleaves cytosine-containing oligonucleotides completely whereas 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotides are cleaved at a reduced rate. The presence of the larger halogens Cl, Br, or I as well as a methyl group completely prevents cleavage by HpaII. These data suggest that the steric wall is encountered by HpaII slightly beyond the fluorine substituent, at about 2.65 A from the pyrimidine C5-position. It is known that 5-fluorocytosine in an oligonucleotide can form a covalent irreversible suicide complex with either prokaryotic or eukaryotic methyltransferases. Kinetic data reported here suggest that the 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotide can also inhibit M.HpaII by formation of a reversible, noncovalent complex. Our results indicate that although a 5-Cl substituent has electronic properties similar to 5-F, 5-chlorocytosine duplexes neither form a complex with M.HpaII nor inhibit enzymatic

  3. Identification of N2-(1-carboxyethyl)guanine (CEG) as a guanine advanced glycosylation end product.

    PubMed

    Papoulis, A; al-Abed, Y; Bucala, R

    1995-01-17

    Reducing sugars such as glucose react nonenzymatically with protein amino groups to initiate a posttranslational modification process known as advanced glycosylation. Nucleotide bases also participate in advanced glycosylation reactions, producing DNA-linked advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) that cause mutations and DNA transposition. Although several protein-derived AGEs have been isolated and structurally characterized, AGE-modified nucleotides have not yet been reported. We systematically examined the reactivities of the model nucleotide bases 9-methylguanine (9-mG), 9-methyladenine (9-mA), and 1-methylcytosine (1-mC) toward glucose and several glucose-derived reactants. In "fast" reactions performed at refluxing temperature and physiological pH, 1 equiv of nucleotide base was reacted with 10 equiv of D-glucose, D-glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), D-glucose 6-phosphate/lysine (G-6-P/Lys), the Schiff base 1-n-propylamino-N-D-glucoside (SB), or the Amadori product 1-n-propylamino-N-D-fructose (AP). In every reaction involving 9-mG, N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine (CEmG) was a major product which was produced. N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine also formed from 9-mG and AP in long-term incubations performed at 37 degrees C. Direct treatment of 9-mG with methylglyoxal (MG), a Maillard reaction propagator that forms from the decomposition of AP, also produced CEmG in high yield. N2-(1-Carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine appears to result from the nucleophilic addition of the primary amino group of guanine to the ketone group of MG followed by an intramolecular rearrangement. Methylglyoxal is a known prokaryotic mutagen and was shown additionally to be mutagenic in a eukaryotic shuttle vector assay system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Slow deactivation channels in UV-photoexcited adenine DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai; Wang, Haobin

    2014-03-07

    The molecular mechanism for removing the excess energy in DNA bases is responsible for the high photostability of DNA and is thus the subject of intense theoretical/computational investigation. To understand why the excited state decay of the stacked bases is significantly longer than that of the monomers, we carried out electronic structure calculations on an adenine monomer and an aqueous (dA)5 oligonucleotide employing the CASPT2//CASSCF and CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER levels of theory. The newly-found bright excited state pair Sstack1((1)ππ*) and Sstack2((1)ππ*) of d(A)5, originated from base stacking, is of intra-base charge transfer nature and occurs in different stacked bases with charge transfer along opposite directions. Two slow deactivation channels of d(A)5 were proposed as a result of the sizable barriers along the relaxation paths starting from the FC point of the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state. The SN1P((1)nπ*) state of d(A)5 serves as an intermediate state in one relaxation channel, to which a nonadiabatic decay from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state occurs in an energy degeneracy region. A relatively high barrier in this state is found and attributed to the steric hindrance of the DNA environment due to the large NH2 group twisting, which gives a weak and red-shifted fluorescence. Another direct relaxation channel, induced by the C2-H2 bond twisting motion, is found to go through a conical intersection between the Sstack1((1)ππ*) and the ground state. The barrier found here enables fluorescence from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state and may explain the bright state emission observed in the fluorescence upconversion measurements. The inter-molecular SCT((1)ππ*) state may be involved in the slow relaxation process of the photoexcited adenine oligomers through efficient internal conversion to the intra-base Sstack1((1)ππ*) state.

  5. Regulation of IMP dehydrogenase gene expression by its end products, guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Glesne, D A; Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1991-01-01

    To study the regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), the rate-limiting enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, we examined the effects of nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleotide analogs, or the IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA) on the steady-state levels of IMPDH mRNA. The results indicated that IMPDH gene expression is regulated inversely by the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. We have shown that treatment with guanosine increased the level of cellular guanine ribonucleotides and subsequently reduced IMPDH steady-state mRNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conversely, MPA treatment diminished the level of guanine ribonucleotides and increased IMPDH mRNA levels. Both of these effects on the steady-state level of IMPDH mRNA could be negated by cotreatment with guanosine and MPA. The down regulation of IMPDH gene expression by guanosine or its up regulation by MPA was not due to major changes in transcriptional initiation and elongation or mRNA stability in the cytoplasm but rather was due to alterations in the levels of the IMPDH mRNA in the nucleus. These results suggest that IMPDH gene expression is regulated by a posttranscriptional, nuclear event in response to fluctuations in the intracellular level of guanine ribonucleotides. Images PMID:1717828

  6. Theoretical Study of the Photophysics of 8-Vinylguanine, an Isomorphic Fluorescent Analogue of Guanine.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Michał A; Pola, Martina; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-11

    Paving the way for the application of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order (ADC(2)) to systems based on the guanine chromophore, we demonstrate the this excited-state electronic structure method provides a realistic description of the photochemistry of 9H-guanine, in close agreement with the benchmark provided by the CASPT2 method. We then proceed to apply the ADC(2) method to the photochemistry of 8-vinylguanine (8vG), a minimally modified analogue of guanine which, unlike the naturally occurring nucleobase, displays intense fluorescence, indicative of a much longer-lived excited electronic state. The emissive electronic state of 8vG is identified as an ππ*-type intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, in which a charge of roughly -0.2 e is transferred from the guanine moiety onto the vinyl substituent. The main radiationless deactivation pathway competing with fluorescence is predicted to involve the molecule leaving the minimum on the ICT ππ* state, and reaching a region of the S1 adiabatic state where it resembles the La ππ* state of unmodified 9H-guanine. The topology of the La ππ* region of the S1 state favors subsequent internal conversion at a crossing seam with the ground electronic state. The sensitivity of this process to environment polarity may explain the experimentally observed fluorescence quenching of 8vG upon incorporation in single- and double-stranded DNA.

  7. Control of self-assembled 2D nanostructures by methylation of guanine.

    PubMed

    Bald, Ilko; Wang, Yao-guang; Dong, Mingdong; Rosen, Christian B; Ravnsbaek, Jens B; Zhuang, Gui-lin; Gothelf, Kurt V; Wang, Jian-guo; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2011-04-04

    Methylation of DNA nucleobases is an important control mechanism in biology applied, for example, in the regulation of gene expression. The effect of methylation on the intermolecular interactions between guanine molecules is studied through an interplay between scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory with empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D). The present STM and DFT-D results show that methylation of guanine can have subtle effects on the hydrogen-bond strength with a strong dependence on the position of methylation. It is demonstrated that the methylation of DNA nucleobases is a precise means to tune intermolecular interactions and consequently enables very specific recognition of DNA methylation by enzymes. This scheme is used to generate four different types of artificial 2D nanostructures from methylated guanine. For instance, a 2D guanine windmill motif that is stabilized by cooperative hydrogen bonding is revealed. It forms by self-assembly on a graphite surface under ambient conditions at the liquid-solid interface when the hydrogen-bonding donor at the N1 site of guanine is blocked by a methyl group.

  8. Guanine-based structural coloration as an indicator of oxidative stress in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Matthew D; Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2015-07-01

    Vertebrate pigmentation is known to be influenced by oxidative stress, but few studies have tested the hypothesis that structural coloration can be similarly affected. We tested whether fish iridophores, which produce structural color using guanine stacks, might be affected by the prooxidant-antioxidant balance of the animal. Specifically, we hypothesized that convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) metabolize guanine present in iridophores to uric acid, an antioxidant, in response to oxidative damage. We used Hunter's contrast gloss and high performance liquid chromatography to determine whether dietary guanine supplementation allows fish to maintain their structural coloration despite oxidative stress induced via ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. We found that dietary guanine was associated with greater skin gloss, and that exposure to UV-B light reduced glossiness. UV-B exposure did not increase oxidative damage (acrolein) or total antioxidant capacity in the skin or liver. Our experiment did not detect effects of dietary guanine or UV-B light on uric acid, but uric acid was positively related to antioxidant capacity. Our results support the hypothesis that structural color in fish may be altered by environmental stressors such as exposure to UV light, and highlight the need for future studies to consider the role of iridophores in condition-dependent visual signaling.

  9. Label-free detection of telomerase activity using guanine electrochemical oxidation signal.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Ugur; Ozkan-Ariksoysal, Dilsat; Ozsoz, Mehmet; Oktem, Huseyin Avni

    2007-11-15

    Telomerase is an important biomarker for cancer cells and its activation in 85% of all cancer types confers a clinical diagnostic value. A label-free electrochemical assay based on guanine oxidation signal to measure telomerase activity is described. This developed technology combined with a disposable sensor, carbon graphite electrode (CGE), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was performed by using PCR amplicons with/without telomeric repeats as the guanine oxidation signal observed at +1.0 V measured after the immobilization of PCR products. Guanine oxidation signal was chosen as a measure of telomerase activity because a substantial increase in the number of guanines was introduced by the action of telomerase which adds hexameric repeats (TTAGGG)n that contain 50% guanine. The developed assay was shown to specifically measure telomerase activity from cell extracts, and elongation rates increased linearly in a concentration dependent manner. Telomerase activity could be detected in cell extracts containing as low as 100 ng/microL of protein. All of the electrochemical measurements were also confirmed with the conventional TRAP-silver staining assay. Rapidity, simplicity, and the label-free nature of the developed assay make it suitable for practical use in quantitative determination of telomerase activity from clinical samples for diagnosis of cancer.

  10. Reduction of electron deficient guanine radical species in plasmid DNA by tyrosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Mandi; Do, Trinh T; Tang, Vicky J; Aguilera, Joseph A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2010-06-07

    Guanine bases are the most easily oxidized sites in DNA and therefore electron deficient guanine radical species are major intermediates in the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself) on DNA as a consequence of hole migration to guanine. As a model for this process we have used gamma-irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions to generate single electron oxidized guanine radicals in a plasmid target in aqueous solution. The stable species formed from these radicals can be detected and quantified by the formation of strand breaks in the plasmid after a post-irradiation incubation using a suitable enzyme. If a tyrosine derivative is also present during irradiation, the production of guanine oxidation products is decreased by electron transfer from tyrosine to the intermediate guanyl radical species. By using cationic tyrosine containing ligands we are able to observe this process when the tyrosine is electrostatically bound to the plasmid. The driving force dependence of this reaction was determined by comparing the reactivity of tyrosine with its 3-nitro analog. The results imply that the electron transfer reaction is coupled to a proton transfer. The experimental conditions used in this model system provide a reasonable approximation to those involved in the radioprotection of DNA by tightly bound proteins in chromatin.

  11. Guanine derivatives modulate L-glutamate uptake into rat brain synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Carla I; Santos, Tiago G; Tavares, Rejane G; Battastini, Ana M O; Rocha, João B T; Souza, Diogo O

    2004-05-01

    Glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles is driven by a proton electrochemical gradient generated by a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and stimulated by physiological concentrations of chloride. This uptake plays an important role in glutamatergic transmission. We show here that vesicular glutamate uptake is selectively inhibited by guanine derivatives, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Guanosine, GMP, GDP, guanosine-5'-O-2-thiodiphosphate, GTP, or 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited glutamate uptake in 1.5 and 3 min incubations, however, when incubating for 10 min, only GTP or GppNHp displayed such inhibition. By increasing ATP concentrations, the inhibitory effect of GTP was no longer observed, but GppNHp still inhibited glutamate uptake. In the absence of ATP, vesicular ATPase can hydrolyze GTP in order to drive glutamate uptake. However, 5mM GppNHp inhibited ATP hydrolysis by synaptic vesicle preparations. GTP or GppNHp decreased the proton electrochemical gradient, whereas the other guanine derivatives did not. Glutamate saturation curves were assayed in order to evaluate the specificity of inhibition of the vesicular glutamate carrier by the guanine derivatives. The maximum velocity of the initial rate of glutamate uptake was decreased by all guanine derivatives. These results indicate that, although GppNHp can inhibit ATPase activity, guanine derivatives are more likely to be acting through interaction with vesicular glutamate carrier.

  12. Reaction mechanism of zinc-dependent cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli: a quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Manta, Bianca; Raushel, Frank M; Himo, Fahmi

    2014-05-29

    The reaction mechanism of cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli is studied using density functional theory. This zinc-dependent enzyme catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to form uracil and ammonia. The calculations give a detailed description of the catalytic mechanism and establish the role of important active-site residues. It is shown that Glu217 is essential for the initial deprotonation of the metal-bound water nucleophile and the subsequent protonation of the substrate. It is also demonstrated that His246 is unlikely to function as a proton shuttle in the nucleophile activation step, as previously proposed. The steps that follow are nucleophilic attack by the metal-bound hydroxide, protonation of the leaving group assisted by Asp313, and C-N bond cleavage. The calculated overall barrier is in good agreement with the experimental findings. Finally, the calculations reproduce the experimentally determined inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect, which further corroborates the suggested reaction mechanism.

  13. Stabilization of Aspergillus parasiticus cytosine deaminase by immobilization on calcium alginate beads improved enzyme operational stability.

    PubMed

    Zanna, H; Nok, A J; Ibrahim, S; Inuwa, H M

    2013-12-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) from Aspergillus parasiticus, which has half-life of 1.10 h at 37°C, was stabilized by immobilization on calcium alginate beads. The immobilized CD had pH and temperature optimum of 5 and 50°C respectively. The immobilized enzyme also stoichiometrically deaminated Cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) with the apparent K(M) values of 0.60 mM and 0.65 mM respectively, displaying activation energy of 10.72 KJ/mol. The immobilization of native CD on calcium alginate beads gave the highest yield of apparent enzymatic activity of 51.60% of the original activity and the enzymatic activity was lost exponentially at 37°C over 12 h with a half-life of 5.80 h. Hence, the operational stability of native CD can be improved by immobilization on calcium alginate beads.

  14. Design of laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H bond of adenine and adenine-thymine base pair using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sitansh; Sharma, Purshotam; Singh, Harjinder; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    Time dependent quantum dynamics and optimal control theory are used for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H (amino N-H) bond in free adenine and in the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair. For the N6-H bond in free adenine we have used a one dimensional model while for the hydrogen bond, N6-H(A)...O4(T), present in the A-T base pair, a two mathematical dimensional model is employed. The conjugate gradient method is used for the optimization of the field dependent cost functional. Optimal laser fields are obtained for selective population transfer in both the model systems, which give virtually 100% excitation probability to preselected vibrational levels. The effect of the optimized laser field on the other hydrogen bond, N1(A)...H-N3(T), present in A-T base pair is also investigated.

  15. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  16. Molecular energetics of cytosine revisited: a joint computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José R B; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Freitas, Vera L S; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A V

    2007-08-02

    A static bomb calorimeter has been used to measure the standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, of a commercial sample of cytosine. From this energy, the standard (p degrees = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state was derived as -(221.9 +/- 1.7) kJ.mol(-1). This value confirms one experimental value already published in the literature but differs from another literature value by 13.5 kJ.mol(-1). Using the present standard molar enthalpy of formation in the condensed phase and the enthalpy of sublimation due to Burkinshaw and Mortimer [J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans. 1984, 75], (155.0 +/- 3.0) kJ.mol(-1), results in a value for the gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation for cytosine of -66.9 kJ.mol(-1). A similar value, -65.1 kJ.mol(-1), has been estimated after G3MP2B3 calculations combined with the reaction of atomization on three different tautomers of cytosine. In agreement with experimental evidence, the hydroxy-amino tautomer is the most stable form of cytosine in the gas phase. The enthalpies of formation of the other two tautomers were also estimated as -60.7 kJ.mol(-1) and -57.2 kJ.mol(-1) for the oxo-amino and oxo-imino tautomers, respectively. The same composite approach was also used to compute other thermochemical data, which is difficult to be measured experimentally, such as C-H, N-H, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities, and ionization enthalpies.

