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Sample records for adenine methyltransferase dam

  1. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    DOE PAGES

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify amore » DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.« less

  2. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify a DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.

  3. A dual role for substrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine in the methylation reaction with bacteriophage T4 Dam DNA-[N6-adenine]-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Malygin, E G; Evdokimov, A A; Zinoviev, V V; Ovechkina, L G; Lindstrom, W M; Reich, N O; Schlagman, S L; Hattman, S

    2001-06-01

    The fluorescence of 2-aminopurine ((2)A)-substituted duplexes (contained in the GATC target site) was investigated by titration with T4 Dam DNA-(N6-adenine)-methyltransferase. With an unmethylated target ((2)A/A duplex) or its methylated derivative ((2)A/(m)A duplex), T4 Dam produced up to a 50-fold increase in fluorescence, consistent with (2)A being flipped out of the DNA helix. Though neither S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine nor sinefungin had any significant effect, addition of substrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) sharply reduced the Dam-induced fluorescence with these complexes. In contrast, AdoMet had no effect on the fluorescence increase produced with an (2)A/(2)A double-substituted duplex. Since the (2)A/(m)A duplex cannot be methylated, the AdoMet-induced decrease in fluorescence cannot be due to methylation per se. We propose that T4 Dam alone randomly binds to the asymmetric (2)A/A and (2)A/(m)A duplexes, and that AdoMet induces an allosteric T4 Dam conformational change that promotes reorientation of the enzyme to the strand containing the native base. Thus, AdoMet increases enzyme binding-specificity, in addition to serving as the methyl donor. The results of pre-steady-state methylation kinetics are consistent with this model.

  4. Bacteriophage T4 Dam DNA-[N6-adenine]methyltransferase. Kinetic evidence for a catalytically essential conformational change in the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Alexey A; Zinoviev, Victor V; Malygin, Ernst G; Schlagman, Samuel L; Hattman, Stanley

    2002-01-01

    We carried out a steady state kinetic analysis of the bacteriophage T4 DNA-[N6-adenine]methyltransferase (T4 Dam) mediated methyl group transfer reaction from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to Ade in the palindromic recognition sequence, GATC, of a 20-mer oligonucleotide duplex. Product inhibition patterns were consistent with a steady state-ordered bi-bi mechanism in which the order of substrate binding and product (methylated DNA, DNA(Me) and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, AdoHcy) release was AdoMet downward arrow DNA downward arrow DNA(Me) upward arrow AdoHcy upward arrow. A strong reduction in the rate of methylation was observed at high concentrations of the substrate 20-mer DNA duplex. In contrast, increasing substrate AdoMet concentration led to stimulation in the reaction rate with no evidence of saturation. We propose the following model. Free T4 Dam (initially in conformational form E) randomly interacts with substrates AdoMet and DNA to form a ternary T4 Dam-AdoMet-DNA complex in which T4 Dam has isomerized to conformational state F, which is specifically adapted for catalysis. After the chemical step of methyl group transfer from AdoMet to DNA, product DNA(Me) dissociates relatively rapidly (k(off) = 1.7 x s(-1)) from the complex. In contrast, dissociation of product AdoHcy proceeds relatively slowly (k(off) = 0.018 x s(-1)), indicating that its release is the rate-limiting step, consistent with kcat = 0.015 x s(-1). After AdoHcy release, the enzyme remains in the F conformational form and is able to preferentially bind AdoMet (unlike form E, which randomly binds AdoMet and DNA), and the AdoMet-F binary complex then binds DNA to start another methylation cycle. We also propose an alternative pathway in which the release of AdoHcy is coordinated with the binding of AdoMet in a single concerted event, while T4 Dam remains in the isomerized form F. The resulting AdoMet-F binary complex then binds DNA, and another methylation reaction ensues. This route is

  5. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    PubMed

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  6. DNA (cytosine-N4-)- and -(adenine-N6-)-methyltransferases have different kinetic mechanisms but the same reaction route. A comparison of M.BamHI and T4 Dam.

    PubMed

    Malygin, Ernst G; Zinoviev, Victor V; Evdokimov, Alexey A; Lindstrom, William M; Reich, Norbert O; Hattman, Stanley

    2003-05-01

    We studied the kinetics of methyl group transfer by the BamHI DNA-(cytosine-N(4)-)-methyltransferase (MTase) from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to a 20-mer oligodeoxynucleotide duplex containing the palindromic recognition site GGATCC. Under steady state conditions the BamHI MTase displayed a simple kinetic behavior toward the 20-mer duplex. There was no apparent substrate inhibition at concentrations much higher than the K(m) for either DNA (100-fold higher) or S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) (20-fold higher); this indicates that dead-end complexes did not form in the course of the methylation reaction. The DNA methylation rate was analyzed as a function of both substrate and product concentrations. It was found to exhibit product inhibition patterns consistent with a steady state random bi-bi mechanism in which the dominant order of substrate binding and product release (methylated DNA, DNA(Me), and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, AdoHcy) was Ado-Met DNA DNA(Me) AdoHcy. The M.BamHI kinetic scheme was compared with that for the T4 Dam (adenine-N(6)-)-MTase. The two differed with respect to an effector action of substrates and in the rate-limiting step of the reaction (product inhibition patterns are the same for the both MTases). From this we conclude that the common chemical step in the methylation reaction, methyl transfer from AdoMet to a free exocyclic amino group, is not sufficient to dictate a common kinetic scheme even though both MTases follow the same reaction route.

  7. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  8. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    PubMed

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence. PMID:27195796

  9. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison E.; Rogovskyy, Artem S.; Crowley, Michael A.; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence. PMID:27195796

  10. DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants of Salmonella Typhimurium and a Novel Dam-Regulated Locus

    PubMed Central

    Torreblanca, J.; Casadesus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium lacking DNA adenine methylase were isolated; they include insertion and deletion alleles. The dam locus maps at 75 min between cysG and aroB, similar to the Escherichia coli dam gene. Dam(-) mutants of S. typhimurium resemble those of E. coli in the following phenotypes: (1) increased spontaneous mutations, (2) moderate SOS induction, (3) enhancement of duplication segregation, (4) inviability of dam recA and dam recB mutants, and (5) suppression of the inviability of the dam recA and dam recB combinations by mutations that eliminate mismatch repair. However, differences between S. typhimurium and E. coli dam mutants are also found: (1) S. typhimurium dam mutants do not show increased UV sensitivity, suggesting that methyl-directed mismatch repair does not participate in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Salmonella. (2) S. typhimurium dam recJ mutants are viable, suggesting that the Salmonella RecJ function does not participate in the repair of DNA strand breaks formed in the absence of Dam methylation. We also describe a genetic screen for detecting novel genes regulated by Dam methylation and a locus repressed by Dam methylation in the S. typhimurium virulence (or ``cryptic'') plasmid. PMID:8878670

  11. Partial purification of a 6-methyladenine mRNA methyltransferase which modifies internal adenine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, M T

    1992-01-01

    Two forms of a 6-methyladenine mRNA methyltransferase have been partially purified using a T7 transcript coding for mouse dihydrofolate reductase as an RNA substrate. Both enzyme forms modify internal adenine residues within the RNA substrate. The enzymes were purified 357- and 37-fold respectively from nuclear salt extracts prepared from HeLa cells using DEAE-cellulose and phosphocellulose chromatography. The activity of the first form of the enzyme eluted from DEAE-cellulose (major form) was at least 3-fold greater than that of the second (minor form). H.p.l.c. analysis of the hydrolysed, methylated mRNA substrates demonstrated that both forms of the enzyme produced only 6-methyladenine. The two forms of the enzyme differed in their RNA substrate specificity as well as in the dependence for a 5' cap structure. The 6-methyladenine mRNA methyltransferase activity was found to be elevated in HeLa nuclei as compared with nuclear extracts from rat kidney and brain. Enzymic activity could not be detected in nuclei from either normal rat liver or regenerating rat liver. In the case of the HeLa cell, activity could only be detected in nuclear extracts, with a small amount in the ribosomal fraction. Other HeLa subcellular fractions were void of activity. PMID:1445268

  12. The isolation and characterization of the Escherichia coli DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J E; Blumenthal, R M; Gingeras, T R

    1983-01-01

    The E. coli dam (DNA adenine methylase) enzyme is known to methylate the sequence GATC. A general method for cloning sequence-specific DNA methylase genes was used to isolate the dam gene on a 1.14 kb fragment, inserted in the plasmid vector pBR322. Subsequent restriction mapping and subcloning experiments established a set of approximate boundaries of the gene. The nucleotide sequence of the dam gene was determined, and analysis of that sequence revealed a unique open reading frame which corresponded in length to that necessary to code for a protein the size of dam. Amino acid composition derived from this sequence corresponds closely to the amino acid composition of the purified dam protein. Enzymatic and DNA:DNA hybridization methods were used to investigate the possible presence of dam genes in a variety of prokaryotic organisms. PMID:6300769

  13. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  14. Wolbachia Prophage DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Genes in Different Drosophila-Wolbachia Associations

    PubMed Central

    Saridaki, Aggeliki; Sapountzis, Panagiotis; Harris, Harriet L.; Batista, Philip D.; Biliske, Jennifer A.; Pavlikaki, Harris; Oehler, Stefan; Savakis, Charalambos; Braig, Henk R.; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory intracellular bacterium which often manipulates the reproduction of its insect and isopod hosts. In contrast, Wolbachia is an essential symbiont in filarial nematodes. Lately, Wolbachia has been implicated in genomic imprinting of host DNA through cytosine methylation. The importance of DNA methylation in cell fate and biology calls for in depth studing of putative methylation-related genes. We present a molecular and phylogenetic analysis of a putative DNA adenine methyltransferase encoded by a prophage in the Wolbachia genome. Two slightly different copies of the gene, met1 and met2, exhibit a different distribution over various Wolbachia strains. The met2 gene is present in the majority of strains, in wAu, however, it contains a frameshift caused by a 2 bp deletion. Phylogenetic analysis of the met2 DNA sequences suggests a long association of the gene with the Wolbachia host strains. In addition, our analysis provides evidence for previously unnoticed multiple infections, the detection of which is critical for the molecular elucidation of modification and/or rescue mechanism of cytoplasmic incompatibility. PMID:21573076

  15. N6-methyl-adenine: an epigenetic signal for DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Wion, Didier; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-03-01

    N(6)-methyl-adenine is found in the genomes of bacteria, archaea, protists and fungi. Most bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferases are part of restriction-modification systems. Certain groups of Proteobacteria also harbour solitary DNA adenine methyltransferases that provide signals for DNA-protein interactions. In gamma-proteobacteria, Dam methylation regulates chromosome replication, nucleoid segregation, DNA repair, transposition of insertion elements and transcription of specific genes. In Salmonella, Haemophilus, Yersinia and Vibrio species and in pathogenic Escherichia coli, Dam methylation is required for virulence. In alpha-proteobacteria, CcrM methylation regulates the cell cycle in Caulobacter, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium, and has a role in Brucella abortus infection.

  16. Specificity of the ModA11, ModA12 and ModD1 epigenetic regulator N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Seib, Kate L.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Tan, Aimee; Scott, Adeana L.; Kumar, Ritesh; Power, Peter M.; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Hill, Dorothea M. C.; Luyten, Yvette A.; Morgan, Richard D.; Roberts, Richard J.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Rao, Desirazu N.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Phase variation (random ON/OFF switching) of gene expression is a common feature of host-adapted pathogenic bacteria. Phase variably expressed N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases (Mod) alter global methylation patterns resulting in changes in gene expression. These systems constitute phase variable regulons called phasevarions. Neisseria meningitidis phasevarions regulate genes including virulence factors and vaccine candidates, and alter phenotypes including antibiotic resistance. The target site recognized by these Type III N6-adenine DNA methyltransferases is not known. Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylome analysis was used to identify the recognition site for three key N. meningitidis methyltransferases: ModA11 (exemplified by M.NmeMC58I) (5′-CGYm6AG-3′), ModA12 (exemplified by M.Nme77I, M.Nme18I and M.Nme579II) (5′-ACm6ACC-3′) and ModD1 (exemplified by M.Nme579I) (5′-CCm6AGC-3′). Restriction inhibition assays and mutagenesis confirmed the SMRT methylome analysis. The ModA11 site is complex and atypical and is dependent on the type of pyrimidine at the central position, in combination with the bases flanking the core recognition sequence 5′-CGYm6AG-3′. The observed efficiency of methylation in the modA11 strain (MC58) genome ranged from 4.6% at 5′-GCGCm6AGG-3′ sites, to 100% at 5′-ACGTm6AGG-3′ sites. Analysis of the distribution of modified sites in the respective genomes shows many cases of association with intergenic regions of genes with altered expression due to phasevarion switching. PMID:25845594

  17. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-01

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  18. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer.

  19. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Liow, Hien-haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Brent, Michael; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA Adenine Methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried Interaction or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome, and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  20. Electrochemical strategy for sensing DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Lin; Zhou, Long Yin; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2013-03-20

    The present work demonstrates a novel signal-off electrochemical method for the determination of DNA methylation and the assay of methyltransferase activity using the electroactive complex [Ru(NH3)6](3+) (RuHex) as a signal transducer. The assay exploits the electrostatic interactions between RuHex and DNA strands. Thiolated single strand DNA1 was firstly self-assembled on a gold electrode via Au-S bonding, followed by hybridization with single strand DNA2 to form double strand DNA containing specific recognition sequence of DNA adenine methylation MTase and methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. The double strand DNA may adsorb lots of electrochemical species ([Ru(NH3)6](3+)) via the electrostatic interaction, thus resulting in a high electrochemical signal. In the presence of DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase and S-adenosyl-l-methionine, the formed double strand DNA was methylated by DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase, then the double strand DNA can be cleaved by methylation-responsive restriction endonuclease Dpn I, leading to the dissociation of a large amount of signaling probes from the electrode. As a result, the adsorption amount of RuHex reduced, resulting in a decrease in electrochemical signal. Thus, a sensitive electrochemical method for detection of DNA methylation is proposed. The proposed method yielded a linear response to concentration of Dam MTase ranging from 0.25 to 10UmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.18UmL(-1) (S/N=3), which might promise this method as a good candidate for monitoring DNA methylation in the future. PMID:23473252

  1. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  2. Two novel temperate bacteriophages co-existing in Aeromonas sp. ARM81 - characterization of their genomes, proteomes and DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Radlinska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas species are causative agents of a wide spectrum of diseases in animals and humans. Although these bacteria are commonly found in various environments, little is known about their phages. Thus far, only one temperate Aeromonas phage has been characterized. Whole-genome sequencing of an Aeromonas sp. strain ARM81 revealed the presence of two prophage clusters. One of them is integrated into the chromosome and the other was maintained as an extrachromosomal, linear plasmid-like prophage encoding a protelomerase. Both prophages were artificially and spontaneously inducible. We separately isolated both phages and compared their genomes with other known viruses. The novel phages show no similarity to the previously characterized Aeromonas phages and might represent new evolutionary lineages of viruses infecting Aeromonadaceae. Apart from the comparative genomic analyses of these phages, complemented with their structural and molecular characterization, a functional analysis of four DNA methyltransferases encoded by these viruses was conducted. One of the investigated N6-adenine-modifying enzymes shares sequence specificity with a Dam-like methyltransferase of its bacterial host, while another one is non-specific, as it catalyzes adenine methylation in various sequence contexts. The presented results shed new light on the diversity of Aeromonas temperate phages.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles-cooperated fluorescence sensor for sensitive and accurate detection of DNA methyltransferase activity coupled with exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Zhang, Youna; Xu, Shuling; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuanfu; Yue, Qiaoli; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Huaisheng

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescence magnetic biosensor for the DNA methyltransferase activity was developed based on the cooperative amplification by combining the magnetic nanoparticles synergistic exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted circular exponential amplification and a supramolecular structure ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex. First, a duplex DNA probe, which was constructed by the hybridization of a quadruplex-forming oligomer with a molecular beacon, was assembled on the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a reporter. A hairpin probe (HP)-containing sequence of GATC was used as the methylation substrate of DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM). Once HP was methylated by DAM, it could be recognized and cleaved by Dpn I, which allows the release of a single-stranded DNA. The DNA (tDNA1) then hybridizes to the MNP probe, which then triggers the exonuclease III-mediated target exponential recycling reaction. Simultaneously, numerous quadruplex forming oligomers are liberated and folded into the G-quadruplex-ZnPPIX complexes with the help of zinc(ii)-protoporphyrin IX(ZnPPIX) on the MNP surface to give a remarkable fluorescence response. In the developed sensor, a small amount of target DAM can be converted to a large number of stable DNA triggers, leading to remarkable amplification of the target. Moreover, using MNPs as a vector of the sensor may reduce the interference from the real samples, which increases the anti-interference of the sensing system. Based on this unique amplification strategy, a very low detection limit down to 2.0 × 10(-4) U mL(-1) was obtained. Furthermore, the sensor could be used to evaluate the DAM activity in different growth stages of E. coli cells and screen Dam MTase inhibitors. Therefore, the strategy proposed here provides a promising platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTases and has great potential to be applied further in early clinical diagnostics and medical research.

  4. A novel label-free fluorescence strategy for methyltransferase activity assay based on dsDNA-templated copper nanoparticles coupled with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    Lai, Q Q; Liu, M D; Gu, C C; Nie, H G; Xu, X J; Li, Z H; Yang, Z; Huang, S M

    2016-02-21

    Evaluating DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity has received considerable attention due to its significance in the fields of early cancer clinical diagnostics and drug discovery. Herein, we proposed a novel label-free fluorescence method for MTase activity assay by coupling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) with an endonuclease-assisted signal transduction system. In this strategy, dsDNA molecules were first methylated by DNA adenine methylation (Dam) MTase and then cleaved by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease DpnI. The cleaved DNA fragments could not act as efficient templates for the formation of fluorescent CuNPs and thus no fluorescence signal was produced. Under optimized experimental conditions, the developed strategy exhibited a sensitive fluorescence response to Dam MTase activity. This strategy was also demonstrated to provide an excellent platform to the inhibitor screening for Dam MTase. These results demonstrated the great potential for the practical applications of the proposed strategy for Dam MTase activity assay. PMID:26764536

  5. DamID Analysis of Nuclear Organization in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saldivar, Georgina; Meister, Peter; Askjaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The development of genomics and next generation sequencing platforms has dramatically improved our insight into chromatin structure and organization and its fine interplay with gene expression. The nuclear envelope has emerged as a key component in nuclear organization via extensive contacts between the genome and numerous proteins at the nuclear periphery. These contacts may have profound effects on gene expression as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Indeed, their perturbations are associated with several human pathologies known as laminopathies or nuclear envelopathies. However, due to their dynamic behavior the contacts between nuclear envelope proteins and chromatin are challenging to identify, in particular in intact tissues. Here, we propose the DamID technique as an attractive method to globally characterize chromatin organization in the popular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. DamID is based on the in vivo expression of a chromatin-associated protein of interest fused to the Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase, which produces unique identification tags at binding site in the genome. This marking is simple, highly specific and can be mapped by sensitive enzymatic and next generation sequencing approaches.

  6. One-pot synthesis of GO/AgNPs/luminol composites with electrochemiluminescence activity for sensitive detection of DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui-Fang; Liang, Ru-Ping; Wang, Jing-Wu; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-01-15

    DNA methyltransferases catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to the target adenine or cytosine, eventually inducing the DNA methylation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Herein, we developed a novel electrochemiluminescence biosensor to quantify DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) employing signal amplification of GO/AgNPs/luminol composites to enhance the assay sensitivity. The method was developed by designing a capture probe DNA, which was immobilized on gold electrode surface, to hybridize with azide complementary DNA to form the azide-terminated dsDNA. Then, alkynyl functionalized GO/AgNPs/luminol composites as the signal probe were immobilized to azide-terminated dsDNA modified electrode via click chemistry, resulting in a high electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal. Once the DNA hybrid was methylated (under catalysis of Dam MTase) and further cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease (a site-specific endonuclease recognizing the duplex symmetrical sequence of 5'-G-Am-T-C-3'), GO/AgNPs/luminol composites release from the electrode surface to the solution, leading to significant reduction of the ECL signal. The change of the ECL intensity is related to the methylation status and MTase activity, which forms the basis of MTase activity assay and site-specific methylation determination. This novel strategy can be further used as a universal method for other transferase determination by designing various transferase-specific DNA sequences. In addition, this method can be used for the screening of antimicrobial drugs and has a great potential to be further applied in early clinical diagnosis.

  7. DNA methyltransferases and epigenetic regulation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Satish; Curtis, Patrick D

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetics is a change in gene expression that is heritable without a change in DNA sequence itself. This phenomenon is well studied in eukaryotes, particularly in humans for its role in cellular differentiation, X chromosome inactivation and diseases like cancer. However, comparatively little is known about epigenetic regulation in bacteria. Bacterial epigenetics is mainly present in the form of DNA methylation where DNA methyltransferases add methyl groups to nucleotides. This review focuses on two methyltransferases well characterized for their roles in gene regulation: Dam and CcrM. Dam methyltransferase in Escherichia coli is important for expression of certain genes such as the pap operon, as well as other cellular processes like DNA replication initiation and DNA repair. In Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria, the methyltransferase CcrM is cell cycle regulated and is involved in the cell-cycle-dependent regulation of several genes. The diversity of regulatory targets as well as regulatory mechanisms suggests that gene regulation by methylation could be a widespread and potent method of regulation in bacteria. PMID:27476077

  8. Vertical Ionization Energies of Adenine and 9-Methyl Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2009-07-01

    Vertical ionization energies of 9-H adenine and 9-methyl adenine have been calculated with the following, ab initio, electron propagator methods: the outer valence Green's function (OVGF), partial third-order theory (P3), and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction, or ADC(3). Basis set effects have been systematically examined. All methods predict near degeneracy in the π2-n1 and π3-n2 pairs of cationic, adenine final states and larger splittings of the corresponding, cationic states of 9-methyl adenine. P3 results for adenine predict the following order of the first six final states: π1, n1, π2, n2, π3, n3. Coupled-cluster calculations on the first three cationic states of adenine confirm these predictions. OVGF and ADC(3) calculations reverse the order of the second and third states and of the fourth and fifth states. All results confirm previous interpretations of experiments in which the second and third spectral bands correspond to the aforementioned pairs of final states and disagree with a recent reassignment based on time-resolved photoelectron spectra. Lower ionization energies and larger splittings in the methylated molecule are interpreted in terms of phase relationships in the Dyson orbitals. ADC(3) results confirm the qualitative validity of the one-electron approximation for the first six final states of both molecules and disclose its inadequacies for higher ionization energies.

  9. Regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 by DNA adenine methylation.

    PubMed

    López-Garrido, Javier; Casadesús, Josep

    2010-03-01

    DNA adenine methylase (Dam(-)) mutants of Salmonella enterica are attenuated in the mouse model and present multiple virulence-related defects. Impaired interaction of Salmonella Dam(-) mutants with the intestinal epithelium has been tentatively correlated with reduced secretion of pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) effectors. In this study, we show that S. enterica Dam(-) mutants contain lowered levels of the SPI-1 transcriptional regulators HilA, HilC, HilD, and InvF. Epistasis analysis indicates that Dam-dependent regulation of SPI-1 requires HilD, while HilA, HilC, and InvF are dispensable. A transcriptional hilDlac fusion is expressed at similar levels in Dam(+) and Dam(-) hosts. However, lower levels of hilD mRNA are found in a Dam(-) background, thus providing unsuspected evidence that Dam methylation might exert post-transcriptional regulation of hilD expression. This hypothesis is supported by the following lines of evidence: (i) lowered levels of hilD mRNA are found in Salmonella Dam(-) mutants when hilD is transcribed from a heterologous promoter; (ii) increased hilD mRNA turnover is observed in Dam(-) mutants; (iii) lack of the Hfq RNA chaperone enhances hilD mRNA instability in Dam(-) mutants; and (iv) lack of the RNA degradosome components polynucleotide phosphorylase and ribonuclease E suppresses hilD mRNA instability in a Dam(-) background. Our report of Dam-dependent control of hilD mRNA stability suggests that DNA adenine methylation plays hitherto unknown roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  10. Protein Modification by Adenine Propenal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. Nε-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine–lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is Nε-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA’s ability to bind to a DNA substrate. PMID:25211669

  11. Highly sensitive fluorescence assay of DNA methyltransferase activity via methylation-sensitive cleavage coupled with nicking enzyme-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Wu, Yayan; Dong, Yanhua; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-04-15

    Herein, using DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) as a model analyte, a simple, rapid, and highly sensitive fluorescence sensing platform for monitoring the activity and inhibition of DNA MTase was developed on the basis of methylation-sensitive cleavage and nicking enzyme-assisted signal amplification. In the presence of Dam MTase, an elaborately designed hairpin probe was methylated. With the help of methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease DpnI, the methylated hairpin probe could be cleaved to release a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Subsequently, this released ssDNA would hybridize with the molecular beacon (MB) to open its hairpin structure, resulting in the restoration of fluorescence signal as well as formation of the double-stranded recognition site for nicking enzyme Nt.BbvCI. Eventually, an amplified fluorescence signal was observed through the enzymatic recycling cleavage of MBs. Based on this unique strategy, a very low detection limit down to 0.06 U/mL was achieved within a short assay time (60 min) in one step, which is superior to those of most existing approaches. Owing to the specific site recognition of MTase toward its substrate, the proposed sensing system was able to readily discriminate Dam MTase from other MTase such as M.SssI and even detect the target in complex biological matrix. Furthermore, the application of the proposed sensing strategy for screening Dam MTase inhibitors was also demonstrated with satisfactory results. This novel method not only provides a promising platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of DNA MTases, but also shows great potentials in biological process researches, drugs discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  12. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  13. A DNA adenine methylase mutant of Shigella flexneri shows no significant attenuation of virulence.

    PubMed

    Honma, Yasuko; Fernández, Reinaldo E; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2004-04-01

    Mutants of Salmonella defective in DNA adenine methylase (dam) have been reported to be attenuated for virulence and to provide protective immunity when used as vaccine strains. To determine whether these observations could be extended to Shigella, a dam mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a was characterized and examined for the role of dam in pathogenesis. The Shigella dam mutant showed some unique characteristics; however, it retained virulence in vivo as well as in vitro. The mutant invaded cultured L2 monolayer cells as efficiently as the wild-type parent, but its intracellular growth was suppressed up to 7 h post-invasion. Furthermore, the invading dam mutant formed smaller plaques in cell monolayers compared to the parent strain. However, the mutant produced keratoconjunctivitis in the Sereny test in guinea pigs only slightly more slowly than the wild-type. While the effect of the dam mutation on virulence was modest, the rate of spontaneous mutation in the dam mutant was 1000-fold greater compared with the wild-type. The virulence and high mutability displayed by the dam mutant of Sh. flexneri suggest that a general anti-bacterial pathogen vaccine strategy based on mutations in dam needs to be re-evaluated.

  14. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  15. Crystal structure of MboIIA methyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Walsh, M. A.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Gdansk; Medical Research Council France

    2003-09-15

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are sequence-specific enzymes which transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the amino group of either cytosine or adenine within a recognized DNA sequence. Methylation of a base in a specific DNA sequence protects DNA from nucleolytic cleavage by restriction enzymes recognizing the same DNA sequence. We have determined at 1.74 {angstrom} resolution the crystal structure of a {beta}-class DNA MTase MboIIA (M {center_dot} MboIIA) from the bacterium Moraxella bovis, the smallest DNA MTase determined to date. M {center_dot} MboIIA methylates the 3' adenine of the pentanucleotide sequence 5'-GAAGA-3'. The protein crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit which we propose to resemble the dimer when M {center_dot} MboIIA is not bound to DNA. The overall structure of the enzyme closely resembles that of M {center_dot} RsrI. However, the cofactor-binding pocket in M {center_dot} MboIIA forms a closed structure which is in contrast to the open-form structures of other known MTases.

  16. 106. DAM EARTH DIKE SUBMERSIBLE DAMS & DIKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. DAM - EARTH DIKE - SUBMERSIBLE DAMS & DIKE CONN. AT MOVABLE DAM (ML-8-52/2-FS) March 1940 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  17. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  18. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  19. Activation and inactivation of methanol: 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid methyltransferase from Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, P; Heythuysen, H J; Sliepenbeek, H T; Houwen, F P; van der Drift, C; Vogels, G D

    1983-01-01

    Methanol is converted to methane by crude extracts of Methanosarcina barkeri. The first reaction involved in this process, is catalyzed by methanol:2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.-). The methyltransferase has an optimum at pH 6.5 and is not inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate acts as an inhibitor (Ki = 0.30 mM). The methyltransferase was tested in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, which inhibits the conversion of 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid to methane. The reaction is subject to activation and inactivation. Inactivation is brought about by the presence of oxygen, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid, the product of the reaction. Activation of the system requires the presence of ATP and Mg2+ and of hydrogen. Hydrogen can be replaced by enzymatic systems, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase, which deliver free hydrogen. PMID:6294063

  20. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  1. The determination of DNA methyltransferase activity by quenching of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium electrogenerated chemiluminescence with ferrocene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoe; Li, Yan; Zheng, Jianbin; Qi, Honglan; Liang, Zhenxing; Ning, Xiaohui

    2015-06-11

    An electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensing method for the determination of DNA methyltransferase activity is developed by the quenching of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium ECL by ferrocene, and it is demonstrated that the ECL biosensing method measures DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase over a dynamic concentration range (0.1 U mL(-1)-100 U mL(-1)) with an extremely low detection limit of 0.03 U mL(-1), using gold nanoparticles and a quenching ECL signal produced by a chemical quencher such as ferrocene.

  2. 107. DAM EARTH DIKE SUBMERSIBLE DAMS PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. DAM - EARTH DIKE - SUBMERSIBLE DAMS - PLANS & SECTIONS (ML-8-52/3-FS) March 1940 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  3. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  4. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  5. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  6. Isolation and characterization of site-specific DNA-methyltransferases from Bacillus coagulans K.

    PubMed

    Svadbina, I V; Zelinskaya, N V; Kovalevskaya, N P; Zheleznaya, L A; Matvienko, N I

    2004-03-01

    Two site-specific DNA methyltransferases, M.BcoKIA and M.BcoKIB, were isolated from the thermophilic strain Bacillus coagulans K. Each of the methylases protects the recognition site 5'-CTCTTC-3'/5'-GAAGAG-3' from cleavage with the cognate restriction endonuclease BcoKI. It is shown that M.BcoKIB is an N6-adenine specific methylase and M.BcoKIA is an N4-cytosine specific methylase. According to bisulfite mapping, M.BcoKIA methylates the first cytosine in the sequence 5'-CTCTTC-3'. PMID:15061697

  7. Adenine methylation in eukaryotes: Apprehending the complex evolutionary history and functional potential of an epigenetic modification

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    While N6‐methyladenosine (m6A) is a well‐known epigenetic modification in bacterial DNA, it remained largely unstudied in eukaryotes. Recent studies have brought to fore its potential epigenetic role across diverse eukaryotes with biological consequences, which are distinct and possibly even opposite to the well‐studied 5‐methylcytosine mark. Adenine methyltransferases appear to have been independently acquired by eukaryotes on at least 13 occasions from prokaryotic restriction‐modification and counter‐restriction systems. On at least four to five instances, these methyltransferases were recruited as RNA methylases. Thus, m6A marks in eukaryotic DNA and RNA might be more widespread and diversified than previously believed. Several m6A‐binding protein domains from prokaryotes were also acquired by eukaryotes, facilitating prediction of potential readers for these marks. Further, multiple lineages of the AlkB family of dioxygenases have been recruited as m6A demethylases. Although members of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases have also been suggested to be m6A demethylases, this proposal needs more careful evaluation. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26660621

  8. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  9. DAM Safety and Deformation Monitoring in Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.; Potts, L.; Miiama, J.; Mahgoub, M.; Rahman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water is the life and necessity to water is increasing day by day with respect to the World population, rising of living standards and destruction of nature. Thus, the importance of water and water structures have been increasing gradually. Dams are among the most important engineering structures used for water supplies, flood controls, agricultural purposes as well as drinking and hydroelectric power. There are about 150.000 large size dams in the World. Especially after the Second World War, higher and larger capacity dams have been constructed. Dams create certain risks like the other manmade structures. No one knows precisely how many dam failures have occurred in the World, whereas hundreds of dam failures have occurred throughout the U.S. history. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. These physical data are measured and monitored by the instruments and equipment. Dams and their surroundings have to be monitored by using essential methods at periodic time intervals in order to determine the possible changes that may occur over the time. Monitoring programs typically consist of; surveillance or visual observation. These programs on dams provide information for evaluating the dam's performance related to the design intent and expected changes that could affect the safety performance of the dam. Additionally, these programs are used for investigating and evaluating the abnormal or degrading performance where any remedial action is necessary. Geodetic and non-geodetic methods are used for monitoring. Monitoring the performance of the dams is critical for producing and maintaining the safe dams. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the

  10. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  11. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  12. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  13. (Accumulation of methyl-deficient rat liver messenger ribonucleic acid on ethionine administration). Progress report. [Methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and effects of phorbol ester on methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, E.

    1980-01-01

    Enzyme fractions were isolated from Ehrlich ascites cells which introduced methyl groups into methyl deficient rat liver mRNA and unmethylated vaccinia mRNA. The methyl groups were incorporated at the 5' end into cap 1 structures by the viral enzyme, whereas both cap 0 and cap 1 structures were formed by the Ehrlich ascites cell enzymes. Preliminary results indicate the presence of adenine N/sup 6/-methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites cells. These results indicate that mRNA deficient in 5'-cap methylation and in internal methylation of adenine accumulated in rats on exposure to ethionine. The methyl-deficient mRNA isolated from the liver of ethionine-fed rats differed in its translational properties from mRNA isolated from control animals. Preliminary experiments indicate that single topical application of 17n moles of TPA to mouse skin altered tRNA methyltransferases. The extent of methylation was increased over 2-fold in mouse skin treated with TPA for 48 hours. These changes have been observed as early as 12 hours following TPA treatment. In contrast, the application of initiating dose of DMBA had no effect on these enzymes. It should be emphasized that the changes in tRNA methyltransferases produced by TPA are not merely an increase of the concentration of the enzyme, rather that they represent alterations of specificity of a battery of enzymes. In turn the change in enzyme specificity can produce alterations in the structure of tRNA. (ERB)

  14. Adenine nucleotide transporters in organelles: novel genes and functions.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; del Arco, Araceli

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, cellular energy in the form of ATP is produced in the cytosol via glycolysis or in the mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation and, in photosynthetic organisms, in the chloroplast via photophosphorylation. Transport of adenine nucleotides among cell compartments is essential and is performed mainly by members of the mitochondrial carrier family, among which the ADP/ATP carriers are the best known. This work reviews the carriers that transport adenine nucleotides into the organelles of eukaryotic cells together with their possible functions. We focus on novel mechanisms of adenine nucleotide transport, including mitochondrial carriers found in organelles such as peroxisomes, plastids, or endoplasmic reticulum and also mitochondrial carriers found in the mitochondrial remnants of many eukaryotic parasites of interest. The extensive repertoire of adenine nucleotide carriers highlights an amazing variety of new possible functions of adenine nucleotide transport across eukaryotic organelles.

  15. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  16. Characterizing DNA methyltransferases with an ultrasensitive luciferase-linked continuous assay.

    PubMed

    Hemeon, Ivan; Gutierrez, Jemy A; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Schramm, Vern L

    2011-06-15

    DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the 5-position of cytosine residues and thereby silence transcription of regulated genes. DNMTs are important epigenetic targets. However, isolated DNMTs are weak catalysts and are difficult to assay. We report an ultrasensitive luciferase-linked continuous assay that converts the S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine product of DNA methylation to a quantifiable luminescent signal. Results with this assay are compared with the commonly used DNA labeling from [methyl-(3)H]AdoMet. A 5'-methylthioadenosine-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase is used to hydrolyze AdoHcy to adenine. Adenine phosphoribosyl transferase converts adenine to AMP and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase converts AMP to ATP. Firefly luciferase gives a stable luminescent signal that results from continuous AMP recycling to ATP. This assay exhibits a broad dynamic range (0.1-1000 pmol of AdoHcy). The rapid response time permits continuous assays of DNA methylation detected by light output. The assay is suitable for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for DNMT inhibition activity. The kinetic properties of human and bacterial CpG methyltransferases are characterized using this assay. Human catalytic domain DNMT3b activation by DNMT3L is shown to involve two distinct kinetic states that alter k(cat) but not K(m) for AdoMet. The assay is shown to be robust in the presence of high concentrations of the pyrimidine analogues 5-azacytidine and 5-azacytosine.

  17. Focusing on dam safety

    SciTech Connect

    Lagassa, G.

    1993-01-01

    With increased relicensing activity and a federal emphasis on safety, dam repair and refurbishment is a growing business. Providers of goods and services are gearing up to meet the dam repair and rehabilitation needs that result.

  18. Hoover Dam Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Reclamation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This learning packet provides background information about Hoover Dam (Nevada) and the surrounding area. Since the dam was built at the height of the Depression in 1931, people came from all over the country to work on it. Because of Hoover Dam, the Colorado River was controlled for the first time in history and farmers in Nevada, California, and…

  19. PERSPECTIVE ON LANDSLIDE DAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Robert L.; Costa, John E.; ,

    1986-01-01

    The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and soil slumps and slides; mud, debris, and earth flows: and rock and debris avalanches. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snow melt, and earthquakes. Most landslide dams are remarkable short-lived. In a sample of 63 documented cases, 22 percent of the landslide dams failed in less than 1 day after formation, and half failed within 10 days. Overtopping was by far the most frequent cause of landslide-dam failure. Backwater flooding behind landslide dams can inundate communities and valuable agricultural land. Floods from the failure of landslide dams are smaller than floods from constructed dams impounding bodies of water with the same potential energy, but larger than floods from failure of ice dams. Secondary effects of landslide-dam failures include additional landslides as reservoir levels drop rapidly, aggradation of valleys upstream and downstream of the dams, and avulsive channel changes downstream.

  20. What is adenine doing in photolyase?

    PubMed

    Acocella, Angela; Jones, Garth A; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2010-03-25

    The short answer to the title question is that it acts as an electrostatic bouncer that shoves the charge flow from flavin toward the DNA lesion that photolyase repairs. This explanation is provided by an explicit time-dependent quantum mechanical approach, which is used to investigate the electron transfer process that triggers the repair mechanism. The transfer occurs from the flavin photolyase cofactor to the cyclobutane ring of DNA, previously formed by light-induced cycloaddition of adjacent pyrimidine bases. The electron wave function dynamics accurately accounts for the previously proposed mechanism of transfer via the terminal methyl group of the flavin moiety present in the catalytic electron-donor cofactor, FADH(-), which also contains adenine. This latter moiety, which has often been assumed to be present mainly for structural reasons, instantaneously modifies the interaction between acceptor and donor by a variation of the electrostatic interactions so that the presence of its local atomic charges is necessary to trigger the transfer. In principle, knowledge of the details of the electron transfer dynamics and of the important role of polarization effects can be exploited to improve the efficiency of the repair mechanism in artificial systems.

  1. Ultraviolet Photostability of Adenine on Gold and Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo-Martí, Eva; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Martín-Gago, Jose-Angel

    2009-08-01

    The adenine molecule is a DNA nucleobase, an essential component of genetic material. Because of the important role of DNA nucleobases in terrestrial biochemistry, we have studied the molecular adsorption, orientation, and chemical binding of adenine on metallic and semiconducting surfaces, such as gold and silicon, respectively, and their stability toward ultraviolet radiation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) techniques. We have exposed the adenine surface system to UV radiation (200-400 nm) under a high-vacuum environment (10-7 mbar) to study the photostability and photochemistry of adenine on different surfaces. After 10 or 24 hours of exposure under interplanetary space conditions, UV radiation induces desorption and partial dissociation of the molecule, which is dependant on the nature of the surface. The electronic excitations, induced in the material by UV absorption, play a major role in the photodestruction of the absorbed molecules on the solid surfaces.

  2. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  3. 16. Parker Dam, only top fourth of dam visible, at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Parker Dam, only top fourth of dam visible, at 320' high, Parker Dam is one of the highest in the world. Much of this height is because dam penetrates well below river bottom to fasten to bedrock. - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  4. 9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Excavation work at Pleasant Dam (now called Waddell Dam). Photographer unknown, July, 22, 1926. Source: Maricopa County Municipal Water Conservation District Number One (MWD). - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 51. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- TAINTER GATE -- GENERAL ARRANGEMENT. M-L 26(R) 45/1 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  6. Dam methylation regulates the expression of SPI-5-encoded sopB gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Buzzola, Fernanda; García, Mauro D; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Cerquetti, María C

    2014-08-01

    DNA adenine methylation is an essential factor in Salmonella virulence. Here, we investigate the involvement of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) in the expression and translocation of a SPI-5-encoded effector of S. Typhimurium. SopB expression and secretion were determined using SopB-FLAG-tagged wild type and dam strains of S. Typhimurium. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the dam mutant expresses lower levels of SopB protein and sopB mRNA than the wild type strain under SPI-1 and SPI-2 inducing conditions in vitro. SopB secretion was also considerably impaired in the absence of dam. In agreement with in vitro experiments, SopB synthesis in dam mutants recovered from infected epithelial cells and from murine mesenteric lymph nodes was reduced by 40% respect to the wild type strain (p < 0.05). SopB translocation was neither detected in the cytosol of epithelial cells nor in the cytosol of cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes infected with the dam mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in S. Typhimurium, Dam methylation modulates the expression and translocation of SPI-5-encoded SopB effector.

  7. Dam methylation regulates the expression of SPI-5-encoded sopB gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Giacomodonato, Mónica N; Llana, Mariángeles Noto; Castañeda, María del Rosario Aya; Buzzola, Fernanda; García, Mauro D; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Sarnacki, Sebastián H; Cerquetti, María C

    2014-08-01

    DNA adenine methylation is an essential factor in Salmonella virulence. Here, we investigate the involvement of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) in the expression and translocation of a SPI-5-encoded effector of S. Typhimurium. SopB expression and secretion were determined using SopB-FLAG-tagged wild type and dam strains of S. Typhimurium. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that the dam mutant expresses lower levels of SopB protein and sopB mRNA than the wild type strain under SPI-1 and SPI-2 inducing conditions in vitro. SopB secretion was also considerably impaired in the absence of dam. In agreement with in vitro experiments, SopB synthesis in dam mutants recovered from infected epithelial cells and from murine mesenteric lymph nodes was reduced by 40% respect to the wild type strain (p < 0.05). SopB translocation was neither detected in the cytosol of epithelial cells nor in the cytosol of cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes infected with the dam mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in S. Typhimurium, Dam methylation modulates the expression and translocation of SPI-5-encoded SopB effector. PMID:24947562

  8. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  9. Dammed or Damned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes issues raised at a workshop on "People and Dams" organized by the Society for Participatory Research in Asia. Objectives were to (1) understand problems created by dams for people, (2) consider forces affecting displaced populations and rehabilitation efforts, and (3) gain a perspective on popular education efforts among affected…

  10. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  11. Possible prebiotic catalysts formed from adenine and aldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Dumas, L.; Décout, J.-L.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2000-09-01

    Careful examination of the present metabolism and in vitro selection of various catalytic RNAs strongly support the "RNA World" hypothesis of the origin of life. However, in this scenario, the difficult prebiotic synthesis of ribose and consequently of nucleotides remain a major problem. In order to overcome this problem and obtain nucleoside analogs, we are investigating reactions of the nucleic acid base, adenine 1, with different aldehydes under presumably prebiotic conditions. In the reaction of adenine and pyruvaldehyde 2 in water, we report here the formation in high yield of two isomeric products. These compounds possessing alcohols functions as nucleosides result from condensation of two molecules of pyruvaldehyde on the 6-amino group of one adenine molecule. Their catalytic activities in the model hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylesters appeared interesting in the search of prebiotic catalysts.

  12. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  13. 1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GORGE HIGH DAM. THIS THIN ARCH DAM WITH A GRAVITY SECTION IS THE THIRD DAM BUILT BY SEATTLE CITY LIGHT TO PROVIDE WATER FOR GORGE POWERHOUSE AND WAS COMPLETED IN 1961, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  14. Sensitive SERS detection of DNA methyltransferase by target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Chuanfeng; Han, Huixia; Zhao, Caisheng; Zhang, Xiaoru

    2016-07-15

    A novel and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method is proposed for the assay of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and evaluation of inhibitors by developing a target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy. By using of a duplex substrate for Dam MTase, two hairpin templates and a Raman probe, multiple signal amplification mode is achieved. Once recognized by Dam MTase, the duplex substrate can be cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease and two primers are released for triggering the multiple signal amplification reaction. Consequently, a wide dynamic range and remarkably high sensitivity are obtained under isothermal conditions. The detection limit is 2.57×10(-4)UmL(-1). This assay exhibits an excellent selectivity and is successfully applied in the screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. In addition, this novel sensing system is potentially universal as the recognition element can be conveniently designed for other target analytes by changing the substrate of DNA MTase.

  15. Lineage-Specific Methyltransferases Define the Methylome of the Globally Disseminated Escherichia coli ST131 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Ashcroft, Melinda M.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Sarkar, Sohinee; Peters, Kate M.; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Upton, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a clone of uropathogenic E. coli that has emerged rapidly and disseminated globally in both clinical and community settings. Members of the ST131 lineage from across the globe have been comprehensively characterized in terms of antibiotic resistance, virulence potential, and pathogenicity, but to date nothing is known about the methylome of these important human pathogens. Here we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) PacBio sequencing to determine the methylome of E. coli EC958, the most-well-characterized completely sequenced ST131 strain. Our analysis of 52,081 methylated adenines in the genome of EC958 discovered three m6A methylation motifs that have not been described previously. Subsequent SMRT sequencing of isogenic knockout mutants identified the two type I methyltransferases (MTases) and one type IIG MTase responsible for m6A methylation of novel recognition sites. Although both type I sites were rare, the type IIG sites accounted for more than 12% of all methylated adenines in EC958. Analysis of the distribution of MTase genes across 95 ST131 genomes revealed their prevalence is highly conserved within the ST131 lineage, with most variation due to the presence or absence of mobile genetic elements on which individual MTase genes are located. PMID:26578678

  16. Identification of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto Cesar; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and virulence in some pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we describe DNA methyltransferases (MTases) present in human pathogenic bacteria and compared them with related species, which are not pathogenic or less pathogenic, based in comparative genomics. We performed a search in the KEGG database of the KEGG database orthology groups associated with adenine and cytosine DNA MTase activities (EC: 2.1.1.37, EC: 2.1.1.113 and EC: 2.1.1.72) in 37 human pathogenic species and 18 non/less pathogenic relatives and performed comparisons of the number of these MTases sequences according to their genome size, the DNA MTase type and with their non-less pathogenic relatives. We observed that Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria spp. presented the highest number of MTases while ten different species did not present a predicted DNA MTase. We also detected a significant increase of adenine MTases over cytosine MTases (2.19 vs. 1.06, respectively, p < 0.001). Adenine MTases were the only MTases associated with restriction modification systems and DNA MTases associated with type I restriction modification systems were more numerous than those associated with type III restriction modification systems (0.84 vs. 0.17, p < 0.001); additionally, there was no correlation with the genome size and the total number of DNA MTases, indicating that the number of DNA MTases is related to the particular evolution and lifestyle of specific species, regulating the expression of virulence genes in some pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Identification of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Human Pathogenic Bacteria by Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Poot-Hernández, Augusto Cesar; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression and virulence in some pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we describe DNA methyltransferases (MTases) present in human pathogenic bacteria and compared them with related species, which are not pathogenic or less pathogenic, based in comparative genomics. We performed a search in the KEGG database of the KEGG database orthology groups associated with adenine and cytosine DNA MTase activities (EC: 2.1.1.37, EC: 2.1.1.113 and EC: 2.1.1.72) in 37 human pathogenic species and 18 non/less pathogenic relatives and performed comparisons of the number of these MTases sequences according to their genome size, the DNA MTase type and with their non-less pathogenic relatives. We observed that Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria spp. presented the highest number of MTases while ten different species did not present a predicted DNA MTase. We also detected a significant increase of adenine MTases over cytosine MTases (2.19 vs. 1.06, respectively, p < 0.001). Adenine MTases were the only MTases associated with restriction modification systems and DNA MTases associated with type I restriction modification systems were more numerous than those associated with type III restriction modification systems (0.84 vs. 0.17, p < 0.001); additionally, there was no correlation with the genome size and the total number of DNA MTases, indicating that the number of DNA MTases is related to the particular evolution and lifestyle of specific species, regulating the expression of virulence genes in some pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27570304

  18. Innate interferon response in macrophage and epithelial cells infected with wild-type compared to DNA adenine methylase and flagellin mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Simon, Raphael; Samuel, Charles E

    2007-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is highly virulent and mediates robust interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) induction, whereas bacterial mutants that lack the DNA adenine methylase (Dam) are attenuated, elicit a reduced ISG activation profile, and establish immunity to murine typhoid fever. We show here that in contrast to observations in mice, infection of macrophage cell cultures with either wild-type (WT) or dam(-) mutant Salmonella resulted in surprisingly similar kinetics and amplitudes of induction of IFN-beta, the type I IFN-alpha,beta beacon gene Mx, and the type II IFN-gamma beacon inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Likewise, activation of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression in epithelial cells was comparable with WT and dam(-) mutant Salmonella. In contrast, the flagellin-deficient flhC(-) mutant did not activate NF-kappaB in epithelial cells but activated ISG expression comparable to that of WT Salmonella in macrophage cells. WT and dam(-) strains displayed a similar Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-dependent NF-kappaB activation, whereas the flhC(-) mutant lacked this activity. UV-inactivated Salmonella elicited similar ISG induction to that of viable Salmonella in macrophages and mediated the establishment of a functional antiviral state but displayed decreased cytocidal activity. These results establish that the inherent IFN system-inducing capacities of dam(-) and WT Salmonella strains in cultured macrophage and epithelial cells, unlike the mouse, are indistinguishable.

  19. Novel N-terminal and Lysine Methyltransferases That Target Translation Elongation Factor 1A in Yeast and Human.

    PubMed

    Hamey, Joshua J; Winter, Daniel L; Yagoub, Daniel; Overall, Christopher M; Hart-Smith, Gene; Wilkins, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is an essential, highly methylated protein that facilitates translational elongation by delivering aminoacyl-tRNAs to ribosomes. Here, we report a new eukaryotic protein N-terminal methyltransferase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae YLR285W, which methylates eEF1A at a previously undescribed high-stoichiometry N-terminal site and the adjacent lysine. Deletion of YLR285W resulted in the loss of N-terminal and lysine methylation in vivo, whereas overexpression of YLR285W resulted in an increase of methylation at these sites. This was confirmed by in vitro methylation of eEF1A by recombinant YLR285W. Accordingly, we name YLR285W as elongation factor methyltransferase 7 (Efm7). This enzyme is a new type of eukaryotic N-terminal methyltransferase as, unlike the three other known eukaryotic N-terminal methyltransferases, its substrate does not have an N-terminal [A/P/S]-P-K motif. We show that the N-terminal methylation of eEF1A is also present in human; this conservation over a large evolutionary distance suggests it to be of functional importance. This study also reports that the trimethylation of Lys(79) in eEF1A is conserved from yeast to human. The methyltransferase responsible for Lys(79) methylation of human eEF1A is shown to be N6AMT2, previously documented as a putative N(6)-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase. It is the direct ortholog of the recently described yeast Efm5, and we show that Efm5 and N6AMT2 can methylate eEF1A from either species in vitro. We therefore rename N6AMT2 as eEF1A-KMT1. Including the present work, yeast eEF1A is now documented to be methylated by five different methyltransferases, making it one of the few eukaryotic proteins to be extensively methylated by independent enzymes. This implies more extensive regulation of eEF1A by this posttranslational modification than previously appreciated.

  20. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  1. Thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Ziora, Zyta M; Coles, Daniel J; Lin, I-Chun; Toth, Istvan

    2010-05-14

    A novel class of thymine, adenine and lipoamino acid based non-viral carriers for gene delivery has been developed. Their ability to bind to DNA by hydrogen bonding was confirmed by NMR diffusion, isothermal titration calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  2. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity.

  3. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  4. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  5. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  6. Interethnic difference in thiopurine methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Klemetsdal, B; Tollefsen, E; Loennechen, T; Johnsen, K; Utsi, E; Gisholt, K; Wist, E; Aarbakke, J

    1992-01-01

    A number of metabolic pathways are subject to both genetic polymorphism and interethnic differences. A catabolic pathway of 6-mercaptopurine, red blood cell (RBC) thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity showed genetic polymorphism in Caucasians, but variation according to ethnicity has not been studied. We investigated if red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase was subject to interethnic variation in a Saami (Lappish; n = 36) and a Caucasian population (n = 50). The Saami population sample had 29% higher thiopurine methyltransferase activity, 17.0 +/- 3.3 U/ml red blood cell compared with the Caucasian population sample, 13.1 +/- 2.9 U/ml red blood cell (p much less than 0.001). Probit plots and frequency distribution histograms supported bimodality consistent with genetic polymorphism in both study populations. Differences in chronic diseases, drug consumption, age, or gender could not explain the interethnic difference in red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase activity. The higher red blood cell thiopurine methyltransferase activity in the Saami population group indicates that these subjects may require higher dosages of thiopurine drugs than Caucasians.

  7. Mutational analysis of basic residues in the N-terminus of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, G; Bujnicki, J M; Flögel, M

    2004-01-01

    Erm methyltransferases mediate the resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics via dimethylation of a specific adenine residue in 23S rRNA. The role of positively charged N-terminal residues of the ErmC' methyltransferase in RNA binding and/or catalysis was determined. Mutational analysis of amino acids K4 and K7 was performed and the mutants were characterized in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The K4 and K7 residues were suggested not to be essential for the enzyme activity but to provide a considerable support for the catalytic step of the reaction, probably by maintaining the optimum conformation of the transition state through interactions with the phosphate backbone of RNA. PMID:15114858

  8. Mutational analysis of basic residues in the N-terminus of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, G; Bujnicki, J M; Flögel, M

    2004-01-01

    Erm methyltransferases mediate the resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics via dimethylation of a specific adenine residue in 23S rRNA. The role of positively charged N-terminal residues of the ErmC' methyltransferase in RNA binding and/or catalysis was determined. Mutational analysis of amino acids K4 and K7 was performed and the mutants were characterized in in vivo and in vitro experiments. The K4 and K7 residues were suggested not to be essential for the enzyme activity but to provide a considerable support for the catalytic step of the reaction, probably by maintaining the optimum conformation of the transition state through interactions with the phosphate backbone of RNA.

  9. Sequence, internal homology and high-level expression of the gene for a DNA-(cytosine N4)-methyltransferase, M.Pvu II.

    PubMed Central

    Tao, T; Walter, J; Brennan, K J; Cotterman, M M; Blumenthal, R M

    1989-01-01

    The base sequence of the pvuIIM gene has been determined. This gene codes for a DNA-(cytosine N4)-methyltransferase, M.Pvu II. The base sequence contains a single large open reading frame that predicts a 38.3kDa polypeptide, consistent with experimental data. The pvuIIM gene contains some sequences common to DNA methyltransferases in general, but includes none of the sequences specifically conserved among DNA-(cytosine 5)-methyltransferases. The pvuIIM sequence also reveals an internal homology at the amino acid level, each half of which spans over 100 amino acids and is itself homologous to the sequences of some DNA-(adenine N6)-methyltransferases. A derivative of the pvuIIM plasmid was constructed to allow high-level production of M.Pvu II. Specifically, the composite Ptac promoter was inserted 5' to pvuIIM, intervening DNA was deleted, and the resulting construct was used to transform an mcrB laclq strain of Escherichia coli. When this transformant was induced with isopropyl-B-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG), growth rapidly ceased and M.Pvu II accumulated to the point of comprising over 10% of the total soluble protein. Images PMID:2662138

  10. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  11. Dams and Intergovernmental Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.

    2012-12-01

    Gainers and Losers are always associated with large scale hydrological infrastructure construction, such as dams, canals and water treatment facilities. Since most of these projects are public services and public goods, Some of these uneven impacts cannot fully be solved by markets. This paper tried to explore whether the governments are paying any effort to balance the uneven distributional impacts caused by dam construction or not. It showed that dam construction brought an average 2% decrease in per capita tax revenue in the upstream counties, a 30% increase in the dam-location counties and an insignificant increase in downstream counties. Similar distributional impacts were observed for other outcome variables. like rural income and agricultural crop yields, though the impacts differ across different crops. The paper also found some balancing efforts from inter-governmental transfers to reduce the unevenly distributed impacts caused by dam construction. However, overall the inter-governmental fiscal transfer efforts were not large enough to fully correct those uneven distributions, reflected from a 2% decrease of per capita GDP in upstream counties and increase of per capita GDP in local and downstream counties. This paper may shed some lights on the governmental considerations in the decision making process for large hydrological infrastructures.

  12. 52. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- TAINTER GATE HOIST-ASSEMBLY -- PLANS AND ELEVATIONS. M-L 26(R) 46/2 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  13. ECHETA DAM RIPRAP ON RESERVOIR SIDE OF THE DAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ECHETA DAM RIP-RAP ON RESERVOIR SIDE OF THE DAM AT BREACH. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Echeta Dam & Reservoir, 2.9 miles east of Echeta Road at Echeta Railroad Siding at County Road 293, Echeta, Campbell County, WY

  14. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF TIETON DAM, UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM (Trashrack-structure for outlet at lower left in reservoir, spillway at upper left. Reservoir nearly empty due to drought.) - Tieton Dam, South & East of State Highway 12, Naches, Yakima County, WA

  15. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  16. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1. PMID:25869111

  17. Dam health diagnosis and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongru; Su, Huaizhi

    2005-06-01

    Based on the bionics principle in the life sciences field, we regard a dam as a vital and intelligent system. A bionics model is constructed to observe, diagnose and evaluate dam health. The model is composed of a sensing system (nerve), central processing unit (cerebrum) and decision-making implement (organism). In addition, the model, index system and engineering method on dam health assessment are presented. The proposed theories and methods are applied to evaluate dynamically the health of one concrete dam.

  18. COBALAMIN- AND COBAMIDE-DEPENDENT METHYLTRANSFERASES

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Rowena G.; Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim

    2008-01-01

    Methyltransferases that employ cobalamin cofactors, or their analogues the cobamides, as intermediates in catalysis of methyl transfer play vital roles in energy generation in anaerobic unicellular organisms. In a broader range of organisms they are involved in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Although the individual methyl transfer reactions catalyzed are simple SN2 displacements, the required change in coordination at the cobalt of the cobalamin or cobamide cofactors and the lability of the reduced Co+1 intermediates introduces the necessity for complex conformational changes during the catalytic cycle. Recent spectroscopic and structural studies on several of these methyltransferases have helped to reveal the strategies by which these conformational changes are facilitated and controlled. PMID:19059104

  19. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  20. CG-DAMS: Concrete gravity dam stability analysis software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    CG-DAMS is a finite element based program written specifically for the stability analysis of concrete gravity dams. The code automates the prediction and evaluation of cracking in the dam, along the dam-rock interface, and in the foundation using incremental nonlinear analysis techniques based on the smeared crack'' approach. Its primary application is in the computation of dam-rock interface sliding stability factors of safety. The automated procedure for crack propagation analysis replaces the trial-and-error cracked-base analysis method commonly used in gravity dam safety analyses. This Application manual of CG-DAMS illustrates, through sample problems, the many features of the software. Example problems illustrate the capabilities of both CG-DAMS-PC and CG-DAMS-ABAQUS. CG-DAMS-PC is a menu driven program that runs on 386/486 PCs under the DOS operating system (4 Megabytes RAM, 25 Megabytes of hard disk space). CG-DAMS-ABAQUS is a pre- and post-processor along with a concrete constitutive model and distributed load module that interfaces with the ABAQUS general purpose finite element program. The PC program contains thermal analysis capabilities, a rough crack constitutive model, and an interface to the CRFLOOD software not available with the ABAQUS version. The CG-DAMS-ABAQUS program contains time marching dynamic analysis capabilities not available with the PC program. Example analyses presented include static, pseudo dynamic, and time marching dynamic analyses. The manual also presents sensitivity evaluations on mesh size and foundation material strength. Comparisons are presented between CG-DAMS and gravity method calculations. Comparisons with other finite element software are included for the dynamic time history analyses.

  1. Examination of tyrosine/adenine stacking interactions in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kari L; Pellock, Samuel J; Cox, James R; Cafiero, Mauricio L; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2013-11-14

    The π-stacking interactions between tyrosine amino acid side chains and adenine-bearing ligands are examined. Crystalline protein structures from the protein data bank (PDB) exhibiting face-to-face tyrosine/adenine arrangements were used to construct 20 unique 4-methylphenol/N9-methyladenine (p-cresol/9MeA) model systems. Full geometry optimization of the 20 crystal structures with the M06-2X density functional theory method identified 11 unique low-energy conformations. CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limit interaction energies were estimated for all of the structures to determine the magnitude of the interaction between the two ring systems. CCSD(T) computations with double-ζ basis sets (e.g., 6-31G*(0.25) and aug-cc-pVDZ) indicate that the MP2 method overbinds by as much as 3.07 kcal mol(-1) for the crystal structures and 3.90 kcal mol(-1) for the optimized structures. In the 20 crystal structures, the estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy ranges from -4.00 to -6.83 kcal mol(-1), with an average interaction energy of -5.47 kcal mol(-1), values remarkably similar to the corresponding data for phenylalanine/adenine stacking interactions. Geometry optimization significantly increases the interaction energies of the p-cresol/9MeA model systems. The average estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy of the 11 optimized structures is 3.23 kcal mol(-1) larger than that for the 20 crystal structures.

  2. Crystal Structure of Human DNA Methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Shuo; Lin, Krystal; Luo, Youfu; Perry, John Jefferson; Wang, Yinsheng; Song, Jikui

    2015-07-31

    DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is responsible for propagating the DNA methylation patterns during DNA replication. DNMT1 contains, in addition to a C-terminal methyltransferase domain, a large N-terminal regulatory region that is composed of an RFTS (replication foci targeting sequence) domain, a CXXC zinc finger domain and a pair of BAH (bromo adjacent homology) domains. The regulatory domains of DNMT1 mediate a network of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to control the recruitment and enzymatic activity of DNMT1. Here we report the crystal structure of human DNMT1 with all the structural domains (hDNMT1, residues 351-1600) in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine at 2.62Å resolution. The RFTS domain directly associates with the methyltransferase domain, thereby inhibiting the substrate binding of hDNMT1. Through structural analysis, mutational, biochemical and enzymatic studies, we further identify that a linker sequence between the CXXC and BAH1 domains, aside from its role in the CXXC domain-mediated DNMT1 autoinhibition, serves as an important regulatory element in the RFTS domain-mediated autoinhibition. In comparison with the previously determined structure of mouse DNMT1, this study also reveals a number of distinct structural features that may underlie subtle functional diversity observed for the two orthologues. In addition, this structure provides a framework for understanding the functional consequence of disease-related hDNMT1 mutations.

  3. Synthesis and Assays of Inhibitors of Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-C; Kapilashrami, K; Luo, M

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation requires site-specific modification of the genome and is involved in multiple physiological processes and disease etiology. Methyltransferases, which catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to various substrates, are critical components of the epigenetic machinery. This group of enzymes can methylate diverse substrates including DNA, RNA, proteins, and small-molecule metabolites. Their dysregulation has also been implicated in multiple disease states such as cancer, neurological, and cardiovascular disorders. Developing potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of methyltransferases is valuable not only for therapeutic intervention but also for investigating the roles of these enzymes in disease progression. In this chapter, we will discuss the strategies of designing and synthesizing methyltransferases inhibitors based on the SAM scaffold. Following the section of inhibitor design, we will briefly review representative assays that are available to evaluate the potency of these inhibitors along with a detailed description of the most commonly used radiometric assay. PMID:27423865

  4. A non-parametric peak calling algorithm for DamID-Seq.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhua; Hempel, Leonie U; Jiang, Tingbo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a significant role in gene regulation and expression. In order to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) of double sex (DSX)-an important transcription factor in sex determination, we applied the DNA adenine methylation identification (DamID) technology to the fat body tissue of Drosophila, followed by deep sequencing (DamID-Seq). One feature of DamID-Seq data is that induced adenine methylation signals are not assured to be symmetrically distributed at TFBS, which renders the existing peak calling algorithms for ChIP-Seq, including SPP and MACS, inappropriate for DamID-Seq data. This challenged us to develop a new algorithm for peak calling. A challenge in peaking calling based on sequence data is estimating the averaged behavior of background signals. We applied a bootstrap resampling method to short sequence reads in the control (Dam only). After data quality check and mapping reads to a reference genome, the peaking calling procedure compromises the following steps: 1) reads resampling; 2) reads scaling (normalization) and computing signal-to-noise fold changes; 3) filtering; 4) Calling peaks based on a statistically significant threshold. This is a non-parametric method for peak calling (NPPC). We also used irreproducible discovery rate (IDR) analysis, as well as ChIP-Seq data to compare the peaks called by the NPPC. We identified approximately 6,000 peaks for DSX, which point to 1,225 genes related to the fat body tissue difference between female and male Drosophila. Statistical evidence from IDR analysis indicated that these peaks are reproducible across biological replicates. In addition, these peaks are comparable to those identified by use of ChIP-Seq on S2 cells, in terms of peak number, location, and peaks width.

  5. A non-parametric peak calling algorithm for DamID-Seq.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhua; Hempel, Leonie U; Jiang, Tingbo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a significant role in gene regulation and expression. In order to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) of double sex (DSX)-an important transcription factor in sex determination, we applied the DNA adenine methylation identification (DamID) technology to the fat body tissue of Drosophila, followed by deep sequencing (DamID-Seq). One feature of DamID-Seq data is that induced adenine methylation signals are not assured to be symmetrically distributed at TFBS, which renders the existing peak calling algorithms for ChIP-Seq, including SPP and MACS, inappropriate for DamID-Seq data. This challenged us to develop a new algorithm for peak calling. A challenge in peaking calling based on sequence data is estimating the averaged behavior of background signals. We applied a bootstrap resampling method to short sequence reads in the control (Dam only). After data quality check and mapping reads to a reference genome, the peaking calling procedure compromises the following steps: 1) reads resampling; 2) reads scaling (normalization) and computing signal-to-noise fold changes; 3) filtering; 4) Calling peaks based on a statistically significant threshold. This is a non-parametric method for peak calling (NPPC). We also used irreproducible discovery rate (IDR) analysis, as well as ChIP-Seq data to compare the peaks called by the NPPC. We identified approximately 6,000 peaks for DSX, which point to 1,225 genes related to the fat body tissue difference between female and male Drosophila. Statistical evidence from IDR analysis indicated that these peaks are reproducible across biological replicates. In addition, these peaks are comparable to those identified by use of ChIP-Seq on S2 cells, in terms of peak number, location, and peaks width. PMID:25785608

  6. A comparison of adenine and some derivatives on pig isolated tracheal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Dieterle, Y.; Holden, W. E.; Junod, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    We studied the muscle relaxation induced by adenine and several adenine derivatives in strips of tracheal smooth muscle from pigs; in addition their metabolism by the tissue was examined. Adenine relaxed tissue which was contracted by carbachol, histamine, or KCl. Adenine's potency was similar to that of adenosine and ATP (threshold about 4 X 10(-5)M). In tissues with carbachol-induced tone, the adenine effect differed from adenosine and ATP by being slower in onset and in 'washout' time. Furthermore, neither dipyridamole nor theophylline modified the response to adenine. The relationship was examined between pharmacological effects and the metabolism of [3H]-adenosine and [3H]-adenine. Both substrates were taken up by the tissue and converted to nucleotides, but relaxation correlated with nucleotide accumulation only in the case of [3H]-adenine. We conclude that the site and mechanism of adenine-induced relaxation is different from that of adenosine and ATP in porcine tracheal muscle. PMID:6571222

  7. Substrate Specificity of the HEMK2 Protein Glutamine Methyltransferase and Identification of Novel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kusevic, Denis; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Jeltsch, Albert

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial HEMK2 homologs initially had been proposed to be involved in heme biogenesis or to function as adenine DNA methyltransferase. Later it was shown that this family of enzymes has protein glutamine methyltransferase activity, and they methylate the glutamine residue in the GGQ motif of ribosomal translation termination factors. The murine HEMK2 enzyme methylates Gln(185) of the eukaryotic translation termination factor eRF1. We have employed peptide array libraries to investigate the peptide sequence recognition specificity of murine HEMK2. Our data show that HEMK2 requires a GQX3R motif for methylation activity. In addition, amino acid preferences were observed between the -3 and +7 positions of the peptide substrate (considering the target glutamine as 0), including a preference for Ser, Arg, and Gly at the +1 and a preference for Arg at the +7 position. Based on our specificity profile, we identified several human proteins that contain putative HEMK2 methylation sites and show that HEMK2 methylates 58 novel peptide substrates. After cloning, expression, and purification of the corresponding protein domains, we confirmed methylation for 11 of them at the protein level. Transfected CHD5 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 5) and NUT (nuclear protein in testis) were also demonstrated to be methylated by HEMK2 in human HEK293 cells. Our data expand the range of proteins potentially subjected to glutamine methylation significantly, but further investigation will be required to understand the function of HEMK2-mediated methylation in proteins other than eRF1. PMID:26797129

  8. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  9. Mitochondrial 16S rRNA Is Methylated by tRNA Methyltransferase TRMT61B in All Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Frumkin, Idan; Yashiro, Yuka; Chujo, Takeshi; Ishigami, Yuma; Chemla, Yonatan; Blumberg, Amit; Schlesinger, Orr; Bieri, Philipp; Greber, Basil; Ban, Nenad; Zarivach, Raz; Alfonta, Lital; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Mishmar, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial ribosome, which translates all mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded proteins, should be tightly regulated pre- and post-transcriptionally. Recently, we found RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) at human mitochondrial 16S (large) rRNA position 947 that were indicative of post-transcriptional modification. Here, we show that these 16S rRNA RDDs result from a 1-methyladenosine (m1A) modification introduced by TRMT61B, thus being the first vertebrate methyltransferase that modifies both tRNA and rRNAs. m1A947 is conserved in humans and all vertebrates having adenine at the corresponding mtDNA position (90% of vertebrates). However, this mtDNA base is a thymine in 10% of the vertebrates and a guanine in the 23S rRNA of 95% of bacteria, suggesting alternative evolutionary solutions. m1A, uridine, or guanine may stabilize the local structure of mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomes. Experimental assessment of genome-edited Escherichia coli showed that unmodified adenine caused impaired protein synthesis and growth. Our findings revealed a conserved mechanism of rRNA modification that has been selected instead of DNA mutations to enable proper mitochondrial ribosome function. PMID:27631568

  10. Modelling proton tunnelling in the adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Godbeer, A D; Al-Khalili, J S; Stevenson, P D

    2015-05-21

    The energies of the canonical (standard, amino-keto) and tautomeric (non-standard, imino-enol) charge-neutral forms of the adenine-thymine base pair (A-T and A*-T*, respectively) are calculated using density functional theory. The reaction pathway is then computed using a transition state search to provide the asymmetric double-well potential minima along with the barrier height and shape, which are combined to create the potential energy surface using a polynomial fit. The influence of quantum tunnelling on proton transfer within a base pair H-bond (modelled as the DFT deduced double-well potential) is then investigated by solving the time-dependent master equation for the density matrix. The effect on a quantum system by its surrounding water molecules is explored via the inclusion of a dissipative Lindblad term in the master equation, in which the environment is modelled as a heat bath of harmonic oscillators. It is found that quantum tunnelling, due to transitions to higher energy eigenstates with significant amplitudes in the shallow (tautomeric) side of the potential, is unlikely to be a significant mechanism for the creation of adenine-thymine tautomers within DNA, with thermally assisted coupling of the environment only able to boost the tunnelling probability to a maximum of 2 × 10(-9). This is barely increased for different choices of the starting wave function or when the geometry of the potential energy surface is varied.

  11. Mutants of Neurospora deficient in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R E; Selitrennikoff, C P; Siegel, R W

    1975-01-01

    A new screening technique has been developed for the rapid identification of Neurospora crassa mutants that are deficient in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase (NADase) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate glycohydrolase (NADPase) activities. Using this procedure, five single-gene mutants were isolated whose singular difference from wild type appeared to be the absence of NAD(P)ase (EC 3.2.2.6). All five mutants were found to be genetically allelic and did not complement in heterocaryons. This gene, nada [NAD(P)ase], was localized in linkage group IV. One of the nada alleles was found to specify an enzyme that was critically temperature sensitive and had altered substrate affinity. Mutations at the nada locus did not affect the genetic program for the expression of NAD(P)ase during cell differentiation, nor did they have a general effect on NAD catabolism. Nada mutations did not have simultaneous effects on other glycohydrolase activities. Tests of dominance (in heterocaryons) and in vitro mixing experiments did not provide evidence that nada mutations alter activators or inhibitors of NAD(P)ase. Thus, the nada gene appears to specify only the structure of N. crassa NAD(P)ase. Images PMID:165174

  12. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  13. 1000 dams down and counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.; Duda, Jeff J.; Grant, Gordon E.

    2015-01-01

    Forty years ago, the demolition of large dams was mostly fiction, notably plotted in Edward Abbey's novel The Monkey Wrench Gang. Its 1975 publication roughly coincided with the end of large-dam construction in the United States. Since then, dams have been taken down in increasing numbers as they have filled with sediment, become unsafe or inefficient, or otherwise outlived their usefulness (1) (see the figure, panel A). Last year's removals of the 64-m-high Glines Canyon Dam and the 32-m-high Elwha Dam in northwestern Washington State were among the largest yet, releasing over 10 million cubic meters of stored sediment. Published studies conducted in conjunction with about 100 U.S. dam removals and at least 26 removals outside the United States are now providing detailed insights into how rivers respond (2, 3).

  14. Health impacts of large dams

    SciTech Connect

    Lerer, L.B.; Scudder, T.

    1999-03-01

    Large dams have been criticized because of their negative environmental and social impacts. Public health interest largely has focused on vector-borne diseases, such as schistosomiasis, associated with reservoirs and irrigation projects. Large dams also influence health through changes in water and food security, increases in communicable diseases, and the social disruption caused by construction and involuntary resettlement. Communities living in close proximity to large dams often do not benefit from water transfer and electricity generation revenues. A comprehensive health component is required in environmental and social impact assessments for large dam projects.

  15. Sequence-specific labeling of nucleic acids and proteins with methyltransferases and cofactor analogues.

    PubMed

    Hanz, Gisela Maria; Jung, Britta; Giesbertz, Anna; Juhasz, Matyas; Weinhold, Elmar

    2014-11-22

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet or SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase) catalyze the transfer of the activated methyl group from AdoMet to specific positions in DNA, RNA, proteins and small biomolecules. This natural methylation reaction can be expanded to a wide variety of alkylation reactions using synthetic cofactor analogues. Replacement of the reactive sulfonium center of AdoMet with an aziridine ring leads to cofactors which can be coupled with DNA by various DNA MTases. These aziridine cofactors can be equipped with reporter groups at different positions of the adenine moiety and used for Sequence-specific Methyltransferase-Induced Labeling of DNA (SMILing DNA). As a typical example we give a protocol for biotinylation of pBR322 plasmid DNA at the 5'-ATCGAT-3' sequence with the DNA MTase M.BseCI and the aziridine cofactor 6BAz in one step. Extension of the activated methyl group with unsaturated alkyl groups results in another class of AdoMet analogues which are used for methyltransferase-directed Transfer of Activated Groups (mTAG). Since the extended side chains are activated by the sulfonium center and the unsaturated bond, these cofactors are called double-activated AdoMet analogues. These analogues not only function as cofactors for DNA MTases, like the aziridine cofactors, but also for RNA, protein and small molecule MTases. They are typically used for enzymatic modification of MTase substrates with unique functional groups which are labeled with reporter groups in a second chemical step. This is exemplified in a protocol for fluorescence labeling of histone H3 protein. A small propargyl group is transferred from the cofactor analogue SeAdoYn to the protein by the histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) MTase Set7/9 followed by click labeling of the alkynylated histone H3 with TAMRA azide. MTase-mediated labeling with cofactor analogues is an enabling technology for many exciting applications including identification and functional study of MTase substrates as

  16. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of pea seed glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Knight, T J; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-08-15

    The effects of adenine nucleotides on pea seed glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) activity were examined as a part of our investigation of the regulation of this octameric plant enzyme. Saturation curves for glutamine synthetase activity versus ATP with ADP as the changing fixed inhibitor were not hyperbolic; greater apparent Vmax values were observed in the presence of added ADP than the Vmax observed in the absence of ADP. Hill plots of data with ADP present curved upward and crossed the plot with no added ADP. The stoichiometry of adenine nucleotide binding to glutamine synthetase was examined. Two molecules of [gamma-32P]ATP were bound per subunit in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. These ATP molecules were bound at an allosteric site and at the active site. One molecule of either [gamma-32P]ATP or [14C]ADP bound per subunit in the absence of methionine sulfoximine; this nucleotide was bound at an allosteric site. ADP and ATP compete for binding at the allosteric site, although ADP was preferred. ADP binding to the allosteric site proceeded in two kinetic phases. A Vmax value of 1.55 units/mg was measured for glutamine synthetase with one ADP tightly bound per enzyme subunit; a Vmax value of 0.8 unit/mg was measured for enzyme with no adenine nucleotide bound at the allosteric site. The enzyme activation caused by the binding of ADP to the allosteric sites was preceded by a lag phase, the length of which was dependent on the ADP concentration. Enzyme incubated in 10 mM ADP bound approximately 4 mol of ADP/mol of native enzyme before activation was observed; the activation was complete when 7-8 mol of ADP were bound per mol of the octameric, native enzyme. The Km for ATP (2 mM) was not changed by ADP binding to the allosteric sites. ADP was a simple competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.05 mM) of ATP for glutamine synthetase with eight molecules of ADP tightly bound to the allosteric sites of the octamer. Binding of ATP to the allosteric sites led to marked

  17. Major and minor groove conformations of DNA trimers modified on guanine or adenine by 4-aminobiphenyl: Adenine adducts favor the minor groove

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.; Ellis, S.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the conformational effects of 4-aminobiphenyl modification at C-8 of guanine or adenine on double-stranded DNA trimers. We used sequences with the modified purine at the central base pair and all 16 possible neighboring sequences at the outer pairs. Minimized potential energy calculations were carried out using the molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to survey the conformation space of these adducts, using a total of 1280 starting structures both in the modified guanine series and in the modified adenine series. Conformer families in which the bound 4-aminobiphenyl was located in the DNA major groove, and in the minor groove, were located for both adenine and guanine modification. In the modified guanine series, the major and minor groove families were roughly comparable in energy, and the sequence context determined which was more stable in a particular case. In the modified adenine series, however, the minor groove structure was more that 10 kcal/mol more stable than the major groove for all sequences. As a result, minor groove adducts provided most of the global minima in the adenine-modified series. This result may be relevant to a previous mutagenesis study [Lasko et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15429-15435] in which the hot spot of most frequent occurrence was located at an adenine, in the sequence GAT. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  19. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  20. A 7-Deazaadenosylaziridine Cofactor for Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA by the DNA Cytosine-C5 Methyltransferase M.HhaI.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Falk; Lurz, Rudi; Weinhold, Elmar

    2015-11-23

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) catalyze the transfer of the activated methyl group of the cofactor S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet or SAM) to the exocyclic amino groups of adenine or cytosine or the C5 ring atom of cytosine within specific DNA sequences. The DNA adenine-N6 MTase from Thermus aquaticus (M.TaqI) is also capable of coupling synthetic N-adenosylaziridine cofactor analogues to its target adenine within the double-stranded 5'-TCGA-3' sequence. This M.TaqI-mediated coupling reaction was exploited to sequence-specifically deliver fluorophores and biotin to DNA using N-adenosylaziridine derivatives carrying reporter groups at the 8-position of the adenine ring. However, these 8-modified aziridine cofactors were poor substrates for the DNA cytosine-C5 MTase from Haemophilus haemolyticus (M.HhaI). Based on the crystal structure of M.HhaI in complex with a duplex oligodeoxynucleotide and the cofactor product, we synthesized a stable 7-deazaadenosylaziridine derivative with a biotin group attached to the 7-position via a flexible linker. This 7-modified aziridine cofactor can be efficiently used by M.HhaI for the direct, quantitative and sequence-specific delivery of biotin to the second cytosine within 5'-GCGC-3' sequences in short duplex oligodeoxynucleotides and plasmid DNA. In addition, we demonstrate that biotinylation by M.HhaI depends on the methylation status of the target cytosine and, thus, could provide a method for cytosine-C5 DNA methylation detection in mammalian DNA.

  1. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam's vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use of

  2. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nonveiller, E.; Rupcic, J. |; Sever, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  3. Characterization of prenylated protein methyltransferase in Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Hasne, M P; Lawrence, F

    1999-01-01

    Prenylated protein methyltransferase, an enzyme involved in the post-translational modification of many signalling proteins, has been characterized in a parasitic flagellated protozoan, Leishmania donovani. The activity of this enzyme was monitored by the methylation of an artificial substrate, an S-prenylated cysteine analogue, with S-adenosyl-l-[methyl-(3)H]methionine as methyl donor. More than 85% of the methyltransferase activity was associated with membranes. The enzyme methylates N-acetyl-S-trans, trans-farnesyl-l-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-all-trans-geranylgeranyl-l-cysteine, but N-acetyl-S-trans, trans-geranyl-l-cysteine only very weakly. In contrast with the enzyme from mammals, the leishmanial enzyme had a greater affinity for the farnesylated substrate than for the geranylgeranylated one. Activity in vitro was not modulated by cAMP, protein kinase C activator or guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. An analysis of the endogenous substrates showed that the carboxymethylated proteins were also isoprenylated. The main carboxymethylated proteins have molecular masses of 95, 68, 55, 46, 34-23, 18 and less than 14 kDa. Treatment of cells with N-acetyl-S-trans,trans-farnesyl-l-cysteine decreased the carboxymethylation level, whereas treatment with guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate increased the carboxymethylation of various proteins, particularly those of molecular masses 30-20 kDa. PMID:10477261

  4. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. Association of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) containing nucleobase multiple hydrogen bonding of adenine for DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Chen, Jem-Kun; Cheng, Chih-Chia; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this study we used the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a medium to generate PNIPAAm-adenine supramolecular complexes. A nucleobase-like hydrogen bonding (NLHB) between PNIPAAm and adenine was found that changed the morphology, crystalline structure, and temperature responsiveness of PNIPAAm microgels relatively to the adenine concentrations. With increasing the adenine concentration, the PNIPAAm-adenine supramolecular complexes gradually altered their morphologies from microgel particles to thin film structures and suppressed the thermodynamical coil-to-globule transition of PNIPAAm because of the NLHB existed between the PNIPAAm amide and ester groups and the adenine amide groups (Cdbnd O⋯Hsbnd N and Nsbnd H⋯Nsbnd R), verified by FTIR spectral analysis. NLHB was also diverse and extensive upon increasing the temperature; therefore, the thermoresponsive behavior of the complexes was altered with the NLBH intensity, evaluated by the inter-association equilibrium constant (Ka) above and below their LCST. Therefore, PNIPAAm can be as a medium to recognize adenine in various concentrations, which could potentially be applied in DNA recognition.

  6. Evolution of novel O-methyltransferases from the Vanilla planifolia caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaijun Michael; Rotter, David; Hartman, Thomas G; Pak, Fulya E; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2006-06-01

    The biosynthesis of many plant secondary compounds involves the methylation of one or more hydroxyl groups, catalyzed by O-methyltransferases (OMTs). Here, we report the characterization of two OMTs, Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3, from the orchid Vanilla planifolia Andrews. These enzymes catalyze the methylation of a single outer hydroxyl group in substrates possessing a 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene moiety, such as methyl gallate and myricetin. This is a substrate requirement not previously reported for any OMTs. Based on sequence analysis these enzymes are most similar to caffeic acid O-methyltransferases (COMTs), but they have negligible activity with typical COMT substrates. Seven of 12 conserved substrate-binding residues in COMTs are altered in Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences suggests that Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3 evolved from the V. planifolia COMT. These V. planifolia OMTs are new instances of COMT-like enzymes with novel substrate preferences.

  7. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  8. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model.

  9. A nonpyrrolysine member of the widely distributed trimethylamine methyltransferase family is a glycine betaine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ticak, Tomislav; Kountz, Duncan J; Girosky, Kimberly E; Krzycki, Joseph A; Ferguson, Donald J

    2014-10-28

    COG5598 comprises a large number of proteins related to MttB, the trimethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase. MttB has a genetically encoded pyrrolysine residue proposed essential for catalysis. MttB is the only known trimethylamine methyltransferase, yet the great majority of members of COG5598 lack pyrrolysine, leaving the activity of these proteins an open question. Here, we describe the function of one of the nonpyrrolysine members of this large protein family. Three nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs are encoded in Desulfitobacterium hafniense, a Gram-positive strict anaerobe present in both the environment and human intestine. D. hafniense was found capable of growth on glycine betaine with electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate, producing dimethylglycine and CO2 as products. Examination of the genome revealed genes for tetrahydrofolate-linked oxidation of a methyl group originating from a methylated corrinoid protein, but no obvious means to carry out corrinoid methylation with glycine betaine. DSY3156, encoding one of the nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs, was up-regulated during growth on glycine betaine. The recombinant DSY3156 protein converts glycine betaine and cob(I)alamin to dimethylglycine and methylcobalamin. To our knowledge, DSY3156 is the first glycine betaine:corrinoid methyltransferase described, and a designation of MtgB is proposed. In addition, DSY3157, an adjacently encoded protein, was shown to be a methylcobalamin:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase and is designated MtgA. Homologs of MtgB are widely distributed, especially in marine bacterioplankton and nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts. They are also found in multiple members of the human microbiome, and may play a beneficial role in trimethylamine homeostasis, which in recent years has been directly tied to human cardiovascular health.

  10. A nonpyrrolysine member of the widely distributed trimethylamine methyltransferase family is a glycine betaine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ticak, Tomislav; Kountz, Duncan J.; Girosky, Kimberly E.; Krzycki, Joseph A.; Ferguson, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    COG5598 comprises a large number of proteins related to MttB, the trimethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase. MttB has a genetically encoded pyrrolysine residue proposed essential for catalysis. MttB is the only known trimethylamine methyltransferase, yet the great majority of members of COG5598 lack pyrrolysine, leaving the activity of these proteins an open question. Here, we describe the function of one of the nonpyrrolysine members of this large protein family. Three nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs are encoded in Desulfitobacterium hafniense, a Gram-positive strict anaerobe present in both the environment and human intestine. D. hafniense was found capable of growth on glycine betaine with electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate, producing dimethylglycine and CO2 as products. Examination of the genome revealed genes for tetrahydrofolate-linked oxidation of a methyl group originating from a methylated corrinoid protein, but no obvious means to carry out corrinoid methylation with glycine betaine. DSY3156, encoding one of the nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs, was up-regulated during growth on glycine betaine. The recombinant DSY3156 protein converts glycine betaine and cob(I)alamin to dimethylglycine and methylcobalamin. To our knowledge, DSY3156 is the first glycine betaine:corrinoid methyltransferase described, and a designation of MtgB is proposed. In addition, DSY3157, an adjacently encoded protein, was shown to be a methylcobalamin:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase and is designated MtgA. Homologs of MtgB are widely distributed, especially in marine bacterioplankton and nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts. They are also found in multiple members of the human microbiome, and may play a beneficial role in trimethylamine homeostasis, which in recent years has been directly tied to human cardiovascular health. PMID:25313086

  11. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam’s vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use

  12. Structures of NS5 Methyltransferase from Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Coloma, Javier; Jain, Rinku; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2016-09-20

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) poses a major public health emergency. To aid in the development of antivirals, we present two high-resolution crystal structures of the ZIKV NS5 methyltransferase: one bound to S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and the other bound to SAM and 7-methyl guanosine diphosphate (7-MeGpp). We identify features of ZIKV NS5 methyltransferase that lend to structure-based antiviral drug discovery. Specifically, SAM analogs with functionalities on the Cβ atom of the methionine portion of the molecules that occupy the RNA binding tunnel may provide better specificity relative to human RNA methyltransferases.

  13. Structures of NS5 Methyltransferase from Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Coloma, Javier; Jain, Rinku; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2016-09-20

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) poses a major public health emergency. To aid in the development of antivirals, we present two high-resolution crystal structures of the ZIKV NS5 methyltransferase: one bound to S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and the other bound to SAM and 7-methyl guanosine diphosphate (7-MeGpp). We identify features of ZIKV NS5 methyltransferase that lend to structure-based antiviral drug discovery. Specifically, SAM analogs with functionalities on the Cβ atom of the methionine portion of the molecules that occupy the RNA binding tunnel may provide better specificity relative to human RNA methyltransferases. PMID:27633330

  14. Is it worth a dam?

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1997-01-01

    Once a sign of modernization and growth, dams are often seen today as symbols of environmental and social devastation. Over 800,000 dams have been built worldwide to provide drinking water, flood control, hydropower, irrigation, navigation, and water storage. Dams do indeed provide these things,but at the cost of several adverse, unexpected effects: disruption of ecosystems, decline of fish stocks, forced human and animal resettlements, and diseases such as malaria, which are borne by vectors that thrive in quiet waters. PMID:9349830

  15. Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Plant Tissues: Some Effects of Kinetin on Enzymic Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. B.; Murray, A. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity was measured in extracts of soybean (Glycine max var. Acme) callus and of senescing barley leaves (Hordeum distichon c.v. Prior). The enzyme from soybean callus had Michaelis constants for adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate of 1.5 and 7.5 μm respectively and was inhibited by AMP and stimulated by ATP. The presence of kinetin was found to considerably increase the activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in extracts of soybean callus and senescing barley leaves. PMID:16656820

  16. Deer Creek Dam, Dam, 1,204 feet/238 degrees from intersection of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deer Creek Dam, Dam, 1,204 feet/238 degrees from intersection of dam complex access road and U.S. Highway 189 to center of dam, 874 feet/352 degrees from Hydroelectric Powerplant (HAER UT-93-B) to center of dam, Charleston, Wasatch County, UT

  17. Sensitive SERS detection of DNA methyltransferase by target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Chuanfeng; Han, Huixia; Zhao, Caisheng; Zhang, Xiaoru

    2016-07-15

    A novel and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method is proposed for the assay of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and evaluation of inhibitors by developing a target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy. By using of a duplex substrate for Dam MTase, two hairpin templates and a Raman probe, multiple signal amplification mode is achieved. Once recognized by Dam MTase, the duplex substrate can be cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease and two primers are released for triggering the multiple signal amplification reaction. Consequently, a wide dynamic range and remarkably high sensitivity are obtained under isothermal conditions. The detection limit is 2.57×10(-4)UmL(-1). This assay exhibits an excellent selectivity and is successfully applied in the screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. In addition, this novel sensing system is potentially universal as the recognition element can be conveniently designed for other target analytes by changing the substrate of DNA MTase. PMID:26926592

  18. FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.; Schuster, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and late-neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. Landslide dams form a wide range of physiographic settings. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches; rock and soil slumps and slides; and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Natural dams may cause upstream flooding as the lake rises and downstream flooding as a result of failure of the dam. Although data are few, for the same potential energy at the dam site, downstream flood peaks from the failure of glacier-ice dams are smaller than those from landslide, moraine, and constructed earth-fill and rock-fill dam failures.

  19. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  20. Monolignol 4-O-methyltransferases and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Zhang, Kewei

    2014-11-18

    Modified (iso)eugenol 4-O-methyltransferase enzymes having novel capacity for methylation of monolignols and reduction of lignin polymerization in plant cell wall are disclosed. Sequences encoding the modified enzymes are disclosed.

  1. Monomethylioarsenicals are substratres for human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monomethylthioarsenicals are substrates for human arsenic (+3 oxida1tion state) methyltransferase Methylated thioarsenicals are structural analogs of methylated oxyarsenic in which one or more oxygen atom bound t...

  2. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  3. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  4. Evidence for an early gene duplication event in the evolution of the mitochondrial transcription factor B family and maintenance of rRNA methyltransferase activity in human mtTFB1 and mtTFB2.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S

    2006-11-01

    Most metazoans have two nuclear genes encoding orthologues of the well-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial transcription factor B (sc-mtTFB). This class of transcription factors is homologous to the bacterial KsgA family of rRNA methyltransferases, which in Escherichia coli dimethylates adjacent adenine residues in a stem-loop of the 16S rRNA. This posttranscriptional modification is conserved in most metazoan cytoplasmic and mitochondrial rRNAs. Homo sapiens mitochondrial transcription factor B1 (h-mtTFB1) possesses this enzymatic activity, implicating it as a dual-function protein involved in mitochondrial transcription and translation. Here we demonstrate that h-mtTFB2 also has rRNA methyltransferase activity but is a less efficient enzyme than h-mtTFB1. In contrast, sc-mtTFB has no detectable rRNA methyltransferase activity, correlating with the lack of the corresponding modification in the mitochondrial rRNA of budding yeast. Based on these results, and reports that Drosophila melanogaster mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 do not have completely overlapping functions, we propose a model for human mtDNA regulation that takes into account h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 likely having partially redundant transcription factor and rRNA methyltransferase functions. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of this family of proteins strongly suggest that the presence of two mtTFB homologues in metazoans is the result of a gene duplication event that occurred early in eukaryotic evolution prior to the divergence of fungi and metazoans. This model suggests that, after the gene duplication event, differential selective pressures on the rRNA methyltransferase and transcription factor activities of mtTFB genes occurred, with extreme cases culminating in the loss of one of the paralogous genes in certain species.

  5. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways. PMID:26058161

  6. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways.

  7. Two distinct O-methyltransferases in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yabe, K; Ando, Y; Hashimoto, J; Hamasaki, T

    1989-09-01

    The substances belonging to the sterigmatocystin group bear a close structural relationship to aflatoxins. When demethylsterigmatocystin (DMST) was fed to Aspergillus parasiticus NIAH-26, which endogenously produces neither aflatoxins nor precursors in YES medium, aflatoxins B1 and G1 were produced. When dihydrodemethylsterigmatocystin (DHDMST) was fed to this mutant, aflatoxins B2 and G2 were produced. Results of the cell-free experiment with S-adenosyl-[methyl-3H]methionine showed that first the C-6-OH groups of DMST and DHDMST are methylated to produce sterigmatocystin and dihydrosterigmatocystin (O-methyltransferase I) and then the C-7-OH groups are methylated to produce O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) and dihydro-O-methylsterigmatocystin (DHOMST) (O-methyltransferase II). However, no methyltransferase activity was observed when either OMST, DHOMST, 5,6-dimethoxysterigmatocystin, 5-methoxysterigmatocystin, or sterigmatin was incubated with the cell extract. Treatment of the cell extract with N-ethylmaleimide inhibited O-methyltransferase I activity but not that of O-methyltransferase II. Furthermore, these O-methyltransferases were different in their protein molecules and were involved in both the reactions from DMST to OMST and DHDMST to DHOMST. The reactions described in this paper were not observed when the same mold had been cultured in YEP medium.

  8. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-independent lactate dehydrogenases in homofermentative and heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doelle, H W

    1971-12-01

    Three homofermentative (Lactobacillus plantarum B38, L. plantarum B33, Pediococcus pentosaceus B30) and three heterofermentative (Leuconostoc mesenteroides 39, L. oenos B70, Lactobacillus brevis) lactic acid bacteria were examined for the presence or absence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent and NAD-independent d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases. Two of the six strains investigated, P. pentosaceus and L. oenos, did not exhibit an NAD-independent enzyme activity capable of reducing dichlorophenol indophenol. The pH optima of the lactic dehydrogenases were determined. The NAD-dependent enzymes from homofermentative strains exhibited optima at pH 7.8 to 8.8, whereas values from 9.0 to 10.0 were noted for these enzymes from heterofermentative organisms. The optima for the NAD-independent enzymes were between 5.8 and 6.6. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants determined for both NAD and the substrates demonstrated the existence of a greater affinity for d- than l-lactic acid. A comparison of the specific NAD-dependent and NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenase activities revealed a direct correlation of the d/l ratios of these activities with the type of lactic acid produced during the growth of the organism.

  9. Mutational analysis defines the roles of conserved amino acid residues in the predicted catalytic pocket of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2003-09-01

    Methyltransferases (MTases) from the Erm family catalyze S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent modification of a specific adenine residue in bacterial 23S rRNA, thereby conferring resistance to clinically important macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics. Despite the available structural data and functional analyses on the level of the RNA substrate, still very little is known about the mechanism of rRNA:adenine-N(6) methylation. Only predictions regarding various aspects of this reaction have been made based on the analysis of the crystal structures of methyltransferase ErmC' (without the RNA) and their comparison with the crystallographic and biochemical data for better studied DNA:m(6)A MTases. To validate the structure-based predictions of presumably essential residues in the catalytic pocket of ErmC', we carried out the site-directed mutagenesis and studied the function of the mutants in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that the active site of rRNA:m(6)A MTases is much more tolerant to amino acid substitutions than the active site of DNA:m(6)A MTases. Only the Y104 residue implicated in stabilization of the target base was found to be indispensable. Remarkably, the N101 residue from the "catalytic" motif IV and two conserved residues that form the floor (F163) and one of the walls (N11) of the base-binding site are not essential for catalysis in ErmC'. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in the light of the available structural data and in the phylogenetic context of the Erm family. PMID:12946350

  10. Mutational analysis defines the roles of conserved amino acid residues in the predicted catalytic pocket of the rRNA:m6A methyltransferase ErmC'.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2003-09-01

    Methyltransferases (MTases) from the Erm family catalyze S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent modification of a specific adenine residue in bacterial 23S rRNA, thereby conferring resistance to clinically important macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics. Despite the available structural data and functional analyses on the level of the RNA substrate, still very little is known about the mechanism of rRNA:adenine-N(6) methylation. Only predictions regarding various aspects of this reaction have been made based on the analysis of the crystal structures of methyltransferase ErmC' (without the RNA) and their comparison with the crystallographic and biochemical data for better studied DNA:m(6)A MTases. To validate the structure-based predictions of presumably essential residues in the catalytic pocket of ErmC', we carried out the site-directed mutagenesis and studied the function of the mutants in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that the active site of rRNA:m(6)A MTases is much more tolerant to amino acid substitutions than the active site of DNA:m(6)A MTases. Only the Y104 residue implicated in stabilization of the target base was found to be indispensable. Remarkably, the N101 residue from the "catalytic" motif IV and two conserved residues that form the floor (F163) and one of the walls (N11) of the base-binding site are not essential for catalysis in ErmC'. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in the light of the available structural data and in the phylogenetic context of the Erm family.

  11. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  12. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  13. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  14. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  15. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Haloferax volcanii H26 and identification of DNA methyltransferase related PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein HVO_A0006

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Matthew; Jackson, Laura; Chimileski, Scott; Papke, R. Thane

    2015-01-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems have evolved to protect the cell from invading DNAs and are composed of two enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction endonuclease. Although RM systems are present in both archaeal and bacterial genomes, DNA methylation in archaea has not been well defined. In order to characterize the function of RM systems in archaeal species, we have made use of the model haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. A genomic DNA methylation analysis of H. volcanii strain H26 was performed using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. This analysis was also performed on a strain of H. volcanii in which an annotated DNA methyltransferase gene HVO_A0006 was deleted from the genome. Sequence analysis of H26 revealed two motifs which are modified in the genome: Cm4TAG and GCAm6BN6VTGC. Analysis of the ΔHVO_A0006 strain indicated that it exhibited reduced adenine methylation compared to the parental strain and altered the detected adenine motif. However, protein domain architecture analysis and amino acid alignments revealed that HVO_A0006 is homologous only to the N-terminal endonuclease region of Type IIG RM proteins and contains a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif, suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein. Further bioinformatic analysis of the HVO_A0006 gene demonstrated that the gene is rare among the Halobacteria. It is surrounded by two transposition genes suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a fragment of a Type IIG RM gene, which has likely been acquired through gene transfer, and affects restriction-modification activity by interacting with another RM system component(s). Here, we present the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation in an archaeal species and examine the function of a DNA methyltransferase related gene HVO_A0006. PMID:25904898

  16. Floods from tailings dam failures.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Benito, G; Díez-Herrero, A

    2008-06-15

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released, and this outflow volume is difficult to estimate prior the incident. In this study, tailings' volume stored at the time of failure was shown to have a good correlation (r2=0.86) with the tailings outflow volume, and the volume of spilled tailings was correlated with its run-out distance (r2=0.57). An envelope curve was drawn encompassing the majority of data points indicating the potential maximum downstream distance affected by a tailings' spill. The application of the described regression equations for prediction purposes needs to be treated with caution and with support of on-site measurement and observations. However, they may provide a universal baseline approximation on tailing outflow characteristics (even if detailed dam information is unavailable), which is of a great importance for risk analysis purposes.

  17. Influence of developmental lead exposure on expression of DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J S; Kidd, S K; Anderson, D W

    2013-02-13

    Developmental exposure to lead (Pb) has adverse effects on cognitive functioning and behavior that can persist into adulthood. Exposures that occur during fetal or early life periods may produce changes in brain related to physiological re-programming from an epigenetic influence such as altered DNA methylation status. Since DNA methylation is regulated by DNA methyltransferases and methyl cytosine-binding proteins, this study assessed the extent to which developmental Pb exposure might affect expression of these proteins in the hippocampus. Long Evans dams were fed chow with or without added Pb acetate (0, 150, 375, 750 ppm) prior to breeding and remained on the same diet through weaning (perinatal exposure group). Other animals were exposed to the same doses of Pb but exposure started on postnatal day 1 and continued through weaning (early postnatal exposure group). All animals were euthanized on day 55 and hippocampi were removed. Western blot analyses showed significant effects of Pb exposure on DNMT1, DNMT3a, and MeCP2 expression, with effects often seen at the lowest level of exposure and modified by sex and developmental window of Pb exposure. These data suggest potential epigenetic effects of developmental Pb exposure on DNA methylation mediated at least in part through dysregulation of methyltransferases. PMID:23246732

  18. Isolation of DNA methyltransferase from plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, K.; Malbroue, C.

    1987-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DMT) were isolated from nuclei of cauliflower, soybean, and pea by extraction with 0.35 M NaCl. Assays were performed on hemimethylated Micrococcus luteus DNA or on M. luteus DNA to test for maintenance or de novo methylase activity, respectively. Fully methylated DNA was used as a substrate to determine background levels of methylation. Based on these tests, yields of maintenance DMT activity in the crude extract from pea hypocotyl, soybean hypocotyl, and cauliflower inflorescence were 2.8, 0.9, and 1.6 units per g wet tissue (one unit equals 1 pmol of methyl from (/sup 3/H)AdoMet incorporated into acid precipitable material per h at 30/sup 0/). Two peaks of DMT activity were detected in the soybean nuclear extract following phosphocellulose chromatography. One eluted at 0.4 M and the other at 0.8 M KCl. With both fractions maintenance activity was approximately 2 times that of the de novo activity. Using gel filtration the DMT eluted at 220,000 Daltons. The optimal pH for activity was between 6.5 and 7.0, and the optimal temperature was 30/sup 0/.

  19. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  20. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice.

  1. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  2. Three Gorges Dam, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This ASTER image shows a 60 km stretch of the Yangtze River in China, including the Xiling Gorge, the eastern of the three gorges. In the left part of the image is the construction site of the Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest.

    This image was acquired on July 20, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Size: 60 x 24 km (36 x 15 miles) Location: 30.6 deg. North lat., 111.2 deg. East long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER

  3. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  4. Melatonin biosynthesis requires N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase activity of caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in rice

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Yeong; Choi, Geun-Hee; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) methylates N-acetylserotonin into melatonin; that is, it has N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) activity. The ASMT activity of COMT was first detected in Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (AtCOMT). To confirm the involvement of COMT on melatonin synthesis in other plant species, the ASMT activity of a COMT from rice (Oryza sativa) (OsCOMT) was evaluated. Purified recombinant OsCOMT protein from Escherichia coli was used to validate the high ASMT activity of OsCOMT, similar to that of AtCOMT. The K m and V max values for the ASMT activity of OsCOMT were 243 µM and 2400 pmol min−1 mg protein−1, which were similar to those of AtCOMT. Similar to AtCOMT, OsCOMT was localized in the cytoplasm. In vitro ASMT activity was significantly inhibited by either caffeic acid or quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Analogously, in vivo production of melatonin was significantly inhibited by quercetin in 4-week-old detached rice leaves. Lastly, the transgenic rice plants overexpressing rice COMT showed an increase in melatonin levels whereas transgenic rice plants suppressing the rice COMT had a significant decrease on melatonin levels, suggestive of the direct role of COMT in melatonin biosynthesis in plants. PMID:26276868

  5. Melatonin biosynthesis requires N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase activity of caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in rice.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Choi, Geun-Hee; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-11-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) methylates N-acetylserotonin into melatonin; that is, it has N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) activity. The ASMT activity of COMT was first detected in Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (AtCOMT). To confirm the involvement of COMT on melatonin synthesis in other plant species, the ASMT activity of a COMT from rice (Oryza sativa) (OsCOMT) was evaluated. Purified recombinant OsCOMT protein from Escherichia coli was used to validate the high ASMT activity of OsCOMT, similar to that of AtCOMT. The K m and V max values for the ASMT activity of OsCOMT were 243 µM and 2400 pmol min(-1) mg protein(-1), which were similar to those of AtCOMT. Similar to AtCOMT, OsCOMT was localized in the cytoplasm. In vitro ASMT activity was significantly inhibited by either caffeic acid or quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Analogously, in vivo production of melatonin was significantly inhibited by quercetin in 4-week-old detached rice leaves. Lastly, the transgenic rice plants overexpressing rice COMT showed an increase in melatonin levels whereas transgenic rice plants suppressing the rice COMT had a significant decrease on melatonin levels, suggestive of the direct role of COMT in melatonin biosynthesis in plants.

  6. 17. VIEW OF MAIN AND DIVERSION DAMS FROM WATERGATE AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF MAIN AND DIVERSION DAMS FROM WATER-GATE AFTER REMOVAL OF DRIFTWOOD. DIVERSION DAM IN LEFT FOREGROUND, MAIN DAM TO THE RIGHT. Photographed July 18, 1938. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  7. The Dramatic Methods of Hans van Dam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1994-01-01

    Interprets for the American reader the untranslated dramatic methods of Hans van Dam, a leading drama theorist in the Netherlands. Discusses the functions of drama as a method, closed dramatic methods, open dramatic methods, and applying van Dam's methods. (SR)

  8. Simulation of Breach Outflow for Earthfill Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razad, Azwin Zailti Abdul; Sabri Muda, Rahsidi; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Azia, Intan Shafilah Abdul; Hanum Mansor, Faezah; Yalit, Ruzaimei

    2013-06-01

    Dams have been built for many reasons such as irrigation, hydropower, flood mitigation, and water supply to support development for the benefit of human. However, the huge amount of water stored behind the dam can seriously pose adverse impacts to the downstream community should it be released due to unwanted dam break event. To minimise the potential loss of lives and property damages, a workable Emergency Response Plan is required to be developed. As part of a responsible dam owner and operator, TNB initiated a study on dam breach modelling for Cameron Highlands Hydroelectric Scheme to simulate the potential dam breach for Jor Dam. Prediction of dam breach parameters using the empirical equations of Froehlich and Macdonal-Langridge-Monopolis formed the basis of the modelling, coupled with MIKE 11 software to obtain the breach outflow due to Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). This paper will therefore discuss the model setup, simulation procedure and comparison of the prediction with existing equations.

  9. Have Large Dams Altered Extreme Precipitation Patterns?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Faisal; Jeyachandran, Indumathi; Pielke, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Dams and their impounded waters are among the most common civil infrastructures, with a long heritage of modern design and operations experience. In particular, large dams, defined by the International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD) as having a height greater than 15 meters from the foundation and holding a reservoir volume of more than 3 million cubic meters, have the potential to vastly transform local climate, landscapes, regional economics, and urbanization patterns. In the United States alone, about 75,000 dams are capable of storing a volume of water equaling almost 1 year's mean runoff of the nation [Graf, 1999]. The World Commission on Dams (WCD) reports that at least 45,000 large dams have been built worldwide since the 1930s. These sheer numbers raise the question of the extent to which large dams and their impounded waters alter patterns that would have been pervasive had the dams not been built.

  10. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams AGENCY: Tennessee... preferred alternative in its final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the dam safety modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams. The notice of availability (NOA) of the...

  11. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  12. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  13. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  14. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  15. Rubber dam isolation in a difficult situation.

    PubMed

    Re, G J; Porter, K H; Marshall, T D

    1986-09-01

    Rubber dam retainers can be modified easily in the dental office to enable the dentist to isolate teeth with difficult restorative problems with the rubber dam. Isolation with the rubber dam enhances visibility and access and gives the dentist the opportunity to render safe, restorative care of high quality to the patient.

  16. Rubber dam--the easy way.

    PubMed

    Small, B W

    1999-01-01

    Rubber dam use can only enhance a dental procedure by allowing better access, visibility, and dry field isolation. The reasons offered by many dentists for not using the dam can be overcome by additional training and clinical use. Suggestions are given that have made rubber dam use routine for the author and have facilitated much improved dentistry.

  17. Webinar: Stepped chute design for embankment dams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing demographics in the vicinity of dams have led to hazard creep in a number of dams worldwide. Many of these dams now have insufficient spillway capacity as a result of these changes in hazard classification from low to significant or high hazard. Stepped chutes applied to the embankment da...

  18. Inception point for embankment dam stepped spillways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams have become a common design practice with the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those experiencing a hazard classification change from low to high hazard. Previous research on stepped spillways focused on gravity dams where aerated flow ...

  19. 30 CFR 56.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retaining dams. 56.20010 Section 56.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be of...

  20. 30 CFR 57.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Retaining dams. 57.20010 Section 57.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....20010 Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be...

  1. 30 CFR 57.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retaining dams. 57.20010 Section 57.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....20010 Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be...

  2. 30 CFR 56.20010 - Retaining dams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Retaining dams. 56.20010 Section 56.20010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Retaining dams. If failure of a water or silt retaining dam will create a hazard, it shall be of...

  3. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  4. Characterization of a multifunctional methyltransferase from the orchid Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Pak, F E; Gropper, S; Dai, W D; Havkin-Frenkel, D; Belanger, F C

    2004-07-01

    The final enzymatic step in the synthesis of the flavor compound vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is believed to be methylation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde. We have isolated and functionally characterized a cDNA that encodes a multifunctional methyltransferase from Vanilla planifolia tissue cultures that can catalyze the conversion of 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde to vanillin, although 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde is not the preferred substrate. The higher catalytic efficiency of the purified recombinant enzyme with the substrates caffeoyl aldehyde and 5-OH-coniferaldehyde, and its tissue distribution, suggest this methyltransferase may primarily function in lignin biosynthesis. However, since the enzyme characterized here does have 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde-O-methyltransferase activity, it may be useful in engineering strategies for the synthesis of natural vanillin from alternate sources.

  5. Catalytic promiscuity of a bacterial α-N-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2012-01-01

    The posttranslational methylation of N-terminal α-amino groups (α-N-methylation) is a ubiquitous reaction found in all domains of life. Although this modification usually occurs on protein substrates, recent studies have shown that it also takes place on ribosomally synthesized natural products. Here we report an investigation of the bacterial α-N-methyltransferase CypM involved in the biosynthesis of the peptide antibiotic cypemycin. We demonstrate that CypM has low substrate selectivity and methylates a variety of oligopeptides, cyclic peptides such as nisin and haloduracin, and the ε-amino group of lysine. Hence it may have potential for enzyme engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis. Bayesian phylogenetic inference of bacterial α-N-methyltransferases suggests that they have not evolved as a specific group based on the chemical transformations they catalyze, but that they have been acquired from various other methyltransferase classes during evolution. PMID:22841713

  6. The formation and failure of natural dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Schuster, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches, rock and soil slumps and slides, and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Landslide dams can be classified into six categories based on their relation with the valley floor. Type I dams (11%) of the 81 landslide dams around the world that were classifed do not reach from one valley side to the other. Type II dams (44%) span the entire valley flood, occasionally depositing material high up on opposite valley sides. Type III dams (41%) move considerable distances both upstream and downstream from the landslide failure. Type IV dams (1%) are rare and involve the contemporaneous failure of material from both sides of a valley. Type V dams (1%) are also rare, and are created when a single landslide sends multiple tongues of debris into a valley forming two or more landslide dams in the same surfaces, that extend under the stream or valley and emerge on the opposite valley side. Many landslide dams fail shortly after formation. Overtopping is by far the most common cause of failure. Glacial ice dams can produce at least nine kinds of ice-dammed lakes. The most dangerous are lakes formed in main valleys dammed by tributary glaciers. Failure can occur by erosion of a drainage tunnel under or through the ice dam or by a channel over the ice dam. Cold polar ice dams generally drain supraglacially or marginally by downmelting of an outlet channel. Warmer temperate-ice dams tend to fail by sudden englacial or subglacial breaching and drainage. Late neoglacial moraine-dammed lakes are located in steep mountain areas affected by the advances and retreats of valley glaciers in the last several

  7. Subdaily Hydrologic Variability by Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Ruffing, C.; Smith, J. M.; Daniels, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The effects dams have on hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic regimes has been well characterized using mean daily discharge. Subdaily discharge variation (herein flashiness) has not been well characterized for a variety of dam, watershed, and land cover characteristics. The hourly hydrologic records for 30 sites across the continental United States were analyzed for flashiness using the Richards-Baker Index, coefficient of daily variation, percent of total flow variation, and the percent of the year when daily discharge is greater than mean daily discharge. The goal of this analysis is to evaluate the role of catchment variables such as mean slope and land use conditions across receiving watersheds in predicting flashiness; compare flashiness metrics across sites to identify relationships between dam related variables such as type and size; and determine the most appropriate temporal extent for assessing flashiness in streamflow. Our approach relies on data at the watershed scale with a fine temporal grain to determine flashiness over a decade of operation for each dam.

  8. Temperature-dependent self-assembly of adenine derivative on HOPG.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhongcheng; Rubner, Oliver; Bamler, Markus; Blömker, Tobias; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Heuer, Andreas; Fuchs, Harald; Chi, Lifeng

    2013-08-27

    Temperature-dependent self-assembly formed by the adsorption of the nucleobase adenine derivative on a graphite surface were investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The high-resolution STM images reveal two types of structures, α phase and β phase, which are mainly driven by either hydrogen bonding or aromatic π-π interactions between adenine bases, respectively, as well as the interactions of alkyl chains. α-Phase structures can be transformed into β-phase structures by increasing temperature. The reverse is true for decreasing temperature. This reflects structural stabilities resulting from the different interactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to characterize possible arrangements of adjacent adenine moieties systematically in terms of binding energies and structural properties. Via a systematic search algorithm, all possible network structures were determined on a microscopic level. In this way, it is possible to rationalize the structural parameters as found in the STM images.

  9. Deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of adenine on aluminum nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shankar K; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Agio, Mario; Ekinci, Yasin; Löffler, Jörg F

    2012-02-01

    We report the ultrasensitive detection of adenine using deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering on aluminum nanostructures. Well-defined Al nanoparticle arrays fabricated over large areas using extreme-UV interference lithography exhibited sharp and tunable plasmon resonances in the UV and deep-UV wavelength ranges. Theoretical modeling based on the finite-difference time-domain method was used to understand the near-field and far-field optical properties of the nanoparticle arrays. Raman measurements were performed on adenine molecules coated uniformly on the Al nanoparticle arrays at a laser excitation wavelength of 257.2 nm. With this technique, less than 10 amol of label-free adenine molecules could be detected reproducibly in real time. Zeptomole (~30,000 molecules) detection sensitivity was readily achieved proving that deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering is an extremely sensitive tool for the detection of biomolecules.

  10. DNA with adenine tracts contains poly(dA).poly(dT) conformational features in solution.

    PubMed

    Brahms, S; Brahms, J G

    1990-03-25

    The conformation of DNA's with adenine-thymine tracts exhibiting retardation in electrophoretic migration and considered as curved were investigated in solution by CD and RAMAN spectroscopy. The following curved multimers with adenine tracts but of different flanking sequences d(CA5TGCC)n, d(TCTCTA6TATATA5)n, d(GA4T4C)n yield CD spectroscopic features indicating a non-B structure of the dA.dT tract with similarities to polyd(A).polyd(T). We suggest that adenine-thymine bases in these multimers contain some of the distinctive conformational features of poly(A).polyd(T) probably with large propeller twist found by NMR (Behling and Kearns, 1987) and by X-ray diffraction on oligonucleotides containing a tract of adenines (Nelson et al. 1987, Coll et al; 1987; DiGabriele et al. 1989). Some elements of distinctive CD features of the contiguous adenines run are also observed in the straight multi-9-mer d(CA5GCC)n which lacks in-phase relation to the helical repeat. Despite the presence of the TpA step in the straight multimer d(GT4A4)n, the altered dA.dT conformation is not completely destroyed. Interruption of adenine tract by a guanine in d(CAAGAATGCC)n leads to a B-like conformation and to a normal electrophoretic mobility. The Raman spectra reveal a rearrangement of the sugar-phosphate backbone of dA.dT tract in the multimer d(CA5TGCC)n with respect to that of polydA.polydT. This is reflected in the presence of an unique Raman band associated to C2'-endo sugar with a predominant contribution of C1'-exo puckering which is exhibited by the multimer whereas two distinct Raman bands characterize poly(dA).poly(dT) backbone conformation.

  11. Dietary Flavones as Dual Inhibitors of DNA Methyltransferases and Histone Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Rajnee; Datt, Manish; Liu, Xiaoqi; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of DNA and histone proteins are mutually involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). DNMTs methylate cytosine residues within gene promoters, whereas HMTs catalyze the transfer of methyl groups to lysine and arginine residues of histone proteins, thus causing chromatin condensation and transcriptional repression, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer. The potential reversibility of epigenetic alterations has encouraged the development of dual pharmacologic inhibitors of DNA and histone methylation as anticancer therapeutics. Dietary flavones can affect epigenetic modifications that accumulate over time and have shown anticancer properties, which are undefined. Through DNA binding and in silico protein-ligand docking studies with plant flavones viz. Apigenin, Chrysin and Luteolin, the effect of flavones on DNA and histone methylation was assessed. Spectroscopic analysis of flavones with calf-thymus DNA revealed intercalation as the dominant binding mode, with specific binding to a GC-rich sequence in the DNA duplex. A virtual screening approach using a model of the catalytic site of DNMT and EZH2 demonstrated that plant flavones are tethered at both ends inside the catalytic pocket of DNMT and EZH2 by means of hydrogen bonding. Epigenetic studies performed with flavones exhibited a decrease in DNMT enzyme activity and a reversal of the hypermethylation of cytosine bases in the DNA and prevented cytosine methylation in the GC-rich promoter sequence incubated with the M.SssI enzyme. Furthermore, a marked decrease in HMT activity and a decrease in EZH2 protein expression and trimethylation of H3K27 were noted in histones isolated from cancer cells treated with plant flavones. Our results suggest that dietary flavones can alter DNMT and HMT activities and the methylation of DNA and histone proteins that regulate epigenetic modifications, thus

  12. Solution structure of a five-adenine bulge loop within a DNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Hillisch, A; Gollmick, F A; Fritzsche, H; Diekmann, S

    1999-09-28

    The three-dimensional solution structure of a DNA molecule of the sequence 5'-d(GCATCGAAAAAGCTACG)-3' paired with 5'-d(CGTAGCCGATGC)-3' containing a five-adenine bulge loop (dA(5)-bulge) between two double helical stems was determined by 2D (1)H and (31)P NMR, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy. The DNA in both stems adopt a classical B-form double helical structure with Watson-Crick base pairing and C2'-endo sugar conformation. In addition, the two dG/dC base pairs framing the dA(5)-bulge loop are formed and are stable at least up to 30 degrees C. The five adenine bases of the bulge loop are localized at intrahelical positions within the double helical stems. Stacking on the double helical stem is continued for the first four 5'-adenines in the bulge loop. The total rise (the height) of these four stacked adenines roughly equals the diameter of the double helical stem. The stacking interactions are broken between the last of these four 5'-adenines and the fifth loop adenine at the 3'-end. This 3'-adenine partially stacks on the other stem. The angle between the base planes of the two nonstacking adenines (A10 and A11) in the bulge loop reflects the kinking angle of the global DNA structure. The neighboring cytosines opposite the dA(5)-bulge (being parts of the bulge flanking base pairs) do not stack on one another. This disruption of stacking is characterized by a partial shearing of these bases, such that certain sequential NOEs for this base step are preserved. In the base step opposite the loop, an extraordinary hydrogen bond is observed between the phosphate backbone of the 5'-dC and the amino proton of the 3'-dC in about two-thirds of the conformers. This hydrogen bond probably contributes to stabilizing the global DNA structure. The dA(5)-bulge induces a local kink into the DNA molecule of about 73 degrees (+/-11 degrees ). This kinking angle and the mutual orientation of the two double helical stems agree well with results from fluorescence resonance energy

  13. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  14. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  15. Nonlinear Seismic Analysis of Morrow Point Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R; Nuss, L K

    2004-02-20

    This research and development project was sponsored by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), who are best known for the dams, power plants, and canals it constructed in the 17 western states. The mission statement of the USBR's Dam Safety Office, located in Denver, Colorado, is ''to ensure Reclamation dams do not present unacceptable risk to people, property, and the environment.'' The Dam Safety Office does this by quickly identifying the dams which pose an increased threat to the public, and quickly completing the related analyses in order to make decisions that will safeguard the public and associated resources. The research study described in this report constitutes one element of USBR's research and development work to advance their computational and analysis capabilities for studying the response of dams to strong earthquake motions. This project focused on the seismic response of Morrow Point Dam, which is located 263 km southwest of Denver, Colorado.

  16. Seismic safety of high concrete dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houqun

    2014-08-01

    China is a country of high seismicity with many hydropower resources. Recently, a series of high arch dams have either been completed or are being constructed in seismic regions, of which most are concrete dams. The evaluation of seismic safety often becomes a critical problem in dam design. In this paper, a brief introduction to major progress in the research on seismic aspects of large concrete dams, conducted mainly at the Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR) during the past 60 years, is presented. The dam site-specific ground motion input, improved response analysis, dynamic model test verification, field experiment investigations, dynamic behavior of dam concrete, and seismic monitoring and observation are described. Methods to prevent collapse of high concrete dams under maximum credible earthquakes are discussed.

  17. Measurement of liver adenine nucleotides and S-adenosyl amino acids by one-step high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, H; Lavoie, R; Grose, J H; Bélanger, L

    1986-10-01

    A reverse-phase isocratic HPLC method is described for direct simultaneous assay of ATP, ADP, AMP, S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, S-adenosylethionine, and other adenine derivatives in liver microbiopsies. The procedure was tested in conditions which alter the hepatic content of adenine nucleotides and sulfur-adenosyl amino acids in humans, rats, and guinea pigs.

  18. Cloning and expresion of cDNA for rat O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sakumi, K; Shiraishi, A; Hayakawa, H; Sekiguchi, M

    1991-10-25

    cDNA for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was isolated by screening rat liver cDNA libraries, using as a probe the human cDNA sequence for methyltransferase. The rat cDNA encodes a protein with 209 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the rat methyltransferase exhibits considerable homology with those of the human, yeast and bacterial enzymes, especially around putative methyl acceptor sites. When the cDNA was placed under control of the lac promoter and expressed in methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli (ada-, ogt-) cells, a characteristic methyltransferase protein was produced. The rat DNA methyltransferase thus expressed could complement the biological defects of the E. coli cell caused by lack of its own DNA methyltransferases; e.g. increased sensitivity to alkylating agents in terms of both cell death and mutation induction.

  19. Characterization of DNA methyltransferase genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ryo; Sasaki, Taku; Nishio, Takeshi

    2006-08-01

    DNA methylation is essential for normal development and plays important roles in regulating gene expression in plants. Analysis of the key enzymes catalyzing DNA methylation is important to understand epigenetic phenomena. In this study, three putative methyltransferase genes, BrMET1a, BrMET1b, and BrCMT, were isolated from a genome library of Brassica rapa. Structural conservation of the amino acid sequence between BrMET1a/BrMET1b and AtMET1 and that between BrCMT and AtCMT3 suggests that they may function as DNA methyltransferase. BrMET1a was expressed in vegetative and reproductive organs, while BrMET1b was expressed only in pistils, indicating that these two genes have different functions. BrCMT was expressed especially in stamens at the stage of 2-4 days before anthesis. We isolated three DNA methyltransferase genes in Brassica rapa and indicated differences of expression patterns of these DNA methyltransferase genes and expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, suggesting that these genes might play important roles in epigenetic gene regulation in B. rapa.

  20. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  1. Diversity in mechanism and function of tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Swinehart, William E; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    tRNA molecules undergo extensive post-transcriptional processing to generate the mature functional tRNA species that are essential for translation in all organisms. These processing steps include the introduction of numerous specific chemical modifications to nucleotide bases and sugars; among these modifications, methylation reactions are by far the most abundant. The tRNA methyltransferases comprise a diverse enzyme superfamily, including members of multiple structural classes that appear to have arisen independently during evolution. Even among closely related family members, examples of unusual substrate specificity and chemistry have been observed. Here we review recent advances in tRNA methyltransferase mechanism and function with a particular emphasis on discoveries of alternative substrate specificities and chemistry associated with some methyltransferases. Although the molecular function for a specific tRNA methylation may not always be clear, mutations in tRNA methyltransferases have been increasingly associated with human disease. The impact of tRNA methylation on human biology is also discussed. PMID:25626150

  2. Convergent Mechanistic Features between the Structurally Diverse N- and O-Methyltransferases: Glycine N-Methyltransferase and Catechol O-Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyu; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-07-27

    Although an enormous and still growing number of biologically diverse methyltransferases have been reported and identified, a comprehensive understanding of the enzymatic methyl transfer mechanism is still lacking. Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), a member of the family that acts on small metabolites as the substrate, catalyzes methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to glycine to form S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sarcosine. We report primary carbon ((12)C/(14)C) and secondary ((1)H3/(3)H3) kinetic isotope effects at the transferred methyl group, together with (1)H3/(3)H3 binding isotope effects for wild-type GNMT and a series of Tyr21 mutants. The data implicate a compaction effect in the methyl transfer step that is conferred by the protein structure. Furthermore, a remarkable similarity of properties is observed between GNMT and catechol O-methyltransferase, despite significant differences between these enzymes with regard to their active site structures and catalyzed reactions. We attribute these results to a catalytically relevant reduction in the methyl donor-acceptor distance that is dependent on a tyrosine side chain positioned behind the methyl-bearing sulfur of AdoMet. PMID:27355841

  3. In vivo-selected mutations in methyl-directed mismatch repair suppress the virulence attenuation of Salmonella dam mutant strains following intraperitoneal, but not oral, infection of naïve mice.

    PubMed

    Heithoff, Douglas M; Badie, Golnaz; Julio, Steven M; Enioutina, Elena Y; Daynes, Raymond A; Sinsheimer, Robert L; Mahan, Michael J

    2007-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that lacks the DNA adenine methylase (Dam) ectopically expresses multiple genes that are preferentially expressed during infection, is attenuated for virulence, and confers heightened immunity in vaccinated hosts. The safety of dam mutant Salmonella vaccines was evaluated by screening within infected mice for isolates that have an increased capacity to cause disease relative to the attenuated parental strain. Since dam mutant strains are sensitive to the DNA base analog 2-aminopurine (2-AP), we screened for 2-AP-resistant (2-AP(r)) isolates in systemic tissues of mice infected with dam mutant Salmonella. Such 2-AP(r) derivatives were isolated following intraperitoneal but not oral administration and were shown to be competent for infectivity via intraperitoneal but not oral infection of naïve mice. These 2-AP(r) derivatives were deficient in methyl-directed mismatch repair and were resistant to nitric oxide, yet they retained the bile-sensitive phenotype of the parental dam mutant strain. Additionally, introduction of a mutH null mutation into dam mutant cells suppressed the inherent defects in intraperitoneal infectivity and nitric oxide resistance, as well as overexpression of SpvB, an actin cytotoxin required for Salmonella systemic survival. These data suggest that restoration of intraperitoneal virulence of dam mutant strains is associated with deficiencies in methyl-directed mismatch repair that correlate with the production of systemically related virulence functions.

  4. EPRI dam safety workshop summary: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, R.

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has an extensive history of working with utilities, federal and state agencies, consultants, and other interests to conduct a number of workshops and studies to improve the safety of dams. Through these efforts, EPRI has developed a number of tools to assist dam owners, particularly EPRI members, in the evaluation and modification of dams. Although a considerable amount of progress has been made toward improving dam safety, there remain among the over 75,000 dams in the US a significant number of structures that require in-depth evaluation and possible modifications. At the same time, there are pressures from several directions to prioritize dam safety issues and find cost-effective solutions to problems because there seems to be an ever-decreasing amount of funds to address dam safety. In that regard, EPRI is sensitive to those cost considerations in a changing utility environment. Therefore, EPRI recently entered into discussions with utilities, regulatory agencies, federal agencies (dam owners), and others interested in dam safety issues. From those discussions, a number of research ideas were developed, which were distilled into three primary topics and several secondary topics of importance. The three primary areas of concern included: penstocks, tunnels, and gates; instrumentation and monitoring; and post-tensioned anchors. This report will provide a review of the workshop and insight on ideas for future dam safety R and D.

  5. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  6. Controlling two-phase self-assembly of an adenine derivative on HOPG via kinetic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Jana, Pritam Kumar; Zhang, Haiming; Mu, Zhongcheng; Kehr, Gerald; Blömker, Tobias; Erker, Gerhard; Fuchs, Harald; Heuer, Andreas; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-08-21

    Large-area self-assembled structures of a nucleobase adenine derivative were successfully realized through vacuum deposition. STM images reveal two types of structures, which could be regulated by substrate temperature and the evaporation rate, indicating the relevance of kinetic effects. The results are supported by computer simulations.

  7. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  8. Effects of adenine arabinoside on lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, W C; Siegel, P J; Baer, J

    1978-01-01

    Low concentrations of adenine arabinoside inhibited growth of two Epstein-Barr virus producer cell lines in culture, while not significantly affecting a nonproducer cell line and a B-cell-negative line. These observations were extended to include freshly infected cells. Mitogen-stimulated human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were unaffected by the drug at concentration levels that inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated cells. DNA synthesis in Epstein-Barr virus-superinfected Raji cells was also adversely affected by adenine arabinoside. However, these same low concentrations of adenine arabinoside in the triphosphate form produced less effect on DNA synthesis in nuclear systems and DNA polymerase assays than on growth or DNA synthesis in whole cells. Therefore the effects reported here of low concentrations of the drug on whole cells may be only in part related to DNA polymerase inhibition. The work reported here suggests that adenine arabinoside has multiple sites of action in infected cells. PMID:212577

  9. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  10. Macrophage Trafficking as Key Mediator of Adenine-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; da Silva, João Santana; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a special role in the onset of several diseases, including acute and chronic kidney injuries. In this sense, tubule interstitial nephritis (TIN) represents an underestimated insult, which can be triggered by different stimuli and, in the absence of a proper regulation, can lead to fibrosis deposition. Based on this perception, we evaluated the participation of macrophage recruitment in the development of TIN. Initially, we provided adenine-enriched food to WT and searched for macrophage presence and action in the kidney. Also, a group of animals were depleted of macrophages with the clodronate liposome while receiving adenine-enriched diet. We collected blood and renal tissue from these animals and renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis were evaluated. We observed higher expression of chemokines in the kidneys of adenine-fed mice and a substantial protection when macrophages were depleted. Then, we specifically investigated the role of some key chemokines, CCR5 and CCL3, in this TIN experimental model. Interestingly, CCR5 KO and CCL3 KO animals showed less renal dysfunction and a decreased proinflammatory profile. Furthermore, in those animals, there was less profibrotic signaling. In conclusion, we can suggest that macrophage infiltration is important for the onset of renal injury in the adenine-induced TIN. PMID:25132730

  11. Structural and quantum chemical studies of 8-aryl-sulfanyl adenine class Hsp90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Kang, Yanlong; Chiosis, Gabriela; Gewirth, Daniel T

    2006-08-10

    Hsp90 chaperones play a critical role in modulating the activity of many cell signaling proteins and are an attractive target for anti-cancer therapeutics. We report here the structures of the water soluble 8-aryl-sulfanyl adenine class Hsp90 inhibitors, 1 (PU-H71) and 2 (PU-H64), in complex with the N-terminal domain of human Hsp90alpha. The conformation of 1 when bound to Hsp90 differs from previously reported 8-aryl adenine Hsp90 inhibitors including 3 (PU24FCl). While the binding mode for 3 places the 2'-halide of the 8-aryl group on top of the adenine ring, for 1 and 2, we show that the 2'-halide is rotated approximately 180 degrees away. This difference explains the opposing trends in Hsp90 inhibitory activity for the 2'-halo derivatives of the 3',4',5'-trimethoxy series where Cl > Br > I compared to the 4',5'-methylenedioxy series where I > Br > Cl. We also present quantum chemical calculations of 2 and its analogues that illuminate their basis for Hsp90 inhibition. The calculated conformation of 2 agreed well with the crystallographically observed conformations of 1 and 2. The predictive nature of the calculations has allowed the exploration of additional derivatives based on the 8-aryl adenine scaffold.

  12. SERS, XPS, and DFT Study of Adenine Adsorption on Silver and Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Marco; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Pratesi, Giovanni; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-19

    The adsorption of adenine on silver and gold surfaces has been investigated combining density functional theory calculations with surface-enhanced Raman scattering and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, obtaining useful insight into the orientation and interaction of the nucleobase with the metal surfaces.

  13. Egypt: after the Aswan Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, S.

    1981-05-01

    Ten years after its completion, the controversial Aswan High Dam's hydrologic and human consequences are clearer because of a joint US-Egyptian interdisciplinary study. Water supply and distribution is emerging as a major world resource problem with the recognition that unsafe drinking water and inadequate sanitation contribute to health problems. Dams provide water supplies, but they also create conditions favorable to the spread of water-borne diseases. The Aswan Dam solved problems of flooding and drought by opening 2.5 million acres to year-round irrigation, although some of the reclaimed land has been lost to urban expansion and shoreline erosion, and provides hydroelectric power. The negative effects include increasing soil salinity, changes in the water table, excessive downstream water plant growth, and diseases such as schistosomiasis and other intestinal parasites, and the social impact on the Nubians, whose homeland was flooded. Planners must use the information gathered in this study to see that the benefits outweigh the human costs. 22 references, 7 figures.

  14. Structure and Function of Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Y.; Ray, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, H.; Ren, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Bernard, K.; Shi, P.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    The plus-strand RNA genome of flavivirus contains a 5' terminal cap 1 structure (m{sup 7}GpppAmG). The flaviviruses encode one methyltransferase, located at the N-terminal portion of the NS5 protein, to catalyze both guanine N-7 and ribose 2'-OH methylations during viral cap formation. Representative flavivirus methyltransferases from dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile virus (WNV) sequentially generate GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppAm. The 2'-O methylation can be uncoupled from the N-7 methylation, since m{sup 7}GpppA-RNA can be readily methylated to m{sup 7}GpppAm-RNA. Despite exhibiting two distinct methylation activities, the crystal structure of WNV methyltransferase at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution showed a single binding site for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor. Therefore, substrate GpppA-RNA should be repositioned to accept the N-7 and 2'-O methyl groups from SAM during the sequential reactions. Electrostatic analysis of the WNV methyltransferase structure showed that, adjacent to the SAM-binding pocket, is a highly positively charged surface that could serve as an RNA binding site during cap methylations. Biochemical and mutagenesis analyses show that the N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations require distinct buffer conditions and different side chains within the K{sub 61}-D{sub 146}-K{sub 182}-E{sub 218} motif, suggesting that the two reactions use different mechanisms. In the context of complete virus, defects in both methylations are lethal to WNV; however, viruses defective solely in 2'-O methylation are attenuated and can protect mice from later wild-type WNV challenge. The results demonstrate that the N-7 methylation activity is essential for the WNV life cycle and, thus, methyltransferase represents a novel target for flavivirus therapy.

  15. Engineering Monolignol 4-O-Methyltransferases to Modulate Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiya, M.W.; Liu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polymer derived from the oxidative coupling of three classical monolignols. Lignin precursors are methylated exclusively at the meta-positions (i.e. 3/5-OH) of their phenyl rings by native O-methyltransferases, and are precluded from substitution of the para-hydroxyl (4-OH) position. Ostensibly, the para-hydroxyls of phenolics are critically important for oxidative coupling of phenoxy radicals to form polymers. Therefore, creating a 4-O-methyltransferase to substitute the para-hydroxyl of monolignols might well interfere with the synthesis of lignin. The phylogeny of plant phenolic O-methyltransferases points to the existence of a batch of evolutionarily 'plastic' amino acid residues. Following one amino acid at a time path of directed evolution, and using the strategy of structure-based iterative site-saturation mutagenesis, we created a novel monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase from the enzyme responsible for methylating phenylpropenes. We show that two plastic residues in the active site of the parental enzyme are vital in dominating substrate discrimination. Mutations at either one of these separate the evolutionarily tightly linked properties of substrate specificity and regioselective methylation of native O-methyltransferase, thereby conferring the ability for para-methylation of the lignin monomeric precursors, primarily monolignols. Beneficial mutations at both sites have an additive effect. By further optimizing enzyme activity, we generated a triple mutant variant that may structurally constitute a novel phenolic substrate binding pocket, leading to its high binding affinity and catalytic efficiency on monolignols. The 4-O-methoxylation of monolignol efficiently impairs oxidative radical coupling in vitro, highlighting the potential for applying this novel enzyme in managing lignin polymerization in planta.

  16. Homocysteine homeostasis in the rat is maintained by compensatory changes in cystathionine β-synthase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene transcription occurring in response to maternal protein and folic acid intake during pregnancy and fat intake after weaning.

    PubMed

    Chmurzynska, Agata; Malinowska, Anna M

    2011-07-01

    The reactions of the methionine/homocysteine pathway are mediated by several enzymes, including phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, cystathionine β-synthase, and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase. Homocysteine homeostasis is regulated by these enzymes. We hypothesized here that the protein and folic acid content in the maternal diet affects methionine/homocysteine metabolism in the progeny. To test this hypothesis, pregnant rats were fed a diet with normal protein and normal folic acid levels (a modified casein-based AIN-93G diet), a protein-restricted and normal folic acid diet, a protein-restricted and folic acid-supplemented diet, or a normal protein and folic acid-supplemented diet. The progeny were fed either the modified AIN-93G diet or a high-fat lard-based diet. Progeny were analyzed for expression of the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, cystathionine β-synthase, and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase genes in the liver and for serum homocysteine concentration. Interactions between prenatal and postnatal nutrition were also determined. The progeny of the dams fed the diets supplemented with folic acid showed decreased expression of all 3 genes (P < .001). An interaction effect between the protein and folic acid content in the maternal diet contributed to this down-regulation (P < .001), and the postweaning diet modified these effects. Serum homocysteine concentrations were approximately 15% higher in the male rats (P < .01), but neither prenatal nutrition nor the postweaning diet affected it significantly. We conclude that maternal diet during gestation has an important effect on the transcription level of these 3 genes, but changes in gene expression were not associated with significant changes in progeny homocysteine concentrations.

  17. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  18. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  19. Exporting dams: China's hydropower industry goes global.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristen; Bosshard, Peter; Brewer, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    In line with China's "going out" strategy, China's dam industry has in recent years significantly expanded its involvement in overseas markets. The Chinese Export-Import Bank and other Chinese financial institutions, state-owned enterprises, and private firms are now involved in at least 93 major dam projects overseas. The Chinese government sees the new global role played by China's dam industry as a "win-win" situation for China and host countries involved. But evidence from project sites such as the Merowe Dam in Sudan demonstrates that these dams have unrecognized social and environmental costs for host communities. Chinese dam builders have yet to adopt internationally accepted social and environmental standards for large infrastructure development that can assure these costs are adequately taken into account. But the Chinese government is becoming increasingly aware of the challenge and the necessity of promoting environmentally and socially sound investments overseas.

  20. Measurement of Dam Deformations: Case Study of Obruk Dam (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulal, V. Engin; Alkan, R. Metin; Alkan, M. Nurullah; İlci, Veli; Ozulu, I. Murat; Tombus, F. Engin; Kose, Zafer; Aladogan, Kayhan; Sahin, Murat; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Oku, Guldane

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, there is information regarding the first deformation and displacement measurements in dams that were conducted in 1920s Switzerland. Todays, deformation measurements in the dams have gained very different functions with improvements in both measurement equipment and evaluation of measurements. Deformation measurements and analysis are among the main topics studied by scientists who take interest in the engineering measurement sciences. The Working group of Deformation Measurements and Analysis, which was established under the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), carries out its studies and activities with regard to this subject. At the end of the 1970s, the subject of the determination of fixed points in the deformation monitoring network was one of the main subjects extensively studied. Many theories arose from this inquiry, as different institutes came to differing conclusions. In 1978, a special commission with representatives of universities has been established within the FIG 6.1 working group; this commission worked on the issue of determining a general approach to geometric deformation analysis. The results gleaned from the commission were discussed at symposiums organized by the FIG. In accordance with these studies, scientists interested in the subject have begun to work on models that investigate cause and effect relations between the effects that cause deformation and deformation. As of the scientist who interest with the issue focused on different deformation methods, another special commission was established within the FIG engineering measurements commission in order to classify deformation models and study terminology. After studying this material for a long time, the official commission report was published in 2001. In this prepared report, studies have been carried out by considering the FIG Engineering Surveying Commission's report entitled, 'MODELS AND TERMINOLOGY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GEODETIC MONITORING OBSERVATIONS

  1. 18. DETAIL AT JUNCTION OF MAIN DAM AT LEFT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL AT JUNCTION OF MAIN DAM AT LEFT AND DIVERSION DAM AT RIGHT SHOWING LOG CRIBBING. SPACES INSIDE CRIBBING WERE FILLED WITH STONE TO ANCHOR DAM; DETERIORATION OF DAM HAS ALLOWED STONE BALLAST TO WASH AWAY. Photographed July 18, 1938. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  2. View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of the forebay dam of Grand Coulee Dam, looking west. Construction of the forebay dam, which replaced the eastern end of the original Grand Coulee Dam, was completed in 1974. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  3. Dam breaching and Chinook salmon recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M.; Rossignol, Philippe A.; Li, Hiram W.; Emlen, John M.; Kareiva, Peter; Marvier, Michelle; Michelle M. McClure,

    2001-01-01

    The Report by Kareiva et al. on recovery and management options for spring/summer chinook salmon (1) has the potential to have a major impact in deciding whether to breach dams on the Snake River. Based on interpretation of their model results, they argue that dam breaching would be insufficient to reverse the decline of salmon. An examination of the specifics of their model, however, suggests that, despire their argument, dam breaching remains a viable recovery option for chinook salmon.

  4. 78 FR 60271 - Hollow Dam Power Company; Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hollow Dam Power Company; Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC; Notice of..., Hollow Dam Power Company (transferor) and Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC (transferee) filed an application for transfer of license for the Hollow Dam Project, FERC No. 6972, located on the West Branch...

  5. Evidence of two levels of control of P1 oriR and host oriC replication origins by DNA adenine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, A; Brendler, T; Austin, S

    1993-01-01

    A mutant mini-P1 plasmid with increased copy number can be established in Dam- strains of Escherichia coli, where mini-P1 plasmid replication is normally blocked. Comparison of this plasmid and a plasmid driven by the host oriC replication origin showed that both origins are subject to control by methylation at two different levels. First, both origins appear to be subject to negative regulation acting at the level of hemimethylation. This probably involves the sequestration of the hemimethylated DNA produced by replication, as has been previously described for oriC. Second, both origins show a positive requirement for adenine methylation for efficient function in vivo. This conclusion is supported by the behavior of the P1 origin in an improved in vitro replication system. In vitro, where sequestration of hemimethylated DNA is not expected to occur, the hemimethylated P1 origin DNA was fully functional as a template. However, the activity of fully unmethylated DNA was severely restricted in comparison with that of either of the methylated forms. This in vitro uncoupling of the two effects of origin methylation suggests that two separate mechanisms are involved. Images PMID:8253669

  6. 1. General view of dam looking west, showing both the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of dam looking west, showing both the downstream buttresses and the upstream arch-rings. The spillway is on the far end of the dam. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  8. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  9. 56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). AUXILIARY LOCK AND REMAINDER OF DAM -- CONCRETE MONOLITH PLAN AND WALL ELEVATIONS (WITH LOCK APPURTENANCES). Drawing V-601 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  10. GENERAL VIEW OF THE WILSON DAM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, GENERATING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE WILSON DAM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, GENERATING PLANT IN THE BACKGROUND. - Wilson Dam & Hydroelectric Plant, Spanning Tennessee River at Wilson Dam Road (Route 133), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  11. 5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  12. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  13. 6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  14. 4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SHOWING UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM, LOOKING NORTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  15. 4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING A LARGE FIELDSTONE DAM (KNOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING A LARGE FIELD-STONE DAM (KNOWN LOCALLY AS DAM NO. 1), BUILT BY THE CCC - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  16. 8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL FROM THE DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM WITH POND A IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  17. 3. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING A SMALL FIELDSTONE DAM (KNOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING A SMALL FIELD-STONE DAM (KNOWN LOCALLY AS DAM NO. 2), BUILT BY THE CCC - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  18. Dam located to east of powerhouse, view from south. This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dam located to east of powerhouse, view from south. This dam holds back the waters of the Chattahoochee River to form the mill pond north of Riverdale Cotton Mill - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Powerhouse & Dam, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  19. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING CREST AND DOWNSTREAM FACE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING CREST AND DOWNSTREAM FACE, WITH CONCRETE EXTENSION IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Fire Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  20. 10. BRIDGE IN CONTEXT OF DAM, THIRD POWER HOUSE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. BRIDGE IN CONTEXT OF DAM, THIRD POWER HOUSE IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH BY 360 DEGREES - Columbia River Bridge at Grand Coulee Dam, Spanning Columbia River at State Route 155, Coulee Dam, Okanogan County, WA

  1. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING ROLLER AND TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS, HEADHOUSES AND DAM BRIDGES, LOOKING SOUTH, DOWNSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 4, Alma, Buffalo County, WI

  2. 2. East side of lower dam shown with water flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. East side of lower dam shown with water flowing over dam. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  3. 9. VIEW OF LATERAL GATE ON CANAL NEAR DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF LATERAL GATE ON CANAL NEAR DAM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Twin Pots Dam, Ashley National Forest, 10.1 miles North of Mountain Home, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  4. 14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT, COFFER DAM IS UPSTREAM OF PLACING TOWER. EAST DOME IS VISIBLE AT LEFT OF TOWER, c. 1927 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  5. Transfer RNA methyltransferases from yellow lupin seeds: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicka, H; Jakubowski, H; Pawelkiewicz

    1975-01-01

    tRNA methyltransferases from extract of yellow lupin seeds were purified over 300-fold by the methods based on hydrophobic and affinity chromatography. However, in the most active fractions the methylating enzymes were over 2000 purified. The purified enzyme fractions catalysed the formation of 1-methyladenine and 5-methylcytosine using E. coli B and B. subtilis tRNAs as substrates and S-adenosylmethionine as the methyl donor. They were unable to methylate their own endogenous tRNA but they were capable of methylating tRNA of some other lupinus species. Whereas the patterns of methylated constituents of tRNA of some other lupinus and B. subtilis were quite similar, they differed considerably from those obtained with lupin species tRNAs. Some properties of purified methyltransferases from yellow lupin seeds have been described. PMID:236549

  6. [Bioinformatics analysis and expressed level of histone methyltransferase genes in Lonicera japonica].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi; Long, Ping; Zha, Liang-ping; Wang, Yao-long

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three histone methyltransferase genes were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica. The nucleotide and proteins characteristics, subcellular localization, senior structural domains and conservative forecasting were analyzed. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that 23 histone methyltransferases were mainly divided into two groups: lysine methyltransferase and arginine methyltransferases. The result of gene expression showed that 23 histone methyltransferases showed preference in terms of interspecies and organs. They were more expressed in buds of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis and lower in leaves of L. japonica than in L. japonica var. chinensis. Eight genes were specific expressed in flower. These results provided basis for further understanding the function of histone methyltransferase and epigenetic regulation of active ingredients of L. japonica. PMID:26552158

  7. Plant isoflavone and isoflavanone O-methyltransferase genes

    DOEpatents

    Broeckling, Bettina E.; Liu, Chang-Jun; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-19

    The invention provides enzymes that encode O-methyltransferases (OMTs) from Medicago truncatula that allow modification to plant (iso)flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. In certain aspects of the invention, the genes encoding these enzymes are provided. The invention therefore allows the modification of plants for isoflavonoid content. Transgenic plants comprising such enzymes are also provided, as well as methods for improving disease resistance in plants. Methods for producing food and nutraceuticals, and the resulting compositions, are also provided.

  8. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  9. McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William

    1997-07-01

    The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

  10. Structural characterization of the mitomycin 7-O-methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Shanteri; Chang, Aram; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Grüschow, Sabine; Sherman, David H.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2014-10-02

    Mitomycins are quinone-containing antibiotics, widely used as antitumor drugs in chemotherapy. Mitomycin-7-O-methyltransferase (MmcR), a key tailoring enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of mitomycin in Streptomyces lavendulae, catalyzes the 7-O-methylation of both C9{beta}- and C9{alpha}-configured 7-hydroxymitomycins. We have determined the crystal structures of the MmcR-S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) binary complex and MmcR-SAH-mitomycin A (MMA) ternary complex at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.3 {angstrom}, respectively. The study revealed MmcR to adopt a common S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase fold and the presence of a structurally conserved active site general acid-base pair is consistent with a proton-assisted methyltransfer common to most methyltransferases. Given the importance of C7 alkylation to modulate mitomycin redox potential, this study may also present a template toward the future engineering of catalysts to generate uniquely bioactive mitomycins.

  11. Endothelial transcriptome in response to pharmacological methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Jun; Fernandez, Ana Z; Ziemann, Mark; Keating, Samuel T; Balcerczyk, Aneta; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic activities of protein methyltransferases serve to write covalent modifications on histone and non-histone proteins in the control of gene transcription. Here, we describe gene expression changes in human endothelial cells caused by treatment with methyltransferase inhibitors 7,7'-carbonylbis (azanediyl) bis(4-hydroxynaphthalene-2 -sulfonic acid (AMI-1) and disodium-2-(2,4,5,7- tetrabromo-3-oxido-6-oxoxanthen-9-yl) benzoate trihydrate (AMI-5). Deep sequencing of mRNA indicated robust change on transcription following AMI-5 treatment compared with AMI-1. Functional annotation analysis revealed that both compounds suppress the expression of genes associated with translational regulation, suggesting arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) could be associated with regulation of this pathway. Interestingly, AMI-5 but not AMI-1 was found to decrease methylation of H3 histones at lysine 4 and down-regulate gene expression associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathways. These results imply that inhibition of protein methylation by AMI-1 and AMI-5 can differentially regulate specific pathways with potential to interrupt pathological signaling in the vascular endothelium. PMID:24850797

  12. Endothelial transcriptome in response to pharmacological methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Jun; Fernandez, Ana Z; Ziemann, Mark; Keating, Samuel T; Balcerczyk, Aneta; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-08-01

    The enzymatic activities of protein methyltransferases serve to write covalent modifications on histone and non-histone proteins in the control of gene transcription. Here, we describe gene expression changes in human endothelial cells caused by treatment with methyltransferase inhibitors 7,7'-carbonylbis (azanediyl) bis(4-hydroxynaphthalene-2 -sulfonic acid (AMI-1) and disodium-2-(2,4,5,7- tetrabromo-3-oxido-6-oxoxanthen-9-yl) benzoate trihydrate (AMI-5). Deep sequencing of mRNA indicated robust change on transcription following AMI-5 treatment compared with AMI-1. Functional annotation analysis revealed that both compounds suppress the expression of genes associated with translational regulation, suggesting arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) could be associated with regulation of this pathway. Interestingly, AMI-5 but not AMI-1 was found to decrease methylation of H3 histones at lysine 4 and down-regulate gene expression associated with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathways. These results imply that inhibition of protein methylation by AMI-1 and AMI-5 can differentially regulate specific pathways with potential to interrupt pathological signaling in the vascular endothelium.

  13. 75 FR 62024 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (75 FR 49429) asking interested parties to comment on... Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Parts 56 and 57 RIN 1219-AB70 Metal and Nonmetal Dams AGENCY..., operation, and maintenance of safe dams which can assure miners are protected from the hazards of...

  14. Potential for seepage erosion of landslide dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, W.; Schuster, R.L.; Sabol, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The failure potential of the debris-avalanche dam at Castle Lake near Mount St. Helens, Washington, by three processes of seepage erosion (1) Heave; (2) piping; and (3) internal erosion, is examined. Results indicated that the dam is stable against piping but potentially locally unstable against heave. -from Authors

  15. 75 FR 49429 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ..., processing minerals, treating or supplying water, and controlling run- off and sediment. Although many of... 100-foot high dam at a limestone mine in Puerto Rico released over 10 million gallons of water and... slope failure in 1987, the mine operator installed instruments in the dam to monitor internal...

  16. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding. PMID:26004863

  17. Role of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, E. A.; Simakov, M. B.; Mal'Ko, I. L.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Gontareva, N. B.

    With the use of high performance liquid chromatography the products of abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides in solid films were indentified and estimated quantitatively. The main products of photosynthesis appeared to be adenosine and deoxyadenosine monophosphates. Maximal yield of these products in case of adenosine has been 0.36 for 5'AMP, 0.41% for 2'(3')AMP, 0.20 for 2'3'cAMP in case of deoxyadenosine 0.13% for 5'dAMP, 0.15% for 3'dAMP, 0.24% for 3'5'cdAMP. The destruction of initial adenosine and deoxyadenosine by the end of the experiment was 10 and 15%, respectively. By the increasing of irradiation dose, 5'AMP and 5'dAMP synthesized in the cource of VUV photolysis were destructed up to adenine, its yield being 15% in both cases.

  18. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  19. Oxidation of Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate by Isolated Corn Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Koeppe, D. E.; Miller, Raymond J.

    1972-01-01

    Isolated corn (Zea mays L.) mitochondria were found to oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in a KCl reaction medium. This oxidation was dependent on the presence of calcium or phosphate or both. Strontium and manganese substituted for calcium, but magnesium or barium did not. The oxidation of NADPH produced contraction of mitochondria swollen in KCl. Further evidence that the oxidation of NADPH was coupled was observed in respiratory control and adenosine diphosphate-oxygen ratios that were comparable to those reported for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The pathways of electron flow from NADH and NADPH were compared through the addition of electron transport inhibitors. The only difference between the two dinucleotides was that amytal was found to inhibit almost totally the state 3 oxidation of NADPH, but had little effect on the state 3 oxidation of NADH. The hypothetical pathways for electron flow from NADPH are discussed, as are the possible sites of calcium and phosphate stimulation. PMID:16657960

  20. The Impact of Dam-Reservoir-Foundation Interaction on Nonlinear Response of Concrete Gravity Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Ali Reza; Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ghaemian, Mohsen

    2008-07-08

    To study the impact of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction on nonlinear response of concrete gravity dams, a two-dimensional finite element model of a concrete gravity dam including the dam body, a part of its foundation and a part of the reservoir was made. In addition, the proper boundary conditions were used in both reservoir and foundation in order to absorb the energy of outgoing waves at the far end boundaries. Using the finite element method and smeared crack approach, some different seismic nonlinear analyses were done and finally, we came to a conclusion that the consideration of dam-reservoir-foundation interaction in nonlinear analysis of concrete dams is of great importance, because from the performance point of view, this interaction significantly improves the nonlinear response of concrete dams.

  1. First prebiotic generation of a ribonucleotide from adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Baccolini, Graziano; Boga, Carla; Micheletti, Gabriele

    2011-03-28

    Adenosine monophosphate isomers are obtained by self-assembling of adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate in aqueous solution in good yields. This generation of a ribonucleotide from its three molecular components occurs in a one-pot reaction at room temperature for about 30-40 days and with high chemio-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity. Similar results are obtained with guanine. A mechanism is also proposed. PMID:21305098

  2. Protection of Chinese herbs against adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanqing; Han, Bing; Guo, Hongyang; Liu, Yanru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of Chinese herbs (Angelica sinensis, Ligusticum wallichii, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Rhodiola crenilata, Astragalus membranaceus and Angelica sinensis) on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. 30 age-matched male Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Rats in group A (n = 10), B (n = 10) and C (n = 10) were fed a standard laboratory chow and allowed tap water ad libitum. In group B and C, renal failure was induced by the administration of a diet containing 0.75% adenine for 28 days which began at day 0. Rats in group C were given Chinese herbs (40 ml/kg with drug concentration 1.75 g/ml) beginning at day 0. Urine albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were determined at days 0, 14 and 28. At day 28, the animals were killed and their kidneys removed for light microscope evaluation. Body weight in Group B decreased more significantly than that in Group C (p = 0.032) at day 28. The rats in group B demonstrated more severe proteinuria and higher Serum creatinine and BUN levels than group C at day 14 and day 28 (P < 0.05, 0.01). All rats given adenine developed marked structural renal damage involving the tubule and interstitium. The values were much less severe in group C than those in group B. In adenine-induced chronic renal failure rats, the protective effects of these Chinese herbs were of a significant nature. Our results do support the notion that these Chinese herbs are useful in deferring the advance of chronic renal failure. We recommend Chinese herbs as a beneficial treatment for pre-end stage chronic renal failure.

  3. Hypomethylation of ERVs in the sperm of mice haploinsufficient for the histone methyltransferase Setdb1 correlates with a paternal effect on phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Daxinger, Lucia; Oey, Harald; Isbel, Luke; Whitelaw, Nadia C.; Youngson, Neil A.; Spurling, Alex; Vonk, Kelly K. D.; Whitelaw, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The number of reports of paternal epigenetic influences on the phenotype of offspring in rodents is increasing but the molecular events involved remain unclear. Here, we show that haploinsufficiency for the histone 3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Setdb1 in the sire can influence the coat colour phenotype of wild type offspring. This effect occurs when the allele that directly drives coat colour is inherited from the dam, inferring that the effect involves an “in trans” step. The implication of this finding is that epigenetic state of the sperm can alter the expression of genes inherited on the maternally derived chromosomes. Whole genome bisulphite sequencing revealed that Setdb1 mutant mice show DNA hypomethylation at specific classes of transposable elements in the sperm. Our results identify Setdb1 as a paternal effect gene in the mouse and suggest that epigenetic inheritance may be more likely in individuals with altered levels of epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27112447

  4. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3184 genes were methylated as well as 1735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states. PMID:25101067

  5. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3184 genes were methylated as well as 1735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states.

  6. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  7. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  8. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  9. Chemical evolution: The mechanism of the formation of adenine under prebiotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjani; Najafian, Katayoun; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental building blocks of life have been detected extraterrestrially, even in interstellar space, and are known to form nonenzymatically. Thus, the HCN pentamer, adenine (a base present in DNA and RNA), was first isolated in abiogenic experiments from an aqueous solution of ammonia and HCN in 1960. Although many variations of the reaction conditions giving adenine have been reported since then, the mechanistic details remain unexplored. Our predictions are based on extensive computations of sequences of reaction steps along several possible mechanistic routes. H2O- or NH3-catalyzed pathways are more favorable than uncatalyzed neutral or anionic alternatives, and they may well have been the major source of adenine on primitive earth. Our report provides a more detailed understanding of some of the chemical processes involved in chemical evolution, and a partial answer to the fundamental question of molecular biogenesis. Our investigation should trigger similar explorations of the detailed mechanisms of the abiotic formation of the remaining nucleic acid bases and other biologically relevant molecules. PMID:17951429

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids.

  11. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-08

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  12. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life’s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum. PMID:22075932

  13. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  14. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine. PMID:25245205

  15. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine.

  16. Do we need construct more dams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Shi, H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews global dam development in association with the growths of global population, economy, and energy consumption in the past several decades, and also evaluates contributions of dam development to future world sustainable development. Eventually, this paper answers whether we need more dams in the future or not. The world population has rapidly increased from 1.6 billion in 1900, 2.5 billion in 1950, 6.1 billion in 2000, to 7.0 billion in 2011, and is projected to reach 9.5 billion in 2050; similarly, the world economy has dramatically expanded. To maintain socioeconomic development, the consumption of water, food and energy has increased rapidly as well. However, the total volume of available water resource over the world is limited, the food production largely depends on water supply, and the main energy sources are still oil, coal and gas at present, which are regarded as non-renewable resources. Accordingly, it is expected that we will face serious problems to deal with the challenges of water crisis, food security and energy shortage in the near future. In order to enhance the capability of regulating water resource, a great number of global dams (and related reservoirs) have been constructed in the last one hundred years; currently, almost all large rivers over the world have been regulated by dams. The reservoirs can supply sufficient water for irrigated land to ensure food production, and the associated hydropower stations can generate electricity. This article collects the dam data from the ICOLD (International Commission on Large Dams) and GRanD (Global Reservoir and Dam) databases, and some socioeconomic data, including population, economy, and consumptions of water, food and energy over the world. Analysis of these data reveals that global dam development has a great impact on the world sustainable development. Further, it is concluded that we need further dam development to maintain our future development.

  17. Single amino acid substitution in the methyltransferase domain of Paprika mild mottle virus replicase proteins confers the ability to overcome the high temperature-dependent Hk gene-mediated resistance in Capsicum plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Katsutoshi; Johnishi, Kousuke; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Hiromasa; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Kobayashi, Kappei; Suzuki, Kazumi; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2009-03-01

    Capsicum plants harboring the Hk gene (Hk) show resistance to Paprika mild mottle virus (PaMMV) at 32 degrees C but not 24 degrees C. To identify the viral elicitor that activates the Hk-mediated resistance, several chimeric viral genomes were constructed between PaMMV and Tobacco mosaic virus-L. Infection patterns of these chimeric viruses in Hk-harboring plants revealed responsibility of PaMMV replicase genes for activation of the Hk-mediated resistance. The comparison of nucleotide sequence of replicase genes between PaMMV and PaHk1, an Hk-resistance-breaking strain of PaMMV, revealed that the adenine-to-uracil substitution at the nucleotide position 721 causes an amino acid change from threonine to serine at the 241st residue in the methyltransferase domain. Introduction of the A721U mutation into the replicase genes of parental PaMMV overcame the Hk resistance at 32 degrees C. The results indicate that Hk-mediated resistance is induced by PaMMV replicase proteins and that methyltransferase domain has a role in this elicitation.

  18. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  19. Modeling an ancient Iranian dam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits; De Schacht, Tijs

    2013-04-01

    In Iran, along the northern and eastern fringes of the Pasargadae plain, five dam remains from the Achaemenid period (550-330 BCE) present an important footprint of the human impact and reshaping of the region. The dams are predominantly found in dry wadi beds. In the framework of the Joint Iranian-French Archaeological Project at Pasargadae, these dam sites were studied and excavated. Located 22 km to the north of Pasargadae in a small wadi, the Sad-i Didegan dam has a watershed of circa 46 square km, small compared with catchments of other known Achaemenid dams. It is an earth built gravity dam of circa 90 m wide, 21 m high and with a crown length of about 150 m. In the lower body of the dam, remains of a feeder canal and an accessible control infrastructure at the downstream flank of the dam were found. To the northwest, the dam site of Sad-i Shahidabad can be found, another large Achaemenid dam, which stored water from the perennial river of the Rud-i Polvar. This dam also had a similar canal and control structure. Close to the Sad-i Didegan area is a large earthwork, found to cross the watershed divide between Didegan and Shahidabad, consisting of a wide V-shaped trench of remarkable size: up to 100 m wide, a total length of at least 900 m and a maximum present day depth of 7.5 m. Even though the construction of the system in this case clearly was left unfinished, the remains echo the major investment of available labor. Given the contemporaneity of both dam sites, it is clear evidence of the more regionally and elaborately planned character of the hydrological endeavors in the Pasargadae area. Only through further study and future fieldwork (also obtaining absolute dating material), this impressive feature will be fully understood. This contribution proposes a possible use of the two dam system using a modern control simulation model. This analysis will also shed light on the question why the system probably never functioned.

  20. Adenine photodimerization in deoxyadenylate sequences: elucidation of the mechanism through structural studies of a major d(ApA) photoproduct.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Joshi, P C; Sharma, N D; Bose, S N; Jeremy, R; Davies, H; Takeda, N; McCloskey, J A

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of the photodimerization of adjacent adenine bases on the same strand of DNA has been elucidated by determining the structure of one of the two major photoproducts that are formed by UV irradiation of the deoxydinucleoside monophosphate d(ApA). The photoproduct, denoted d(ApA)*, corresponds to a species of adenine photodimer first described by Pörschke (Pörschke, D. (1973) J.Am.Chem.Soc. 95, 8440-8446). From a detailed examination of its chemical and spectroscopic properties, including comparisons with the model compound N-cyano-N1-(1-methylimidazol-5-yl)formamidine, it is deduced that d(ApA)* contains a deoxyadenosine unit covalently linked through its C(8) position to C(4) of an imidazole N(1) deoxyribonucleoside moiety bearing an N-cyanoformamidino substituent at C(5). On treatment with acid, d(ApA)* is degraded with high specificity to 8-(5-amino-imidazol-4-yl)adenine whose identity has been confirmed by independent chemical synthesis. It is concluded that the primary event in adenine photodimerization entails photoaddition of the N(7)-C(8) double bond of the 5'-adenine across the C(6) and C(5) positions of the 3'-adenine. The azetidine species thus generated acts as a common precursor to both types of d(ApA) photoproduct which are formed from it by competing modes of azetidine ring fission. PMID:2057348

  1. Movement and Metabolism of Kinetin-14C and of Adenine-14C in Coleus Petiole Segments of Increasing Age 1

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Henk; Jacobs, William P.

    1969-01-01

    To see if polar movement was typical of growth-regulators other than auxins, the movement of adenine-8-14C and of kinetin-8-14C was studied in segments cut from petioles of increasing age. No polarity was found. In time-course experiments lasting 24 hr, kinetin showed a progressive increase of radioactivity in receiver blocks, while adenine showed a maximum at 8 hr with a decline thereafter. More kinetin moved through older segments than through younger ones. There was no difference in net loss as far as the position of the donor block is concerned. However, the loss of radioactivity from adenine donor blocks was much higher than the loss of radioactivity from kinetin donor blocks. The radioactivity in receiver blocks after 24 hr treatment with kinetin-14C was still with kinetin, judging by location on chromatograms. By the same criterion, adenine and a smaller amount of some other compound were in receiver blocks after a 6 hr transport with adenine-14C in the donors. By contrast, more zones of radioactivity were extracted from petiole segments to which kinetin or adenine had been added. For both purine derivatives the original compound represented no more than 20% of the total radioactivity extracted from the tissue after a transport period of 24 hr. PMID:16657203

  2. Deformation Monitoring and Bathymetry Analyses in Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey has 595 dams constructed between 1936 and 2013 for the purposes of irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric energy and drinking water. A major portion of the dam basins in Turkey are deprived of vegetation and have slope topography on near surrounding area. However, landscaping covered with forest around the dam basin is desirable for erosion control. In fact; the dams, have basins deprived of vegetation, fill up quickly due to sediment transport. Erosion control and forestation are important factors, reducing the sediment, to protect the water basins of the dams and increase the functioning life of the dams. The functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Dams are very large and critical structures and they demand the use or application of precise measuring systems. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. Monitoring is an essential component of the dam after construction and during operation and must en­able the timely detection of any behavior that could deteriorate the dam, potentially result in its shutdown or failure. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the dams, dam safety and related analysis. The case study is the deformation measurements of Atatürk Dam in Turkey which is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Brief information is given about the

  3. Dam Failure Inundation Map Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Carl; Iokepa, Judy; Dahlman, Jill; Michaud, Jene; Paylor, Earnest (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At the end of the first year, we remain on schedule. Property owners were identified and contacted for land access purposes. A prototype software package has been completed and was demonstrated to the Division of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), National Weather Service (NWS) and Pacific Disaster Center (PDC). A field crew gathered data and surveyed the areas surrounding two dams in Waimea. (A field report is included in the annual report.) Data sensitivity analysis was initiated and completed. A user's manual has been completed. Beta testing of the software was initiated, but not completed. The initial TNK and property owner data collection for the additional test sites on Oahu and Kauai have been initiated.

  4. CG-DAMS: Concrete gravity dam stability analysis software. Application manual, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    CG-DAMS is a finite element based program written specifically for the stability analysis of concrete gravity dams. The code automates the prediction and evaluation of cracking in the dam, along the dam-rock interface, and in the foundation using incremental nonlinear analysis techniques based on the ``smeared crack`` approach. Its primary application is in the computation of dam-rock interface sliding stability factors of safety. The automated procedure for crack propagation analysis replaces the trial-and-error cracked-base analysis method commonly used in gravity dam safety analyses. This Application manual of CG-DAMS illustrates, through sample problems, the many features of the software. Example problems illustrate the capabilities of both CG-DAMS-PC and CG-DAMS-ABAQUS. CG-DAMS-PC is a menu driven program that runs on 386/486 PCs under the DOS operating system (4 Megabytes RAM, 25 Megabytes of hard disk space). CG-DAMS-ABAQUS is a pre- and post-processor along with a concrete constitutive model and distributed load module that interfaces with the ABAQUS general purpose finite element program. The PC program contains thermal analysis capabilities, a rough crack constitutive model, and an interface to the CRFLOOD software not available with the ABAQUS version. The CG-DAMS-ABAQUS program contains time marching dynamic analysis capabilities not available with the PC program. Example analyses presented include static, pseudo dynamic, and time marching dynamic analyses. The manual also presents sensitivity evaluations on mesh size and foundation material strength. Comparisons are presented between CG-DAMS and gravity method calculations. Comparisons with other finite element software are included for the dynamic time history analyses.

  5. Dams on the Mekong: Cumulative sediment starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Rubin, Z. K.; Minear, J. T.

    2014-06-01

    The Mekong River, largely undeveloped prior to 1990, is undergoing rapid dam construction. Seven dams are under construction on the mainstem in China and 133 proposed for the Lower Mekong River and tributaries. We delineated nine distinct geomorphic regions, for which we estimated sediment yields based on geomorphic characteristics, tectonic history, and the limited sediment transport data available. We then applied the 3W model to calculate cumulative sediment trapping by these dams, accounting for changing trap efficiency over time and multiple dams on a single river system. Under a "definite future" scenario of 38 dams (built or under construction), cumulative sediment reduction to the Delta would be 51%. Under full build-out of all planned dams, cumulative sediment trapping will be 96%. That is, once in-channel stored sediment is exhausted, only 4% of the predam sediment load would be expected to reach the Delta. This scenario would have profound consequences on productivity of the river and persistence of the Delta landform itself, and suggests that strategies to pass sediment through/around dams should be explored to prevent the consequences of downstream sediment starvation.

  6. The role of dams in development.

    PubMed

    Altinbilek, Doğan

    2002-01-01

    Dams are a major issue in sustainable management of finite water resources; they have also become the subject of vigorous public debate. This article considers them in the light of the report of the World Commission on Dams and using the example of Turkey. It is argued that economic development and population growth, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions, make plain the need for dams for hydropower and irrigation. Environmental impact assessment is essential, as are effective programmes for resettlement to avoid the impoverishment of displaced people.

  7. 46. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1933. VIEW OF DAM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1933. VIEW OF DAM AND FOREBAY. NOTE ALL WATER FLOWING THROUGH FOREBAY AND OUT EITHER TAILRACE OR SLUICE GATE (INSTEAD OF OVER DAM) BECAUSE OF LOW WATER FLOW. (Courtesy of the Potomac Edison Company Library (Hagerstown, MD), Historical Data Files, Dam No. 5 listing - Dam No. 5 Hydroelectric Plant, On Potomac River, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, WV

  8. 6. DAM AFTERBAY, WITH OWYEE RIVER IN FOREGROUND, SHOWING OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DAM AFTERBAY, WITH OWYEE RIVER IN FOREGROUND, SHOWING OUTLET TUNNEL PORTAL (LEFT) AND POWERHOUSE AND ENTRANCE PORTAL TO DAM INTERIOR (RIGHT). NOTE RELEASE OF WATER FROM NEEDLE VALVE NUMBER 2 IN VALVEHOUSE ON DAM. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR

  9. 7. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE MULTIPLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE MULTIPLE ARCHES, AN UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE PARAPET WALL ALONG THE CREST OF THE DAM, AND THE SHELTER HOUSE AT THE EAST END OF THE DAM. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Structural Biology of Human H3K9 Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.; Min, J; Lunin, V; Antoshenko, T; Dombrovsk, L; Zeng, H; Allali-Hassani, A; Campagna-Slater, V; Vedadi, M; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain methyltransferases deposit methyl marks on specific histone tail lysine residues and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We solved the structures of the catalytic domains of GLP, G9a, Suv39H2 and PRDM2, four of the eight known human H3K9 methyltransferases in their apo conformation or in complex with the methyl donating cofactor, and peptide substrates. We analyzed the structural determinants for methylation state specificity, and designed a G9a mutant able to tri-methylate H3K9. We show that the I-SET domain acts as a rigid docking platform, while induced-fit of the Post-SET domain is necessary to achieve a catalytically competent conformation. We also propose a model where long-range electrostatics bring enzyme and histone substrate together, while the presence of an arginine upstream of the target lysine is critical for binding and specificity. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins regulate chromatin compaction, mediate epigenetic regulation of transcription, and control cellular differentiation in health and disease. Methylation of histone tails is one of the fundamental events of epigenetic signaling. Tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9) mediates chromatin recruitment of HP1, heterochromatin condensation and gene silencing. Similarly, methylation of H3K27 and H4K20 are associated with a repressed state of chromatin, whereas expressed genes are methylated at H3K4, H3K36 and H3K79. Histone methyltransferases are divided into protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). HKMTs catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from the co-factor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to a substrate lysine and, with the exception of DOT1L, are all organized around a canonical SET domain. The structures of a number of HKMTs have been reported, including ternary complexes of human orthologs with co-factor and substrate peptides (SETD7-H3K4, SETD8-H4K20 and MLL1-H3K4), as well

  11. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C.; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I.; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2015-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  12. Detecting 16S rRNA Methyltransferases in Enterobacteriaceae by Use of Arbekacin.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick; Chahine, Sarah; Okafor, Darius; Ong, Ana C; Maybank, Rosslyn; Kwak, Yoon I; Wilson, Kerry; Zapor, Michael; Lesho, Emil; Hinkle, Mary

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases confer resistance to most aminoglycosides, but discriminating their activity from that of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) is challenging using phenotypic methods. We demonstrate that arbekacin, an aminoglycoside refractory to most AMEs, can rapidly detect 16S methyltransferase activity in Enterobacteriaceae with high specificity using the standard disk susceptibility test. PMID:26537447

  13. Conserved plant genes with similarity to mammalian de novo DNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaofeng; Springer, Nathan M.; Muszynski, Michael G.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Kaeppler, Shawn; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2000-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a critical role in controlling states of gene activity in most eukaryotic organisms, and it is essential for proper growth and development. Patterns of methylation are established by de novo methyltransferases and maintained by maintenance methyltransferase activities. The Dnmt3 family of de novo DNA methyltransferases has recently been characterized in animals. Here we describe DNA methyltransferase genes from both Arabidopsis and maize that show a high level of sequence similarity to Dnmt3, suggesting that they encode plant de novo methyltransferases. Relative to all known eukaryotic methyltransferases, these plant proteins contain a novel arrangement of the motifs required for DNA methyltransferase catalytic activity. The N termini of these methyltransferases contain a series of ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains. UBA domains are found in several ubiquitin pathway proteins and in DNA repair enzymes such as Rad23, and they may be involved in ubiquitin binding. The presence of UBA domains provides a possible link between DNA methylation and ubiquitin/proteasome pathways. PMID:10781108

  14. Functional Identification of Triterpene Methyltransferases from Botryococcus braunii Race B*

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Tom D.; Kinison, Scott; Okada, Shigeru; Yeo, Yun-soo; Bell, Stephen A.; Cui, Ping; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Chappell, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii race B is a colony-forming, green algae that accumulates triterpene oils in excess of 30% of its dry weight. The composition of the triterpene oils is dominated by dimethylated to tetramethylated forms of botryococcene and squalene. Although unusual mechanisms for the biosynthesis of botryococcene and squalene were recently described, the enzyme(s) responsible for decorating these triterpene scaffolds with methyl substituents were unknown. A transcriptome of B. braunii was screened computationally assuming that the triterpene methyltransferases (TMTs) might resemble the S-adenosyl methionine-dependent enzymes described for methylating the side chain of sterols. Six sterol methyltransferase-like genes were isolated and functionally characterized. Three of these genes when co-expressed in yeast with complementary squalene synthase or botryococcene synthase expression cassettes resulted in the accumulation of mono- and dimethylated forms of both triterpene scaffolds. Surprisingly, TMT-1 and TMT-2 exhibited preference for squalene as the methyl acceptor substrate, whereas TMT-3 showed a striking preference for botryococcene as its methyl acceptor substrate. These in vivo preferences were confirmed with in vitro assays utilizing microsomal preparations from yeast overexpressing the respective genes, which encode for membrane-associated enzymes. Structural examination of the in vivo yeast generated mono- and dimethylated products by NMR identified terminal carbons, C-3 and C-22/C-20, as the atomic acceptor sites for the methyl additions to squalene and botryococcene, respectively. These sites are identical to those previously reported for the triterpenes extracted from the algae. The availability of closely related triterpene methyltransferases exhibiting distinct substrate selectivity and successive catalytic activities provides important tools for investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the specificities exhibited by these unique

  15. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Moon, Hong S; Kapteyn, Jeremy; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Stewart, Neal C.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  16. Multimethylation of Rickettsia OmpB Catalyzed by Lysine Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Abeykoon, Amila; Wang, Guanghui; Chao, Chien-Chung; Chock, P. Boon; Gucek, Marjan; Ching, Wei-Mei; Yang, David C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of rickettsial OmpB (outer membrane protein B) has been implicated in bacterial virulence. Rickettsial methyltransferases RP789 and RP027-028 are the first biochemically characterized methyltransferases to catalyze methylation of outer membrane protein (OMP). Methylation in OMP remains poorly understood. Using semiquantitative integrated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, we characterize methylation of (i) recombinantly expressed fragments of Rickettsia typhi OmpB exposed in vitro to trimethyltransferases of Rickettsia prowazekii RP027-028 and of R. typhi RT0101 and to monomethyltransferases of R. prowazekii RP789 and of R. typhi RT0776, and (ii) native OmpBs purified from R. typhi and R. prowazekii strains Breinl, RP22, and Madrid E. We found that in vitro trimethylation occurs at relatively specific locations in OmpB with consensus motifs, KX(G/A/V/I)N and KT(I/L/F), whereas monomethylation is pervasive throughout OmpB. Native OmpB from virulent R. typhi contains mono- and trimethyllysines at locations well correlated with methylation in recombinant OmpB catalyzed by methyltransferases in vitro. Native OmpBs from highly virulent R. prowazekii strains Breinl and RP22 contain multiple clusters of trimethyllysine in contrast to a single cluster in OmpB from mildly virulent R. typhi. Furthermore, OmpB from the avirulent strain Madrid E contains mostly monomethyllysine and no trimethyllysine. The native OmpB from Madrid E was minimally trimethylated by RT0101 or RP027-028, consistent with a processive mechanism of trimethylation. This study provides the first in-depth characterization of methylation of an OMP at the molecular level and may lead to uncovering the link between OmpB methylation and rickettsial virulence. PMID:24497633

  17. Characterization of Phenylpropene O-Methyltransferases from Sweet Basil

    PubMed Central

    Gang, David R.; Lavid, Noa; Zubieta, Chloe; Chen, Feng; Beuerle, Till; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Noel, Joseph P.; Pichersky, Eran

    2002-01-01

    Some basil varieties are able to convert the phenylpropenes chavicol and eugenol to methylchavicol and methyleugenol, respectively. Chavicol O-methyltransferase (CVOMT) and eugenol O-methyltransferase (EOMT) cDNAs were isolated from the sweet basil variety EMX-1 using a biochemical genomics approach. These cDNAs encode proteins that are 90% identical to each other and very similar to several isoflavone O-methyltransferases such as IOMT, which catalyzes the 4′-O-methylation of 2,7,4′-trihydroxyisoflavanone. On the other hand, CVOMT1 and EOMT1 are related only distantly to (iso)eugenol OMT from Clarkia breweri, indicating that the eugenol O-methylating enzymes in basil and C. breweri evolved independently. Transcripts for CVOMT1 and EOMT1 were highly expressed in the peltate glandular trichomes on the surface of the young basil leaves. The CVOMT1 and EOMT1 cDNAs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and active proteins were produced. CVOMT1 catalyzed the O-methylation of chavicol, and EOMT1 also catalyzed the O-methylation of chavicol with equal efficiency to that of CVOMT1, but it was much more efficient in O-methylating eugenol. Molecular modeling, based on the crystal structure of IOMT, suggested that a single amino acid difference was responsible for the difference in substrate discrimination between CVOMT1 and EOMT1. This prediction was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, in which the appropriate mutants of CVOMT1 (F260S) and EOMT1 (S261F) were produced that exhibited the opposite substrate preference relative to the respective native enzyme. PMID:11884690

  18. Do cholinephosphotransferase and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase synthesize different species of phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Moore, T.S.

    1986-04-01

    Two pathways exist for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis in castor bean endosperm. The major pathway utilizes the reaction; (CDPcholine + diacylglycerol ..-->.. PC + CMP) while the other is through (PE + 3 S-Adenosylmethioninie ..-->.. PC + 3 homocysteine). The reason for two pathways is not clear. In an effort to determine if they produce two different products, radioactive precursors (SAM and CDPcholine) were administered to isolated endoplasmic reticulum from the castor bean endosperm. The products were extracted, chromatographed on TLC, and the PC classes separated by argentation chromatography. The radioactivity was determined by a RTLC Scanner. By these methods, it has been determined that there are differences between the PC products of the methyltransferase and the cholinephosphotransferase.

  19. Analysis of seismic disaster failure mechanism and dam-break simulation of high arch dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingkui; Zhang, Liaojun

    2014-06-01

    Based on a Chinese national high arch dam located in a meizoseismal region, a nonlinear numerical analysis model of the damage and failure process of a dam-foundation system is established by employing a 3-D deformable distinct element code (3DEC) and its re-development functions. The proposed analysis model considers the dam-foundation-reservoir coupling effect, influence of nonlinear contact in the opening and closing of the dam seam surface and abutment rock joints during strong earthquakes, and radiation damping of far field energy dissipation according to the actual workability state of an arch dam. A safety assessment method and safety evaluation criteria is developed to better understand the arch dam system disaster process from local damage to ultimate failure. The dynamic characteristics, disaster mechanism, limit bearing capacity and the entire failure process of a high arch dam under a strong earthquake are then analyzed. Further, the seismic safety of the arch dam is evaluated according to the proposed evaluation criteria and safety assessment method. As a result, some useful conclusions are obtained for some aspects of the disaster mechanism and failure process of an arch dam. The analysis method and conclusions may be useful in engineering practice.

  20. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenyu; Chory, Emma J.; Wernimont, Amy K.; Tempel, Wolfram; Scopton, Alex; Federation, Alexander; Marineau, Jason J.; Qi, Jun; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Yi, Joanna; Marcellus, Richard; Iacob, Roxana E.; Engen, John R.; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Wienholds, Erno; Li, Fengling; Pineda, Javier; Estiu, Guillermina; Shatseva, Tatiana; Hajian, Taraneh; Al-awar, Rima; Dick, John E.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bradner, James E.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  1. Electrochemical Assay for the Signal-on Detection of Human DNA Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to detect human DNA methyltransferases are needed, given that aberrant methylation by these enzymes is associated with cancer initiation and progression. Here we describe a non-radioactive, antibody-free, electrochemical assay in which methyltransferase activity on DNA-modified electrodes confers protection from restriction for signal-on detection. We implement this assay with a multiplexed chip platform and show robust detection of both bacterial (SssI) and human (Dnmt1) methyltransferase activity. Essential to work with human methyltransferases, our unique assay design allows activity measurements on both unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA substrates. We validate this assay by comparison with a conventional radioactive method. The advantages of electrochemistry over radioactivity and fluorescence make this assay an accessible and promising new approach for the sensitive, label-free detection of human methyltransferase activity. PMID:24164112

  2. Allergic reaction after rubber dam placement.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, E D; Ranali, J; Volpato, M C; de Oliveira, M M

    2000-03-01

    In the last few years allergic reactions to natural rubber latex (NRL) have increased in dental practice affecting both the dental team and patients. Some case reports discuss the potential risks of hypersensitivity to NRL products. An adverse patient reaction after dental rubber dam placement is reported. About 1 min after the isolation of the tooth with a rubber dam the patient presented signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity. Oxygen and intravenous hydrocortisone were administered and the patient kept under observation. After 2 h she had stable vital signs and no more allergics symptoms. It is unclear whether components of the NRL dam or the cornstarch powder incorporated with the rubber dam was responsible for the allergic reaction. Dentists must be aware of the health problem and be prepared for an adequate management in dental practice.

  3. ESTIMATION OF NAVIGATION - DAM DISCHARGE IN ILLINOIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques were used to estimate discharge for the Brandon Road Dam on the Des Plaines River and the Dresden Island, Marseilles, and Starved Rock Dams on the Illinois River in northern Illinois. Tainter gates are operated to regulate streamflow at all dams. Additionally, headgates are used for regulation of the Brandon Road Dam. Stage-discharge, gate-opening relations were developed from a total of 91 discharge measurements that range from 198 to 86,400 cubic feet per second (5. 6 to 2,450 cubic meters per second). Values for discharge coefficients, in equations that express discharge as a function of tailwater depth, headwater depth, and vertical height of gate opening, were determined for conditions of free-orifice, submerged-orifice, free-weir, and submerged-weir flow past a tainter gate.

  4. White Sturgeon Passage at The Dalles Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Researchers at the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center's Columbia River Research Laboratory, working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, sought to better understand upstream and downstream passage of white sturgeon at dams. A study at The Dalles Dam provided the opportunity to compare two fish ladders; one that passes sturgeon upstream to one that does not, to determine if subtle differences in construction result in better passage of white sturgeon. Researchers conducted a study using a combination of acoustic and radio telemetry technologies to obtain information on juvenile and adult white sturgeon near The Dalles Dam, with the objectives of characterizing the distribution and movements of white sturgeon in the immediate vicinity of the dam and to determine timing and routes of upstream and downstream passage.

  5. 76 FR 25310 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Zoar Levee and Diversion Dam, Dam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Levee and Diversion Dam, Dam Safety Modification Study, Tuscarawas County, OH AGENCY: Department of the... with Zoar Levee and Diversion Dam. These high hazard structures do not meet current performance... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1. Authority: Investigation and justification of modifications for dam...

  6. 76 FR 34799 - Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Alternatives: permanent modifications to dam structures and removal of the temporary HESCO baskets before the... Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN AGENCY... various alternatives for permanent modifications to the existing dam facilities at Cherokee, Fort...

  7. 33 CFR 208.19 - Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir... Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Texas. In the interest of flood control, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) shall operate the Marshall Ford Dam...

  8. Handling protocol of posterior composites Rubber Dam.

    PubMed

    Strydom, C

    2005-08-01

    Although it can never provide perfect isolation, rubber dam greatly facilitates adhesive procedures by keeping the operating field dry throughout operative procedures. Research has shown time and again that the modern dentin bonding agents cannot cope with blood- or saliva contamination. In spite of this very few dentists use rubber dam routinely. Once experienced in its use, it should not take up much more clinical time than 2 minutes.

  9. Earthquake-dammed lakes in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.

    1981-05-01

    Eleven small lakes were formed by landslides caused by the 1929 Buller earthquake; four others were formed by other historic earthquakes in New Zealand. At least nine other New Zealand lakes are also dammed by landslides and were probably formed by prehistoric earthquakes. When recognized by morphology, synchronous age, and areal distribution, earthquake-dammed lakes could provide an estimate of paleoseismicity for the past few hundred or thousand years.

  10. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10-15 and 3.2 × 10-15 cm2, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10-18 and 7.6 × 10-18 cm2 at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  11. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  12. NF-κB activation mediates crystal translocation and interstitial inflammation in adenine overload nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Cristiene; Borges, Raquel Lerner; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Fanelli, Camilla; Barlette, Grasiela Pedreira; Machado, Flavia Gomes; Arias, Simone Costa Alarcon; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Zatz, Roberto; Fujihara, Clarice Kazue

    2013-07-15

    Adenine overload promotes intratubular crystal precipitation and interstitial nephritis. We showed recently that these abnormalities are strongly attenuated in mice knockout for Toll-like receptors-2, -4, MyD88, ASC, or caspase-1. We now investigated whether NF-κB activation also plays a pathogenic role in this model. Adult male Munich-Wistar rats were distributed among three groups: C (n = 17), receiving standard chow; ADE (n = 17), given adenine in the chow at 0.7% for 1 wk and 0.5% for 2 wk; and ADE + pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; n = 14), receiving adenine as above and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (120 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹ in the drinking water). After 3 wk, widespread crystal deposition was seen in tubular lumina and in the renal interstitium, along with granuloma formation, collagen accumulation, intense tubulointerstitial proliferation, and increased interstitial expression of inflammatory mediators. Part of the crystals were segregated from tubular lumina by a newly formed cell layer and, at more advanced stages, appeared to be extruded to the interstitium. p65 nuclear translocation and IKK-α increased abundance indicated activation of the NF-κB system. PDTC treatment prevented p65 migration and normalized IKK-α, limited crystal shift to the interstitium, and strongly attenuated interstitial fibrosis/inflammation. These findings indicate that the complex inflammatory phenomena associated with this model depend, at least in part, on NF-κB activation, and suggest that the NF-κB system may become a therapeutic target in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  13. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  14. Global phosphorus retention by river damming.

    PubMed

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H; Powley, Helen R; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-12-22

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y(-1), or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions.

  15. Distributional Impacts of Large Dams in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.

    2010-12-01

    Dams on a river are believed to have heterogeneous impacts to the upstream, local and downstream areas. Generally, irrigation dams will bring benefits to the downstream by facilitating more irrigation, while it will bring negative impacts to upstream due to inundation or no impact to local area as a combination result of population dislocation and economic benefits. This paper checked the impacts of large dams (above 100 meters) on the upstream, downstream and local area, using 2000-2008 county level data in China. Robust heterogeneous impacts of different categories of dams (mainly dams serving for irrigation, hydropower, or other purposes) were found on different areas, using IV regression approaches. Dams higher than 100 meters are significantly and heterogeneously impacting agricultural production, urban employment and rural per capita income. Its beneficial impact on agriculture production is significant for downstream especially in continuous drought years. But its impacts on social welfare indicators, such as primary school enrollment and hospital beds, are not heterogeneously different across regions.

  16. Global phosphorus retention by river damming

    PubMed Central

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T.; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H.; Powley, Helen R.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y−1, or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions. PMID:26644553

  17. Global phosphorus retention by river damming.

    PubMed

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H; Powley, Helen R; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-12-22

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y(-1), or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions. PMID:26644553

  18. Floodplain Hyporheic Response under Dam Release Hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ward, A. S.; O'Connor, B. L.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydropower operations cause altered hydrograph patterns downstream of dams, which regulates the direction and magnitude of floodplain and riverbed hyporheic flux. Periodic adjustments in river stage changes temporal and spatial patterns in hydraulic pressure, initiates propagation of lateral and vertical hyporheic flux, and affects the riparian ecological system by changing the hyporheic penetration distance, hyporheic flux rate, and thermal conditions in river banks. While this issue has been largely neglected by watershed scientists and managers, there is the potential to use hyporheic metrics in setting dam release rules and restoring downstream river reaches. In order to evaluate the hyporheic feedbacks of various dam release patterns, this study applied a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the interaction of open water hydrographs on porous media lateral hyporheic exchange for the Green River, Utah, downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam. The CFD initially represented the river as a straight channel with a thick porous media extending from the channel banks and bottom. The dam release hydrographs changed the patterns of hyporheic flux at the river banks, the penetration distance of the hyporheic flux, the subsurface thermal patterns, and the residence time of water in the subsurface. The results suggest the undulating river stage downstream of dam releases can initiate patterns of hyporheic exchange similar to those induced by restoration of river bed morphology.

  19. The structure, stability, H-bonding pattern, and electrostatic potential of adenine tetrads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2001-03-01

    Two conformations of the adenine tetrad were investigated at the HF and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. Both conformations are predicted to be stable only in the nonplanar form. They adopt the bowl type structure. Since the planar form offers better geometry for stacking with the adjacent G-tetrad, both planar forms are expected to be important in the formation of the tetraplexes. Based on electrostatic potential map the positive electrostatic potential in the central area of both conformations is expected to reinforce the stacking between the A-tetrads and the G-tetrads in the tetraplexes.

  20. Strong coupling between adenine nucleobases in DNA single strands revealed by circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Holm, Anne I. S.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2008-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) experiments on DNA single strands (dAn) at the ASTRID synchrotron radiation facility reveal that eight adenine (A) bases electronically couple upon 190nm excitation. After n=8 , the CD signal increases linearly with n with a slope equal to the sum of the coupling terms. Nearest neighbor interactions account for only 24% of the CD signal whereas electronic communication is limited to nearest neighbors for two other exciton bands observed at 218 and 251nm (i.e., dimer excited states). Electronic coupling between bases in DNA is important for nonradiative deexcitation of electronically excited states since the hazardous energy is spread over a larger spatial region.

  1. Dam failure analysis for the Lago de Matrullas Dam, Orocovis, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Sierra, Heriberto; Gómez-Fragoso, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Results from the simulated dam failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam using the HEC–RAS model for the 6- and 24-hour PMP events showed peak discharges at the dam of 3,149.33 and 3,604.70 m3/s, respectively. Dam failure during the 100-year-recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event resulted in a peak discharge of 2,103.12 m3/s directly downstream from the dam. Dam failure under sunny day conditions produced a peak discharge of 1,695.91 m3/s at the dam assuming the antecedent lake level was at the morning-glory spillway invert elevation. Flood-inundation maps prepared as part of the study depict the flood extent and provide valuable information for preparing an Emergency Action Plan. Results of the failure analysis indicate that a failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam could cause flooding to many of the inhabited areas along stream banks from the Lago de Matrullas Dam to the mouth of the Río Grande de Manatí. Among the areas most affected are the low-lying regions in the vicinity of the towns of Ciales, Manatí, and Barceloneta. The delineation of the flood boundaries near the town of Barceloneta considered the effects of a levee constructed during 2000 at Barceloneta in the flood plain of the Río Grande de Manatí to provide protection against flooding to the near-by low-lying populated areas. The results showed overtopping can be expected in the aforementioned levee during 6- and 24-hour probable-maximum-precipitation dam failure scenarios. No overtopping of the levee was simulated, however, during dam failure scenarios under the 100-year recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event or sunny day conditions.

  2. Redox Control of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Yalemi; Nitzel, Damon V.; Price, Owen M.; Gui, Shanying; Li, Jun; Qu, Jun; Hevel, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) correlate with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. ADMA is generated by the catabolism of proteins methylated on arginine residues by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. Reports have shown that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity is down-regulated and PRMT1 protein expression is up-regulated under oxidative stress conditions, leading many to conclude that ADMA accumulation occurs via increased synthesis by PRMTs and decreased degradation. However, we now report that the methyltransferase activity of PRMT1, the major PRMT isoform in humans, is impaired under oxidative conditions. Oxidized PRMT1 displays decreased activity, which can be rescued by reduction. This oxidation event involves one or more cysteine residues that become oxidized to sulfenic acid (-SOH). We demonstrate a hydrogen peroxide concentration-dependent inhibition of PRMT1 activity that is readily reversed under physiological H2O2 concentrations. Our results challenge the unilateral view that increased PRMT1 expression necessarily results in increased ADMA synthesis and demonstrate that enzymatic activity can be regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. PMID:25911106

  3. Lipid substrate specificity of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    The ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila forms about 60% of its phosphatidylcholine by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine with S-adenosylmethionine using the enzyme phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase. Analogues of ethanolamine or of ethanolamine phosphate are incorporated into the phospholipids of Tetrahymena when cells are cultured in their presence. These compounds, 3-amino-1-propanol, 2-aminoethylphosphonate, 3-aminopropylphosphonate and N,N-dimethylaminoethylphosphonate replace from 50 to 75% of the ethanolamine phosphate in phosphatidylethanolamine. However, analysis of the phospholipids of lipid-altered Tetrahymena showed that none of the phosphatidylethanolamine analogues had been converted to the corresponding phosphatidylcholine analogue. No incorration of (/sup 14/C-CH/sub 3/)methionine into the phosphatidylcholine analogues could be demonstrated in vivo, nor was label from (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)S-adenosylmethionine incorporated in virto. Thus, only phosphatidylethanolamine and its monomethyl and dimethyl derivatives have been found to be substrates for the phosphatidylethanoiamine N-methyltransferase. The enzyme therefore requires a phospholipid substrate containing an ester linkage between the alkylamine and phosphorus, with the amino group required to be ..beta.. to the alcohol.

  4. An allosteric inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 3.

    PubMed

    Siarheyeva, Alena; Senisterra, Guillermo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Wasney, Gregory A; Chau, Irene; Marcellus, Richard; Hajian, Taraneh; Liu, Feng; Korboukh, Ilia; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Min, Jinrong; Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Loppnau, Peter; Poda, Gennadiy; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Brown, Peter J; Jin, Jian; Al-Awar, Rima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Schapira, Matthieu; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-08-01

    PRMT3, a protein arginine methyltransferase, has been shown to influence ribosomal biosynthesis by catalyzing the dimethylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S2. Although PRMT3 has been reported to be a cytosolic protein, it has been shown to methylate histone H4 peptide (H4 1-24) in vitro. Here, we report the identification of a PRMT3 inhibitor (1-(benzo[d][1,2,3]thiadiazol-6-yl)-3-(2-cyclohexenylethyl)urea; compound 1) with IC50 value of 2.5 μM by screening a library of 16,000 compounds using H4 (1-24) peptide as a substrate. The crystal structure of PRMT3 in complex with compound 1 as well as kinetic analysis reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Mutating PRMT3 residues within the allosteric site or using compound 1 analogs that disrupt interactions with allosteric site residues both abrogated binding and inhibitory activity. These data demonstrate an allosteric mechanism for inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases, an emerging class of therapeutic targets.

  5. Diamidine Compounds for Selective Inhibition of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification critical for a variety of biological processes. Misregulation of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has been linked to many pathological conditions. Most current PRMT inhibitors display limited specificity and selectivity, indiscriminately targeting many methyltransferase enzymes that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a cofactor. Here we report diamidine compounds for specific inhibition of PRMT1, the primary type I enzyme. Docking, molecular dynamics, and MM/PBSA analysis together with biochemical assays were conducted to understand the binding modes of these inhibitors and the molecular basis of selective inhibition for PRMT1. Our data suggest that 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan (1, furamidine, DB75), one leading inhibitor, targets the enzyme active site and is primarily competitive with the substrate and noncompetitive toward the cofactor. Furthermore, cellular studies revealed that 1 is cell membrane permeable and effectively inhibits intracellular PRMT1 activity and blocks cell proliferation in leukemia cell lines with different genetic lesions. PMID:24564570

  6. Purification of phospholipid methyltransferase from rat liver microsomal fraction.

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, M A; Villalba, M; Mato, J M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid methyltransferase, the enzyme that converts phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine with S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor, was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver microsomal fraction. When analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis only one protein, with molecular mass about 50 kDa, is detected. This protein could be phosphorylated at a single site by incubation with [alpha-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. A less-purified preparation of the enzyme is mainly composed of two proteins, with molecular masses about 50 kDa and 25 kDa, the 50 kDa form being phosphorylated at the same site as the homogeneous enzyme. After purification of both proteins by electro-elution, the 25 kDa protein forms a dimer and migrates on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with molecular mass about 50 kDa. Peptide maps of purified 25 kDa and 50 kDa proteins are identical, indicating that both proteins are formed by the same polypeptide chain(s). It is concluded that rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase can exist in two forms, as a monomer of 25 kDa and as a dimer of 50 kDa. The dimer can be phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3800912

  7. A Histone Methyltransferase ESET Is Critical for T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Takikita, Shoichi; Muro, Ryunosuke; Takai, Toshiyuki; Otsubo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Dohi, Taeko; Oda, Hiroyo; Kitajima, Masayuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Endo, Takaho A; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Weis, John; Shinkai, Yoichi; Suzuki, Harumi

    2016-09-15

    ESET/SETDB1, one of the major histone methyltransferases, catalyzes histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation. ESET is critical for suppressing expression of retroviral elements in embryonic stem cells; however, its role in the immune system is not known. We found that thymocyte-specific deletion of ESET caused impaired T cell development, with CD8 lineage cells being most severely affected. Increased apoptosis of CD8 single-positive cells was observed, and TCR-induced ERK activation was severely inhibited in ESET(-/-) thymocytes. Genome-wide comprehensive analysis of mRNA expression and H3K9 trimethylation revealed that ESET regulates expression of numerous genes in thymocytes. Among them, FcγRIIB, whose signaling can inhibit ERK activation, was strongly and ectopically expressed in ESET(-/-) thymocytes. Indeed, genetic depletion of FcγRIIB in ESET(-/-) thymocytes rescued impaired ERK activation and partially restored defective positive selection in ESET(-/-) mice. Therefore, impaired T cell development in ESET(-/-) mice is partly due to the aberrant expression of FcγRIIB. Collectively, to our knowledge, we identify ESET as the first trimethylated H3K9 histone methyltransferase playing a crucial role in T cell development. PMID:27511731

  8. In Vitro Assay to Measure Phosphatidylethanolamine Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases are biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the transfer of one or more methyl group(s) from S-adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine, monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, or dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine to give either monomethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, dimethyl-phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine. These enzymes are ubiquitous in animal cells, fungi, and are also found in approximately 10% of bacteria. They fulfill various important functions in cell physiology beyond their direct role in lipid metabolism such as in insulin resistance, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cell growth, or virulence. The present manuscript reports on a simple cell-free enzymatic assay that measures the transfer of tritiated methyl group(s) from S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine onto phosphatidylethanolamine using whole cell extracts as an enzyme source. The resulting methylated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine are hydrophobic and thus, can be separated from water soluble S-[Methyl-3H]adenosyl-L-methionine by organic extraction. This assay can potentially be applied to any other cell types and used to test inhibitors/drugs specific to a phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase of interest without the need to purify the enzyme. PMID:26780155

  9. Experimental Approaches for Target Profiling of RNA Cytosine Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Vahid; Yerra, Archana; Cairns, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    RNA cytosine methyltransferases (m(5)C-RMTs) constitute an important class of RNA-modifying enzymes, methylating specific cytosines within particular RNA targets in both coding and noncoding RNAs. Almost all organisms express at least one m(5)C-RMT, and vertebrates often express different types or variants of m(5)C-RMTs in different cell types. Deletion or mutation of particular m(5)C-RMTs is connected to severe pathological manifestations ranging from developmental defects to infertility and mental retardation. Some m(5)C-RMTs show spatiotemporal patterns of expression and activity requiring careful experimental design for their analysis in order to capture their context-dependent targets. An essential step for understanding the functions of both the enzymes and the modified cytosines is defining the one-to-one connection between particular m(5)C-RMTs and their target cytosines. Recent technological and methodological advances have provided researchers with new tools to comprehensively explore RNA cytosine methylation and methyltransferases. Here, we describe three complementary approaches applicable for both discovery and validation of candidate target sites of specific m(5)C-RMTs.

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  12. The isolation and characterisation of a new type of dimeric adenine photoproduct in UV-irradiated deoxyadenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Sharma, N D; Davies, R J; Phillipson, D W; McCloskey, J A

    1987-01-01

    A new type of dimeric adenine photoproduct has been isolated from d(ApA) irradiated at 254 nm in neutral aqueous solution. It is formed in comparable amounts to another, quite distinct, adenine photoproduct first described by Pörschke (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1973), 95, 8440-8446). Results from high resolution mass spectrometry and 1H NMR indicate that the new photoproduct comprises a mixture of two stereoisomers whose formation involves covalent coupling of the adenine bases in d(ApA) and concomitant incorporation of the elements of one molecule of water. The photoproduct is degraded specifically by acid to 4,6-diamino-5-guanidinopyrimidine (DGPY) whose identity has been confirmed by independent chemical synthesis. Formation of the new photoproduct in UV-irradiated d(pA)2 and poly(dA), but not poly(rA), has been demonstrated by assaying their acid hydrolysates for the presence of DGPY. The properties of the photoproduct are consistent with it being generated by the hydrolytic fission of an azetidine photoadduct in which the N(7) and C(8) atoms of the 5'-adenine in d(ApA) are linked respectively to the C(6) and C(5) positions of the 3'-adenine. PMID:3822822

  13. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  14. Project Planning for Cougar Dam during 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haskell, Craig A.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Cougar Dam is a 158 m-tall, rock fill dam located about 63 km east of Springfield, Oregon. Completed in 1963, the dam is owned and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). It impounds Cougar Reservoir, which is 9.7 km long, has a surface area of 518 ha, and is predominately used for flood control. The pool elevation typically ranges from a maximum conservation pool of 515 m (1,690 ft) National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD) in summer to a minimum flood control elevation of 467 m (1,532 ft NGVD) in winter. The reservoir thermally stratifies in the summer, has an average depth of 37 m, and holds 153,500 acre-feet when full. Cougar Dam is located on the South Fork of the McKenzie River 7 km upstream from the mainstem McKenzie River, a tributary of the Willamette River. The McKenzie River Basin basin supports the largest remaining population of wild spawning spring Chinook salmon in the Willamette River Basin (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; NOAA, 2008). Cougar Dam and others were collectively deemed to cause jeopardy to the sustainability of anadromous fish stocks in the Willamette River Basin (NOAA, 2008). Prior to dam construction, as many as 805 redds were observed in the South Fork of the McKenzie River (Willis and others, 1960) and it is estimated that 40 km of spawning habitat were lost when access was blocked after dam construction. The 2008 Willamette Biological Opinion (BIOP) requires improvements to operations and structures to reduce impacts on Upper Willamette River (UWR) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and UWR steelhead (O. mykiss; NOAA, 2008). In 2010, an adult fish collection facility was completed below Cougar Dam to collect returning adult salmon for transport to spawning habitats above the dam. Before that time, returning adult spring Chinook salmon were transported to upstream spawning areas as part of a trap-and-haul program with adults passed ranging annually from 0 to 1,038 (Taylor, 2000). The progeny of

  15. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features.

  16. Differentiation alters the unstable expression of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in mouse teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Turker, M S; Tischfield, J A; Rabinovitch, P; Stambrook, P J; Trill, J J; Smith, A C; Ogburn, C E; Martin, G M

    1986-01-01

    Three multipotent mouse teratocarcinoma stem lines, all exhibiting unstable expression for the purine salvage enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) were used for the isolation of differentiated cell lines from neoplasms developed in syngeneic mice. Two of the stem cell lines (DAP1B and DAP1C) exhibited homozygous deficiencies for APRT expression while the third stem cell line (E140) exhibited a heterozygous deficiency (Turker, M.S., Smith, A.C., and Martin, G.M.; Somat. Cell Mol. Genet.; 10:55-69; 1984). A total of 16 morphologically differentiated cell lines were established from these neoplasms; most were no longer tumorigenic. Differentiated cell lines derived from the E140-induced tumors segregated homozygous deficient mutants in a single step, consistent with their retention of the heterozygous deficient state. Differentiated homozygous deficient cell lines gave rise to phenotypic revertants at very high frequencies (10(-1) to 10(-2)). The majority of these putative revertants, however, yielded cell-free extracts with little or no detectable APRT activity. These putative revertants were capable of adenine salvage and were therefore termed APRT pseudorevertants. Since the APRT pseudorevertant phenotype was only observed in the differentiated progeny of the APRT deficient stem cell lines, we conclude that this change in the nature of the revertant phenotype was a consequence of cellular differentiation.

  17. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  18. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  19. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    PubMed Central

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (εΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs. PMID:26227585

  20. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  1. Probing ultrafast dynamics in adenine with mid-UV four-wave mixing spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2011-08-11

    Heterodyne-detected transient grating (TG) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectroscopies are extended to the mid-UV spectral range in this investigation of photoinduced relaxation processes of adenine in aqueous solution. These experiments are the first to combine a new method for generating 25 fs laser pulses (at 263 nm) with the passive phase stability afforded by diffractive optics-based interferometry. We establish a set of conditions (e.g., laser power density, solute concentration) appropriate for the study of dynamics involving the neutral solute. Undesired solute photoionization is shown to take hold at higher peak powers of the laser pulses. Signatures of internal conversion and vibrational cooling dynamics are examined using TG measurements with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 350 at short delay times. In addition, 2DPE line shapes reveal correlations between excitation and emission frequencies in adenine, which reflect electronic and nuclear relaxation processes associated with particular tautomers. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of techniques that will hold many advantages for the study of biomolecules whose lowest-energy electronic resonances are found in the mid-UV (e.g., DNA bases, amino acids).

  2. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  3. Ultraviolet photolysis of adenine: Dissociation via the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} state

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Michael G. D.; Devine, Adam L.; Cronin, Brid; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2007-03-28

    High resolution total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra of the H atom fragments resulting from photodissociation of jet-cooled adenine molecules at 17 wavelengths in the range 280>{lambda}{sub phot}>214 nm are reported. TKER spectra obtained at {lambda}{sub phot}>233 nm display broad, isotropic profiles that peak at low TKER ({approx}1800 cm{sup -1}) and are largely insensitive to the choice of excitation wavelength. The bulk of these products is attributed to unintended multiphoton dissociation processes. TKER spectra recorded at {lambda}{sub phot}{<=}233 nm display additional fast structure, which is attributed to N{sub 9}-H bond fission on the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} potential energy surface (PES). Analysis of the kinetic energies and recoil anisotropies of the H atoms responsible for the fast structure suggests excitation to two {sup 1}{pi}{pi}{sup *} excited states (the {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}B{sub b} states) at {lambda}{sub phot}{approx}230 nm, both of which dissociate to yield H atoms together with ground state adeninyl fragments by radiationless transfer through conical intersections with the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} PES. Parallels with the photochemistry exhibited by other, smaller heteroaromatics (pyrrole, imidazole, phenol, etc.) are highlighted, as are inconsistencies between the present conclusions and those reached in two other recent studies of excited state adenine molecules.

  4. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  5. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features. PMID:27409976

  6. Mammalian WTAP is a regulatory subunit of the RNA N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xiao-Li; Sun, Bao-Fa; Wang, Lu; Xiao, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Wen-Jia; Adhikari, Samir; Shi, Yue; Lv, Ying; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Xu; Li, Ang; Yang, Ying; Dahal, Ujwal; Lou, Xiao-Min; Liu, Xi; Huang, Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Fan; Cheng, Tao; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xinquan; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2014-02-01

    The methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3)-containing methyltransferase complex catalyzes the N6-methyladenosine (m6A) formation, a novel epitranscriptomic marker; however, the nature of this complex remains largely unknown. Here we report two new components of the human m6A methyltransferase complex, Wilms' tumor 1-associating protein (WTAP) and methyltransferase like 14 (METTL14). WTAP interacts with METTL3 and METTL14, and is required for their localization into nuclear speckles enriched with pre-mRNA processing factors and for catalytic activity of the m6A methyltransferase in vivo. The majority of RNAs bound by WTAP and METTL3 in vivo represent mRNAs containing the consensus m6A motif. In the absence of WTAP, the RNA-binding capability of METTL3 is strongly reduced, suggesting that WTAP may function to regulate recruitment of the m6A methyltransferase complex to mRNA targets. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses in combination with photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) illustrate that WTAP and METTL3 regulate expression and alternative splicing of genes involved in transcription and RNA processing. Morpholino-mediated knockdown targeting WTAP and/or METTL3 in zebrafish embryos caused tissue differentiation defects and increased apoptosis. These findings provide strong evidence that WTAP may function as a regulatory subunit in the m6A methyltransferase complex and play a critical role in epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. PMID:24407421

  7. Methylation of translation-associated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Identification of methylated lysines and their methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Couttas, Timothy A; Raftery, Mark J; Padula, Matthew P; Herbert, Ben R; Wilkins, Marc R

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to identify sites of lysine methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the associated methyltransferases. Hexapeptide ligand affinity chromatography was used to normalize the abundance levels of proteins in whole cell lysate. MS/MS, in association with antibody-based detection, was then used to identify lysine methylated proteins and the precise sites of modification. Lysine methylation was found on the proteins elongation factor (EF) 1-α, 2, and 3A, as well as ribosomal proteins 40S S18-A/B, 60S L11-A/B, L18-A/B, and L42-A/B. Precise sites were mapped in all cases. Single-gene knockouts of known and putative methyltransferase(s), in association with MS/MS, showed that EF1-α is monomethylated by Efm1 at lysin 30 and dimethylated by See1 at lysine 316. Methyltransferase Rkm1 was found to monomethylate 40S ribosomal protein S18-A/B at lysine 48. Knockout analysis also revealed that putative methyltransferase YBR271W affects the methylation of proteins EF2 and 3A; this was detected by Western blotting and immunodetection. This methyltransferase shows strong interspecies conservation and a tryptophan-containing motif associated with its active site. We suggest that enzyme YBR271W is named EF methyltransferase 2 (Efm2), in line with the recent naming of YHL039W as Efm1. PMID:22522802

  8. A van der Waals density functional study of adenine on graphene: Single molecular adsorption and overlayer binding

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Kristian; Cooper, Valentino R; Langreth, David C.; Schroder, Prof. Elsebeth; Chakarova-Kack, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of an adenine molecule on graphene is studied using a first-principles van der Waals functional (vdW-DF) [Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)]. The cohesive energy of an ordered adenine overlayer is also estimated. For the adsorption of a single molecule, we determine the optimal binding configuration and adsorption energy by translating and rotating the molecule. The adsorption energy for a single molecule of adenine is found to be 711 meV, which is close to the calculated adsorption energy of the similar-sized naphthalene. Based on the single molecular binding configuration, we estimate the cohesive energy of a two-dimensional ordered overlayer. We find a significantly stronger binding energy for the ordered overlayer than for single-molecule adsorption.

  9. Roles of DNA adenine methylation in host-pathogen interactions: mismatch repair, transcriptional regulation, and more

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, Martin G.; Casadesus, Josep

    2010-01-01

    The Dam methylase of gamma-proteobacteria and the CcrM methylase of alpha-proteobacteria catalyze an identical reaction (methylation of adenosine moieties using S-adenosyl-methionine as methyl donor) at similar DNA targets (GATC and GANTC, respectively). Dam and CcrM are of independent evolutionary origin. Each may have evolved from an ancestral restriction-modification system that lost its restriction component, leaving an “orphan” methylase devoted solely to epigenetic genome modification. Formation of 6-methyladenine lowers the thermodynamic stability of DNA and changes DNA curvature. As a consequence, the methylation state of specific adenosine moieties can affect DNA-protein interactions. Well known examples include binding of the replication initiation complex to the methylated oriC, recognition of hemimethylated GATCs in newly replicated DNA by the MutHLS mismatch repair complex, and discrimination of methylation states in promoters and regulatory DNA motifs by RNA polymerase and transcription factors. In recent years, Dam and CcrM have been shown to play roles in host-pathogen interactions. These roles are diverse and only partially understood. Especially intriguing is the evidence that Dam methylation regulates virulence genes in E. coli, Salmonella, and Yersinia at the postranscriptional level. PMID:19175412

  10. DFT Studies of the Extent of Hole Delocalization in One-electron Oxidized Adenine and Guanine base Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of hole delocalization in one-electron oxidized adenine (A)- and guanine (G)-stacks and shows that new IR vibrational bands are predicted that are characteristic of hole delocalization within A-stacks. The geometries of A-stack (Ai; i = 2 – 8) and G-stack (GG and GGG) in their neutral and one-electron oxidized states were optimized with the bases in a B-DNA conformation using the M06-2X/6-31G* method. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) is localized on a single adenine in A-stacks and on a single guanine in GG and GGG stacks; located at the 5′-site of the stack. On one-electron oxidation (removal of an electron from the HOMO of the neutral A- and G-stacks) a “hole” is created. Mulliken charge analysis shows that these “holes” are delocalized over 2 – 3 adenine bases in the A-stack. The calculated spin density distribution of (Ai)•+ (i = 2 – 8), also, showed delocalization of the hole predominantly on two adenine bases with some delocalization on a neighboring base. For GG and GGG radical cations, the hole was found to be localized on a single G in the stack. The calculated HFCCs of GG and GGG are in good agreement with the experiment. Further, from the vibrational frequency analysis, it was found that IR spectra of neutral and the corresponding one-electron oxidized adenine stacks are quite different. The IR spectra of (A2)•+ has intense IR peaks between 900 – 1500 cm−1 which are not present in the neutral A2 stack. The presence of (A2)•+ in the adenine stack has a characteristic intense peak at ~1100 cm−1. Thus IR and Raman spectroscopy has potential for monitoring the extent of hole delocalization in A stacks. PMID:21417208

  11. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Analogs Substituted on the Nicotinic Acid and Adenine Ribosides. Effects on Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Trabbic, Christopher J.; Zhang, Fan; Walseth, Timothy F.; Slama, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca2+ releasing intracellular second messenger in both mammals and echinoderms. We report that large functionalized substituents introduced at the nicotinic acid 5-position are recognized by the sea urchin receptor, albeit with a 20–500 fold loss in agonist potency. 5-(3-Azidopropyl)-NAADP was shown to release Ca2+ with an EC50 of 31 µM and to compete with NAADP for receptor binding with an IC50 of 56 nM. Attachment of charged groups to the nicotinic acid of NAADP is associated with loss of activity, suggesting that the nicotinate riboside moiety is recognized as a neutral zwitterion. Substituents (Br- and N3-) can be introduced at the 8-adenosyl position of NAADP while preserving high potency and agonist efficacy and an NAADP derivative substituted at both the 5-position of the nicotinic acid and at the 8-adenosyl position was also recognized although the agonist potency was significantly reduced. PMID:25826221

  12. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon

    PubMed Central

    Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut. PMID:25755826

  13. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon.

    PubMed

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut.

  14. Dental dam patch: an effective intraoral repair technique using cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1998-10-01

    Secondary dental dam retention is a critical component of successful dental dam isolation and relates to the provision of an effective seal at the dam/tooth junction. Restorative success can be compromised if this seal is inadvertently interrupted during the operative effort. One such periodic mishap is entanglement of the bur and the interdental dam strip during caries or restorative removal. This invariably results in a gaping interproximal defect in the dam. This article discusses the importance of optimum isolation as it relates to current "wet bonding" adhesive procedures, and introduces a repair technique using a patch of dental dam and cyanoacrylate.

  15. Marmot Dam Removal: Predictions and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Orr, B. K.; Wilcox, A.; Vick, J.; Podolak, C.; Wilcox, P.

    2008-12-01

    The 14-m tall Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon was removed in the summer of 2007, allowing the approximately 730,000 cubic meters of sand and gravel to remain in the river for natural erosion by the flow. Pre-dam removal studies included sediment transport modeling that simulated several dam removal alternatives and provided key pieces of information that allowed a diverse stakeholder group to unanimously agree on the "blow-and-go" alternative, allowing a large amount of sediment to be released to a major salmonid-bearing river in the Columbia River basin. Although it is still too early to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the model performance because morphological responses in the downstream reaches, if any, are likely years away, observations to date (one year after dam removal) indicate that model predictions are generally accurate. Here we present some of the key findings of pre-dam-removal sediment transport modeling predictions and compare them with post-removal observations.

  16. Backbone resonance assignments for the SET domain of the human methyltransferase NSD2.

    PubMed

    Bobby, Romel; Peciak, Karolina; Milbradt, Alexander G

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant NSD2 methyltransferase activity is implicated as the oncogenic driver in multiple myeloma, suggesting opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention. The methyltransferase activity of NSD2 resides in its catalytic SET domain, which is conserved among most lysine methyltransferases. Here we report the backbone [Formula: see text], N, C[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and side-chain [Formula: see text] assignments of a 25 kDa NSD2 SET domain construct, spanning residues 991-1203. A chemical shift analysis of C[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] resonances predicts a secondary structural pattern that is in agreement with homology models.

  17. Histone lysine methyltransferases as anti-cancer targets for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Ming-wei

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational epigenetic modification of histones is controlled by a number of histone-modifying enzymes. Such modification regulates the accessibility of DNA and the subsequent expression or silencing of a gene. Human histone methyltransferases (HMTs)constitute a large family that includes histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) and histone/protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There is increasing evidence showing a correlation between HKMTs and cancer pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of representative HKMTs, including their biological and biochemical properties as well as the profiles of small molecule inhibitors for a comprehensive understanding of HKMTs in drug discovery. PMID:27397541

  18. Emerging Diversity of the Cobalamin-Dependent Methyltransferases Involving Radical-Based Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Li, Qien; Jia, Youli; Ji, Xinjian; Qianzhu, Haocheng; Zhang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Cobalamins comprise a group of cobalt-containing organometallic cofactors that play important roles in cellular metabolism. Although many cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases (e.g., methionine synthase MetH) have been extensively studied, a new group of methyltransferases that are cobalamin-dependent and utilize radical chemistry in catalysis is just beginning to be appreciated. In this Concept article, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the radical-based and cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases and discuss the functional and mechanistic diversity of this emerging class of enzymes. PMID:27028019

  19. REVERSAL BY ADENINE OF THE ETHIONINE-INDUCED LIPID ACCUMULATION IN THE ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM OF THE RAT LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Baglio, Corrado M.; Farber, Emmanuel

    1965-01-01

    Within 3.5 to 4 hours after thionine administration, numerous small osmiophilic bodies, liposomes, appear in the endoplasmic reticulum of the liver cells. By fusion, the liposomes lead to the formation of larger collections of fat, giant liposomes. Adenine administration to ethionine-treated rats removes the liposomes from the hepatocytes and causes the transitory appearance of osmiophilic droplets in the sinusoidal space of Disse. The characteristic disaggregation of hepatic polysomes seen in the liver after ethionine administration is corrected by the injection of adenine. PMID:5885431

  20. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  1. Progesterone-adenine hybrids as bivalent inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug efflux: design, synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zeinyeh, Waël; Mahiout, Zahia; Radix, Sylvie; Lomberget, Thierry; Dumoulin, Axel; Barret, Roland; Grenot, Catherine; Rocheblave, Luc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Dumontet, Charles; Walchshofer, Nadia

    2012-10-01

    Bivalent ligands were designed on the basis of the described close proximity of the ATP-site and the putative steroid-binding site of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1). The syntheses of 19 progesterone-adenine hybrids are described. Their abilities to inhibit P-glycoprotein-mediated daunorubicin efflux in K562/R7 human leukemic cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein were evaluated versus progesterone. The hybrid with a hexamethylene linker chain showed the best inhibitory potency. The efficiency of these progesterone-adenine hybrids depends on two main factors: (i) the nature of the linker and (ii) its attachment point on the steroid skeleton.

  2. The Remains of the Dam: What Have We Learned From 10 Years of Dam Removals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G. E.; O'Connor, J. E.; Major, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 10 years in the U.S., dam removal has evolved from an occasionally implemented, rarely studied, and poorly understood intervention to improve rivers, to a much more frequently accomplished and better studied and understood approach to river restoration. Over that same time period, the numbers and sizes of dams and volumes of sediment released have dramatically increased. By some estimates close to 1000 dams have been removed over the last 100 years, with most of those occurring within the last 10. While most of these are small (less than 15 m high) dams, removals of dams up to 70 m high are presently underway. Releases of sediment associated with these removals over the past 10 years have also increased by close to four orders of magnitude; for example removal of the Elwha River dams in Washington is estimated to release almost 107 m3 of sediment into the lower Elwha River. Given a decade's worth of dam removals and, in some cases, well-orchestrated case studies of the effects of removal on the geomorphology and (to a lesser extent) ecology of rivers, what have we learned? More specifically, where do we now stand with respect to being able to predict the consequences of future dam removals? Drawing on both field examples and numerical models of dam removals in the western U.S., several key lessons stand out. Although every dam removal and river are different, removals initiate very rapid upstream river response and reservoir erosion and evacuation of sediment by various mechanisms that are strongly controlled by grain size of the deposit, volumes of residual sediment relative to total reservoir volume, and style of dam removal (instantaneous versus staged). Erosion of sediment accumulations in fully and partially filled (by sediment) reservoirs proceeds by different trajectories and rates, with full reservoirs releasing sediment primarily by upstream knickpoint retreat while erosion and sediment release in partially-filled reservoirs proceeds by

  3. Toward policies and decision-making for dam removal.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Harbor, Jon M; Stanley, Emily H

    2003-04-01

    Dam removal has emerged as a critical issue in environmental management. Agencies responsible for dams face a drastic increase in the number of potential dam removals in the near future. Given limited resources, these agencies need to develop ways to decide which dams should be removed and in what order. The underlying science of dam removal is relatively undeveloped and most agencies faced with dam removal lack a coherent purpose for removing dams. These shortcomings can be overcome by the implementation of two policies by agencies faced with dam removal: (1) the development and adoption of a prioritization scheme for what constitutes an important dam removal, and (2) the establishment of minimum levels of analysis prior to decision-making about a dam removal. Federal and state agencies and the scientific community must encourage an initial experimental phase of dam removal during which only a few dams are removed, and these are studied intensively. This will allow for the development of the fundamental scientific understanding needed to support effective decision-making in the future and minimize the risk of disasters arising from poorly thought out dam removal decisions. PMID:12677292

  4. Toward policies and decision-making for dam removal.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Martin W; Harbor, Jon M; Stanley, Emily H

    2003-04-01

    Dam removal has emerged as a critical issue in environmental management. Agencies responsible for dams face a drastic increase in the number of potential dam removals in the near future. Given limited resources, these agencies need to develop ways to decide which dams should be removed and in what order. The underlying science of dam removal is relatively undeveloped and most agencies faced with dam removal lack a coherent purpose for removing dams. These shortcomings can be overcome by the implementation of two policies by agencies faced with dam removal: (1) the development and adoption of a prioritization scheme for what constitutes an important dam removal, and (2) the establishment of minimum levels of analysis prior to decision-making about a dam removal. Federal and state agencies and the scientific community must encourage an initial experimental phase of dam removal during which only a few dams are removed, and these are studied intensively. This will allow for the development of the fundamental scientific understanding needed to support effective decision-making in the future and minimize the risk of disasters arising from poorly thought out dam removal decisions.

  5. Water-quality study of proposed reregulation dam downstream of Wolf Creek Dam, Cumberland River, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the application of an unsteady, one-dimensional water-quality model to the Cumberland River below Wolf Creek Dam, Kentucky. A hydropower upgrade of Wolf Creek Dam and construction of a reregulation dam, located approximately 10 miles below Wolf Creek Dam, are under consideration. Simulations were conducted under unreregulated conditions and projected conditions following impoundment to provide information concerning the effect of the reregulation dam on water quality in the Cumberland River. Under the conditions simulated, the reregulation dam was predicted to have little impact on temporally averaged water temperatures or dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Temporal variations in water temperatures were retarded under reregulation conditions.

  6. Histone methyltransferases: novel targets for tumor and developmental defects

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Yan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation plays a critical role in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotes. To date, studies have shown that lysine residues of K4, K9, K27, K36 and K79 in histone H3 and K20 in histone H4 can be modified by histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Such histone methylation can specifically activate or repress the transcriptional activity to play a key role in gene expression/regulation and biological genetics. Importantly, abnormities of patterns or levels of histone methylation in higher eukaryotes may result in tumorigenesis and developmental defects, suggesting histone methylation will be one of the important targets or markers for treating these diseases. This review will outline the structural characteristics, active sites and specificity of HMTs, correlation between histone methylation and human diseases and lay special emphasis on the progress of the research on H3K36 methylation. PMID:26807165

  7. Novel Broad Spectrum Inhibitors Targeting the Flavivirus Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Jones, Susan A.; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zhong; Kramer, Laura D.; Li, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) is an essential enzyme that sequentially methylates the N7 and 2’-O positions of the viral RNA cap, using S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) as a methyl donor. We report here that small molecule compounds, which putatively bind to the SAM-binding site of flavivirus MTase and inhibit its function, were identified by using virtual screening. In vitro methylation experiments demonstrated significant MTase inhibition by 13 of these compounds, with the most potent compound displaying sub-micromolar inhibitory activity. The most active compounds showed broad spectrum activity against the MTase proteins of multiple flaviviruses. Two of these compounds also exhibited low cytotoxicity and effectively inhibited viral replication in cell-based assays, providing further structural insight into flavivirus MTase inhibition. PMID:26098995

  8. Clinical utility of thiopurine S-methyltransferase genotyping.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Hèctor; Baiget, Montserrat

    2004-01-01

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a major role in the metabolism of thiopurine drugs such as mercaptopurine and azathioprine. The interindividual differences in response to thiopurine administration is in part due to the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the gene that regulates TPMT activity. TPMT genotype correlates well with the in vivo enzyme activity within erythrocytes. Patients with genetically determined decreased TPMT activity develop severe myelosuppression when treated with standard doses of thiopurine drugs because an excess of thioguanine nucleotides accumulates in hematopoietic tissues. TPMT genotyping provides clinicians with a reliable method for identifying TPMT-deficient patients who can benefit from low doses of thiopurine drugs in order to reduce the risk of developing adverse effects. Moreover, the administration of higher doses of the drug could improve therapeutic response in patients in whom the TPMT genotyping demonstrates the absence of mutated alleles.

  9. Arginine methyltransferase CARM1/PRMT4 regulates endochondral ossification

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tatsuo; Yadav, Neelu; Lee, Jaeho; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Noboru; Hashimoto, Megumi; Tsuchiya, Megumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Lotz, Martin; Bedford, Mark T; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background Chondrogenesis and subsequent endochondral ossification are processes tightly regulated by the transcription factor Sox9 (SRY-related high mobility group-Box gene 9), but molecular mechanisms underlying this activity remain unclear. Here we report that coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) regulates chondrocyte proliferation via arginine methylation of Sox9. Results CARM1-null mice display delayed endochondral ossification and decreased chondrocyte proliferation. Conversely, cartilage development of CARM1 transgenic mice was accelerated. CARM1 specifically methylates Sox9 at its HMG domain in vivo and in vitro. Arg-methylation of Sox9 by CARM1 disrupts interaction of Sox9 with beta-catenin, regulating Cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle progression of chondrocytes. Conclusion These results establish a role for CARM1 as an important regulator of chondrocyte proliferation during embryogenesis. PMID:19725955

  10. RNA methyltransferase NSUN2 promotes stress-induced HUVEC senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hao; Hu, Han; Pang, Lijun; Xing, Junyue; Liu, Zhenyun; Luo, Yuhong; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Te; Gorospe, Myriam; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Wengong

    2016-01-01

    The tRNA methyltransferase NSUN2 delays replicative senescence by regulating the translation of CDK1 and CDKN1B mRNAs. However, whether NSUN2 influences premature cellular senescence remains untested. Here we show that NSUN2 methylates SHC mRNA in vitro and in cells, thereby enhancing the translation of the three SHC proteins, p66SHC, p52SHC, and p46SHC. Our results further show that the elevation of SHC expression by NSUN2-mediated mRNA methylation increased the levels of ROS, activated p38MAPK, thereby accelerating oxidative stress- and high-glucose-induced senescence of human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Our findings highlight the critical impact of NSUN2-mediated mRNA methylation in promoting premature senescence. PMID:26992231

  11. Low catechol-O-methyltransferase activity in a Saami population.

    PubMed

    Klemetsdal, B; Straume, B; Giverhaug, T; Aarbakke, J

    1994-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes the O-methylation of catechol hormones, neurotransmitters and certain drugs. It is subject to genetic polymorphism and ethnic differences. High red blood cell (RBC) COMT activity has been correlated with a poor response to levodopa treatment in Parkinson's disease. RBC COMT was determined in a Norwegian population (n = 213) of whom 115 were Saami (Laaps). The Saami had 16.5% lower RBC COMT activity compared to a non-Saami population sample from the northern part of Norway (n = 50), 13.9 vs. 16.4 units/ml RBC (U) (P = 0.04). This is the first report of any population with lower RBC COMT activity than a Caucasian population. A wide range of RBC COMT activities was found in the entire population examined (1.3-38.3 U).

  12. DNA Electrochemistry Shows DNMT1 Methyltransferase Hyperactivity in Colorectal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel L; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-07-23

    DNMT1, the most abundant human methyltransferase, is responsible for translating the correct methylation pattern during DNA replication, and aberrant methylation by DNMT1 has been linked to tumorigenesis. We have developed a sensitive signal-on electrochemical assay for the measurement of DNMT1 activity in crude tissue lysates. We have further analyzed ten tumor sets and have found a direct correlation between DNMT1 hyperactivity and tumorous tissue. In the majority of samples analyzed, the tumorous tissue has significantly higher DNMT1 activity than the healthy adjacent tissue. No such correlation is observed in measurements of DNMT1 expression by qPCR, DNMT1 protein abundance by western blotting, or DNMT1 activity using a radiometric DNA labeling assay. DNMT1 hyperactivity can result from both protein overexpression and enzyme hyperactivity. DNMT1 activity measured electrochemically provides a direct measure of activity in cell lysates and, as a result, provides a sensitive and early indication of cancerous transformation.

  13. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  14. International small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks to avoid dam failure flood disasters in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Dam, Tuyet Thi; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne L.

    2015-12-01

    In developing countries small dam failure disasters are common yet research on their dam safety management is lacking. This paper reviews available small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks from international literature, synthesises them for applicability in developing countries, and provides example application through a case study of Vietnam. Generic models from 'minimum' to 'best' practice (Pisaniello, 1997) are synthesised with the World Bank's 'essential' and 'desirable' elements (Bradlow et al., 2002) leading to novel policy analysis and design criteria for developing countries. The case study involved 22 on-site dam surveys finding micro level physical and management inadequacies that indicates macro dam safety management policy performs far below the minimum benchmark in Vietnam. Moving assurance policy towards 'best practice' is necessary to improve the safety of Vietnam's considerable number of hazardous dams to acceptable community standards, but firstly achieving 'minimum practice' per the developed guidance is essential. The policy analysis/design process provides an exemplar for other developing countries to follow for avoiding dam failure flood disasters.

  15. RNA methyltransferases involved in 5′ cap biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Byszewska, Magdalena; Śmietański, Mirosław; Purta, Elżbieta; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes and viruses that infect them, the 5′ end of mRNA molecules, and also many other functionally important RNAs, are modified to form a so-called cap structure that is important for interactions of these RNAs with many nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. The RNA cap has multiple roles in gene expression, including enhancement of RNA stability, splicing, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and translation initiation. Apart from guanosine addition to the 5′ end in the most typical cap structure common to transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II (in particular mRNA), essentially all cap modifications are due to methylation. The complexity of the cap structure and its formation can range from just a single methylation of the unprocessed 5′ end of the primary transcript, as in mammalian U6 and 7SK, mouse B2, and plant U3 RNAs, to an elaborate m7Gpppm6,6AmpAmpCmpm3Um structure at the 5′ end of processed RNA in trypanosomes, which are formed by as many as 8 methylation reactions. While all enzymes responsible for methylation of the cap structure characterized to date were found to belong to the same evolutionarily related and structurally similar Rossmann Fold Methyltransferase superfamily, that uses the same methyl group donor, S-adenosylmethionine; the enzymes also exhibit interesting differences that are responsible for their distinct functions. This review focuses on the evolutionary classification of enzymes responsible for cap methylation in RNA, with a focus on the sequence relationships and structural similarities and dissimilarities that provide the basis for understanding the mechanism of biosynthesis of different caps in cellular and viral RNAs. Particular attention is paid to the similarities and differences between methyltransferases from human cells and from human pathogens that may be helpful in the development of antiviral and antiparasitic drugs. PMID:25626080

  16. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  17. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  18. Hydroxyl radical reactions with adenine: reactant complexes, transition states, and product complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qianyi; Gu, Jiande; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-18

    In order to address problems such as aging, cell death, and cancer, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind reactions causing DNA damage. One specific reaction implicated in DNA oxidative damage is hydroxyl free-radical attack on adenine (A) and other nucleic acid bases. The adenine reaction has been studied experimentally, but there are few theoretical results. In the present study, adenine dehydrogenation at various sites, and the potential-energy surfaces for these reactions, are investigated theoretically. Four reactant complexes [A···OH]* have been found, with binding energies relative to A+OH* of 32.8, 11.4, 10.7, and 10.1 kcal mol(-1). These four reactant complexes lead to six transition states, which in turn lie +4.3, -5.4, (-3.7 and +0.8), and (-2.3 and +0.8) kcal mol(-1) below A+OH*, respectively. Thus the lowest lying [A···OH]* complex faces the highest local barrier to formation of the product (A-H)*+H(2)O. Between the transition states and the products lie six product complexes. Adopting the same order as the reactant complexes, the product complexes [(A-H)···H(2)O]* lie at -10.9, -22.4, (-24.2 and -18.7), and (-20.5 and -17.5) kcal mol(-1), respectively, again relative to separated A+OH*. All six A+OH* → (A-H)*+H(2)O pathways are exothermic, by -0.3, -14.7, (-17.4 and -7.8), and (-13.7 and -7.8) kcal mol(-1), respectively. The transition state for dehydrogenation at N(6) lies at the lowest energy (-5.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to A+OH*), and thus reaction is likely to occur at this site. This theoretical prediction dovetails with the observed high reactivity of OH radicals with the NH(2) group of aromatic amines. However, the high barrier (37.1 kcal mol(-1)) for reaction at the C(8) site makes C(8) dehydrogenation unlikely. This last result is consistent with experimental observation of the imidazole ring opening upon OH radical addition to C(8). In addition, TD-DFT computed electronic transitions of the N(6) product around 420 nm

  19. Chronic kidney disease induced by adenine: a suitable model of growth retardation in uremia.

    PubMed

    Claramunt, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena; Fuente, Rocío; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Hernández-Frías, Olaya; Ordoñez, Flor A; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Santos, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Growth retardation is a major manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in pediatric patients. The involvement of the various pathogenic factors is difficult to evaluate in clinical studies. Here, we present an experimental model of adenine-induced CKD for the study of growth failure. Three groups (n = 10) of weaning female rats were studied: normal diet (control), 0.5% adenine diet (AD), and normal diet pair fed with AD (PF). After 21 days, serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH), weight and length gains, femur osseous front advance as an index of longitudinal growth rate, growth plate histomorphometry, chondrocyte proliferative activity, bone structure, aorta calcifications, and kidney histology were analyzed. Results are means ± SE. AD rats developed renal failure (serum urea nitrogen: 70 ± 6 mg/dl and creatinine: 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/dl) and secondary hyperparathyroidism (PTH: 480 ± 31 pg/ml). Growth retardation of AD rats was demonstrated by lower weight (AD rats: 63.3 ± 4.8 g, control rats: 112.6 ± 4.7 g, and PF rats: 60.0 ± 3.8 g) and length (AD rats: 7.2 ± 0.2 cm, control rats: 11.1 ± 0.3 cm, and PF rats: 8.1 ± 0.3 cm) gains as well as lower osseous front advances (AD rats: 141 ± 13 μm/day, control rats: 293 ± 16 μm/day, and PF rats: 251 ± 10 μm/day). The processes of chondrocyte maturation and proliferation were impaired in AD rats, as shown by lower growth plate terminal chondrocyte height (21.7 ± 2.3 vs. 26.2 ± 1.9 and 23.9 ± 1.3 μm in control and PF rats) and proliferative activity index (AD rats: 30 ± 2%, control rats: 38 ± 2%, and PF rats: 42 ± 3%). The bone primary spongiosa structure of AD rats was markedly disorganized. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD in young rats is associated with growth retardation and disturbed endochondral ossification. This animal protocol may be a useful new experimental model to study growth in CKD.

  20. Optimizing the dammed: water supply losses and fish habitat gains from dam removal in California.

    PubMed

    Null, Sarah E; Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Lent, Michelle; Lund, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    Dams provide water supply, flood protection, and hydropower generation benefits, but also harm native species by altering the natural flow regime and degrading aquatic and riparian habitat. Restoring some rivers reaches to free-flowing conditions may restore substantial environmental benefits, but at some economic cost. This study uses a systems analysis approach to preliminarily evaluate removing rim dams in California's Central Valley to highlight promising habitat and unpromising economic use tradeoffs for water supply and hydropower. CALVIN, an economic-engineering optimization model, is used to evaluate water storage and scarcity from removing dams. A warm and dry climate model for a 30-year period centered at 2085, and a population growth scenario for year 2050 water demands represent future conditions. Tradeoffs between hydropower generation and water scarcity to urban, agricultural, and instream flow requirements were compared with additional river kilometers of habitat accessible to anadromous fish species following dam removal. Results show that existing infrastructure is most beneficial if operated as a system (ignoring many current institutional constraints). Removing all rim dams is not beneficial for California, but a subset of existing dams are potentially promising candidates for removal from an optimized water supply and free-flowing river perspective. Removing individual dams decreases statewide delivered water by 0-2282 million cubic meters and provides access to 0 to 3200 km of salmonid habitat upstream of dams. The method described here can help prioritize dam removal, although more detailed, project-specific studies also are needed. Similarly, improving environmental protection can come at substantially lower economic cost, when evaluated and operated as a system.

  1. Dam failure analysis for the Lago de Matrullas Dam, Orocovis, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Sierra, Heriberto; Gómez-Fragoso, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Results from the simulated dam failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam using the HEC–RAS model for the 6- and 24-hour PMP events showed peak discharges at the dam of 3,149.33 and 3,604.70 m3/s, respectively. Dam failure during the 100-year-recurrence, 24-hour rainfall event resulted in a peak discharge of 2,103.12 m3/s directly downstream from the dam. Dam failure under sunny day conditions produced a peak discharge of 1,695.91 m3/s at the dam assuming the antecedent lake level was at the morning-glory spillway invert elevation. Flood-inundation maps prepared as part of the study depict the flood extent and provide valuable information for preparing an Emergency Action Plan. Results of the failure analysis indicate that a failure of the Lago de Matrullas Dam could cause flooding to many of the inhabited areas along stream banks from the Lago de Matrullas Dam to the mouth of the Río Grande de Manatí. Among the areas most affected are the low-lying regions in the vicinity of the towns of Ciales, Manatí, and Barceloneta. The delineation of the flood boundaries near the town of Barceloneta considered the effects of a levee constructed during 2000 at Barceloneta in the flood plain of the Río Grande de Manatí to provide protection against flooding to the near-by low-lying populated areas. The results showed overtopping can be expected in the aforementioned levee during 6- and 2

  2. Optimizing the dammed: water supply losses and fish habitat gains from dam removal in California.

    PubMed

    Null, Sarah E; Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Escriva-Bou, Alvar; Lent, Michelle; Lund, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    Dams provide water supply, flood protection, and hydropower generation benefits, but also harm native species by altering the natural flow regime and degrading aquatic and riparian habitat. Restoring some rivers reaches to free-flowing conditions may restore substantial environmental benefits, but at some economic cost. This study uses a systems analysis approach to preliminarily evaluate removing rim dams in California's Central Valley to highlight promising habitat and unpromising economic use tradeoffs for water supply and hydropower. CALVIN, an economic-engineering optimization model, is used to evaluate water storage and scarcity from removing dams. A warm and dry climate model for a 30-year period centered at 2085, and a population growth scenario for year 2050 water demands represent future conditions. Tradeoffs between hydropower generation and water scarcity to urban, agricultural, and instream flow requirements were compared with additional river kilometers of habitat accessible to anadromous fish species following dam removal. Results show that existing infrastructure is most beneficial if operated as a system (ignoring many current institutional constraints). Removing all rim dams is not beneficial for California, but a subset of existing dams are potentially promising candidates for removal from an optimized water supply and free-flowing river perspective. Removing individual dams decreases statewide delivered water by 0-2282 million cubic meters and provides access to 0 to 3200 km of salmonid habitat upstream of dams. The method described here can help prioritize dam removal, although more detailed, project-specific studies also are needed. Similarly, improving environmental protection can come at substantially lower economic cost, when evaluated and operated as a system. PMID:24594701

  3. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jason; Meyers, Amy

    2014-12-31

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  4. 3. POOL, DAM, AND INTAKE TO PIPELINE LEADING TO FISH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. POOL, DAM, AND INTAKE TO PIPELINE LEADING TO FISH WHEEL, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. 1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION OF INTAKE ON EAST SIDE OF DAM - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  6. 5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM AND POWER HOUSE, LOOKING UPSTREAM TO SOUTH FROM THE A MOUND OF DEBRIS ABOUT THIRTY TO FORTY FEET ABOVE THE RIVER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  7. 21. THE WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION CAMP AT THE DIVERSION DAM, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. THE WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION CAMP AT THE DIVERSION DAM, FACING SOUTH. WOOD BURNING PLANT AT RIGHT, INTAKE GATES AT CENTER LEFT. Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, June 13, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  8. 44. Reinforcement construction to Pleasant Dam. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Reinforcement construction to Pleasant Dam. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: Huber Collection, University of California, Berkeley, Water Resources Library. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  10. 7. Detail view of reinforced concrete archrings comprising dam's upstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view of reinforced concrete arch-rings comprising dam's upstream face. Impressions of the wooden formwork used in construction are visible in the concrete. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 78. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: DIMENSIONS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, SHEET 5; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 81. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 6; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 6; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 5; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 2. VIEW EAST OF HEADGATES AT SPOOL DAM; DRAIN GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST OF HEADGATES AT SPOOL DAM; DRAIN GATE MECHANISM AND DAM EDGE AT RIGHT - Willimantic Linen Company, Mill No. 1, Immediately West of South Main Street, North Bank of Willimantic River, Windham, Windham County, CT

  16. 1. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FACE OF DAM AT RIGHT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FACE OF DAM AT RIGHT CENTER, HEADGATES AND CANAL AT LEFT - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  17. 3. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM AT LEFT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM AT LEFT CENTER, HEADGATE STRUCTURE AT CENTER - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  18. 2. VIEW EAST, WEST END OF DAM AT CENTER, HEADGATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST, WEST END OF DAM AT CENTER, HEADGATE OPERATING MECHANISMS AT LEFT - Dayville Mills Hydroelectric Facility, Dam, North side of Route 101, .5 mile west of Route 395, Killingly Center, Windham County, CT

  19. 10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement storage shed is at center right. Photographer unknown, September 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 11. VIEW OF HOCK OUTCROPPING, CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF HOCK OUTCROPPING, CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND LAKE WITH TUNNEL INLET STRUCTURE IN DISTANCE, SHOWN AT MINIMUM WATER FLOW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  1. 1. OVERALL VIEW SHOWING FACE OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW SHOWING FACE OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM AND FISH LADDER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST (UPSTREAM) FROM SNORE OPPOSITE FISH LADDER - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  2. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF STEPPED CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF STEPPED CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM FACE AND ROCK OUTCROPPING, WITH LAKE IN BACKGROUND, SHOWN AT MINIMUM WATER FLOW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST (UPSTREAM) - Van Arsdale Dam, South Fork of Eel River, Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA

  3. 10. DETAIL OF NONOVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING PENSTOCK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF NON-OVERFLOW SECTION OF DAM SHOWING PENSTOCK OF SUBMERSIBLE TURBINE-GENERATOR - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  4. 2. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR UNDER CONSTRUCTION LOOKING WEST WITH EAST DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR UNDER CONSTRUCTION LOOKING WEST WITH EAST DAM IN MIDDLE GROUND, WEST DAM IN DISTANCE. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  5. "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing into high line. June, 1917. R.B.D." - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  6. 32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the dam blends into its environment. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  7. 23. VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM, SHOWING SPILLWAY DISCHARGE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM, SHOWING SPILLWAY DISCHARGE TUNNEL AT LEFT, RIGHT (OR NORTH) SPILLWAY, HEFU POWER UNIT, AND ORIGINAL POWER PLANT - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 24. CLOSEUP VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM. HEFU PENSTOCK IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF HORSE MESA DAM. HEFU PENSTOCK IS AT CENTER RIGHT, AND LEFT (OR SOUTH) SPILLWAY CHUTE IS AT UPPER RIGHT - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 22. VIEW SHOWING THE COMPLETED HORSE MESA DAM, EXCEPT FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW SHOWING THE COMPLETED HORSE MESA DAM, EXCEPT FOR TRANSFORMER EQUIPMENT BEING INSTALLED ABOVE THE POWER PLANT 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 36. CROSS SECTIONAL VIEW OF ORIGINAL HORSE MESA DAM POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. CROSS SECTIONAL VIEW OF ORIGINAL HORSE MESA DAM POWER PLANT, LOOKING NORTH. ONLY TWO OF THE THREE UNITS ARE VISIBLE - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF TOE SPILLWAY SECTION OF LOWWATER DAM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF TOE SPILLWAY SECTION OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST (UPSTREAM). ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  12. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWWATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF LOW-WATER DAM, LOOKING UPSTREAM. CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE AND ST. LOUIS WATER DEPARTMENT INTAKE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  13. 56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Upstream face of diversion dam looking east. Headgates are partially visible at far left. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at right. Photographer unknown, c. late 1920s. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 60. Waddell Dam in relation and spillway tailrace. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Waddell Dam in relation and spillway tailrace. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at center. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice opening at center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Upstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam showing sluice opening. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under construction. Part of construction camp housing is visible in foreground. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  5. 2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  6. 3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  7. 4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. 11. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING REFUGE HEADQUARTERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING REFUGE HEADQUARTERS ON THE HORIZON (LEFT, CENTER), LOOKING EAST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  9. 1. VIEW OF DAM 83, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM THE LOOKOUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DAM 83, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM THE LOOKOUT TOWER AT THE REFUGE HEADQUARTERS (see HAER No. ND-3-A-13 for comparison) - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  10. 9. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING LOCATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING LOCATION OF FORMER CONCRETE FLASHBOARD STRUCTURE ON RIGHT, LOOKING WEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  11. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 83, SHOWING RIVER COBBLE PAVING (FOREGROUND) AND WINGWALL, LOOKING EAST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  12. 6. VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM DURING CONSTRUCTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST END OF DAM DURING CONSTRUCTION OF FISHWAY, DECEMBER 1995, SHOWING REMOVAL OF PLANKING - Norwich Water Power Company, Dam, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  13. 19. View of low crib dam, headworks, and tramway above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of low crib dam, headworks, and tramway above dam, looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  14. 77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Plan of Proposed Concrete of Rubble Masonry Dam at Frog Tanks on the Agua Fria River, Arizona. September 1903. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. View of powerhouse and dam from third floor of original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of powerhouse and dam from third floor of original section of Langdale Cotton Mill, looking northeast - Langdale Cotton Mill, Powerhouse & Dam, 5910 Nineteenth Avenue, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  16. 6. EASTERLY VIEW OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE SHELTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. EASTERLY VIEW OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE SHELTER HOUSE IN THE BACKGROUND. PHOTO TAKEN FROM THE ACCESS ROAD LEADING TO THE CONTROL HOUSE. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. View of Read Sawmill masonry dam, site of submerged sawmill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Read Sawmill masonry dam, site of submerged sawmill remains and earthen dam, facing north - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  18. 12. VIEW SHOWING CCC CREWS FREEING FLOOD GATES AT DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW SHOWING CCC CREWS FREEING FLOOD GATES AT DAM 326 OF ICE TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO STRUCTURE - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 326, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  19. 10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 326, SHOWING ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL VIEW OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 326, SHOWING ORIGINAL FIELD-STONE WEIR WALL BENEATH CONCRETE BUTTRESSING, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 326, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  20. 1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and silt sluice gate (center), main canal headworks (to right), view to northwest - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  1. 2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, headworks overflow weir to center left, view to east - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  2. 9. VIEW OF DAM FROM LEFT SIDE. PUMPCRETE PIPE LINES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF DAM FROM LEFT SIDE. PUMPCRETE PIPE LINES ARE CARRIED ON WALKWAY. UPSTREAM PARTS OF BUTTRESSES ARE FOG-SPRAYED TO PERMIT PROMPT FILLING OF CONTRACTION JOINTS. July 30, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 5. GORGE HIGH DAM; LOOKING TOWARD INTAKE WITH WATER FLOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GORGE HIGH DAM; LOOKING TOWARD INTAKE WITH WATER FLOWING OVER THE TOP OF THE SPILLGATE, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge High Dam, On Skagit River, 2.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  4. 45. Reinforcement work to buttresses at Pleasant Dam. Support work ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Reinforcement work to buttresses at Pleasant Dam. Support work for roadway and roadway visible. Photographer unknown, 1935. Source: Huber Collection. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. UPSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  6. 2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  7. 42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break as seen from upstream. Note original timber cribbing to left. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  8. 44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from downstream showing break closed and installation of new concrete cap piece under way. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  9. 10. VIEW OF WEST END OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 96, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF WEST END OF SPILLWAY AT DAM 96, SHOWING SEGMENT OF THE WEIR WALL WHICH HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH CONCRETE, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 96, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  10. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM 87, SHOWING STOPLOG STRUCTURE (PARTIALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM 87, SHOWING STOPLOG STRUCTURE (PARTIALLY HIDDEN BY MARSH GRASSES IN LOWER PART OF PHOTO) AT RIGHT (WEST) END OF SPILLWAY - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 87, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  11. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING TAINTER GATES, GATE PIERS AND DAN BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSES AND LOCKS IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST, UPSTREAM - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 4, Alma, Buffalo County, WI

  12. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 3; DECEMBER 20, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF UPSTREAM FACE OF DAM; SPILLWAY IN FOREGROUND, LOCK IN BACKGROUND ON NORTH RIVER BANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  15. 7. CLOSEUP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, THREE BEARS LAKE, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  16. 1. MORRIS DAM TEST FACILITY (MDTF) AND VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. MORRIS DAM TEST FACILITY (MDTF) AND VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER AS SEEN FROM STATE HIGHWAY 39 NEAR MORRIS DAM LOOKING EAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Interior of dam, showing one of the ten bays, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of dam, showing one of the ten bays, looking west through arched openings along the center of the dam. - Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  18. 4. Aerial view of Whitsett intake (lower right), Parker Dam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Aerial view of Whitsett intake (lower right), Parker Dam and village (left), Gene Wash Reservoir, Gene Pump Plant and village (right). - Parker Dam, Spanning Colorado River between AZ & CA, Parker, La Paz County, AZ

  19. 4. Side of view of upper dam overspill, taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Side of view of upper dam overspill, taken from west bank of Millstone Creek, VIEW EAST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  20. 5. View of upper dam side sluice taken from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of upper dam side sluice taken from east bank of Millstone Creek. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  1. 3. Side view of upper dam overspill, taken from east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Side view of upper dam overspill, taken from east bank of Millstone Creek. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  2. 1. East side of lower dam shown with water level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. East side of lower dam shown with water level dropped. VIEW WEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  3. 11. AVALON DAM GATE KEEPER'S COMPLEX: PUMPHOUSE AND LIFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. AVALON DAM - GATE KEEPER'S COMPLEX: PUMPHOUSE AND LIFT FOR HOUSE WATER SUPPLY. VIEW TO EAST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Avalon Dam, On Pecos River, 4 miles North of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  4. 20. HORSESHOE DAM LOOKING EAST WITH UPPER END DEMOLISHED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. HORSESHOE DAM LOOKING EAST WITH UPPER END DEMOLISHED FOR NEW SPILLWAY (negative reversed) - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  5. 7. ISLAND PLANT AND HORSESHOE DAM FROM WEST BANK (negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ISLAND PLANT AND HORSESHOE DAM FROM WEST BANK (negative reversed) - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  6. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF DAM SITE SHOWING OUTLET WORKS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF DAM SITE SHOWING OUTLET WORKS AND DIVERSION CHANNEL IN FOREGROUND.... Volume XVIII, No. 9, March 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  7. 6. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION VIEW ALONG AXIS OF DAM FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION VIEW ALONG AXIS OF DAM FROM THE EAST ABUTMENT.... Volume XVII, No. 18, December 18, 1939. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  8. 15. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF DAM SITE SHOWING SPILLWAY OGEE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF DAM SITE SHOWING SPILLWAY OGEE SECTION AND SPILLWAY APRON EXCAVATION IN FOREGROUND.... Volume XVIII, No. 10, January 18, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  9. 34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE TOWERS, WEST SPILLWAY CHANNEL AND DECORATIVE EAGLES ALL CLEARLY VISIBLE, c. 1928 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  10. Photoaffinity labelling of methyltransferase enzymes with S-adenosylmethionine: effects of methyl acceptor substrates.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J H; Billingsley, M L; Lovenberg, W

    1984-07-31

    Radioactivity from 3H-[methyl]-S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) was covalently bound to protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase following 10-15 min irradiation by short-wave ultraviolet light. This photoaffinity binding of 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet was blocked by S-adenosylhomocysteine and sinefungin, but was not affected by 5 mM dithiothreitol. The binding was also inhibited by including methyl acceptors such as calmodulin (protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase) or phenylethanolamine (phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase) in the photoaffinity incubation. Staphlococcus V8 protease digests of 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet/enzyme complexes revealed that the primary structure around the AdoMet binding site is different in these two enzymes. Thus, protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase, a large molecule methyltransferase, can covalently bind 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet in a manner similar to that of phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase.

  11. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  12. *Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) , yielding mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals. A comparative genomic approach focused on Ciona intestinaJis, an invertebrate chordate, was u...

  13. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  14. Expression of an exogenous eukaryotic DNA methyltransferase gene induces transformation of NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Issa, J P; Herman, J; Bassett, D E; Nelkin, B D; Baylin, S B

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal regional increases in DNA methylation, which have potential for causing gene inactivation and chromosomal instability, are consistently found in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. Increased DNA methyltransferase activity, which is also a characteristic of such cells, is a candidate to mediate these abnormal DNA methylation patterns. We now show that, in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, constitutive overexpression of an exogenous mouse DNA methyltransferase gene results in a marked increase in overall DNA methylation which is accompanied by tumorigenic transformation. These transformation changes can also be elicited by dexamethasone-inducible expression of an exogenous DNA methyltransferase gene. Our findings provide strong evidence that the increase in DNA methyltransferase activity associated with tumor progression could be a key step in carcinogenesis and provide a model system that can be used to further study this possibility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8415627

  15. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation by an arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), yielding methyl arsenic (MA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and trimethylarsenic (TMA). To identify molecular mechanisms that coordinate arsenic biotra...

  16. Widespread occurrence of bacterial thiol methyltransferases and the biogenic emission of methylated sulfur gases.

    PubMed Central

    Drotar, A; Burton, G A; Tavernier, J E; Fall, R

    1987-01-01

    A majority of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from soil, water, sediment, vegetation, and marine algae cultures methylated sulfide, producing methanethiol. This was demonstrated with intact cells by measuring the emission of methanethiol with a sulfur-selective chemiluminescence detector, and in cell extracts by detection of sulfide-dependent thiol methyltransferase activity. Extracts of two Pseudomonas isolates were fractionated by gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, and with sulfide as the substrate a single peak of thiol methyltransferase activity was seen in each case. Extracts of several bacterial strains also contained thiol methyltransferase activity with organic thiols as substrates. Thus, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent thiol methyltransferase activities are widespread in bacteria and may contribute to biogenic emissions of methylated sulfur gases and to the production of methyl thioethers. PMID:3662509

  17. External electric field promotes proton transfer in the radical cation of adenine-thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiqing; Xie, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    According to pKa measurements, it has been predicted that proton transfer would not occur in the radical cation of adenine-thymine (A:T). However, recent theoretical calculations indicate that proton transfer takes place in the base pair in water below the room temperature. We have performed simulations of proton transfer in the cation of B-DNA stack composed of 10 A:T base pairs in water from 20 K to 300 K. Proton transfer occurs below the room temperature, meanwhile it could also be observed at the room temperature under the external electric field. Another case that interests us is that proton transfer bounces back after ˜300 fs from the appearance of proton transfer at low temperatures.

  18. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of azido-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Samrat; Rock, William; Cook, Richard J.; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2011-08-01

    Mid-IR active analogs of enzyme cofactors have the potential to be important spectroscopic reporters of enzyme active site dynamics. Azido-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which has been recently synthesized in our laboratory, is a mid-IR active analog of NAD+, a ubiquitous redox cofactor in biology. In this study, we measure the frequency-frequency time correlation function for the antisymmetric stretching vibration of the azido group of azido-NAD+ in water. Our results are consistent with previous studies of pseudohalides in water. We conclude that azido-NAD+ is sensitive to local environmental fluctuations, which, in water, are dominated by hydrogen-bond dynamics of the water molecules around the probe. Our results demonstrate the potential of azido-NAD+ as a vibrational probe and illustrate the potential of substituted NAD+-analogs as reporters of local structural dynamics that could be used for studies of protein dynamics in NAD-dependent enzymes.

  19. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  20. Prebiotic synthesis of adenine and amino acids under Europa-like conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Brinton, K.; Bada, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites, we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 years at -20 and -78 degrees C. In addition, the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20 degrees C. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be wider than previously thought.

  1. Vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism reveals DNA duplex formation between short strands of adenine and thymine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2012-11-21

    Absorbance spectroscopy is used extensively to tell when two DNA single strands come together and form a double strand. Here we show that circular dichroism in the vacuum ultraviolet region provides an even stronger indication for duplex formation in the case of short strands of adenine and thymine (4 to 16 bases in each strand). Indeed, our results show that a strong positive CD band appears at 179 nm when double strands are formed. Melting experiments were done in aqueous solution with and without added Na(+) counter ions. With additional salt present a huge increase in the 179 nm CD band was observed when lowering the temperature. A 179 nm CD marker band for duplex formation can be used to measure the kinetics for the association of two single strands. Such experiments rely on large changes at one particular wavelength since it is too time-consuming to record a full-wavelength spectrum.

  2. Metal-adeninate vertices for the construction of an exceptionally porous metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    An, Jihyun; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Pohl, Ehmke; Yeh, Joanne I; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2012-01-03

    Metal-organic frameworks comprising metal-carboxylate cluster vertices and long, branched organic linkers are the most porous materials known, and therefore have attracted tremendous attention for many applications, including gas storage, separations, catalysis and drug delivery. To increase metal-organic framework porosity, the size and complexity of linkers has increased. Here we present a promising alternative strategy for constructing mesoporous metal-organic frameworks that addresses the size of the vertex rather than the length of the organic linker. This approach uses large metal-biomolecule clusters, in particular zinc-adeninate building units, as vertices to construct bio-MOF-100, an exclusively mesoporous metal-organic framework. Bio-MOF-100 exhibits a high surface area (4,300 m(2) g(-1)), one of the lowest crystal densities (0.302 g cm(-3)) and the largest metal-organic framework pore volume reported to date (4.3 cm(3) g(-1)).

  3. Synthesis and enzymatic incorporation of α-L-threofuranosyl adenine triphosphate (tATP).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su; Chaput, John C

    2013-03-01

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an artificial genetic polymer in which the natural ribose sugar found in RNA has been replaced with an unnatural threose sugar. TNA can be synthesized enzymatically using Therminator DNA polymerase to copy DNA templates into TNA. Here, we expand the substrate repertoire of Therminator DNA polymerase to include threofuranosyl adenine 3'-triphsophate (tATP). We chemically synthesized tATP by two different methods from the 2'-O-acetyl derivative. Enzyme-mediated polymerization reveals that tATP functions as an efficient substrate for Therminator DNA polymerase, indicating that tATP can replace the diaminopurine analogue (tDTP) in TNA transcription reactions. PMID:23352269

  4. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  5. Prebiotic Synthesis of Adenine and Amino Acids Under Europa-like Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Matthew; Miller, Stanley L.; Brinton, Karen; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites. we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 year at -20 and -78 C. In addition the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20%. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be m der than previously thought.

  6. [Absolute bioavailability of the adenine derivative VMA-99-82 possessing antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, L A; Suchkov, E A; Riabukha, A F; Kuznetsov, K A; Ozerov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of the main pharmacokinetic parameters of adenine derivative VMA-99-82 in rats showed large values of the half-life (T1/2 = 11.03 h) and the mean retention time of drug molecules in the organism (MRT = 9.53 h). A high rate of the drug concentration decrease in the plasma determines a small value of the area under the pharmacokinetic curve (AUC = 74.96 mg h/ml). The total distribution volume (V(d) = 10.61 l/kg) is 15.8 times greater than the volume of extracellular fluid in the body of rat, which is indicative of a high ability of VMA-99-82 to be distributed and accumulated in the organs and tissues. The absolute bioavailability of VMA-99-82 is 66%. PMID:24605425

  7. Animal models of pediatric chronic kidney disease. Is adenine intake an appropriate model?

    PubMed

    Claramunt, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena; Fuente, Rocío; Hernández-Frías, Olaya; Santos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) has peculiar features. In particular, growth impairment is a major clinical manifestation of CKD that debuts in pediatric age because it presents in a large proportion of infants and children with CKD and has a profound impact on the self-esteem and social integration of the stunted patients. Several factors associated with CKD may lead to growth retardation by interfering with the normal physiology of growth plate, the organ where longitudinal growth rate takes place. The study of growth plate is hardly possible in humans and justifies the use of animal models. Young rats made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy have been widely used as a model to investigate growth retardation in CKD. This article examines the characteristics of this model and analyzes the utilization of CKD induced by high adenine diet as an alternative research protocol.

  8. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    PubMed

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described.

  9. Intriguing radical-radical interactions among double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Su, Xiyu; Su, Hanlei; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pair as well as its deprotonated Watson-Crick derivatives. Double-electron oxidation can destabilize the AT unit, leading to a barrier-hindered metastable A+T+ state with a dissociation channel featuring negative dissociation energy. This unusual energetic phenomenon originates from the competition of electrostatic repulsion and attractively hydrogen-bonding interaction co-existing between Arad + and Trad +. The associated double-proton-transfer process is also explored, suggesting a possible two-step mechanism. Magnetic coupling interactions of various diradical structures are controlled by both intra- and inter-molecular interactions.

  10. Production and characterization of reduced NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Thuring, Jan W; Conway, Stuart J; Packman, Len; Holmes, Andrew B; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate) has been shown to act as a Ca2+-releasing intracellular messenger in a wide variety of systems from invertebrates to mammals and has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. NAADP is structurally very similar to its precursor, the endogenous coenzyme NADP and while much is known about the reduced form of NADP, NADPH, it is not known whether NAADP can also exist in a reduced state. Here we report that NAADP can be reduced to NAADPH by endogenous cellular enzymes and that NAADPH is functionally inert at the NAADP receptor. These data suggest that NAADPH could represent a mechanism for rapidly inactivating NAADP in cells. PMID:14606955

  11. Sites of Adsorption of Adenine, Uracil, and Their Corresponding Derivatives on Sodium Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perezgasga, L.; Serrato-Díaz, A.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Gal'N, L. De Pablo; Mosqueira, F. G.

    2005-04-01

    Clay minerals are considered important to chemical evolution processes due to their properties, ancient origin, and wide distribution. To extend the knowledge of their role in the prebiotic epoch, the adsorption sites of adenine, adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP, Poly A, uracil, uridine, UMP, UDP, UTP and Poly U on sodium montmorillonite are investigated. X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy studies indicate that these molecules distribute into the interlamellar channel and the edge of the clay crystals. Monomers are adsorbed predominantly in the interlamellar channel, whereas polymers adsorb along the crystal edges. Such behavior is discussed mainly in terms of bulk pH, pKa of the adsorbate, and Van der Waals interactions.

  12. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-05-05

    The /sup 13/C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO/sub 2/ with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources.

  13. 2. View of the southern twothirds of the dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of the southern two-thirds of the dam showing the Glens Falls Bridge over the Hudson River on the left, the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation penstocks and inktake structure at the southeast corner of the dam, and the dam itself. The Finch Pruyn & Company Forebay is the foreground. Facing south. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

  14. "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from the east end. F.E.D. June, 1916." Compare this historic image, taken upon dam completion (1916), with current-condition photograph HAER CO-90-1. The dam retains a remarkable degree of integrity of design and setting - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  15. Gold nanorods-based FRET assay for ultrasensitive detection of DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Lin; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-09-21

    A fluorescence method for the detection of DNA methylation and the assay of methyltransferase activity is proposed using gold nanorods as a fluorescence quencher on the basis of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. It is demonstrated that this method is capable of detecting methyltransferase with a detection limit of 0.25 U mL(-1), which might make this method a good candidate for monitoring DNA methylation in the future. PMID:25028809

  16. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Barry, S; O'Carra, P

    1973-12-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD(+) through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD(+) (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm-agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD(+) derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD(+). Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD(+)-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  17. Similarities between UDP-Glucose and Adenine Nucleotide Release in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Esther, Charles R.; Sesma, Juliana I.; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Ault, Addison D.; Clas, Marién L.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular UDP-glucose is a natural purinergic receptor agonist, but its mechanisms of cellular release remain unclear. We studied these mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a simple model organism that releases ATP, another purinergic agonist. Similar to ATP, UDP-glucose was released by S. cerevisiae at a rate that was linear over time. However, unlike ATP release, UDP-glucose release was not dependent on glucose stimulation. This discrepancy was resolved by demonstrating the apparent glucose stimulation of ATP release reflected glucose-dependent changes in the intracellular pattern of adenine nucleotides, with AMP release dominating in the absence of glucose. Indeed, total adenine nucleotide release, like UDP-glucose release, did not vary with glucose concentration over the short term. The genetic basis of UDP-glucose release was explored through analysis of deletion mutants, aided by development of a novel bioassay for UDP-glucose based on signaling through heterologously expressed human P2Y14 receptors. Using this assay, an elevated rate of UDP-glucose release was demonstrated in mutants lacking the putative Golgi nucleotide sugar transporter YMD8. An increased rate of UDP-glucose release in ymd8Δ was reduced by deletion of the YEA4 UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or the HUT1 UDP-galactose transporters, and overexpression of YEA4 or HUT1 increased the rate of UDP-glucose release. These findings suggest an exocytotic release mechanism similar to that of ATP, a conclusion supported by decreased rates of ATP, AMP, and UDP-glucose release in response to the secretory inhibitor Brefeldin A. These studies demonstrate the involvement of the secretory pathway in nucleotide and nucleotide sugar efflux in yeast and offer a powerful model system for further investigation. PMID:18693752

  18. Acceleration of adventitious shoots by interaction between exogenous hormone and adenine sulphate in Althaea officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Naz, Ruphi; Anis, M

    2012-11-01

    In the current study attempts were made to investigate the effects of three different phases of callus induction followed by adventitious regeneration from leaf segments (central and lateral vein). Callus induction was observed in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium supplemented with 15.0 μM 2,4-dichloro phenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). Adventitious shoot buds formation was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 7.5 μM 2,4-D and 20.0 μM AdS in liquid medium as it induced 19.2 ± 0.58 buds in central vein explants. Addition of different growth regulators (cytokinins-6-benzyladenine, kinetin and 2-isopentenyl adenine alone or in combination with auxins-indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid and α-naphthalene acetic acid, improved the shoot regeneration efficiency, in which 5.0 μM 6-benzyl adenine along with 0.25 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid was shown to be the most effective medium for maximum shoot regeneration (81.3 %) with 24.6 number of shoots and 4.4 ± 0.08 cm shoot length per explant. Leaf culture of central veins led to better shoot formation capacity in comparison to lateral vein. Rooting was readily achieved on the differentiated shoots on 1/2 MS medium augmented with 20.0 μM indole-3-butyric acid. The plants were successfully hardened off in sterile soilrite followed by their establishment in garden soil with 80 % survival rate.

  19. Herpes simplex type 1 defective interfering particles do not affect the antiviral activity of acyclovir, foscarnet and adenine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Harmenberg, J G; Svensson, L T

    1988-03-01

    The concentration of defective interfering particles (DI-particles) of herpes simplex type 1 virus was analysed by electron microscopy and plaque titration. Fifteen consecutive passages of undiluted virus in green monkey kidney cells were followed. No relationship was found between the concentration of DI-particles and the activity of antiviral substances such as acyclovir, foscarnet and adenine arabinoside.

  20. 1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE HEADGATE STRUCTURE ON NORTH BANK, SPILLWAY ON LEFT SIDE OF DAM, AND SPLASH LOGS ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO