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Sample records for adenine nucleotide exchange

  1. Applications of adenine nucleotide measurements in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm-Hansen, O.; Hodson, R.; Azam, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methodology involved in nucleotide measurements is outlined, along with data to support the premise that ATP concentrations in microbial cells can be extrapolated to biomass parameters. ATP concentrations in microorganisms and nucleotide analyses are studied.

  2. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  3. Adenine nucleotide translocator transports haem precursors into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Motoki; Kabe, Yasuaki; Kuramori, Chikanori; Kondo, Masao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Haem is a prosthetic group for haem proteins, which play an essential role in oxygen transport, respiration, signal transduction, and detoxification. In haem biosynthesis, the haem precursor protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) must be accumulated into the mitochondrial matrix across the inner membrane, but its mechanism is largely unclear. Here we show that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), the inner membrane transporter, contributes to haem biosynthesis by facilitating mitochondrial accumulation of its precursors. We identified that haem and PP IX specifically bind to ANT. Mitochondrial uptake of PP IX was inhibited by ADP, a known substrate of ANT. Conversely, ADP uptake into mitochondria was competitively inhibited by haem and its precursors, suggesting that haem-related porphyrins are accumulated into mitochondria via ANT. Furthermore, disruption of the ANT genes in yeast resulted in a reduction of haem biosynthesis by blocking the translocation of haem precursors into the matrix. Our results represent a new model that ANT plays a crucial role in haem biosynthesis by facilitating accumulation of its precursors into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:18728780

  4. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  5. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  6. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  7. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  8. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-10-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP(4-) (out) for ADP(3-) (in) + 0.5 phosphate(2-) (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated. PMID:283393

  9. Functional Linkage of Adenine Nucleotide Binding Sites in Mammalian Muscle 6-Phosphofructokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Brüser, Antje; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Kloos, Marco; Sträter, Norbert; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    6-Phosphofructokinases (Pfk) are homo- and heterooligomeric, allosteric enzymes that catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps of the glycolysis: the phosphorylation of fructose 6-phosphate at position 1. Pfk activity is modulated by a number of regulators including adenine nucleotides. Recent crystal structures from eukaryotic Pfk revealed several adenine nucleotide binding sites. Herein, we determined the functional relevance of two adenine nucleotide binding sites through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme kinetic studies. Subsequent characterization of Pfk mutants allowed the identification of the activating (AMP, ADP) and inhibitory (ATP, ADP) allosteric binding sites. Mutation of one binding site reciprocally influenced the allosteric regulation through nucleotides interacting with the other binding site. Such reciprocal linkage between the activating and inhibitory binding sites is in agreement with current models of allosteric enzyme regulation. Because the allosteric nucleotide binding sites in eukaryotic Pfk did not evolve from prokaryotic ancestors, reciprocal linkage of functionally opposed allosteric binding sites must have developed independently in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Pfk (convergent evolution). PMID:22474333

  10. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  11. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  12. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Hagan, William J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite is investigated in the presence of salts and Good's zwitterion buffers, PIPES and MES. The initial concentrations of nucleotide and the percent adsorbtion are used to calculate the adsorption isotherms, and the Langmuir adsorption equation is used for the analysis of data. The adsorption coefficient was found to be three times greater in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES than in its absence. In addition, basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction were increased by the buffer. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn(2+) complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. Mixed ligand complexes of this type are reminiscent of the complexes observed between metal ions and biological molecules in living systems.

  13. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J P; Hagan, W J

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite was investigated in the presence of buffers and salts. Good's buffers, piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonate) [PIPES] and morpholine-N-2-ethanesulfonate [MES], perturbed the exchangeable cations to a lesser extent (only 9% of Zn2+ displaced by 0.2 M buffer) than was observed with imidazole and lutidine buffers or NaCl and KCl salts (up to 80% of Zn2+ displaced). AMP adsorption isotherms measured in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES, MES, or Na2SO4 exhibited normal Langmuir-type behavior. The adsorption coefficient, KL, is 3-fold greater in the presence of HEPES or PIPES than it is in the absence of buffers. Basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction for Zn(2+)-montmorillonite are 13 and 15 angstroms in the presence of PIPES, while a value of 12.8 angstroms was determined in the absence of PIPES. These data are interpreted in a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn2+ complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. The type of exchangeable cation does not affect the ability of the lattice-bound Fe3+ in the montmorillonite to oxidize diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN). Exchangeable Cu2+ oxidizes DAMN, but exchangeable Fe3+ is nearly ineffective as an oxidant. The addition of DISN to 3'-AMP bound to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES resulted in a higher yield of 2',3'-cAMP than is observed with a comparable concentration of Zn2+, a result which inplicates surface catalysis by the montmorillonite. PMID:11540864

  14. MICROCALORIMETRIC STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF MAGNESIUM COMPLEXES OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, J. P.; Sari, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Values for the thermodynamic quantities (ΔF, ΔH, ΔS) in reactions in which complexes of adenine nucleotides with magnesium ion (ATPMg--, ADPMg-, AMPMg) are formed have been obtained by a microcalorimetric technique by using an isothermic Calvet's apparatus. Experimental values measured at ionic strength μ = 0.2 indicate that complex formation reactions are driven by the entropic factor and that stability of complexes increases with length of the phosphate chain. PMID:5261047

  15. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  16. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids. PMID:15737999

  17. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27048932

  18. Two Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Paralogues Involved in Cell Proliferation and Spermatogenesis in the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Jouraku, Akiya; Nakakura, Takayo; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4) and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4) is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1) and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2). The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1), but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2), restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4. PMID:25742135

  19. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 4 Is Expressed Within Embryonic Ovaries and Dispensable During Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V.; Resnick, James L.; Oh, S. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. PMID:25031318

  20. Role of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, E. A.; Simakov, M. B.; Mal'Ko, I. L.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Gontareva, N. B.

    With the use of high performance liquid chromatography the products of abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides in solid films were indentified and estimated quantitatively. The main products of photosynthesis appeared to be adenosine and deoxyadenosine monophosphates. Maximal yield of these products in case of adenosine has been 0.36 for 5'AMP, 0.41% for 2'(3')AMP, 0.20 for 2'3'cAMP in case of deoxyadenosine 0.13% for 5'dAMP, 0.15% for 3'dAMP, 0.24% for 3'5'cdAMP. The destruction of initial adenosine and deoxyadenosine by the end of the experiment was 10 and 15%, respectively. By the increasing of irradiation dose, 5'AMP and 5'dAMP synthesized in the cource of VUV photolysis were destructed up to adenine, its yield being 15% in both cases.

  1. Purification and characterization of the reconstitutively active adenine nucleotide carrier from mitochondria of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Spagnoletta, Anna; De Santis, Aurelio; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2002-12-01

    The adenine nucleotide carrier from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers mitochondria was solubilized with Triton X-100 and purified by sequential chromatography on hydroxapatite and Matrex Gel Blue B in the presence of cardiolipin and asolectin. SDS gel electrophoresis of the purified fraction showed a single polypeptide band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa. When reconstituted in liposomes, the adenine nucleotide carrier catalyzed a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-sensitive ATP/ATP exchange. It was purified 75-fold with a recovery of 15% and a protein yield of 0.18% with respect to the mitochondrial extract. Among the various substrates and inhibitors tested, the reconstituted protein transported only ATP, ADP, and GTP and was inhibited by bongkrekate, phenylisothiocyanate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, mersalyl and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (but not N-ethylmaleimide). Atractyloside and carboxyatractyloside (at concentrations normally inhibitory in animal and plant mitochondria) were without effect in Jerusalem artichoke tubers mitochondria. Vmax of the reconstituted ATP/ATP exchange was determined to be 0.53 micromol/min per mg protein at 25 degrees C. The half-saturation constant Km and the corresponding inhibition constant Ki were 20.4 microM for ATP and 45 microM for ADP. The activation energy of the ATP/ATP exchange was 28 KJ/mol between 5 and 30 degrees C. The N-terminal amino acid partial sequence of the purified protein showed a partial homology with the ANT protein purified from mitochondria of maize shoots. PMID:12678438

  2. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. PMID:27062185

  3. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  4. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-08-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  5. Severity of cardiomyopathy associated with adenine nucleotide translocator-1 deficiency correlates with mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; DuBiner, Lauren; Simon, Mariella; Zaragoza, Michael; Sengupta, Partho P; Li, Peng; Narula, Navneet; Dreike, Sandra; Platt, Julia; Procaccio, Vincent; Ortiz-González, Xilma R; Puffenberger, Erik G; Kelley, Richard I; Morton, D Holmes; Narula, Jagat; Wallace, Douglas C

    2013-02-26

    Mutations of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded mitochondrial proteins can cause cardiomyopathy associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, the cardiac phenotype of nuclear DNA mitochondrial mutations might be modulated by mtDNA variation. We studied a 13-generation Mennonite pedigree with autosomal recessive myopathy and cardiomyopathy due to an SLC25A4 frameshift null mutation (c.523delC, p.Q175RfsX38), which codes for the heart-muscle isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocator-1. Ten homozygous null (adenine nucleotide translocator-1(-/-)) patients monitored over a median of 6 years had a phenotype of progressive myocardial thickening, hyperalaninemia, lactic acidosis, exercise intolerance, and persistent adrenergic activation. Electrocardiography and echocardiography with velocity vector imaging revealed abnormal contractile mechanics, myocardial repolarization abnormalities, and impaired left ventricular relaxation. End-stage heart disease was characterized by massive, symmetric, concentric cardiac hypertrophy; widespread cardiomyocyte degeneration; overabundant and structurally abnormal mitochondria; extensive subendocardial interstitial fibrosis; and marked hypertrophy of arteriolar smooth muscle. Substantial variability in the progression and severity of heart disease segregated with maternal lineage, and sequencing of mtDNA from five maternal lineages revealed two major European haplogroups, U and H. Patients with the haplogroup U mtDNAs had more rapid and severe cardiomyopathy than those with haplogroup H. PMID:23401503

  6. Pleiotropic effects of the yeast Sal1 and Aac2 carriers on mitochondrial function via an activity distinct from adenine nucleotide transport

    PubMed Central

    Kucejova, Blanka; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaowen; Giannattasio, Sergio; Chen, Xin Jie

    2009-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SAL1 encodes a Ca2+-binding mitochondrial carrier. Disruption of SAL1 is synthetically lethal with the loss of a specific function associated with the Aac2 isoform of the ATP/ADP translocase. This novel activity of Aac2 is defined as the V function (for Viability of aac2 sal1 double mutant), which is independent of the ATP/ADP exchange activity required for respiratory growth (the R function). We found that co-inactivation of SAL1 and AAC2 leads to defects in mitochondrial translation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Additionally, sal1Δ exacerbates the respiratory deficiency and mtDNA instability of ggc1Δ, shy1Δ and mtg1Δ mutants, which are known to reduce mitochondrial protein synthesis or protein complex assembly. The V function is complemented by the human Short Ca2+-binding Mitochondrial Carrier (SCaMC) protein, SCaMC-2, a putative ATP-Mg/Pi exchangers on the inner membrane. However, mitochondria lacking both Sal1p and Aac2p are not depleted of adenine nucleotides. The Aac2R252I and Aac2R253I variants mutated at the R252-254 triplet critical for nucleotide transport retain the V function. Likewise, Sal1p remains functionally active when the R479I and R481I mutations were introduced into the structurally equivalent R479-T480-R481 motif. Finally, we found that the naturally occurring V-R+ Aac1 isoform of adenine nucleotide translocase partially gains the V function at the expense of the R function by introducing the mutations P89L and A96V. Thus, our data support the view that the V function is independent of adenine nucleotide transport associated with Sal1p and Aac2p and this evolutionarily conserved activity affects multiple processes in mitochondria. PMID:18431598

  7. [Corrective effect of trimethylglycine on the nicotinamide coenzyme and adenine nucleotide content of the tissues in experimental atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zapadniuk, V I; Chekman, I S; Panteleĭmonova, T N; Tumanov, V A

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on adult rabbits with experimental atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol (0.25 g/kg for 90 days) showed that chronic administration of trimethylglycine (1.5 g/kg for 30 days) prevented a decrease of the liver and myocardium content of nicotinamide coenzymes and adenine nucleotides. PMID:3758334

  8. Adenine nucleotide-dependent and redox-independent control of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is important for sustaining cellular growth and maintenance; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying individual processes in plant mitochondria remain largely uncharacterized. Previous redox-proteomics studies have suggested that mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and redox shuttling, is under thiol-based redox regulation as a target candidate of thioredoxin (Trx). In addition, the adenine nucleotide status may be another factor controlling mitochondrial metabolism, as respiratory ATP production in mitochondria is believed to be influenced by several environmental stimuli. Using biochemical and reverse-genetic approaches, we addressed the redox- and adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of mMDH in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant mMDH protein formed intramolecular disulfide bonds under oxidative conditions, but these bonds did not have a considerable effect on mMDH activity. Mitochondria-localized o-type Trx (Trx-o) did not facilitate re-reduction of oxidized mMDH. Determination of the in vivo redox state revealed that mMDH was stably present in the reduced form even in Trx-o-deficient plants. Accordingly, we concluded that mMDH is not in the class of redox-regulated enzymes. By contrast, mMDH activity was lowered by adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Each adenine nucleotide suppressed mMDH activity with different potencies and ATP exerted the largest inhibitory effect with a significantly lower K(I). Correspondingly, mMDH activity was inhibited by the increase in ATP/ADP ratio within the physiological range. These results suggest that mMDH activity is finely controlled in response to variations in mitochondrial adenine nucleotide balance. PMID:26946085

  9. Release of adenine nucleotide metabolites by toxic concentrations of cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, W

    1994-01-01

    In isolated perfused guinea-pig hearts the effect of toxic concentrations of cardiac glycosides on the release of the adenine nucleotide metabolites adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid was investigated. Digoxin concentrations of 0.03-1 mumol.l-1 produced moderate to severe tachyarrhythmias. Large amounts of metabolites were released by concentrations of 0.1 mumol.l-1, and higher. Occurrence of glycoside-induced ventricular fibrillation was associated with a particularly high release. Metabolite release was also obtained when fibrillation was elicited electrically in normal control hearts, or in hearts receiving simultaneously a marginally toxic digoxin concentration (0.03 mumol.l-1). Digoxin-induced tachyarrhythmias and metabolite release were almost completely prevented by a high potassium concentration in the coronary perfusion fluid (8.1 mmol.l-1). The antiarrhythmic effect was also obtained with lidocaine (60 mumol.l-1), but the release was only partially antagonized. Similar results concerning arrhythmias and metabolite release as with digoxin were obtained with ouabain. The findings suggest that the decrease in myocardial ATP observed in glycoside-intoxicated heart preparations is partly due to the loss of nucleotide precursor substances. Moreover, it appears likely that liberated adenosine in the interstitium of severely intoxicated heart preparations reaches pharmacologically effective concentrations. PMID:7826306

  10. The silencing of adenine nucleotide translocase isoform 1 induces oxidative stress and programmed cell death in ADF human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Vecchio, Donatella; Evangelista, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are multitask proteins involved in several aspects of cell metabolism, as well as in the regulation of cell death/survival processes. We investigated the role played by ANT isoforms 1 and 2 in the growth of a human glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). The silencing of ANT2 isoform, by small interfering RNA, did not produce significant changes in ADF cell viability. By contrast, the silencing of ANT1 isoform strongly reduced ADF cell viability by inducing a non-apoptotic cell death process resembling paraptosis. We demonstrated that cell death induced by ANT1 depletion cannot be ascribed to the loss of the ATP/ADP exchange function of this protein. By contrast, our findings indicate that ANT1-silenced cells experience oxidative stress, thus allowing us to hypothesize that the effect of ANT1-silencing on ADF is mediated by the loss of the ANT1 uncoupling function. Several studies ascribe a pro-apoptotic role to ANT1 as a result of the observation that ANT1 overexpression sensitizes cells to mitochondrial depolarization or to apoptotic stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its pro-apoptotic function at a high expression level, the reduction of ANT1 density below a physiological baseline impairs fundamental functions of this protein in ADF cells, leading them to undertake a cell death process. PMID:20528917

  11. Modulation by adenine nucleotides of epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ross, F M; Brodie, M J; Stone, T W

    1998-01-01

    Hippocampal slices (450 μm) generate epileptiform bursts of an interictal nature when perfused with a zero magnesium medium containing 4-aminopyridine (50 μM). The effect of adenine nucleotides on this activity was investigated.ATP and adenosine depressed this epileptiform activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with both purines being equipotent at concentrations above 10 μM.Adenosine deaminase 0.2 u ml−1, a concentration that annuls the effect of adenosine (50 μM), did not significantly alter the depression of activity caused by ATP (50 μM).8-Cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), an A1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the discharge rate significantly and inhibited the depressant effect of both ATP and adenosine such that the net effect of ATP or adenosine plus CPT was excitatory.Several ATP analogues were also tested: α, β-methyleneATP (α, β-meATP), 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP). Only α, β-meATP (10 μM) produced an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity which suggests a lack of involvement of P2Y or P2U receptors.Suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′, 4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS), P2 receptor antagonists, failed to inhibit the depression produced by ATP (50 μM). The excitatory effect of α, β-meATP (10 μM) was inhibited by suramin (50 μM) and PPADS (5 μM).ATP therefore depresses epileptiform activity in this model in a manner which is not consistent with the activation of known P1 or P2 receptors, suggesting the involvement of a xanthine-sensitive nucleotide receptor. The results are also indicative of an excitatory P2X receptor existing in the hippocampal CA3 region. PMID:9484856

  12. Content of Adenine Nucleotides and Orthophosphate in Exporting and Importing Mature Maize Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Eschrich, Walter; Fromm, Joerg

    1985-01-01

    Events of reactivation by re-illumination were studied in predarkened detached mature maize leaves, which were arranged as distal sources and proximal sinks; the latter were kept in CO2-free atmosphere and were either illuminated or darkened. Adenine nucleotide (AdN) content and orthophosphate (Pi) concentrations were measured 10 minutes, 30 minutes, and 2, 7, and 14 hours after the onset of re-illumination. For comparison, mature leaves attached to the plant were analyzed. The sum of AdN increased up to 7 hours of re-illumination, then dark sinks and their sources showed decreasing amounts of AdN, while the increase continued up to 14 hours in sources and illuminated sinks. In leaves attached to the plant, no further increase in AdN level followed the 7-hour mark. The amount of individual AdN (ATP, ADP, AMP) differed considerably in sources and sinks of the detached leaves. Although both the source supplying the illuminated sink and the source supplying the dark sink were treated the same, they showed striking differences in AdN contents. Such relations were also observed, when ATP/ADP ratios and Pi concentrations were compared. The influence a sink can exert on its source suggests a participation of the physiological events in the sink on the regulation of AdN and Pi metabolism in the source. PMID:16664246

  13. Analysis of functional coupling: mitochondrial creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Lemba, Maris; Saks, Valdur A

    2004-07-01

    The mechanism of functional coupling between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MiCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in isolated heart mitochondria is analyzed. Two alternative mechanisms are studied: 1), dynamic compartmentation of ATP and ADP, which assumes the differences in concentrations of the substrates between intermembrane space and surrounding solution due to some diffusion restriction and 2), direct transfer of the substrates between MiCK and ANT. The mathematical models based on these possible mechanisms were composed and simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. The first model, based on a dynamic compartmentation mechanism, was not sufficient to reproduce the measured values of apparent dissociation constants of MiCK reaction coupled to oxidative phosphorylation. The second model, which assumes the direct transfer of substrates between MiCK and ANT, is shown to be in good agreement with experiments--i.e., the second model reproduced the measured constants and the estimated ADP flux, entering mitochondria after the MiCK reaction. This model is thermodynamically consistent, utilizing the free energy profiles of reactions. The analysis revealed the minimal changes in the free energy profile of the MiCK-ANT interaction required to reproduce the experimental data. A possible free energy profile of the coupled MiCK-ANT system is presented. PMID:15240503

  14. Divalent phosphate is a counterion for carboxyatractyloside-insensitive adenine nucleotide transport in rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Nosek, M.T.; Aprille, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Unidirectional, carboxyatractyloside(CAT)-insensitive adenine nucleotide (AdN) fluxes have been studied in isolated rat liver mitochondria (mito). Previous work has shown that ATP x Mg transport in one direction is coupled to ATP x Mg or P/sub i/ transport in the opposite direction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether divalent HPO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ or monovalent H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ is the transported phosphate species. The authors used the monofluorophosphate (PO/sub 3/F/sup 2 -/) and difluorophosphate (PO/sub 2/F/sub 2//sup -/) analogues as potential counterions forAdN efflux. After a preincubation on ice with /sup 14/C-ADP to label the matrix AdN, efflux was measured at 30/sup 0/C, pH 7.4, in 225mM sucrose, 10mM KCl, 5mM MgCl/sub 2/, 5mM glutamate, 5mM malate, 10mM Tris, 0.5mM P/sub i/, 1mM ATP, and 5..mu..M CAT. With no other additions efflux was -0.62 +/- 0.20 nmole/minute/mg protein. The data supports the hypothesis that divalent but not monovalent phosphate can act as a counterion for ATPx Mg transport over this CAT-insensitive carrier.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase in mitochondrial membrane patch.

    PubMed

    Karo, Jaanus; Peterson, Pearu; Vendelin, Marko

    2012-03-01

    Interaction between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) can play an important role in determining energy transfer pathways in the cell. Although the functional coupling between MtCK and ANT has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism of the coupling is not clear. To study the details of the coupling, we turned to molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce a new coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of a patch of the mitochondrial inner membrane containing a transmembrane ANT and an MtCK above the membrane. The membrane model consists of three major types of lipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cardiolipin) in a roughly 2:1:1 molar ratio. A thermodynamics-based coarse-grained force field, termed MARTINI, has been used together with the GROMACS molecular dynamics package for all simulated systems in this work. Several physical properties of the system are reproduced by the model and are in agreement with known data. This includes membrane thickness, dimension of the proteins, and diffusion constants. We have studied the binding of MtCK to the membrane and demonstrated the effect of cardiolipin on the stabilization of the binding. In addition, our simulations predict which part of the MtCK protein sequence interacts with the membrane. Taken together, the model has been verified by dynamical and structural data and can be used as the basis for further studies. PMID:22241474

  16. ADENYLATE ENERGY CHARGE AND ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS AS INDICATORS OF STRESS IN THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, TREATED WITH DREDGED MATERIAL UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adenylate energy charge is an indication of the amount of energy available to an organism from the adenylate pool. t is calculated from measured concentrations of three adenine nucleotides, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP...

  17. Inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocator by N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Timothy M. Oliveira, Paulo J.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-03-01

    N-alkyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides have been widely used as surfactants on fabrics and papers, fire retardants, and anti-corrosion agents, among many other commercial applications. The global distribution and environmental persistence of these compounds has generated considerable interest regarding potential toxic effects. We have previously reported that perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (FOSAA) and N-ethylperfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (N-EtFOSAA) induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in vitro. In this study we tested the hypothesis that FOSAA and N-EtFOSAA interact with the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) resulting in a functional inhibition of the translocator and induction of the MPT. Respiration and membrane potential of freshly isolated liver mitochondria from Sprague-Dawley rats were measured using an oxygen electrode and a tetraphenylphosphonium-selective (TPP{sup +}) electrode, respectively. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically. The ANT ligands bongkregkic acid (BKA) and carboxyatractyloside (cATR) inhibited uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration caused by 10 {mu}M N-EtFOSAA, 40 {mu}M FOSAA, and the positive control 8 {mu}M oleic acid. ADP-stimulated respiration and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential were inhibited by cATR, FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid, but not by FCCP. BKA inhibited calcium-dependent mitochondrial swelling induced by FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid. Seventy-five micromolar ADP also inhibited swelling induced by the test compounds, but cATR induced swelling was not inhibited by ADP. Results of this investigation indicate that N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides interact directly with the ANT to inhibit ADP translocation and induce the MPT, one or both of which may account for the metabolic dysfunction observed in vivo.

  18. Mitochondrial permeability transition as induced by cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Zazueta, C; Reyes-Vivas, H; Zafra, G; Sánchez, C A; Vera, G; Chávez, E

    1998-04-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is caused by the opening of a transmembrane pore whose chemical nature has not been well established yet. The present work was aimed to further contribute to the knowledge of the membrane entity comprised in the formation of the non-specific channel. The increased permeability was established by analyzing the inability of rat kidney mitochondria to take up and accumulate Ca2+, as well as their failure to build up a transmembrane potential, after the cross-linking of membrane proteins by copper plus ortho-phenanthroline. To identify the cross-linked proteins, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. The results are representative of at least three separate experiments. It is indicated that 30 microM Cu2+ induced the release of 4.3 nmol Ca2+ per mg protein. However, in the presence of 100 microM ortho-phenanthroline only 2 microM Cu2+ was required to attain the total release of the accumulated Ca2+; it should be noted that such a reaction is not inhibited by cyclosporin. The increased permeability corresponds to cross-linking of membrane proteins in which approximately 4 nmol thiol groups per mg protein appear to be involved. Such a linking process is inhibited by carboxyatractyloside. By using the fluorescent probe eosin-5-maleimide the label was found in a cross-linking 60 kDa dimer of two 30 kDa monomers. From the data presented it is concluded that copper-o-phenanthroline induces the intermolecular cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase which in turn is converted to non-specific pore. PMID:9675885

  19. Dual role for adenine nucleotides in the regulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor, guanylyl cyclase-A.

    PubMed

    Foster, D C; Garbers, D L

    1998-06-26

    The ability to both sensitize and desensitize a guanylyl cyclase receptor has not been previously accomplished in a broken cell or membrane preparation. The guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor is known to require both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and an adenine nucleotide for maximal cyclase activation. When membranes from NIH 3T3 cells stably overexpressing GC-A were incubated with ATP, AMPPNP, or ATPgammaS, only ATPgammaS dramatically potentiated ANP-dependent cyclase activity. When the membranes were incubated with ATPgammaS and then washed, GC-A now became sensitive to ANP/AMPPNP stimulation, suggestive that thiophosphorylation had sensitized GC-A to ligand and adenine nucleotide binding. Consistent with this hypo- thesis, the ATPgammaS effects were both time- and concentration-dependent. Protein phosphatase stability of thiophosphorylation (ATPgammaS) relative to phosphorylation (ATP) appeared to explain the differential effects of the two nucleotides since microcystin, beta-glycerol phosphate, or okadaic acid coincident with ATP or ATPgammaS effectively sensitized GC-A to ligand stimulation over prolonged periods of time in either case. GC-A was phosphorylated in the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, and the magnitude of the phosphorylation was increased by the addition of microcystin. Thus, the phosphorylation of GC-A correlates with the acquisition of ligand sensitivity. The establishment of an in vitro system to sensitize GC-A demonstrates that adenine nucleotides have a daul function in the regulation of GC-A through both phosphorylation of and binding to regulatory sites. PMID:9632692

  20. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  1. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  2. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Is Acetylated in Vivo in Human Muscle: Modeling Predicts a Decreased ADP Affinity and Altered Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics techniques have revealed that lysine acetylation is abundant in mitochondrial proteins. This study was undertaken (1) to determine the relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation and insulin sensitivity in human skeletal muscle, identifying key acetylated proteins, and (2) to use molecular modeling techniques to understand the functional consequences of acetylation of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 (ANT1), which we found to be abundantly acetylated. Eight lean and eight obese nondiabetic subjects had euglycemic clamps and muscle biopsies for isolation of mitochondrial proteins and proteomics analysis. A number of acetylated mitochondrial proteins were identified in muscle biopsies. Overall, acetylation of mitochondrial proteins was correlated with insulin action (r = 0.60; P < 0.05). Of the acetylated proteins, ANT1, which catalyzes ADP–ATP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane, was acetylated at lysines 10, 23, and 92. The extent of acetylation of lysine 23 decreased following exercise, depending on insulin sensitivity. Molecular dynamics modeling and ensemble docking simulations predicted the ADP binding site of ANT1 to be a pocket of positively charged residues, including lysine 23. Calculated ADP–ANT1 binding affinities were physiologically relevant and predicted substantial reductions in affinity upon acetylation of lysine 23. Insertion of these derived binding affinities as parameters into a complete mathematical description of ANT1 kinetics predicted marked reductions in adenine nucleotide flux resulting from acetylation of lysine 23. Therefore, acetylation of ANT1 could have dramatic physiological effects on ADP–ATP exchange. Dysregulation of acetylation of mitochondrial proteins such as ANT1 therefore could be related to changes in mitochondrial function that are associated with insulin resistance. PMID:24884163

  3. A weak pulsed magnetic field affects adenine nucleotide oscillations, and related parameters in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Davies, E; Olliff, C; Wright, I; Woodward, A; Kell, D

    1999-02-01

    A model eukaryotic cell system was used to explore the effect of a weak pulsed magnetic field (PMF) on time-varying physiological parameters. Dictyostelium discoideum cells (V12 strain) were exposed to a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) of flux density 0.4 mT, generated via air-cored coils in trains of 2 ms pulses gated at 20 ms. This signal is similar to those used to treat non-uniting fractures. Samples were taken over periods of 20 min from harvested suspensions of amoebae during early aggregation phase, extracted and derivatised for HPLC fluorescent assay of adenine nucleotides. Analysis of variance showed a significant athermal damping effect (P < 0.002, n = 22) of the PMF on natural adenine nucleotide oscillations and some consistent changes in phase relationships. The technique of nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS) revealed a distinctive effect of PMF, caffeine and EGTA in modulating the cellular harmonic response to an applied weak signal. Light scattering studies also showed altered frequency response of cells to PMF, EGTA and caffeine. PMF caused a significant reduction of caffeine induced cell contraction (P < 0.0006, n = 19 by paired t-test) as shown by Malvern particle size analyser, suggesting that intracellular calcium may be involved in mediating the effect of the PMF. PMID:10228582

  4. Effects of increased heart work on glycolysis and adenine nucleotides in the perfused heart of normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L. H.; Mansford, K. R. L.; Owen, Patricia

    1971-01-01

    1. In the isolated perfused rat heart, the contractile activity and the oxygen uptake were varied by altering the aortic perfusion pressure, or by the atrial perfusion technique (`working heart'). 2. The maximum increase in the contractile activity brought about an eightfold increase in the oxygen uptake. The rate of glycolytic flux rose, while tissue contents of hexose monophosphates, citrate, ATP and creatine phosphate decreased, and contents of ADP and AMP rose. 3. The changes in tissue contents of adenine nucleotides during increased heart work were time-dependent. The ATP content fell temporarily (30s and 2min) after the start of left-atrial perfusion; at 5 and 10min values were normal; and at 30 and 60min values were decreased. ADP and AMP values were increased in the first 15min, but were at control values 30 or 60min after the onset of increased heart work. 4. During increased heart work changes in the tissue contents of adenine nucleotide and of citrate appeared to play a role in altered regulation of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase activity. 5. In recirculation experiments increased heart work for 30min was associated with increased entry of [14C]glucose (11.1mm) and glycogen into glycolysis and a comparable increase in formation of products of glycolysis (lactate, pyruvate and 14CO2). There was no major accumulation of intermediates. Glycogen was not a major fuel for respiration. 6. Increased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused and working hearts was obtained by the addition of insulin to the perfusion medium. The concomitant increases in the tissue values of hexose phosphates and of citrate contrasted with the decreased values of hexose monophosphates and of citrate during increased glycolytic flux obtained by increased heart work. 7. Decreased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused hearts was obtained by using acute alloxan-diabetic and chronic streptozotocin-diabetic rats; in the latter condition there were decreased tissue

  5. Low-molecular-weight constituents of isolated insulin-secretory granules. Bivalent cations, adenine nucleotides and inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, J C; Penn, E J; Peshavaria, M

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of Zn2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Pi and adenine nucleotides were determined in insulin-secretory granules prepared from a transplantable rat insulinoma. Differential and density-gradient centrifugation analyses revealed that Zn2+ in this tissue was principally localized in the secretory granule, a second major fraction being found in association with cytosolic proteins. Pi was principally recovered in the latter fraction, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ were more widely distributed. Intragranular ion-distribution experiments suggested that Zn2+ was complexed mainly to insulin and its precursor forms and remained in the granule in an insoluble state. The Zn2+/insulin ratio (0.54) was greater than that expected for insulin molecules having two centrally co-ordinated Zn2+ atoms/hexamer, but less than the maximal Zn2+-binding capacity of the molecule. Most of the granular Ca2+, Mg2+ and Pi was released in a soluble form when granules were disrupted by sonication. Simulation in vitro of the ionic composition of the granule suggested that up to 90% of its Ca2+ was complexed to Pi and adenine nucleotides. Granular macromolecules also bound Ca2+, as shown by equilibrium-dialysis studies of granule lysates. However, such binding was displaced by Mg2+. Examination of the efflux of Ca2+ from granules incubated in iso-osmotic suspensions at 37 degrees C suggested that the passive permeability of the granule membrane to Ca2+ was very low. Nevertheless, more than 50% of the granular Ca2+ was rapidly released in an ionized form on hypo-osmotic or detergent-induced disruption of the granule membrane. This may represent a potentially mobilizable pool of Ca2+ in vivo. PMID:6344863

  6. Absence of Ca2+-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition but Presence of Bongkrekate-Sensitive Nucleotide Exchange in C. crangon and P. serratus

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Torocsik, Beata; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria from the embryos of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) do not undergo Ca2+-induced permeability transition in the presence of a profound Ca2+ uptake capacity. Furthermore, this crustacean is the only organism known to exhibit bongkrekate-insensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide exchange, prompting the conjecture that refractoriness to bongkrekate and absence of Ca2+-induced permeability transition are somehow related phenomena. Here we report that mitochondria isolated from two other crustaceans, brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) and common prawn (Palaemon serratus) exhibited bongkrekate-sensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport, but lacked a Ca2+-induced permeability transition. Ca2+ uptake capacity was robust in the absence of adenine nucleotides in both crustaceans, unaffected by either bongkrekate or cyclosporin A. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ca2+-loaded mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material strikingly similar to those observed in mitochondria from the hepatopancreas of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and the embryos of Artemia franciscana. Alignment analysis of the partial coding sequences of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) expressed in Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus versus the complete sequence expressed in Artemia franciscana reappraised the possibility of the 208-214 amino acid region for conferring sensitivity to bongkrekate. However, our findings suggest that the ability to undergo Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and the sensitivity of adenine nucleotide translocase to bongkrekate are not necessarily related phenomena. PMID:22768139

  7. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Effects of photofrin II and light on cellular adenine nucleotides and their modulation.