  17. Radiolysis of aqueous adenine (vitamin B4) and 8-hydroxyadenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.; Quint, R. M.; Getoff, N.

    2007-05-01

    The radiolysis of adenine (vitamin B4) was studied in aqueous solution (pH˜7.4) saturated either with argon (operating radicals: 44% e -aq, 46% OH, 10% H) or with air (46% OH, 54% O 2rad - ) and with N 2O (90% OH, 10% H), respectively. The obtained initial Gi-values are: 0.88, 1.16 and 1.45. As main radiolytic product was determined 8-hydroxyadenine (8-HOA), whose yield depends on the OH concentration in the reacting media. Hence, under the same experimental conditions the Gi-values are in media saturated with argon: 0.1, in air: 0.15 and in N 2O: 0.29. In aerated solution also a mixture of aldehydes as well as of carboxylic acids were formed, but they were not identified. 8-HOA is of some biological interest; therefore, its radiolysis was also investigated under the same conditions. The determined Gi(-8HOA)-values were in airfree solution negligible, in aerated solutions: 3.1 and in the presence of N 2O: 4.0. For explanation of the product formation some probable reaction mechanisms were given.

  18. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  19. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  1. Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J.; Lapinski, Leszek

    2012-02-14

    Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics.

  2. The Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard S.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a Ki of 52 nM. The zinc and iron containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0 and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on kcat and kcat/Km, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed. PMID:21545144

  3. Isolation and identification by sequence homology of a putative cytosine methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, E J; Dennis, E S

    1993-01-01

    A plant cytosine methyltransferase cDNA was isolated using degenerate oligonucleotides, based on homology between prokaryote and mouse methyltransferases, and PCR to amplify a short fragment of a methyltransferase gene. A fragment of the predicted size was amplified from genomic DNA from Arabidopsis thaliana. Overlapping cDNA clones, some with homology to the PCR amplified fragment, were identified and sequenced. The assembled nucleic acid sequence is 4720 bp and encodes a protein of 1534 amino acids which has significant homology to prokaryote and mammalian cytosine methyltransferases. Like mammalian methylases, this enzyme has a C terminal methyltransferase domain linked to a second larger domain. The Arabidopsis methylase has eight of the ten conserved sequence motifs found in prokaryote cytosine-5 methyltransferases and shows 50% homology to the murine enzyme in the methyltransferase domain. The amino terminal domain is only 24% homologous to the murine enzyme and lacks the zinc binding region that has been found in methyltransferases from both mouse and man. In contrast to mouse where a single methyltransferase gene has been identified, a small multigene family with homology to the region amplified in PCR has been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Images PMID:8389441

  4. Effect of intense magnetic fields on the convection of biogenic guanine crystals in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Mizukawa, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the basic magneto-optic properties of biogenic microcrystals in aqueous media were investigated. Microcrystals, mica plates, silica, and microcrystals from a diatom cell and biogenic guanine crystals from goldfish showed light scattering inhibition when the crystals were observed in water under a 5 T magnetic field and dark-field illumination. In particular, in 50% ethanol/water medium, convection of the biogenic guanine particle aggregates was reversibly inhibited when the microcrystal suspension was exposed to a 5 T magnetic field. Microscopic observation comparing the biogenic guanine crystals in water with 95% ethanol or 99% acetone revealed that light flickering on the surface of the crystals was affected by the surface interaction of the crystal with the surrounding medium. By considering both the magnetic orientation of the microcrystals and the possible interactions of crystals with the surrounding medium, a magnetically controllable fluidic tracer was suggested.

  5. Formation of the carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid from guanine oxidative lesion dehydro-guanidinohydantoin.

    PubMed

    Irvoas, Joris; Trzcionka, Jérôme; Pratviel, Geneviève

    2014-09-01

    DNA damage under oxidative stress leads to oxidation of guanine base. The identification of the resulting guanine lesions in cellular DNA is difficult due to the sensitivity of the primary oxidation products to hydrolysis and/or further oxidation. We isolated dehydroguanidino-hydantoin (DGh) (or oxidized guanidinohydantoin), a secondary oxidation product of guanine, and showed that this lesion reacts readily with nucleophiles such as asymmetric peroxides and transforms to 2,4,6-trioxo-1,3,5-triazinane-1-carboxamidine residue. Further hydrolysis of this intermediate leads to cyanuric acid and finally to urea residue. This work demonstrates a new possible pathway for the formation of the well-known carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid lesion.

  6. Rapid and simple G-quadruplex DNA aptasensor with guanine chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sandy; Park, Lucienne; Chong, Richard; Kim, Young Teck; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2014-02-15

    Cost-effective and sensitive aptasensor with guanine chemiluminescence detection capable of simply quantifying thrombin in human serum was developed using thrombin aptamer (TBA), one of the G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, without expensive nanoparticles and complicated procedures. Guanines of G-quadruplex TBA-conjugated carboxyfluorescein (6-FAM) bound with thrombin do not react with 3,4,5-trimethoxylphenylglyoxal (TMPG) in the presence of tetra-n-propylammonium hydroxide (TPA), whereas guanines of free TBA- and TBA-conjugated 6-FAM immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide rapidly react with TMPG to emit light. Thus, guanine chemiluminescence in 5% human serum with thrombin was lower than that without thrombin when TBA-conjugated 6-FAM was added in two samples and incubated for 20 min. In other words, the brightness of guanine chemiluminescence was quenched due to the formation of G-quadruplex TBA-conjugated 6-FAM bound with thrombin in a sample. High-energy intermediate, capable of emitting dim light by itself, formed from the reaction between guanines of TBA and TMPG in the presence of TPA, transfers energy to 6-FAM to emit bright light based on the principle of chemiluminescence energy transfer (CRET). G-quadruplex TBA aptasensor devised using the rapid interaction between TBA-conjugated 6-FAM and thrombin quantified trace levels of thrombin without complicated procedures. The limit of detection (LOD = background + 3 × standard deviation) of G-quadruplex TBA aptasensor with good linear calibration curve, accuracy, precision, and recovery was as low as 12.3 nM in 5% human serum. Using the technology reported in this research, we expect that various types of G-quadruplex DNA aptasensors capable of specifically sensing a target molecule such as ATP, HIV, ochratoxin, potassium ions, and thrombin can be developed.

  7. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in a triphasic rat model of adenine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amnon; Brod, Vera; Awad, Hoda; Heyman, Samuel N; Abassi, Zaid; Frajewicki, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether NGAL, given its advantages over traditional biomarkers, can be used to describe the dynamic characteristics of the renal tubulointerstitial insult caused by adenine. Subsequently, it will be possible to assess NGAL as a biomarker of any acute kidney injury, on top of chronic interstitial disease, if NGAL levels are stable through the chronic phase of our adenine model. Study group rats were fed an adenine diet, and control group rats were fed a regular diet only. Blood and urine samples for urea, creatinine and NGAL were drawn from each rat at the beginning of the study and after 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 weeks. Kidney slices from these rats were stained with Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and β-actin stainings. Serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio in the study group were higher than baseline and than in the control group; these differences were statistically significant in some of the intervals. Tubulointerstitial changes and adenine crystals were evident in the study group rats. In the rats fed adenine, serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio followed a triphasic pattern of kidney injury: an acute phase while on the adenine diet, a partial recovery phase after switching to the regular diet and a chronic kidney disease phase after stabilization of renal function. NGAL can serve a biomarker for acute kidney injury and possibly for chronic kidney disease in the tubulointerstitial rat model.

  8. Improved growth and stress tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 mutant triggered by altered adenine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sukrong, Suchada; Yun, Kil-Young; Stadler, Patrizia; Kumar, Charan; Facciuolo, Tony; Moffatt, Barbara A; Falcone, Deane L

    2012-11-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses. A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1, a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions. Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1), an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), indicating a link between purine metabolism, whole-plant growth responses, and stress acclimation. The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity. Correspondingly, oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine. Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1. The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge. Finally, it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth, leading to increases in plant biomass. The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  9. Kennedy's disease and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Report of 4 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valera Yepes, Rocío; Virgili Casas, Maria; Povedano Panades, Monica; Guerrero Gual, Mireia; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-05-01

    Kennedy's disease, also known as bulbospinal muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodegenerative disorder affecting adult males. It is caused by expansion of an unstable cytosine-adenine-guanine tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor gene on chromosome Xq11-12, and is characterized by spinal motor neuron progressive degeneration. Endocrinologically, these patients often have the features of hypogonadism associated to the androgen insensitivity syndrome, particularly its partial forms. We report 4 cases with the typical neurological presentation, consisting of slowly progressing generalized muscle weakness with atrophy and bulbar muscle involvement; these patients also had several endocrine manifestations; the most common non-neurological manifestation was gynecomastia. In all cases reported, molecular analysis showed an abnormal cytosine-adenine-guanine triplet repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene.

  10. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  11. Mechanisms of oxidation of guanine in DNA by carbonate radical anion, a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Seog K; Margolin, Yelena; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is produced during inflammation and combines rapidly with carbon dioxide to yield the unstable nitrosoperoxycarbonate, which decomposes (in part) to CO(3) (.-) and (.)NO(2) radicals. The CO(3) (.-) radicals oxidize guanine bases in DNA through a one-electron transfer reaction process that ultimately results in the formation of stable guanine oxidation products. Here we have explored these mechanisms, starting with a spectroscopic study of the kinetics of electron transfer from 20-22mer double-stranded oligonucleotides to CO(3) (.-) radicals, together with the effects of base sequence on the formation of the end-products in runs of one, two, or three contiguous guanines. The distributions of these alkali-labile lesions were determined by gel electrophoresis methods. The cascade of events was initiated through the use of 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate CO(3) (.-) radicals by an established method based on the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radicals and the oxidation of bicarbonate. Although the Saito model (Saito et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6406-6407) predicts relative ease of one-electron oxidations in DNA, following the trend 5'-GGG > 5'-GG > 5'-G, we found that the rate constants for CO(3) (.-)-mediated oxidation of guanines in these sequence contexts (k(5)) showed only small variation within a narrow range [(1.5-3.0)x10(7) M(-1) s(-1)]. In contrast, the distributions of the end-products are dependent on the base sequence context and are higher at the 5'-G in 5'-GG sequences and at the first two 5'-guanines in the 5'-GGG sequences. These effects are attributed to a combination of initial hole distributions among the contiguous guanines and the subsequent differences in chemical reaction yields at each guanine. The lack of dependence of k(5) on sequence context indicates that the one-electron oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3) (.-) radicals occurs by an inner-sphere mechanism.

  12. Alkylation of urinary guanine in mice by the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Zayed, S M; Mostafa, I Y; Hegazi, B

    1984-06-01

    The methylating capability of tetrachlorvinphos on urinary guanine in mice has been investigated using an insecticide labeled at both O-CH3 groups. Following intraperitoneal administration of the 14C-labeled insecticide to mice, about 0.57% of the radioactivity in the O- to 24-hr samples was associated with the purine fraction. The amount of [7-14C]methylguanine in 0- to 48-hr urine samples, estimated as fraction of applied dose, was 26-31 X 10(-5). The results obtained indicate possible chemical alkylation of urinary guanine. On the other hand, a considerable portion of radioactivity is probably incorporated via the C-1 pool.

  13. Transcription profiling of guanine nucleotide binding proteins during developmental regulation, and pesticide response in Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guanine nucleotide binding proteins (GNBP or G-protein) are glycoproteins anchored on the cytoplasmic cell membrane, and are mediators for many cellular processes. Complete cDNA of guanine nucleotide-binding protein gene ß-subunit (SiGNBP) was cloned and sequenced from S. invicta workers. To detect ...

  14. Thiaminylated adenine nucleotides. Chemical synthesis, structural characterization and natural occurrence.

    PubMed

    Frédérich, Michel; Delvaux, David; Gigliobianco, Tiziana; Gangolf, Marjorie; Dive, Georges; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Elias, Benjamin; De Pauw, Edwin; Angenot, Luc; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2009-06-01

    Thiamine and its three phosphorylated derivatives (mono-, di- and triphosphate) occur naturally in most cells. Recently, we reported the presence of a fourth thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate, produced in Escherichia coli in response to carbon starvation. Here, we show that the chemical synthesis of adenosine thiamine triphosphate leads to another new compound, adenosine thiamine diphosphate, as a side product. The structure of both compounds was confirmed by MS analysis and 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR, and some of their chemical properties were determined. Our results show an upfield shifting of the C-2 proton of the thiazolium ring in adenosine thiamine derivatives compared with conventional thiamine phosphate derivatives. This modification of the electronic environment of the C-2 proton might be explained by a through-space interaction with the adenosine moiety, suggesting U-shaped folding of adenosine thiamine derivatives. Such a structure in which the C-2 proton is embedded in a closed conformation can be located using molecular modeling as an energy minimum. In E. coli, adenosine thiamine triphosphate may account for 15% of the total thiamine under energy stress. It is less abundant in eukaryotic organisms, but is consistently found in mammalian tissues and some cell lines. Using HPLC, we show for the first time that adenosine thiamine diphosphate may also occur in small amounts in E. coli and in vertebrate liver. The discovery of two natural thiamine adenine compounds further highlights the complexity and diversity of thiamine biochemistry, which is not restricted to the cofactor role of thiamine diphosphate.

  15. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  16. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  17. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  18. B3LYP, BLYP and PBE DFT band structures of the nucleotide base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekeres, Zs; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    DFT crystal orbital (band structure) calculations have been performed for the nucleotide base stacks of cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine arranged in DNA B geometry. The band structures obtained with PBE, BLYP, and B3LYP functionals are presented and compared to other related experimental and theoretical results. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the fundamental gap values was also investigated using Clementi's double ζ, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets.

  19. Cleavage of oligodeoxyribonucleotides from controlled-pore glass supports and their rapid deprotection by gaseous amines.

    PubMed Central

    Boal, J H; Wilk, A; Harindranath, N; Max, E E; Kempe, T; Beaucage, S L

    1996-01-01

    A novel method for the deprotection of oligodeoxyribonucleotides has been developed. Gaseous amines such as ammonia or methylamine were employed under pressure to achieve mild and rapid deprotection conditions. For example, oligodeoxyribonucleotides having a (tert-butyl)phenoxyacetyl group for the protection of the exocyclic amino function of cytosine, adenine and guanine were released from controlled-pore glass supports and fully deprotected by ammonia or methylamine under gas phase conditions, at room temperature, within 35 or 2 min respectively. PMID:8760903

  20. Modeling of Bacillus spores: Inactivation and Outgrowth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    bases: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T). In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick correctly proposed that the DNA molecule consist... DNA double helix can be readily, faithfully repaired, but completely cleaving the DNA double helix in multiple locations may not be faithfully... helix begins to dissociate into its component single strands. This is because the hydroxide ions can react with bases in DNA base pairs to remove

  1. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O’Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  2. The UV absorption of nucleobases: semi-classical ab initio spectra simulations.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Aquino, Adelia J A; Lischka, Hans

    2010-05-21

    Semi-classical simulations of the UV-photoabsorption cross sections of adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil in gas phase were performed at the resolution-of-identity coupled cluster to the second-order (RI-CC2) level. With the exception of cytosine, the spectra of the other four nucleobases show a two band pattern separated by a low intensity region. The spectrum of cytosine is shaped by a sequence of three bands of increasing intensity. The first band of guanine is composed by two pipi* transitions of similar intensities. The analysis of individual contributions to the spectra allows a detailed assignment of bands. It is shown that the semi-classical simulations are able to predict general features of the experimental spectra, including their absolute intensities.

