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Sample records for adenine methyltransferase dam

  1. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify a DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.

  2. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify amore » DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.« less

  3. DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) controls the expression of the cytotoxic enterotoxin (act) gene of Aeromonas hydrophila via tRNA modifying enzyme-glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA)

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Kosykh, Valeri G.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is both a human and animal pathogen, and the cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) is a crucial virulence factor of this bacterium because of its associated hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities. Previously, to define the role of some regulatory genes in modulating Act production, we showed that deletion of a glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) encoding tRNA methylase reduced Act levels, while overproduction of DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) led to a concomitant increase in Act-associated biological activities of a diarrheal isolate SSU of A. hydrophila. Importantly, there are multiple GATC binding sites for Dam within an upstream sequence of the gidA gene and one such target site in the act gene upstream region. We showed the dam gene to be essential for the viability of A. hydrophila SSU, and, therefore, to better understand the interaction of the encoding genes, Dam and GidA, in act gene regulation, we constructed a gidA in-frame deletion mutant of Escherichia coli GM28 (dam+) and GM33 (Δdam) strains. We then tested the expressional activity of the act and gidA genes by using a promoterless pGlow-TOPO vector containing a reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our data indicated that in GidA+ strains of E. coli, constitutive methylation of the GATC site(s) by Dam negatively regulated act and gidA gene expression as measured by GFP production. However, in the ΔgidA strains, irrespective of the presence or absence of constitutively active Dam, we did not observe any alteration in the expression of the act gene signifying the role of GidA in positively regulating Act production. To determine the exact mechanism of how Dam and GidA influence Act, a real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was performed. The analysis indicated an increase in gidA and act gene expression in the A. hydrophila Dam-overproducing strain, and these data matched with Act production in the E. coli GM28 strain. Thus, the extent of DNA methylation caused by

  4. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  5. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    PubMed

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  6. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  7. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison E.; Rogovskyy, Artem S.; Crowley, Michael A.; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence. PMID:27195796

  8. Tools for DNA adenine methyltransferase identification analysis of nuclear organization during C. elegans development.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Ritler, Dominic; Meister, Peter

    2016-04-01

    C. elegans has recently emerged as a valuable model to understand the link between nuclear organization and cell fate, by combining microscopy approaches, genome-wide mapping techniques with advanced genetics. Crucial to these analyses are techniques to determine the genome-wide interaction pattern of proteins with DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation has proven valuable but it requires considerable amounts of starting material. This is sometimes difficult to achieve, in particular for specific genotypes (balanced strains, different sexes, severe phenotypes…). As an alternative to ChIP, DNA adenine methyltransferase identification by sequencing (DamID-seq) was recently shown to be able to characterize binding sites in single mammalian cells. Additionally, DamID can be achieved for cell-type specific analysis by expressing Dam fusion proteins under tissue specific promoters in a controlled manner. In this report, we present a user-friendly pipeline to analyse DamID-seq data in C. elegans. Based upon this pipeline, we provide a comparative analysis of libraries generated with different starting material and discuss important library features. Moreover, we introduce an adaptation of an imaging based tool to visualize in vivo the cell-specific tridimensional binding pattern of any protein of interest. genesis 54:151-159, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26845390

  9. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:26807517

  10. DamID-seq: Genome-wide Mapping of Protein-DNA Interactions by High Throughput Sequencing of Adenine-methylated DNA Fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feinan; Olson, Brennan G; Yao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) assay is a powerful method to detect protein-DNA interactions both locally and genome-wide. It is an alternative approach to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). An expressed fusion protein consisting of the protein of interest and the E. coli DNA adenine methyltransferase can methylate the adenine base in GATC motifs near the sites of protein-DNA interactions. Adenine-methylated DNA fragments can then be specifically amplified and detected. The original DamID assay detects the genomic locations of methylated DNA fragments by hybridization to DNA microarrays, which is limited by the availability of microarrays and the density of predetermined probes. In this paper, we report the detailed protocol of integrating high throughput DNA sequencing into DamID (DamID-seq). The large number of short reads generated from DamID-seq enables detecting and localizing protein-DNA interactions genome-wide with high precision and sensitivity. We have used the DamID-seq assay to study genome-nuclear lamina (NL) interactions in mammalian cells, and have noticed that DamID-seq provides a high resolution and a wide dynamic range in detecting genome-NL interactions. The DamID-seq approach enables probing NL associations within gene structures and allows comparing genome-NL interaction maps with other functional genomic data, such as ChIP-seq and RNA-seq. PMID:26862720

  11. Identification of the active oligomeric state of an essential adenine DNA methyltransferase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Shier, V K; Hancey, C J; Benkovic, S J

    2001-05-01

    Caulobacter crescentus contains one of the two known prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases that lacks a cognate endonuclease. This endogenous cell cycle regulated adenine DNA methyltransferase (CcrM) is essential for C. crescentus cellular viability. DNA methylation catalyzed by CcrM provides an obligatory signal for the proper progression through the cell cycle. To further our understanding of the regulatory role played by CcrM, we sought to investigate its biophysical properties. In this paper we employed equilibrium ultracentrifugation, velocity ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking to show that CcrM is dimeric at physiological concentrations. However, surface plasmon resonance experiments in the presence of S-adenosyl-homocysteine evince that CcrM binds as a monomer to a defined hemi-methylated DNA substrate containing the canonical methylation sequence, GANTC. Initial velocity experiments demonstrate that dimerization of CcrM does not affect DNA methylation. Collectively, these findings suggest that CcrM is active as a monomer and provides a possible in vivo role for dimerization as a means to stabilize CcrM from premature catabolism. PMID:11278726

  12. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  13. Investigation of the C-terminal domain of the bacterial DNA-(adenine N6)-methyltransferase CcrM.

    PubMed

    Maier, Johannes A H; Albu, Razvan F; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-12-01

    CcrM-related DNA-(adenine N6)-methyltransferases play very important roles in the biology of Caulobacter crescentus and other alpha-proteobacteria. These enzymes methylate GANTC sequences, but the molecular mechanism by which they recognize their target sequence is unknown. We carried out multiple sequence alignments and noticed that CcrM enzymes contain a conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) which is not present in other DNA-(adenine N6)-methyltransferases and we show here that deletion of this part abrogates catalytic activity and DNA binding of CcrM. A mutational study identified 7 conserved residues in the CTD (out of 13 tested), mutation of which led to a strong reduction in catalytic activity. All of these mutants showed altered DNA binding, but no change in AdoMet binding and secondary structure. Some mutants exhibited reduced DNA binding, but others showed an enhanced DNA binding. Moreover, we show that CcrM does not specifically bind to DNA containing GANTC sequences. Taken together, these findings suggest that the specific CcrM-DNA complex undergoes a conformational change, which is endergonic but essential for catalytic activity and this step is blocked by some of the mutations. Moreover, our data indicate that the CTD of CcrM is involved in DNA binding and recognition. This suggests that the CTD functions as target recognition domain of CcrM and, therefore, CcrM can be considered the first example of a δ-type DNA-(adenine N6)-methyltransferase identified so far. PMID:26475175

  14. Dimerization of the bacterial RsrI N6-adenine DNA methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Dimeric restriction endonucleases and monomeric modification methyltransferases were long accepted as the structural paradigm for Type II restriction systems. Recent studies, however, have revealed an increasing number of apparently dimeric DNA methyltransferases. Our initial characterization of RsrI methyltransferase (M.RsrI) was consistent with the enzyme functioning as a monomer, but, subsequently, the enzyme crystallized as a dimer with 1500 Å2 of buried surface area. This result led us to re-examine the biochemical properties of M.RsrI. Gel-shift studies of M.RsrI binding to DNA suggested that binding cooperativity targets hemimethylated DNA preferentially over unmethylated DNA. Size-exclusion chromatography indicated that the M.RsrI–DNA complex had a size and stoichiometry consistent with a dimeric enzyme binding to the DNA. Kinetic measurements revealed a quadratic relationship between enzyme velocity and concentration. Site-directed mutagenesis at the dimer interface affected the kinetics and DNA-binding of the enzyme, providing support for a model proposing an active enzyme dimer. We also identified a conserved motif in the dimer interfaces of the β-class methyltransferases M.RsrI, M.MboIIA and M2.DpnII. Taken together, these data suggest that M.RsrI may be part of a sub-class of MTases that function as dimers. PMID:16464821

  15. X-ray crystal structure of N-6 adenine deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phidung Hong

    X-ray diffraction by using resonant anomalous scattering has become a popular tool for solving crystal structures in the last ten years with the expanded availability of tunable synchrotron radiation for protein crystallography. Mercury atoms were used for phasing. The crystal structure of N-6 deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptoccocus pneumoniae (DpnM) was solved by using the Multiple Anomalous Diffraction technique. The crystal structure reveals the formation of mercaptide between the mercury ion and the thiol group on the cysteine amino acid in a hydrophobic environment. The crystal structure contains the bound ligand, S- adenosyl-l-methionine on the surface of the concave opening. The direction of the β-strands on the beta sheets are identical to other solved methyltransferases. The highly conserved motifs, DPPY and the FxGxG, are found to be important in ligand binding and possibly in methyl group transfer. The structure has a concave cleft with an opening on the order of 30 Å that can accommodate a DNA duplex. By molecular modelling coupled to sequence alignment, two other highly conserved residues Arg21 and Gly19 are found to be important in catalysis.

  16. Specificity of the ModA11, ModA12 and ModD1 epigenetic regulator N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Seib, Kate L.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Tan, Aimee; Scott, Adeana L.; Kumar, Ritesh; Power, Peter M.; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Luyten, Yvette A.; Morgan, Richard D.; Roberts, Richard J.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Rao, Desirazu N.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Phase variation (random ON/OFF switching) of gene expression is a common feature of host-adapted pathogenic bacteria. Phase variably expressed N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases (Mod) alter global methylation patterns resulting in changes in gene expression. These systems constitute phase variable regulons called phasevarions. Neisseria meningitidis phasevarions regulate genes including virulence factors and vaccine candidates, and alter phenotypes including antibiotic resistance. The target site recognized by these Type III N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases is not known. Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis was used to identify the recognition site for three key N. meningitidis methyltransferases: ModA11 (exemplified by M.NmeMC58I) (5′-CGYm6AG-3′), ModA12 (exemplified by M.Nme77I, M.Nme18I and M.Nme579II) (5′-ACm6ACC-3′) and ModD1 (exemplified by M.Nme579I) (5′-CCm6AGC-3′). Restriction inhibition assays and mutagenesis confirmed the SMRT methylome analysis. The ModA11 site is complex and atypical and is dependent on the type of pyrimidine at the central position, in combination with the bases flanking the core recognition sequence 5′-CGYm6AG-3′. The observed efficiency of methylation in the modA11 strain (MC58) genome ranged from 4.6% at 5′-GCGCm6AGG-3′ sites, to 100% at 5′-ACGTm6AGG-3′ sites. Analysis of the distribution of modified sites in the respective genomes shows many cases of association with intergenic regions of genes with altered expression due to phasevarion switching. PMID:25845594

  17. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26478921

  18. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Liow, Hien-haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Brent, Michael; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA Adenine Methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried Interaction or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome, and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  19. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Hass, Matthew R; Liow, Hien-Haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T; Brent, Michael R; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-08-20

    We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA adenine methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried. Either direct interaction between proteins or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding, thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  20. Research Resource: The Estrogen Receptor α Cistrome Defined by DamIP

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Sun, Deqiang; Ayers, Stephen; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Baxter, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is tightly regulated by transcription factors and cofactors that function by directly or indirectly interacting with DNA of the genome. Understanding how and where these proteins bind provides essential information to uncover genetic regulatory mechanisms. We have developed a new method to study DNA-protein interaction in vivo called DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam)IP, which is based on fusing a protein of interest to a mutant form of Dam from Escherichia coli. We showed previously that DamIP can efficiently identify in vivo binding sites of Dam-tethered human estrogen receptor (hER)α. In current study, we present the cistrome of hERα determined by DamIP and high throughput sequencing (DamIP-seq). The DamIP-seq-defined hERα cistrome identifies many new binding regions and overlaps with those determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip or ChIP-seq. Elements uniquely identified by DamIP-seq include a unique class of elements that show low, but persistent, hERα binding when reexamined by conventional ChIP. In contrast, DamIP-seq fails to detect some elements with very transient hERα binding. The methyl-adenine modifications introduced by Dam are stable and do not decrease over 12 d. In summary, the current study provides both an alternate view of the hERα cistrome to further understand the mechanism of hERα-mediated transcription and a new tool to explore other transcriptional factors and cofactors that is very different from conventional ChIP. PMID:22207717

  1. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the Ecal DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, V; Venetianer, P; Kiss, A

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the GGTNACC specific Ecal DNA methyltransferase (M.Ecal) has been cloned in E. coli from Enterobacter cloacae and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. The ecalM gene codes for a protein of 452 amino acids (Mr: 51,111). It was determined that M.Ecal is an adenine methyltransferase. M.Ecal shows limited amino acid sequence similarity to other adenine methyltransferases. A clone that expresses Ecal methyltransferase at high level was constructed. Images PMID:2183182

  2. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  3. Two novel temperate bacteriophages co-existing in Aeromonas sp. ARM81 - characterization of their genomes, proteomes and DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Radlinska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas species are causative agents of a wide spectrum of diseases in animals and humans. Although these bacteria are commonly found in various environments, little is known about their phages. Thus far, only one temperate Aeromonas phage has been characterized. Whole-genome sequencing of an Aeromonas sp. strain ARM81 revealed the presence of two prophage clusters. One of them is integrated into the chromosome and the other was maintained as an extrachromosomal, linear plasmid-like prophage encoding a protelomerase. Both prophages were artificially and spontaneously inducible. We separately isolated both phages and compared their genomes with other known viruses. The novel phages show no similarity to the previously characterized Aeromonas phages and might represent new evolutionary lineages of viruses infecting Aeromonadaceae. Apart from the comparative genomic analyses of these phages, complemented with their structural and molecular characterization, a functional analysis of four DNA methyltransferases encoded by these viruses was conducted. One of the investigated N6-adenine-modifying enzymes shares sequence specificity with a Dam-like methyltransferase of its bacterial host, while another one is non-specific, as it catalyzes adenine methylation in various sequence contexts. The presented results shed new light on the diversity of Aeromonas temperate phages. PMID:27184451

  4. Fate of prebiotic adenine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, C A; Hansson, T K; Larsson, H S; Sowerby, S J; Holm, N G

    2001-01-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data for the purine base adenine has been obtained on several prebiotically relevant minerals by frontal analysis using water as a mobile phase. Adenine is far displaced toward adsorption on pyrite (FeS2), quartz (SiO2), and pyrrhotite (FeS), but somewhat less for magnetite (Fe3O4) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The prebiotic prevalence of these minerals would have allowed them to act as a sink for adenine; removal from the aqueous phase would confer protection from hydrolysis as well, establishing a nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework for increased adenine synthesis. Our results provide evidence that adsorption phenomena may have been critical for the primordial genetic architecture. PMID:12448980

  5. Identification of Tox chromatin binding properties and downstream targets by DamID-Seq.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Domingues, António Miguel; Artegiani, Benedetta; Dahl, Andreas; Calegari, Federico

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) has emerged as a powerful tool to profile protein-DNA interaction on a genome-wide scale. While DamID has been primarily combined with microarray analyses, which limits the spatial resolution and full potential of this technique, our group was the first to combine DamID with sequencing (DamID-Seq) for characterizing the binding loci and properties of a transcription factor (Tox) (sequencing data available at NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE64240). Our approach was based on the combination and optimization of several bioinformatics tools that are here described in detail. Analysis of Tox proximity to transcriptional start sites, profiling on enhancers and binding motif has allowed us to identify this transcription factor as an important new regulator of neural stem cells differentiation and newborn neurons maturation during mouse cortical development. Here we provide a valuable resource to study the role of Tox as a novel key determinant of mammalian somatic stem cells during development of the nervous and lymphatic system, in which this factor is known to be active, and describe a useful pipeline to perform DamID-Seq analyses for any other transcription factor. PMID:26981424

  6. Dam it's good! DamID profiling of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Aughey, Gabriel N; Southall, Tony D

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with chromatin is fundamental for several essential cellular processes. During the development of an organism, genes must to be tightly regulated both temporally and spatially. This is achieved through the action of chromatin-binding proteins such as transcription factors, histone modifiers, nucleosome remodelers, and lamins. Furthermore, protein-DNA interactions are important in the adult, where their perturbation can lead to disruption of homeostasis, metabolic dysregulation, and diseases such as cancer. Understanding the nature of these interactions is of paramount importance in almost all areas of molecular biological research. In recent years, DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) has emerged as one of the most comprehensive and versatile methods available for profiling protein-DNA interactions on a genomic scale. DamID has been used to map a variety of chromatin-binding proteins in several model organisms and has the potential for continued adaptation and application in the field of genomic biology. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:25-37. doi: 10.1002/wdev.205 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26383089

  7. DNA methyltransferase activity detection based on fluorescent silver nanocluster hairpin-shaped DNA probe with 5'-C-rich/G-rich-3' tails.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenting; Lai, Han; Huang, Rong; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Yimo; Weng, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation has received a large amount of attention due to its close relationship to a wide range of biological phenomena, such as gene activation, gene imprinting, and chromatin stability. Herein, we have designed a hairpin-shaped DNA probe with 5'-C-rich/G-rich-3' tails and developed a simple and reliable fluorescence turn-off assay for DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) detection combining site recognition and the fluorescence enhancement of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) by guanine-rich DNA sequences. A designed hairpin probe with 5' CCCTTACCCC and 3' GGGTGGGGTGGGGTGGGG displays a bright red emission after reacting with AgNO3 and NaBH4. In the presence of Dam MTase, the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I which has the same recognition site with the Dam MTase can split the probe, freeing the G-rich sequence from the C-rich sequence, thus quenching the fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs. Compared to traditional fluorescent-based methods, this strategy is simple and inexpensive. A linear response to concentrations of Dam MTase which range from 1 U/mL to 100 U/mL and a detection limit of 1 U/mL are obtained without any amplification steps. In addition, we also demonstrate the method can be used for evaluation and screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. PMID:25682501

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles-cooperated fluorescence sensor for sensitive and accurate detection of DNA methyltransferase activity coupled with exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Youna; Xu, Shuling; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuanfu; Yue, Qiaoli; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescence magnetic biosensor for the DNA methyltransferase activity was developed based on the cooperative amplification by combining the magnetic nanoparticles synergistic exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted circular exponential amplification and a supramolecular structure ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex. First, a duplex DNA probe, which was constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon, was assembled on the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a reporter. A hairpin probe (HP)-containing sequence of GATC was used as the methylation substrate of DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM). Once HP was methylated by DAM, it could be recognized and cleaved by Dpn I, which allows the release of a single-stranded DNA. The DNA (tDNA1) then hybridizes to the MNP probe, which then triggers the exonuclease III-mediated target exponential recycling reaction. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex forming oligomers are liberated and folded into the G-quadruplex-ZnPPIX complexes with the help of zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX(ZnPPIX) on the MNP surface to give a remarkable fluorescence response. In the developed sensor, a small amount of target DAM can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to remarkable amplification of the target. Moreover, using MNPs as a vector of the sensor may reduce the interference from the real samples, which increases the anti-interference of the sensing system. Based on this unique amplification strategy, a very low detection limit down to 2.0 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) was obtained. Furthermore, the sensor could be used to evaluate the DAM activity in different growth stages of E. coli cells and screen Dam MTase inhibitors. Therefore, the strategy proposed here provides a promising platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTases and has great potential to be applied further in early clinical diagnostics and medical research. PMID:26421322

  9. DNA-AuNPs based signal amplification for highly sensitive detection of DNA methylation, methyltransferase activity and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaoying; Cao, Xianqing; Wang, Li; Lan, Tian; Li, Yiyan; Xie, Guoming

    2014-08-15

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical method was developed for the detection of DNA methylation, determination of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and screening of MTase inhibitor. Methylene blue (MB) was employed as electrochemical indicator and DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as signal amplification unit because the DNA strands in this composite have strong adsorption ability for MB. First, the thiolated single-stranded DNA S1 was self-assembled on gold electrode, hybridization between the lower portion of DNA S1 and its complementary DNA S2 formed an identical double-stranded tetranucleotide target sequence for both DNA adenine methylation (Dam) MTase and methylation-resistant endonuclease Mbo I, then the upper portion of DNA S1 was hybridized with its complementary DNA S3 modified on AuNPs to bring the DNA S3-AuNPs amplification units onto the electrode. The DNA S1/S2/S3-AuNPs bioconjugate has lots of DNA strands, and they can adsorb abundant MB. Mbo I endounuclease could not cleave the identical target sequence after it was methylated by Dam MTase. On the contrary, the sequence without methylation could be cleaved, which would decrease the amount of adsorbed MB. The presence of redox-active MB was detected electrochemically by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Thus, the activity of Dam MTase and methylation status were sensitively converted to the DNA S3-AuNPs amplified DPV signals. The DPV signal demonstrated a linear relationship with logarithm of Dam concentration ranging from 0.075 to 30U/mL, achieving a detection limit of 0.02U/mL (S/N=3). Also, screening of Dam MTase inhibitor 5-fluorouracil was successfully investigated using this fabricated sensor. PMID:24613968

  10. An enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay for S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kathleen M; Wooderchak, Whitney L; Wynn, Donraphael P; Karschner, Erin L; Alfaro, Joshua F; Cui, Yinqiu; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Hevel, Joan M

    2006-03-15

    Modification of small molecules and proteins by methyltransferases affects a wide range of biological processes. Here, we report an enzyme-coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay to quantitatively characterize S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet/SAM)-dependent methyltransferase activity. In this assay, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy/SAH), the transmethylation product of AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases, is hydrolyzed to S-ribosylhomocysteine and adenine by recombinant S-adenosylhomocysteine/5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (SAHN/MTAN, EC 3.2.2.9). Subsequently, adenine generated from AdoHcy is further hydrolyzed to hypoxanthine and ammonia by recombinant adenine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.2). This deamination is associated with a decrease in absorbance at 265 nm that can be monitored continuously. Coupling enzymes are recombinant and easily purified. The utility of this assay was shown using recombinant rat protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, EC 2.1.1.125), which catalyzes the mono- and dimethylation of guanidino nitrogens of arginine residues in select proteins. Using this assay, the kinetic parameters of PRMT1 with three synthetic peptides were determined. An advantage of this assay is the destruction of AdoHcy by AdoHcy nucleosidase, which alleviates AdoHcy product feedback inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. Finally, this method may be used to assay other enzymes that produce AdoHcy, 5'-methylthioadenosine, or compounds that can be cleaved by AdoHcy nucleosidase. PMID:16460659

  11. Highly sensitive fluorescence assay of DNA methyltransferase activity via methylation-sensitive cleavage coupled with nicking enzyme-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Wu, Yayan; Dong, Yanhua; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-04-15

    Herein, using DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) as a model analyte, a simple, rapid, and highly sensitive fluorescence sensing platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTase was developed on the basis of methylation-sensitive cleavage and nicking enzyme-assisted signal amplification. In the presence of Dam MTase, an elaborately designed hairpin probe was methylated. With the help of methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease DpnI, the methylated hairpin probe could be cleaved to release a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Subsequently, this released ssDNA would hybridize with the molecular beacon (MB) to open its hairpin structure, resulting in the restoration of fluorescence signal as well as formation of the double-stranded recognition site for nicking enzyme Nt.BbvCI. Eventually, an amplified fluorescence signal was observed through the enzymatic recycling cleavage of MBs. Based on this unique strategy, a very low detection limit down to 0.06 U/mL was achieved within a short assay time (60 min) in one step, which is superior to those of most existing approaches. Owing to the specific site recognition of MTase toward its substrate, the proposed sensing system was able to readily discriminate Dam MTase from other MTase such as M.SssI and even detect the target in complex biological matrix. Furthermore, the application of the proposed sensing strategy for screening Dam MTase inhibitors was also demonstrated with satisfactory results. This novel method not only provides a promising platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of DNA MTases, but also shows great potentials in biological process researches, drugs discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23202331

  12. An electrochemical one-step system for assaying methyltransferase activity based on transport of a quantum dot signaling tracer.

    PubMed

    Baek, Songyi; Won, Byoung Yeon; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2013-11-15

    A one-step, electrochemical method for assaying methyltransferase (MTase) activity, based on the convective transport of a quantum dot (QD) signaling tracer, has been developed. The assay chip used in this system was prepared by modifying a gold matrix with CdSe/ZnS QD-tagged dsDNA, which contains a specific methylation site (5'-GATC-3') recognized by MTase. Treatment of the chip with DNA adenine methylation (Dam) MTase, generates a methylated sequence (5'-GAmTC-3') within the dsDNA. The methylated dsDNA is then subjected to a cleavage reaction, induced by DpnI, which leads to release from the gold matrix of a DNA fragment tethered to a QD. Detection of the released QD, using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode, enables the reliable quantitation of the methylated DNA. Because it is accomplished in a simple and convenient one step and does not require any complicated secondary or tedious washing steps, the new assay method holds great promise for epigenetic analysis in facility-limited environments or point-of-care testing (POCT) applications. PMID:23777705

  13. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  14. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  15. Crystal structure of MboIIA methyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Walsh, M. A.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Gdansk; Medical Research Council France

    2003-09-15

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are sequence-specific enzymes which transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the amino group of either cytosine or adenine within a recognized DNA sequence. Methylation of a base in a specific DNA sequence protects DNA from nucleolytic cleavage by restriction enzymes recognizing the same DNA sequence. We have determined at 1.74 {angstrom} resolution the crystal structure of a {beta}-class DNA MTase MboIIA (M {center_dot} MboIIA) from the bacterium Moraxella bovis, the smallest DNA MTase determined to date. M {center_dot} MboIIA methylates the 3' adenine of the pentanucleotide sequence 5'-GAAGA-3'. The protein crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit which we propose to resemble the dimer when M {center_dot} MboIIA is not bound to DNA. The overall structure of the enzyme closely resembles that of M {center_dot} RsrI. However, the cofactor-binding pocket in M {center_dot} MboIIA forms a closed structure which is in contrast to the open-form structures of other known MTases.

  16. 106. DAM EARTH DIKE SUBMERSIBLE DAMS & DIKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. DAM - EARTH DIKE - SUBMERSIBLE DAMS & DIKE CONN. AT MOVABLE DAM (ML-8-52/2-FS) March 1940 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  17. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  18. Distinction between the Cfr Methyltransferase Conferring Antibiotic Resistance and the Housekeeping RlmN Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Gemma C.; Hansen, Lykke H.; Tenson, Tanel; Rasmussen, Anette; Kirpekar, Finn

    2013-01-01

    The cfr gene encodes the Cfr methyltransferase that primarily methylates C-8 in A2503 of 23S rRNA in the peptidyl transferase region of bacterial ribosomes. The methylation provides resistance to six classes of antibiotics of clinical and veterinary importance. The rlmN gene encodes the RlmN methyltransferase that methylates C-2 in A2503 in 23S rRNA and A37 in tRNA, but RlmN does not significantly influence antibiotic resistance. The enzymes are homologous and use the same mechanism involving radical S-adenosyl methionine to methylate RNA via an intermediate involving a methylated cysteine in the enzyme and a transient cross-linking to the RNA, but they differ in which carbon atom in the adenine they methylate. Comparative sequence analysis identifies differentially conserved residues that indicate functional sequence divergence between the two classes of Cfr- and RlmN-like sequences. The differentiation between the two classes is supported by previous and new experimental evidence from antibiotic resistance, primer extensions, and mass spectrometry. Finally, evolutionary aspects of the distribution of Cfr- and RlmN-like enzymes are discussed. PMID:23752511

  19. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  20. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  1. 107. DAM EARTH DIKE SUBMERSIBLE DAMS PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. DAM - EARTH DIKE - SUBMERSIBLE DAMS - PLANS & SECTIONS (ML-8-52/3-FS) March 1940 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  2. The determination of DNA methyltransferase activity by quenching of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium electrogenerated chemiluminescence with ferrocene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoe; Li, Yan; Zheng, Jianbin; Qi, Honglan; Liang, Zhenxing; Ning, Xiaohui

    2015-06-11

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensing method for the determination of DNA methyltransferase activity is developed by the quenching of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium ECL by ferrocene, and it is demonstrated that the ECL biosensing method measures DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase over a dynamic concentration range (0.1 U mL(-1)-100 U mL(-1)) with an extremely low detection limit of 0.03 U mL(-1), using gold nanoparticles and a quenching ECL signal produced by a chemical quencher such as ferrocene. PMID:25963150

  3. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  4. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  5. Dam safety: Morris Sheppard Dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.D.; Waters, R.H.; Focht, J.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Morris Sheppard Dam is one of the world`s largest flat slab buttress dams. It is located on the Brazos River about 96 km (60 miles) west of Dallas - Fort Worth. Designed by Ambursen Dam Company, the dam was constructed between 1938 and 1941 at a cost of $8.7 million. In 1987, a maximum buttress movement of 114 mm (4.5 inches) was discovered. The dam was successfully rehabilitated between 1987 and 1994 at a cost of $36 million. This paper will describe: (1) the dam`s construction and operational history, (2) the lowering of the reservoir by 3.94 m (13 feet) as an emergency response when the movement was discovered, (3) the initial stabilization of the dam by the addition of relief wells and grouting, (4) the final stabilization using ballast to increase the weight of the dam, (5) the use of actual dam performance as a full-scale, long-term, load test to back-calculate realistic strength parameters, (6) the multiple sets of design stability criteria used to analyze the structure, and (7) the use of model studies to enlarge the dam`s stilling basin and design an emergency spillway to handle the PMF.

  6. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-12-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine. PMID:27075339

  7. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  8. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  9. Isolation and characterization of site-specific DNA-methyltransferases from Bacillus coagulans K.

    PubMed

    Svadbina, I V; Zelinskaya, N V; Kovalevskaya, N P; Zheleznaya, L A; Matvienko, N I

    2004-03-01

    Two site-specific DNA methyltransferases, M.BcoKIA and M.BcoKIB, were isolated from the thermophilic strain Bacillus coagulans K. Each of the methylases protects the recognition site 5'-CTCTTC-3'/5'-GAAGAG-3' from cleavage with the cognate restriction endonuclease BcoKI. It is shown that M.BcoKIB is an N6-adenine specific methylase and M.BcoKIA is an N4-cytosine specific methylase. According to bisulfite mapping, M.BcoKIA methylates the first cytosine in the sequence 5'-CTCTTC-3'. PMID:15061697

  10. Excimer states in microhydrated adenine clusters.

    PubMed

    Smith, V R; Samoylova, E; Ritze, H-H; Radloff, W; Schultz, T

    2010-09-01

    We present femtosecond pump-probe mass and photoelectron spectra for adenine (A) and microhydrated A(m)(H(2)O)(n) clusters. Three distinct relaxation processes of photoexcited electronic states were distinguished: in unhydrated A, relaxation of the optically bright pipi* state occurred via the dark npi* state with respective lifetimes of <0.1 and 1.3 ps. In microhydrated clusters A(H(2)O)(n), relaxation via the npi* state is quenched by a faster relaxation process, probably involving pisigma* states. For the predominantly hydrogen-bonded adenine dimer (A(2)), excited state relaxation is dominated by monomer-like processes. When the adenine dimer is clustered with several water molecules, we observe a nanosecond lifetime from excimer states in pi-stacked clusters. From the electron spectra we estimate adiabatic ionization potentials of 8.32 eV (A), 8.27 eV (A(H(2)O)(1)), 8.19 eV (A(H(2)O)(2)), 8.10 eV (A(H(2)O)(3)), 8.18 eV (A(2)), and 8.0 eV (A(2)(H(2)O)(3-5)). PMID:20556283

  11. DAM Safety and Deformation Monitoring in Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.; Potts, L.; Miiama, J.; Mahgoub, M.; Rahman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water is the life and necessity to water is increasing day by day with respect to the World population, rising of living standards and destruction of nature. Thus, the importance of water and water structures have been increasing gradually. Dams are among the most important engineering structures used for water supplies, flood controls, agricultural purposes as well as drinking and hydroelectric power. There are about 150.000 large size dams in the World. Especially after the Second World War, higher and larger capacity dams have been constructed. Dams create certain risks like the other manmade structures. No one knows precisely how many dam failures have occurred in the World, whereas hundreds of dam failures have occurred throughout the U.S. history. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. These physical data are measured and monitored by the instruments and equipment. Dams and their surroundings have to be monitored by using essential methods at periodic time intervals in order to determine the possible changes that may occur over the time. Monitoring programs typically consist of; surveillance or visual observation. These programs on dams provide information for evaluating the dam's performance related to the design intent and expected changes that could affect the safety performance of the dam. Additionally, these programs are used for investigating and evaluating the abnormal or degrading performance where any remedial action is necessary. Geodetic and non-geodetic methods are used for monitoring. Monitoring the performance of the dams is critical for producing and maintaining the safe dams. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the

  12. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  13. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  14. Adenine methylation in eukaryotes: Apprehending the complex evolutionary history and functional potential of an epigenetic modification.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Zhang, Dapeng; Aravind, L

    2016-01-01

    While N(6) -methyladenosine (m(6) A) is a well-known epigenetic modification in bacterial DNA, it remained largely unstudied in eukaryotes. Recent studies have brought to fore its potential epigenetic role across diverse eukaryotes with biological consequences, which are distinct and possibly even opposite to the well-studied 5-methylcytosine mark. Adenine methyltransferases appear to have been independently acquired by eukaryotes on at least 13 occasions from prokaryotic restriction-modification and counter-restriction systems. On at least four to five instances, these methyltransferases were recruited as RNA methylases. Thus, m(6) A marks in eukaryotic DNA and RNA might be more widespread and diversified than previously believed. Several m(6) A-binding protein domains from prokaryotes were also acquired by eukaryotes, facilitating prediction of potential readers for these marks. Further, multiple lineages of the AlkB family of dioxygenases have been recruited as m(6) A demethylases. Although members of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases have also been suggested to be m(6) A demethylases, this proposal needs more careful evaluation. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26660621

  15. Adenine methylation in eukaryotes: Apprehending the complex evolutionary history and functional potential of an epigenetic modification

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    While N6‐methyladenosine (m6A) is a well‐known epigenetic modification in bacterial DNA, it remained largely unstudied in eukaryotes. Recent studies have brought to fore its potential epigenetic role across diverse eukaryotes with biological consequences, which are distinct and possibly even opposite to the well‐studied 5‐methylcytosine mark. Adenine methyltransferases appear to have been independently acquired by eukaryotes on at least 13 occasions from prokaryotic restriction‐modification and counter‐restriction systems. On at least four to five instances, these methyltransferases were recruited as RNA methylases. Thus, m6A marks in eukaryotic DNA and RNA might be more widespread and diversified than previously believed. Several m6A‐binding protein domains from prokaryotes were also acquired by eukaryotes, facilitating prediction of potential readers for these marks. Further, multiple lineages of the AlkB family of dioxygenases have been recruited as m6A demethylases. Although members of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases have also been suggested to be m6A demethylases, this proposal needs more careful evaluation. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26660621

  16. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  17. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  18. (Accumulation of methyl-deficient rat liver messenger ribonucleic acid on ethionine administration). Progress report. [Methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and effects of phorbol ester on methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, E.

    1980-01-01

    Enzyme fractions were isolated from Ehrlich ascites cells which introduced methyl groups into methyl deficient rat liver mRNA and unmethylated vaccinia mRNA. The methyl groups were incorporated at the 5' end into cap 1 structures by the viral enzyme, whereas both cap 0 and cap 1 structures were formed by the Ehrlich ascites cell enzymes. Preliminary results indicate the presence of adenine N/sup 6/-methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites cells. These results indicate that mRNA deficient in 5'-cap methylation and in internal methylation of adenine accumulated in rats on exposure to ethionine. The methyl-deficient mRNA isolated from the liver of ethionine-fed rats differed in its translational properties from mRNA isolated from control animals. Preliminary experiments indicate that single topical application of 17n moles of TPA to mouse skin altered tRNA methyltransferases. The extent of methylation was increased over 2-fold in mouse skin treated with TPA for 48 hours. These changes have been observed as early as 12 hours following TPA treatment. In contrast, the application of initiating dose of DMBA had no effect on these enzymes. It should be emphasized that the changes in tRNA methyltransferases produced by TPA are not merely an increase of the concentration of the enzyme, rather that they represent alterations of specificity of a battery of enzymes. In turn the change in enzyme specificity can produce alterations in the structure of tRNA. (ERB)

  19. Focusing on dam safety

    SciTech Connect

    Lagassa, G.

    1993-01-01

    With increased relicensing activity and a federal emphasis on safety, dam repair and refurbishment is a growing business. Providers of goods and services are gearing up to meet the dam repair and rehabilitation needs that result.

  20. Small-dam rehabs

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article examines the economics of maintenance, rehabilitation and improvement for small, aging, high-hazard dams. The topics of the article include raising the height of the spillway and repairing deteriorated concrete in the spillway of Fellows Lake Dam, emergency repair of the outlet conduit and replacement of riprap on the upstream slope of Storrie Lake Dam, and extensive rehabilitation of Reeves Lake Dam.

  1. Hoover Dam Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Reclamation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This learning packet provides background information about Hoover Dam (Nevada) and the surrounding area. Since the dam was built at the height of the Depression in 1931, people came from all over the country to work on it. Because of Hoover Dam, the Colorado River was controlled for the first time in history and farmers in Nevada, California, and…

  2. In vitro selection of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Meli, Marc; Vergne, Jacques; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2003-03-14

    Adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes were isolated by in vitro selection from a degenerated hairpin ribozyme population. Two new adenine-dependent ribozymes catalyze their own reversible cleavage in the presence of free adenine. Both aptamers have Mg(2+) requirements for adenine-assisted cleavage similar to the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. Cleavage kinetics studies in the presence of various other small molecules were compared. The data suggest that adenine does not induce RNA self-cleavage in the same manner for both aptamers. In addition, investigations of pH effects on catalytic rates show that both adenine-dependent aptamers are more active in basic conditions, suggesting that they use new acid/base catalytic strategies in which adenine could be involved directly. The discovery of hairpin ribozymes dependent on adenine for their reversible self-cleavage presents considerable biochemical and evolutionary interests because we show that RNA is able to use exogenous reactive molecules to enhance its own catalytic activity. Such a mechanism may have been a means by which the ribozymes of the RNA world enlarged their chemical repertoire. PMID:12519767

  3. 16. Parker Dam, only top fourth of dam visible, at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Parker Dam, only top fourth of dam visible, at 320' high, Parker Dam is one of the highest in the world. Much of this height is because dam penetrates well below river bottom to fasten to bedrock. - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  4. Substrate Recognition and Modification by the Nosiheptide Resistance Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The proliferation of antibiotic resistant pathogens is an increasing threat to the general public. Resistance may be conferred by a number of mechanisms including covalent or mutational modification of the antibiotic binding site, covalent modification of the drug, or the over-expression of efflux pumps. The nosiheptide resistance methyltransferase (NHR) confers resistance to the thiazole antibiotic nosiheptide in the nosiheptide producer organism Streptomyces actuosus through 2ʹO-methylation of 23S rRNA at the nucleotide A1067. Although the crystal structures of NHR and the closely related thiostrepton-resistance methyltransferase (TSR) in complex with the cofactor S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) are available, the principles behind NHR substrate recognition and catalysis remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the binding interactions between NHR and model 58 and 29 nucleotide substrate RNAs by gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy. We show that the enzyme binds to RNA as a dimer. By constructing a hetero-dimer complex composed of one wild-type subunit and one inactive mutant NHR-R135A subunit, we show that only one functional subunit of the NHR homodimer is required for its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis suggests that the interactions between neighbouring bases (G1068 and U1066) and A1067 have an important role in methyltransfer activity, such that the substitution of a deoxy sugar spacer (5ʹ) to the target nucleotide achieved near wild-type levels of methylation. A series of atomic substitutions at specific positions on the substrate adenine show that local base-base interactions between neighbouring bases are important for methylation. Conclusion/Significance Taken together these data suggest that local base-base interactions play an important role in aligning the substrate 2’ hydroxyl group of A1067 for methyl group transfer. Methylation of nucleic acids is playing an

  5. 31. AVALON DAM OUTLET WORKS FROM CREST OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. AVALON DAM - OUTLET WORKS FROM CREST OF DAM INCLUDING SPILLWAY NO. 1 AND CYLINDER GATE DISCHARGE PORTALS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  6. 9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). Photographer unknown, July, 22, 1926. Source: Maricopa County Municipal Water Conservation District Number One (MWD). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed. PMID:26547179

  8. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  9. Dam methylation regulates the expression of SPI-5-encoded sopB gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Buzzola, Fernanda; García, Mauro D; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Cerquetti, María C

    2014-08-01

    DNA adenine methylation is an essential factor in Salmonella virulence. Here, we investigate the involvement of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) in the expression and translocation of a SPI-5-encoded effector of S. Typhimurium. SopB expression and secretion were determined using SopB-FLAG-tagged wild type and dam strains of S. Typhimurium. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the dam mutant expresses lower levels of SopB protein and sopB mRNA than the wild type strain under SPI-1 and SPI-2 inducing conditions in vitro. SopB secretion was also considerably impaired in the absence of dam. In agreement with in vitro experiments, SopB synthesis in dam mutants recovered from infected epithelial cells and from murine mesenteric lymph nodes was reduced by 40% respect to the wild type strain (p < 0.05). SopB translocation was neither detected in the cytosol of epithelial cells nor in the cytosol of cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes infected with the dam mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in S. Typhimurium, Dam methylation modulates the expression and translocation of SPI-5-encoded SopB effector. PMID:24947562

  10. NEW ENGLAND DAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the National Dam Inspection Act (P.L. 92-367) of 1972, Congress authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to inventory dams located in the United States. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (P.L 99-662) authorized USACE to maintain and periodically publish...

  11. Dammed or Damned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes issues raised at a workshop on "People and Dams" organized by the Society for Participatory Research in Asia. Objectives were to (1) understand problems created by dams for people, (2) consider forces affecting displaced populations and rehabilitation efforts, and (3) gain a perspective on popular education efforts among affected…

  12. 1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A GRAVITY SECTION IS THE THIRD DAM BUILT BY SEATTLE CITY LIGHT TO PROVIDE WATER FOR GORGE POWERHOUSE AND WAS COMPLETED IN 1961, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  13. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S.; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Fan, Hao; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Lindahl, Paul A.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (kcat = 2.0 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn2+ prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 200 s−1 and 5 × 105 M−1s−1, respectively. The apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe2+, Zn2+, or Mn2+. In each case, two enzyme-equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member within the deaminase sub-family of the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [FeII/FeII]-ADE was oxidized to [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity and thus the di-ferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence for spin-coupling between metal ions was evident by EPR or Mössbauer spectroscopies. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and adenine was modeled into the active site based on homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Based on the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH rate profiles and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate limiting steps. PMID:21247091

  14. Catechol-O-methyltransferase: characteristics, polymorphisms and role in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yager, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are carcinogenic, probably because of their estrogenicity and potential for further oxidative metabolism to reactive quinones. Estrogenic quinones cause oxidative DNA damage as well as form mutagenic depurinating adenine and guanine adducts. O-Methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) blocks their estrogenicity and prevents their oxidation to quinones. A single gene encodes both membrane bound (MB) and soluble (S) forms of COMT. The COMT gene contains 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The valine108 (S-COMT)/158 (MB-COMT) SNP encodes a low activity form of COMT and has been widely studied as a putative risk factor for breast cancer, with inconsistent results. Investigations of two other SNPs in the promoter of MB-COMT that may affect its expression have also provided mixed results. Future studies on the role of COMT in breast cancer should incorporate measurement of biomarkers that reflect COMT activity and its protective effects. PMID:23734165

  15. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric characterization of photocrosslinked DNA-EcoRI DNA methyltransferase complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D L; Pavlovich, J G; Reich, N O

    1998-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy combining photocrosslinking and HPLC-based electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify UV crosslinked DNA-protein complexes. Eco RI DNA methyltransferase modifies the second adenine within the recognition sequence GAATTC. Substitution of 5-iodouracil for the thymine adjacent to the target base (GAATTC) does not detectably alter the DNA-protein complex. Irradiation of the 5-iodouracil-substituted DNA-protein complex at various wavelengths was optimized, with a crosslinking yield >60% at 313 nm after 1 min. No protein degradation was observed under these conditions. The crosslinked DNA-protein complex was further analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The total mass is consistent with irradiation-dependent covalent bond formation between one strand of DNA and the protein. These preliminary results support the possibility of identifying picomole quantities of crosslinked peptides by similar strategies. PMID:9421528

  16. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  17. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  18. Lineage-Specific Methyltransferases Define the Methylome of the Globally Disseminated Escherichia coli ST131 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Ashcroft, Melinda M.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Sarkar, Sohinee; Peters, Kate M.; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Upton, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a clone of uropathogenic E. coli that has emerged rapidly and disseminated globally in both clinical and community settings. Members of the ST131 lineage from across the globe have been comprehensively characterized in terms of antibiotic resistance, virulence potential, and pathogenicity, but to date nothing is known about the methylome of these important human pathogens. Here we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) PacBio sequencing to determine the methylome of E. coli EC958, the most-well-characterized completely sequenced ST131 strain. Our analysis of 52,081 methylated adenines in the genome of EC958 discovered three m6A methylation motifs that have not been described previously. Subsequent SMRT sequencing of isogenic knockout mutants identified the two type I methyltransferases (MTases) and one type IIG MTase responsible for m6A methylation of novel recognition sites. Although both type I sites were rare, the type IIG sites accounted for more than 12% of all methylated adenines in EC958. Analysis of the distribution of MTase genes across 95 ST131 genomes revealed their prevalence is highly conserved within the ST131 lineage, with most variation due to the presence or absence of mobile genetic elements on which individual MTase genes are located. PMID:26578678

  19. Identification of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto Cesar; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and virulence in some pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we describe DNA methyltransferases (MTases) present in human pathogenic bacteria and compared them with related species, which are not pathogenic or less pathogenic, based in comparative genomics. We performed a search in the KEGG database of the KEGG database orthology groups associated with adenine and cytosine DNA MTase activities (EC: 2.1.1.37, EC: 2.1.1.113 and EC: 2.1.1.72) in 37 human pathogenic species and 18 non/less pathogenic relatives and performed comparisons of the number of these MTases sequences according to their genome size, the DNA MTase type and with their non-less pathogenic relatives. We observed that Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria spp. presented the highest number of MTases while ten different species did not present a predicted DNA MTase. We also detected a significant increase of adenine MTases over cytosine MTases (2.19 vs. 1.06, respectively, p < 0.001). Adenine MTases were the only MTases associated with restriction modification systems and DNA MTases associated with type I restriction modification systems were more numerous than those associated with type III restriction modification systems (0.84 vs. 0.17, p < 0.001); additionally, there was no correlation with the genome size and the total number of DNA MTases, indicating that the number of DNA MTases is related to the particular evolution and lifestyle of specific species, regulating the expression of virulence genes in some pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27570304

  20. Mutational analysis of basic residues in the N-terminus of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, G; Bujnicki, J M; Flögel, M

    2004-01-01

    Erm methyltransferases mediate the resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics via dimethylation of a specific adenine residue in 23S rRNA. The role of positively charged N-terminal residues of the ErmC' methyltransferase in RNA binding and/or catalysis was determined. Mutational analysis of amino acids K4 and K7 was performed and the mutants were characterized in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The K4 and K7 residues were suggested not to be essential for the enzyme activity but to provide a considerable support for the catalytic step of the reaction, probably by maintaining the optimum conformation of the transition state through interactions with the phosphate backbone of RNA. PMID:15114858

  1. Dams and Intergovernmental Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.

    2012-12-01

    Gainers and Losers are always associated with large scale hydrological infrastructure construction, such as dams, canals and water treatment facilities. Since most of these projects are public services and public goods, Some of these uneven impacts cannot fully be solved by markets. This paper tried to explore whether the governments are paying any effort to balance the uneven distributional impacts caused by dam construction or not. It showed that dam construction brought an average 2% decrease in per capita tax revenue in the upstream counties, a 30% increase in the dam-location counties and an insignificant increase in downstream counties. Similar distributional impacts were observed for other outcome variables. like rural income and agricultural crop yields, though the impacts differ across different crops. The paper also found some balancing efforts from inter-governmental transfers to reduce the unevenly distributed impacts caused by dam construction. However, overall the inter-governmental fiscal transfer efforts were not large enough to fully correct those uneven distributions, reflected from a 2% decrease of per capita GDP in upstream counties and increase of per capita GDP in local and downstream counties. This paper may shed some lights on the governmental considerations in the decision making process for large hydrological infrastructures.

  2. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  3. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  4. Selective inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases by dinucleoside disulfide mimics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Sham, Yuk Yin; Chen, Liqiang; Felczak, Krzysztof; Bennett, Eric; Wilson, Daniel; Aldrich, Courtney; Yu, Jose S; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Magni, Giulio; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2009-08-01

    Diadenosine disulfide (5) was reported to inhibit NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex has been solved. We have synthesized tiazofurin adenosine disulfide (4) and the disulfide 5, and found that these compounds were moderate inhibitors of human NAD kinase (IC(50)=110 microM and IC(50)=87 microM, respectively) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD kinase (IC(50)=80 microM and IC(50)=45 microM, respectively). We also found that NAD mimics with a short disulfide (-S-S-) moiety were able to bind in the folded (compact) conformation but not in the common extended conformation, which requires the presence of a longer pyrophosphate (-O-P-O-P-O-) linkage. Since majority of NAD-dependent enzymes bind NAD in the extended conformation, selective inhibition of NAD kinases by disulfide analogues has been observed. Introduction of bromine at the C8 of the adenine ring restricted the adenosine moiety of diadenosine disulfides to the syn conformation making it even more compact. The 8-bromoadenosine adenosine disulfide (14) and its di(8-bromoadenosine) analogue (15) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of human (IC(50)=6 microM) and mycobacterium NAD kinase (IC(50)=14-19 microM reported so far. None of the disulfide analogues showed inhibition of lactate-, and inosine monophosphate-dehydrogenase (IMPDH), enzymes that bind NAD in the extended conformation. PMID:19596199

  5. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  6. ECHETA DAM RIPRAP ON RESERVOIR SIDE OF THE DAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ECHETA DAM RIP-RAP ON RESERVOIR SIDE OF THE DAM AT BREACH. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Echeta Dam & Reservoir, 2.9 miles east of Echeta Road at Echeta Railroad Siding at County Road 293, Echeta, Campbell County, WY

  7. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM (Trashrack-structure for outlet at lower left in reservoir, spillway at upper left. Reservoir nearly empty due to drought.) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  8. Effect of Adenine on Clozapine-induced Neutropenia in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Kishi, Taro; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the utility of adenine for preventing clozapine-induced neutropenia. Methods This retrospective study examined the effect of adenine on clozapine-induced neutropenia in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and was conducted at Okehazama Hospital in Japan from July 2010 to June 2013. Adenine was available for use from June 2011 onwards. Twenty-one patients started receiving clozapine treatment from July 2010 to April 2011 (the pre-adenine adoption group), and 47 patients started receiving it from May 2011 to June 2013 (the post-adenine adoption group). The effects of adenine were assessed based on changes in the patients’ leukocyte counts and the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Results Sixty-eight patients were treated with clozapine from July 2010 to June 2013. Of the 21 patients in the pre-adenine adoption group, 4 discontinued treatment due to clozapine-induced neutropenia, whereas only 2 of the 47 patients in the post-adenine adoption group discontinued treatment. The frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia was significantly lower in post-adenine adoption group than in the pre-adenine adoption group (p=0.047). Conclusion Adenine decreased the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Our data suggest that combined treatment with clozapine and adenine is a safe and effective strategy against treatment-resistant schizophrenia. PMID:26243842

  9. Dam health diagnosis and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongru; Su, Huaizhi

    2005-06-01

    Based on the bionics principle in the life sciences field, we regard a dam as a vital and intelligent system. A bionics model is constructed to observe, diagnose and evaluate dam health. The model is composed of a sensing system (nerve), central processing unit (cerebrum) and decision-making implement (organism). In addition, the model, index system and engineering method on dam health assessment are presented. The proposed theories and methods are applied to evaluate dynamically the health of one concrete dam.

  10. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  11. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  12. Arginine methyltransferases in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Sarah M; Liu, Fan; Nimer, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine methylation is an abundant covalent modification that regulates diverse cellular processes, including transcription, translation, DNA repair, and RNA processing. The enzymes that catalyze these marks are known as the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), and they can generate asymmetric dimethyl arginine (type I arginine methyltransferases), symmetric dimethylarginine (type II arginine methyltransferases), or monomethyarginine (type III arginine methyltransferases). The PRMTs are capable of modifying diverse substrates, from histone components to specific nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Additionally, the PRMTs can orchestrate chromatin remodeling by blocking the docking of other epigenetic modifying enzymes or by recruiting them to specific gene loci. In the hematopoietic system, PRMTs can regulate cell behavior, including the critical balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, in at least two critical ways, via (i) the covalent modification of transcription factors and (ii) the regulation of histone modifications at promoters critical to cell fate determination. Given these important functions, it is not surprising that these processes are altered in hematopoietic malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, where they promote increased self-renewal and impair hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:27026282

  13. Methemoglobinemia and eccentrocytosis in equine erythrocyte flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J W; Stockham, S L; Scott, M A; Johnson, P J; Donald, J J; Chandler, C J

    2003-11-01

    This report describes erythrocyte biochemical findings in an adult Spanish mustang mare that exhibited persistent methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis that were not related to the consumption or administration of an exogenous oxidant. The methemoglobinemia was attributed to a deficiency in cytochrome-b5 reductase (Cb5R) activity, and the eccentrocytes and pyknocytes were attributed to a marked deficiency in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity that resulted in decreased reduced glutathione concentration within erythrocytes. The GR activity increased to a near-normal value after addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the enzyme assay, indicating a deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes. The methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis were attributed to deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes because the GR and Cb5R enzymes use FAD as a cofactor. This deficiency in FAD results from a defect in erythrocyte riboflavin metabolism, which has not been documented previously in animals. PMID:14608016

  14. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). PMID:27163876

  15. A non-parametric peak calling algorithm for DamID-Seq.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhua; Hempel, Leonie U; Jiang, Tingbo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a significant role in gene regulation and expression. In order to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) of double sex (DSX)-an important transcription factor in sex determination, we applied the DNA adenine methylation identification (DamID) technology to the fat body tissue of Drosophila, followed by deep sequencing (DamID-Seq). One feature of DamID-Seq data is that induced adenine methylation signals are not assured to be symmetrically distributed at TFBS, which renders the existing peak calling algorithms for ChIP-Seq, including SPP and MACS, inappropriate for DamID-Seq data. This challenged us to develop a new algorithm for peak calling. A challenge in peaking calling based on sequence data is estimating the averaged behavior of background signals. We applied a bootstrap resampling method to short sequence reads in the control (Dam only). After data quality check and mapping reads to a reference genome, the peaking calling procedure compromises the following steps: 1) reads resampling; 2) reads scaling (normalization) and computing signal-to-noise fold changes; 3) filtering; 4) Calling peaks based on a statistically significant threshold. This is a non-parametric method for peak calling (NPPC). We also used irreproducible discovery rate (IDR) analysis, as well as ChIP-Seq data to compare the peaks called by the NPPC. We identified approximately 6,000 peaks for DSX, which point to 1,225 genes related to the fat body tissue difference between female and male Drosophila. Statistical evidence from IDR analysis indicated that these peaks are reproducible across biological replicates. In addition, these peaks are comparable to those identified by use of ChIP-Seq on S2 cells, in terms of peak number, location, and peaks width. PMID:25785608

  16. 1000 dams down and counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.; Duda, Jeff J.; Grant, Gordon E.

    2015-01-01

    Forty years ago, the demolition of large dams was mostly fiction, notably plotted in Edward Abbey's novel The Monkey Wrench Gang. Its 1975 publication roughly coincided with the end of large-dam construction in the United States. Since then, dams have been taken down in increasing numbers as they have filled with sediment, become unsafe or inefficient, or otherwise outlived their usefulness (1) (see the figure, panel A). Last year's removals of the 64-m-high Glines Canyon Dam and the 32-m-high Elwha Dam in northwestern Washington State were among the largest yet, releasing over 10 million cubic meters of stored sediment. Published studies conducted in conjunction with about 100 U.S. dam removals and at least 26 removals outside the United States are now providing detailed insights into how rivers respond (2, 3).