    PubMed

    Khanum, F; Jain, V

    1997-04-01

    Effects of photofrin II (PII) and light on the intra cellular nucleotide levels have been investigated using BHK-21 cell line. Results indicate that lower concentrations of photofrin II in dark increases ATP levels in a non linear manner, however, there has been no change in energy charge and levels of other nucleotides. Photoirradiation of PII-treated cells leads to a significant reduction in ATP levels and energy charge along with an increase in ATP breakdown products like ADP and AMP. The phosphorylation potential [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] also reduces upon photoirradiation of PII treated cells. Incubation conditions like pH of the medium and temperature modulate the cellular responses to a great extent. PMID:9315234

  9. [Dependence of creatine kinase and glycogen synthetase activities of skeletal muscles on state of adenine nucleotide phosphorylation and cAMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, N N; Chagovets, N R; Maksimova, L V

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the contents of adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate, creatine, glucose-6-phosphate and glycogen and the activity of adenylate cyclase, creatine kinase, glycogen phosphorylase 31:51-AMP-phosphodiesterase and glycogen synthetase in muscles and of blood catecholamines were studied in adult rats before loading, immediately after the cessation of the muscular activity, and at rest. Adenine nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes related to the muscular activity. It is established that compensation and supercompensation of the working losses of muscular creatine phosphate and glycogen are due to activation of anabolic processes under conditions of higher phosphorylation of the adenylic system. PMID:6247797

  10. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  11. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  12. The effect of antidepressive drugs and some related compounds on the levels of adenine nucleotides, inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J. J.; Van Petten, G. R.

    1963-01-01

    The effects upon levels of adenine nucleotides, phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate of iproniazid, isoniazid, phenelzine, pheniprazine, tranylcypromine, harmine, imipramine, amitriptyline, orphenadrine, diphenhydramine and cocaine have been studied. With the exception of harmine and diphenhydramine, each of these compounds increased the brain level of adenosine triphosphate and, with the exception of imipramine and cocaine, the level of adenosine diphosphate decreased. Harmine had no effect on levels of adenine nucleotides and, in the case of diphenhydramine, the level of adenosine diphosphate increased and the level of adenosine triphosphate tended to decrease. There appears to be a relationship between the ability of the drugs to cause behavioural signs of central nervous stimulation and to produce an increase in the adenosine triphosphate/diphosphate ratio. This effect may be a factor in the action of antidepressive drugs. PMID:19108178

  13. Adenine Nucleotide Analogues Locked in a Northern Methanocarba Conformation: Enhanced Stability and Potency as P2Y1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Servos, Jörg; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lee, Kyeong; Maddileti, Savitri; Boyer, José L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Preference for the Northern (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of nucleotide 5′-triphosphate agonists at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y11 receptors, but not P2Y6 receptors, was established using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a 3.1.0-bicyclohexane) ring as a ribose substitute (Kim et al. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 208–218.). We have now combined the ring-constrained (N)-methanocarba modification of adenine nucleotides with other functionalities known to enhance potency at P2 receptors. The potency of the newly synthesized analogues was determined in the stimulation of phospholipase C through activation of turkey erythrocyte P2Y1 or human P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors stably expressed in astrocytoma cells. An (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio-ADP analogue displayed an EC50 at the hP2Y1 receptor of 0.40 nM and was 55-fold more potent than the corresponding triphosphate and 16-fold more potent than the riboside 5′-diphosphate. 2-Cl–(N)-methanocarba-ATP and its N6-Me analogue were also highly selective, full agonists at P2Y1 receptors. The (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio and 2-chloromonophosphate analogues were full agonists exhibiting micromolar potency at P2Y1 receptors, while the corresponding ribosides were inactive. Although β,γ-methylene-ATP was inactive at P2Y receptors, β,γ-methylene-(N)-methanocarba-ATP was a potent hP2Y1 receptor agonist with an EC50 of 160 nM and was selective versus hP2Y2 and hP2Y4 receptors. The rates of hydrolysis of Northern (N) and Southern (S) methanocarba analogues of AMP by rat 5′-ectonucleotidase were negligible. The rates of hydrolysis of the corresponding triphosphates by recombinant rat NTPDase1 and 2 were studied. Both isomers were hydrolyzed by NTPDase 1 at about half the rate of ATP hydrolysis. The (N) isomer was hardly hydrolyzed by NTPDase 2, while the (S) isomer was hydrolyzed at one-third of the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that new, more stable and selective nucleotide agonists may be designed on the basis of

  14. In vitro studies of release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from rat vascular endothelium in response to alpha 1-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, K; Hashimoto, M; Masumura, S; Bjur, R A; Westfall, D P; Hattori, K

    1994-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline-induced release of endogenous adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) and adenosine from both rat caudal artery and thoracic aorta was characterized, using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. 2. Noradrenaline, in a concentration-dependent manner, increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the caudal artery. The noradrenaline-induced release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from the caudal artery was abolished by bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by idazoxan, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, contracted caudal artery smooth muscle but did not induce release of adenine nucleotides or adenosine. 3. Noradrenaline also significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the thoracic aorta in the rat; however, the amount of adenine nucleotides and adenosine released from the aorta was considerably less than that released from the caudal artery. 4. Noradrenaline significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the aorta was also much less than that from cultured endothelial cells from the caudal artery. In cultured smooth muscle cells from the caudal artery, a significant release of ATP or its metabolites was not observed. 5. These results suggest that there are vascular endothelial cells that are able to release ATP by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism, but that these cells are not homogeneously distributed in the vasculature. PMID:7889273

  15. Hypothesis on Skeletal Muscle Aging: Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Translocator Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species Production While Preserving Coupling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diolez, Philippe; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Calmettes, Guillaume; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Rouland, Richard; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production—but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius) of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling) or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating—in vivo—conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand), coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies. PMID:26733871

  16. Changes in the expression of the human adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms condition cellular metabolic/proliferative status

    PubMed Central

    Mampel, Teresa; Viñas, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Human cells express four mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (hANT) isoforms that are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. hANT1 is mainly expressed in terminally differentiated muscle cells; hANT2 is growth-regulated and is upregulated in highly glycolytic and proliferative cells; and hANT3 is considered to be ubiquitous and non-specifically regulated. Here, we studied how the expression of hANT isoforms is regulated by proliferation and in response to metabolic stimuli, and examined the metabolic consequences of their silencing and overexpression. In HeLa and HepG2 cells, expression of hANT3 was upregulated by shifting metabolism towards oxidation or by slowed growth associated with contact inhibition or growth-factor deprivation, indicating that hANT3 expression is highly regulated. Under these conditions, changes in hANT2 mRNA expression were not observed in either HeLa or HepG2 cells, whereas in SGBS preadipocytes (which, unlike HeLa and HepG2 cells, are growth-arrest-sensitive cells), hANT2 mRNA levels decreased. Additionally, overexpression of hANT2 promoted cell growth and glycolysis, whereas silencing of hANT3 decreased cellular ATP levels, limited cell growth and induced a stress-like response. Thus, cancer cells require both hANT2 and hANT3, depending on their proliferation status: hANT2 when proliferation rates are high, and hANT3 when proliferation slows. PMID:26842067

  17. Effect of genetic and physiological manipulations onthe kinetic and binding parameters of the adenine nucleotide translocator in Saccharomyces cervisiae and Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Lauquin, G; Lunardi, J; Vignais, P V

    1976-01-01

    1. Ghe kinetic and binding parameters of adenine-nucleotide transport have been studied in mitochondria isolated from yeast cells in which the mitochondrial protein-synthetizing system had been inhibited by growth in the presence of erythromycin. These parameters have also been studied in promitochondria isolated from yeast grown in anaerobiosis aesence of ethidium bromide results in a loss of cytochromes b, alpha and alpha 3, but it does not affect the rate constant of ADP transport in isolated mitochondria, nor the number of binding sites for atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP. 3. Promitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in anaerobiosis, mitochondria from a qo mutant (qo mitochondria) and mitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in the presence of erythromycin (ERY-mitochondria) are able to transport ADP by the same exchange-diffusion mechanism, sensitive to carboxy-atractyloside, and with the same rate constant as the wild type mitochondria. Promitochondria, qo mitochondria and ERY-mitochondria bind atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP with the same high affinity as the wild type mitochondria. They only differ from the wild type mitochondria by a lower number of binding sites for ADP and for specific inhibitors of ADP transport. 4. Mitochondria isolated from the nuclear mutant p9 of S. cerevisae, called also op1, are characterized by a much lower affinity for bongkrekic acid than mitochondria from the wild type (20 times less). 5. Manipulation of the fatty acid composition of the mitochondrial membranes in the desaturase auxotroph mutant KD115 does not modify the number of sites, no their affinity of bongkrekic acid. 6. The above results are interpreted to mean that the structure and function of the mitochondrial adN translocator are not affected by any change in the mitochondrial protein synthetizing system. PMID:795470

  18. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  19. Adenine-DNA adducts derived from the highly tumorigenic dibenzo[a,l]pyrene are resistant to nucleotide excision repair while guanine adducts are not

    PubMed Central

    Kropachev, Konstantin; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Yuqin; Zhang, Lu; Schwaid, Adam G.; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Ding, Shuang; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    The structural origins of differences in susceptibilities of various DNA lesions to nucleotide excision repair (NER) are poorly understood. Here we compared, in the same sequence context, the relative NER dual incision efficiencies elicited by two stereochemically distinct pairs of guanine (N2-dG) and adenine (N6-dA) DNA lesions, derived from enantiomeric genotoxic diol epoxides of the highly tumorigenic fjord region polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). Remarkably, in cell-free HeLa cell extracts, the guanine adduct with R absolute chemistry at the N2-dG linkage site is ~ 35 times more susceptible to NER dual incisions than the stereochemically identical N6-dA adduct. For the guanine and adenine adducts with S stereochemistry, a similar, but somewhat smaller effect (factor of ~15) is observed. The striking resistance of the bulky N6-dA in contrast to the modest to good susceptibilities of the N2-dG adducts to NER are interpreted in terms of the balance between lesion-induced DNA-distorting and DNA-stabilizing van der Waals interactions in their structures, that are partly reflected in the overall thermal stabilities of the modified duplexes. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the high genotoxic activity of DB[a,l]P is related to the formation of NER-resistant and persistent DB[a,l]P-derived adenine adducts in cellular DNA. PMID:23570232

  20. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry: pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mensonides, Femke I C; Bakker, Barbara M; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-09-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular monitors of the state of living cells, such as ATP, affect multiple enzymes of the former and that these interactions have gone unnoticed in enzymology. We test this hypothesis in terms of the effect that ATP, ADP, and AMP might have on the major free-energy delivering pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Assaying cell-free extracts, we collected a comprehensive set of quantitative kinetic data concerning the enzymes of the glycolytic and the ethanol fermentation pathways. We determined systematically the extent to which the enzyme activities depend on the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. We found that the effects of the adenine nucleotides on enzymes catalysing reactions in which they are not directly involved as substrate or product, are substantial. This includes effects on the Michaelis-Menten constants, adding new perspective on these, 100 years after their introduction. PMID:23856461

  1. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Andreas; Verghese, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1, and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell. PMID:26913285

  2. Bijective transformation circular codes and nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-04-01

    The C(3) self-complementary circular code X identified in genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is a set of 20 trinucleotides enabling reading frame retrieval and maintenance, i.e. a framing code (Arquès and Michel, 1996; Michel, 2012, 2013). Some mitochondrial RNAs correspond to DNA sequences when RNA transcription systematically exchanges between nucleotides (Seligmann, 2013a,b). We study here the 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX of X which may code nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription as suggested by this mitochondrial observation. The 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX are C(3) trinucleotide circular codes, seven of them are also self-complementary. Furthermore, several correlations are observed between the Reading Frame Retrieval (RFR) probability of bijective transformation codes ΠX and the different biological properties of ΠX related to their numbers of RNAs in GenBank's EST database, their polymerization rate, their number of amino acids and the chirality of amino acids they code. Results suggest that the circular code X with the functions of reading frame retrieval and maintenance in regular RNA transcription, may also have, through its bijective transformation codes ΠX, the same functions in nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription. Associations with properties such as amino acid chirality suggest that the RFR of X and its bijective transformations molded the origins of the genetic code's machinery. PMID:24565870

  3. Scambio, a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina; Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Haataja, Leena; Senadheera, Dinithi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2004-01-01

    Background Small GTPases of the Rho family are critical regulators of various cellular functions including actin cytoskeleton organization, activation of kinase cascades and mitogenesis. For this reason, a major objective has been to understand the mechanisms of Rho GTPase regulation. Here, we examine the function of a novel protein, Scambio, which shares homology with the DH-PH domains of several known guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family members. Results Scambio is located on human chromosome 14q11.1, encodes a protein of around 181 kDa, and is highly expressed in both heart and skeletal muscle. In contrast to most DH-PH-domain containing proteins, it binds the activated, GTP-bound forms of Rac and Cdc42. However, it fails to associate with V14RhoA. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that Scambio and activated Rac3 colocalize in membrane ruffles at the cell periphery. In accordance with these findings, Scambio does not activate either Rac or Cdc42 but rather, stimulates guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and its close relative, RhoC. Conclusion Scambio associates with Rac in its activated conformation and functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho. PMID:15107133

  4. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  5. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Korotkov, Sergey M.

    2016-01-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  6. Differential Expression of Adenine Nucleotide Converting Enzymes in Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space: A Potential Role of Adenylate Kinase Isozyme 2 in Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanimura, Ayako; Horiguchi, Taigo; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide dynamics in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) play a key role in oxidative phosphorylation. In a previous study, Drosophila adenylate kinase isozyme 2 (Dak2) knockout was reported to cause developmental lethality at the larval stage in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, two other studies reported that AK2 is a responsible gene for reticular dysgenesis (RD), a human disease that is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency and deafness. Therefore, mitochondrial AK2 may play an important role in hematopoietic differentiation and ontogenesis. Three additional adenine nucleotide metabolizing enzymes, including mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1 and CKMT2) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase isoform D (NDPK-D), have been found in IMS. Although these kinases generate ADP for ATP synthesis, their involvement in RD remains unclear and still an open question. In this study, mRNA and protein expressions of these mitochondrial kinases were firstly examined in mouse ES cells, day 8 embryos, and 7-week-old adult mice. It was found that their expressions are spatiotemporally regulated, and Ak2 is exclusively expressed in bone marrow, which is a major hematopoietic tissue in adults. In subsequent experiments, we identified increased expression of both AK2 and CKMT1 during macrophage differentiation and exclusive production of AK2 during neutrophil differentiation using HL-60 cells as an in vitro model of hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, AK2 knockdown specifically inhibited neutrophil differentiation without affecting macrophage differentiation. These data suggest that AK2 is indispensable for neutrophil differentiation and indicate a possible causative link between AK2 deficiency and neutropenia in RD. PMID:24587121

  7. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M

    2016-06-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) 'c' conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca(2+)-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25-75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca(2+). The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca(2+) alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca(2+)-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in 'm' conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript "To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria" (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  8. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on cape cod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (EC(A)) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T)) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free- living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. EC(A)s (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated EC(A)s (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although EC(A) and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture. These data suggest that the DNA content of groundwater bacteria may be more sensitive than their A(T) to the degree of carbon loading, which may have significant ramifications in the use of nucleic acids and adenine nucleotides for estimating the metabolic status of bacterial communities within more highly contaminated aquifers.

  9. The activation of non-phosphorylating electron transport by adenine nucleotides in Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibandhu, R; Palmer, J M

    1975-01-01

    In isolated plant mitochondria the oxidation of both succinate and exogenous NADH responded in the expected manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents, and the uncoupled rate of respiration was often in excess of the rate obtained in the presence of ADP. However, the oxidation of NAD+-linked substrates responded in a much more complex manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate plus malate failed to result in a reliable stimulation; this uncoupled rate could be stimulated by adding AMP or ADP in the presence of oligomycin or bongkrekic acid. Spectrophometric measurements showed that the addition of AMP or ADP resulted in the simultaneous oxidation of endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide and the reduction of cytochrome b. ADP was only effective in bringing about these changes in redox state in the presence of Mg2+ whereas AMP did not require Mg2+. It was concluded that AMP activated the flow of electrons from endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide to cytochrome b, possible at the level of the internal NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:1227506

  10. sup 31 P NMR saturation-transfer study of the in situ kinetics of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    SciTech Connect

    Masiakos, P.T.; Williams, G.D.; Berkich, D.A.; Smith, M.B.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-08-27

    The exchange of intramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub in}) for extramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub out}) was measured by using {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures in isolated rat liver mitochondria oxidizing glutamate and succinate in the presence of external ATP but no added ADP (state 4). The rate of this exchange is more than an order of magnitude faster than rates reported previously that were determined by using isotopic techniques in the presence of oligomycin, the potent ATPase inhibitor. Differences are ascribed in part to the low levels of matrix ATP present in oligomycin-treated mitochondrial. Intramitochondrial ATP content regulates the rate of the ATP{sub in}/ATP{sub out} exchange. At 18C, the concentration of internal ATP that produces half-maximal transport rate is 6.6{plus minus}0.12 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. The relationship between substrate concentration and flux is sigmoidal and is 90% saturated at 11.3{plus minus}0.18 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. Since the measured rates of exchange of ATP{sub in} for ATP{sub out} are almost 10 times faster than the ATP synthase (ATP/P{sub i}) exchange rates, the translocase cannot limit net ATP/P{sub i} exchange in state 4. It may, nonetheless, limit net synthesis of ATP under other conditions when matrix ATP concentration is lower than in state 4 and when external ADP is present at higher concentrations than in these experiments.

  11. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds. PMID:26835787

  12. Adenine nucleotide translocator isoforms 1 and 2 are differently distributed in the mitochondrial inner membrane and have distinct affinities to cyclophilin D.

    PubMed Central

    Vyssokikh, M Y; Katz, A; Rueck, A; Wuensch, C; Dörner, A; Zorov, D B; Brdiczka, D

    2001-01-01

    Different isoforms of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. It was assumed that ANT-1 and ANT-2 co-exist in every single mitochondrion and might be differently distributed within the membrane structures that constitute the peripheral inner membrane or the crista membrane. To discriminate between ANT originating from peripheral or from cristal inner membranes we made use of the fact that complexes between porin, the outer-membrane pore protein, and the ANT can be generated. Such complexes between porin and the ANT in the peripheral inner membrane were induced in rat heart mitochondria and isolated from rat brain and kidney. Using ANT-isotype-specific antibodies and sequence analysis of the N-terminal end, it was discovered that the peripheral inner membrane contained ANT-1 and ANT-2, whereas the cristal membrane contained exclusively ANT-2. Cyclophilin was co-purified with the porin-ANT complexes, whereas it was absent in the crista-derived ANT. This suggested that ANT-1 might have a higher affinity for cyclophilin. This specific intra-mitochondrial distribution of the two ANT isotypes and cyclophilin D suggests specific functions of the peripheral and crista-forming parts of the inner membrane and the two ANT isotypes therein. PMID:11513733

  13. RasGRP Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ksionda, Olga; Limnander, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Summary RasGRP proteins are activators of Ras and other related small GTPases by the virtue of functioning as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In vertebrates, four RasGRP family members have been described. RasGRP-1 through −4 share many structural domains but there are also subtle differences between each of the different family members. Whereas SOS RasGEFs are ubiquitously expressed, RasGRP proteins are expressed in distinct patterns, such as in different cells of the hematopoietic system and in the brain. Most studies have concentrated on the role of RasGRP proteins in the development and function of immune cell types because of the predominant RasGRP expression profiles in these cells and the immune phenotypes of mice deficient for Rasgrp genes. However, more recent studies demonstrate that RasGRPs also play an important role in tumorigenesis. Examples are skin- and hematological-cancers but also solid malignancies such as melanoma or prostate cancer. These novel studies bring up many new and unanswered questions related to the molecular mechanism of RasGRP-driven oncogenesis, such as new receptor systems that RasGRP appears to respond to as well as regulatory mechanism for RasGRP expression that appear to be perturbed in these cancers. Here we will review some of the known aspects of RasGRP biology in lymphocytes and will discuss the exciting new notion that RasGRP Ras exchange factors play a role in oncogenesis downstream of various growth factor receptors. PMID:24744772

  14. Formation of ternary complexes by coordination of (diethylenetriamine)-platinum(II) to N1 or N7 of the adenine moiety of the antiviral nucleotide analogue 9.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Lüth, M S; Kapinos, L E; Müller, J; Holý, A; Lippert, B; Sigel, H

    2001-05-01

    are somewhat less stable, but again Cu2+ and Zn2+ also form with this ligand comparable amounts of the mentioned five-membered chelates. In contrast, both M[(Dien)Pt(PMEA-N1/N7)]2+ complexes differ from the parent M(PMEA) complexes considerably; in the latter instance the formation of the five-membered chelates is of significance for all divalent metal ions studied. The observation that divalent metal-ion binding to the phosphonate group of (Dien)Pt(PMEA-N1) and (Dien)Pt(PMEA-N7) is only moderately inhibited (about 0.2-0.4 log units) by the twofold positively charged (Dien)Pt2+ unit at the adenine residue allows the general conclusion, considering that PMEA is a nucleotide analogue, that this is also true for nucleotides and that consequently participation of, for example, two metal ions in an enzymatic process involving nucleotides is not seriously hampered by charge repulsion. PMID:11405468

  15. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Exchange in Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Ron O.; Mildorf, Thomas J.; Hilger, Daniel; Manglik, Aashish; Borhani, David W.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Philippsen, Ansgar; Villanueva, Nicolas; Yang, Zhongyu; Lerch, Michael T.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Shaw, David E.

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay diverse extracellular signals into cells by catalyzing nucleotide release from heterotrimeric G proteins, but the mechanism underlying this quintessential molecular signaling event has remained unclear. Here we use atomic-level simulations to elucidate the nucleotide-release mechanism. We find that the G protein α subunit Ras and helical domains—previously observed to separate widely upon receptor binding to expose the nucleotide-binding site—separate spontaneously and frequently even in the absence of a receptor. Domain separation is necessary but not sufficient for rapid nucleotide release. Rather, receptors catalyze nucleotide release by favoring an internal structural rearrangement of the Ras domain that weakens its nucleotide affinity. We use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and protein engineering to confirm predictions of our computationally determined mechanism. PMID:26089515

  16. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on Cape Cod.

    PubMed Central

    Metge, D W; Brooks, M H; Smith, R L; Harvey, R W

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (ECA) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free-living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. ECAS (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated ECAS (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although ECA and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8357263

  17. Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factors during development

    PubMed Central

    Mulinari, Shai

    2010-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms is associated with extensive rearrangements of tissues and cell sheets. The driving force for these rearrangements is generated mostly by the actin cytoskeleton. In order to permit the reproducible development of a specific body plan, dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton must be precisely coordinated in space and time. GTP-exchange factors that activate small GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in this process. Here we review the role of this class of cytoskeletal regulators during important developmental processes such as epithelial morphogenesis, cytokinesis, cell migration, cell polarity, neuronal growth cone extension and phagocytosis in different model systems. PMID:21686118

  18. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Simultaneous determination of purine nucleotides, their metabolites and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cerebellar granule cells by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Gagliardi, Sara; Samaja, Michele; Marra, Ersilia

    2003-02-01

    The method described here allows the quantitative simultaneous determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine, guanosine 5'-triphosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. The chromatographic analysis requires 26 min per sample and allows the separation of the mentioned metabolites in a time as short as 16 min. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing 25 mM KCl for 1.5-48 h and their acid extracts were injected onto column. Uric acid, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate were identified and quantified, while hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanosine were below the detection limit. This method makes use of a single-step sample pre-treatment procedure which allows a greater than 91% recovery of the compounds of interest and provides the assay of the metabolites of interest in little amounts of cell extracts. Therefore, this method is suitable to evaluate the energetic state in a variety of cell types, both under normal and dismetabolic conditions, such as after the induction of apoptosis or necrosis. PMID:12565687

  20. Andrographolide derivatives inhibit guanine nucleotide exchange and abrogate oncogenic Ras function.

    PubMed

    Hocker, Harrison J; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Chen, Chung-Ying K; Rambahal, Nandini; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Shaari, Khozirah; Stanslas, Johnson; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2013-06-18

    Aberrant signaling by oncogenic mutant rat sarcoma (Ras) proteins occurs in ∼15% of all human tumors, yet direct inhibition of Ras by small molecules has remained elusive. Recently, several small-molecule ligands have been discovered that directly bind Ras and inhibit its function by interfering with exchange factor binding. However, it is unclear whether, or how, these ligands could lead to drugs that act against constitutively active oncogenic mutant Ras. Using a dynamics-based pocket identification scheme, ensemble docking, and innovative cell-based assays, here we show that andrographolide (AGP)--a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata--and its benzylidene derivatives bind to transient pockets on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) and inhibit GDP-GTP exchange. As expected for inhibitors of exchange factor binding, AGP derivatives reduced GTP loading of wild-type K-Ras in response to acute EGF stimulation with a concomitant reduction in MAPK activation. Remarkably, however, prolonged treatment with AGP derivatives also reduced GTP loading of, and signal transmission by, oncogenic mutant K-RasG12V. In sum, the combined analysis of our computational and cell biology results show that AGP derivatives directly bind Ras, block GDP-GTP exchange, and inhibit both wild-type and oncogenic K-Ras signaling. Importantly, our findings not only show that nucleotide exchange factors are required for oncogenic Ras signaling but also demonstrate that inhibiting nucleotide exchange is a valid approach to abrogating the function of oncogenic mutant Ras. PMID:23737504

  1. Andrographolide derivatives inhibit guanine nucleotide exchange and abrogate oncogenic Ras function

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Harrison J.; Cho, Kwang-Jin; Chen, Chung-Ying K.; Rambahal, Nandini; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Shaari, Khozirah; Stanslas, Johnson; Hancock, John F.; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant signaling by oncogenic mutant rat sarcoma (Ras) proteins occurs in ∼15% of all human tumors, yet direct inhibition of Ras by small molecules has remained elusive. Recently, several small-molecule ligands have been discovered that directly bind Ras and inhibit its function by interfering with exchange factor binding. However, it is unclear whether, or how, these ligands could lead to drugs that act against constitutively active oncogenic mutant Ras. Using a dynamics-based pocket identification scheme, ensemble docking, and innovative cell-based assays, here we show that andrographolide (AGP)—a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata—and its benzylidene derivatives bind to transient pockets on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) and inhibit GDP–GTP exchange. As expected for inhibitors of exchange factor binding, AGP derivatives reduced GTP loading of wild-type K-Ras in response to acute EGF stimulation with a concomitant reduction in MAPK activation. Remarkably, however, prolonged treatment with AGP derivatives also reduced GTP loading of, and signal transmission by, oncogenic mutant K-RasG12V. In sum, the combined analysis of our computational and cell biology results show that AGP derivatives directly bind Ras, block GDP–GTP exchange, and inhibit both wild-type and oncogenic K-Ras signaling. Importantly, our findings not only show that nucleotide exchange factors are required for oncogenic Ras signaling but also demonstrate that inhibiting nucleotide exchange is a valid approach to abrogating the function of oncogenic mutant Ras. PMID:23737504

  2. The emerging role of guanine nucleotide exchange factors in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Droppelmann, Cristian A.; Campos-Melo, Danae; Volkening, Kathryn; Strong, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPases participate in a broad range of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in the activation of these GTPases is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which two classes: Dbl-related exchange factors and the more recently described dedicator of cytokinesis proteins family exchange factors. Increasingly, deregulation of normal GEF activity or function has been associated with a broad range of disease states, including neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we examine this evidence with special emphasis on the novel role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF/p190RhoGEF) in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. RGNEF is the first neurodegeneration-linked GEF that regulates not only RhoA GTPase activation but also functions as an RNA binding protein that directly acts with low molecular weight neurofilament mRNA 3′ untranslated region to regulate its stability. This dual role for RGNEF, coupled with the increasing understanding of the key role for GEFs in modulating the GTPase function in cell survival suggests a prominent role for GEFs in mediating a critical balance between cytotoxicity and neuroprotection which, when disturbed, contributes to neuronal loss. PMID:25309324

  3. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  4. Molecular chaperones of the Hsp110 family act as nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70s

    PubMed Central

    Dragovic, Zdravko; Broadley, Sarah A; Shomura, Yasuhito; Bracher, Andreas; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Hsp70 molecular chaperones function in protein folding in a manner dependent on regulation by co-chaperones. Hsp40s increase the low intrinsic ATPase activity of Hsp70, and nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) remove ADP after ATP hydrolysis, enabling a new Hsp70 interaction cycle with non-native protein substrate. Here, we show that members of the Hsp70-related Hsp110 family cooperate with Hsp70 in protein folding in the eukaryotic cytosol. Mammalian Hsp110 and the yeast homologues Sse1p/2p catalyze efficient nucleotide exchange on Hsp70 and its orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ssa1p, respectively. Moreover, Sse1p has the same effect on Ssb1p, a ribosome-associated isoform of Hsp70 in yeast. Mutational analysis revealed that the N-terminal ATPase domain and the ultimate C-terminus of Sse1p are required for nucleotide exchange activity. The Hsp110 homologues significantly increase the rate and yield of Hsp70-mediated re-folding of thermally denatured firefly luciferase in vitro. Similarly, deletion of SSE1 causes a firefly luciferase folding defect in yeast cells under heat stress in vivo. Our data indicate that Hsp110 proteins are important components of the eukaryotic Hsp70 machinery of protein folding. PMID:16688212

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of transducin: interdomain and front to back communication in activation and nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Marc A; Periole, Xavier; Weinstein, Harel

    2004-04-30

    The dynamic events that underlie the nucleotide exchange process for the Galpha subunit of transducin (Galpha(t)) were studied with nanosecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The modeled systems include the active and inactive forms of the wild-type Galpha(t) and three of its mutants (GDP-bound form only): F332A, A322S, and Q326A that are known to exhibit various degrees of enhancement of their basal and receptor-catalyzed rates of nucleotide exchange (150-fold, 70-fold and WT-like, respectively). The results of these computational experiments reveal a number of nucleotide-dependent structural and dynamic changes (involving the alpha(B)-alpha(C) loop, the inter-domain orientation of the helical and GTPase domains and the alpha(5) helix) that were not observed in the various crystal structures of Galpha(t). Notably, the results show the existence of a front to back communication device (involving the beta(2)-beta(3) hairpin, the alpha(1) helix and the alpha(5) helix), strategically located near all elements susceptible to be involved in receptor-mediated activation/nucleotide exchange. The wild-type simulations suggest that the dynamic interplay between the elements of this device would be critical for the activation of the Galpha(t) subunit. This inference is confirmed by the results of the computational experiments on the mutants that show that even in their GDP-bound forms, the A322S and F332A mutants acquire an "active-like" structure and dynamics phenotype. The same is not true for the Q326A mutant whose structural and dynamic properties remain similar to those of the GDP-bound WT. Taken together the results suggest a nucleotide exchange mechanism, analogous to that found in the Arf family GTPases, in which a partially activated state, achievable from a receptor-mediated action of the front to back communication device either by displacement of the C-terminal alpha(5) helix, of the N-terminal alpha(N) helix, or of the Gbetagamma subunit, could

  6. Photo-excitation of adenine cation radical [A•+] in the near UV-vis region produces sugar radicals in Adenosine and in its nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report the formation of ribose sugar radicals in high yields (85 – 100%) via photo-excitation of adenine cation radical (A•+) in Ado and its ribonucleotides. Photo-excitation of A•+ at low temperatures in homogenous aqueous glassy samples of Ado, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and 5′-AMP forms sugar radicals predominantly at C5′- and also at C3′-sites. The C5′• and C3′• sugar radicals were identified employing Ado deuterated at specific carbon sites: C1′, C2′, and at C5′. Phosphate substitution is found to deactivate sugar radical formation at the site of substitution. Thus, in 5′-AMP, C3′• is observed to be the main radical formed via photo-excitation at ca. 143 K whereas in 3′-AMP, C5′• is the only species found. These results were supported by results obtained employing 5′-AMP with specific deuteration at C5′-site (i.e., 5′,5′-D,D-5′-AMP). Moreover, contrary to the C5′• observed in 3′-dAMP, we find that C5′• in 3′-AMP shows a clear pH dependent conformational change as evidenced by a large increase in the C4′ β–hyperfine coupling on increasing the pH from 6 to 9. Calculations performed employing DFT (B3LYP/6-31G*) for C5′• in 3′-AMP show that the two conformations of C5′• result from strong hydrogen bond formation between the O5′-H and the 3′-phosphate dianion at higher pHs. Employing time-dependent density functional theory [TD-DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(d)] we show that in the excited state, the hole transfers to the sugar moiety and has significant hole localization at the C5′-site in a number of allowed transitions. This hole localization is proposed to lead to the formation of the neutral C5′-radical (C5′•) via deprotonation. PMID:19367991

  7. Modulation of the chaperone DnaK allosterism by the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE.

    PubMed

    Melero, Roberto; Moro, Fernando; Pérez-Calvo, María Ángeles; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Quintana-Gallardo, Lucía; Llorca, Oscar; Muga, Arturo; Valpuesta, José María

    2015-04-17

    Hsp70 chaperones comprise two domains, the nucleotide-binding domain (Hsp70NBD), responsible for structural and functional changes in the chaperone, and the substrate-binding domain (Hsp70SBD), involved in substrate interaction. Substrate binding and release in Hsp70 is controlled by the nucleotide state of DnaKNBD, with ATP inducing the open, substrate-receptive DnaKSBD conformation, whereas ADP forces its closure. DnaK cycles between the two conformations through interaction with two cofactors, the Hsp40 co-chaperones (DnaJ in Escherichia coli) induce the ADP state, and the nucleotide exchange factors (GrpE in E. coli) induce the ATP state. X-ray crystallography showed that the GrpE dimer is a nucleotide exchange factor that works by interaction of one of its monomers with DnaKNBD. DnaKSBD location in this complex is debated; there is evidence that it interacts with the GrpE N-terminal disordered region, far from DnaKNBD. Although we confirmed this interaction using biochemical and biophysical techniques, our EM-based three-dimensional reconstruction of the DnaK-GrpE complex located DnaKSBD near DnaKNBD. This apparent discrepancy between the functional and structural results is explained by our finding that the tail region of the GrpE dimer in the DnaK-GrpE complex bends and its tip contacts DnaKSBD, whereas the DnaKNBD-DnaKSBD linker contacts the GrpE helical region. We suggest that these interactions define a more complex role for GrpE in the control of DnaK function. PMID:25739641

  8. Structural basis of nucleotide exchange and client binding by the novel Hsp70-cochaperone Bag2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Page, Richard C; Gomes, Michelle M; Kohli, Ekta; Nix, Jay C; Herr, Andrew B; Patterson, Cam; Misra, Saurav

    2009-01-01

    Cochaperones are essential for Hsp70/Hsc70-mediated folding of proteins and include nucleotide exchange factors (NEF) that assist protein folding by accelerating ADP/ATP exchange on Hsp70. The cochaperone Bag2 binds misfolded Hsp70 clients and also acts as a NEF, but the molecular basis of its functions is unclear. We show that, rather than being a member of the Bag domain family, Bag2 contains a new type of Hsp70 NEF domain, which we call the “Brand New Bag” (BNB) domain. Free and Hsc70-bound crystal structures of Bag2-BNB show its dimeric structure in which a flanking linker helix and loop bind to Hsc70 to promote nucleotide exchange. NMR analysis demonstrates that the client-binding sites and Hsc70 interaction sites of Bag2-BNB overlap, and that Hsc70 can displace clients from Bag2-BNB, indicating a distinct mechanism for the regulation of Hsp-70-mediated protein folding by Bag2. PMID:19029896

  9. The rate of ATP export in the extramitochondrial phase via the adenine nucleotide translocator changes in aging in mitochondria isolated from heart left ventricle of either normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; Seccia, Teresa Maria; Marra, Ersilia; Passarella, Salvatore

    2011-10-01

    To find out whether and how deficit of cellular energy supply from mitochondria to cytosol occurs in aging and hypertension, we used mitochondria isolated from 5 to 72 week-old heart left ventricle of either normotensive (WKY) or spontaneous hypertensive (SH) rats as a model system. Measurements were made of the rate of ATP appearance outside mitochondria, due to externally added ADP, as an increase of NADPH absorbance which occurs when ATP is produced in the presence of glucose, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Such a rate proved to mirror the function of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) rather than other processes linked to the both oxidative and substrate level phosphorylation. The changes in both Ki for atractyloside and Km for ADP suggest the occurrence of modification of the ANT conformation during aging in which the ANT Vmax was found to decrease in normotensive but to increase under spontaneously hypertension in 24 week-old rats with a subsequent decrease in both cases. ANT function, as investigated in the ADP physiological range (20-60μM), is expected to decrease in normotensive, but to increase in hypertensive rats up to 48 weeks. Later a decrease in the ATP rate of export outside mitochondria should occur in both cases. PMID:21855562

  10. Structure of Gαi1 bound to a GDP-selective peptide provides insight into guanine nucleotide exchange

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Willard, Francis S.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Fredericks, Zoey; Bodor, Erik T.; Jones, Miller B.; Blaesius, Rainer; Watts, Val J.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John; Ramer, J. Kevin; Siderovski, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that regulate numerous signaling pathways involved in cellular physiology. This characteristic is achieved by the adoption of two principal states: an inactive, GDP-bound and an active, GTP-bound state. Under basal conditions G-proteins exist in the inactive GDP-bound state, thus nucleotide exchange is crucial to the onset of signaling. Despite our understanding of G-protein signaling pathways, the mechanism of nucleotide exchange remains elusive. We employed phage display technology to identify nucleotide-state-dependent Gα binding peptides. Herein, we report a GDP-selective Gα-binding peptide, KB-752, that enhances spontaneous nucleotide exchange of Gαi subunits. Structural determination of the Gαi1/peptide complex reveals unique changes in the Gα switch regions predicted to enhance nucleotide exchange by creating a GDP dissociation route. Our results cast light onto a potential mechanism by which Gα subunits adopt a conformation suitable for nucleotide exchange. PMID:16004878

  11. The Grp170 nucleotide exchange factor executes a key role during ERAD of cellular misfolded clients

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    When a protein misfolds in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), it retrotranslocates to the cytosol and is degraded by the proteasome via a pathway called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). To initiate ERAD, ADP-BiP is often recruited to the misfolded client, rendering it soluble and translocation competent. How the misfolded client is subsequently released from BiP so that it undergoes retrotranslocation, however, remains enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) Grp170 plays an important role during ERAD of the misfolded glycosylated client null Hong Kong (NHK). As a NEF, Grp170 triggers nucleotide exchange of BiP to generate ATP-BiP. ATP-BiP disengages from NHK, enabling it to retrotranslocate to the cytosol. We demonstrate that Grp170 binds to Sel1L, an adapter of the transmembrane Hrd1 E3 ubiquitin ligase postulated to be the retrotranslocon, and links this interaction to Grp170’s function during ERAD. More broadly, Grp170 also promotes degradation of the nonglycosylated transthyretin (TTR) D18G misfolded client. Our findings thus establish a general function of Grp170 during ERAD and suggest that positioning this client-release factor at the retrotranslocation site may afford a mechanism to couple client release from BiP and retrotranslocation. PMID:27030672

  12. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  13. An Adenine-DNA Adduct Derived from Nitroreduction of 6-Nitrochrysene is more Resistant to Nucleotide Excision Repair than Guanine-DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Jacek; Kropachev, Konstantin; Reeves, Dara; Kolbanovskiy, Aleksandr; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Chen, Kun-Ming; Sharma, Arun K.; Geacintov, Nicholas; Amin, Shantu; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in rats, mice and in vitro systems showed that 6-NC can be metabolically activated by two major pathways: 1) the formation of N-hydroxy-6-aminochrysene by nitroreduction to yield three major adducts: N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC, 5-(dG-N2-yl)-6-AC and N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC, and 2) the formation of trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxylaminochrysene (1,2-DHD-6-NHOH-C) by a combination of nitroreduction and ring oxidation pathways to yield: N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC, 5-(dG-N2-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC and N-(dA-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC. These DNA lesions are likely to cause mutations if they are not removed by cellular defense mechanisms before DNA replication occurs. Here we compared for the first time, in HeLa cell extracts in vitro, the relative nucleotide excision repair (NER) efficiencies of DNA lesions derived from simple nitroreduction and from a combination of nitroreduction and ring oxidation pathways. We show that the N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC adduct is more resistant to NER than the N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC adduct by a factor of ~2. Furthermore, the N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC is much more resistant to repair since its NER efficiency is ~ 8-fold lower than that of the N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC adduct. On the basis of our previous study and the present investigation, lesions derived from 6-NC and benzo[a]pyrene can be ranked from the most to the least resistant lesion as follows: N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC > N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC > 5-(dG-N2-yl)-6-AC ~ N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC ~ (+)-7R,8S,9S,10S-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-derived trans-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N2-dG adduct. The slow repair of the various lesions derived from 6-NC and thus their potential persistence in mammalian tissue, could in part account for the powerful carcinogenicity of 6-NC as compared to B[a]P in the rat mammary gland. PMID:24112095

  14. Tubulin exchanges divalent cations at both guanine nucleotide-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correia, J J; Beth, A H; Williams, R C

    1988-08-01

    The tubulin heterodimer binds a molecule of GTP at the nonexchangeable nucleotide-binding site (N-site) and either GDP or GTP at the exchangeable nucleotide-binding site (E-site). Mg2+ is known to be tightly linked to the binding of GTP at the E-site (Correia, J. J., Baty, L. T., and Williams, R. C., Jr. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17278-17284). Measurements of the exchange of Mn2+ for bound Mg2+ (as monitored by atomic absorption and EPR) demonstrate that tubulin which has GDP at the E-site possesses one high affinity metal-binding site and that tubulin which has GTP at the E-site possesses two such sites. The apparent association constants are 0.7-1.1 x 10(6) M-1 for Mg2+ and approximately 4.1-4.9 x 10(7) M-1 for Mn2+. Divalent cations do bind to GDP at the E-site, but with much lower affinity (2.0-2.3 x 10(3) M-1 for Mg2+ and 3.9-6.6 x 10(3) M-1 for Mn2+). These data suggest that divalent cations are involved in GTP binding to both the N- and E-sites of tubulin. The N-site metal exchanges slowly (kapp = 0.020 min-1), suggesting a mechanism involving protein "breathing" or heterodimer dissociation. The N-site metal exchange rate is independent of the concentration of protein and metal, an observation consistent with the possibility that a dynamic breathing process is the rate-limiting step. The exchange of Mn2+ for Mg2+ has no effect on the secondary structure of tubulin at 4 degrees C or on the ability of tubulin to form microtubules. These results have important consequences for the interpretation of distance measurements within the tubulin dimer using paramagnetic ions. They are also relevant to the detailed mechanism of divalent cation release from microtubules after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:3392036

  15. Genetic interactions in yeast between Ypt GTPases and Arf guanine nucleotide exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Jedd, G; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A; Bartolini, F; Segev, N

    1999-01-01

    Two families of GTPases, Arfs and Ypt/rabs, are key regulators of vesicular transport. While Arf proteins are implicated in vesicle budding from the donor compartment, Ypt/rab proteins are involved in the targeting of vesicles to the acceptor compartment. Recently, we have shown a role for Ypt31/32p in exit from the yeast trans-Golgi, suggesting a possible function for Ypt/rab proteins in vesicle budding as well. Here we report the identification of a new member of the Sec7-domain family, SYT1, as a high-copy suppressor of a ypt31/32 mutation. Several proteins that belong to the Sec7-domain family, including the yeast Gea1p, have recently been shown to stimulate nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases. Nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases, the switch from the GDP- to the GTP-bound form, is thought to be crucial for their function. Sec7p itself has an important role in the yeast secretory pathway. However, its mechanism of action is not yet understood. We show that all members of the Sec7-domain family exhibit distinct genetic interactions with the YPT genes. Biochemical assays demonstrate that, although the homology between the members of the Sec7-domain family is relatively low (20-35%) and limited to a small domain, they all can act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Arf proteins, but not for Ypt GTPases. The Sec7-domain of Sec7p is sufficient for this activity. Interestingly, the Sec7 domain activity is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that inhibits some of the Arf-GEFs, indicating that this domain is a target for BFA. These results demonstrate that the ability to act as Arf-GEFs is a general property of all Sec7-domain proteins in yeast. The genetic interactions observed between Arf GEFs and Ypt GTPases suggest the existence of a Ypt-Arf GTPase cascade in the secretory pathway. PMID:10430582

  16. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges X<>Y, e.g. A<>G, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information. PMID:27079465

  17. Biochemical evidence of the interactions of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) with adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT): potential implications linking proteolysis with energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Radichev, Ilian A; Remacle, Albert G; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Rozanov, Dmitri V; Zhu, Wenhong; Golubkova, Natalya V; Postnova, Tatiana I; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Strongin, Alex Y

    2009-05-15

    Invasion-promoting MT1-MMP (membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase) is a key element in cell migration processes. To identify the proteins that interact and therefore co-precipitate with this proteinase from cancer cells, we used the proteolytically active WT (wild-type), the catalytically inert E240A and the C-end truncated (tailless; DeltaCT) MT1-MMP-FLAG constructs as baits. The identity of the pulled-down proteins was determined by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem MS) and then confirmed by Western blotting using specific antibodies. We determined that, in breast carcinoma MCF cells (MCF-7 cells), ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator) efficiently interacted with the WT, E240A and DeltaCT constructs. The WT and E240A constructs also interacted with alpha-tubulin, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In turn, tubulin did not co-precipitate with the DeltaCT construct because of the inefficient endocytosis of the latter, thus suggesting a high level of selectivity of our test system. To corroborate these results, we then successfully used the ANT2-FLAG construct as a bait to pull-down MT1-MMP, which was naturally produced by fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. We determined that the presence of the functionally inert catalytic domain alone was sufficient to cause the proteinase to interact with ANT2, thus indicating that there is a non-proteolytic mode of these interactions. Overall, it is tempting to hypothesize that by interacting with pro-invasive MT1-MMP, ANT plays a yet to be identified role in a coupling mechanism between energy metabolism and pericellular proteolysis in migrating cancer cells. PMID:19232058

  18. Zizimin and Dock guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cell function and disease.

    PubMed

    Pakes, Nicholl K; Veltman, Douwe M; Williams, Robin S B

    2013-01-01

    Zizimin proteins belong to the Dock (Dedicator of Cytokinesis) superfamily of Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) proteins. This family of proteins plays a role in the regulation of Rho family small GTPases. Together the Rho family of small GTPases and the Dock/Zizimin proteins play a vital role in a number of cell processes including cell migration, apoptosis, cell division and cell adhesion. Our recent studies of Zizimin proteins, using a simple biomedical model, the eukaryotic social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, have helped to elucidate the cellular role of these proteins. In this article, we discuss the domain structure of Zizimin proteins from an evolutionary viewpoint. We also compare what is currently known about the mammalian Zizimin proteins to that of related Dock proteins. Understanding the cellular functions of these proteins will provide a better insight into their role in cell signaling, and may help in treating disease pathology associated with mutations in Dock/Zizimin proteins. PMID:23247359

  19. Identification of a brefeldin A-insensitive guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factor in bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1994-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that participate in vesicular transport in the Golgi and other intracellular compartments and stimulate cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. ARFs are active in the GTP-bound form; hydrolysis of bound GTP to GDP, possibly with the assistance of a GTP hydrolysis (GTPase)-activating protein results in inactivation. Exchange of GDP for GTP and reactivation were shown by other workers to be enhanced by Golgi membranes in a brefeldin A-sensitive reaction, leading to the proposal that the guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (GEP) was a target of brefeldin A. In the studies reported here, a soluble GEP was partially purified from bovine brain. Exchange of nucleotide on ARFs 1 and 3, based on increased ARF activity in a toxin assay and stimulation of binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate, was dependent on phospholipids, with phosphatidylserine being more effective than cardiolipin. GEP appeared to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange but did not affect the affinity of ARF for GTP. Whereas the crude GEP had a size of approximately 700 kDa, the partially purified GEP behaved on Ultrogel AcA 54 as a protein of 60 kDa. With purification, the GEP activity became insensitive to brefeldin A, consistent with the conclusion that, in contrast to earlier inferences, the exchange protein is not itself the target of brefeldin A. PMID:8159707

  20. Nucleotide sequences provide evidence of genetic exchange among distantly related lineages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carlos A.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2001-01-01

    Simple phylogenetic tests were applied to a large data set of nucleotide sequences from two nuclear genes and a region of the mitochondrial genome of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease. Incongruent gene genealogies manifest genetic exchange among distantly related lineages of T. cruzi. Two widely distributed isoenzyme types of T. cruzi are hybrids, their genetic composition being the likely result of genetic exchange between two distantly related lineages. The data show that the reference strain for the T. cruzi genome project (CL Brener) is a hybrid. Well-supported gene genealogies show that mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences from T. cruzi cluster, respectively, in three or four distinct clades that do not fully correspond to the two previously defined major lineages of T. cruzi. There is clear genetic differentiation among the major groups of sequences, but genetic diversity within each major group is low. We estimate that the major extant lineages of T. cruzi have diverged during the Miocene or early Pliocene (3–16 million years ago). PMID:11416213

  1. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 can be a new biomarker of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1), which couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation, is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor. Studies have shown that GEF-H1 can be involved in various cancer pathways; however, the clinical significance of GEF-H1 expression and functions in melanoma has not been established. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and GEF-H1 functions in melanoma. A total of 60 cases of different grades of melanoma samples were used to detect the expression of GEF-H1. Results showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels of GEF-H1 were significantly higher in high-grade melanomas. Furthermore, patients with high GEF-H1 expression had a shorter overall survival (22 months) than patients with low level of GEF-H1 expression (33.38 months). We also found that GEF-H1 can promote the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma cells. In summary, these results suggested that GEF-H1 may be a valuable biomarker for assessing the degree and prognosis of melanoma following surgery. PMID:27462139

  2. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  3. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  4. Structural basis for auto-inhibition of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor FARP2

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaojing; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Rosche, Tyler J.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2013-01-01

    Summary FARP2 is a Dbl-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that contains a 4.1, ezrin, radixin and moesin (FERM) domain, a Dbl-homology (DH) domain and two pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. FARP2 activates Rac1 or Cdc42 in response to upstream signals, thereby regulating processes such as neuronal axon guidance and bone homeostasis. How the GEF activity of FARP2 is regulated remained poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structures of the catalytic DH domain and the DH-PH-PH domains of FARP2. The structures reveal an auto-inhibited conformation in which the GEF substrate-binding site is blocked collectively by the last helix in the DH domain and the two PH domains. This conformation is stabilized by multiple interactions among the domains and two well-structured inter-domain linkers. Our cell-based activity assays confirm the suppression of the FARP2 GEF activity by these auto-inhibitory elements. PMID:23375260

  5. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  6. RESTRICTED EXPRESSION OF NEW GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTOR ZIZIMIN2 IN AGED ACQUIRED IMMUNE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    JIA, YANJUN; SAKABE, ISAMU; MATSUDA, TAKENORI; HAYAKAWA, TOMOKO; MARUYAMA, MITSUO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activity of various biological functions, such as nervous, endocrine and immune systems including acquired immunity, is known to decline along with aging. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon, we here compared the number of thymocytes, splenocytes, and bone marrow lymphocytes in young and aged mice and found the age-related functional fragility of the immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms or even the key molecules remain elusive. Therefore, we further focused on a candidate for immunosenesence-related molecules, Zizimin2, which we have recently isolated and identified as a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is highly expressed in murine splenic germinal center B cells after immunization with a T cell-dependent antigen. Here, we showed that endogenous Zizimin2 protein as well as mRNA expression levels in immune organs are strictly suppressed in aged mice. We further observed that the serum antigen specific antibody response is hampered in aged mice compared to that in young animals. Moreover, the Zizimin2 mRNA expression level was not activated after immunization in aged mice. Taken together, these data suggested that Zizimin2 is associated with the reduction of immune response in acquired immunity along with aging. PMID:23092103

  7. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  8. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors: regulators of Rho GTPase activity in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Danielle R.; Rossman, Kent L.; Der, Channing J.

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant activity of Ras homologous (Rho) family small GTPases (20 human members) has been implicated in cancer and other human diseases. However, in contrast to the direct mutational activation of Ras found in cancer and developmental disorders, Rho GTPases are activated most commonly by indirect mechanisms in disease. One prevalent mechanism involves aberrant Rho activation via the deregulated expression and/or activity of Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). RhoGEFs promote formation of the active GTP-bound state of Rho GTPases. The largest family of RhoGEFs is comprised of the Dbl family RhoGEFs with 70 human members. The multitude of RhoGEFs that activate a single Rho GTPase reflect the very specific role of each RhoGEF in controlling distinct signaling mechanisms involved in Rho activation. In this review, we summarize the role of Dbl RhoGEFs in development and disease, with a focus on Ect2, Tiam1, Vav and P-Rex1/2. PMID:24037532

  9. Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors bind retromer and promote its recruitment to endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Bjorn D. M.; Davey, Michael; Snider, Jamie; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Tinney, Matthew; Stagljar, Igor; Babu, Mohan; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex facilitates the sorting of integral membrane proteins from the endosome to the late Golgi. In mammalian cells, the efficient recruitment of retromer to endosomes requires the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) as well as Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases. However, in yeast, the role of Rabs in recruiting retromer to endosomes is less clear. We identified novel physical interactions between retromer and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS9-domain Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Muk1 and Vps9. Furthermore, we identified a new yeast VPS9 domain-containing protein, VARP-like 1 (Vrl1), which is related to the human VARP protein. All three VPS9 domain–containing proteins show localization to endosomes, and the presence of any one of them is necessary for the endosomal recruitment of retromer. We find that expression of an active VPS9-domain protein is required for correct localization of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 and the production of endosomal PI3P. These results suggest that VPS9 GEFs promote retromer recruitment by establishing PI3P-enriched domains at the endosomal membrane. The interaction of retromer with distinct VPS9 GEFs could thus link GEF-dependent regulatory inputs to the temporal or spatial coordination of retromer assembly or function. PMID:25609093

  10. Arf6 guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-2 regulates myelination in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Takashima, Shou; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-05-01

    In postnatal development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths, increasing the nerve conduction velocity. To produce the mature myelin sheath with its multiple layers, Schwann cells undergo dynamic morphological changes. While extracellular molecules such as growth factors and cell adhesion ligands are known to regulate the myelination process, the intracellular molecular mechanism underlying myelination remains unclear. In this study, we have produced Schwann cell-specific conditional knockout mice for cytohesin-2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specifically activating Arf6. Arf6, a member of the Ras-like protein family, participates in various cellular functions including cell morphological changes. Cytohesin-2 knockout mice exhibit decreased Arf6 activity and reduced myelin thickness in the sciatic nerves, with decreased expression levels of myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major myelin marker protein. These results are consistent with those of experiments in which Schwann cell-neuronal cultures were treated with pan-cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3. On the other hand, the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in knockout mice and controls are comparable, indicating that cytohesin-2 does not have a positive effect on cell numbers. Thus, signaling through cytohesin-2 is required for myelination by Schwann cells, and cytohesin-2 is added to the list of molecules known to underlie PNS myelination. PMID:25824033

  11. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  12. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  13. Fate of prebiotic adenine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, C A; Hansson, T K; Larsson, H S; Sowerby, S J; Holm, N G

    2001-01-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data for the purine base adenine has been obtained on several prebiotically relevant minerals by frontal analysis using water as a mobile phase. Adenine is far displaced toward adsorption on pyrite (FeS2), quartz (SiO2), and pyrrhotite (FeS), but somewhat less for magnetite (Fe3O4) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The prebiotic prevalence of these minerals would have allowed them to act as a sink for adenine; removal from the aqueous phase would confer protection from hydrolysis as well, establishing a nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework for increased adenine synthesis. Our results provide evidence that adsorption phenomena may have been critical for the primordial genetic architecture. PMID:12448980

  14. Lpg0393 of Legionella pneumophila Is a Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Rab5, Rab21 and Rab22

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Young-Sik; Shin, Ho-Chul; Park, Wei Sun; Ge, Jianning; Kim, Chan-Hee; Lee, Bok Luel; Do Heo, Won; Jung, Jae U.; Rigden, Daniel John; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a human intracellular pathogen, encodes about 290 effector proteins that are translocated into host cells through a secretion machinery. Some of these proteins have been shown to manipulate or subvert cellular processes during infection, but functional roles of a majority of them remain unknown. Lpg0393 is a newly identified Legionella effector classified as a hypothetical protein. Through X-ray crystallographic analysis, we show that Lpg0393 contains a Vps9-like domain, which is structurally most similar to the catalytic core of human Rabex-5 that activates the endosomal Rab proteins Rab5, Rab21 and Rab22. Consistently, Lpg0393 exhibited a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor activity toward the endosomal Rabs. This work identifies the first example of a bacterial guanine-nucleotide exchange factor that is active towards the Rab5 sub-cluster members, implying that the activation of these Rab proteins might be advantageous for the intracellular survival of Legionella. PMID:25821953

  15. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors involved in cyclic-stretch-induced reorientation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Hiyori; Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Hiatari, Ryuichi; Mashiko, Toshiya; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic stretch is an artificial model of mechanical force loading, which induces the reorientation of vascular endothelial cells and their stress fibers in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis. Rho family GTPases are crucial for cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation; however, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced activation of Rho family GTPases is unknown. A screen of short hairpin RNAs targeting 63 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Rho-GEFs) revealed that at least 11 Rho-GEFs – Abr, alsin, ARHGEF10, Bcr, GEF-H1 (also known as ARHGEF2), LARG (also known as ARHGEF12), p190RhoGEF (also known as ARHGEF28), PLEKHG1, P-REX2, Solo (also known as ARHGEF40) and α-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6) – which specifically or broadly target RhoA, Rac1 and/or Cdc42, are involved in cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells. Overexpression of Solo induced RhoA activation and F-actin accumulation at cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion sites. Knockdown of Solo suppressed cyclic-stretch- or tensile-force-induced RhoA activation. Moreover, knockdown of Solo significantly reduced cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells when cells were cultured at high density, but not when they were cultured at low density or pretreated with EGTA or VE-cadherin-targeting small interfering RNAs. These results suggest that Solo is involved in cell-cell-adhesion-mediated mechanical signal transduction during cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation. PMID:25795300

  16. Expression Pattern and Localization Dynamics of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor RIC8 during Mouse Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tõnissoo, Tambet; Meier, Riho; Kask, Keiu; Ruisu, Katrin; Karis, Alar; Salumets, Andres; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of G proteins to the cell cortex and their activation is one of the triggers of both asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (RIC8), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, activates a certain subgroup of G protein α-subunits in a receptor independent manner. RIC8 controls the asymmetric cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, and symmetric cell division in cultured mammalian cells, where it regulates the mitotic spindle orientation. Although intensely studied in mitosis, the function of RIC8 in mammalian meiosis has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that the expression and subcellular localization of RIC8 changes profoundly during mouse oogenesis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that RIC8 expression is dependent on oocyte growth and cell cycle phase. During oocyte growth, RIC8 is abundantly present in cytoplasm of oocytes at primordial, primary and secondary preantral follicle stages. Later, upon oocyte maturation RIC8 also populates the germinal vesicle, its localization becomes cell cycle dependent, and it associates with chromatin and the meiotic spindle. After fertilization, RIC8 protein converges to the pronuclei and is also detectable at high levels in the nucleolus precursor bodies of both maternal and paternal pronucleus. During first cleavage of zygote RIC8 localizes in the mitotic spindle and cell cortex of forming blastomeres. In addition, we demonstrate that RIC8 co-localizes with its interaction partners Gαi1/2:GDP and LGN in meiotic/mitotic spindle, cell cortex and polar bodies of maturing oocytes and zygotes. Downregulation of Ric8 by siRNA leads to interferred translocation of Gαi1/2 to cortical region of maturing oocytes and reduction of its levels. RIC8 is also expressed at high level in female reproductive organs e.g. oviduct. Therefore we suggest a regulatory function for RIC8 in mammalian gametogenesis and fertility. PMID:26062014

  17. Catching Functional Modes and Structural Communication in Dbl Family Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Felline, Angelo; Fanelli, Francesca

    2015-09-28

    Computational approaches such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Elastic Network Model-Normal Mode Analysis (ENM-NMA) are proving to be of great value in investigating relevant biological problems linked to slow motions with no demand in computer power. In this study, these approaches have been coupled to the graph theory-based Protein Structure Network (PSN) analysis to dissect functional dynamics and structural communication in the Dbl family of Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs). They are multidomain proteins whose common structural feature is a DH-PH tandem domain deputed to the GEF activity that makes them play a central role in cell and cancer biology. While their common GEF action is accomplished by the DH domain, their regulatory mechanisms are highly variegate and depend on the PH and the additional domains as well as on interacting proteins. Major evolutionary-driven deformations as inferred from PCA concern the α6 helix of DH that dictates the orientation of the PH domain. Such deformations seem to depend on the mechanisms adopted by the GEF to prevent Rho binding, i.e. functional specialization linked to autoinhibition. In line with PCA, ENM-NMA indicates α6 and the linked PH domain as the portions of the tandem domain holding almost the totality of intrinsic and functional dynamics, with the α6/β1 junction acting as a hinge point for the collective motions of PH. In contrast, the DH domain holds a static scaffolding and hub behavior, with structural communication playing a central role in the regulatory actions by other domains/proteins. Possible allosteric communication pathways involving essentially DH were indeed found in those RhoGEFs acting as effectors of small or heterotrimeric RasGTPases. The employed methodology is suitable for deciphering structure/dynamics relationships in large sets of homologous or analogous proteins. PMID:26322553

  18. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  19. BiP and its nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1: mechanisms of action and biological functions.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Julia; Feige, Matthias J; Hendershot, Linda M

    2015-04-10

    BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) orthologue of the Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones and is intricately involved in most functions of this organelle through its interactions with a variety of substrates and regulatory proteins. Like all Hsp70 family members, the ability of BiP to bind and release unfolded proteins is tightly regulated by a cycle of ATP binding, hydrolysis, and nucleotide exchange. As a characteristic of the Hsp70 family, multiple DnaJ-like co-factors can target substrates to BiP and stimulate its ATPase activity to stabilize the binding of BiP to substrates. However, only in the past decade have nucleotide exchange factors for BiP been identified, which has shed light not only on the mechanism of BiP-assisted folding in the ER but also on Hsp70 family members that reside throughout the cell. We will review the current understanding of the ATPase cycle of BiP in the unique environment of the ER and how it is regulated by the nucleotide exchange factors, Grp170 (glucose-regulated protein of 170kDa) and Sil1, both of which perform unanticipated roles in various biological functions and disease states. PMID:25698114

  20. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  1. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Y; Onodera, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Nomimura, S; Kubo, Y; Nam, J-M; Kajiwara, K; Nada, S; Oneyama, C; Sabe, H; Okada, M

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumor cells often acquire malignant properties, such as invasion/metastasis and uncontrolled cell growth, by undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms by which EMT contributes to malignant progression remain elusive. Here we show that the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARHGEF5 promotes tumor malignancy in a manner dependent on EMT status. We previously identified ARHGEF5, a member of the Dbl family of GEFs, as a multifunctional mediator of Src-induced cell invasion and tumor growth. In the present study, ARHGEF5 was upregulated during tumor growth factor-β-induced EMT in human epithelial MCF10A cells, and promoted cell migration by activating the Rho-ROCK pathway. ARHGEF5 was necessary for the invasive and in vivo metastatic activity of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. These findings underscore the crucial role of ARHGEF5 in cell migration and invasion/metastasis. An in vivo tumorigenesis assay revealed that ARHGEF5 had the potential to promote tumor growth via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. However, ARHGEF5 was not required for tumor growth in epithelial-like human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas the growth of mesenchymal-like SW480 and SW620 cells depended on ARHGEF5. Induction of EMT by tumor necrosis factor-α or Slug in HCT116 cells resulted in the dependence of tumor growth on ARHGEF5. In these mesenchymal-like cells, Akt was activated via ARHGEF5 and its activity was required for tumor growth. Analysis of a transcriptome data set revealed that the combination of ARHGEF5 upregulation and E-cadherin downregulation or Snail upregulation was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancers. Taken together, our findings suggest that EMT-induced ARHGEF5 activation contributes to the progression of tumor malignancy. ARHGEF5 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in a subset of malignant tumors that have undergone EMT. PMID

  2. Flow Cytometry for Real-Time Measurement of Guanine Nucleotide Binding and Exchange by Ras-like GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Samantha L.; Tessema, Mathewos; Buranda, Tione; Phlypenko, Olena; Rak, Alexey; Simons, Peter C.; Surviladze, Zurab; Sklar, Larry A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Ras-like small GTPases cycle between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive conformational states to regulate diverse cellular processes. Despite their importance, detailed kinetic or comparative studies of family members are rarely undertaken due to the lack of real-time assays measuring nucleotide binding or exchange. Here, we report a bead-based, flow cytometric assay that quantitatively measures the nucleotide binding properties of GST-chimeras for prototypical Ras-family members Rab7 and Rho. Measurements are possible in the presence or absence of Mg2+, with magnesium cations principally increasing affinity and slowing nucleotide dissociation rate 8- to 10-fold. GST-Rab7 exhibited a 3-fold higher affinity for GDP relative to GTP that is consistent with a 3-fold slower dissociation rate of GDP. Strikingly, GST-Rab7 had a marked preference for GTP with ribose ring-conjugated BODIPY FL. The more commonly used γ-NH-conjugated BODIPY FL GTP analogue failed to bind to GST-Rab7. In contrast, both BODIPY analogues bound equally well to GST-RhoA and GST-RhoC. Comparisons of the GST-Rab7 and GST-RhoA GTP-binding pockets provide a structural basis for the observed binding differences. In sum, the flow cytometric assay can be used to measure nucleotide binding properties of GTPases in real-time and quantitatively assess differences between GTPases. PMID:18638444

  3. A homogeneous method to measure nucleotide exchange by α-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins using fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Muller, Robin E; Klein, Klara R; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Siderovski, David P; Kimple, Adam J

    2010-10-01

    The mainstay of assessing guanosine diphosphate release by the α-subunit of a heterotrimeric G-protein is the [³⁵S]guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) radionucleotide-binding assay. This assay requires separation of protein-bound GTPγS from free GTPγS at multiple time points followed by quantification via liquid scintillation. The arduous nature of this assay makes it difficult to quickly characterize multiple mutants, determine the effects of individual variables (e.g., temperature and Mg(2+) concentration) on nucleotide exchange, or screen for small molecule modulators of Gα nucleotide binding/cycling properties. Here, we describe a robust, homogeneous, fluorescence polarization assay using a red-shifted fluorescent GTPγS probe that can rapidly determine the rate of GTPγS binding by Gα subunits. PMID:20662737

  4. A Homogeneous Method to Measure Nucleotide Exchange by α-Subunits of Heterotrimeric G-Proteins Using Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robin E.; Klein, Klara R.; Hutsell, Stephanie Q.; Kimple, Adam J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The mainstay of assessing guanosine diphosphate release by the α-subunit of a heterotrimeric G-protein is the [35S]guanosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) radionucleotide-binding assay. This assay requires separation of protein-bound GTPγS from free GTPγS at multiple time points followed by quantification via liquid scintillation. The arduous nature of this assay makes it difficult to quickly characterize multiple mutants, determine the effects of individual variables (e.g., temperature and Mg2+ concentration) on nucleotide exchange, or screen for small molecule modulators of Gα nucleotide binding/cycling properties. Here, we describe a robust, homogeneous, fluorescence polarization assay using a red-shifted fluorescent GTPγS probe that can rapidly determine the rate of GTPγS binding by Gα subunits. PMID:20662737

  5. Structural insights into the dual nucleotide exchange and GDI displacement activity of SidM/DrrA

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hye-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ku, Bonsu; Choi, Sung-Jin; Woo, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2010-01-01

    GDP-bound prenylated Rabs, sequestered by GDI (GDP dissociation inhibitor) in the cytosol, are delivered to destined sub-cellular compartment and subsequently activated by GEFs (guanine nucleotide exchange factors) catalysing GDP-to-GTP exchange. The dissociation of GDI from Rabs is believed to require a GDF (GDI displacement factor). Only two RabGDFs, human PRA-1 and Legionella pneumophila SidM/DrrA, have been identified so far and the molecular mechanism of GDF is elusive. Here, we present the structure of a SidM/DrrA fragment possessing dual GEF and GDF activity in complex with Rab1. SidM/DrrA reconfigures the Switch regions of the GTPase domain of Rab1, as eukaryotic GEFs do toward cognate Rabs. Structure-based mutational analyses show that the surface of SidM/DrrA, catalysing nucleotide exchange, is involved in GDI1 displacement from prenylated Rab1:GDP. In comparison with an eukaryotic GEF TRAPP I, this bacterial GEF/GDF exhibits high binding affinity for Rab1 with GDP retained at the active site, which appears as the key feature for the GDF activity of the protein. PMID:19942850

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations and coupled nucleotide substitution experiments indicate the nature of A·A base pairing and a putative structure of the coralyne-induced homo-adenine duplex

    PubMed Central

    Hud, Nicholas V.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Coralyne is an alkaloid drug that binds homo-adenine DNA (and RNA) oligonucleotides more tightly than it does Watson–Crick DNA. Hud’s laboratory has shown that poly(dA) in the presence of coralyne forms an anti-parallel duplex, however attempts to determine the structure by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography have been unsuccessful. Assuming adenine–adenine hydrogen bonding between the two poly(dA) strands, we constructed 40 hypothetical homo-(dA) anti-parallel duplexes and docked coralyne into the six most favorable duplex structures. The two most stable structures had trans glycosidic bonds, but distinct pairing geometries, i.e. either Watson–Crick Hoogsteen (transWH) or Watson–Crick Watson–Crick (transWW) with stability of transWH > transWW. To narrow down the possibilities, 7-deaza adenine base substitutions (dA→7) were engineered into homo-(dA) sequences. These substitutions significantly reduced the thermal stability of the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) structure. These experiments strongly suggest the involvement of N7 in the coralyne-induced A·A base pairs. Moreover, due to the differential effect on melting as a function of the location of the dA→7 mutations, these results are consistent with the N1–N7 base pairing of the transWH pairs. Together, the simulation and base substitution experiments predict that the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) duplex structure adopts the transWH geometry. PMID:19850721

  7. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  8. BiP and its Nucleotide Exchange Factors Grp170 and Sil1: Mechanisms of Action and Biological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Julia; Feige, Matthias J.; Hendershot, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    BiP is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) orthologue of the Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones and is intricately involved in most functions of this organelle through its interactions with a variety of substrates and regulatory proteins. Like all Hsp70 family members, the ability of BiP to bind and release unfolded proteins is tightly regulated by a cycle of ATP binding, hydrolysis, and nucleotide exchange. As a characteristic of the Hsp70 family, multiple DnaJ-like co-factors exist that can target substrates to BiP and stimulate its ATPase activity to stabilize the binding of BiP to substrates. However, only in the past decade have nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) for BiP been identified, which has shed light not only on the mechanism of BiP assisted folding in the ER but also on Hsp70 family members that reside throughout the cell. We will review the current understanding of the ATPase cycle of BiP in the unique environment of the ER and how it is regulated by the NEFs, Grp170 and Sil1, both of which perform unanticipated roles in various biological functions and disease states. PMID:25698114

  9. Ric-8A catalyzes guanine nucleotide exchange on G alphai1 bound to the GPR/GoLoco exchange inhibitor AGS3.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celestine J; Tall, Gregory G; Adhikari, Anirban; Sprang, Stephen R

    2008-08-22

    Microtubule pulling forces that govern mitotic spindle movement of chromosomes are tightly regulated by G-proteins. A host of proteins, including Galpha subunits, Ric-8, AGS3, regulators of G-protein signalings, and scaffolding proteins, coordinate this vital cellular process. Ric-8A, acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, catalyzes the release of GDP from various Galpha.GDP subunits and forms a stable nucleotide-free Ric-8A:Galpha complex. AGS3, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI), binds and stabilizes Galpha subunits in their GDP-bound state. Because Ric-8A and AGS3 may recognize and compete for Galpha.GDP in this pathway, we probed the interactions of a truncated AGS3 (AGS3-C; containing only the residues responsible for GDI activity), with Ric-8A:Galpha(il) and that of Ric-8A with the AGS3-C:Galpha(il).GDP complex. Pulldown assays, gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and rapid mixing stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy indicate that Ric-8A catalyzes the rapid release of GDP from AGS3-C:Galpha(i1).GDP. Thus, Ric-8A forms a transient ternary complex with AGS3-C:Galpha(i1).GDP. Subsequent dissociation of AGS3-C and GDP from Galpha(i1) yields a stable nucleotide free Ric-8A.Galpha(i1) complex that, in the presence of GTP, dissociates to yield Ric-8A and Galpha(i1).GTP. AGS3-C does not induce dissociation of the Ric-8A.Galpha(i1) complex, even when present at very high concentrations. The action of Ric-8A on AGS3:Galpha(i1).GDP ensures unidirectional activation of Galpha subunits that cannot be reversed by AGS3. PMID:18541531

  10. Identification of Arabidopsis Cyclase-associated Protein 1 as the First Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Plant Actin

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP–actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP– and ATP–monomeric actin (Kd ∼ 1.3 μM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP–actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux of

  11. SUMO and ubiquitin-dependent XPC exchange drives nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    van Cuijk, Loes; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Turkyilmaz, Yasemin; Poulsen, Sara L.; Janssens, Roel C.; Theil, Arjan F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lans, Hannes; Mailand, Niels; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A.

    2015-01-01

    XPC recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates their removal by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Damage recognition in NER is tightly controlled by ubiquitin and SUMO modifications. Recent studies have shown that the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF111 promotes K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC after DNA damage. However, the exact regulatory function of these modifications in vivo remains elusive. Here we show that RNF111 is required for efficient repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions. RNF111-mediated ubiquitylation promotes the release of XPC from damaged DNA after NER initiation, and is needed for stable incorporation of the NER endonucleases XPG and ERCC1/XPF. Our data suggest that RNF111, together with the CRL4DDB2 ubiquitin ligase complex, is responsible for sequential XPC ubiquitylation, which regulates the recruitment and release of XPC and is crucial for efficient progression of the NER reaction, thereby providing an extra layer of quality control of NER. PMID:26151477

  12. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  13. New insights into the dimerization of small GTPase Rac/ROP guanine nucleotide exchange factors in rice

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Akira; Uno, Kazumi; Kato, Midori; Wong, Hann Ling; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Molecular links between receptor-kinases and Rac/ROP family small GTPases mediated by activator guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) govern diverse biological processes. However, it is unclear how the Rac/ROP GTPases orchestrate such a wide variety of activities. Here, we show that rice OsRacGEF1 forms homodimers, and heterodimers with OsRacGEF2, at the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). OsRacGEF2 does not bind directly to the receptor-like kinase (RLK) OsCERK1, but forms a complex with OsCERK1 through OsRacGEF1 at the ER. This complex is transported from ER to the PM and there associates with OsRac1, resulting in the formation of a stable immune complex. Such RLK-GEF heterodimer complexes may explain the diversity of Rac/ROP family GTPase signalings. PMID:26251883

  14. Superoxide Inhibits Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Action on Ras, but not on Rho, through Desensitization of Ras to GEF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are molecular switches for various vital cellular signaling pathways. Overactivation of these GTPases often causes development of cancer. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and oxidants function to upregulate these GTPases through facilitation of guanine nucleotide exchange (GNE) of these GTPases. However, the effect of oxidants on GEF functions, or vice versa, has not been known. We show that, via targeting Ras Cys51, an oxidant inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25—the catalytic domain of RasGEFs—on Ras. However, the enhancement of Ras GNE by an oxidant continues regardless of the presence of Cdc25. Limiting RasGEF action by an oxidant may function to prevent the pathophysiological overactivation of Ras in the presence of both RasGEFs and oxidants. The continuous exposure of Ras to nitric oxide and its derivatives can form S-nitrosated Ras (Ras-SNO). This study also shows that an oxidant not only inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25 on Ras-SNO but also fails to enhance Ras-SNO GNE. This lack of enhancement then populates the biologically inactive Ras-SNO in cells, which may function to prevent the continued redox signaling of the Ras pathophysiological response. Finally, this study also demonstrates that, unlike the case with RasGEFs, an oxidant does not inhibit the catalytic action of RhoGEF—Vav or Dbs—on Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA, RhoC, and Cdc42. This result explains the results of the previous study in which, despite the presence of an oxidant, the catalytic action of Dbs in cells continued to enhance RhoC GNE. PMID:24422478

  15. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  16. Real-time NMR Study of Three Small GTPases Reveals That Fluorescent 2′(3′)-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl)-tagged Nucleotides Alter Hydrolysis and Exchange Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T.; Marshall, Christopher B.; Smith, Matthew; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M. C.; Stambolic, Vuk; Rottapel, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The Ras family of small GTPases control diverse signaling pathways through a conserved “switch” mechanism, which is turned on by binding of GTP and turned off by GTP hydrolysis to GDP. Full understanding of GTPase switch functions requires reliable, quantitative assays for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. Fluorescently labeled guanine nucleotides, such as 2′(3′)-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) (mant)-substituted GTP and GDP analogs, have been widely used to investigate the molecular properties of small GTPases, including Ras and Rho. Using a recently developed NMR method, we show that the kinetics of nucleotide hydrolysis and exchange by three small GTPases, alone and in the presence of their cognate GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors, are affected by the presence of the fluorescent mant moiety. Intrinsic hydrolysis of mantGTP by Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is ∼10 times faster than that of GTP, whereas it is 3.4 times slower with RhoA. On the other hand, the mant tag inhibits TSC2GAP-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Rheb but promotes p120 RasGAP-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by H-Ras. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor-catalyzed nucleotide exchange for both H-Ras and RhoA was inhibited by mant-substituted nucleotides, and the degree of inhibition depends highly on the GTPase and whether the assay measures association of mantGTP with, or dissociation of mantGDP from the GTPase. These results indicate that the mant moiety has significant and unpredictable effects on GTPase reaction kinetics and underscore the importance of validating its use in each assay. PMID:20018863

  17. Insights into the Molecular Activation Mechanism of the RhoA-specific Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect

    Bielnicki, Jakub A.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Derewenda, Urszula; Somlyo, Avril V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-10-09

    PDZRhoGEF (PRG) belongs to a small family of RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors that mediates signaling through select G-protein-coupled receptors via G{alpha}{sub 12/13} and activates RhoA by catalyzing the exchange of GDP to GTP. PRG is a multidomain protein composed of PDZ, regulators of G-protein signaling-like (RGSL), Dbl-homology (DH), and pleckstrin-homology (PH) domains. It is autoinhibited in cytosol and is believed to undergo a conformational rearrangement and translocation to the membrane for full activation, although the molecular details of the regulation mechanism are not clear. It has been shown recently that the main autoregulatory elements of PDZRhoGEF, the autoinhibitory 'activation box' and the 'GEF switch,' which is required for full activation, are located directly upstream of the catalytic DH domain and its RhoA binding surface, emphasizing the functional role of the RGSL-DH linker. Here, using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, we show that the mechanism of PRG regulation is yet more complex and may involve an additional autoinhibitory element in the form of a molten globule region within the linker between RGSL and DH domains. We propose a novel, two-tier model of autoinhibition where the activation box and the molten globule region act synergistically to impair the ability of RhoA to bind to the catalytic DH-PH tandem. The molten globule region and the activation box become less ordered in the PRG-RhoA complex and dissociate from the RhoA-binding site, which may constitute a critical step leading to PRG activation.

  18. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor OSG-1 Confers Functional Aging via Dysregulated Rho Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhibing; Sesti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Rho signaling regulates a variety of biological processes, but whether it is implicated in aging remains an open question. Here we show that a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Dbl family, OSG-1, confers functional aging by dysregulating Rho GTPases activities in C. elegans. Thus, gene reporter analysis revealed widespread OSG-1 expression in muscle and neurons. Loss of OSG-1 gene function was not associated with developmental defects. In contrast, suppression of OSG-1 lessened loss of function (chemotaxis) in ASE sensory neurons subjected to conditions of oxidative stress generated during natural aging, by oxidative challenges, or by genetic mutations. RNAi analysis showed that OSG-1 was specific toward activation of RHO-1 GTPase signaling. RNAi further implicated actin-binding proteins ARX-3 and ARX-5, thus the actin cytoskeleton, as one of the targets of OSG-1/RHO-1 signaling. Taken together these data suggest that OSG-1 is recruited under conditions of oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging, and contributes to promote loss of neuronal function by affecting the actin cytoskeleton via altered RHO-1 activity. PMID:25527286

  19. Critical function of RA-GEF-2/Rapgef6, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rap1, in mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keisuke; Miyake, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Chiba, Koji; Maeta, Kazuhiro; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Edamatsu, Hironori; Kataoka, Tohru; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-02-28

    Small GTPase Rap1 has been implicated in the proper differentiation of testicular germ cells. In the present study, we investigated the functional significance of RA-GEF-2/Rapgef6, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rap1, in testicular differentiation using mice lacking RA-GEF-2. RA-GEF-2 was expressed predominantly on the luminal side of the seminiferous tubules in wild-type mice. No significant differences were observed in the body weights or hormonal parameters of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) and wild-type mice. However, the testes of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) male mice were significantly smaller than those of wild-type mice and were markedly atrophied as well as hypospermatogenic. The concentration and motility of epididymal sperm were also markedly reduced and frequently had an abnormal shape. The pregnancy rate and number of fetuses were markedly lower in wild-type females after they mated with RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) males than with wild-type males, which demonstrated the male infertility phenotype of RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) mice. Furthermore, a significant reduction and alteration were observed in the expression level and cell junctional localization of N-cadherin, respectively, in RA-GEF-2(-)(/)(-) testes, which may, at least in part, account for the defects in testicular differentiation and spermatogenesis in these mice. PMID:24491570

  20. Bisphenol A binds to Ras proteins and competes with guanine nucleotide exchange: implications for GTPase-selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schöpel, Miriam; Jockers, Katharina F G; Düppe, Peter M; Autzen, Jasmin; Potheraveedu, Veena N; Ince, Semra; Yip, King Tuo; Heumann, Rolf; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2013-12-12

    We show for the first time that bisphenol A (10) has the capacity to interact directly with K-Ras and that Rheb weakly binds to bisphenol A (10) and 4,4'-biphenol derivatives. We have characterized these interactions at atomic resolution suggesting that these compounds sterically interfere with the Sos-mediated nucleotide exchange in H- and K-Ras. We show that 4,4'-biphenol (5) selectively inhibits Rheb signaling and induces cell death suggesting that this compound might be a novel candidate for treatment of tuberous sclerosis-mediated tumor growth. Our results propose a new mode of action for bisphenol A (10) that advocates a reduced exposure to this compound in our environment. Our data may lay the foundation for the future design of GTPase-selective antagonists with higher affinity to benefit of the treatment of cancer because K-Ras inhibition is regarded to be a promising strategy with a potential therapeutic window for targeting Sos in Ras-driven tumors. PMID:24266771

  1. Activation of the Small G Protein Arf6 by Dynamin2 through Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors in Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Risa; Yamauchi, Yohei; Hongu, Tsunaki; Funakoshi, Yuji; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The small G protein Arf6 and the GTPase dynamin2 (Dyn2) play key roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). However, their functional relationship remains obscure. Here, we show that Arf6 functions as a downstream molecule of Dyn2 in CME. Wild type of Dyn2 overexpressed in HeLa cells markedly activates Arf6, while a GTPase-lacking Dyn2 mutant does not. Of the Arf6-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors, EFA6A, EFA6B, and EFA6D specifically interact with Dyn2. Furthermore, overexpression of dominant negative mutants or knockdown of EFA6B and EFA6D significantly inhibit Dyn2-induced Arf6 activation. Finally, overexpression of the binding region peptide of EFA6B for Dyn2 or knockdown of EFA6B and EFA6D significantly suppresses clathrin-mediated transferrin uptake. These results provide evidence for a novel Arf6 activation mechanism by Dyn2 through EFA6B and EFA6D in CME in a manner dependent upon the GTPase activity of Dyn2. PMID:26503427

  2. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP. PMID:25877869

  3. RINL, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Rab5-Subfamily, Is Involved in the EphA8-Degradation Pathway with Odin

    PubMed Central

    Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference)-like (RINL), which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM) domain-containing (Anks) protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin. PMID:22291991

  4. RINL, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rab5-subfamily, is involved in the EphA8-degradation pathway with odin.

    PubMed

    Kajiho, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Shinichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference)-like (RINL), which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM) domain-containing (Anks) protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin. PMID:22291991

  5. Degenerate specificity of PDZ domains from RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG.

    PubMed

    Smietana, Katarzyna; Kasztura, Monika; Paduch, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Derewenda, Zygmunt S; Otlewski, Jacek

    2008-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous protein-protein interaction modules which bind short, usually carboxyterminal fragments of receptors, other integral or membrane-associated proteins, and occasionally cytosolic proteins. Their role in organizing multiprotein complexes at the cellular membrane is crucial for many signaling pathways, but the rules defining their binding specificity are still poorly understood and do not readily explain the observed diversity of their known binding partners. Two homologous RhoA-specific, multidomain nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG contain PDZ domains which show a particularly broad recognition profile, as suggested by the identification of five diverse biological targets. To investigate the molecular roots of this phenomenon, we constructed a phage display library of random carboxyterminal hexapeptides. Peptide variants corresponding to the sequences identified in library selection were synthesized and their affinities for both PDZ domains were measured and compared with those of peptides derived from sequences of natural partners. Based on the analysis of the binding sequences identified for PDZRhoGEF, we propose a sequence for an 'optimal' binding partner. Our results support the hypothesis that PDZ-peptide interactions may be best understood when one considers the sum of entropic and dynamic effects for each peptide as a whole entity, rather than preferences for specific residues at a given position. PMID:18542831

  6. ELMO1 and Dock180, a bipartite Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, promote human glioma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jarzynka, Michael J; Hu, Bo; Hui, Kwok-Min; Bar-Joseph, Ifat; Gu, Weisong; Hirose, Takanori; Haney, Lisa B; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Nishikawa, Ryo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A distinct feature of malignant gliomas is the intrinsic ability of single tumor cells to disperse throughout the brain, contributing to the failure of existing therapies to alter the progression and recurrence of these deadly brain tumors. Regrettably, the mechanisms underlying the inherent invasiveness of glioma cells are poorly understood. Here, we report for the first time that engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) and dedicator of cytokinesis 1 (Dock180), a bipartite Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), are evidently linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of primary human glioma specimens showed high expression levels of ELMO1 and Dock180 in actively invading tumor cells in the invasive areas, but not in the central regions of these tumors. Elevated expression of ELMO1 and Dock180 was also found in various human glioma cell lines compared with normal human astrocytes. Inhibition of endogenous ELMO1 and Dock180 expression significantly impeded glioma cell invasion in vitro and in brain tissue slices with a concomitant reduction in Rac1 activation. Conversely, exogenous expression of ELMO1 and Dock180 in glioma cells with low level endogenous expression increased their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and in brain tissue. These data suggest that the bipartite GEF, ELMO1 and Dock180, play an important role in promoting cancer cell invasion and could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diffuse malignant gliomas. PMID:17671188

  7. Expanding functions of GIT Arf GTPase-activating proteins, PIX Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GIT-PIX complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Li, Xiaobo; Premont, Richard T

    2016-05-15

    The GIT proteins, GIT1 and GIT2, are GTPase-activating proteins (inactivators) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small GTP-binding proteins, and function to limit the activity of Arf proteins. The PIX proteins, α-PIX and β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6 and ARHGEF7, respectively), are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (activators) for the Rho family small GTP-binding protein family members Rac1 and Cdc42. Through their multi-domain structures, GIT and PIX proteins can also function as signaling scaffolds by binding to numerous protein partners. Importantly, the constitutive association of GIT and PIX proteins into oligomeric GIT-PIX complexes allows these two proteins to function together as subunits of a larger structure that coordinates two distinct small GTP-binding protein pathways and serves as multivalent scaffold for the partners of both constituent subunits. Studies have revealed the involvement of GIT and PIX proteins, and of the GIT-PIX complex, in numerous fundamental cellular processes through a wide variety of mechanisms, pathways and signaling partners. In this Commentary, we discuss recent findings in key physiological systems that exemplify current understanding of the function of this important regulatory complex. Further, we draw attention to gaps in crucial information that remain to be filled to allow a better understanding of the many roles of the GIT-PIX complex in health and disease. PMID:27182061

  8. Activation of Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8 by ERK1/2 in response to EGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juanfei; Ren, Jinqi; Wu, Bin; Feng, Shanshan; Cai, Guoping; Tuluc, Florin; Peränen, Johan; Guo, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Exocytosis is tightly regulated in many cellular processes, from neurite expansion to tumor proliferation. Rab8, a member of the Rab family of small GTPases, plays an important role in membrane trafficking from the trans-Golgi network and recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane. Rabin8 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and major activator of Rab8. Investigating how Rabin8 is activated in cells is thus pivotal to the understanding of the regulation of exocytosis. Here we show that phosphorylation serves as an important mechanism for Rabin8 activation. We identified Rabin8 as a direct phospho-substrate of ERK1/2 in response to EGF signaling. At the molecular level, ERK phosphorylation relieves the autoinhibition of Rabin8, thus promoting its GEF activity. We further demonstrate that blocking ERK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of Rabin8 inhibits transferrin recycling to the plasma membrane. Together, our results suggest that ERK1/2 activate Rabin8 to regulate vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane in response to extracellular signaling. PMID:25535387

  9. Sil1, a nucleotide exchange factor for BiP, is not required for antibody assembly or secretion.

    PubMed

    Ichhaporia, Viraj P; Sanford, Tyler; Howes, Jenny; Marion, Tony N; Hendershot, Linda M

    2015-02-01

    Sil1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP, and mutations in this gene lead to Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS), a debilitating autosomal recessive disease characterized by multisystem defects. A mouse model for MSS was previously produced by disrupting Sil1 using gene-trap methodology. The resulting Sil1Gt mouse phenocopies several pathologies associated with MSS, although its ability to assemble and secrete antibodies, the best-characterized substrate of BiP, has not been investigated. In vivo antigen-specific immunizations and ex vivo LPS stimulation of splenic B cells revealed that the Sil1Gt mouse was indistinguishable from wild-type age-matched controls in terms of both the kinetics and magnitude of antigen-specific antibody responses. There was no significant accumulation of BiP-associated Ig assembly intermediates or evidence that another molecular chaperone system was used for antibody production in the LPS-stimulated splenic B cells from Sil1Gt mice. ER chaperones were expressed at the same level in Sil1WT and Sil1Gt mice, indicating that there was no evident compensation for the disruption of Sil1. Finally, these results were confirmed and extended in three human EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from individuals with MSS, leading us to conclude that the BiP cofactor Sil1 is dispensable for antibody production. PMID:25473114

  10. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence*

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L.; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly 15N-labeled Ras as well as [13C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  11. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  12. Identification of Intersubunit Domain Interactions within Eukaryotic Initiation Factor (eIF) 2B, the Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Translation Initiation*

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Peter J.; Mohammad-Qureshi, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic translation initiation, eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) required for reactivation of the G protein eIF2 between rounds of protein synthesis initiation. eIF2B is unusually complex with five subunits (α–ϵ) necessary for GEF activity and its control by phosphorylation of eIF2α. In addition, inherited mutations in eIF2B cause a fatal leukoencephalopathy. Here we describe experiments examining domains of eIF2Bγ and ϵ that both share sequence and predicted tertiary structure similarity with a family of phospho-hexose sugar nucleotide pyrophosphorylases. Firstly, using a genetic approach, we find no evidence to support a significant role for a potential nucleotide-binding region within the pyrophosphorylase-like domain (PLD) of eIF2Bϵ for nucleotide exchange. These findings are at odds with one mechanism for nucleotide exchange proposed previously. By using a series of constructs and a co-expression and precipitation strategy, we find that the eIF2Bϵ and -γ PLDs and a shared second domain predicted to form a left-handed β helix are all critical for interprotein interactions between eIF2B subunits necessary for eIF2B complex formation. We have identified extensive interactions between the PLDs and left-handed β helix domains that form the eIF2Bγϵ subcomplex and propose a model for domain interactions between eIF2B subunits. PMID:22238343

  13. The Ect2 Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Is Essential for Early Mouse Development and Normal Cell Cytokinesis and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Danielle R.; Solski, Patricia A.; Bultman, Scott J.; Kauselmann, Gunther; Schoor, Michael; Kuehn, Ralf; Friedman, Lori S.; Cowley, Dale O.; Van Dyke, Terry; Yeh, Jen Jen; Johnson, Leisa

    2011-01-01

    Ect2 is a member of the human Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) that serve as activators of Rho family small GTPases. Although Ect2 is one of at least 25 RhoGEFs that can activate the RhoA small GTPase, cell culture studies using established cell lines determined that Ect2 is essential for mammalian cell cytokinesis and proliferation. To address the function of Ect2 in normal mammalian development, we performed gene targeting to generate Ect2 knockout mice. The heterozygous Ect2 +/– mice showed normal development and life span, indicating that Ect2 haplodeficiency was not deleterious for development or growth. In contrast, Ect2 –/– embryos were not found at birth or postimplantation stages. Ect2 –/– blastocysts were recovered at embryonic day 3.5 but did not give rise to viable outgrowths in culture, indicating that Ect2 is required for peri-implantation development. To further assess the importance of Ect2 in normal cell physiology, we isolated primary fibroblasts from Ect2 fl/fl embryos (MEFs) and ablated Ect2 using adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase. We observed a significant increase in multinucleated cells and accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, consistent with a role for Ect2 in cytokinesis. Ect2 deficiency also caused enlargement of the cytoplasm and impaired cell migration. Finally, although Ect2-dependent activation of RhoA has been implicated in cytokinesis, Ect2 can also activate Rac1 and Cdc42 to cause growth transformation. Surprisingly, ectopic expression of constitutively activated RhoA, Rac1, or Cdc42, known substrates of Ect2, failed to phenocopy Ect2 and did not rescue the defect in cytokinesis caused by loss of Ect2. In summary, our results establish the unique role of Ect2 in development and normal cell proliferation. PMID:22701760

  14. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Asef2 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation via Rac Activation and Spinophilin-dependent Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. Corey; Robinson, Cristina M.; Shi, Mingjian; Webb, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are actin-rich protrusions that establish excitatory synaptic contacts with surrounding neurons. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for the development and plasticity of dendritic spines, which is the basis for learning and memory. Rho family GTPases are emerging as important modulators of spines and synapses, predominantly through their ability to regulate actin dynamics. Much less is known, however, about the function of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which activate these GTPases, in spine and synapse development. In this study we show that the Rho family GEF Asef2 is found at synaptic sites, where it promotes dendritic spine and synapse formation. Knockdown of endogenous Asef2 with shRNAs impairs spine and synapse formation, whereas exogenous expression of Asef2 causes an increase in spine and synapse density. This effect of Asef2 on spines and synapses is abrogated by expression of GEF activity-deficient Asef2 mutants or by knockdown of Rac, suggesting that Asef2-Rac signaling mediates spine development. Because Asef2 interacts with the F-actin-binding protein spinophilin, which localizes to spines, we investigated the role of spinophilin in Asef2-promoted spine formation. Spinophilin