  3. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus.

  4. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  5. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  6. Exploring the Use of a Guanine-Rich Catalytic DNA for Sulfoxide Preparation.

    PubMed

    Dellafiore, María A; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2015-01-01

    A guanine-rich DNA oligonucleotide complexed with hemin was used to catalyze controlled oxygen transfer reactions to different sulfides for sulfoxide preparation in the presence of H2O2. Comparable activities were obtained when using fully modified L-DNA. In addition, oligonucleotide immobilization led to an active catalyst which could be successfully recovered and reused without loss of activity.

  7. Vibrational investigations of guanine, thioguanine and their singly charged cations and anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Yadav, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The complete vibrational studies have been done with help of quantum mechanics for the neutral Guanine (Gua) and Thioguanine (TGua) molecules and their singly charged cations and anions employing the B3LYP/6-311++G** method. Neutral Thioguanine and cations of Guanine and Thioguanine show planar structures and belong to Cs point group symmetry while the neutral Guanine and anions of Guanine and Thioguanine possess non-planar structure with C1 point group symmetry. Vibrational studies of ionic radicals of Gua and its thio- derivative are not available in literatures. Such extensive studies have been attempted for the first time. The normal modes of all the species have been assigned on the basis using potential energy distributions (PEDs) using GAR2PED software. The PEDs have also been calculated to make a conspicuous assignment as animation available in GaussView is not a guarantee for correct normal mode assignment. Charge transfer occurs in the molecule have been shown by the calculated highest occupied molecular orbital—lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) energies. The mapping of electron density iso-surface with electrostatic potential, has been carried out to get the information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies have been measured. The energy gap from HOMO to LUMO of the Gua is 5.0547 eV and TGua 4.0743 eV.

  8. Human Sos1: a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras that binds to GRB2.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Camonis, J H; Gale, N W; van Aelst, L; Schlessinger, J; Wigler, M H; Bar-Sagi, D

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Valence-Shell Ionization Spectra of Guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, Irina L.; Trofimov, Alexander B.; Schirmer, Jochen; Plekan, Oksana; Feyer, Vitaliy; Richter, Robert; Coreno, Marcello; Prince, Kevin C.

    2009-10-01

    The full valence-shell ionization spectra of the four most stable guanine tautomers were studied theoretically. The third-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(3)) method for the one-particle Green's function was used to calculate the energies and relative intensities of the vertical ionization transitions. For low-lying transitions, the influence of planar and nonplanar guanine configurations on the ionization energies, as well as the convergence of the results with respect to basis set was studied at the level of the outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) approximation scheme. The results of the calculations were used to interpret recent synchrotron radiation valence-shell photoionization spectra of guanine in the gas phase under thermal equilibrium conditions. The photoelectron spectrum was modeled by summing individual tautomer spectra weighted by Boltzmann population ratios (BPR) of tautomers from our previous high-level ab initio thermochemical calculations. The theoretical spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results, providing assignments of most observed structures and offering insight into tautomerism of guanine in the gas phase. The first six molecular orbitals give rise to single-hole states with a binding energy of about 7-12 eV. At higher binding energy the spectral features are mainly due to satellite states.

  10. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, C.; Matozaki, T.; Nagao, M.; Baba, S.

    1987-09-01

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p)>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent /sup 125/I-(Tyr/sup 1/)somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor.

  11. Successive attachment of electrons to protonated Guanine: (G+H)* radicals and (G+H)- anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun D; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2006-11-02

    The structures, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of nine hydrogenated 9H-keto-guanine radicals (G+H)(*) and closed-shell anions (G+H)(-) are predicted using the carefully calibrated (Chem. Rev. 2002, 102, 231) B3LYP density functional method in conjunction with a DZP++ basis set. These radical and anionic species come from consecutive electron attachment to the corresponding protonated (G+H)(+) cations in low pH environments. The (G+H)(+) cations are studied using the same level of theory. The proton affinity (PA) of guanine computed in this research (228.1 kcal/mol) is within 0.7 kcal/mol of the latest experiment value. The radicals range over 41 kcal/mol in relative energy, with radical r1, in which H is attached at the C8 site of guanine, having the lowest energy. The lowest energy anion is a2, derived by hydride ion attachment at the C2 site of guanine. No stable N2-site hydride should exist in the gas phase. Structure a9 was predicted to be dissociative in this research. The theoretical adiabatic electron affinities (AEA), vertical electron affinities, and vertical detachment energies were computed, with AEAs ranging from 0.07 to 3.12 eV for the nine radicals.

  12. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all p<0.05). Glibenclamide decreased infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys.

  13. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  14. Specific and modular binding code for cytosine recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-07-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  15. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  16. One-pot synthesis of fluorescent polysaccharides: adenine grafted agarose and carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Oza, Mihir D; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K

    2012-08-01

    New fluorescent polysaccharides were synthesized by grafting the nucleobase adenine on to the backbones of agarose and κ-carrageenan, which were characterized by FT-IR, (13)C NMR, TGA, XRD, UV, and fluorescence properties. The synthesis involved a rapid water based potassium persulfate (KPS) initiated method under microwave irradiation. The emission spectra of adenine grafted agarose and κ-carrageenan were recorded in aqueous (5×10(-5) M) solution, exhibiting λ(em,max) 347 nm by excitation at 261 nm, affording ca. 30% and 40% enhanced emission intensities, respectively compared to that of pure adenine solution in the same concentration. Similar emission intensity was recorded in the pure adenine solution at its molar equivalent concentrations present in the 5×10(-5) M solution of the agarose and carrageenan grafted products, that is, 3.28×10(-5) M and 4.5×10(-5) M respectively. These fluorescent adenine grafted products may have potential utility in various sensor applications.

  17. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-15

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  19. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-05

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  20. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Marie E.; Cherney, Maia M.; Marcato, Paola; Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D.; James, Michael N. G.

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  1. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Annexin V-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy using cytosine deaminase in combination with 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Van Rite, Brent D; Harrison, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    A fusion protein, consisting of cytosine deaminase (CD) linked to human annexin V, was created for use in an enzyme prodrug therapy targeted to the tumor vasculature and associated cancer cells in the primary tumor and distant metastases. The major finding of this study is that the CD-annexin V fusion protein in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine has significant cytotoxic activity against endothelial cells and two breast cancer cells lines in vitro that expose phosphatidylserine on their surface. The cytotoxicity experiments verified this novel enzyme prodrug system has the ability to produce therapeutic levels of 5-fluorouracil and thus appears promising.

  3. A quantum theoretical study of reactions of methyldiazonium ion with DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Ganapathy, Vinay; Mishra, P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Methylation of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs by the methyldiazonium ion was investigated employing density functional and second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Methylation at the N3, N7 and O6 sites of guanine, N1, N3 and N7 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine and the O2 and O4 sites of thymine were considered. The computed reactivities for methylation follow the order N7(guanine) > N3(adenine) > O6(guanine) which is in agreement with experiment. The base pairing in DNA is found to play a significant role with regard to reactivities of the different sites.

  4. Excited-state lifetime of adenine near the first electronic band origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyuk; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-10-01

    The excited-state lifetime of supersonically cooled adenine was measured in the gas phase by femtosecond pump-probe transient ionization as a function of excitation energy between 36 100 and 37 500 cm-1. The excited-state lifetime of adenine is ˜2 ps around the 0-0 band of the L1b ππ ∗ state (36 105 cm-1). The lifetime drops to ˜1 ps when adenine is excited to the L1a ππ ∗ state with the pump energy at 36 800 cm-1 and above. The excited-state lifetimes of L1a and L1b ππ∗ states are differentiated in accordance with previous frequency-resolved and computational studies.

  5. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease.

  6. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors.

  7. The basal proton conductance of mitochondria depends on adenine nucleotide translocase content

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The basal proton conductance of mitochondria causes mild uncoupling and may be an important contributor to metabolic rate. The molecular nature of the proton-conductance pathway is unknown. We show that the proton conductance of muscle mitochondria from mice in which isoform 1 of the adenine nucleotide translocase has been ablated is half that of wild-type controls. Overexpression of the adenine nucleotide translocase encoded by the stress-sensitive B gene in Drosophila mitochondria increases proton conductance, and underexpression decreases it, even when the carrier is fully inhibited using carboxyatractylate. We conclude that half to two-thirds of the basal proton conductance of mitochondria is catalysed by the adenine nucleotide carrier, independently of its ATP/ADP exchange or fatty-acid-dependent proton-leak functions. PMID:16076285

  8. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  9. Base flip in DNA studied by molecular dynamics simulationsof differently-oxidized forms of methyl-Cytosine.

    PubMed

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Kanaan, Natalia; Imhof, Petra

    2014-07-03

    Distortions in the DNA sequence, such as damage or mispairs, are specifically recognized and processed by DNA repair enzymes. Many repair proteins and, in particular, glycosylases flip the target base out of the DNA helix into the enzyme's active site. Our molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with intact and damaged (oxidized) methyl-cytosine show that the probability of being flipped is similar for damaged and intact methyl-cytosine. However, the accessibility of the different 5-methyl groups allows direct discrimination of the oxidized forms. Hydrogen-bonded patterns that vary between methyl-cytosine forms carrying a carbonyl oxygen atom are likely to be detected by the repair enzymes and may thus help target site recognition.

  10. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the (1-14C)glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis.

  11. Efficacy of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Kuffer, M; Balzarini, J; Naesens, L; Goldberg, M; Erfle, V; Goebel, F D; De Clercq, E; Jindrich, J; Holy, A; Bischofberger, N; Kraft, W

    1998-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) were evaluated for their efficacy and side effects in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial using naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. This natural retrovirus animal model is considered highly relevant for the pathogenesis and chemotherapy of HIV in humans. Both PMEA and FPMPA proved effective in ameliorating the clinical symptoms of FIV-infected cats, as measured by several clinical parameters including the incidence and severity of stomatitis, Karnofsky's score, immunologic parameters such as relative and absolute CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and virologic parameters including proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of drug-treated animals. In contrast with PMEA, FPMPA showed no hematologic side effects at a dose that was 2.5-fold higher than PMEA.

  12. The Role of Hydrogen Bonds in the Stabilization of Silver-Mediated Cytosine Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Leal, Leonardo Andrés; Karpenko, Alexander; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G; Rojas-Cervellera, Victor; Rovira, Carme; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    2015-10-15

    DNA oligomers can form silver-mediated duplexes, stable in gas phase and solution, with potential for novel biomedical and technological applications. The nucleobase-metal bond primarily drives duplex formation, but hydrogen (H-) bonds may also be important for structure selection and stability. To elucidate the role of H-bonding, we conducted theoretical and experimental studies of a duplex formed by silver-mediated cytosine homopobase DNA strands, two bases long. This silver-mediated cytosine tetramer is small enough to permit accurate, realistic modeling by DFT-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. In gas phase, our calculations found two energetically favorable configurations distinguished by H-bonding, one with a novel interplane H-bond, and the other with planar H-bonding of silver-bridged bases. Adding solvent favored silver-mediated tetramers with interplane H-bonding. Overall agreement of electronic circular dichroism spectra for the final calculated structure and experiment validates these findings. Our results can guide use of these stabilization mechanisms for devising novel metal-mediated DNA structures.

  13. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  14. Yeast cytosine deaminase mutants with increased thermostability impart sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S; Korkegian, Aaron M; Willmon, Candice L; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2008-03-28

    Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of CD-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of CD are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study, we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast CD (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated T(m) values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in stability, as well as a more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models.

  15. Stability and isomerization of complexes formed by metal ions and cytosine isomers in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongqi; Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Kwaichow

    2013-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the stability of the formation of complexes produced by four metal ions (M(+/2+)) and 14 cytosine isomers (Cn). This work predicts theoretically that predominant product complexes are associated with higher-energy C4M(+/2+) and C5M(+/2+) rather than the most stable C1M(+/2+). The prediction resolves successfully several experimental facts puzzling two research groups. Meanwhile, in-depth studies further reveal that direct isomerization of C1↔C4 is almost impossible, and also that the isomerization induced by either metalation or hydration, or by a combination of the two unfavorable. It is the single water molecule locating between the H1(-N1) and O2 of the cytosine that plays the dual roles of being a bridge and an activator that consequently improves the isomerization greatly. Moreover, the cooperation of divalent metal ion and such a monohydration actually leads to an energy-free C1←C4 isomerization in the gas phase. Henceforth, we are able to propose schemes inhibiting the free C1←C4 isomerization, based purely on extended hydration at the divalent metal ion.

  16. Inheritance of cytosine methylation patterns in purebred versus hybrid chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Sun, D X; Li, J L; Liu, R; Wang, Y C; Zhang, Y

    2013-07-30

    We used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism to examine DNA methylation levels and CCGG patterns in parents and offsprings of 3 groups of adult chickens, purebred White Leghorn (AA), White Plymouth Rock (EE), and crossbred individuals (EA) using 10 primer combinations. We found that about 66% of the cytosines at CCGG sites were not methylated. Fully methylated sites were less frequent than hemi-methylated sites in the chicken genome; these frequencies were different from those of plants. We observed that the probability that the offspring would inherit the methylation pattern for any given site from the parents was 88%; consequently, unexpected methylation patterns in offspring occurred at a rate of about 12%. The methylation degree in offspring was lower than in parents, and there were more sites with altered methylation patterns in EA crossbreds compared with AA and EE purebreds. Seven differentially methylated fragments between parental lines and their offspring were isolated, sequenced, and characterized, 4 of which were located in the coding regions. We conclude that most of the methylation status is transferred from parents to offspring in chickens, and that there are differences in the inheritance of methylation status in purebred versus crossbred offspring. We also concluded that methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism is highly efficient for large-scale detection of cytosine methylation in the chicken genome.

  17. Ricin Activity Assay by Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry Detection of Adenine Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry. The release of adenine from the inhomo- geneous substrate herring sperm DNA by ricin was determined to...chain catalyzes cleavage at adenosine 4324 (in rat RNA) of 28S rRNA to release adenine.10 This action inhibits protein synthesis, leading to cell...death. In addition to RNA, herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) is a substrate for ricin.11 We chose to employ hsDNA for this assay because it is relatively stable

  18. The final deprotection step in oligonucleotide synthesis is reduced to a mild and rapid ammonia treatment by using labile base-protecting groups.

    PubMed Central

    Schulhof, J C; Molko, D; Teoule, R

    1987-01-01

    Phenoxyacetyl (pac) and methoxyacetyl (mac) for adenine and guanine, isobutyryl for cytosine, were successfully applied as amino protecting groups both in phosphotriester and phosphoramidite approaches. As shown by N.M.R. and H.P.L.C. analysis, they are completely deblocked in less than four hours in 29% ammonia at room temperature allowing the preparation of modified DNA containing alkali labile bases such as saturated pyrimidines. The stability of N6-phenoxyacetyl-deoxyadenosine versus depurination in acidic conditions used in the detritylation step was favorably compared with that of the classic N6-benzoyl protected adenine. Images PMID:3822812

  19. Affinity of a galactose-specific legume lectin from Dolichos lablab to adenine revealed by X-ray cystallography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kartika N; Latha, Vakada Lavanya; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-07-01

    Crystal structure analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from a leguminous food crop Dolichos lablab (Indian lablab beans) has been carried out to obtain insights into its quaternary association and lectin-carbohydrate interactions. The analysis led to the identification of adenine binding sites at the dimeric interfaces of the heterotetrameric lectin. Structural details of similar adenine binding were reported in only one legume lectin, Dolichos biflorus, before this study. Here, we present the structure of the galactose-binding D. lablab lectin at different pH values in the native form and in complex with galactose and adenine. This first structure report on this lectin also provides a high resolution atomic view of legume lectin-adenine interactions. The tetramer has two canonical and two DB58-like interfaces. The binding of adenine, a non-carbohydrate ligand, is found to occur at four hydrophobic sites at the core of the tetramer at the DB58-like dimeric interfaces and does not interfere with the carbohydrate-binding site. To support the crystallographic observations, the adenine binding was further quantified by carrying out isothermal calorimetric titration. By this method, we not only estimated the affinity of the lectin to adenine but also showed that adenine binds with negative cooperativity in solution.

  20. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9 L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

  1. Finding Adiabatically Bound Anions of Guanine through a Combinatorial Computational Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2005-09-15

    In summary, guanine supports many adiabatically bound valence anions, which result from enamine-imine transformations of the most stable neutral tautomers. These stable anionic tautomers have been found using combinatorial-computational prescreening at the B3LYP level of theory followed by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations. The new anionic tautomers contradict a common opinion that guanine has the lowest electron affinity among nucleobases. The new anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom. They might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. Chemical transformations of DNA triggered by the new anionic tautomers will be explored in our future studies.

  2. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  3. Guanine-based amphiphiles: synthesis, ion transport properties and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Milano, Domenico; Tecilla, Paolo; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Novel amphiphilic guanine derivatives, here named Gua1 and Gua2, have been prepared through few, simple and efficient synthetic steps. In ion transport experiments through phospholipid bilayers, carried out to evaluate their ability to mediate H(+) transport, Gua2 showed high activity. When this compound was investigated for ion-selective transport activities, no major differences were observed in the behaviour with cations while, in the case of anions, selective activity was observed in the series I(-)>Br(-)>Cl(-)>F(-). The bioactivity of these guanine analogues has been evaluated on a panel of human tumour and non-tumour cell lines in preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity assays, showing a relevant antiproliferative profile for Gua2.

  4. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  5. Synthesis, cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine and its hydrochloride salt.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, Kamal H; Abramian, Lara; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Usher, Karyn; Vladimirov, Nikolay

    2012-11-08

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl) adenine. We evaluated two different synthetic routes starting with adenine where the optimal route was achieved through coupling of 9-(2-chloroethyl)adenine with diallylamine. The cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine hydrochloride salt resulted in low molecular weight oligomers in low yields. In contrast, 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine failed to cyclopolymerize, however, it formed a copolymer with SO₂ in relatively good yields. The molecular weights of the cyclopolymers were around 1,700-6,000 g/mol, as estimated by SEC. The cyclo-copolymer was stable up to 226 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a free-radical cyclo-copolymerization of a neutral alkyldiallylamine derivative with SO₂. These polymers represent a novel class of carbocyclic polynucleotides.

  6. Caffeine biosynthesis and adenine metabolism in transgenic Coffea canephora plants with reduced expression of N-methyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Katahira, Riko; Morimoto, Masayuki; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sano, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    In anti-sense and RNA interference transgenic plants of Coffea canephora in which the expression of CaMXMT1 was suppressed, caffeine biosynthesis from [8-(14)C]adenine was investigated, together with the overall metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine. Compared with wild type control plants, total purine alkaloid biosynthesis from adenine and conversion of theobromine to caffeine were both reduced in the transgenic plants. As found previously, [8-(14)C]adenine was metabolised to salvage products (nucleotides and RNA), to degradation products (ureides and CO(2)) and to purine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine). In the transgenic plants, metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine shifted from purine alkaloid synthesis to purine catabolism or salvage for nucleotides. HPLC analysis revealed a significantly reduced caffeine content in the transgenic plants. A small quantity (less than 20 nmol g(-1) fresh weight) of xanthosine had accumulated in at least one of the transgenic plants.

  7. Solubilization and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, K.; Dickey, B.F.; Pyun, H.Y.; Navarro, J.

    1988-07-12

    The authors describe the solubilization, resolution, and reconstitution of the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMet-Leu-Phe) receptor and guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins (G-proteins). The receptor was solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. Guanine nucleotides decreased the number of high-affinity binding sites and accelerated the rate of dissociation of the receptor-ligand complex, suggesting that the solubilized receptor remained coupled to endogenous G-proteins. The solubilized receptor was resolved from endogenous G-proteins by fractionation on a wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose 4B column. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)fMet-Leu-Phe binding to the WGA-purified receptor was diminished and exhibited reduced guanine nucleotide sensitivity. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)fMET-Leu-Phe binding and guanine nucleotide sensitivity were reconstituted upon the addition of purified brain G-proteins. Similar results were obtained when the receptor was reconstituted with brain G-proteins into phospholipid vesicles by gel filtration chromatography. In addition, they also demonstrated fMET-Leu-Phe-dependent GTP hydrolysis in the reconstituted vesicles. The results of this work indicate that coupling of the fMet-Leu-Phe receptor to G-proteins converts the receptor to a high-affinity binding state and that agonist produces activation of G-proteins. The resolution and functional reconstitution of this receptor should provide an important step toward the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of the fMet-Leu-Phe transduction system in neutrophils.

  8. Mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor gene IQSEC2 cause nonsyndromic intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Shoubridge, Cheryl; Tarpey, Patrick S; Abidi, Fatima; Ramsden, Sarah L; Rujirabanjerd, Sinitdhorn; Murphy, Jessica A; Boyle, Jackie; Shaw, Marie; Gardner, Alison; Proos, Anne; Puusepp, Helen; Raymond, F Lucy; Schwartz, Charles E; Stevenson, Roger E; Turner, Gill; Field, Michael; Walikonis, Randall S; Harvey, Robert J; Hackett, Anna; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Gécz, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    The first family identified as having a nonsyndromic intellectual disability was mapped in 1988. Here we show that a mutation of IQSEC2, encoding a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the ADP-ribosylation factor family of small GTPases, caused this disorder. In addition to MRX1, IQSEC2 mutations were identified in three other families with X-linked intellectual disability. This discovery was made possible by systematic and unbiased X chromosome exome resequencing. PMID:20473311

  9. Protein–DNA charge transport: Redox activation of a DNA repair protein by guanine radical

    PubMed Central

    Yavin, Eylon; Boal, Amie K.; Stemp, Eric D. A.; Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA charge transport (CT) chemistry provides a route to carry out oxidative DNA damage from a distance in a reaction that is sensitive to DNA mismatches and lesions. Here, DNA-mediated CT also leads to oxidation of a DNA-bound base excision repair enzyme, MutY. DNA-bound Ru(III), generated through a flash/quench technique, is found to promote oxidation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster of MutY to [4Fe-4S]3+ and its decomposition product [3Fe-4S]1+. Flash/quench experiments monitored by EPR spectroscopy reveal spectra with g = 2.08, 2.06, and 2.02, characteristic of the oxidized clusters. Transient absorption spectra of poly(dGC) and [Ru(phen)2dppz]3+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine), generated in situ, show an absorption characteristic of the guanine radical that is depleted in the presence of MutY with formation instead of a long-lived species with an absorption at 405 nm; we attribute this absorption also to formation of the oxidized [4Fe-4S]3+ and [3Fe-4S]1+ clusters. In ruthenium-tethered DNA assemblies, oxidative damage to the 5′-G of a 5′-GG-3′ doublet is generated from a distance but this irreversible damage is inhibited by MutY and instead EPR experiments reveal cluster oxidation. With ruthenium-tethered assemblies containing duplex versus single-stranded regions, MutY oxidation is found to be mediated by the DNA duplex, with guanine radical as an intermediate oxidant; guanine radical formation facilitates MutY oxidation. A model is proposed for the redox activation of DNA repair proteins through DNA CT, with guanine radicals, the first product under oxidative stress, in oxidizing the DNA-bound repair proteins, providing the signal to stimulate DNA repair. PMID:15738421

  10. Guanine nucleotide-induced polymerization of actin in electropermeabilized human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The effects of exogenous guanine nucleotides on the polymerization of actin in human neutrophils were tested in an electropermeabilized cell preparation. Close to 40% permeabilization was achieved with a single electric discharge as measured by nucleic acid staining with ethidium bromide or propidium iodide with minimal (less than 2%) release of the cytoplasmic marker lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, electropermeabilized neutrophils retained their capacity to produce superoxide anions and to sustain a polymerization of actin in response to surface-receptor dependent stimuli such as chemotactic factors. Electropermeabilization produced a rapid and transient permeabilization that allowed the entry of guanine nucleotides into the cells. GTP and, to a larger extent, its nonhydrolyzable analog guanosine 5'-O-2- thiotriphosphate (GTP[S]), induced a time- and concentration-dependent polymerization of actin, as determined by increased staining with 7- nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazolylphallacidin. The effects of the aforementioned guanine nucleotides were antagonized by GDP[S], but were insensitive to pertussis toxin. Cholera toxin potentiated to a small degree the amount of actin polymerization induced by GTP[S]. These results provided direct evidence for the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of the organization of the cytoskeleton of neutrophils, an event that is of crucial importance to the performance of the defense-oriented functions of these cells. PMID:2768336

  11. Non-covalent functionalization of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets with guanine.

    PubMed

    Anota, E Chigo; Tlapale, Y; Villanueva, M Salazar; Márquez, J A Rivera

    2015-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to analyze changes in the structural and electronic properties generated by the interaction of a single nucleobase group (guanine) with the surface of boron nitride nanosheets with hexagonal symmetry (hBNNs). Nanosheets in two contexts were tested: pristine sheets and with point defects (doped with carbon atoms). The criterion of energy minimum was used to find the ground state of the nine possible isomers generated by the hBNNs-guanine interaction. The phenomenon of physisorption is known to occur at values less than 1.0 eV; the adsorption energy results revealed that the preferential geometry was a parallel arrangement between the two partners, with van der Waals-type bonds generated for the hBNNs doped with two carbon atoms. This was the only energetically stable configuration, thus revealing a vibrational mode rather than imaginaries. Furthermore, the hBNNs/C-guanine system has a low value for work function, and therefore could be used in health applications such drug transport and delivery. The increased polarity values suggest that these nanosheets could be solubilized in common solvents used in experimental processes.

  12. Thiol-modifying phenylarsine oxide inhibits guanine nucleotide binding of Rho but not of Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Ralf; John, Harald; Aktories, Klaus; Just, Ingo

    2003-06-01

    Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) is a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that cross-links vicinal thiol groups, thereby inactivating phosphatases possessing XCysXXCysX motifs. The RhoA-GTPase, but not the Rac1-GTPase, also possesses vicinal cysteines within the guanine nucleotide-binding region (aa 13-20) and the phosphohydrolase activity site. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with PAO showed a dose-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, indicating involvement of Rho GTPases. As tested by pull-down experiments, RhoA, but not Rac1, from cell lysates was inactivated by PAO in a concentration-dependent manner. Modification of RhoA by PAO resulted in altered mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and PAO-modified RhoA was no longer substrate for C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, RhoA treated with PAO, but not Rac1 treated with PAO, lost its property to bind to guanine nucleotides. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass analysis of PAO-modified RhoA showed a mass shift according to an adduction of a single PAO molecule per molecule RhoA. Further analysis of Glu-C-generated RhoA peptides confirmed binding of PAO to a peptide harboring the guanine nucleotide binding region. Thus, PAO does not exclusively inhibit phosphotyrosine phosphatases but also inactivates RhoA by alteration of nucleotide binding.

  13. Oxidative modification of guanine bases initiated by oxyl radicals derived from photolysis of azo compounds.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2010-05-20

    Oxidative damage to guanine bases initiated by photolysis of the water-soluble radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) has been investigated by laser kinetic spectroscopy. In the neutral oxygenated aqueous solutions, 355 nm laser flash photolysis of AAPH generates a whole spectrum of free radicals including 2-amidinoprop-2-peroxyl (ROO(*)), 2-amidinoprop-2-oxyl (RO(*)), and superoxide (O(2)(*-)) radicals. These oxyl radicals with negligible absorption in a near UV-visible range were monitored in the reactions leading to the products with characteristic absorption spectra. This approach reveals that RO(*) radicals induce fast one-electron oxidation of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) to form guanine neutral radicals, dG(-H)(*). In contrast, ROO(*) radicals do not react at observable rates with dG. The O(2)(*-) radicals were detected using a classical test reaction with tetranitromethane to form nitroform. The major pathway for formation of the end-products of guanine oxidation is the combination of the G(-H)(*) and O(2)(*-) radicals to form 2,5-diamino-4H-imidazolone (Iz). This mechanism was confirmed by analysis of the end-products produced by oxidation of two substrates: (1) the guanosine derivative 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetylguanosine (tri-O-Ac-G) and (2) the 5'-d(CCATCGCTACC) sequence. The major products isolated by HPLC and identified by mass spectrometry methods were the tri-O-Ac-Iz and 5'-d(CCATC[Iz]CTACC products.

  14. DNA polymerase V allows bypass of toxic guanine oxidation products in vivo.

    PubMed

    Neeley, William L; Delaney, Sarah; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Jarosz, Daniel F; Delaney, James C; Walker, Graham C; Essigmann, John M

    2007-04-27

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen radicals produced during metabolic processes, such as respiration and inflammation, combine with DNA to form many lesions primarily at guanine sites. Understanding the roles of the polymerases responsible for the processing of these products to mutations could illuminate molecular mechanisms that correlate oxidative stress with cancer. Using M13 viral genomes engineered to contain single DNA lesions and Escherichia coli strains with specific polymerase (pol) knockouts, we show that pol V is required for efficient bypass of structurally diverse, highly mutagenic guanine oxidation products in vivo. We also find that pol IV participates in the bypass of two spiroiminodihydantoin lesions. Furthermore, we report that one lesion, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, is a substrate for multiple SOS polymerases, whereby pol II is necessary for error-free replication and pol V for error-prone replication past this lesion. The results spotlight a major role for pol V and minor roles for pol II and pol IV in the mechanism of guanine oxidation mutagenesis.

  15. Rates of chemical cleavage of DNA and RNA oligomers containing guanine oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Aaron M; Alshykhly, Omar; Zhu, Judy; Muller, James G; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-06-15

    The nucleobase guanine in DNA (dG) and RNA (rG) has the lowest standard reduction potential of the bases, rendering it a major site of oxidative damage in these polymers. Mapping the sites at which oxidation occurs in an oligomer via chemical reagents utilizes hot piperidine for cleaving oxidized DNA and aniline (pH 4.5) for cleaving oxidized RNA. In the present studies, a series of time-dependent cleavages of DNA and RNA strands containing various guanine lesions were examined to determine the strand scission rate constants. The guanine base lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z), and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih) were evaluated in piperidine-treated DNA and aniline-treated RNA. These data identified wide variability in the chemical lability of the lesions studied in both DNA and RNA. Further, the rate constants for cleaving lesions in RNA were generally found to be significantly smaller than for lesions in DNA. The OG nucleotides were poorly cleaved in DNA and RNA; Sp nucleotides were slowly cleaved in DNA and did not cleave significantly in RNA; Gh and Z nucleotides cleaved in both DNA and RNA at intermediate rates; and 2Ih oligonucleotides cleaved relatively quickly in both DNA and RNA. The data are compared and contrasted with respect to future experimental design.

  16. Formation of ring-opened and rearranged products of guanine: mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R; Mishra, P C

    2012-07-01

    DNA damage by endogenous and exogenous agents is a serious concern, as the damaged products can affect genome integrity severely. Damage to DNA may arise from various factors such as DNA base modifications, strand break, inter- and intrastrand crosslinks, and DNA-protein crosslinks. Among these factors, DNA base modification is a common and important form of DNA damage that has been implicated in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and many other pathological conditions. Among the four DNA bases, guanine (G) has the smallest oxidation potential, because of which it is frequently modified by reactive species, giving rise to a plethora of lethal lesions. Similarly, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), an oxidatively damaged guanine lesion, also undergoes various degradation reactions giving rise to several mutagenic species. The various products formed from reactions of G or 8-oxoG with different reactive species are mainly 2,6-diamino-4-oxo-5-formamidopyrimidine, 2,5-diamino-4H-imidazolone, 2,2,4-triamino-5-(2H)-oxazolone, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, guanidinohydantoin, spiroiminodihydantoin, cyanuric acid, parabanic acid, oxaluric acid, and urea, among others. These products are formed from either ring opening or ring opening and subsequent rearrangement. The main aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various possible reactions and the mechanisms involved, after which these ring-opened and rearranged products of guanine would be formed in DNA. The biological significance of oxidatively damaged products of G is also discussed.

  17. Magnetic Control of the Light Reflection Anisotropy in a Biogenic Guanine Microcrystal Platelet.

    PubMed

    Iwasaka, Masakazu; Mizukawa, Yuri; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2016-01-12

    Bioinspired but static optical devices such as lenses, retarders, and reflectors have had a significant impact on the designs of many man-made optical technologies. However, while numerous adaptive and flexible optical mechanisms are found throughout the animal kingdom, highly desirable biomimetic copies of these remarkable smart systems remain, in many cases, a distant dream. Many aquatic animals have evolved highly efficient reflectors based on multilayer stacks of the crystallized nucleic acid base guanine. With exceptional levels of spectral and intensity control, these reflectors represent an interesting design pathway towards controllable micromirror structures. Here we show that individual guanine crystals, with dimensions of 5 μm × 20 μm × 70 nm, can be magnetically controlled to act as individual micromirrors. By applying magnetic fields of 500 mT, the reflectivity of these crystals can be switched off and on for the change in reflectivity. Overall, the use of guanine represents a novel design scheme for a highly efficient and controllable synthetic organic micromirror array.

  18. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  19. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N.; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J.

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it’s in-built supply of Li+-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10‑7 to 10‑3 Ω‑1 cm‑1) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80–100 °C, from a dual Li+ and H+ (<100 °C) to a pure Li+ conductor (>100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries.

  20. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N.; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it’s in-built supply of Li+-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10−7 to 10−3 Ω−1 cm−1) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80–100 °C, from a dual Li+ and H+ (<100 °C) to a pure Li+ conductor (>100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries. PMID:27091631

  1. ESI-MS Characterization of a Novel Pyrrole-Inosine Nucleoside that Interacts with Guanine Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Sherman, Courtney L.; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Lawrence, Candace M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Based on binding studies undertaken by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, a synthetic pyrrole-inosine nucleoside, 1, capable of forming an extended three-point Hoogsteen-type hydrogen-bonding interaction with guanine, is shown to form specific complexes with two different quadruplex DNA structures [dTG4T]4 and d(T2G4)4 as well as guanine rich duplex DNA. The binding interactions of two other analogs were evaluated in order to unravel the structural features that contribute to specific DNA recognition. The importance of the Hoogsteen interactions was confirmed through the absence of specific binding when the pyrrole NH hydrogen-bonding site was blocked or removed. While 2, with a large blocking group, was not found to interact with virtually any form of DNA, 3, with the pyrrole functionality missing, was found to interact non-specifically with several types of DNA. The specific binding of 1 to guanine rich DNA emphasizes the necessity of careful ligand design for specific sequence recognition. PMID:18790136

  2. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  3. Diminution in adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by platelets and serum from rats submitted to Walker 256 tumour.

    PubMed

    Buffon, Andréia; Ribeiro, Vanessa B; Schanoski, Alessandra S; Sarkis, João J F

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in the circulation is mediated by the action of an NTPDase (CD39, apyrase) and of a 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), presenting as a final product, adenosine. Among other properties described for adenine nucleotides, an anti-cancer activity is suggested, since ATP is considered a cytotoxic molecule in several tumour cell systems. Conversely, some studies demonstrate that adenosine presents a tumour-promoting activity. In this study, we evaluated the pattern of adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by serum and platelets from rats submitted to the Walker 256 tumour model. Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by blood serum and platelets obtained from rats at, 6, 10 and 15 days after the subcutaneous Walker 256 tumour inoculation, was evaluated. Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum at 6, 10 and 15 days after tumour induction. In platelets, a significant reduction in ATP and AMP hydrolysis was observed at 10 and 15 days after tumour induction, while an inhibition of ADP hydrolysis was observed at all times studied. Based on these results, it is possible to suggest a physiologic protection mechanism against the tumoral process in circulation. The inhibition in nucleotide hydrolysis observed probably maintains ATP levels elevated (cytotoxic compound) and, at the same time, reduces the adenosine production (tumour-promoting molecule) in the circulation.

  4. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  5. Ameliorative effect of chrysin on adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Adham, Sirin A; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine - induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered.

  6. Effect of atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Liu, C; Zhou, Q; Xie, Y C; Qiu, X M; Feng, X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the therapeutic effects of Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided in to 5 groups (n=10 rats per group): The normal control group, the chronic renal failure pathological control group, the dexamethasone treatment group and two Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide treatment groups, treated with two different concentrations of the polysaccharide, the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group. All the rats, except those in the normal control group were fed adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 3 weeks. After being fed with adenine, the dexamethasone treatment group, Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group rats were administered the drug orally for 2 weeks. On day 35, the kidney coefficient of the rats and the serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein and hemalbumin were determined. Subsequent to experimentation on a model of chronic renal failure in rats, the preparation was proven to be able to reduce serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and hemalbumin levels (P<0.05) and improve renal function. Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide had reversed the majority of the indices of chronic renal failure in rats.

  7. The Effect of Adenine Repeats on G-quadruplex/hemin Peroxidase Mimicking DNAzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jielin; Guo, Yuehua; Zhou, Jun; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-03-23

    The catalytic activity of G-quadruplex/hemin is much lower than that of proteinous enzymes, so it is very important to increase its activity. Very recently, flanking sequences, which can be regarded as an external part of G-quadruplexes, were found to enhance the activity of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme. However, little is known about the effect of internal parts, such as loop sequences and linkers, on the activity. In the present study, adenine repeats were incorporated into several designed G-quadruplex structures either in the loops, bulges, or linkers, and the constructed G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme exhibit about fivefold improvement in peroxidase-mimicking activity in some cases. The enhancement effect may result from the formation of compound I, protoporphyrin⋅Fe(IV) =O(.+) , accelerated by dA repeats, which was demonstrated by H2 O2 decay kinetics and pH dependency analysis. The novel enhancement methods described here may help in the development of high-activity DNAzymes, illustrated by a dimer G-quadruplex with flanking adenine at one end, a relatively long adenine run in one loop, and another adenine run in the linker.

  8. Macrophage Trafficking as Key Mediator of Adenine-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; da Silva, João Santana; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a special role in the onset of several diseases, including acute and chronic kidney injuries. In this sense, tubule interstitial nephritis (TIN) represents an underestimated insult, which can be triggered by different stimuli and, in the absence of a proper regulation, can lead to fibrosis deposition. Based on this perception, we evaluated the participation of macrophage recruitment in the development of TIN. Initially, we provided adenine-enriched food to WT and searched for macrophage presence and action in the kidney. Also, a group of animals were depleted of macrophages with the clodronate liposome while receiving adenine-enriched diet. We collected blood and renal tissue from these animals and renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis were evaluated. We observed higher expression of chemokines in the kidneys of adenine-fed mice and a substantial protection when macrophages were depleted. Then, we specifically investigated the role of some key chemokines, CCR5 and CCL3, in this TIN experimental model. Interestingly, CCR5 KO and CCL3 KO animals showed less renal dysfunction and a decreased proinflammatory profile. Furthermore, in those animals, there was less profibrotic signaling. In conclusion, we can suggest that macrophage infiltration is important for the onset of renal injury in the adenine-induced TIN. PMID:25132730

  9. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  10. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  11. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  12. Cytosine-cytosinium dimer behavior in a cocrystal with a decavanadate anion as a function of the temperature.

    PubMed

    Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne

    2010-10-07

    We have performed X-ray diffraction measurements on single crystals of Na(3)[V(10)O(28)](C(4)N(3)OH(5))(3)(C(4)N(3)OH(6))(3)·10H(2)O as a function of the temperature. When the sample is cooled, from room temperature to 100 K, we have observed additional peaks well indexed in P1, while the phase at room temperature crystallizes in P1. The molecular structure at 210 K indicates that the center of inversion is located between two cytosinium molecules, formally described with a charge of +0.5. When this crystal is heated to room temperature and the structure in P1 reindexed, some peaks remained unindexed. A protonation-deprotonation process gives rise to additional diffraction peaks at temperatures lower than 210 K. The triply bridged hydrogen bonded cytosine-cytosinum dimer is discussed according to the results of the charge density analysis and topological analysis at 210 K. The structure at 100 K has been completely solved based on a comparative study with other compounds containing cytosine-cytosinium dimer. This description could be considered as a reference for such dimer. It could help for discrimination between cytosine and cytosinium molecules, for any new structure containing a cytosine-cytosinium pair, and for which the quality does not allow a precise determination of the hydrogen localization.

  13. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selection marker for gene disruption and replacement in the genus Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, Marie-Pierre; Ghinet, Mariana Gabriela; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Clermont, Nancy; Beaulieu, Carole; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2009-02-01

    We developed a novel negative selection system for actinobacteria based on cytosine deaminase (CodA). We constructed vectors that include a synthetic gene encoding the CodA protein from Escherichia coli optimized for expression in Streptomyces species. Gene disruption and the introduction of an unmarked in-frame deletion were successfully achieved with these vectors.

  14. Electron transport through 5-substituted pyrimidines in DNA: electron affinities of uracil and cytosine derivatives differently affect the apparent efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Utsumi, Nihiro; Hamaguchi, Yuta; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2013-11-11

    We investigated excess electron transport (EET) in DNA containing cytosine derivatives. By arranging the derivatives according to their electron affinities, the apparent EET efficiency was successfully regulated. Unexpectedly, however, providing gradients of electron affinity by inserting 5-fluorocytosine did not always enhance EET.

  15. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of DNA-(N4-cytosine)-methyltransferase from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Roca, Maite; López-Canut, Violeta; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the reaction mechanism for methylation of cytosine at the exocyclic N4 position catalyzed by M.PvuII has been explored by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. A reaction model was prepared by placing a single cytosine base in the active site of the enzyme. In this model the exocyclic amino group of the base establishes hydrogen bond interactions with the hydroxyl oxygen atom of Ser53 and the carbonyl oxygen atom of Pro54. The reaction mechanism involves a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the N4 atom and a proton transfer from this atom to Ser53, which in turn transfers a proton to Asp96. Different timings for the proton transfers and methylation steps have been explored at the AM1/MM and B3LYP/MM levels including localization and characterization of stationary structures. At our best estimate the reaction proceeds by means of a simultaneous but asynchronous proton transfer from Ser53 to Asp96 and from N4 of cytosine to Ser53 followed by a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the exocyclic N4 of cytosine.

  16. Lead(II)-catalyzed oxidation of guanine in solution studied with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Banu, Laura; Blagojevic, Voislav; Bohme, Diethard K

    2012-10-04

    The oxidation of guanine was investigated in water/methanol solution both in the absence and in the presence of Pb(II) with a variable temperature reactor coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer that allowed signature ions of solution reagents and products to be monitored by electrospray ionization (ESI). Two different oxidizing agents were employed, one strong (peroxymonosulfuric acid) and one weaker (hydrogen peroxide). Peroxymonosulfuric acid was observed to oxidize guanine rapidly at room temperature, k(app) > 10(-2) s(-1), whether in the absence or in the presence of Pb(II), to produce spiroiminohydantoin. Guanine did not show measurable oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the absence of Pb(II) at concentrations of H(2)O(2) up to 1 M at temperatures up to 333 K (k(app) < 3 × 10(-8) s(-1) at 298 K), but in the presence of Pb(II), it was observed to produce both 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2-Ih) and imidazolone (Iz) in a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.1 with a total rate enhancement of more than 4 × 10(3). The activation energy was measured to be 82 ± 11 kJ mol(-1) and is more than 120 kJ mol(-1) lower than that for the uncatalyzed oxidation with hydrogen peroxide measured to be at least 208 ± 26 kJ mol(-1). An activation energy of 113 ± 9 kJ mol(-1) has been reported by Bruskov et al. (Nucleic Acids Res.2002, 30, 1354) for the heat-induced oxidation by hydrogen peroxide of guanine embedded as guanosine in DNA which leads to the production of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxo-Gua). The atomic lead dication lowers the activation energy by activating the hydrogen peroxide oxidant, possibly by O-O bond activation, and by directing the oxidation, possibly through coordination to the functional groups adjacent to the carbon C5: the C6 carbonyl group and the N7 nitrogen. The coupling of tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)) with a simple variable temperature reactor by ESI proved to be very effective for measuring reaction kinetics and activation energies in solution

  17. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  18. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Pacheco e Silva Filho, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-06-18

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration.

  19. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  20. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  1. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-04-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures.

  2. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

  3. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  4. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2015-12-11

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27.

  5. Genetic immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by endothelial progenitor cells armed with cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Yu-Jia, Zhen; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) serve as cellular vehicles for targeting cancer cells and are a powerful tool for delivery of therapeutic genes. Cytosine deaminase (CD), a kind of frequent suicide gene which can kill carcinoma cells by converting a non-poisonous pro-drug 5-flucytosine (5-FC) into a poisonous cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We combined super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled EPCs with CD gene to treat grafted liver carcinomas and tracked them with 7.0 T Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that the therapeutic EPCs loaded with CD plus 5-Fc provided stronger carcinoma growth suppression compared with treatment using CD alone. The CD/5-Fc significantly inhibited the growth of endothelial cells and induced carcinoma cells apoptosis. These results indicate that EPCs transfected with anti-carcinoma genes can be used in carcinoma therapy as a novel therapeutic modality.

  6. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  7. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures. PMID:22888295

  8. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Jelmar S.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80–90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27163364

  9. Mutation of Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase significantly enhances molecular chemotherapy of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, S A; Market, J M; Gillespie, G Y; Krendelchtchikova, V; Della Manna, D; Sellers, J C; Kaliberova, L N; Black, M E; Buchsbaum, D J

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment using adenoviral (Ad)-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful method of cancer therapy. We have developed an Ad vector encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene (AdbCD-D314A), which has a higher affinity for cytosine than wild-type bCD (bCDwt). The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of the combination of AdbCD-D314A with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ionizing radiation against human glioma. The present study demonstrates that AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated cell killing, compared with AdbCDwt. Furthermore, a significant increase in cytotoxicity following AdbCD-D314A and radiation treatment of glioma cells in vitro was demonstrated as compared to AdbCDwt. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of subcutaneous or intracranial tumor growth of D54MG glioma xenografts by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with ionizing radiation as compared with either agent alone, and with AdbCDwt/5-FC plus radiation. The results suggest that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation produces markedly increased cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that combined treatment with this novel mutant enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiotherapy provides a promising approach for cancer therapy.

  10. Targeted endostatin-cytosine deaminase fusion gene therapy plus 5-fluorocytosine suppresses ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sher, Y-P; Chang, C-M; Juo, C-G; Chen, C-T; Hsu, J L; Lin, C-Y; Han, Z; Shiah, S-G; Hung, M-C

    2013-02-28

    There are currently no effective therapies for cancer patients with advanced ovarian cancer, therefore developing an efficient and safe strategy is urgent. To ensure cancer-specific targeting, efficient delivery, and efficacy, we developed an ovarian cancer-specific construct (Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD) composed of the cancer specific promoter survivin in a transgene amplification vector (VISA; VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier) to express a secreted human endostatin-yeast cytosine deaminase fusion protein (hEndoyCD) for advanced ovarian cancer treatment. hEndoyCD contains an endostatin domain that has tumor-targeting ability for anti-angiogenesis and a cytosine deaminase domain that converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD was found to be highly specific, selectively express secreted hEndoyCD from ovarian cancer cells, and induce cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo in the presence of 5-FC without affecting normal cells. In addition, Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD plus 5-FC showed strong synergistic effects in combination with cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell lines. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment with Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD coupled with liposome attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice bearing advanced ovarian tumors. Importantly, there was virtually no severe toxicity when hEndoyCD is expressed by Survivin-VISA plus 5-FC compared with CMV plus 5-FC. Thus, the current study demonstrates an effective cancer-targeted gene therapy that is worthy of development in clinical trials for treating advanced ovarian cancer.

  11. Reactions of an osmium-hexahydride complex with cytosine, deoxycytidine, and cytidine: the importance of the minor tautomers.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; García-Raboso, Jorge; Oliván, Montserrat

    2012-09-03

    Complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) deprotonates cytosine to give molecular hydrogen and the d(4)-trihydride derivative OsH(3)(cytosinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2), which in solution exists as a mixture of isomers containing κ(2)-N1,O (2a) and κ(2)-N3,O (2b) amino-oxo and κ(2)-N3,N4 (2c) imino-oxo tautomers. The major isomer 2b associates with the minor one 2c through N-H···N and N-H···O hydrogen bonds to form [2b·2c](2) dimers, which crystallize from saturated pentane solutions of 2. Complex 1 is also able to perform the double deprotonation of cytosine (cytosinate') to afford the dinuclear derivative (P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(3)Os(cytosinate')OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3), where the anion is coordinated κ(2)-N1,O and κ(2)-N3,N4 to two different OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) metal fragments. The deprotonation of deoxycytidine and cytidine leads to OsH(3)(deoxycytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (4) and OsH(3)(cytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (5), respectively, containing the anion κ(2)-N3,N4 coordinated. Dimer [2b·2c](2) and dinuclear complex 3 have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  12. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  13. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock7 mediates HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion via Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D W; Didier, S; Chan, A; Paulino, V; Van Aelst, L; Ruggieri, R; Tran, N L; Byrne, A T; Symons, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive primary brain tumour, remains an incurable disease. Rho GTPases and their activators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), have central roles in GBM invasion. Anti-angiogenic therapies may stimulate GBM invasion via HGF/c-Met signalling. We aim to identify mediators of HGF-induced GBM invasion that may represent targets in a combination anti-angiogenic/anti-invasion therapeutic paradigm. Methods: Guanine nucleotide exchange factor expression was measured by microarray analysis and western blotting. Specific depletion of proteins was accomplished using siRNA. Cell invasion was determined using matrigel and brain slice assays. Cell proliferation and survival were monitored using sulforhodamine B and colony formation assays. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor and GTPase activities were determined using specific affinity precipitation assays. Results: We found that expression of Dock7, a GEF, is elevated in human GBM tissue in comparison with non-neoplastic brain. We showed that Dock7 mediates serum- and HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion. We also showed that Dock7 co-immunoprecipitates with c-Met and that this interaction is enhanced upon HGF stimulation in a manner that is dependent on the adaptor protein Gab1. Dock7 and Gab1 also co-immunoprecipitate in an HGF-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gab1 is required for HGF-induced Dock7 and Rac1 activation and glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: Dock7 mediates HGF-induced GBM invasion. Targeting Dock7 in GBM may inhibit c-MET-mediated invasion in tumours treated with anti-angiogenic regimens. PMID:24518591

  14. Interactions of. beta. -adrenergic receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors were investigated with radioligand binding assays using the agonists (/sup 3/H)hydroxybenzyl-isoproterenol (/sup 3/H-HBI) and (/sup 3/H)epinephrine (/sup 3/H-EPI), and the antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol (/sup 125/I-IPIN). Membranes prepared from L6 myoblasts bound (/sup 3/H)HBI, (/sup 3/H)EPI, and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 222 +/- 23, 111 +/- 7, and 325 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 3/H)EPI was inhibited allosterically by guanine nucleotides. Membranes prepared from wild-type S49 lymphoma cells bound (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 48.9 +/- 7.1 and 196 +/- 29 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI was inhibited allosterically by GTP. Similar results were obtained with membranes prepared from the adenylate cyclase deficient variant of S49 lymphoma cells (cyc-), which does not contain a functional stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub s/), but does contain a functional inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub i/). Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI to membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells interact with N/sub i/ to form a ternary complex composed of agonist, receptor, and N/sub i/.

  15. Effect O6-guanine alkylation on DNA flexibility studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kara, Mahmut; Drsata, Tomas; Lankas, Filip; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Alkylation of guanine at the O6 atom is a highly mutagenic DNA lesion because it alters the coding specificity of the base causing G:C to A:T transversion mutations. Specific DNA repair enzymes, e.g. O(6)-alkylguanin-DNA-Transferases (AGT), recognize and repair such damage after looping out the damaged base to transfer it into the enzyme active site. The exact mechanism how the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site within a large surplus of undamaged DNA is not fully understood. The O(6)-alkylation of guanine may change the deformability of DNA which may facilitate the initial binding of a repair enzyme at the damaged site. In order to characterize the effect of O(6)-methyl-guanine (O(6)-MeG) containing base pairs on the DNA deformability extensive comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on duplex DNA with central G:C, O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs were performed. The simulations indicate significant differences in the helical deformability due to the presence of O(6)-MeG compared to regular undamaged DNA. This includes enhanced base pair opening, shear and stagger motions and alterations in the backbone fine structure caused in part by transient rupture of the base pairing at the damaged site and transient insertion of water molecules. It is likely that the increased opening motions of O(6)-MeG:C or O(6)-MeG:T base pairs play a decisive role for the induced fit recognition or for the looping out of the damaged base by repair enzymes.

  16. N-terminal and C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Tian, Yong-Jun; Ding, Hong-Hui; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Yan; Hao, You-Hua; Zhao, Xi-Ping; Lu, Meng-Ji; Gong, Fei-Li; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic-polypeptide 3G (APOBEC3G) and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain-mediated antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The mammalian hepatoma cells HepG2 and HuH7 were cotransfected with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vector and 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA as well as the linear monomeric HBV of genotype B and C. For in vivo study, an HBV vector-based mouse model was used in which APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vectors were co-delivered with 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA via high-volume tail vein injection. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the media of the transfected cells and in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA. The expression of hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) in the transfected cells was determined by Western blot analysis. Core-associated HBV DNA was examined by Southern blot analysis. Levels of HBV DNA in the sera of mice as well as HBV core-associated RNA in the liver of mice were determined by quantitative PCR and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Human APOBEC3G exerted an anti-HBV activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, and comparable suppressive effects were observed on genotype B and C as that of genotype A. Interestingly, the N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain alone could also inhibit HBV replication in HepG2 cells as well as Huh7 cells. Consistent with in vitro results, the levels of HBsAg in the sera of mice were dramatically decreased, with more than 50 times decrease in the levels of serum HBV DNA and core-associated RNA in the liver of mice treated with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain as compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide probably the

  17. Characterization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-nucleobase supramolecular complexes featuring bio-multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Lee, Ai-Wei; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2014-11-07

    In this study we employed poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a matrix that we hybridized with five different nucleobase units (adenine, thymine, uracil, guanine, cytosine) to generate PNIPAAm-nucleobase supramolecular complexes (PNSCs) stabilized through bio-multiple hydrogen bonds (BMHBs). These nucleobase units interacted with PNIPAAm through BMHBs of various strengths, leading to competition between the BMHBs and the intramolecular hydrogen bonds (HBs) of PNIPAAm. The changes in morphology, crystalline structure, and thermoresponsive behavior of PNIPAAm were related to the strength of its BMHBs with the nucleobases. The strengths of the BMHBs followed the order guanine > adenine > thymine > cytosine > uracil, as verified through analyses of Fourier transform infrared spectra, lower critical solution temperatures, and inter-association equilibrium constants. The PNSCs also exhibited remarkable improvements in conductivity upon the formation of BMHBs, which facilitated proton transport. The neat PNIPAAm film was an insulator, but it transformed into a semiconductor after hybridizing with the nucleobases. In particular, the resistivity of the PNIPAAm-guanine supramolecular complex decreased to 1.35 × 10(5) ohm cm. The resistivity of the PNIPAAm-cytosine supramolecular complex increased significantly from 5.83 × 10(6) to 3 × 10(8) ohm cm upon increasing the temperature from 40 to 50 °C, suggesting that this material might have applicability in thermo-sensing. The ability to significantly improve the conductivity of hydrogels through such a simple approach involving BMHBs might facilitate their use as novel materials in bioelectronics.

  18. Effect of hydration on the lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry of guanine: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, M K; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2005-09-15

    An ab-initio computational study was performed to investigate the effect of explicit hydration on the ground and lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry and on the selected stretching vibrational frequencies corresponding to the different NH sites of the guanine acting as hydrogen-bond donors. The studied systems consisted of guanine interacting with one, three, five, six, and seven water molecules. Ground-state geometries were optimized at the HF level, while excited-state geometries were optimized at the CIS level. The 6-311G(d,p) basis set was used in all calculations. The nature of potential energy surfaces was ascertained via the harmonic vibrational frequency analysis; all structures were found minima at the respective potential energy surfaces. The changes in the geometry and the stretching vibrational frequencies of hydrogen-bond-donating sites of the guanine in the ground and excited state consequent to the hydration are discussed. It was found that the first solvation shell of the guanine can accommodate up to six water molecules. The addition of the another water molecule distorts the hydrogen-bonding network by displacing other neighboring water molecules away from the guanine plane.

  19. Acyclic phosph(on)ate inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Evans, Gary B.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoa responsible for malaria lack enzymes for the de novo synthesis of purines and rely on purine salvage from the host. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) converts hypoxanthine to inosine monophosphate and is essential for purine salvage making the enzyme an anti-malarial drug target. We have synthesized a number of simple acyclic aza-C- nucleosides and shown that some are potent inhibitors of Pf HGXPRT while showing excellent selectivity for the Pf versus the human enzyme. PMID:23810424

  20. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16,000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses.

  1. Electron and hole transfer from DNA base radicals to oxidized products of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongli; Sevilla, Michael D

    2003-03-01

    An investigation of electron and hole transfer to oxidized guanine bases in DNA is reported. Guanine in DNA was preferentially oxidized by Br(2)(*-) at 298 K to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxo-G) and higher oxidation products. HPLC-EC analysis of irradiated DNA shows that the formation of 8-oxo-G could not be increased above the ratio of one 8-oxo-G to 127 +/- 6 bp regardless of dose. 8-oxo-G can be produced only at low levels because it is further oxidized to other species. These oxidation products of guanine have been extensively investigated and identified by others. Our electron spin resonance studies suggest that at 77 K 8-oxo-G is a trap for radiation-produced holes, but certain further oxidation products of 8-oxo-G (G(ox)) are found to be efficient electron traps. Gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA samples in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous ices and glassy 7 M LiBr solutions resulted in radicals formed by electron attachment to the G(ox) sites that were monitored by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) at 77 K. These ESR spectra suggest that those oxidation products of 8-oxo-G containing alpha-diketo groups account for the electron traps (G(ox)) in oxidized DNA with oxaluric acid a likely major trap. Electron transfer from DNA anion radicals to G(ox) was followed by monitoring of their ESR signals with time at 77 K. Using typical values for the tunneling constant beta estimates of the relative amount of G(ox) to base pairs were obtained. Radicals formed by UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions were also investigated. The 8-oxo-G cation accounts for less than 10% of all the radicals observed after either gamma irradiation of oxidized DNA in frozen (D(2)O) aqueous solution or UV photolysis of oxidized DNA in 8 M NaClO(4) glassy aqueous solutions. We estimate hole transfer distances of about 7 +/- 1 bp at 1 min from G(*+) to 8-oxo-G.

  2. Generation of guanine-thymidine cross-links in DNA by peroxynitrite/carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2011-07-18

    Nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite is an important chemical mediator of inflammation. In aqueous solutions, it rapidly decomposes to the reactive species CO(3)(•-) and (•)NO(2) radicals that are known to initiate the selective oxidation and nitration of guanine in DNA. We have previously demonstrated that the reactions of carbonate radical anions with guanine in 2'-deoxyoligoribonucleotides generate a previously unknown intrastrand cross-linked guanine-thymine product G*-T* with a covalent bond between the C8 (G*) and the thymine N3 (T*) atoms (Crean Nucleic Acids Res. 2008, 36, 742-755). In this work, we demonstrate that G*-T* cross-linked products are also formed when peroxynitrite (0.1 mM) reacts with native DNA in aqueous solutions (pH 7.5-7.7) containing 25 mM carbon dioxide/bicarbonate, in addition to the well-known nitration/oxidation products of guanine such as 8-nitroguanine (8-nitro-G), 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole (NIm), 8-oxo-7,8-dehydroguanine (8-oxo-G), and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). The yields of these products, after enzymatic digestion with P1 nuclease and alkaline phosphatase to the nucleotide level and reversed phase HPLC separation, were compared with those obtained with the uniformly, isotopically labeled (15)N,(13)C-labeled 2'-deoxy oligoribonucleotides 5'-dGpT and 5'-dGpCpT. The d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) cross-linked products derived from the di- and trioligonucleotides, respectively, were used as standards for identifying the analogous lesions in calf thymus DNA by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS methods in the selected reaction monitoring mode. The NIm and 8-nitro-G are the major products formed (∼0.05% each), and lesser amounts of 8-oxo-G (∼0.02%) and d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) enzymatic digestion products (∼0.002% each) were found. It is shown that the formation of d(G*pT*) enzyme digestion product can arise only from intrastrand cross-links, whereas d(G*-T*) can arise from both interstrand

  3. Experimental treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bovine intramammary infection using a guanine riboswitch ligand analog.

    PubMed

    Ster, C; Allard, M; Boulanger, S; Lamontagne Boulet, M; Mulhbacher, J; Lafontaine, D A; Marsault, E; Lacasse, P; Malouin, F

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of intramammary infections (IMI). We recently demonstrated that Staph. aureus strains express the gene guaA during bovine IMI. This gene codes for a guanosine monophosphate synthetase and its expression is regulated by a guanine riboswitch. The guanine analog 2,5,6-triaminopyrimidine-4-one (PC1) is a ligand of the guanine riboswitch. Interactions between PC1 and its target result in inhibition of guanosine monophosphate synthesis and subsequent death of the bacterium. The present study describes the investigational use of PC1 for therapy of Staph. aureus IMI in lactating cows. The in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration of PC1 ranged from 0.5 to 4 μg/mL for a variety of Staph. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains and required a reducing agent for stability and full potency. A safety assessment study was performed, whereby the healthy quarters of 4 cows were infused with increasing doses of PC1 (0, 150, 250, and 500 mg). Over the 44 h following infusions, no obvious adverse effect was observed. Ten Holstein multiparous cows in mid lactation were then experimentally infused into 3 of the quarters with approximately 50 cfu of Staph. aureus strain SHY97-3906 and infection was allowed to progress for 2 wk before starting PC1 treatment. Bacterial counts reached then about 10(3) to 10(4) cfu/mL of milk. Infected quarters were treated with 1 of 3 doses of PC1 (0, 250, or 500 mg) after each morning and evening milking for 7d (i.e., 14 intramammary infusions of PC1). During the treatment period, milk from PC1-treated quarters showed a significant reduction in bacterial concentrations. However, this reduction of Staph. aureus count in milk was not maintained during the 4 wk following the end of the treatment and only 15% of the PC1-treated quarters underwent bacteriological cure. The somatic cell count and the quarter milk production were not affected by treatments. Although bacterial clearance was not achieved following

  4. Differences in sequence selectivity of DNA alkylation by isomeric intercalating aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Wakelin, L P

    1990-01-01

    Two DNA-targeted mustard derivatives, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-4-(5-[9-acridinylamino]-pentamido)aniline and 4-(9-[acridinylamino]butyl 4-(N,N-bis[2-chloroethyl]-aminobenzamide, which are isomeric compounds where the mustard is linked to the DNA-binding 9-aminoacridine moiety by either a -CONH- or a -NHCO- group, show significant differences in the sequence selectivity of their alkylation of DNA. The CONH isomer is a more efficient alxylating agent than the NHCO compound by an order of magnitude, consistent with the larger electron release of the CONH group to the aniline ring. However, the pattern of alkylation by the two compounds is also very different, with the CONH isomer preferring alkylation of guanines adjacent to 3'- or 5'-adenines and cytosines (for example those in sequences 5'-CGC, 5'-AGC, 5'-CGG and 5'-AGA) while the isomeric NHCO compound shows preference for guanines in runs of Gs. In addition, both isomers alkylate 3'-adenines in runs of adenines. Both compounds also show completely different patterns of alkylation to their untargeted mustard counterparts, since 4-MeCONH-aniline mustard alkylates all guanines and adenines in runs of adenines, while 4-Me2NCO-aniline mustard fails to alkylate DNA at all. These differences in alkylation patterns between the CONH- and its isomeric NHCO- compounds and their relationships between the alkylation patterns of the isomers and their biological activities are discussed.

  5. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  6. From formamide to adenine: a self-catalytic mechanism for an abiotic approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-11-14

    Mechanisms for abiotic reaction pathways from formamide (H2NCHO) to adenine are presented herein. Formamide is a simple C1 building block hypothesized to be a precursor to many protometabolic compounds. On the basis of a step-by-step mechanism of the reaction pathways, formamide is suggested to be more reactive in addition reactions than HCN. In addition to its simplicity, the formamide self-catalyzed mechanism is energetically (kinetically) more viable than either a water-catalyzed mechanism or noncatalyzed processes. Moreover, this self-catalyzed mechanism accounts for the yields of purine and adenine previously observed in experiments. This mechanism may elucidate processes that were vital for the emergence of life on the early earth.

  7. Critical appraisal of excited state nonadiabatic dynamics simulations of 9H-adenine.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Lan, Zhenggang; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Szymczak, Jaroslaw J; Lischka, Hans; Thiel, Walter

    2012-12-14

    In spite of the importance of nonadiabatic dynamics simulations for the understanding of ultrafast photo-induced phenomena, simulations based on different methodologies have often led to contradictory results. In this work, we proceed through a comprehensive investigation of on-the-fly surface-hopping simulations of 9H-adenine in the gas phase using different electronic structure theories (ab initio, semi-empirical, and density functional methods). Simulations that employ ab initio and semi-empirical multireference configuration interaction methods predict the experimentally observed ultrafast deactivation of 9H-adenine with similar time scales, however, through different internal conversion channels. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory with six different hybrid and range-corrected functionals fail to predict the ultrafast deactivation. The origin of these differences is analyzed by systematic calculations of the relevant reaction pathways, which show that these discrepancies can always be traced back to topographical features of the underlying potential energy surfaces.

  8. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  9. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Ding, Qing-Bao; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Yong-Li; Ou, Lin; Wang, Chang-Lu

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells of Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  10. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  11. Adenine Nucleotides Control Proliferation In Vivo of Rat Retinal Progenitors by P2Y1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Pereira, Luana; Magalhães, Camila Feitosa; Repossi, Marinna Garcia; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza Prates; Sholl-Franco, Alfred; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne

    2016-08-24

    Previous studies demonstrated that exogenous ATP is able to regulate proliferation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro possibly via P2Y1 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we evaluated the function of adenine nucleotides in vivo during retinal development of newborn rats. Intravitreal injection of apyrase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleotides, reduced cell proliferation in retinas at postnatal day 2 (P2). This decrease was reversed when retinas were treated together with ATPγ-S or ADPβ-S, two hydrolysis-resistant analogs of ATP and ADP, respectively. During early postnatal days (P0 to P5), an increase in ectonucleotidase (E-NTPDase) activity was observed in the retina, suggesting a decrease in the availability of adenine nucleotides, coinciding with the end of proliferation. Interestingly, intravitreal injection of the E-NTPDase inhibitor ARL67156 increased proliferation by around 60 % at P5 rats. Furthermore, immunolabeling against P2Y1 receptor was observed overall in retina layers from P2 rats, including proliferating Ki-67-positive cells in the neuroblastic layer (NBL), suggesting that this receptor could be responsible for the action of adenine nucleotides upon proliferation of RPCs. Accordingly, intravitreal injection of MRS2179, a selective antagonist of P2Y1 receptors, reduced cell proliferation by approximately 20 % in P2 rats. Moreover, treatment with MRS 2179 caused an increase in p57(KIP2) and cyclin D1 expression, a reduction in cyclin E and Rb phosphorylated expression and in BrdU-positive cell number. These data suggest that the adenine nucleotides modulate the proliferation of rat RPCs via activation of P2Y1 receptors regulating transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle.

  12. Geometric consequences of electron delocalization for adenine tautomers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Makowski, Mariusz

    2014-06-01

    Geometric consequences of electron delocalization were studied for all possible adenine tautomers in aqueous solution by means of ab initio methods {PCM(water)//DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)} and compared to those in the gas phase {DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)}. To measure the consequences of any type of resonance conjugation (π-π, n-π, and σ-π), the geometry-based harmonic oscillator model of electron delocalization (HOMED) index, recently extended to the isolated (DFT) and hydrated (PCM//DFT) molecules, was applied to the molecular fragments (imidazole, pyrimidine, 4-aminopyrimidine, and purine) and also to the whole tautomeric system. For individual tautomers, the resonance conjugations and consequently the bond lengths strongly depend on the position of the labile protons. The HOMED indices are larger for tautomers (or their fragments) possessing the labile proton(s) at the N rather than C atom. Solvent interactions with adenine tautomers slightly increase the resonance conjugations. Consequently, they slightly shorten the single bonds and lengthen the double bonds. When going from the gas phase to water solution, the HOMED indices increase (by less than 0.15 units). There is a good relation between the HOMED indices estimated in water solution and those in the gas phase for the neutral and ionized forms of adenine. Subtle effects, being a consequence of intramolecular interactions between the neighboring groups, are so strongly reduced by solvent that the relation between the HOMED indices and the relative energies for the neutral adenine tautomers seems to be better in water solution than in the gas phase.

  13. Synthesis of metal-adeninate frameworks with high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Nan; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    By introducing isophthalic acid or 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid to assemble with adenine and cadmium salt, two isostructural and anionic porous metal-organic frameworks (1 and 2) possessing the novel (4,8)-connected sqc topology are presented here. 1 shows permanent porosity with Langmuir surface area of 770.1 m2/g and exhibits high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons.

  14. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  15. Dietary L-lysine prevents arterial calcification in adenine-induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-09-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC.

  16. Synthesis of rigid homo- and heteroditopic nucleobase-terminated molecules incorporating adenine and/or thymine.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Mikkel F; Andersen, Casper S; Knudsen, Martin M; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2007-07-19

    A series of homo- and heteroditopic thymine- and/or adenine-terminated molecules incorporating rigid aryl or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) linkers has been efficiently synthesized. The key steps involved in the synthesis are the construction of the N-arylated nucleobases using the Chan-Lam-Evans-modified Ullman coupling and their further elaboration using the Sonogashira coupling. Furthermore, the synthesis of a rigid tripodal thymine derivative is reported.

  17. Dietary l-Lysine Prevents Arterial Calcification in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC. PMID:24652795

  18. Adenine nucleotides stimulate migration in wounded cultures of kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, S; Toback, F G

    1992-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides speed structural and functional recovery when administered after experimental renal injury in the rat and stimulate proliferation of kidney epithelial cells. As cell migration is a component of renal regeneration after acute tubular necrosis, we have used an in vitro model of wound healing to study this process. High density, quiescent monkey kidney epithelial cultures were wounded by mechanically scraping away defined regions of the monolayer to simulate the effect of cell loss after tubular necrosis and the number of cells that migrated into the denuded area was counted. Migration was independent of cell proliferation. Provision of adenosine, adenine nucleotides, or cyclic AMP increased the number of migrating cells and accelerated repair of the wound. Other purine and pyrimidine nucleotides were not effective. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine peptide, which blocks the binding of extracellular fibronectin to its cell surface receptor, completely inhibited migration in the presence or absence of ADP. Very low concentrations of epidermal growth factor (K0.5 approximately 0.3 ng/ml) stimulated migration, whereas transforming growth factor-beta 2 was inhibitory (Ki approximately 0.2 ng/ml). Thus, adenosine and/or adenine nucleotides released from injured or dying renal cells, or administered exogenously, may stimulate surviving cells in the wounded nephron to migrate along the basement membrane, thereby rapidly restoring tubular structure and function. Images PMID:1634617

  19. Mechanism of charge separation in DNA by hole transfer through consecutive adenines.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Osakada, Yasuko; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of charge separation in DNA with consecutive adenines adjacent to a photosensitizer (Sens), a series of naphthalimide (NI) and 5-bromouracil ((br)U)-modified DNAs were prepared, and the quantum yields of formation of the charge-separated states (Phi) upon photo-excitation of the Sens NI in DNA were measured. The Phi was modulated by the incorporation site of (br)U, which changes the oxidation potential of its complementary A through hydrogen bonding and the hole-transfer rates between adenines. The results were interpreted as charge separation by means of the initial charge transfer between NI in the singlet excited state and the second- and third-nearest adenine to the NI. In addition, the oxidation of the A nearest to NI leads to the rapid charge recombination within a contact ion pair. This suggests that the charge-separation process can be refined to maximize the Phi by putting a redox-inactive spacer base pair between a photosensitizer and an A-T stretch.

  20. Identification of a Campylobacter coli methyltransferase targeting adenines at GATC sites.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Vikrant; Altermann, Eric; Crespo, Maria D; Olson, Jonathan W; Siletzky, Robin M; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-12-02

    Campylobacter coli can infect humans and colonize multiple other animals but its host-associated genes or adaptations are poorly understood. Adenine methylation at GATC sites, resulting in MboI resistance of genomic DNA, was earlier frequently detected among C. coli from swine but not among turkey-derived isolates. The underlying genetic basis has remained unknown. Comparative genome sequence analyses of C. coli 6461, a swine-derived strain with MboI-resistant DNA, revealed two chromosomal ORFs, 0059 and 0060, encoding a putative DNA methyltransferase and a conserved hypothetical protein, respectively, which were lacking from the genome of the turkey-derived C. coli strain 11601, which had MboI-susceptible DNA. To determine whether the ORF0059 mediated MboI resistance and hence encoded a putative N6-adenine DNA methyltransferase, the gene was cloned immediately upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance cassette (cat) and a PCR fragment harboring ORF0059-cat was transformed into C. coli 11601. The transformants had MboI-resistant DNA, suggesting a direct role of this gene in methylation of adenines at GATC sites. In-silico analyses suggested that the ORF0059-ORF0060 cassette was more frequent among C. coli from swine than certain other sources (e.g. cattle, humans). Potential impacts of ORF0059-mediated methylation on C. coli host preference and other adaptations remain to be elucidated.

  1. Absorption by DNA single strands of adenine isolated in vacuo: The role of multiple chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-02-01

    The degree of electronic coupling between DNA bases is a topic being up for much debate. Here we report on the intrinsic electronic properties of isolated DNA strands in vacuo free of solvent, which is a good starting point for high-level excited states calculations. Action spectra of DNA single strands of adenine reveal sign of exciton coupling between stacked bases from blueshifted absorption bands (˜3 nm) relative to that of the dAMP mononucleotide (one adenine base). The bands are blueshifted by about 10 nm compared to those of solvated strands, which is a shift similar to that for the adenine molecule and the dAMP mononucleotide. Desolvation has little effect on the bandwidth, which implies that inhomogenous broadening of the absorption bands in aqueous solution is of minor importance compared to, e.g., conformational disorder. Finally, at high photon energies, internal conversion competes with electron detachment since dissociation of the bare photoexcited ions on the microsecond time scale is measured.

  2. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  3. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-08

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  4. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  5. White spot syndrome virus VP12 interacts with adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang-fang; Chou, Zhi-guang; Liu, Qing-hui; Guan, Guangkuo; Li, Chen; Huang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus VP12 contains cell attachment motif RGD which is considered to be critical for host cell binding. Until now, the function of this protein remains undefined. In this study, we explored the interaction of VP12 with host cells. A new shrimp protein (adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei, LvANT) is selected by far-western overlay assay. Tissue distribution of adenine nucleotide translocase mRNA showed that it was commonly spread in all the tissues detected. Cellular localization of LvANT in shrimp hemocytes showed that it was primarily located in the cytoplasm of hemocytes and colocalized with mitochondria. ELISA and far-western blot assay confirmed that VP12 interacted with LvANT. In vivo neutralization assay showed that anti-LvANT antibody can significantly reduce the mortality of shrimp challenged by WSSV at 48h post-treatment. Our results collectively showed that VP12 is involved in host cell binding via interaction with adenine nucleotide translocase.

  6. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  7. Adenine deaminase is encoded by Tad1 and participates in copper accumulation in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kehe; Fan, Lili; Yu, Chuangjing; Li, Yingying; Gao, Shigang; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-02-01

    We cloned a novel Tad1 gene and demonstrated that this gene is closely involved in copper bioaccumulation in Trichoderma reesei. Tad1 gene encodes a 510 amino acids protein of the amidohydrolase superfamily which belongs to COG0402. We found that adenine was the most efficient substrate of Tad1 protein among the substrates used in this study. Gene function was also investigated by overexpression and RNA interference. Results showed that copper accumulation increased in mutant cells when Tad1 was overexpressed; by contrast, copper accumulation significantly decreased when Tad1 was inhibited. To investigate the function of Tad1 in copper bioaccumulation, we determined adenine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine concentrations by reversed phase HPLC. Tad1 overexpression induced a substantial production of xanthine, which functions in binding numerous copper ions and reducing copper concentration. We further compared the gene expression profile of AT01 with that of a wild-type T. reesei strain grown in a medium containing 1.0mM Cu(2+) by performing DNA microarray. Several upregulated genes in the mutant were associated with adenine or copper metabolism.

  8. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    DOE PAGES

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; ...

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu7(μ2-OH2)6(μ3-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu2(μ2-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-clustermore » interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.« less

  9. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology.

    PubMed

    Anumukonda, Lakshmi N; Young, Avery; Lynn, David G; Buckley, Ragan; Warrayat, Amena; Graves, Christina L; Bean, Heather D; Hud, Nicholas V

    2011-12-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life's chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum.

  10. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life’s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum. PMID:22075932

  11. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  12. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; Gai, Z.; Cruz, C.; Reis, M. S.; Santos, T. M.; Félix, V.

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu72-OH2)63-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu22-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-cluster interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.

  13. Properties of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Fun; Ljungdahl, Lars; Wood, Harland G.

    1966-01-01

    Li, Lan-Fun (Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio), Lars Ljungdahl, and Harland G. Wood. Properties of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum. J. Bacteriol. 92: 405–412. 1966.—A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent formate dehydrogenase has been isolated from C. thermoaceticum. The enzyme is very sensitive to oxygen and requires sulfhydryl compounds for activity. The apparent Km at 50 C and pH 7.0 for NADP is 5.9 × 10−5m and for formate, 2.2 × 10−4m. The enzyme is most active at about 60 C and at pH values between 7.0 and 9.0. The enzyme catalyzes an exchange between C14O2 and formate, which requires NADP, but net synthesis of formate from CO2 and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate could not be demonstrated. The reaction does not involve ferredoxin. PMID:16562128

  14. Photoinduced formation of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine derivatives at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozinova, T. A.; Lobanov, A. V.; Lander, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The amount of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine (A), adenosine (Ado), cytidine (Cyt), and thymine (T) containing 0.1 M NaCl and irradiated with near-UV light at 77 K is determined. It is established by comparing the results to data obtained earlier that the amount of H2O2 detected in the defrosted samples following identical irradiation falls in the order Ado > adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) > A >> Cyt. The formation of H2O2 was not detected for T. The formation of H2O2 in solutions of adenine derivatives was observed when the samples were irradiated with light having wavelengths in the ranges λ = 240-400 nm and 290-450 nm. The latter covers only the long wave absorption range of these compounds. It is shown that the change in the intensity of irradiation that strongly affected the intensity of EPR signals of irradiated samples prior to defrosting affected the amount of detected H2O2 only slightly, and the effect was not unidirectional. The results from determining H2O2 in the samples of adenine derivatives are compared to estimates of the content of free peroxyl radicals, obtained by analyzing EPR spectra. Plausible mechanisms of the processes are discussed.

  15. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  16. The solute specificity profiles of nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) from Zea mays and Setaria viridis illustrate functional flexibility.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Micah; Schein, Jessica; Hunt, Kevin A; Nalam, Vamsi; Mourad, George S; Schultes, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The solute specificity profiles (transport and binding) for the nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) proteins, from the closely related C4 grasses Zea mays and Setaria viridis, differ from that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NCS1. Solute specificity profiles for NCS1 from Z. mays (ZmNCS1) and S. viridis (SvNCS1) were determined through heterologous complementation studies in NCS1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The four Viridiplantae NCS1 proteins transport the purines adenine and guanine, but unlike the dicot and algal NCS1, grass NCS1 proteins fail to transport the pyrimidine uracil. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence similarity, ZmNCS1 and SvNCS1 display distinct solute transport and recognition profiles. SvNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, cytosine, and allantoin and competitively binds xanthine and uric acid. ZmNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, and cytosine and competitively binds, 5-fluorocytosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. The differences in grass NCS1 profiles are due to a limited number of amino acid alterations. These amino acid residues do not correspond to amino acids essential for overall solute and cation binding or solute transport, as previously identified in bacterial and fungal NCS1, but rather may represent residues involved in subtle solute discrimination. The data presented here reveal that within Viridiplantae, NCS1 proteins transport a broad range of nucleobase compounds and that the solute specificity profile varies with species.

  17. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V.; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A.; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)—32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains. PMID:28275585

  18. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)-32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains.

  19. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João P T; Nabeshima, Henrique S; da Costa, Marcello F; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2014-05-21

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr(2+) promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4=C5 and C6=O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310cm(-1) was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  20. Effect of gum arabic on oxidative stress and inflammation in adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Husseni, Isehaq; Beegam, Sumyia; Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schierling, Simone; Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease in humans, and in chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats. The aim of this work was to study the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in adenine-induced CRF and the effect thereon of the purported nephroprotective agent gum arabic (GA). Rats were divided into four groups and treated for 4 weeks as follows: control, adenine in feed (0.75%, w/w), GA in drinking water (15%, w/v) and adenine+GA, as before. Urine, blood and kidneys were collected from the rats at the end of the treatment for analysis of conventional renal function tests (plasma creatinine and urea concentration). In addition, the concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the oxidative stress markers glutathione and superoxide dismutase, renal apoptosis, superoxide formation and DNA double strand break frequency, detected by immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX, were measured. Adenine significantly increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine in plasma, significantly decreased the creatinine clearance and induced significant increases in the concentration of the measured inflammatory mediators. Further, it caused oxidative stress and DNA damage. Treatment with GA significantly ameliorated these actions. The mechanism of the reported salutary effect of GA in adenine-induced CRF is associated with mitigation of the adenine-induced inflammation and generation of free radicals.

  1. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João P. T.; Nabeshima, Henrique S.; da Costa, Marcello F.; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr2+ promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+ of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4dbnd C5 and C6dbnd O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310 cm-1 was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  3. Inhibition of transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vitro by the alc gene product of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Drivdahl, R H; Kutter, E M

    1990-01-01

    The alc gene product (gpalc) of bacteriophage T4 inhibits the transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vivo. We examined its effect on transcription in vitro by comparing RNA polymerase isolated from Escherichia coli infected with either wild-type T4D+ or alc mutants. A 50 to 60% decline in RNA polymerase activity, measured on phage T7 DNA, was observed by 1 min after infection with either T4D+ or alc mutants; this did not occur when the infecting phage lacked gpalt. In the case of the T4D+ strain but not alc mutants, this was followed by a further decrease. By 5 min after infection the activity of alc mutants was 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than that of the wild type on various cytosine-containing DNA templates, whereas there was little or no difference in activity on T4 HMdC-DNA, in agreement with the in vivo specificity. Effects on transcript initiation and elongation were distinguished by using a T7 phage DNA template. Rifampin challenge, end-labeling with [gamma-32P]ATP, and selective initiation with a dinucleotide all indicate that the decreased in vitro activity of the wild-type polymerase relative to that of the alc mutants was due to inhibition of elongation, not to any difference in initiation rates. Wild-type (but not mutated) gpalc copurified with RNA polymerase on heparin agarose but not in subsequent steps. Immunoprecipitation of modified RNA polymerase also indicated that gpalc was not tightly bound to RNA polymerase intracellularly. It thus appears likely that gpalc inhibits transcript elongation on cytosine-containing DNA by interacting with actively transcribing core polymerase as a complex with the enzyme and cytosine-rich stretches of the template. Images PMID:2185231

  4. Human Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 11 (ARHGEF11) Regulates Dendritic Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Yutaka; Takaki, Manabu; Sakamoto, Shinji; Okamoto, Sojiro; Kishimoto, Makiko; Okahisa, Yuko; Itoh, Masahiko; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of synaptic connectivity during perinatal and adolescent periods have been hypothesized to be related to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 11 (ARHGEF11) is a specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF) for RhoA, which is a critical regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and organization of dendritic spines and inhibitor of spine maintenance. ARHGEF11 variants are reported to be associated with a higher risk for the onset of schizophrenia in a Japanese population; however, how ARHGEF11 contributes to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in dendritic spines is unknown. Therefore, we first studied the distribution, binding, and function of ARHGEF11 in the dendritic spines of the rat cerebral cortex. After subcellular fractionation of the rat cerebral cortex, ARHGEF11 was detected with synaptophysin and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the P2 fractions including synaptosomal fractions containing presynaptic and postsynaptic density proteins. Endogenous ARHGEF11 was coimmunoprecipitated with synaptophysin or PSD-95. In cortical primary neurons at 28 days in vitro, immunostaining revealed that ARHGEF11 located in the dendrites and dendritic spines and colocalized with PSD-95 and synaptophysin. Overexpression of exogenous ARHGEF11 significantly decreased the number of spines (p = 0.008). These results indicate that ARHGEF11 is likely to be associated with synaptic membranes and regulation of spine. PMID:28036092

  5. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors for RhoGTPases: good therapeutic targets for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2011-06-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are a family of small proteins which function as molecular switches in a variety of signaling pathways following stimulation of cell surface receptors. RhoGTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration, growth and cell survival. Because of their central role in regulating processes that are dysregulated in cancer, it seems reasonable that defects in the RhoGTPase pathway may be involved in the development of cancer. RhoGTPase activity is regulated by a number of protein families: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). This review discusses the participation of RhoGTPases and their regulators, especially GEFs in human cancers. In particular, we focus on the involvement of the RhoGTPase GEF, Vav1, a hematopoietic specific signal transducer which is involved in human neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma and lung cancer. Finally, we summarize recent advances in the design and application of a number of molecules that specifically target individual RhoGTPases or their regulators or effectors, and discuss their potential for cancer therapy.

  6. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  7. The NEIL glycosylases remove oxidized guanine lesions from telomeric and promoter quadruplex DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia; Fleming, Aaron M.; Averill, April M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex is a four-stranded G-rich DNA structure that is highly susceptible to oxidation. Despite the important roles that G-quadruplexes play in telomere biology and gene transcription, neither the impact of guanine lesions on the stability of quadruplexes nor their repair are well understood. Here, we show that the oxidized guanine lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) reduce the thermostability and alter the folding of telomeric quadruplexes in a location-dependent manner. Also, the NEIL1 and NEIL3 DNA glycosylases can remove hydantoin lesions but none of the glycosylases, including OGG1, are able to remove 8-oxoG from telomeric quadruplexes. Interestingly, a hydantoin lesion at the site most prone to oxidation in quadruplex DNA is not efficiently removed by NEIL1 or NEIL3. However, NEIL1, NEIL2 and NEIL3 remove hydantoins from telomeric quadruplexes formed by five TTAGGG repeats much more rapidly than the commonly studied four-repeat quadruplex structures. We also show that APE1 cleaves furan in selected positions in Na+-coordinated telomeric quadruplexes. In promoter G-quadruplex DNA, the NEIL glycosylases primarily remove Gh from Na+-coordinated antiparallel quadruplexes but not K+-coordinated parallel quadruplexes containing VEGF or c-MYC promoter sequences. Thus, the NEIL DNA glycosylases may be involved in both telomere maintenance and in gene regulation. PMID:25813041

  8. Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair of Oxidatively Generated Guanine Lesions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shafirovich, Vladimir; Kropachev, Konstantin; Anderson, Thomas; Liu, Zhi; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Martin, Brooke D; Sugden, Kent; Shim, Yoonjung; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2016-03-04

    The well known biomarker of oxidative stress, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, is more susceptible to further oxidation than the parent guanine base and can be oxidatively transformed to the genotoxic spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) lesions. Incubation of 135-mer duplexes with single Sp or Gh lesions in human cell extracts yields a characteristic nucleotide excision repair (NER)-induced ladder of short dual incision oligonucleotide fragments in addition to base excision repair (BER) incision products. The ladders were not observed when NER was inhibited either by mouse monoclonal antibody (5F12) to human XPA or in XPC(-/-) fibroblast cell extracts. However, normal NER activity appeared when the XPC(-/-) cell extracts were complemented with XPC-RAD23B proteins. The Sp and Gh lesions are excellent substrates of both BER and NER. In contrast, 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole, a product of the oxidation of guanine in DNA by peroxynitrite, is an excellent substrate of BER only. In the case of mouse embryonic fibroblasts, BER of the Sp lesion is strongly reduced in NEIL1(-/-) relative to NEIL1(+/+) extracts. In summary, in human cell extracts, BER and NER activities co-exist and excise Gh and Sp DNA lesions, suggesting that the relative NER/BER product ratios may depend on competitive BER and NER protein binding to these lesions.

  9. Cytosolic Na+ controls and epithelial Na+ channel via the Go guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Komwatana, P; Dinudom, A; Young, J A; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the fate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-beta-S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the alpha-subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8755611

  10. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Blatt, C.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Cohn, V.H.; Zollman, S.; Fournier, R.E.K.; Mohandas, L.T.; Nesbitt, M.; Lugo, T.; Jones, D.T.; Reed, R.R.; Weiner, L.P.; Sparkes, R.S.; Simon, M.I. )

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding {alpha}-subunit proteins, two different {beta} subunits, and one {gamma} subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The {beta} subunits were also assigned-GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extend of the G{alpha} gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases and with genes corresponding to G proteins.

  11. New investigations of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabijanić, Ivana; Matković-Čalogović, Dubravka; Pilepić, Viktor; Ivanišević, Irena; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Sanković, Krešimir

    2017-01-01

    Crystals of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex, (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O (HGua = protonated guanine), were prepared and analysed by spectroscopic (IR, Raman) and computational methods. A new single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to obtain data with lower standard uncertainties than those in the previously published structure. Raman and IR spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis gave us new insight into the vibrational states of the (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O crystal. The vibrational spectra of the crystal were assigned by performing a normal coordinate analysis for a free dimer with a centre of inversion as the only symmetry element. The stretching vibration observed at 279 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum corresponds to the N-Cu bond. The noncovalent interaction (NCI) plots and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis of the electron density obtained from periodic DFT calculations elucidated the interactions that exist within the crystal structure. Closed-shell ionic attractions, as well as weak and medium strength hydrogen bonds, prevailed in the crystal packing.

  12. Monitoring one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine in DNA crystals using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James P.; Poynton, Fergus E.; Keane, Páraic M.; Gurung, Sarah P.; Brazier, John A.; Cardin, David J.; Winter, Graeme; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Towrie, Michael; Cardin, Christine J.; Kelly, John M.; Quinn, Susan J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the molecular origins of diseases caused by ultraviolet and visible light, and also to develop photodynamic therapy, it is important to resolve the mechanism of photoinduced DNA damage. Damage to DNA bound to a photosensitizer molecule frequently proceeds by one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine, but the precise dynamics of this process are sensitive to the location and the orientation of the photosensitizer, which are very difficult to define in solution. To overcome this, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy was performed on photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl-DNA crystals, the atomic structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallography. By combining the X-ray and TRIR data we are able to define both the geometry of the reaction site and the rates of individual steps in a reversible photoinduced electron-transfer process. This allows us to propose an individual guanine as the reaction site and, intriguingly, reveals that the dynamics in the crystal state are quite similar to those observed in the solvent medium.

  13. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  14. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine reveals conservation of its tissue distribution between amphibians and mammals.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rimple D; Sottile, Virginie; Loose, Matthew; De Sousa, Paul A; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2012-02-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) is a form of modified cytosine, which has recently attracted a considerable attention due to its potential role in transcriptional regulation. According to several reports 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine distribution is tissue-specific in mammals. Thus, 5-hmC is enriched in embryonic cell populations and in adult neuronal tissue. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hmC and utilize it to assess the levels of this modification in amphibian tissues. We show that, similar to mammalian embryos, 5-hmC is enriched in axolotl tadpoles compared with adult tissues. Our data demonstrate that 5-hmC distribution is tissue-specific in amphibians, and that strong 5-hmC enrichment in neuronal cells is conserved between amphibians and mammals. In addition, we identify 5-hmC-enriched cell populations that are distributed in amphibian skin and connective tissue in a mosaic manner. Our results illustrate that immunochemistry can be successfully used not only for spatial identification of cells enriched with 5-hmC, but also for the semi-quantitative assessment of the levels of this epigenetic modification in single cells of different tissues.

  15. Epigenetic contribution to successful polyploidizations: variation in global cytosine methylation along an extensive ploidy series in Dianthus broteri (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Conchita; Balao, Francisco; Bazaga, Pilar; Pérez, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Polyploidization is a significant evolutionary force in plants which involves major genomic and genetic changes, frequently regulated by epigenetic factors. We explored whether natural polyploidization in Dianthus broteri complex resulted in substantial changes in global DNA cytosine methylation associated to ploidy. Global cytosine methylation was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 12 monocytotypic populations with different ploidies (2×, 4×, 6×, 12×) broadly distributed within D. broteri distribution range. The effects of ploidy level and local variation on methylation were assessed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). Dianthus broteri exhibited a higher methylation percent (˜33%) than expected by its monoploid genome size and a large variation among study populations (range: 29.3-35.3%). Global methylation tended to increase with ploidy but did not significantly differ across levels due to increased variation within the highest-order polyploidy categories. Methylation varied more among hexaploid and dodecaploid populations, despite such cytotypes showing more restricted geographic location and increased genetic relatedness than diploids and tetraploids. In this study, we demonstrate the usefulness of an HPLC method in providing precise and genome reference-free global measure of DNA cytosine methylation, suitable to advance current knowledge of the roles of this epigenetic mechanism in polyploidization processes.

  16. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  17. Studying Z-DNA an