  17. COBALAMIN- AND COBAMIDE-DEPENDENT METHYLTRANSFERASES

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Rowena G.; Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim

    2008-01-01

    Methyltransferases that employ cobalamin cofactors, or their analogues the cobamides, as intermediates in catalysis of methyl transfer play vital roles in energy generation in anaerobic unicellular organisms. In a broader range of organisms they are involved in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Although the individual methyl transfer reactions catalyzed are simple SN2 displacements, the required change in coordination at the cobalt of the cobalamin or cobamide cofactors and the lability of the reduced Co+1 intermediates introduces the necessity for complex conformational changes during the catalytic cycle. Recent spectroscopic and structural studies on several of these methyltransferases have helped to reveal the strategies by which these conformational changes are facilitated and controlled. PMID:19059104

  18. Structural Chemistry of Human RNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-03-18

    RNA methyltransferases (RNMTs) play important roles in RNA stability, splicing, and epigenetic mechanisms. They constitute a promising target class that is underexplored by the medicinal chemistry community. Information of relevance to drug design can be extracted from the rich structural coverage of human RNMTs. In this work, the structural chemistry of this protein family is analyzed in depth. Unlike most methyltransferases, RNMTs generally feature a substrate-binding site that is largely open on the cofactor-binding pocket, favoring the design of bisubstrate inhibitors. Substrate purine or pyrimidines are often sandwiched between hydrophobic walls that can accommodate planar ring systems. When the substrate base is laying on a shallow surface, a 5' flanking base is sometimes anchored in a druggable cavity. The cofactor-binding site is structurally more diverse than in protein methyltransferases and more druggable in SPOUT than in Rossman-fold enzymes. Finally, conformational plasticity observed both at the substrate and cofactor binding sites may be a challenge for structure-based drug design. The landscape drawn here may inform ongoing efforts toward the discovery of the first human RNMT inhibitors. PMID:26566070

  19. Health impacts of large dams

    SciTech Connect

    Lerer, L.B.; Scudder, T.

    1999-03-01

    Large dams have been criticized because of their negative environmental and social impacts. Public health interest largely has focused on vector-borne diseases, such as schistosomiasis, associated with reservoirs and irrigation projects. Large dams also influence health through changes in water and food security, increases in communicable diseases, and the social disruption caused by construction and involuntary resettlement. Communities living in close proximity to large dams often do not benefit from water transfer and electricity generation revenues. A comprehensive health component is required in environmental and social impact assessments for large dam projects.

  20. Biochemical and Computational Analysis of the Substrate Specificities of Cfr and RlmN Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ntokou, Eleni; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Kongsted, Jacob; Vester, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cfr and RlmN methyltransferases both modify adenine 2503 in 23S rRNA (Escherichia coli numbering). RlmN methylates position C2 of adenine while Cfr methylates position C8, and to a lesser extent C2, conferring antibiotic resistance to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Cfr and RlmN show high sequence homology and may be evolutionarily linked to a common ancestor. To explore their individual specificity and similarity we performed two sets of experiments. We created a homology model of Cfr and explored the C2/C8 specificity using docking and binding energy calculations on the Cfr homology model and an X-ray structure of RlmN. We used a trinucleotide as target sequence and assessed its positioning at the active site for methylation. The calculations are in accordance with different poses of the trinucleotide in the two enzymes indicating major evolutionary changes to shift the C2/C8 specificities. To explore interchangeability between Cfr and RlmN we constructed various combinations of their genes. The function of the mixed genes was investigated by RNA primer extension analysis to reveal methylation at 23S rRNA position A2503 and by MIC analysis to reveal antibiotic resistance. The catalytic site is expected to be responsible for the C2/C8 specificity and most of the combinations involve interchanging segments at this site. Almost all replacements showed no function in the primer extension assay, apart from a few that had a weak effect. Thus Cfr and RlmN appear to be much less similar than expected from their sequence similarity and common target. PMID:26700482

  1. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  2. Substrate Specificity of the HEMK2 Protein Glutamine Methyltransferase and Identification of Novel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kusevic, Denis; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Jeltsch, Albert

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial HEMK2 homologs initially had been proposed to be involved in heme biogenesis or to function as adenine DNA methyltransferase. Later it was shown that this family of enzymes has protein glutamine methyltransferase activity, and they methylate the glutamine residue in the GGQ motif of ribosomal translation termination factors. The murine HEMK2 enzyme methylates Gln(185) of the eukaryotic translation termination factor eRF1. We have employed peptide array libraries to investigate the peptide sequence recognition specificity of murine HEMK2. Our data show that HEMK2 requires a GQX3R motif for methylation activity. In addition, amino acid preferences were observed between the -3 and +7 positions of the peptide substrate (considering the target glutamine as 0), including a preference for Ser, Arg, and Gly at the +1 and a preference for Arg at the +7 position. Based on our specificity profile, we identified several human proteins that contain putative HEMK2 methylation sites and show that HEMK2 methylates 58 novel peptide substrates. After cloning, expression, and purification of the corresponding protein domains, we confirmed methylation for 11 of them at the protein level. Transfected CHD5 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 5) and NUT (nuclear protein in testis) were also demonstrated to be methylated by HEMK2 in human HEK293 cells. Our data expand the range of proteins potentially subjected to glutamine methylation significantly, but further investigation will be required to understand the function of HEMK2-mediated methylation in proteins other than eRF1. PMID:26797129

  3. Orthophosphite-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Malacinski, George M.; Konetzka, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Information was obtained on the general properties and specificity of orthophosphite-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase. The enzyme was extracted from Pseudomonas fluorescens 195 grown in medium containing orthophosphite as the sole source of phosphorus. An enzyme preparation suitable for characterization was obtained from crude extracts by use of high-speed centrifugation, protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex gel filtration. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.0, and was inactivated within 6 min at 37 C. Arsenite, hypophosphite, nitrite, selenite, and tellurite were not oxidized by the enzyme. Sulfite inhibited the enzymatic oxidation of orthophosphite in an apparent competitive manner. PMID:4381632

  4. Saxon Falls Dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.M.; Quist, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxon Falls Hydro Project is a high-head hydro owned and operated by Northern States Power Company (NSP) in northwest Wisconsin. Saxon Falls comprises a concrete buttress overflow spillway; mass-concrete tainter gate spillway, conduit intake, and nonoverflow section; earth dam; 1,600-foot-long, 72-inch-diameter steel conduit; two 150-foot-long, 54-inch-diameter penstocks; steel surge tank; and reinforced concrete powerhouse. All structures are founded on bedrock. Engineering inspections revealed severe concrete deterioration and leakage within the intake and deterioration of the middle nonoverflow section. Subsequent to the inspection, concrete cores confirmed the level of deterioration and indicated that immediate measures were necessary to correct the deficiencies and restore project integrity. Because the dam is located on the border between Michigan and Wisconsin, coordination with the respective Departments of Natural Resources was crucial to obtain permits to construct the repairs. Due to concerns regarding a sensitive fishery, a reservoir drawdown was not allowed. To accomplish the work and allow for a suitable construction area, a special braced sheetpile cofferdam was required to complete the project. NSP elected to complete the construction using its own special-construction crews. Close coordination allowed construction personnel, the owner, and the engineer to overcome difficulties encountered during construction.

  5. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  6. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  7. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  8. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  9. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nonveiller, E.; Rupcic, J. |; Sever, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  10. Geotechnical practice in dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings, Geotechnical Practice in Dam Rehabilitation, consists of papers presented at the Specialty Conference sponsored by the Geotechnical Engineering Division of the American Society of Civil Engineers held in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 25-28, 1993. The conference provided a forum for the discussion of the rehabilitation of dams, including case histories and current geotechnical practice. The topics covered by this proceeding include: (1) inspection and monitoring of dams; (2) investigation and evaluation of dams and foundations; (3) risk and reliability assessment; (4) increasing reservoir capacity, spillway modifications and overtopping; (5) seepage control; (6) improving stability of dams, foundations and reservoir slopes; (7) rehabilitation for seismic stability; and (8) geosynthetics and ground improvement techniques.

  11. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity. PMID:26646852

  13. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs. PMID:27318925

  14. Subcellular Localization of Anthocyanin Methyltransferase in Flowers of Petunia hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Lisbeth M. V.; Donker-Koopman, Wilma E.; Uitslager, Piet; Schram, André W.

    1983-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the enzyme anthocyanin-methyltransferase was studied in cells (protoplasts) obtained from the upper epidermis of petals of Petunia hybrida Hort. Vacuoles were isolated from protoplasts to ascertain the possible presence of the enzyme in these organelles. The recovery of methyltransferase activity in vacuole-enriched fractions equalled that of the cytosolic marker enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The relative activity of methyltransferase in the vacuole fraction was one tenth of that in the protoplast. Neither whole protoplasts nor isolated vacuoles contained inhibitors of methyltransferase activity. Examination of fractions obtained by differential centrifugation of a protoplast lysate showed that the major part of the methyltransferase activity was cytosolic. Activity found in a 130,000g pellet was due to nonspecific adhesion to membranes. The results indicate that terminal steps of anthocyanin biosynthesis take place in the cytosol. They do not lend support to the notion that the vacuole might be involved in (part of) this process. PMID:16662994

  15. Adenine, a hairpin ribozyme cofactor--high-pressure and competition studies.

    PubMed

    Ztouti, Myriam; Kaddour, Hussein; Miralles, Francisco; Simian, Christophe; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    The RNA world hypothesis assumes that life arose from ancestral RNA molecules, which stored genetic information and catalyzed chemical reactions. Although RNA catalysis was believed to be restricted to phosphate chemistry, it is now established that the RNA has much wider catalytic capacities. In this respect, we devised, in a previous study, two hairpin ribozymes (adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1 and adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 2) that require adenine as cofactor for their reversible self-cleavage. We have now used high hydrostatic pressure to investigate the role of adenine in the catalytic activity of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1. High-pressure studies are of interest because they make it possible to determine the volume changes associated with the reactions, which in turn reflect the conformational modifications and changes in hydration involved in the catalytic mechanism. They are also relevant in the context of piezophilic organisms, as well as in relation to the extreme conditions that prevailed at the origin of life. Our results indicate that the catalytic process involves a transition state whose formation is accompanied by a positive activation volume and release of water molecules. In addition, competition experiments with adenine analogs strongly suggest that exogenous adenine replaces the adenine present at the catalytic site of the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. PMID:19476496

  16. Characterization of photophysical and base-mimicking properties of a novel fluorescent adenine analogue in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dierckx, Anke; Dinér, Peter; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Kumar, Joshi Dhruval; Brown, Tom; Grøtli, Morten; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2011-01-01

    To increase the diversity of fluorescent base analogues with improved properties, we here present the straightforward click-chemistry-based synthesis of a novel fluorescent adenine-analogue triazole adenine (AT) and its photophysical characterization inside DNA. AT shows promising properties compared to the widely used adenine analogue 2-aminopurine. Quantum yields reach >20% and >5% in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively, and show dependence on neighbouring bases. Moreover, AT shows only a minor destabilization of DNA duplexes, comparable to 2-aminopurine, and circular dichroism investigations suggest that AT only causes minimal structural perturbations to normal B-DNA. Furthermore, we find that AT shows favourable base-pairing properties with thymine and more surprisingly also with normal adenine. In conclusion, AT shows strong potential as a new fluorescent adenine analogue for monitoring changes within its microenvironment in DNA. PMID:21278417

  17. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  18. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  19. Is it worth a dam?

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1997-01-01

    Once a sign of modernization and growth, dams are often seen today as symbols of environmental and social devastation. Over 800,000 dams have been built worldwide to provide drinking water, flood control, hydropower, irrigation, navigation, and water storage. Dams do indeed provide these things,but at the cost of several adverse, unexpected effects: disruption of ecosystems, decline of fish stocks, forced human and animal resettlements, and diseases such as malaria, which are borne by vectors that thrive in quiet waters. PMID:9349830

  20. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam’s vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use

  1. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  2. Deer Creek Dam, Dam, 1,204 feet/238 degrees from intersection of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deer Creek Dam, Dam, 1,204 feet/238 degrees from intersection of dam complex access road and U.S. Highway 189 to center of dam, 874 feet/352 degrees from Hydroelectric Powerplant (HAER UT-93-B) to center of dam, Charleston, Wasatch County, UT

  3. FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.; Schuster, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and late-neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. Landslide dams form a wide range of physiographic settings. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches; rock and soil slumps and slides; and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Natural dams may cause upstream flooding as the lake rises and downstream flooding as a result of failure of the dam. Although data are few, for the same potential energy at the dam site, downstream flood peaks from the failure of glacier-ice dams are smaller than those from landslide, moraine, and constructed earth-fill and rock-fill dam failures.

  4. A colorimetric assay of DNA methyltransferase activity based on the keypad lock of duplex DNA modified meso-SiO2@Fe3O4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Kexin; Zhang, Ranran; Yin, Huanshun; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-05-12

    Abnormal level of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) - mediated DNA methylation is closely related with cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel strategy based on the keypad lock of duplex DNA modified meso-SiO2@Fe3O4 was developed for colorimetric assay of Dam MTase activity. When the Dam MTase was introduced, the duplex DNA can be methylated at a palindrome sequence of 5'-GATC-3' and cleaved by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. Due to the instability of the newly formed DNA fragment, the hybrid will separated into a single-stranded DNA. Then the keypad lock will open, and the catalytic reaction of TMB and H2O2 can be initiated through the pores of meso-SiO2@Fe3O4, and a high color signal can be clearly observed by the naked eye. Contrarily, without Dam MTase, the catalytic reaction will not be initiated, and result no color signal. The proposed method exhibited a wide dynamic range with a low detection limit of 0.73 U/mL. Additionally, this way can be performed in human serum with satisfying recovery. And the inhibition of Dam MTase can also be well demonstrated by using paclitaxel as a model. Therefore, the designed way not only provides a platform for monitoring Dam MTase activity, but also useful for further application in disease diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:27114226

  5. A nonpyrrolysine member of the widely distributed trimethylamine methyltransferase family is a glycine betaine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ticak, Tomislav; Kountz, Duncan J.; Girosky, Kimberly E.; Krzycki, Joseph A.; Ferguson, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    COG5598 comprises a large number of proteins related to MttB, the trimethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase. MttB has a genetically encoded pyrrolysine residue proposed essential for catalysis. MttB is the only known trimethylamine methyltransferase, yet the great majority of members of COG5598 lack pyrrolysine, leaving the activity of these proteins an open question. Here, we describe the function of one of the nonpyrrolysine members of this large protein family. Three nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs are encoded in Desulfitobacterium hafniense, a Gram-positive strict anaerobe present in both the environment and human intestine. D. hafniense was found capable of growth on glycine betaine with electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate, producing dimethylglycine and CO2 as products. Examination of the genome revealed genes for tetrahydrofolate-linked oxidation of a methyl group originating from a methylated corrinoid protein, but no obvious means to carry out corrinoid methylation with glycine betaine. DSY3156, encoding one of the nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs, was up-regulated during growth on glycine betaine. The recombinant DSY3156 protein converts glycine betaine and cob(I)alamin to dimethylglycine and methylcobalamin. To our knowledge, DSY3156 is the first glycine betaine:corrinoid methyltransferase described, and a designation of MtgB is proposed. In addition, DSY3157, an adjacently encoded protein, was shown to be a methylcobalamin:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase and is designated MtgA. Homologs of MtgB are widely distributed, especially in marine bacterioplankton and nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts. They are also found in multiple members of the human microbiome, and may play a beneficial role in trimethylamine homeostasis, which in recent years has been directly tied to human cardiovascular health. PMID:25313086

  6. Novel electrochemical sensor based on functionalized graphene for simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Sun, Jun-Yong; Han, Cong-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yan-Li; Xiong, Xiao-Qin

    2011-02-01

    A nano-material carboxylic acid functionalized graphene (graphene-COOH) was prepared and used to construct a novel biosensor for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. The direct electrooxidation behaviors of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode (graphene-COOH/GCE) were carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicated that both adenine and guanine showed the increase of the oxidation peak currents with the negative shift of the oxidation peak potentials in contrast to that on the bare glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical parameters of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH/GCE were calculated and a simple and reliable electroanalytical method was developed for the detection of adenine and guanine, respectively. The modified electrode exhibited good behaviors in the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine with the peak separation as 0.334V. The detection limit for individual determination of guanine and adenine was 5.0×10(-8)M and 2.5×10(-8)M (S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the measurements of thermally denatured single-stranded DNA were carried out and the value of (G+C)/(A+T) of single-stranded DNA was calculated as 0.80. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:21050729

  7. Sensitive SERS detection of DNA methyltransferase by target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Chuanfeng; Han, Huixia; Zhao, Caisheng; Zhang, Xiaoru

    2016-07-15

    A novel and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method is proposed for the assay of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and evaluation of inhibitors by developing a target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy. By using of a duplex substrate for Dam MTase, two hairpin templates and a Raman probe, multiple signal amplification mode is achieved. Once recognized by Dam MTase, the duplex substrate can be cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease and two primers are released for triggering the multiple signal amplification reaction. Consequently, a wide dynamic range and remarkably high sensitivity are obtained under isothermal conditions. The detection limit is 2.57×10(-4)UmL(-1). This assay exhibits an excellent selectivity and is successfully applied in the screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. In addition, this novel sensing system is potentially universal as the recognition element can be conveniently designed for other target analytes by changing the substrate of DNA MTase. PMID:26926592

  8. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  9. Elwha River Riparian Vegetation Response to Dams and Dam Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafroth, P. B.; Brown, R. L.; Clausen, A. J.; Chenoweth, J.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian vegetation is highly diverse and influences habitat of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. Riparian vegetation dynamics are driven by stream flow regime, and fluxes of sediment and large woody debris, all of which can be altered by river damming. Dam removal is often implemented, in part, to help restore degraded riparian vegetation by reversing the alteration of these key drivers. However, increased disturbance and sediment flux associated with transport and exposure of trapped reservoir sediment can complicate a simple return to pre-dam conditions and can favor exotic species. We are studying the effects of dams and their removal on riparian vegetation along the Elwha River in Washington State, where removal of two large dams began in September 2011. To characterize vegetation composition, structure, and diversity prior to dam removal, we sampled 60-150 vegetation plots in 2004, 2005, and 2010 along five cross-valley transects in each of three river reaches: above both dams (upper reach), between the dams (middle reach), and downstream of both dams (lower reach). In summer 2012, we resampled a subset of our plots in the lower and middle reaches to evaluate vegetation and geomorphic change. We also sampled vegetation, topography, and grain size along newly-established transects within the exposed former reservoir behind Elwha Dam, which was removed in 2011 and 2012. Plant community distribution on bottomland geomorphic surfaces along the Elwha is typical of other systems in the region. We identified 8 overstory and 26 understory communities using multivariate analyses. Young bar surfaces (5-20 yrs) were dominated by willow, red alder, and black cottonwood. Floodplains and transitional fluvial terraces (<90yrs) were generally dominated by alder and cottonwood. Mature terraces (>90yrs) were often dominated by big-leaf maple. Douglas fir occurred on both young and old floodplains and terraces. Overstory species composition was more stable from 2005 to 2010

  10. Monolignol 4-O-methyltransferases and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Zhang, Kewei

    2014-11-18

    Modified (iso)eugenol 4-O-methyltransferase enzymes having novel capacity for methylation of monolignols and reduction of lignin polymerization in plant cell wall are disclosed. Sequences encoding the modified enzymes are disclosed.

  11. Progress in the Development of Lysine Methyltransferase SETD8 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Milite, Ciro; Feoli, Alessandra; Viviano, Monica; Rescigno, Donatella; Mai, Antonello; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2016-08-19

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the only known lysine methyltransferase that monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20) in vivo. The methyltransferase activity of SETD8 has been implicated in many essential cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. In addition to H4K20, SETD8 monomethylates non-histone substrates including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p53. During the past decade, different structural classes of inhibitors targeting various lysine methyltransferases have been designed and developed. However, the development of SETD8 inhibitors is still in its infancy. This review covers the progress made to date in inhibiting the activity of SETD8 by small molecules, with an emphasis on their discovery, selectivity over other methyltransferases, and cellular activity. PMID:27411844

  12. Monomethylioarsenicals are substratres for human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monomethylthioarsenicals are substrates for human arsenic (+3 oxida1tion state) methyltransferase Methylated thioarsenicals are structural analogs of methylated oxyarsenic in which one or more oxygen atom bound t...

  13. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  14. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways. PMID:26058161

  15. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  16. Floods from tailings dam failures.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Benito, G; Díez-Herrero, A

    2008-06-15

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released, and this outflow volume is difficult to estimate prior the incident. In this study, tailings' volume stored at the time of failure was shown to have a good correlation (r2=0.86) with the tailings outflow volume, and the volume of spilled tailings was correlated with its run-out distance (r2=0.57). An envelope curve was drawn encompassing the majority of data points indicating the potential maximum downstream distance affected by a tailings' spill. The application of the described regression equations for prediction purposes needs to be treated with caution and with support of on-site measurement and observations. However, they may provide a universal baseline approximation on tailing outflow characteristics (even if detailed dam information is unavailable), which is of a great importance for risk analysis purposes. PMID:18096316

  17. Intermolecular interactions of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Junaid Farooqi, M.; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^+/NADH) is a coenzyme involved in cellular respiration as an electron transporter. In aqueous solution, the molecule exhibits a folding transition characterized by the stacking of its aromatic moieties. A transition to an unfolded conformation is possible using chemical denaturants like methanol. Because the reduced NADH form is fluorescent, the folding transition can be monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy, e.g., via a blue-shift in the UV-excited emission peak upon methanol unfolding. Here we present evidence of interactions between NADH molecules in solution. We measure the excited-state emission from NADH at various concentrations (1-100 μM in MOPS buffer, pH 7.5; 337-nm wavelength excitation). Unlike for the folded form, the emission peak wavelength of the unfolded form is concentration dependent, exhibiting a red-shift with higher NADH concentration, suggesting the presence of intermolecular interactions. An understanding of NADH spectra in solution would assist in interpreting intercellular NADH measurements used for the in vivo monitoring cellular energy metabolism.

  18. Adenine nucleotide translocator transports haem precursors into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Motoki; Kabe, Yasuaki; Kuramori, Chikanori; Kondo, Masao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Haem is a prosthetic group for haem proteins, which play an essential role in oxygen transport, respiration, signal transduction, and detoxification. In haem biosynthesis, the haem precursor protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) must be accumulated into the mitochondrial matrix across the inner membrane, but its mechanism is largely unclear. Here we show that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), the inner membrane transporter, contributes to haem biosynthesis by facilitating mitochondrial accumulation of its precursors. We identified that haem and PP IX specifically bind to ANT. Mitochondrial uptake of PP IX was inhibited by ADP, a known substrate of ANT. Conversely, ADP uptake into mitochondria was competitively inhibited by haem and its precursors, suggesting that haem-related porphyrins are accumulated into mitochondria via ANT. Furthermore, disruption of the ANT genes in yeast resulted in a reduction of haem biosynthesis by blocking the translocation of haem precursors into the matrix. Our results represent a new model that ANT plays a crucial role in haem biosynthesis by facilitating accumulation of its precursors into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:18728780

  19. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and Ca2+ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Miklós; Bak, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological processes are controlled by a great diversity of Ca2+ signals that depend on Ca2+ entry into the cell and/or Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores is gated by a family of messengers including inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). There is increasing evidence for a novel intracellular Ca2+ release channel that may be targeted by NAADP and that displays properties distinctly different from the well-characterized InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. These channels appear to localize on a wider range of intracellular organelles, including the acidic Ca2+ stores. Activation of the NAADP-sensitive Ca2+ channels evokes complex changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels by means of channel chatter with other intracellular Ca2+ channels. The recent demonstration of changes in intracellular NAADP levels in response to physiologically relevant extracellular stimuli highlights the significance of NAADP as an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:18569524

  20. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  1. The Cellular Environment Stabilizes Adenine Riboswitch RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Jillian; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    There are large differences between the intracellular environment and the conditions widely used to study RNA structure and function in vitro. To assess the effects of the crowded cellular environment on RNA, we examined the structure and ligand-binding function of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain in healthy, growing Escherichia coli cells at single-nucleotide resolution on the minute timescale using SHAPE. The ligand-bound aptamer structure is essentially the same in cells and in buffer at 1 mM Mg2+, the approximate Mg2+ concentration we measured in cells. In contrast, the in-cell conformation of the ligand-free aptamer is much more similar to the fully folded ligand-bound state. Even adding high Mg2+ concentrations to the buffer used for in vitro analyses did not yield the conformation observed for the free aptamer in cells. The cellular environment thus stabilizes the aptamer significantly more than does Mg2+ alone. Our results show that the intracellular environment has a large effect on RNA structure that ultimately favors highly organized conformations. PMID:24215455

  2. Mutational analysis defines the roles of conserved amino acid residues in the predicted catalytic pocket of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2003-09-01

    Methyltransferases (MTases) from the Erm family catalyze S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent modification of a specific adenine residue in bacterial 23S rRNA, thereby conferring resistance to clinically important macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics. Despite the available structural data and functional analyses on the level of the RNA substrate, still very little is known about the mechanism of rRNA:adenine-N(6) methylation. Only predictions regarding various aspects of this reaction have been made based on the analysis of the crystal structures of methyltransferase ErmC' (without the RNA) and their comparison with the crystallographic and biochemical data for better studied DNA:m(6)A MTases. To validate the structure-based predictions of presumably essential residues in the catalytic pocket of ErmC', we carried out the site-directed mutagenesis and studied the function of the mutants in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that the active site of rRNA:m(6)A MTases is much more tolerant to amino acid substitutions than the active site of DNA:m(6)A MTases. Only the Y104 residue implicated in stabilization of the target base was found to be indispensable. Remarkably, the N101 residue from the "catalytic" motif IV and two conserved residues that form the floor (F163) and one of the walls (N11) of the base-binding site are not essential for catalysis in ErmC'. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in the light of the available structural data and in the phylogenetic context of the Erm family. PMID:12946350

  3. Insights into the hyperthermostability and unusual region-specificity of archaeal Pyrococcus abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Guelorget, Amandine; Roovers, Martine; Guérineau, Vincent; Barbey, Carole; Li, Xuan; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-l-methionine dependent methylation of adenine 58 in the T-loop of tRNAs is essential for cell growth in yeast or for adaptation to high temperatures in thermophilic organisms. In contrast to bacterial and eukaryotic tRNA m1A58 methyltransferases that are site-specific, the homologous archaeal enzyme from Pyrococcus abyssi catalyzes the formation of m1A also at the adjacent position 57, m1A57 being a precursor of 1-methylinosine. We report here the crystal structure of P. abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase (PabTrmI), in complex with S-adenosyl-l-methionine or S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine in three different space groups. The fold of the monomer and the tetrameric architecture are similar to those of the bacterial enzymes. However, the inter-monomer contacts exhibit unique features. In particular, four disulfide bonds contribute to the hyperthermostability of the archaeal enzyme since their mutation lowers the melting temperature by 16.5°C. His78 in conserved motif X, which is present only in TrmIs from the Thermococcocales order, lies near the active site and displays two alternative conformations. Mutagenesis indicates His78 is important for catalytic efficiency of PabTrmI. When A59 is absent in tRNAAsp, only A57 is modified. Identification of the methylated positions in tRNAAsp by mass spectrometry confirms that PabTrmI methylates the first adenine of an AA sequence. PMID:20483913

  4. Three Gorges Dam, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This ASTER image shows a 60 km stretch of the Yangtze River in China, including the Xiling Gorge, the eastern of the three gorges. In the left part of the image is the construction site of the Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest.

    This image was acquired on July 20, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Size: 60 x 24 km (36 x 15 miles) Location: 30.6 deg. North lat., 111.2 deg. East long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER

  5. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  6. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  7. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  8. OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF CASCADE CANAL COMPANY CRIB DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM DIRECTION OF KACHESS DAM. VIEW TO NORTH - Kachess Dam, 1904 Cascade Canal Company Crib Dam, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  9. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  10. Simulation of Breach Outflow for Earthfill Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razad, Azwin Zailti Abdul; Sabri Muda, Rahsidi; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Azia, Intan Shafilah Abdul; Hanum Mansor, Faezah; Yalit, Ruzaimei

    2013-06-01

    Dams have been built for many reasons such as irrigation, hydropower, flood mitigation, and water supply to support development for the benefit of human. However, the huge amount of water stored behind the dam can seriously pose adverse impacts to the downstream community should it be released due to unwanted dam break event. To minimise the potential loss of lives and property damages, a workable Emergency Response Plan is required to be developed. As part of a responsible dam owner and operator, TNB initiated a study on dam breach modelling for Cameron Highlands Hydroelectric Scheme to simulate the potential dam breach for Jor Dam. Prediction of dam breach parameters using the empirical equations of Froehlich and Macdonal-Langridge-Monopolis formed the basis of the modelling, coupled with MIKE 11 software to obtain the breach outflow due to Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). This paper will therefore discuss the model setup, simulation procedure and comparison of the prediction with existing equations.

  11. The Dramatic Methods of Hans van Dam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1994-01-01

    Interprets for the American reader the untranslated dramatic methods of Hans van Dam, a leading drama theorist in the Netherlands. Discusses the functions of drama as a method, closed dramatic methods, open dramatic methods, and applying van Dam's methods. (SR)

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Haloferax volcanii H26 and identification of DNA methyltransferase related PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein HVO_A0006

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Matthew; Jackson, Laura; Chimileski, Scott; Papke, R. Thane

    2015-01-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems have evolved to protect the cell from invading DNAs and are composed of two enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction endonuclease. Although RM systems are present in both archaeal and bacterial genomes, DNA methylation in archaea has not been well defined. In order to characterize the function of RM systems in archaeal species, we have made use of the model haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. A genomic DNA methylation analysis of H. volcanii strain H26 was performed using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. This analysis was also performed on a strain of H. volcanii in which an annotated DNA methyltransferase gene HVO_A0006 was deleted from the genome. Sequence analysis of H26 revealed two motifs which are modified in the genome: Cm4TAG and GCAm6BN6VTGC. Analysis of the ΔHVO_A0006 strain indicated that it exhibited reduced adenine methylation compared to the parental strain and altered the detected adenine motif. However, protein domain architecture analysis and amino acid alignments revealed that HVO_A0006 is homologous only to the N-terminal endonuclease region of Type IIG RM proteins and contains a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif, suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein. Further bioinformatic analysis of the HVO_A0006 gene demonstrated that the gene is rare among the Halobacteria. It is surrounded by two transposition genes suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a fragment of a Type IIG RM gene, which has likely been acquired through gene transfer, and affects restriction-modification activity by interacting with another RM system component(s). Here, we present the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation in an archaeal species and examine the function of a DNA methyltransferase related gene HVO_A0006. PMID:25904898

  13. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  14. Ototoxic Model of Oxaliplatin and Protection from Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Dalian, Ding; Haiyan, Jiang; Yong, Fu; Yongqi, Li; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 μM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 μM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initially increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+ would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 μM or 50 μM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 μM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 μM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apoptotic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+ treatment greatly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+ provides significant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply. PMID:25419212

  15. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  16. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  17. Webinar: Stepped chute design for embankment dams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing demographics in the vicinity of dams have led to hazard creep in a number of dams worldwide. Many of these dams now have insufficient spillway capacity as a result of these changes in hazard classification from low to significant or high hazard. Stepped chutes applied to the embankment da...

  18. 7 CFR 1724.55 - Dam safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Guidelines for Dam Safety,”FEMA 93, June, 1979, published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA...“Federal Guidelines for Dam Safety”may be obtained from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mitigation... with Appendix E of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineering and Design Dam Safety Assurance...

  19. 7 CFR 1724.55 - Dam safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Guidelines for Dam Safety,”FEMA 93, June, 1979, published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA...“Federal Guidelines for Dam Safety”may be obtained from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mitigation... with Appendix E of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineering and Design Dam Safety Assurance...

  20. 7 CFR 1724.55 - Dam safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Guidelines for Dam Safety,”FEMA 93, June, 1979, published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA...“Federal Guidelines for Dam Safety”may be obtained from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mitigation... with Appendix E of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineering and Design Dam Safety Assurance...

  1. 30 CFR 57.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retaining dams. 57.20010 Section 57.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....20010 Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be...

  2. 30 CFR 56.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retaining dams. 56.20010 Section 56.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be of...

  3. 76 FR 12094 - Whitman River Dam, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Whitman River Dam, Inc. Notice of Application Tendered for Filing.... Applicant: Whitman River Dam, Inc. e. Name of Project: Crocker Dam Hydro Project. f. Location: On the Whitman River, in the Town of Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. The project would not...

  4. Inception point for embankment dam stepped spillways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams have become a common design practice with the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those experiencing a hazard classification change from low to high hazard. Previous research on stepped spillways focused on gravity dams where aerated flow ...

  5. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  6. Interaction of the type I methyltransferase M.EcoR124I with modified DNA substrates: sequence discrimination and base flipping.

    PubMed Central

    Mernagh, D R; Taylor, I A; Kneale, G G

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed the DNA-protein contacts made between the type I DNA methyltransferase M.EcoR124I and its recognition sequence. The effects of base modifications have been probed by measuring the affinity of M.EcoR124I for the modified sequences relative to that for the wild-type sequence by using gel-retardation competition assays. These results, along with those from methylation interference footprinting and photo-affinity cross-linking have identified the location of potential DNA contacts within the DNA recognition site. Substitution of 6-thioguanosine for each of the three specific guanines in the recognition sequence leads to a large (10-20-fold) decrease in the strength of DNA binding, indicating the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the major groove of DNA. In contrast, replacement of either (or both) of the adenines at the target site for methylation by the enzyme, to produce either a base pair mismatch or loss of the base, leads to a marked increase in DNA-binding affinity. The results strongly support the proposal that type I methyltransferases employ a base-flipping mechanism to methylate their target base. PMID:9841886

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the BseCI DNA methyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus in complex with its cognate DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetaniou, Evangelia G.; Kotsifaki, Dina; Providaki, Mary; Rina, Maria; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from B. stearothermophilus was crystallized as a complex with its cognate DNA. Crystals belong to space group P6 and diffract to 2.5 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from Bacillus stearothermophilus (EC 2.1.1.72), a 579-amino-acid enzyme, methylates the N6 atom of the 3′ adenine in the sequence 5′-ATCGAT-3′. M.BseCI was crystallized in complex with its cognate DNA. The crystals were found to belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87.0, c = 156.1 Å, β = 120.0° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets were collected at wavelengths of 1.1 and 2.0 Å to 2.5 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at 100 K.

  8. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  9. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, K.; Malbroue, C.

    1987-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from (/sup 3/H)AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 30/sup 0/). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 30/sup 0/.

  10. ALLOWABLE OVERTOPPING OF EARTHEN DAMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging of the nation’s flood control infrastructure has resulted in a need for reevaluation, and, in some instances rehabilitation, of existing earthen dams. Inadequate spillway capacity is often one of the deficiencies identified for these structures. Inadequate spillway capacity may be the result...

  11. Subdaily Hydrologic Variability by Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Ruffing, C.; Smith, J. M.; Daniels, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The effects dams have on hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic regimes has been well characterized using mean daily discharge. Subdaily discharge variation (herein flashiness) has not been well characterized for a variety of dam, watershed, and land cover characteristics. The hourly hydrologic records for 30 sites across the continental United States were analyzed for flashiness using the Richards-Baker Index, coefficient of daily variation, percent of total flow variation, and the percent of the year when daily discharge is greater than mean daily discharge. The goal of this analysis is to evaluate the role of catchment variables such as mean slope and land use conditions across receiving watersheds in predicting flashiness; compare flashiness metrics across sites to identify relationships between dam related variables such as type and size; and determine the most appropriate temporal extent for assessing flashiness in streamflow. Our approach relies on data at the watershed scale with a fine temporal grain to determine flashiness over a decade of operation for each dam.

  12. Melatonin biosynthesis requires N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase activity of caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in rice

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Yeong; Choi, Geun-Hee; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) methylates N-acetylserotonin into melatonin; that is, it has N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) activity. The ASMT activity of COMT was first detected in Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (AtCOMT). To confirm the involvement of COMT on melatonin synthesis in other plant species, the ASMT activity of a COMT from rice (Oryza sativa) (OsCOMT) was evaluated. Purified recombinant OsCOMT protein from Escherichia coli was used to validate the high ASMT activity of OsCOMT, similar to that of AtCOMT. The K m and V max values for the ASMT activity of OsCOMT were 243 µM and 2400 pmol min−1 mg protein−1, which were similar to those of AtCOMT. Similar to AtCOMT, OsCOMT was localized in the cytoplasm. In vitro ASMT activity was significantly inhibited by either caffeic acid or quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Analogously, in vivo production of melatonin was significantly inhibited by quercetin in 4-week-old detached rice leaves. Lastly, the transgenic rice plants overexpressing rice COMT showed an increase in melatonin levels whereas transgenic rice plants suppressing the rice COMT had a significant decrease on melatonin levels, suggestive of the direct role of COMT in melatonin biosynthesis in plants. PMID:26276868

  13. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  14. Nonlinear Seismic Analysis of Morrow Point Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R; Nuss, L K

    2004-02-20

    This research and development project was sponsored by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), who are best known for the dams, power plants, and canals it constructed in the 17 western states. The mission statement of the USBR's Dam Safety Office, located in Denver, Colorado, is ''to ensure Reclamation dams do not present unacceptable risk to people, property, and the environment.'' The Dam Safety Office does this by quickly identifying the dams which pose an increased threat to the public, and quickly completing the related analyses in order to make decisions that will safeguard the public and associated resources. The research study described in this report constitutes one element of USBR's research and development work to advance their computational and analysis capabilities for studying the response of dams to strong earthquake motions. This project focused on the seismic response of Morrow Point Dam, which is located 263 km southwest of Denver, Colorado.

  15. Seismic safety of high concrete dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houqun

    2014-08-01

    China is a country of high seismicity with many hydropower resources. Recently, a series of high arch dams have either been completed or are being constructed in seismic regions, of which most are concrete dams. The evaluation of seismic safety often becomes a critical problem in dam design. In this paper, a brief introduction to major progress in the research on seismic aspects of large concrete dams, conducted mainly at the Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR) during the past 60 years, is presented. The dam site-specific ground motion input, improved response analysis, dynamic model test verification, field experiment investigations, dynamic behavior of dam concrete, and seismic monitoring and observation are described. Methods to prevent collapse of high concrete dams under maximum credible earthquakes are discussed.

  16. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  17. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  18. A computational study of adenine, uracil, and cytosine adsorption upon AlN and BN nano-cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baei, Mohammad T.; Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Soltani, Alireza

    Density-functional theory calculations are used to investigate the interaction of Al12N12 and B12N12 clusters with the adenine (A), uracil (U), and cytosine (C) molecules. The current calculations demonstrate that these hybrid adsorbent materials are able to adsorb the adenine, uracil, and cytosine molecules through exothermic processes. Our theoretical results reveal improvement in the adsorption of adenine, uracil, and cytosine on Al12N12 and B12N12. It is observed that B12N12 is highly sensitive to adenine, uracil, and cytosine compared with Al12N12 to serve as a biochemical sensor.

  19. Multiple lysine methylation of PCAF by Set9 methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Masatsugu, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Ken

    2009-03-27

    The molecular functions of several non-histone proteins are regulated through lysine modification by histone methyltransferases. The p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) is an acetyltransferase that has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we report that PCAF is a novel substrate of Set9 methyltransferase. In vitro mapping experiments revealed six lysine residues could be methylated by Set9. A comparison of amino acid sequences of target sites revealed the novel consensus motif which differs from previously identified Set9-consensus sequence. Further methyltransferase assays focusing on the six lysine residues showed that K78 and K89 are preferentially methylated in full-length PCAF in vitro. Using specific antibodies recognizing mono-methylated K89, in vivo PCAF methylation and its nuclear localization were demonstrated. Our data may lead to a new insight into PCAF functions and provide additional information to identify unknown targets of Set9.

  20. Absolute effective cross sections of ionization of adenine and guanine molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Effective cross sections of the formation of positive ions of nitrous nucleic acids of adenine and guanine are determined by the crossed electron and molecular beam method in the energy interval from the threshold to 200 eV. It is found that the maximal value of the total cross section of adenine ionization is attained at an energy of 90 eV and is equal to (2.8 ± 0.6) × 10-15 cm2. The maximal value of the total cross section of guanine ionization is equal to (3.2 ± 0.7) × 10-15 cm2 and is observed at an energy of 88 eV. The energy ionization thresholds are determined, which amount to (8.8 ± 0.2) eV for adenine and to (8.3 ± 0.2) eV for guanine. The adenine and guanine mass spectra are measured. The absolute values of partial ionization cross sections of adenine and guanine molecules are determined.

  1. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region. PMID:25660103

  2. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  3. Regulation of photolyase in Escherichia coli K-12 during adenine deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, J L; Rupert, C S

    1990-01-01

    DNA photolyase, a DNA repair enzyme encoded by the phr gene of Escherichia coli, is normally regulated at 10 to 20 active molecules per cell. In purA mutants deprived of adenine, this amount increased sixfold within 2 h. Operon fusions placing lacZ under transcriptional control of phr promoters indicated no change in transcription rate during adenine deprivation, and gene fusions of phr with lacZ showed a nearly constant level of translation as well. Immunoblot analysis indicated that the total amount of photolyase protein remained constant during enzyme amplification. On the other hand, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol during the adenine deprivation prevented any increase. DNA regions lying 1.3 to 4.2 kb upstream of the phr coding sequences were necessary for this amplification to occur and for this purpose would function in trans. These results suggest that adenine deprivation leads to a posttranslational change, involving synthesis of protein encoded by sequences lying upstream of phr, which increases photolyase activity. The amplification in activity was found to be reversible, for when adenine was restored, the photolyase activity declined before cell growth resumed. Images PMID:2254263

  4. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  6. 1 Protein Methyltransferases: Their Distribution Among the Five Structural Classes of AdoMet-Dependent Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Heidi L; Blumenthal, Robert M; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) dependent methyltransferases (MTases) are involved in biosynthesis, signal transduction, protein repair, chromatin regulation, and gene silencing. Five different structural folds (designated I through V) have been described that bind AdoMet and catalyze methyltransfer to diverse substrates, although the great majority of known MTases have the Class I fold. Even within a particular MTase class the amino-acid sequence similarity can be as low as 10%. Thus, the structural and catalytic requirements for methyltransfer from AdoMet appear to be remarkably flexible. MTases that act on protein substrates have been found to date among three of the five structural classes (I, the classical fold; III, the corrin MTase fold; and V, the SET fold). "There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same."-Chinese proverb The Columbia World of Quotations, New York, Columbia University Press, 1996. PMID:26718035

  7. Egypt: after the Aswan Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, S.

    1981-05-01

    Ten years after its completion, the controversial Aswan High Dam's hydrologic and human consequences are clearer because of a joint US-Egyptian interdisciplinary study. Water supply and distribution is emerging as a major world resource problem with the recognition that unsafe drinking water and inadequate sanitation contribute to health problems. Dams provide water supplies, but they also create conditions favorable to the spread of water-borne diseases. The Aswan Dam solved problems of flooding and drought by opening 2.5 million acres to year-round irrigation, although some of the reclaimed land has been lost to urban expansion and shoreline erosion, and provides hydroelectric power. The negative effects include increasing soil salinity, changes in the water table, excessive downstream water plant growth, and diseases such as schistosomiasis and other intestinal parasites, and the social impact on the Nubians, whose homeland was flooded. Planners must use the information gathered in this study to see that the benefits outweigh the human costs. 22 references, 7 figures.

  8. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  9. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  10. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  11. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  12. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  13. Measurement of Dam Deformations: Case Study of Obruk Dam (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulal, V. Engin; Alkan, R. Metin; Alkan, M. Nurullah; İlci, Veli; Ozulu, I. Murat; Tombus, F. Engin; Kose, Zafer; Aladogan, Kayhan; Sahin, Murat; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Oku, Guldane

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, there is information regarding the first deformation and displacement measurements in dams that were conducted in 1920s Switzerland. Todays, deformation measurements in the dams have gained very different functions with improvements in both measurement equipment and evaluation of measurements. Deformation measurements and analysis are among the main topics studied by scientists who take interest in the engineering measurement sciences. The Working group of Deformation Measurements and Analysis, which was established under the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), carries out its studies and activities with regard to this subject. At the end of the 1970s, the subject of the determination of fixed points in the deformation monitoring network was one of the main subjects extensively studied. Many theories arose from this inquiry, as different institutes came to differing conclusions. In 1978, a special commission with representatives of universities has been established within the FIG 6.1 working group; this commission worked on the issue of determining a general approach to geometric deformation analysis. The results gleaned from the commission were discussed at symposiums organized by the FIG. In accordance with these studies, scientists interested in the subject have begun to work on models that investigate cause and effect relations between the effects that cause deformation and deformation. As of the scientist who interest with the issue focused on different deformation methods, another special commission was established within the FIG engineering measurements commission in order to classify deformation models and study terminology. After studying this material for a long time, the official commission report was published in 2001. In this prepared report, studies have been carried out by considering the FIG Engineering Surveying Commission's report entitled, 'MODELS AND TERMINOLOGY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GEODETIC MONITORING OBSERVATIONS

  14. Exporting dams: China's hydropower industry goes global.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristen; Bosshard, Peter; Brewer, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    In line with China's "going out" strategy, China's dam industry has in recent years significantly expanded its involvement in overseas markets. The Chinese Export-Import Bank and other Chinese financial institutions, state-owned enterprises, and private firms are now involved in at least 93 major dam projects overseas. The Chinese government sees the new global role played by China's dam industry as a "win-win" situation for China and host countries involved. But evidence from project sites such as the Merowe Dam in Sudan demonstrates that these dams have unrecognized social and environmental costs for host communities. Chinese dam builders have yet to adopt internationally accepted social and environmental standards for large infrastructure development that can assure these costs are adequately taken into account. But the Chinese government is becoming increasingly aware of the challenge and the necessity of promoting environmentally and socially sound investments overseas. PMID:18992986

  15. Cloning and expresion of cDNA for rat O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Sakumi, K; Shiraishi, A; Hayakawa, H; Sekiguchi, M

    1991-01-01

    cDNA for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was isolated by screening rat liver cDNA libraries, using as a probe the human cDNA sequence for methyltransferase. The rat cDNA encodes a protein with 209 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the rat methyltransferase exhibits considerable homology with those of the human, yeast and bacterial enzymes, especially around putative methyl acceptor sites. When the cDNA was placed under control of the lac promoter and expressed in methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli (ada-, ogt-) cells, a characteristic methyltransferase protein was produced. The rat DNA methyltransferase thus expressed could complement the biological defects of the E. coli cell caused by lack of its own DNA methyltransferases; e.g. increased sensitivity to alkylating agents in terms of both cell death and mutation induction. Images PMID:1945835

  16. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  17. Dam breaching and Chinook salmon recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M.; Rossignol, Philippe A.; Li, Hiram W.; Emlen, John M.; Kareiva, Peter; Marvier, Michelle; Michelle M. McClure

    2001-01-01

    The Report by Kareiva et al. on recovery and management options for spring/summer chinook salmon (1) has the potential to have a major impact in deciding whether to breach dams on the Snake River. Based on interpretation of their model results, they argue that dam breaching would be insufficient to reverse the decline of salmon. An examination of the specifics of their model, however, suggests that, despire their argument, dam breaching remains a viable recovery option for chinook salmon.

  18. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications. PMID:25288757

  19. Brain creatine depletion: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (improving with creatine supplementation).

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, V; Bianchi, M C; Tosetti, M; Carducci, C; Cerquiglini, C A; Cioni, G; Antonozzi, I

    2000-11-14

    The authors describe an Italian child with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, neurologic regression, movement disorders, and epilepsy during the first year of life. Brain MRI showed pallidal and periaqueductal alterations. In vivo 1H-MRS showed brain creatine depletion. The assessment of guanidinoacetic acid concentration in biologic fluids confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic improvement followed creatine supplementation. PMID:11087795

  20. Diversity in mechanism and function of tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Swinehart, William E; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    tRNA molecules undergo extensive post-transcriptional processing to generate the mature functional tRNA species that are essential for translation in all organisms. These processing steps include the introduction of numerous specific chemical modifications to nucleotide bases and sugars; among these modifications, methylation reactions are by far the most abundant. The tRNA methyltransferases comprise a diverse enzyme superfamily, including members of multiple structural classes that appear to have arisen independently during evolution. Even among closely related family members, examples of unusual substrate specificity and chemistry have been observed. Here we review recent advances in tRNA methyltransferase mechanism and function with a particular emphasis on discoveries of alternative substrate specificities and chemistry associated with some methyltransferases. Although the molecular function for a specific tRNA methylation may not always be clear, mutations in tRNA methyltransferases have been increasingly associated with human disease. The impact of tRNA methylation on human biology is also discussed. PMID:25626150

  1. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  2. Convergent Mechanistic Features between the Structurally Diverse N- and O-Methyltransferases: Glycine N-Methyltransferase and Catechol O-Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyu; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-07-27

    Although an enormous and still growing number of biologically diverse methyltransferases have been reported and identified, a comprehensive understanding of the enzymatic methyl transfer mechanism is still lacking. Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), a member of the family that acts on small metabolites as the substrate, catalyzes methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to glycine to form S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sarcosine. We report primary carbon ((12)C/(14)C) and secondary ((1)H3/(3)H3) kinetic isotope effects at the transferred methyl group, together with (1)H3/(3)H3 binding isotope effects for wild-type GNMT and a series of Tyr21 mutants. The data implicate a compaction effect in the methyl transfer step that is conferred by the protein structure. Furthermore, a remarkable similarity of properties is observed between GNMT and catechol O-methyltransferase, despite significant differences between these enzymes with regard to their active site structures and catalyzed reactions. We attribute these results to a catalytically relevant reduction in the methyl donor-acceptor distance that is dependent on a tyrosine side chain positioned behind the methyl-bearing sulfur of AdoMet. PMID:27355841

  3. Engineering Monolignol 4-O-Methyltransferases to Modulate Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiya, M.W.; Liu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polymer derived from the oxidative coupling of three classical monolignols. Lignin precursors are methylated exclusively at the meta-positions (i.e. 3/5-OH) of their phenyl rings by native O-methyltransferases, and are precluded from substitution of the para-hydroxyl (4-OH) position. Ostensibly, the para-hydroxyls of phenolics are critically important for oxidative coupling of phenoxy radicals to form polymers. Therefore, creating a 4-O-methyltransferase to substitute the para-hydroxyl of monolignols might well interfere with the synthesis of lignin. The phylogeny of plant phenolic O-methyltransferases points to the existence of a batch of evolutionarily 'plastic' amino acid residues. Following one amino acid at a time path of directed evolution, and using the strategy of structure-based iterative site-saturation mutagenesis, we created a novel monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase from the enzyme responsible for methylating phenylpropenes. We show that two plastic residues in the active site of the parental enzyme are vital in dominating substrate discrimination. Mutations at either one of these separate the evolutionarily tightly linked properties of substrate specificity and regioselective methylation of native O-methyltransferase, thereby conferring the ability for para-methylation of the lignin monomeric precursors, primarily monolignols. Beneficial mutations at both sites have an additive effect. By further optimizing enzyme activity, we generated a triple mutant variant that may structurally constitute a novel phenolic substrate binding pocket, leading to its high binding affinity and catalytic efficiency on monolignols. The 4-O-methoxylation of monolignol efficiently impairs oxidative radical coupling in vitro, highlighting the potential for applying this novel enzyme in managing lignin polymerization in planta.

  4. Structure and Function of Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Y.; Ray, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, H.; Ren, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Bernard, K.; Shi, P.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    The plus-strand RNA genome of flavivirus contains a 5' terminal cap 1 structure (m{sup 7}GpppAmG). The flaviviruses encode one methyltransferase, located at the N-terminal portion of the NS5 protein, to catalyze both guanine N-7 and ribose 2'-OH methylations during viral cap formation. Representative flavivirus methyltransferases from dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile virus (WNV) sequentially generate GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppAm. The 2'-O methylation can be uncoupled from the N-7 methylation, since m{sup 7}GpppA-RNA can be readily methylated to m{sup 7}GpppAm-RNA. Despite exhibiting two distinct methylation activities, the crystal structure of WNV methyltransferase at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution showed a single binding site for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor. Therefore, substrate GpppA-RNA should be repositioned to accept the N-7 and 2'-O methyl groups from SAM during the sequential reactions. Electrostatic analysis of the WNV methyltransferase structure showed that, adjacent to the SAM-binding pocket, is a highly positively charged surface that could serve as an RNA binding site during cap methylations. Biochemical and mutagenesis analyses show that the N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations require distinct buffer conditions and different side chains within the K{sub 61}-D{sub 146}-K{sub 182}-E{sub 218} motif, suggesting that the two reactions use different mechanisms. In the context of complete virus, defects in both methylations are lethal to WNV; however, viruses defective solely in 2'-O methylation are attenuated and can protect mice from later wild-type WNV challenge. The results demonstrate that the N-7 methylation activity is essential for the WNV life cycle and, thus, methyltransferase represents a novel target for flavivirus therapy.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa EftM Is a Thermoregulated Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Owings, Joshua P; Kuiper, Emily G; Prezioso, Samantha M; Meisner, Jeffrey; Varga, John J; Zelinskaya, Natalia; Dammer, Eric B; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Albertí, Sebastián; Conn, Graeme L; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2016-02-12

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that trimethylates elongation factor-thermo-unstable (EF-Tu) on lysine 5. Lysine 5 methylation occurs in a temperature-dependent manner and is generally only seen when P. aeruginosa is grown at temperatures close to ambient (25 °C) but not at higher temperatures (37 °C). We have previously identified the gene, eftM (for EF-Tu-modifying enzyme), responsible for this modification and shown its activity to be associated with increased bacterial adhesion to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. Bioinformatic analyses predicted EftM to be a Class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. An in vitro methyltransferase assay was employed to show that, in the presence of SAM, EftM directly trimethylates EF-Tu. A natural variant of EftM, with a glycine to arginine substitution at position 50 in the predicted SAM-binding domain, lacks both SAM binding and enzyme activity. Mass spectrometry analysis of the in vitro methyltransferase reaction products revealed that EftM exclusively methylates at lysine 5 of EF-Tu in a distributive manner. Consistent with the in vivo temperature dependence of methylation of EF-Tu, preincubation of EftM at 37 °C abolished methyltransferase activity, whereas this activity was retained when EftM was preincubated at 25 °C. Irreversible protein unfolding at 37 °C was observed, and we propose that this instability is the molecular basis for the temperature dependence of EftM activity. Collectively, our results show that EftM is a thermolabile, SAM-dependent methyltransferase that directly trimethylates lysine 5 of EF-Tu in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26677219

  6. Effects of adenine arabinoside on lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, W C; Siegel, P J; Baer, J

    1978-01-01

    Low concentrations of adenine arabinoside inhibited growth of two Epstein-Barr virus producer cell lines in culture, while not significantly affecting a nonproducer cell line and a B-cell-negative line. These observations were extended to include freshly infected cells. Mitogen-stimulated human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were unaffected by the drug at concentration levels that inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated cells. DNA synthesis in Epstein-Barr virus-superinfected Raji cells was also adversely affected by adenine arabinoside. However, these same low concentrations of adenine arabinoside in the triphosphate form produced less effect on DNA synthesis in nuclear systems and DNA polymerase assays than on growth or DNA synthesis in whole cells. Therefore the effects reported here of low concentrations of the drug on whole cells may be only in part related to DNA polymerase inhibition. The work reported here suggests that adenine arabinoside has multiple sites of action in infected cells. PMID:212577

  7. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  8. Assembly of an antiparallel homo-adenine DNA duplex by small-molecule binding.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Santai, Catherine T; Jain, Swapan S; Hud, Nicholas V

    2004-07-21

    Molecules that reversibly bind DNA and trigger the formation of non-Watson-Crick secondary structures would be useful in the design of dynamic DNA nanostructures and as potential leads for new therapeutic agents. We demonstrate that coralyne, a small crescent-shaped molecule, promotes the formation of a duplex secondary structure from homo-adenine oligonucleotides. AFM studies reveal that the staggered alignment of homo-adenine oligonucleotides upon coralyne binding produces polymers of micrometers in length, but only 2 nm in height. A DNA duplex was also studied that contained eight A.A mismatches between two flanking 7-bp Watson-Crick helices. CD spectra confirm that the multiple A.A mismatches of this duplex bind coralyne in manner similar to that of homo-adenine oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the melting temperature of this hybrid duplex increases by 13 degrees C upon coralyne binding. These observations illustrate that the helical structure of the homo-adenine-coralyne duplex is compatible with the B-form DNA helix. PMID:15250704

  9. Fragility Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekie, Paulos B.; Ellingwood, Bruce R.

    2002-09-01

    Concrete gravity dams are an important part ofthe nation's infrastructure. Many dams have been in service for over 50 years, during which time important advances in the methodologies for evaluation of natural phenomena hazards have caused the design-basis events to be revised upwards, in some cases significantly. Many existing dams fail to meet these revised safety criteria and structural rehabilitation to meet newly revised criteria may be costly and difficult. A probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) provides a rational safety assessment and decision-making tool managing the various sources of uncertainty that may impact dam performance. Fragility analysis, which depicts fl%e uncertainty in the safety margin above specified hazard levels, is a fundamental tool in a PSA. This study presents a methodology for developing fragilities of concrete gravity dams to assess their performance against hydrologic and seismic hazards. Models of varying degree of complexity and sophistication were considered and compared. The methodology is illustrated using the Bluestone Dam on the New River in West Virginia, which was designed in the late 1930's. The hydrologic fragilities showed that the Eluestone Dam is unlikely to become unstable at the revised probable maximum flood (PMF), but it is likely that there will be significant cracking at the heel ofthe dam. On the other hand, the seismic fragility analysis indicated that sliding is likely, if the dam were to be subjected to a maximum credible earthquake (MCE). Moreover, there will likely be tensile cracking at the neck of the dam at this level of seismic excitation. Probabilities of relatively severe limit states appear to be only marginally affected by extremely rare events (e.g. the PMF and MCE). Moreover, the risks posed by the extreme floods and earthquakes were not balanced for the Bluestone Dam, with seismic hazard posing a relatively higher risk.

  10. 6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. 4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  12. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  13. 5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  14. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING EAST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  15. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSES IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  16. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER AND ROLLER GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER AND ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, DOWNSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  17. 10. BRIDGE IN CONTEXT OF DAM, THIRD POWER HOUSE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. BRIDGE IN CONTEXT OF DAM, THIRD POWER HOUSE IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH BY 360 DEGREES - Columbia River Bridge at Grand Coulee Dam, Spanning Columbia River at State Route 155, Coulee Dam, Okanogan County, WA

  18. 4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING A LARGE FIELDSTONE DAM (KNOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING A LARGE FIELD-STONE DAM (KNOWN LOCALLY AS DAM NO. 1), BUILT BY THE CCC - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  19. 3. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING A SMALL FIELDSTONE DAM (KNOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING A SMALL FIELD-STONE DAM (KNOWN LOCALLY AS DAM NO. 2), BUILT BY THE CCC - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  20. 1. General view of dam looking west, showing both the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of dam looking west, showing both the downstream buttresses and the upstream arch-rings. The spillway is on the far end of the dam. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Dam located to east of powerhouse, view from south. This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dam located to east of powerhouse, view from south. This dam holds back the waters of the Chattahoochee River to form the mill pond north of Riverdale Cotton Mill - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Powerhouse & Dam, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  2. View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the redwood planks and base of dam from Lake Sabrina Basin, view north - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  3. View of Lake Sabrina Dam downstream face from parking lot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam downstream face from parking lot showing concrete outlet structure on tow of dam at left edge of photo, view southeast - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  4. 14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT, COFFER DAM IS UPSTREAM OF PLACING TOWER. EAST DOME IS VISIBLE AT LEFT OF TOWER, c. 1927 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  5. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  6. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  7. 2. East side of lower dam shown with water flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. East side of lower dam shown with water flowing over dam. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  8. 56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND REMAINDER OF DAM -- CONCRETE MONOLITH PLAN AND WALL ELEVATIONS (WITH LOCK APPURTENANCES). Drawing V-601 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  9. 8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL FROM THE DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM WITH POND A IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  10. GENERAL VIEW OF THE WILSON DAM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, GENERATING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE WILSON DAM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, GENERATING PLANT IN THE BACKGROUND. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  11. McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William

    1997-07-01

    The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

  12. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  13. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  14. USDA earthen embankment dams: Defining the problem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is estimated that there on the order of 2 to 9 million earthen dams in this country with 80,000 large or significant enough to be placed on the National Inventory of Dams (NID). This is an infrastructure that has significant issues related to: aging components; sedimentation; and changing hydrol...

  15. 75 FR 49429 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ..., processing minerals, treating or supplying water, and controlling run- off and sediment. Although many of... 100-foot high dam at a limestone mine in Puerto Rico released over 10 million gallons of water and... slope failure in 1987, the mine operator installed instruments in the dam to monitor internal...

  16. 75 FR 62024 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (75 FR 49429) asking interested parties to comment on measures to assure that metal and nonmetal mine operators design, construct, operate and maintain dams in a... Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Parts 56 and 57 RIN 1219-AB70 Metal and Nonmetal Dams...

  17. Using resistivity measurements for dam safety evaluation at Enemossen tailings dam in southern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjödahl, P.; Dahlin, T.; Johansson, S.

    2005-12-01

    Internal erosion is a major reason for embankment dam failures. Resistivity measurements is an essentially non-destructive technique, which may have the possibility of detecting internal erosion processes and anomalous seepage at an early stage before the safety of the dam is at stake. This paper presents results from part of a dam safety investigation conducted at the Enemossen tailings dam in southern Sweden. Longitudinal resistivity sections, 2D measurements along the dam crest, provided an overview of the whole dam and served to detect anomalous zones. In selected areas, additional cross-sectional 2D surveys gave detailed information about the geo-electrical situations in the embankments. This information is valuable for similar investigations as information about resistivity in embankment construction material is scarce. Known problem areas were associated with low resistivities, even though the resistivity measurements alone did not provide enough information to confidently come to a decision about the status of the dams.

  18. Groundwater Forecasting Optimization Pertain to Dam Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in removing dams due to changing ecological and societal values. Groundwater recharge rate is closely connected to reservoir presence or absence. With the removal of dams and their associated reservoirs, reductions in groundwater levels are likely to impact water supplies for domestic, industrial and agricultural use. Therefore accessible economic and time effective tools to forecast groundwater level declines with acceptable uncertainty following dam removals are critical for public welfare and healthy regional economies. These tools are also vital to project planning and provide beneficial information for restoration and remediation managements. The standard tool for groundwater forecasting is 3D Numerical modeling. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) may be an alternative tool for groundwater forecasting pertain to dam removal. This project compared these two tools throughout the Milltown Dam removal in Western Montana over a five year period. It was determined that ANN modeling had equal or greater accuracy for groundwater forecasting with far less effort and cost involved.

  19. Do we need construct more dams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Shi, H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews global dam development in association with the growths of global population, economy, and energy consumption in the past several decades, and also evaluates contributions of dam development to future world sustainable development. Eventually, this paper answers whether we need more dams in the future or not. The world population has rapidly increased from 1.6 billion in 1900, 2.5 billion in 1950, 6.1 billion in 2000, to 7.0 billion in 2011, and is projected to reach 9.5 billion in 2050; similarly, the world economy has dramatically expanded. To maintain socioeconomic development, the consumption of water, food and energy has increased rapidly as well. However, the total volume of available water resource over the world is limited, the food production largely depends on water supply, and the main energy sources are still oil, coal and gas at present, which are regarded as non-renewable resources. Accordingly, it is expected that we will face serious problems to deal with the challenges of water crisis, food security and energy shortage in the near future. In order to enhance the capability of regulating water resource, a great number of global dams (and related reservoirs) have been constructed in the last one hundred years; currently, almost all large rivers over the world have been regulated by dams. The reservoirs can supply sufficient water for irrigated land to ensure food production, and the associated hydropower stations can generate electricity. This article collects the dam data from the ICOLD (International Commission on Large Dams) and GRanD (Global Reservoir and Dam) databases, and some socioeconomic data, including population, economy, and consumptions of water, food and energy over the world. Analysis of these data reveals that global dam development has a great impact on the world sustainable development. Further, it is concluded that we need further dam development to maintain our future development.

  20. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  1. Effect of l-Methionine and S-Adenosylmethionine on Growth of an Adenine Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yall, Irving; Norrell, Stephen A.; Joseph, Ronald; Knudsen, Richard C.

    1967-01-01

    A pink, adenine-requiring yeast utilized adenine, hypoxanthine, or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), in quantities up to 3 μmoles per 100 ml of medium, as equivalent sources of purine for cell growth, but not methylthioadenosine or S-adenosylhomocysteine. Utilization of SAM for growth was inhibited by the presence of l-methionine in quantities greater than 0.6 μmole per 100 ml of medium. However, 6 μmoles of l-methionine had no effect on growth when adenine or hypoxanthine was the source of purine. These sources also reversed the inhibitory effects of 6 μmoles of the amino acid on the utilization of SAM. The presence of 400 μmoles of the amino acid resulted in some inhibition of growth when the organisms were grown with adenine, hypoxanthine, or adenine plus SAM but had no effect on the total uptake of adenine-8-14C. Studies on the uptake of radioactivity from a mixture of SAM-adenine-8-14C and 3H-labeled SAM-methyl indicated that these components were taken into the cells at different rates which were altered by the presence of l-methionine. The fixation of 35S from 35S-labeled adenosylmethionine into the cells was inhibited by the presence of the amino acid. The cells synthesized and accumulated SAM in the presence of 400 μmoles of l-methionine plus adenine even when exogenous SAM was supplied. Approximately 47% of radioactivity fixed from exogenous SAM-adenine-8-14C and 12% from 3H-labeled SAM-methyl were found in reisolated SAM. PMID:6025443

  2. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael T.; Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Ardissone, Alexandria N.; Kemppainen, Kaisa M.; Drew, Jennifer C.; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3184 genes were methylated as well as 1735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states. PMID:25101067

  3. The NSD family of protein methyltransferases in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Vougiouklakis, Theodore; Hamamoto, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Saloura, Vassiliki

    2015-08-01

    The NSD family of protein lysine methyltransferases consists of NSD1, NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET and NSD3/WHSC1L1. NSD2 haploinsufficiency causes Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, while NSD1 mutations lead to the Sotos syndrome. Recently, a number of studies showed that the NSD methyltransferases were overexpressed, amplified or somatically mutated in multiple types of cancer, suggesting their critical role in cancer. These enzymes methylate specific lysine residues on histone tails and their dysfunction results in epigenomic aberrations which play a fundamental role in oncogenesis. Furthermore, NSD1 was also reported to methylate a nonhistone protein substrate, RELA/p65 subunit of NF-κB, implying its regulatory function through nonhistone methylation pathways. In this review, we summarize the current research regarding the role of the NSD family proteins in cancer and underline their potential as targets for novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:25942451

  4. Structural analysis of histamine N-methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Takemura, M; Yamauchi, K; Yamatodani, A

    1995-11-01

    A clone encoding a part of rat histamine N-tele-methyltransferase gene of 11 kb was isolated. The clone contained 4 exons, encoding from 191 to the 3' end of cDNA. The last exon was 692 bases long and specified more than half of the HMT cDNA. A comparison of the sequences of rat and human cDNAs shows that more than one-third of the human 3' untranslated region does not correspond to the rat counterpart, but a homology was found between this region of human cDNA and the 3' franking region of the rat gene. It was found that an exon was interrupted at 4 residues after a glycine residue, which putatively corresponds to the conserved residue among methyltransferases. PMID:8750786

  5. Accessing Protein Methyltransferase and Demethylase Enzymology Using Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Tim J.; Provencher, Laurel M.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Jin, Jian; Brown, Peter J.; Frye, Stephen V.; Janzen, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of small molecules targeting the > 80 enzymes that add (methyltransferases) or remove (demethylases) methyl marks from lysine and arginine residues, most notably present in histone tails, may yield unprecedented chemotherapeutic agents and facilitate regenerative medicine. To better enable chemical exploration of these proteins, we have developed a novel and highly quantitative microfluidic capillary electrophoresis assay to enable full mechanistic studies of these enzymes and the kinetics of their inhibition. This technology separates small biomolecules, i.e., peptides, based on their charge-to-mass ratio. Methylation, however, does not alter the charge of peptide substrates. To overcome this limitation, we have employed a methylation-sensitive endoproteinase strategy to separate methylated from unmethylated peptides. The assay was validated on a lysine methyltransferase (G9a) and a lysine demethylase (LSD1) and was employed to investigate the inhibition of G9a by small molecules. PMID:20659682

  6. [Bioinformatics analysis and expressed level of histone methyltransferase genes in Lonicera japonica].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Long, Ping; Zha, Liang-ping; Wang, Yao-long

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three histone methyltransferase genes were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica. The nucleotide and proteins characteristics, subcellular localization, senior structural domains and conservative forecasting were analyzed. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that 23 histone methyltransferases were mainly divided into two groups: lysine methyltransferase and arginine methyltransferases. The result of gene expression showed that 23 histone methyltransferases showed preference in terms of interspecies and organs. They were more expressed in buds of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis and lower in leaves of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis. Eight genes were specific expressed in flower. These results provided basis for further understanding the function of histone methyltransferase and epigenetic regulation of active ingredients of L. japonica. PMID:26552158

  7. Dam Failure Inundation Map Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Carl; Iokepa, Judy; Dahlman, Jill; Michaud, Jene; Paylor, Earnest (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At the end of the first year, we remain on schedule. Property owners were identified and contacted for land access purposes. A prototype software package has been completed and was demonstrated to the Division of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), National Weather Service (NWS) and Pacific Disaster Center (PDC). A field crew gathered data and surveyed the areas surrounding two dams in Waimea. (A field report is included in the annual report.) Data sensitivity analysis was initiated and completed. A user's manual has been completed. Beta testing of the software was initiated, but not completed. The initial TNK and property owner data collection for the additional test sites on Oahu and Kauai have been initiated.

  8. Deformation Monitoring and Bathymetry Analyses in Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey has 595 dams constructed between 1936 and 2013 for the purposes of irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric energy and drinking water. A major portion of the dam basins in Turkey are deprived of vegetation and have slope topography on near surrounding area. However, landscaping covered with forest around the dam basin is desirable for erosion control. In fact; the dams, have basins deprived of vegetation, fill up quickly due to sediment transport. Erosion control and forestation are important factors, reducing the sediment, to protect the water basins of the dams and increase the functioning life of the dams. The functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Dams are very large and critical structures and they demand the use or application of precise measuring systems. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. Monitoring is an essential component of the dam after construction and during operation and must en­able the timely detection of any behavior that could deteriorate the dam, potentially result in its shutdown or failure. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the dams, dam safety and related analysis. The case study is the deformation measurements of Atatürk Dam in Turkey which is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Brief information is given about the

  9. Thiostrepton tryptophan methyltransferase expands the chemistry of radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Stéphane; Guillot, Alain; Benjdia, Alhosna; Sandström, Corine; Langella, Philippe; Berteau, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Methylation is among the most widespread chemical modifications encountered in biomolecules and has a pivotal role in many major biological processes. In the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic thiostrepton A, we identified what is to our knowledge the first tryptophan methyltransferase. We show that it uses unprecedented chemistry to methylate inactivated sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, despite being predicted to be a radical SAM enzyme. PMID:23064318

  10. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  11. Plant isoflavone and isoflavanone O-methyltransferase genes

    DOEpatents

    Broeckling, Bettina E.; Liu, Chang-Jun; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-19

    The invention provides enzymes that encode O-methyltransferases (OMTs) from Medicago truncatula that allow modification to plant (iso)flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. In certain aspects of the invention, the genes encoding these enzymes are provided. The invention therefore allows the modification of plants for isoflavonoid content. Transgenic plants comprising such enzymes are also provided, as well as methods for improving disease resistance in plants. Methods for producing food and nutraceuticals, and the resulting compositions, are also provided.

  12. The rat adenine receptor: pharmacological characterization and mutagenesis studies to investigate its putative ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Knospe, Melanie; Müller, Christa E; Rosa, Patrizia; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Thimm, Dominik; Schiedel, Anke C

    2013-09-01

    The rat adenine receptor (rAdeR) was the first member of a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by adenine and designated as P0-purine receptors. The present study aimed at gaining insights into structural aspects of ligand binding and function of the rAdeR. We exchanged amino acid residues predicted to be involved in ligand binding (Phe110(3.24), Asn115(3.29), Asn173(4.60), Phe179(45.39), Asn194(5.40), Phe195(5.41), Leu201(5.47), His252(6.54), and Tyr268(7.32)) for alanine and expressed them in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells. Membrane preparations subjected to [(3)H]adenine binding studies revealed only minor effects indicating that none of the exchanged amino acids is part of the ligand binding pocket, at least in the inactive state of the receptor. Furthermore, we coexpressed the rAdeR and its mutants with mammalian Gi proteins in Sf9 insect cells to probe receptor activation. Two amino acid residues, Asn194(5.40) and Leu201(5.47), were found to be crucial for activation since their alanine mutants did not respond to adenine. Moreover we showed that-in contrast to most other rhodopsin-like GPCRs-the rAdeR does not contain essential disulfide bonds since preincubation with dithiothreitol neither altered adenine binding in Sf9 cell membranes, nor adenine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells transfected with the rAdeR. To detect rAdeRs by Western blot analysis, we developed a specific antibody. Finally, we were able to show that the extended N-terminal sequence of the rAdeR constitutes a putative signal peptide of unknown function that is cleaved off in the mature receptor. Our results provide important insights into this new, poorly investigated family of purinergic receptors. PMID:23413038

  13. Structural characterization of the mitomycin 7-O-methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Shanteri; Chang, Aram; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Grüschow, Sabine; Sherman, David H.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2014-10-02

    Mitomycins are quinone-containing antibiotics, widely used as antitumor drugs in chemotherapy. Mitomycin-7-O-methyltransferase (MmcR), a key tailoring enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of mitomycin in Streptomyces lavendulae, catalyzes the 7-O-methylation of both C9{beta}- and C9{alpha}-configured 7-hydroxymitomycins. We have determined the crystal structures of the MmcR-S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) binary complex and MmcR-SAH-mitomycin A (MMA) ternary complex at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.3 {angstrom}, respectively. The study revealed MmcR to adopt a common S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase fold and the presence of a structurally conserved active site general acid-base pair is consistent with a proton-assisted methyltransfer common to most methyltransferases. Given the importance of C7 alkylation to modulate mitomycin redox potential, this study may also present a template toward the future engineering of catalysts to generate uniquely bioactive mitomycins.

  14. Retinoic acid inhibits histone methyltransferase Whsc1 during palatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiying; Higashihori, Norihisa; Yahiro, Kohei; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-03-13

    Cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P) is a common congenital anomaly in humans and is thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying orofacial clefts are not fully understood. Here, we investigate how the overdose of retinoic acid (RA), which can induce cleft palate in mice and humans, regulates histone methyltransferase, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1) during palatal development in mice. We treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with 1 μM all-trans RA and discovered that the global level of H3K36me3 was downregulated and that expression of the H3K36 methyltransferase gene, Whsc1, was reduced. The expression level of WHSC1 in embryonic palatal shelves was reduced during palatogenesis, following maternal administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of RA by gastric intubation. Furthermore, the expression of WHSC1 in palatal shelves was observed in epithelial and mesenchymal cells at all stages, suggesting an important role for palatal development. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of cleft palate observed after excessive RA exposure is likely to be associated with a reduction in the histone methyltransferase, WHSC1. PMID:25677622

  15. Endothelial transcriptome in response to pharmacological methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Jun; Fernandez, Ana Z; Ziemann, Mark; Keating, Samuel T; Balcerczyk, Aneta; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic activities of protein methyltransferases serve to write covalent modifications on histone and non-histone proteins in the control of gene transcription. Here, we describe gene expression changes in human endothelial cells caused by treatment with methyltransferase inhibitors 7,7'-carbonylbis (azanediyl) bis(4-hydroxynaphthalene-2 -sulfonic acid (AMI-1) and disodium-2-(2,4,5,7- tetrabromo-3-oxido-6-oxoxanthen-9-yl) benzoate trihydrate (AMI-5). Deep sequencing of mRNA indicated robust change on transcription following AMI-5 treatment compared with AMI-1. Functional annotation analysis revealed that both compounds suppress the expression of genes associated with translational regulation, suggesting arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) could be associated with regulation of this pathway. Interestingly, AMI-5 but not AMI-1 was found to decrease methylation of H3 histones at lysine 4 and down-regulate gene expression associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathways. These results imply that inhibition of protein methylation by AMI-1 and AMI-5 can differentially regulate specific pathways with potential to interrupt pathological signaling in the vascular endothelium. PMID:24850797

  16. Hypomethylation of ERVs in the sperm of mice haploinsufficient for the histone methyltransferase Setdb1 correlates with a paternal effect on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Daxinger, Lucia; Oey, Harald; Isbel, Luke; Whitelaw, Nadia C; Youngson, Neil A; Spurling, Alex; Vonk, Kelly K D; Whitelaw, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The number of reports of paternal epigenetic influences on the phenotype of offspring in rodents is increasing but the molecular events involved remain unclear. Here, we show that haploinsufficiency for the histone 3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Setdb1 in the sire can influence the coat colour phenotype of wild type offspring. This effect occurs when the allele that directly drives coat colour is inherited from the dam, inferring that the effect involves an "in trans" step. The implication of this finding is that epigenetic state of the sperm can alter the expression of genes inherited on the maternally derived chromosomes. Whole genome bisulphite sequencing revealed that Setdb1 mutant mice show DNA hypomethylation at specific classes of transposable elements in the sperm. Our results identify Setdb1 as a paternal effect gene in the mouse and suggest that epigenetic inheritance may be more likely in individuals with altered levels of epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27112447

  17. Hypomethylation of ERVs in the sperm of mice haploinsufficient for the histone methyltransferase Setdb1 correlates with a paternal effect on phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Daxinger, Lucia; Oey, Harald; Isbel, Luke; Whitelaw, Nadia C.; Youngson, Neil A.; Spurling, Alex; Vonk, Kelly K. D.; Whitelaw, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The number of reports of paternal epigenetic influences on the phenotype of offspring in rodents is increasing but the molecular events involved remain unclear. Here, we show that haploinsufficiency for the histone 3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Setdb1 in the sire can influence the coat colour phenotype of wild type offspring. This effect occurs when the allele that directly drives coat colour is inherited from the dam, inferring that the effect involves an “in trans” step. The implication of this finding is that epigenetic state of the sperm can alter the expression of genes inherited on the maternally derived chromosomes. Whole genome bisulphite sequencing revealed that Setdb1 mutant mice show DNA hypomethylation at specific classes of transposable elements in the sperm. Our results identify Setdb1 as a paternal effect gene in the mouse and suggest that epigenetic inheritance may be more likely in individuals with altered levels of epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27112447

  18. Sustainability of dams-an evaluation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, E.

    2003-04-01

    Situated in the stream bed of a river, dams and reservoirs interrupt the natural hydrological cycle. They are very sensitive to all kinds of changes in the catchment, among others global impacts on land use, climate, settlement structures or living standards. Vice versa dams strongly affect the spatially distributed, complex system of ecology, economy and society in the catchment both up- and downstream of the reservoir. The occurrence of negative impacts due to large dams led to serious conflicts about future dams. Nevertheless, water shortages due to climatic conditions and their changes, that are faced by enormous water and energy demands due to rising living standards of a growing world population, seem to require further dam construction, even if both supply and demand management are optimised. Although environmental impact assessments are compulsory for dams financed by any of the international funding agencies, it has to be assumed that the projects lack sustainability. Starting from an inventory of today's environmental impact assessments as an integral part of a feasibility study the presentation will identify their inadequacies with regard to the sustainability of dams. To improve the sustainability of future dams and avoid the mistakes of the past, the planning procedures for dams have to be adapted. The highly complex and dynamical system of interrelated physical and non-physical processes, that involves many different groups of stakeholders, constitutes the need for a model-oriented decision support system. In line with the report of the World Commission of Dams an integrated analysis and structure of the complex interrelations between dams, ecology, economy and society will be presented. Thus the system, that a respective tool will be based on, is analysed. Furthermore an outlook will be given on the needs of the potential users of a DSS and how it has to be embedded in the overall planning process. The limits of computer-based decision-support in the

  19. The role of dams in development.

    PubMed

    Altinbilek, Doğan

    2002-01-01

    Dams are a major issue in sustainable management of finite water resources; they have also become the subject of vigorous public debate. This article considers them in the light of the report of the World Commission on Dams and using the example of Turkey. It is argued that economic development and population growth, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions, make plain the need for dams for hydropower and irrigation. Environmental impact assessment is essential, as are effective programmes for resettlement to avoid the impoverishment of displaced people. PMID:12019817

  20. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  1. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding. PMID:26004863

  2. Role of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, E. A.; Simakov, M. B.; Mal'Ko, I. L.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Gontareva, N. B.

    With the use of high performance liquid chromatography the products of abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides in solid films were indentified and estimated quantitatively. The main products of photosynthesis appeared to be adenosine and deoxyadenosine monophosphates. Maximal yield of these products in case of adenosine has been 0.36 for 5'AMP, 0.41% for 2'(3')AMP, 0.20 for 2'3'cAMP in case of deoxyadenosine 0.13% for 5'dAMP, 0.15% for 3'dAMP, 0.24% for 3'5'cdAMP. The destruction of initial adenosine and deoxyadenosine by the end of the experiment was 10 and 15%, respectively. By the increasing of irradiation dose, 5'AMP and 5'dAMP synthesized in the cource of VUV photolysis were destructed up to adenine, its yield being 15% in both cases.

  3. Glutamate Synthase: Properties of the Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.; Larimore, Fred

    1974-01-01

    A reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent glutamate synthase has been detected and partially purified from crude extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme is specific for NADH, glutamine, and α-ketoglutarate (Km values of 2.6 μM, 1.0 mM, and 140 μM, respectively) and has a pH optimum between 7.1 and 7.7. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been determined as 2 mol of glutamate synthesized per mol of glutamine consumed. Glutamate synthase can be distinguished from either of the glutamate dehydrogenases of yeast on the basis of its substrate requirements and behavior during agarose gel and ion exchange chromatography. Variations in the specific activity of glutamate synthase, which occur in response to changes in the growth medium, are similar in character to those observed with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent (anabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:4362465

  4. Trapping efficiency of three types check dams experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui-Kai; CHEN, Su-Chin; AN, Hsuan-Pei

    2015-04-01

    The check dams constructed to trap debris flow. This study divide check dams into three types as closed-type check dam, slit dam, and modular steel check dam. Closed-type check dam which can trap all kind of sediment or driftwood. Slit check dam is permeable dam, so it can prevent from depositing all of sediment or driftwood. A modular steel check dam improves the existing hard-to-change disadvantages of slit dam structure. The assembling of longitudinal and transverse beams can be constructed independently, and then it could be freely configured to form a flexibly adjustable modular steel check dam. This study used the laws of geometric similitude to design model of dam. To explore the trapping mechanisms and phenomenon in different dismantle transverse beams conditions and compared the trapping efficiency with different type of check dams. This study used different volume ratio with driftwood and sediment. In order to capture the trace of debris flow and calculate accuracy velocity of debris flow the study used several high-speed photography combining the method of 3D Remodeling from Motion Structure with Multi-View Stereo which constructed with multiple photos of overlapping coefficient at least 70% and established three-dimensional system of coordinate in laboratory experiment. As a result, the driftwood deposition rate of modular steel check dam increase 60% than slit dam and 40% than closed-type dam; the debris deposition rate increase 30% than slit dam. In addition, the increment of driftwood volume ratio led to the increment of trapping efficiency of three type of check dams. Meanwhile slit dam is the most effective type in trapping driftwood and sediment with more than 50% of increased rate, because of more driftwood flow through the slit dam jam together easily. Finally, transverse beams which installed the modular steel check dam can suppress the upward movement of driftwood, therefore driftwood can easily form the arched stacking efficiency with

  5. 8. WEST DAM, LOOKING DUE NORTH OVER TOP OF WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST DAM, LOOKING DUE NORTH OVER TOP OF WEST DAM, SHOWING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OUTLET TO RIGHT OF DAM, NEW PUMP PLANT BUILDING AND CANAL TO LEFT OF DAM. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  6. 46. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1933. VIEW OF DAM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1933. VIEW OF DAM AND FOREBAY. NOTE ALL WATER FLOWING THROUGH FOREBAY AND OUT EITHER TAILRACE OR SLUICE GATE (INSTEAD OF OVER DAM) BECAUSE OF LOW WATER FLOW. (Courtesy of the Potomac Edison Company Library (Hagerstown, MD), Historical Data Files, Dam No. 5 listing - Dam No. 5 Hydroelectric Plant, On Potomac River, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, WV

  7. 53. AVALON DAM Photographic copy of historic photo, August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. AVALON DAM - Photographic copy of historic photo, August 9, 1893 (original print located at the Carlsbad Irrigation District offices, Carlsbad, New Mexico) photographer unknown 'EDDY DAM. LOOKING EAST.' VIEW OF COLLAPSED DAM - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  8. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Five Point Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 12 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. 8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. 9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  12. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. PMID:26596516

  13. MICROCALORIMETRIC STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF MAGNESIUM COMPLEXES OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, J. P.; Sari, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Values for the thermodynamic quantities (ΔF, ΔH, ΔS) in reactions in which complexes of adenine nucleotides with magnesium ion (ATPMg--, ADPMg-, AMPMg) are formed have been obtained by a microcalorimetric technique by using an isothermic Calvet's apparatus. Experimental values measured at ionic strength μ = 0.2 indicate that complex formation reactions are driven by the entropic factor and that stability of complexes increases with length of the phosphate chain. PMID:5261047

  14. Synthesis of metal-adeninate frameworks with high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Nan; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    By introducing isophthalic acid or 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid to assemble with adenine and cadmium salt, two isostructural and anionic porous metal-organic frameworks (1 and 2) possessing the novel (4,8)-connected sqc topology are presented here. 1 shows permanent porosity with Langmuir surface area of 770.1 m2/g and exhibits high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons.

  15. Femtosecond decay dynamics of intact adenine and thymine base pairs in a supersonic jet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Joon; Chang, Jinyoung; Kim, Hyung Min; Kang, Hyuk; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Heo, Jiyoung; Kim, Seong Keun

    2011-07-11

    We investigated the decay dynamics of the DNA base pairs adenine-adenine (A(2)), adenine-thymine (AT), and thymine-thymine (T(2)) produced in a supersonic jet by femtosecond (fs) time-resolved photoionization spectroscopy. The base pair was excited by a fs pump pulse at 267 nm and the population change of its excited state was monitored by non-resonant three-photon ionization using a fs probe pulse at 800 nm after a certain time delay. All of the transients recorded in the mass channel of the parent ion exhibited a tri-exponential decay, with time constants ranging from 100 fs to longer than 100 ps. Most of these time constants coincide well with the previous values deduced indirectly from the transients of protonated adenine (AH(+)) and thymine (TH(+)), which were assumed to be produced by fragmentation of the base-pair ions. Notably, for the transient of T(2), we observed a new decay component with a time constant of 2.3 ps, which was absent in the transient of TH(+). We suggest that the new decay component arises from the decay of stacked T(2) dimers that are mostly ionized to T(2)(+), whereas the decay signal recorded in the mass channel of TH(+) is merely from the relaxation of hydrogen-bonded T(2) dimers. From the amplitude of the new decay component, the population of the stacked T(2) dimers relative to the hydrogen-bonded dimers was estimated to be ∼2 % in the supersonic jet, which is about fifteen times higher than the theoretical value. PMID:21710523

  16. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine. PMID:25245205

  17. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  18. Functional Linkage of Adenine Nucleotide Binding Sites in Mammalian Muscle 6-Phosphofructokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Brüser, Antje; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Kloos, Marco; Sträter, Norbert; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    6-Phosphofructokinases (Pfk) are homo- and heterooligomeric, allosteric enzymes that catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps of the glycolysis: the phosphorylation of fructose 6-phosphate at position 1. Pfk activity is modulated by a number of regulators including adenine nucleotides. Recent crystal structures from eukaryotic Pfk revealed several adenine nucleotide binding sites. Herein, we determined the functional relevance of two adenine nucleotide binding sites through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme kinetic studies. Subsequent characterization of Pfk mutants allowed the identification of the activating (AMP, ADP) and inhibitory (ATP, ADP) allosteric binding sites. Mutation of one binding site reciprocally influenced the allosteric regulation through nucleotides interacting with the other binding site. Such reciprocal linkage between the activating and inhibitory binding sites is in agreement with current models of allosteric enzyme regulation. Because the allosteric nucleotide binding sites in eukaryotic Pfk did not evolve from prokaryotic ancestors, reciprocal linkage of functionally opposed allosteric binding sites must have developed independently in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Pfk (convergent evolution). PMID:22474333

  19. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-10-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids. PMID:25985129

  20. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  1. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  2. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  3. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  4. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids. PMID:15737999

  6. Chemical evolution: The mechanism of the formation of adenine under prebiotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjani; Najafian, Katayoun; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental building blocks of life have been detected extraterrestrially, even in interstellar space, and are known to form nonenzymatically. Thus, the HCN pentamer, adenine (a base present in DNA and RNA), was first isolated in abiogenic experiments from an aqueous solution of ammonia and HCN in 1960. Although many variations of the reaction conditions giving adenine have been reported since then, the mechanistic details remain unexplored. Our predictions are based on extensive computations of sequences of reaction steps along several possible mechanistic routes. H2O- or NH3-catalyzed pathways are more favorable than uncatalyzed neutral or anionic alternatives, and they may well have been the major source of adenine on primitive earth. Our report provides a more detailed understanding of some of the chemical processes involved in chemical evolution, and a partial answer to the fundamental question of molecular biogenesis. Our investigation should trigger similar explorations of the detailed mechanisms of the abiotic formation of the remaining nucleic acid bases and other biologically relevant molecules. PMID:17951429

  7. ESTIMATION OF NAVIGATION - DAM DISCHARGE IN ILLINOIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques were used to estimate discharge for the Brandon Road Dam on the Des Plaines River and the Dresden Island, Marseilles, and Starved Rock Dams on the Illinois River in northern Illinois. Tainter gates are operated to regulate streamflow at all dams. Additionally, headgates are used for regulation of the Brandon Road Dam. Stage-discharge, gate-opening relations were developed from a total of 91 discharge measurements that range from 198 to 86,400 cubic feet per second (5. 6 to 2,450 cubic meters per second). Values for discharge coefficients, in equations that express discharge as a function of tailwater depth, headwater depth, and vertical height of gate opening, were determined for conditions of free-orifice, submerged-orifice, free-weir, and submerged-weir flow past a tainter gate.

  8. 76 FR 34799 - Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN AGENCY... various alternatives for permanent modifications to the existing dam facilities at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun... embankments at four (Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar) dams. These measures included raising...

  9. 33 CFR 208.19 - Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Texas. In the interest of flood control, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) shall operate the Marshall Ford Dam and... (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Texas. 208.19 Section 208.19 Navigation and Navigable...

  10. Earthquake-dammed lakes in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.

    1981-05-01

    Eleven small lakes were formed by landslides caused by the 1929 Buller earthquake; four others were formed by other historic earthquakes in New Zealand. At least nine other New Zealand lakes are also dammed by landslides and were probably formed by prehistoric earthquakes. When recognized by morphology, synchronous age, and areal distribution, earthquake-dammed lakes could provide an estimate of paleoseismicity for the past few hundred or thousand years.

  11. Stability of the Zhitomir cellular buttress dam

    SciTech Connect

    Zeryukov, V.I.; Karlin, S.I.

    1985-05-01

    This paper reports on the results of inspections of the Zhitomir dam, which show that during its 15-year operation the negligible cracks that have appeared have not affected the strength of the structure. This confirms the main theoretical and construction decisions made in planning the dam. Secondly, to improve monitoring of the conditions of hydraulic structures in general, the authors recommend that they be equipped with measuring instruments such as height markers and piezometers.

  12. Leibis/Lichte Dam in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnel, Markus

    In Thuringia the second highest dam of Germany is under construction (figure 1). The new Leibis/Lichte dam is a 370 m long and 102.5 m high gravity dam of concrete with straight axis. With the completion of the Leibis/Lichte dam in 2005 more than 300.000 inhabitants of the Eastern Regions of Thuringia will be supplied with high quality drinking water. The foundation rocks at the dam site are exclusively greyish-blue argillaceous schist, silt schist and cleaved fine sandstones from the Ordovician period (phycode schist). The main joint system consists of three differently orientated joints. Geomechanically of main interest is the shallow dipping bedding, especially in the left abutment because of its downhill dip. The other joints show a generally steep dip. Wide extending faults with thick mylonites or fractured zones, which could influence the foundation of the dam, do not exist within the dam site. The engineering geological field mapping of the foundation surface confirms the rock mass parameters. The excavation works are carried out in four different stages to avoid loosening of the foundation rock. Great care is taken to assure that the foundation rock is protected against weathering. Based on the results of preliminary investigations the foundation level was planned in a depth of 4 to14 m. The abutments of the dam correspond to the expectations. Predominantly the argillaceous rock shows a low permeability. The permeability is exclusively linked to faults respectively few large joints. In order to prevent seepage and to reduce the uplift pressure, a grout curtain in two rows is arranged with a depth of 5 to 44 metres.

  13. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João P. T.; Nabeshima, Henrique S.; da Costa, Marcello F.; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr2+ promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+ of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4dbnd C5 and C6dbnd O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310 cm-1 was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  14. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  15. Global phosphorus retention by river damming.

    PubMed

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H; Powley, Helen R; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-12-22

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y(-1), or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions. PMID:26644553

  16. Global phosphorus retention by river damming

    PubMed Central

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T.; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H.; Powley, Helen R.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y−1, or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions. PMID:26644553

  17. Floodplain Hyporheic Response under Dam Release Hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ward, A. S.; O'Connor, B. L.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydropower operations cause altered hydrograph patterns downstream of dams, which regulates the direction and magnitude of floodplain and riverbed hyporheic flux. Periodic adjustments in river stage changes temporal and spatial patterns in hydraulic pressure, initiates propagation of lateral and vertical hyporheic flux, and affects the riparian ecological system by changing the hyporheic penetration distance, hyporheic flux rate, and thermal conditions in river banks. While this issue has been largely neglected by watershed scientists and managers, there is the potential to use hyporheic metrics in setting dam release rules and restoring downstream river reaches. In order to evaluate the hyporheic feedbacks of various dam release patterns, this study applied a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the interaction of open water hydrographs on porous media lateral hyporheic exchange for the Green River, Utah, downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam. The CFD initially represented the river as a straight channel with a thick porous media extending from the channel banks and bottom. The dam release hydrographs changed the patterns of hyporheic flux at the river banks, the penetration distance of the hyporheic flux, the subsurface thermal patterns, and the residence time of water in the subsurface. The results suggest the undulating river stage downstream of dam releases can initiate patterns of hyporheic exchange similar to those induced by restoration of river bed morphology.

  18. Distributional Impacts of Large Dams in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.

    2010-12-01

    Dams on a river are believed to have heterogeneous impacts to the upstream, local and downstream areas. Generally, irrigation dams will bring benefits to the downstream by facilitating more irrigation, while it will bring negative impacts to upstream due to inundation or no impact to local area as a combination result of population dislocation and economic benefits. This paper checked the impacts of large dams (above 100 meters) on the upstream, downstream and local area, using 2000-2008 county level data in China. Robust heterogeneous impacts of different categories of dams (mainly dams serving for irrigation, hydropower, or other purposes) were found on different areas, using IV regression approaches. Dams higher than 100 meters are significantly and heterogeneously impacting agricultural production, urban employment and rural per capita income. Its beneficial impact on agriculture production is significant for downstream especially in continuous drought years. But its impacts on social welfare indicators, such as primary school enrollment and hospital beds, are not heterogeneously different across regions.

  19. Uplift investigations at Tillery Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, M.; Booth, P.; Auger, S.

    1995-12-31

    Tillery Dam is located approximately 50 miles east of Charlotte, North Carolina, on the Pee Dee River. Construction of the project was completed in 1928 and, beginning from the east side of the project, it consists of a powerhouse and intake section and east nonoverflow section totaling 618 feet long with a maximum height of 98.5 feet above the rock foundation. The concrete spillway is 758 feet long with 18 34-foot-wide by 24-foot-high tainter gates mounted on a 62-foot-high ogee section with a concrete stilling basin. The west nonoverflow section is 176 feet long. The west end of the project consists of a 1,200-foot-long earth embankment with a maximum height of 77 feet above the cut-off trench that extends to rock. Carolina Power & Light (CP&L) owns the project and operates the facility in accordance with its license issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). In 1990, during the review of a safety inspection report submitted by CP&L and its consultant, FERC made several comments concerning the concrete gravity and embankment structures.

  20. Hydraulics of embankment-dam breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, J. S.; Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Godt, J. W.; Solovitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    Constructed or natural earthen dams can pose hazards to downstream communities. Experiments to date on earthen-dam breaching have focused on dam geometries relevant to engineering practice. We have begun experiments with dam geometries more like those of natural dams. Water was impounded behind dams constructed at the downstream end of the USGS debris-flow flume. Dams were made of compacted, well-sorted, moist beach sand (D50=0.21 mm), 3.5 m from toe to toe, but varying in height from 0.5 to 1 m; the lower the dam, the smaller the reservoir volume and the broader the initially flat crest. Breaching was started by cutting a slot 30-40 mm wide and deep in the dam crest after filling the reservoir. Water level and pore pressure within the dam were monitored. Experiments were also recorded by an array of still- and video cameras above the flume and a submerged video camera pointed at the upstream dam face. Photogrammetric software was used to create DEMs from stereo pairs, and particle-image velocimetry was used to compute the surface-velocity field from the motion of tracers scattered on the water surface. As noted by others, breaching involves formation and migration of a knickpoint (or several). Once the knickpoint reaches the upstream dam face, it takes on an arcuate form whose continued migration we determined by measuring the onset of motion of colored markers on the dam face. The arcuate feature, which can be considered the head of the "breach channel", is nearly coincident with the transition from subcritical to supercritical flow; that is, it acts as a weir that hydraulically controls reservoir emptying. Photogenic slope failures farther downstream, although the morphologically dominant process at work, play no role at all in hydraulic control aside from rare instances in which they extend upstream so far as to perturb the weir, where the flow cross section is nearly self-similar through time. The domain downstream of the critical-flow section does influence

  1. Dam failure analysis for the Lago de Matrullas Dam, Orocovis, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Sierra, Heriberto; Gómez-Fragoso, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Results from the simulated dam failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam using the HEC–RAS model for the 6- and 24-hour PMP events showed peak discharges at the dam of 3,149.33 and 3,604.70 m3/s, respectively. Dam failure during the 100-year-recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event resulted in a peak discharge of 2,103.12 m3/s directly downstream from the dam. Dam failure under sunny day conditions produced a peak discharge of 1,695.91 m3/s at the dam assuming the antecedent lake level was at the morning-glory spillway invert elevation. Flood-inundation maps prepared as part of the study depict the flood extent and provide valuable information for preparing an Emergency Action Plan. Results of the failure analysis indicate that a failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam could cause flooding to many of the inhabited areas along stream banks from the Lago de Matrullas Dam to the mouth of the Río Grande de Manatí. Among the areas most affected are the low-lying regions in the vicinity of the towns of Ciales, Manatí, and Barceloneta. The delineation of the flood boundaries near the town of Barceloneta considered the effects of a levee constructed during 2000 at Barceloneta in the flood plain of the Río Grande de Manatí to provide protection against flooding to the near-by low-lying populated areas. The results showed overtopping can be expected in the aforementioned levee during 6- and 24-hour probable-maximum-precipitation dam failure scenarios. No overtopping of the levee was simulated, however, during dam failure scenarios under the 100-year recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event or sunny day conditions.

  2. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  3. Benzo(A)pyrene induced glycine N-methyltransferase messenger rna expression in Fundulus heteroclitus embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a mediator in the methionine and folate cycles, and is responsible for the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to glycine forming S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sarcosine. All the known DNA methyltransferases use SAM as a methyl donor th...

  4. West Nile virus methyltransferase domain interacts with protein kinase G

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The flaviviral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is a phosphoprotein, though the precise identities and roles of many specific phosphorylations remain unknown. Protein kinase G (PKG), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, has previously been shown to phosphorylate dengue virus NS5. Methods We used mass spectrometry to specifically identify NS5 phosphosites. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to study protein-protein interactions. Effects on viral replication were measured via replicon system and plaque assay titering. Results We identified multiple sites in West Nile virus (WNV) NS5 that are phosphorylated during a WNV infection, and showed that the N-terminal methyltransferase domain of WNV NS5 can be specifically phosphorylated by PKG in vitro. Expressing PKG in cell culture led to an enhancement of WNV viral production. We hypothesized this effect on replication could be caused by factors beyond the specific phosphorylations of NS5. Here we show for the first time that PKG is also able to stably interact with a viral substrate, WNV NS5, in cell culture and in vitro. While the mosquito-borne WNV NS5 interacted with PKG, tick-borne Langat virus NS5 did not. The methyltransferase domain of NS5 is able to mediate the interaction between NS5 and PKG, and mutating positive residues in the αE region of the methyltransferase interrupts the interaction. These same mutations completely inhibited WNV replication. Conclusions PKG is not required for WNV replication, but does make a stable interaction with NS5. While the consequence of the NS5:PKG interaction when it occurs is unclear, mutational data demonstrates that this interaction occurs in a region of NS5 that is otherwise necessary for replication. Overall, the results identify an interaction between virus and a cellular kinase and suggest a role for a host kinase in enhancing flaviviral replication. PMID:23876037

  5. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Moon, Hong S; Kapteyn, Jeremy; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Stewart, Neal C.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  6. Functional Identification of Triterpene Methyltransferases from Botryococcus braunii Race B*

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Tom D.; Kinison, Scott; Okada, Shigeru; Yeo, Yun-soo; Bell, Stephen A.; Cui, Ping; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Chappell, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii race B is a colony-forming, green algae that accumulates triterpene oils in excess of 30% of its dry weight. The composition of the triterpene oils is dominated by dimethylated to tetramethylated forms of botryococcene and squalene. Although unusual mechanisms for the biosynthesis of botryococcene and squalene were recently described, the enzyme(s) responsible for decorating these triterpene scaffolds with methyl substituents were unknown. A transcriptome of B. braunii was screened computationally assuming that the triterpene methyltransferases (TMTs) might resemble the S-adenosyl methionine-dependent enzymes described for methylating the side chain of sterols. Six sterol methyltransferase-like genes were isolated and functionally characterized. Three of these genes when co-expressed in yeast with complementary squalene synthase or botryococcene synthase expression cassettes resulted in the accumulation of mono- and dimethylated forms of both triterpene scaffolds. Surprisingly, TMT-1 and TMT-2 exhibited preference for squalene as the methyl acceptor substrate, whereas TMT-3 showed a striking preference for botryococcene as its methyl acceptor substrate. These in vivo preferences were confirmed with in vitro assays utilizing microsomal preparations from yeast overexpressing the respective genes, which encode for membrane-associated enzymes. Structural examination of the in vivo yeast generated mono- and dimethylated products by NMR identified terminal carbons, C-3 and C-22/C-20, as the atomic acceptor sites for the methyl additions to squalene and botryococcene, respectively. These sites are identical to those previously reported for the triterpenes extracted from the algae. The availability of closely related triterpene methyltransferases exhibiting distinct substrate selectivity and successive catalytic activities provides important tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the specificities exhibited by these unique

  7. Multimethylation of Rickettsia OmpB Catalyzed by Lysine Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Abeykoon, Amila; Wang, Guanghui; Chao, Chien-Chung; Chock, P. Boon; Gucek, Marjan; Ching, Wei-Mei; Yang, David C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of rickettsial OmpB (outer membrane protein B) has been implicated in bacterial virulence. Rickettsial methyltransferases RP789 and RP027-028 are the first biochemically characterized methyltransferases to catalyze methylation of outer membrane protein (OMP). Methylation in OMP remains poorly understood. Using semiquantitative integrated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, we characterize methylation of (i) recombinantly expressed fragments of Rickettsia typhi OmpB exposed in vitro to trimethyltransferases of Rickettsia prowazekii RP027-028 and of R. typhi RT0101 and to monomethyltransferases of R. prowazekii RP789 and of R. typhi RT0776, and (ii) native OmpBs purified from R. typhi and R. prowazekii strains Breinl, RP22, and Madrid E. We found that in vitro trimethylation occurs at relatively specific locations in OmpB with consensus motifs, KX(G/A/V/I)N and KT(I/L/F), whereas monomethylation is pervasive throughout OmpB. Native OmpB from virulent R. typhi contains mono- and trimethyllysines at locations well correlated with methylation in recombinant OmpB catalyzed by methyltransferases in vitro. Native OmpBs from highly virulent R. prowazekii strains Breinl and RP22 contain multiple clusters of trimethyllysine in contrast to a single cluster in OmpB from mildly virulent R. typhi. Furthermore, OmpB from the avirulent strain Madrid E contains mostly monomethyllysine and no trimethyllysine. The native OmpB from Madrid E was minimally trimethylated by RT0101 or RP027-028, consistent with a processive mechanism of trimethylation. This study provides the first in-depth characterization of methylation of an OMP at the molecular level and may lead to uncovering the link between OmpB methylation and rickettsial virulence. PMID:24497633

  8. DNA Methyltransferase Accessibility Protocol for Individual Templates by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Russell P.; Nabilsi, Nancy H.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Riva, Alberto; Kladde, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    A single-molecule probe of chromatin structure can uncover dynamic chromatin states and rare epigenetic variants of biological importance that bulk measures of chromatin structure miss. In bisulfite genomic sequencing, each sequenced clone records the methylation status of multiple sites on an individual molecule of DNA. An exogenous DNA methyltransferase can thus be used to image nucleosomes and other protein–DNA complexes. In this chapter, we describe the adaptation of this technique, termed Methylation Accessibility Protocol for individual templates, to modern high-throughput sequencing, which both simplifies the workflow and extends its utility. PMID:22929770

  9. Project Planning for Cougar Dam during 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haskell, Craig A.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Cougar Dam is a 158 m-tall, rock fill dam located about 63 km east of Springfield, Oregon. Completed in 1963, the dam is owned and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). It impounds Cougar Reservoir, which is 9.7 km long, has a surface area of 518 ha, and is predominately used for flood control. The pool elevation typically ranges from a maximum conservation pool of 515 m (1,690 ft) National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD) in summer to a minimum flood control elevation of 467 m (1,532 ft NGVD) in winter. The reservoir thermally stratifies in the summer, has an average depth of 37 m, and holds 153,500 acre-feet when full. Cougar Dam is located on the South Fork of the McKenzie River 7 km upstream from the mainstem McKenzie River, a tributary of the Willamette River. The McKenzie River Basin basin supports the largest remaining population of wild spawning spring Chinook salmon in the Willamette River Basin (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; NOAA, 2008). Cougar Dam and others were collectively deemed to cause jeopardy to the sustainability of anadromous fish stocks in the Willamette River Basin (NOAA, 2008). Prior to dam construction, as many as 805 redds were observed in the South Fork of the McKenzie River (Willis and others, 1960) and it is estimated that 40 km of spawning habitat were lost when access was blocked after dam construction. The 2008 Willamette Biological Opinion (BIOP) requires improvements to operations and structures to reduce impacts on Upper Willamette River (UWR) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and UWR steelhead (O. mykiss; NOAA, 2008). In 2010, an adult fish collection facility was completed below Cougar Dam to collect returning adult salmon for transport to spawning habitats above the dam. Before that time, returning adult spring Chinook salmon were transported to upstream spawning areas as part of a trap-and-haul program with adults passed ranging annually from 0 to 1,038 (Taylor, 2000). The progeny of

  10. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... of Dam Structures: Combination of Concrete Floodwalls and Earthen Embankments, will protect the four... Watts Bar). TVA also installed a permanent concrete apron on approximately 2 acres of the downstream...--Permanent Modifications of Dam Structures: Combination of Concrete Floodwalls and Earthen Embankments....

  11. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenyu; Chory, Emma J.; Wernimont, Amy K.; Tempel, Wolfram; Scopton, Alex; Federation, Alexander; Marineau, Jason J.; Qi, Jun; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Yi, Joanna; Marcellus, Richard; Iacob, Roxana E.; Engen, John R.; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Wienholds, Erno; Li, Fengling; Pineda, Javier; Estiu, Guillermina; Shatseva, Tatiana; Hajian, Taraneh; Al-awar, Rima; Dick, John E.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bradner, James E.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  12. Electrochemical Assay for the Signal-on Detection of Human DNA Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to detect human DNA methyltransferases are needed, given that aberrant methylation by these enzymes is associated with cancer initiation and progression. Here we describe a non-radioactive, antibody-free, electrochemical assay in which methyltransferase activity on DNA-modified electrodes confers protection from restriction for signal-on detection. We implement this assay with a multiplexed chip platform and show robust detection of both bacterial (SssI) and human (Dnmt1) methyltransferase activity. Essential to work with human methyltransferases, our unique assay design allows activity measurements on both unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA substrates. We validate this assay by comparison with a conventional radioactive method. The advantages of electrochemistry over radioactivity and fluorescence make this assay an accessible and promising new approach for the sensitive, label-free detection of human methyltransferase activity. PMID:24164112

  13. Crystal structure of tRNA m(1)A58 methyltransferase TrmI from Aquifex aeolicus in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Ishii, Ryohei; Matsuno, Michiyo; Si, Shu-Yi; Katsura, Kazushige; Ushikoshi-Nakayama, Ryoko; Shibata, Rie; Shirouzu, Mikako; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    The N (1)-methyladenosine residue at position 58 of tRNA is found in the three domains of life, and contributes to the stability of the three-dimensional L-shaped tRNA structure. In thermophilic bacteria, this modification is important for thermal adaptation, and is catalyzed by the tRNA m(1)A58 methyltransferase TrmI, using S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. We present the 2.2 Å crystal structure of TrmI from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with AdoMet. There are four molecules per asymmetric unit, and they form a tetramer. Based on a comparison of the AdoMet binding mode of A. aeolicus TrmI to those of the Thermus thermophilus and Pyrococcus abyssi TrmIs, we discuss their similarities and differences. Although the binding modes to the N6 amino group of the adenine moiety of AdoMet are similar, using the side chains of acidic residues as well as hydrogen bonds, the positions of the amino acid residues involved in binding are diverse among the TrmIs from A. aeolicus, T. thermophilus, and P. abyssi. PMID:24894648

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the DNA methyltransferase, M.CviBIII, from Chlorella virus NC-1A.

    PubMed Central

    Narva, K E; Wendell, D L; Skrdla, M P; Van Etten, J L

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the DNA methyltransferase, M.CviBIII, from Chlorella virus NC-1A was cloned and expressed in E. coli plasmid pUC8. Plasmid (pNC-1A.14.8) encoded M.CviBIII methylates adenine in TCGA sequences both in vivo in E. coli and in vitro. Transposon Tn5 mutagenesis localized the M.CviBIII functional domain to a 1.5 kbp region of pNC-1A.14.8 and also indicated that a virus promoter directs transcription of the gene in E. coli. The 2.1 kbp insert containing the M.CviBIII gene was sequenced and a single open reading frame of 1131 bp was identified within the domain determined by Tn5 mutagenesis. When the M.CviBIII gene was fused in-frame with the 19 amino-terminal codons of lacZ a 45 kD polypeptide was identified in maxicells as predicted by the DNA sequence. The M.CviBIII gene was not essential for virus replication since a virus M.CviBIII deletion mutant also replicated in Chlorella. Images PMID:3320956

  15. Marmot Dam Removal: Predictions and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Orr, B. K.; Wilcox, A.; Vick, J.; Podolak, C.; Wilcox, P.

    2008-12-01

    The 14-m tall Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon was removed in the summer of 2007, allowing the approximately 730,000 cubic meters of sand and gravel to remain in the river for natural erosion by the flow. Pre-dam removal studies included sediment transport modeling that simulated several dam removal alternatives and provided key pieces of information that allowed a diverse stakeholder group to unanimously agree on the "blow-and-go" alternative, allowing a large amount of sediment to be released to a major salmonid-bearing river in the Columbia River basin. Although it is still too early to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the model performance because morphological responses in the downstream reaches, if any, are likely years away, observations to date (one year after dam removal) indicate that model predictions are generally accurate. Here we present some of the key findings of pre-dam-removal sediment transport modeling predictions and compare them with post-removal observations.

  16. Redox Control of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) Activity.

    PubMed

    Morales, Yalemi; Nitzel, Damon V; Price, Owen M; Gui, Shanying; Li, Jun; Qu, Jun; Hevel, Joan M

    2015-06-12

    Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) correlate with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. ADMA is generated by the catabolism of proteins methylated on arginine residues by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. Reports have shown that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity is down-regulated and PRMT1 protein expression is up-regulated under oxidative stress conditions, leading many to conclude that ADMA accumulation occurs via increased synthesis by PRMTs and decreased degradation. However, we now report that the methyltransferase activity of PRMT1, the major PRMT isoform in humans, is impaired under oxidative conditions. Oxidized PRMT1 displays decreased activity, which can be rescued by reduction. This oxidation event involves one or more cysteine residues that become oxidized to sulfenic acid (-SOH). We demonstrate a hydrogen peroxide concentration-dependent inhibition of PRMT1 activity that is readily reversed under physiological H2O2 concentrations. Our results challenge the unilateral view that increased PRMT1 expression necessarily results in increased ADMA synthesis and demonstrate that enzymatic activity can be regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. PMID:25911106

  17. The histone methyltransferase MMSET regulates class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Pei, Huadong; Wu, Xiaosheng; Liu, Tongzheng; Yu, Kefei; Jelinek, Diane F; Lou, Zhenkun

    2013-01-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a genetic disease with characteristic facial features and developmental disorders. Of interest, loss of the MMSET gene (also known as WHSC1) is considered to be responsible for the core phenotypes of this disease. Patients with WHS also display Ab deficiency, although the underlying cause of this deficiency is unclear. Recent studies suggest that the histone methyltransferase activity of MMSET plays an important role in the DNA damage response by facilitating the recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage. We hypothesize that MMSET also regulates class switch recombination (CSR) through its effect on 53BP1. In this study, we show that MMSET indeed plays an important role in CSR through its histone methyltransferase activity. Knocking down MMSET expression impaired 53BP1 recruitment as well as the germline transcription of the Igh switch regions, resulting in defective CSR but no effect on cell growth and viability. These results suggest that defective CSR caused by MMSET deficiency could be a cause of Ab deficiency in WHS patients. PMID:23241889

  18. In Vitro Assay to Measure Phosphatidylethanolamine Methyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases are biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the transfer of one or more methyl group(s) from S-adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine, monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, or dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine to give either monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine. These enzymes are ubiquitous in animal cells, fungi, and are also found in approximately 10% of bacteria. They fulfill various important functions in cell physiology beyond their direct role in lipid metabolism such as in insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cell growth, or virulence. The present manuscript reports on a simple cell-free enzymatic assay that measures the transfer of tritiated methyl group(s) from S-[Methyl-(3)H]adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine using whole cell extracts as an enzyme source. The resulting methylated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine are hydrophobic and thus, can be separated from water soluble S-[Methyl-(3)H]adenosyl-L-methionine by organic extraction. This assay can potentially be applied to any other cell types and used to test inhibitors/drugs specific to a phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase of interest without the need to purify the enzyme. PMID:26780155

  19. Lipid substrate specificity of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    The ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila forms about 60% of its phosphatidylcholine by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine with S-adenosylmethionine using the enzyme phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Analogues of ethanolamine or of ethanolamine phosphate are incorporated into the phospholipids of Tetrahymena when cells are cultured in their presence. These compounds, 3-amino-1-propanol, 2-aminoethylphosphonate, 3-aminopropylphosphonate and N,N-dimethylaminoethylphosphonate replace from 50 to 75% of the ethanolamine phosphate in phosphatidylethanolamine. However, analysis of the phospholipids of lipid-altered Tetrahymena showed that none of the phosphatidylethanolamine analogues had been converted to the corresponding phosphatidylcholine analogue. No incorration of (/sup 14/C-CH/sub 3/)methionine into the phosphatidylcholine analogues could be demonstrated in vivo, nor was label from (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)S-adenosylmethionine incorporated in virto. Thus, only phosphatidylethanolamine and its monomethyl and dimethyl derivatives have been found to be substrates for the phosphatidylethanoiamine N-methyltransferase. The enzyme therefore requires a phospholipid substrate containing an ester linkage between the alkylamine and phosphorus, with the amino group required to be ..beta.. to the alcohol.

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase decreases levodopa toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Offen, D; Panet, H; Galili-Mosberg, R; Melamed, E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 3-O-methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) on the toxicity of levodopa in neuronal cultures. High concentrations of levodopa are toxic in vitro. Therefore, there is concern that long-term treatment with levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease might accelerate the rate of degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons. However, recent studies have suggested that, while levodopa is harmful in vitro, it may not be toxic in vivo. A possible defense mechanism is by means of metabolic shunting of levodopa excess to 3-O-methyldopa by COMT in peripheral and central nervous system tissues. In this study we examine whether the use of COMT inhibitor, which reduced the levels of 3-O-methyldopa, affect levodopa toxicity. Mice cerebellar granule neurons, PC12, and neuroblastoma cells were used, and their viability following exposure to levodopa and COMT with and without tolcapone, a COMT inhibitor, was measured by neutral red staining. Auto-oxidation of levodopa was evaluated using a spectrophotometer (690 nm). We found that 3-O-methyldopa, unlike levodopa, was not toxic to all cells examined. Addition of purified COMT to levodopa prevented its auto-oxidation and markedly attenuated its cytotoxicity in vitro. Additional tolcapone reversed the protective effect of COMT. The agent 3-O-methyldopa is not toxic to cell cultures. Catechol-O-methyltransferase attenuates toxicity of levodopa in vitro by its metabolism to nontoxic 3-O-methyldopa. PMID:11290879

  1. Purification of phospholipid methyltransferase from rat liver microsomal fraction.

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, M A; Villalba, M; Mato, J M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid methyltransferase, the enzyme that converts phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine with S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor, was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver microsomal fraction. When analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis only one protein, with molecular mass about 50 kDa, is detected. This protein could be phosphorylated at a single site by incubation with [alpha-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. A less-purified preparation of the enzyme is mainly composed of two proteins, with molecular masses about 50 kDa and 25 kDa, the 50 kDa form being phosphorylated at the same site as the homogeneous enzyme. After purification of both proteins by electro-elution, the 25 kDa protein forms a dimer and migrates on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with molecular mass about 50 kDa. Peptide maps of purified 25 kDa and 50 kDa proteins are identical, indicating that both proteins are formed by the same polypeptide chain(s). It is concluded that rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase can exist in two forms, as a monomer of 25 kDa and as a dimer of 50 kDa. The dimer can be phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3800912

  2. In Vitro Assay to Measure Phosphatidylethanolamine Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases are biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the transfer of one or more methyl group(s) from S-adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine, monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, or dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine to give either monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine. These enzymes are ubiquitous in animal cells, fungi, and are also found in approximately 10% of bacteria. They fulfill various important functions in cell physiology beyond their direct role in lipid metabolism such as in insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cell growth, or virulence. The present manuscript reports on a simple cell-free enzymatic assay that measures the transfer of tritiated methyl group(s) from S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine using whole cell extracts as an enzyme source. The resulting methylated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine are hydrophobic and thus, can be separated from water soluble S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine by organic extraction. This assay can potentially be applied to any other cell types and used to test inhibitors/drugs specific to a phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase of interest without the need to purify the enzyme. PMID:26780155

  3. Biological evaluation of tanshindiols as EZH2 histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jimin; Kim, Hyun-Young; Byun, Byung Jin; Chae, Chong-Hak; Lee, Ji Young; Ryu, Shi Yong; Park, Woo-Kyu; Cho, Heeyeong; Choi, Gildon

    2014-06-01

    EZH2 is the core subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2 catalyzing the methylation of histone H3 lysine-27 and closely involved in tumorigenesis. To discover small molecule inhibitors for EZH2 methyltransferase activity, we performed an inhibitor screen with catalytically active EZH2 protein complex and identified tanshindiols as EZH2 inhibitors. Tanshindiol B and C potently inhibited the methyltransferase activity in in vitro enzymatic assay with IC50 values of 0.52μM and 0.55μM, respectively. Tanshindiol C exhibited growth inhibition of several cancer cells including Pfeiffer cell line, a diffuse large B cell lymphoma harboring EZH2 A677G activating mutation. Tanshindiol treatment in Pfeiffer cells significantly decreased the tri-methylated form of histone H3 lysine-27, a substrate of EZH2, as revealed by Western blot analysis and histone methylation ELISA. Based on enzyme kinetics and docking studies, we propose that tanshindiol-mediated inhibition of EZH2 activity is competitive for the substrate S-adenosylmethionine. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that tanshindiols possess a unique anti-cancer activity whose mechanism involves the inhibition of EZH2 activity and would provide chemically valuable information for designing a new class of potent EZH2 inhibitors. PMID:24767850

  4. Diamidine Compounds for Selective Inhibition of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification critical for a variety of biological processes. Misregulation of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has been linked to many pathological conditions. Most current PRMT inhibitors display limited specificity and selectivity, indiscriminately targeting many methyltransferase enzymes that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a cofactor. Here we report diamidine compounds for specific inhibition of PRMT1, the primary type I enzyme. Docking, molecular dynamics, and MM/PBSA analysis together with biochemical assays were conducted to understand the binding modes of these inhibitors and the molecular basis of selective inhibition for PRMT1. Our data suggest that 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan (1, furamidine, DB75), one leading inhibitor, targets the enzyme active site and is primarily competitive with the substrate and noncompetitive toward the cofactor. Furthermore, cellular studies revealed that 1 is cell membrane permeable and effectively inhibits intracellular PRMT1 activity and blocks cell proliferation in leukemia cell lines with different genetic lesions. PMID:24564570

  5. 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue, is a probe of base flipping by DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kongsheng; Matsika, Spiridoula; Stanley, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are formed between adjacent pyrimidines in DNA when it absorbs ultraviolet light. CPDs can be directly repaired by DNA photolyase (PL) in the presence of visible light. How PL recognizes and binds its substrate is still not well understood. Fluorescent nucleic acid base analogues are powerful probes of DNA structure. We have used the fluorescent adenine analogue 6MAP, a pteridone, to probe the local double helical structure of the CPD substrate when bound by photolyase. Duplex melting temperatures were obtained by both UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies to ascertain the effect of the probe and the CPD on DNA stability. Steady-state fluorescence measurements of 6MAP-containing single-stranded and doubled-stranded oligos with and without protein show that the local region around the CPD is significantly disrupted. 6MAP shows a different quenching pattern compared to 2-aminopurine, another important adenine analogue, although both probes show that the structure of the complementary strand opposing the 5'-side of the CPD lesion is more destacked than that opposing the 3'-side in substrate/protein complexes. We also show that 6MAP/CPD duplexes are substrates for PL. Vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moment directions for 6MAP were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. Using these results, the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency between the individual adenine analogues and the oxidized flavin cofactor was calculated to account for the observed intensity pattern. These calculations suggest that energy transfer is highly efficient for the 6MAP probe and less so for the 2Ap probe. However, no experimental evidence for this process was observed in the steady-state emission spectra. PMID:17696385

  6. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  7. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-08-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  8. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  9. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  10. The Remains of the Dam: What Have We Learned From 10 Years of Dam Removals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G. E.; O'Connor, J. E.; Major, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 10 years in the U.S., dam removal has evolved from an occasionally implemented, rarely studied, and poorly understood intervention to improve rivers, to a much more frequently accomplished and better studied and understood approach to river restoration. Over that same time period, the numbers and sizes of dams and volumes of sediment released have dramatically increased. By some estimates close to 1000 dams have been removed over the last 100 years, with most of those occurring within the last 10. While most of these are small (less than 15 m high) dams, removals of dams up to 70 m high are presently underway. Releases of sediment associated with these removals over the past 10 years have also increased by close to four orders of magnitude; for example removal of the Elwha River dams in Washington is estimated to release almost 107 m3 of sediment into the lower Elwha River. Given a decade's worth of dam removals and, in some cases, well-orchestrated case studies of the effects of removal on the geomorphology and (to a lesser extent) ecology of rivers, what have we learned? More specifically, where do we now stand with respect to being able to predict the consequences of future dam removals? Drawing on both field examples and numerical models of dam removals in the western U.S., several key lessons stand out. Although every dam removal and river are different, removals initiate very rapid upstream river response and reservoir erosion and evacuation of sediment by various mechanisms that are strongly controlled by grain size of the deposit, volumes of residual sediment relative to total reservoir volume, and style of dam removal (instantaneous versus staged). Erosion of sediment accumulations in fully and partially filled (by sediment) reservoirs proceeds by different trajectories and rates, with full reservoirs releasing sediment primarily by upstream knickpoint retreat while erosion and sediment release in partially-filled reservoirs proceeds by

  11. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  12. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  13. Design of tailing dam using red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Subrat; Sahoo, Tapaswini; Das, Sarat

    2013-06-01

    Red mud, waste industrial product from aluminum industries produced approximately 75 million tonnes every year with less than half of this is used. Storage of this unutilized red mud takes vast tracts of usable land and pollutes, land, air and water. Construction of high embankments, under passes, flyovers, tailing dams uses vast tract of natural resources (top soil) is also matter of concern as its takes thousands of years to form the natural soil. This paper discusses use of red mud for construction of tailing dam based on laboratory findings and finite element analysis. The geotechnical properties such as plasticity, compaction, permeability, shear strength characteristics and dispersion of red mud are presented. Stability and seepage analysis of tailing dams as per finite element analysis using the above geotechnical parameters is presented.

  14. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  15. Sample preparation workflow for the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based analysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate cofactors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ortmayr, Karin; Nocon, Justyna; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2014-08-01

    The accurate quantification of the highly unstable intracellular cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in its oxidized and reduced forms demands a thorough evaluation of the analytical workflow and dedicated methods reflecting their solution chemistry as well as the biological importance of their ratio. In this work, we present a workflow for the analysis of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in the yeast Pichia pastoris, including hot aqueous extraction, chromatographic separation in reversed-phase conditions employing a 100% wettable stationary phase, and subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A thorough evaluation and optimization of the sample preparation procedure resulted in excellent biological repeatabilities (on average <10%, N = 3) without employing an internal standardization approach. As a consequence, the methodology proved to be appropriate for the relative assessment of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in different P. pastoris strains. The ratio of reduced versus oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was significantly higher in an engineered strain overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase than in the corresponding wildtype strain. Interestingly, a difference was also observed in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate pool size, which was significantly higher in the wildtype than in the modified strain. PMID:24841212

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent.

    PubMed

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-25

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]⋅SO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes. PMID:25150436

  19. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  20. Comparative Study between Transcriptionally- and Translationally-Acting Adenine Riboswitches Reveals Key Differences in Riboswitch Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Simon; Heppell, Benoit; Bastet, Laurène; St-Pierre, Patrick; Massé, Eric; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic). While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21283784

  1. Water-quality study of proposed reregulation dam downstream of Wolf Creek Dam, Cumberland River, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the application of an unsteady, one-dimensional water-quality model to the Cumberland River below Wolf Creek Dam, Kentucky. A hydropower upgrade of Wolf Creek Dam and construction of a reregulation dam, located approximately 10 miles below Wolf Creek Dam, are under consideration. Simulations were conducted under unreregulated conditions and projected conditions following impoundment to provide information concerning the effect of the reregulation dam on water quality in the Cumberland River. Under the conditions simulated, the reregulation dam was predicted to have little impact on temporally averaged water temperatures or dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Temporal variations in water temperatures were retarded under reregulation conditions.

  2. Safety Goals for High-Hazard Dams: Are Dams Too Safe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lave, Lester B.; Resendiz-Carrillo, Daniel; McMichael, Francis C.

    1990-07-01

    The 1977 National Dam Inspection Program determined that many high-hazard dams in the United States were incapable of passing a probable maximum flood (PMF). Retrofitting these dams was estimated to cost at least $10 billion. Since the PMF is revised upward periodically, retrofit is a continual issue. But surviving a PMF is a more stringent safety criterion than preventing other sources of dam failure; in addition, it is more stringent than safety criteria for other structures with respect to wind, earthquakes, or storm surges. This higher safety goal has large social costs. We propose an alternative safety goal, separating property damage from possible loss of lives. For a proposed dam whose failure could cause large loss of life or property damage, a careful evaluation should be done as to whether the dam should be built. For dams that impose smaller hazards, property damage should be handled by an analysis based on expected values of annualized benefits and costs. An adjustment for scale could be used if the property damage were extremely large. Danger to lives should be handled by establishing programs to warn and evacuate people. Our proposal should (1) lead to less injury and death, (2) use society's limited resources more efficiently, and (3) put the determination of safety goals on a more scientific and sensible basis.

  3. International small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks to avoid dam failure flood disasters in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Dam, Tuyet Thi; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne L.

    2015-12-01

    In developing countries small dam failure disasters are common yet research on their dam safety management is lacking. This paper reviews available small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks from international literature, synthesises them for applicability in developing countries, and provides example application through a case study of Vietnam. Generic models from 'minimum' to 'best' practice (Pisaniello, 1997) are synthesised with the World Bank's 'essential' and 'desirable' elements (Bradlow et al., 2002) leading to novel policy analysis and design criteria for developing countries. The case study involved 22 on-site dam surveys finding micro level physical and management inadequacies that indicates macro dam safety management policy performs far below the minimum benchmark in Vietnam. Moving assurance policy towards 'best practice' is necessary to improve the safety of Vietnam's considerable number of hazardous dams to acceptable community standards, but firstly achieving 'minimum practice' per the developed guidance is essential. The policy analysis/design process provides an exemplar for other developing countries to follow for avoiding dam failure flood disasters.

  4. Analysis of deformations of large earth dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak-Chrzanowski, Anna; Massiéra, Michel; Chrzanowski, Adam

    2007-09-01

    Safety of earth dams depends on the proper design, construction, and monitoring of actual behaviour during the construction and during the operation of the structure. The most critical factor in the assessment of the safety threshold value of any structure is the acceleration of its deformation. Therefore, the designed accuracy of monitoring surveys must fulfill requirements of detecting accelerations at critical locations of the investigated object. As an example, time dependant behavior of a large embankment dam during filling up the reservoir has been analyzed and verified by comparing monitoring results with the deterministic (prediction) model of the deformation. The geotechnical and geodetic monitoring besides providing a warning system in case of an abnormal behaviour of the dam, may be used as a tool for a verification of design parameters where geotechnical parameters are of the highest importance. Modeling of deformation of earth dams is a complex process in which one should consider the nonlinear behaviour of the construction material, interaction between the structure and the underlying foundation strata, influence of water load on the structure and on the foundation bedrock, and the effects of water saturation. Due to the uncertainty of the model parameters, careful monitoring of the dam and its surroundings are required in order to verify and enhance the model. In addition, with properly designed monitoring surveys, one may also determine the actual deformation mechanism. The finite element method may be useful tool in the proper design of the monitoring scheme by providing information on the locations and magnitude of the expected maximum displacements and velocites of movements. The discussed problems are illustrated by three types of earth dams located in California, U.S.A. and in Quebec, Canada.

  5. Dam failure analysis for the Lago de Matrullas Dam, Orocovis, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Sierra, Heriberto; Gómez-Fragoso, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Results from the simulated dam failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam using the HEC–RAS model for the 6- and 24-hour PMP events showed peak discharges at the dam of 3,149.33 and 3,604.70 m3/s, respectively. Dam failure during the 100-year-recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event resulted in a peak discharge of 2,103.12 m3/s directly downstream from the dam. Dam failure under sunny day conditions produced a peak discharge of 1,695.91 m3/s at the dam assuming the antecedent lake level was at the morning-glory spillway invert elevation. Flood-inundation maps prepared as part of the study depict the flood extent and provide valuable information for preparing an Emergency Action Plan. Results of the failure analysis indicate that a failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam could cause flooding to many of the inhabited areas along stream banks from the Lago de Matrullas Dam to the mouth of the Río Grande de Manatí. Among the areas most affected are the low-lying regions in the vicinity of the towns of Ciales, Manatí, and Barceloneta. The delineation of the flood boundaries near the town of Barceloneta considered the effects of a levee constructed during 2000 at Barceloneta in the flood plain of the Río Grande de Manatí to provide protection against flooding to the near-by low-lying populated areas. The results showed overtopping can be expected in the aforementioned levee during 6- and 2

  6. Optimizing the dammed: water supply losses and fish habitat gains from dam removal in California.

    PubMed

    Null, Sarah E; Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Lent, Michelle; Lund, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    Dams provide water supply, flood protection, and hydropower generation benefits, but also harm native species by altering the natural flow regime and degrading aquatic and riparian habitat. Restoring some rivers reaches to free-flowing conditions may restore substantial environmental benefits, but at some economic cost. This study uses a systems analysis approach to preliminarily evaluate removing rim dams in California's Central Valley to highlight promising habitat and unpromising economic use tradeoffs for water supply and hydropower. CALVIN, an economic-engineering optimization model, is used to evaluate water storage and scarcity from removing dams. A warm and dry climate model for a 30-year period centered at 2085, and a population growth scenario for year 2050 water demands represent future conditions. Tradeoffs between hydropower generation and water scarcity to urban, agricultural, and instream flow requirements were compared with additional river kilometers of habitat accessible to anadromous fish species following dam removal. Results show that existing infrastructure is most beneficial if operated as a system (ignoring many current institutional constraints). Removing all rim dams is not beneficial for California, but a subset of existing dams are potentially promising candidates for removal from an optimized water supply and free-flowing river perspective. Removing individual dams decreases statewide delivered water by 0-2282 million cubic meters and provides access to 0 to 3200 km of salmonid habitat upstream of dams. The method described here can help prioritize dam removal, although more detailed, project-specific studies also are needed. Similarly, improving environmental protection can come at substantially lower economic cost, when evaluated and operated as a system. PMID:24594701

  7. Mammalian WTAP is a regulatory subunit of the RNA N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xiao-Li; Sun, Bao-Fa; Wang, Lu; Xiao, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Wen-Jia; Adhikari, Samir; Shi, Yue; Lv, Ying; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Xu; Li, Ang; Yang, Ying; Dahal, Ujwal; Lou, Xiao-Min; Liu, Xi; Huang, Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Cheng, Tao; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xinquan; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2014-02-01

    The methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3)-containing methyltransferase complex catalyzes the N6-methyladenosine (m6A) formation, a novel epitranscriptomic marker; however, the nature of this complex remains largely unknown. Here we report two new components of the human m6A methyltransferase complex, Wilms' tumor 1-associating protein (WTAP) and methyltransferase like 14 (METTL14). WTAP interacts with METTL3 and METTL14, and is required for their localization into nuclear speckles enriched with pre-mRNA processing factors and for catalytic activity of the m6A methyltransferase in vivo. The majority of RNAs bound by WTAP and METTL3 in vivo represent mRNAs containing the consensus m6A motif. In the absence of WTAP, the RNA-binding capability of METTL3 is strongly reduced, suggesting that WTAP may function to regulate recruitment of the m6A methyltransferase complex to mRNA targets. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses in combination with photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) illustrate that WTAP and METTL3 regulate expression and alternative splicing of genes involved in transcription and RNA processing. Morpholino-mediated knockdown targeting WTAP and/or METTL3 in zebrafish embryos caused tissue differentiation defects and increased apoptosis. These findings provide strong evidence that WTAP may function as a regulatory subunit in the m6A methyltransferase complex and play a critical role in epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. PMID:24407421

  8. Mammalian WTAP is a regulatory subunit of the RNA N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xiao-Li; Sun, Bao-Fa; Wang, Lu; Xiao, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Wen-Jia; Adhikari, Samir; Shi, Yue; Lv, Ying; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Xu; Li, Ang; Yang, Ying; Dahal, Ujwal; Lou, Xiao-Min; Liu, Xi; Huang, Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Cheng, Tao; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xinquan; Danielsen, Jannie M Rendtlew; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2014-01-01

    The methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3)-containing methyltransferase complex catalyzes the N6-methyladenosine (m6A) formation, a novel epitranscriptomic marker; however, the nature of this complex remains largely unknown. Here we report two new components of the human m6A methyltransferase complex, Wilms' tumor 1-associating protein (WTAP) and methyltransferase like 14 (METTL14). WTAP interacts with METTL3 and METTL14, and is required for their localization into nuclear speckles enriched with pre-mRNA processing factors and for catalytic activity of the m6A methyltransferase in vivo. The majority of RNAs bound by WTAP and METTL3 in vivo represent mRNAs containing the consensus m6A motif. In the absence of WTAP, the RNA-binding capability of METTL3 is strongly reduced, suggesting that WTAP may function to regulate recruitment of the m6A methyltransferase complex to mRNA targets. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses in combination with photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) illustrate that WTAP and METTL3 regulate expression and alternative splicing of genes involved in transcription and RNA processing. Morpholino-mediated knockdown targeting WTAP and/or METTL3 in zebrafish embryos caused tissue differentiation defects and increased apoptosis. These findings provide strong evidence that WTAP may function as a regulatory subunit in the m6A methyltransferase complex and play a critical role in epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. PMID:24407421

  9. Hydroelectric dams need billions for rehab

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F.H.; Soast, A.

    1993-01-11

    Many of the Corps of Engineers older hydroelectric dams will require major rehabilitation over the next ten years. Preventive maintenance, repair work, and major rehabilitation of the Corp's hydro dams in inadequate because the revenue generated by sales of electricity, by law, is returned to the Treasury. Most multimillion dollar rehabilitation projects require specific approval for funding by Congress and securing it is a long and difficult process. It is hoped the funding problem will soon be addressed by the Clinton administration. Already, nearly one-sixth of the 2,154 Mw of hydro is unavailable because with hydro units are either out of service or operating at less than full capacity.

  10. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jason; Meyers, Amy

    2014-12-31

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  11. 1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION OF INTAKE ON EAST SIDE OF DAM - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  12. 93. DAM ROLLER GATE PIER SECTION AND ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. DAM - ROLLER GATE PIER - SECTION AND ELEVATION (ML-8-40/3-FS) June 1935 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  13. 96. DAM PILE SPACING PIER 4 TO PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. DAM - PILE SPACING - PIER 4 TO PIER 9 INCLUSIVE (ML-8-40/6-FS) June 1935 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  14. 1. OVERALL VIEW SHOWING FACE OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW SHOWING FACE OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM AND FISH LADDER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST (UPSTREAM) FROM SNORE OPPOSITE FISH LADDER - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  15. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF STEPPED CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF STEPPED CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ROCK OUTCROPPING, WITH LAKE IN BACKGROUND, SHOWN AT MINIMUM WATER FLOW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  16. 11. VIEW OF HOCK OUTCROPPING, CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF HOCK OUTCROPPING, CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND LAKE WITH TUNNEL INLET STRUCTURE IN DISTANCE, SHOWN AT MINIMUM WATER FLOW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  17. 5. GORGE HIGH DAM; LOOKING TOWARD INTAKE WITH WATER FLOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GORGE HIGH DAM; LOOKING TOWARD INTAKE WITH WATER FLOWING OVER THE TOP OF THE SPILLGATE, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  18. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWWATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE AND ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  19. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF TOE SPILLWAY SECTION OF LOWWATER DAM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF TOE SPILLWAY SECTION OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST (UPSTREAM). ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  20. 27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under construction. Part of construction camp housing is visible in foreground. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 7. CLOSEUP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, THREE BEARS LAKE, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  2. 7. VIEW OF WEST END OF THE SPILLWAY, DAM 357, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WEST END OF THE SPILLWAY, DAM 357, SHOWING ORIGINAL FIELD-STONE WEIR WALL AND CONCRETE BUTTRESSING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 357, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  3. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 326, SHOWING ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 326, SHOWING ORIGINAL FIELD-STONE WEIR WALL BENEATH CONCRETE BUTTRESSING, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 326, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  4. 19. View of low crib dam, headworks, and tramway above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of low crib dam, headworks, and tramway above dam, looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  5. 15. DETAIL FROM NORTH END OF DAM, SHOWING TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL FROM NORTH END OF DAM, SHOWING TOP OF NORTHERNMOST BUTTRESS, END OF CONCRETE WALK ATOP NORTH EMBANKMENT, AND THE ROCK CREEK RESERVOIR BEYOND. - Rock Creek Dam, East end of Rock Creek Road, Auburn, Placer County, CA

  6. 2. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR UNDER CONSTRUCTION LOOKING WEST WITH EAST DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR UNDER CONSTRUCTION LOOKING WEST WITH EAST DAM IN MIDDLE GROUND, WEST DAM IN DISTANCE. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  7. 9. VIEW OF DAM FROM LEFT SIDE. PUMPCRETE PIPE LINES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF DAM FROM LEFT SIDE. PUMPCRETE PIPE LINES ARE CARRIED ON WALKWAY. UPSTREAM PARTS OF BUTTRESSES ARE FOG-SPRAYED TO PERMIT PROMPT FILLING OF CONTRACTION JOINTS. July 30, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement storage shed is at center right. Photographer unknown, September 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 15. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF DAM SITE SHOWING SPILLWAY OGEE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF DAM SITE SHOWING SPILLWAY OGEE SECTION AND SPILLWAY APRON EXCAVATION IN FOREGROUND.... Volume XVIII, No. 10, January 18, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF DAM SITE SHOWING OUTLET WORKS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF DAM SITE SHOWING OUTLET WORKS AND DIVERSION CHANNEL IN FOREGROUND.... Volume XVIII, No. 9, March 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  11. 6. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION VIEW ALONG AXIS OF DAM FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION VIEW ALONG AXIS OF DAM FROM THE EAST ABUTMENT.... Volume XVII, No. 18, December 18, 1939. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN FOREGROUND, LOCK IN BACKGROUND ON NORTH RIVER BANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  13. 3. POOL, DAM, AND INTAKE TO PIPELINE LEADING TO FISH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. POOL, DAM, AND INTAKE TO PIPELINE LEADING TO FISH WHEEL, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. View of powerhouse and dam from third floor of original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of powerhouse and dam from third floor of original section of Langdale Cotton Mill, looking northeast - Langdale Cotton Mill, Powerhouse & Dam, 5910 Nineteenth Avenue, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  15. GENERAL AERIAL VIEW OF LAKE ALDWELL AND ELWHA DAM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL AERIAL VIEW OF LAKE ALDWELL AND ELWHA DAM AND POWERHOUSE, WITH STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA TO THE NORTH. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Elwha Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  16. CONVENTIONAL OVERVIEW OF RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX TO WEST OF DAM, TAINTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONVENTIONAL OVERVIEW OF RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX TO WEST OF DAM, TAINTER GATES, AND SPILLWAYS WITH LIGHT STANDARD ON EAST ABUTMENT. JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  17. AERIAL PHOTO OF ELWHA RIVER, SPILLWAYS AT GLINES DAM, POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL PHOTO OF ELWHA RIVER, SPILLWAYS AT GLINES DAM, POWERHOUSE, SURGE TANK AND TRANSFORMER YARD WITH HISTORIC SHED (WAREHOUSE). PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  18. GENERAL AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, AT GLINES DAM AND POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, AT GLINES DAM AND POWERHOUSE, LAKE MILLS RESERVOIR, AND THE ELWHA RIVER. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  19. GENERAL AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTH OF ELWHA DAM AND POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL AERIAL VIEW TO SOUTH OF ELWHA DAM AND POWERHOUSE WITH NORTH END OF RESERVOIR. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Elwha Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  20. INTAKE, DAMS #1, #2, AND #3, AND FOOTBRIDGE; FACING NORTHNORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTAKE, DAMS #1, #2, AND #3, AND FOOTBRIDGE; FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST - Shoshone Falls Hydroelectric Project, Intake, North Bank of Snake River, immediately West/Northwest of the Shoshone Falls Hydroelectric Project Dam No. 1, Tipperary Corner, Jerome County, ID

  1. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing into high line. June, 1917. R.B.D." - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  3. 17. Credit PED. View of power house and dam from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Credit PED. View of power house and dam from operator's house, looking toward Maryland. Note the absence of transformers adjacent to power house. Photo c. 1910. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  4. View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam and Lake Sabrina from east ridge showing spillway at photo center, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  5. View of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the wooden planks along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam showing the wooden planks along the upstream side face and the spillway at the right center of photo, view north - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  6. View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing redwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Lake Sabrina Dam showing redwood planks and boulders in Lake Sabrina Basin, view north - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  7. View of Lake Sabrina Dam upstream face from ridge showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam upstream face from ridge showing spillway at lower right of photo, view southwest - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  8. Swan Lake Dam: a study in cost saving

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    The construction of the dam for the Swan Lake hydroelectric project in Alaska is discussed. The hydro project was built for an estimated $4.3 million less than conventional hydro dams of this scope. The project highlights are given.

  9. 34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE TOWERS, WEST SPILLWAY CHANNEL AND DECORATIVE EAGLES ALL CLEARLY VISIBLE, c. 1928 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  10. 45. Reinforcement work to buttresses at Pleasant Dam. Support work ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Reinforcement work to buttresses at Pleasant Dam. Support work for roadway and roadway visible. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: Huber Collection. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. View of Read Sawmill masonry dam, site of submerged sawmill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Read Sawmill masonry dam, site of submerged sawmill remains and earthen dam, facing north - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  13. 12. VIEW SHOWING THE CLOSING OF THE GATES OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW SHOWING THE CLOSING OF THE GATES OF DAM 341 ON APRIL 15, 1936, THE DAY THEY BEGAN FLOODING THE MARSHES - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 341, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  14. 29. VIEW NORTHWEST ON SHELTON SIDE OF DAM DURING DEWATERING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW NORTHWEST ON SHELTON SIDE OF DAM DURING DEWATERING. SHELTON GATEHOUSE IN LEFT CENTER. - Ousatonic Water Power Company, Dam & Canals, CT Routes 34 & 108, 1 mile North of Derby-Shelton Bridge, Derby, New Haven County, CT

  15. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the westernmost extend of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake and part of Grand Coulee Dam, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  16. View of downstream face of Grand Coulee Dam (from just ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of downstream face of Grand Coulee Dam (from just below No. 3 Powerhouse), looking southwest. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  17. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  18. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast from the Pumping Plant. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  19. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  20. Detail of downstream face of dam showing water being discharged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of downstream face of dam showing water being discharged through diversion tube. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  1. 5. VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATE PIERS, TAINTER GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATE PIERS, TAINTER GATE NO. 1, AND SERVICE BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (DOWNSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River Nine-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 25, Cap au Gris, Lincoln County, MO

  2. 4. VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATE PIERS, TAINTER GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATE PIERS, TAINTER GATE NO. 1 SERVICE BRIDGE, AND LOCOMOTIVE CRANE, LOOKING NORTHEAST (UPSTREAM) - Upper Mississippi River Nine-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 25, Cap au Gris, Lincoln County, MO

  3. 5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM AND POWER HOUSE, LOOKING UPSTREAM TO SOUTH FROM THE A MOUND OF DEBRIS ABOUT THIRTY TO FORTY FEET ABOVE THE RIVER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  4. 32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the dam blends into its environment. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. 3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  6. 1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  7. 4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. 2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  9. 10. DETAIL OF NONOVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING PENSTOCK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF NON-OVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING PENSTOCK OF SUBMERSIBLE TURBINE-GENERATOR - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  10. 3. Side view of upper dam overspill, taken from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Side view of upper dam overspill, taken from east bank of Millstone Creek. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  11. 1. East side of lower dam shown with water level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. East side of lower dam shown with water level dropped. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  12. 4. Side of view of upper dam overspill, taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Side of view of upper dam overspill, taken from west bank of Millstone Creek, VIEW EAST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  13. 5. View of upper dam side sluice taken from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of upper dam side sluice taken from east bank of Millstone Creek. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  14. 80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 5; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 78. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: DIMENSIONS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, SHEET 5; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 1. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FACE OF DAM AT RIGHT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FACE OF DAM AT RIGHT CENTER, HEADGATES AND CANAL AT LEFT - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  17. 3. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM AT LEFT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM AT LEFT CENTER, HEADGATE STRUCTURE AT CENTER - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  18. 2. VIEW EAST, WEST END OF DAM AT CENTER, HEADGATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST, WEST END OF DAM AT CENTER, HEADGATE OPERATING MECHANISMS AT LEFT - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  19. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 3; DECEMBER 20, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 23. INTAKE DIVERSION DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, FACING NORTHWEST AND DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INTAKE DIVERSION DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, FACING NORTHWEST AND DOWNSTREAM Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, September 17, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  2. 1. TEMPORARY POWER HOUSE AT ROOSEVELT DAM. TRAMWAY LINES CAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TEMPORARY POWER HOUSE AT ROOSEVELT DAM. TRAMWAY LINES CAN BE SEEN AT TOP OF PHOTOGRAPH Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, May 10, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  3. 21. THE WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION CAMP AT THE DIVERSION DAM, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. THE WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION CAMP AT THE DIVERSION DAM, FACING SOUTH. WOOD BURNING PLANT AT RIGHT, INTAKE GATES AT CENTER LEFT. Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, June 13, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  4. 1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and silt sluice gate (center), main canal headworks (to right), view to northwest - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  5. 2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, headworks overflow weir to center left, view to east - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  6. 1. SOUTH END AND EAST SIDE, SHOWING BONNEVILLE DAM POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH END AND EAST SIDE, SHOWING BONNEVILLE DAM POWERHOUSE IN BACKGROUND TO RIGHT - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  7. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING RIVER COBBLE PAVING (FOREGROUND) AND WINGWALL, LOOKING EAST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  8. 9. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING LOCATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING LOCATION OF FORMER CONCRETE FLASHBOARD STRUCTURE ON RIGHT, LOOKING WEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  9. 11. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING REFUGE HEADQUARTERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING REFUGE HEADQUARTERS ON THE HORIZON (LEFT, CENTER), LOOKING EAST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  10. 1. VIEW OF DAM 83, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM THE LOOKOUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DAM 83, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM THE LOOKOUT TOWER AT THE REFUGE HEADQUARTERS (see HAER No. ND-3-A-13 for comparison) - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  11. 22. VIEW SHOWING THE COMPLETED HORSE MESA DAM, EXCEPT FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW SHOWING THE COMPLETED HORSE MESA DAM, EXCEPT FOR TRANSFORMER EQUIPMENT BEING INSTALLED ABOVE THE POWER PLANT 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. 24. CLOSEUP VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM. HEFU PENSTOCK IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM. HEFU PENSTOCK IS AT CENTER RIGHT, AND LEFT (OR SOUTH) SPILLWAY CHUTE IS AT UPPER RIGHT - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 36. CROSS SECTIONAL VIEW OF ORIGINAL HORSE MESA DAM POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. CROSS SECTIONAL VIEW OF ORIGINAL HORSE MESA DAM POWER PLANT, LOOKING NORTH. ONLY TWO OF THE THREE UNITS ARE VISIBLE - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 23. VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM, SHOWING SPILLWAY DISCHARGE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM, SHOWING SPILLWAY DISCHARGE TUNNEL AT LEFT, RIGHT (OR NORTH) SPILLWAY, HEFU POWER UNIT, AND ORIGINAL POWER PLANT - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 20. HORSESHOE DAM LOOKING EAST WITH UPPER END DEMOLISHED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. HORSESHOE DAM LOOKING EAST WITH UPPER END DEMOLISHED FOR NEW SPILLWAY (negative reversed) - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  16. 7. ISLAND PLANT AND HORSESHOE DAM FROM WEST BANK (negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ISLAND PLANT AND HORSESHOE DAM FROM WEST BANK (negative reversed) - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  17. 94. DAM TAINTER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY METHOD OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. DAM - TAINTER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY - METHOD OF ATTACHING LIFTING CHAINS TO DRUMS OF HOIST - LAKESIDE TYPE (ML-4&5-55/34-FS), February 1938 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 4, Alma, Buffalo County, WI

  18. 1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  19. 2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  20. 70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are partially visible at far left. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice opening at center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 44. Reinforcement construction to Pleasant Dam. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Reinforcement construction to Pleasant Dam. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: Huber Collection, University of California, Berkeley, Water Resources Library. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. 60. Waddell Dam in relation and spillway tailrace. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Waddell Dam in relation and spillway tailrace. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. 77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at Frog Tanks on the Agua Fria River, Arizona. September 1903. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at center. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice opening. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at right. Photographer unknown, c. late 1920s. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 4. Aerial view of Whitsett intake (lower right), Parker Dam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Aerial view of Whitsett intake (lower right), Parker Dam and village (left), Gene Wash Reservoir, Gene Pump Plant and village (right). - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  12. 76. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION, SHEET 3; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 74. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: PLAN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: PLAN, SHEET 1, OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 77. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: CROSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: CROSS SECTIONS, SHEET 4; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 75. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: UPSTREAM ELEVATION, SHEET 2; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 79. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: REINFORCEMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: REINFORCEMENT, SHEET 6; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break as seen from upstream. Note original timber cribbing to left. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  18. 44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from downstream showing break closed and installation of new concrete cap piece under way. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  19. 2. VIEW EAST OF HEADGATES AT SPOOL DAM; DRAIN GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST OF HEADGATES AT SPOOL DAM; DRAIN GATE MECHANISM AND DAM EDGE AT RIGHT - Willimantic Linen Company, Mill No. 1, Immediately West of South Main Street, North Bank of Willimantic River, Windham, Windham County, CT

  20. 77 FR 50493 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of proposed extension. SUMMARY: The current Sam Rayburn Dam Project rate was... cost recovery criteria. In accordance with Southwestern's isolated project rate adjustment...

  1. Dams and transnational advocacy: Political opportunities in transnational collective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Teng

    Possible arguments to explain the gradual decline in big dam development and its site transferring from developed to developing countries include technical, economic, and political factors. This study focuses on the political argument---the rise of transnational anti-dam advocacy and its impact on state policy-making. Under what conditions does transnational anti-dam advocacy matter? Under what conditions does transnational advocacy change state dam policies (delay, scale down, or cancel)? It examines the role of transnational anti-dam actors in big dam building in a comparative context in Asia. Applying the social movement theory of political opportunity structure (POS) and using the qualitative case-study method, the study provides both within-case and cross-case analyses. Within-case analysis is utilized to explain the changing dynamics of big dam building in China (Three Gorges Dam and proposed Nu/Salween River dam projects), and to a lesser extent, Sardar Sarovar Project in India and Nam Theun 2 Dam in Laos. Different domestic and international POS (DPOS and IPOS) impact the strategies and outcomes of anti-dam advocacies in these countries. The degree of openness of the POS directly affects the capacity of transnational efforts in influencing state dam policies. The degree of openness or closure is measured by specific laws, institutions, discourse, or elite allies (or the absence of these) for the participation of non-state actors on big dam issues at a particular moment. This degree of openness is relative, varying over time, across countries and regions. This study finds that the impact of transnational anti-dam activism is most effective when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively open. Transnational anti-dam advocacy is least effective in influencing state dam policies when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively closed. Under a relatively open DPOS and closed IPOS, transnational anti-dam advocacy is more likely to successfully change state dam policies and even

  2. Time evolution of the Infrared Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L.; Rubio, L.; Camacho, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine was studied using a high-power CO2 pulsed laser ( λ=10.591 μm, τ FWHM=64 ns and fluences ranging from 25 to 70 J/cm2). The strong emission of the adenine and guanine plasma, collected using a high-resolution spectrometer, at medium-vacuum conditions (4 Pa) and at 1 mm from the target, exhibits excited molecular bands of CN (B2 Σ +-X2 Σ +) and excited neutral H and ionized N+ and C+. The medium-weak emission is due to excited species C2+, C3+, N, O, O+, O2+ and molecular band systems of C2(d3\\varPig{-}a3\\varPiu; D1\\varSigmau+{-}X1\\varSigmag+), OH(A2 Σ +-X2 Π), NH(A3 Π-X3 Σ -), CH(A2 Π-X2 Π), N2+(B2\\varSigmau+{-} X2\\varSigmag+) and N2(C3 Π u-B3 Π g). We focus our attention on the temporal evolution of different atomic/ionic and molecular species. The velocity distributions for various (different) species were obtained from time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Intensities of some lines from C+ were used for determining electron temperature and their Stark-broadened profiles were employed to estimate the temporal evolution of electron density.

  3. Quantitative investigation of the poly-adenine DNA dissociation from the surface of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weiwen; Wang, Lihua; Li, Jiang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Ziang; Shi, Jiye; Zuo, Xiaolei; Pan, Dun

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, poly adenine (polyA) DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) free of modifications was fabricated with high density of DNA attachment and high hybridization ability similar to those of its thiolated counterpart. This nanoconjugate utilized poly adenine as an anchoring block for binding with the AuNPs surface thereby facilitated the appended recognition block a better upright conformation for hybridization, demonstrating its great potential to be a tunable plasmonic biosensor. It’s one of the key points for any of the practical applications to maintaining stable conjugation between DNA oligonucleotides and gold nanoparticles under various experimental treatments. Thus, in this research, we designed a simple but sensitive fluorescence turn-on strategy to systematically investigate and quantified the dissociation of polyA DNA on gold nanoparticles in diverse experimental conditions. DNA desorbed spontaneously as a function of elevated temperature, ion strength, buffer pH, organic solvents and keeping time. What’s more, evaluating this conjugate stability as affected by the length of its polyA anchor was another crucial aspect in our study. With the improved understanding from these results, we were able to control some of our experimental conditions to maintain a good stability of this kind of polyA DNA-AuNPs nanoconjugates.

  4. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m6A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m6A residue in the center. The m6A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m6A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  5. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-09-23

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m(6)A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m(6)A residue in the center. The m(6)A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m(6)A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  6. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    PubMed Central

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (εΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs. PMID:26227585

  7. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  8. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  9. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features. PMID:27409976

  10. Theoretical study on the static and dynamic first-order hyperpolarisabilities of adenine tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Static and dynamic electronic and vibrational first-order hyperpolarisabilities (β) of the lowest energy neutral adenine tautomers (amine forms A7 and A9) were obtained in gaseous and aqueous phases by using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset second-order and fourth-order perturbation theory (MP2 and MP4-SDQ) and conventional and long-range corrected density functional theory methods with the Dunning's correlation-consistent cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ and d-aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Frequency-dependent properties were calculated at the characteristic wavelength of the Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) for the second harmonic generation and electro-optical Pockels effect nonlinear optical processes. Solvent effects were introduced under the polarised continuum model approximation. The electronic βe values of the investigated isomers are noticeably affected by the theoretical level, basis set and solvation. In vacuum, the static and dynamic βe values of A9 are greater than the corresponding data of A7, whereas the contribution of the solvent significantly enhances the hyperpolarisabilities of the A7 tautomer, resulting in βe(A9)/βe(A7) ratios between 0.5 and 0.6. The vibrational hyperpolarisabilities of the adenine tautomers are quite close to each other.

  11. Probing ultrafast dynamics in adenine with mid-UV four-wave mixing spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2011-08-11

    Heterodyne-detected transient grating (TG) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectroscopies are extended to the mid-UV spectral range in this investigation of photoinduced relaxation processes of adenine in aqueous solution. These experiments are the first to combine a new method for generating 25 fs laser pulses (at 263 nm) with the passive phase stability afforded by diffractive optics-based interferometry. We establish a set of conditions (e.g., laser power density, solute concentration) appropriate for the study of dynamics involving the neutral solute. Undesired solute photoionization is shown to take hold at higher peak powers of the laser pulses. Signatures of internal conversion and vibrational cooling dynamics are examined using TG measurements with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 350 at short delay times. In addition, 2DPE line shapes reveal correlations between excitation and emission frequencies in adenine, which reflect electronic and nuclear relaxation processes associated with particular tautomers. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of techniques that will hold many advantages for the study of biomolecules whose lowest-energy electronic resonances are found in the mid-UV (e.g., DNA bases, amino acids). PMID:21756005

  12. Severity of cardiomyopathy associated with adenine nucleotide translocator-1 deficiency correlates with mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; DuBiner, Lauren; Simon, Mariella; Zaragoza, Michael; Sengupta, Partho P; Li, Peng; Narula, Navneet; Dreike, Sandra; Platt, Julia; Procaccio, Vincent; Ortiz-González, Xilma R; Puffenberger, Erik G; Kelley, Richard I; Morton, D Holmes; Narula, Jagat; Wallace, Douglas C

    2013-02-26

    Mutations of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded mitochondrial proteins can cause cardiomyopathy associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, the cardiac phenotype of nuclear DNA mitochondrial mutations might be modulated by mtDNA variation. We studied a 13-generation Mennonite pedigree with autosomal recessive myopathy and cardiomyopathy due to an SLC25A4 frameshift null mutation (c.523delC, p.Q175RfsX38), which codes for the heart-muscle isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocator-1. Ten homozygous null (adenine nucleotide translocator-1(-/-)) patients monitored over a median of 6 years had a phenotype of progressive myocardial thickening, hyperalaninemia, lactic acidosis, exercise intolerance, and persistent adrenergic activation. Electrocardiography and echocardiography with velocity vector imaging revealed abnormal contractile mechanics, myocardial repolarization abnormalities, and impaired left ventricular relaxation. End-stage heart disease was characterized by massive, symmetric, concentric cardiac hypertrophy; widespread cardiomyocyte degeneration; overabundant and structurally abnormal mitochondria; extensive subendocardial interstitial fibrosis; and marked hypertrophy of arteriolar smooth muscle. Substantial variability in the progression and severity of heart disease segregated with maternal lineage, and sequencing of mtDNA from five maternal lineages revealed two major European haplogroups, U and H. Patients with the haplogroup U mtDNAs had more rapid and severe cardiomyopathy than those with haplogroup H. PMID:23401503

  13. Ultraviolet photolysis of adenine: Dissociation via the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} state

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Michael G. D.; Devine, Adam L.; Cronin, Brid; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2007-03-28

    High resolution total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra of the H atom fragments resulting from photodissociation of jet-cooled adenine molecules at 17 wavelengths in the range 280>{lambda}{sub phot}>214 nm are reported. TKER spectra obtained at {lambda}{sub phot}>233 nm display broad, isotropic profiles that peak at low TKER ({approx}1800 cm{sup -1}) and are largely insensitive to the choice of excitation wavelength. The bulk of these products is attributed to unintended multiphoton dissociation processes. TKER spectra recorded at {lambda}{sub phot}{<=}233 nm display additional fast structure, which is attributed to N{sub 9}-H bond fission on the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} potential energy surface (PES). Analysis of the kinetic energies and recoil anisotropies of the H atoms responsible for the fast structure suggests excitation to two {sup 1}{pi}{pi}{sup *} excited states (the {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}B{sub b} states) at {lambda}{sub phot}{approx}230 nm, both of which dissociate to yield H atoms together with ground state adeninyl fragments by radiationless transfer through conical intersections with the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} PES. Parallels with the photochemistry exhibited by other, smaller heteroaromatics (pyrrole, imidazole, phenol, etc.) are highlighted, as are inconsistencies between the present conclusions and those reached in two other recent studies of excited state adenine molecules.

  14. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. PMID:27062185

  15. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  16. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  17. Emerging Diversity of the Cobalamin-Dependent Methyltransferases Involving Radical-Based Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Li, Qien; Jia, Youli; Ji, Xinjian; Qianzhu, Haocheng; Zhang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Cobalamins comprise a group of cobalt-containing organometallic cofactors that play important roles in cellular metabolism. Although many cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases (e.g., methionine synthase MetH) have been extensively studied, a new group of methyltransferases that are cobalamin-dependent and utilize radical chemistry in catalysis is just beginning to be appreciated. In this Concept article, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the radical-based and cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases and discuss the functional and mechanistic diversity of this emerging class of enzymes. PMID:27028019

  18. 2. View of the southern twothirds of the dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of the southern two-thirds of the dam showing the Glens Falls Bridge over the Hudson River on the left, the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation penstocks and inktake structure at the southeast corner of the dam, and the dam itself. The Finch Pruyn & Company Forebay is the foreground. Facing south. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

  19. Valence anions in complexes of adenine and 9-methyladenine with formic acid: stabilization by intermolecular proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Harańczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej; Rak, Janusz; Radisic, Dunja; Eustis, Soren N; Wang, Di; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-02-01

    Photoelectron spectra of adenine-formic acid (AFA(-)) and 9-methyladenine-formic acid (MAFA(-)) anionic complexes have been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. These spectra reveal broad features with maxima at 1.5-1.4 eV that indicate formation of stable valence anions in the gas phase. The neutral and anionic complexes of adenine/9-methyladenine and formic acid were also studied computationally at the B3LYP, second-order Møller-Plesset, and coupled-cluster levels of theory with the 6-31++G** and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds, and the most stable dimers are bound by 17.7 and 16.0 kcal/mol for AFA and MAFA, respectively. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in both AFA(-) and MAFA(-) occupies a pi* orbital localized on adenine/9-methyladenine, and the adiabatic stability of the most stable anions amounts to 0.67 and 0.54 eV for AFA(-) and MAFA(-), respectively. The attachment of the excess electron to the complexes induces a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of formic acid to a N atom of adenine or 9-methyladenine. As a result, the most stable structures of the anionic complexes can be characterized as neutral radicals of hydrogenated adenine (9-methyladenine) solvated by a deprotonated formic acid. The BFPT to the N atoms of adenine may be biologically relevant because some of these sites are not involved in the Watson-Crick pairing scheme and are easily accessible in the cellular environment. We suggest that valence anions of purines might be as important as those of pyrimidines in the process of DNA damage by low-energy electrons. PMID:17263404

  20. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon.

    PubMed

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut. PMID:25755826

  1. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon

    PubMed Central

    Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut. PMID:25755826

  2. 1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE HEADGATE STRUCTURE ON NORTH BANK, SPILLWAY ON LEFT SIDE OF DAM, AND SPLASH LOGS ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  3. 55. AVALON DAM (Photographic copy of photo in Reservoirs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. AVALON DAM - (Photographic copy of photo in Reservoirs for Irrigation, Water-Power, and Domestic Water Supply. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1902.) 'CANAL HEADGATES, LAKE AVALON DAM' - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  4. PVC waterproofing membranes and alkali-aggregated reaction in dams

    SciTech Connect

    Scuero, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A waterproofing polyvinylchloride (PVC) based geocomposite was installed on two dams subject to alkali-aggregate reaction, to eliminate water intrusion and to protect the facing from further deterioration. The installation system allows drainage of the infiltrated water, thus accomplishing dehydration of the dam body. On one dam, the membrane also provided protection for future slot cutting.

  5. 6. VIEW OF NORTH END OF EAST DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF NORTH END OF EAST DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. (View is taken from lakeside with lowered water level. This view encompasses the same area as MT-88-A-5 above.) - Three Bears Lake & Dams, East Dam, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  6. LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOCK, DOG HOUSE, CONTROL STATION, DAM GATE, MANEUVER BOAT No. 1, AND DAM. NOTE LOWER LOCK GATE IN FOREGROUND. LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST. - Illinois Waterway, La Grange Lock and Dam, 3/4 mile south of Country 795N at Illinois River, Versailles, Brown County, IL

  7. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking southwest. Note the trash racks at the entrance to the penstocks. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  8. 9. DETAIL LOOKING EAST OF NONOVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL LOOKING EAST OF NON-OVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING ACCESS DOOR IN DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  9. 7. VIEW SOUTH OF SPILLWAY SECTION OF DAM WITH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW SOUTH OF SPILLWAY SECTION OF DAM WITH CONCRETE ABUTMENT TO LEFT, AND SHOWING FLASH BOARD SUPPORTS ON TOP OF DAM - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  10. WinDAM C earthern embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA has partnered with landowners to build rural flood control dams. Overtopping and internal erosion are the causes of most dam failures. To estimate the peak discharge associated with a dam incident, the USDA-NRCS, -ARS, and Kansas State University have collaboratively developed software. ...

  11. 20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF LOGS PROJECTING BETWEEN CROSS LOGS. FREQUENTLY WHOLE TREES WERE USED IN CONSTRUCTING THESE DAMS. THE BRANCHES WERE PLACED UPSTREAM AND COVERED WITH EARTH AND STONE TO ANCHOR THEM. Photographed November 6, 1935. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  12. 28. Photocopied August 1978. UPPER INTAKE COFFER DAM, OCTOBER 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopied August 1978. UPPER INTAKE COFFER DAM, OCTOBER 7, 1901. LOGS WERE PLACED ON THE WATER SIDE OF THIS DAM TO COUNTERACT WAVE ACTION AGAINST THE DAM. NOTE THE TIMBER RETAINING WALL ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE LOWER INTAKE. (185) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  13. 76 FR 24516 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, consistent with the...

  14. 78 FR 21415 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, consistent with the...

  15. 77 FR 9265 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, consistent with the...

  16. 78 FR 7810 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, consistent with the...

  17. 77 FR 43117 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... other management actions to protect resources downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, consistent with the...

  18. 52. AVALON DAM Photographic copy of historic photo, c1890 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. AVALON DAM - Photographic copy of historic photo, c1890 (original print located at the Carlsbad Irrigation District offices, Carlsbad, New Mexico) photographer unknown VIEW OF SCOURWAY THROUGH AVALON DAM DISCHARGING WATER - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  19. 61. AVALON DAM Photographic copy of historic photo, 1907 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. AVALON DAM - Photographic copy of historic photo, 1907 (original print located at the Carlsbad Irrigation District offices, Carlsbad, New Mexico) photographer unknown VIEW OF AVALON DAM RECONSTRUCTION - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  20. 50. AVALON DAM Photographic copy of historic photo, c1889 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. AVALON DAM - Photographic copy of historic photo, c1889 (original print located at the Carlsbad Irrigation District offices, Carlsbad, New Mexico) photographer unknown 'ROCK CUT AND DAM AT HEAD OF DITCH ABOVE EDDY, N.M.' - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM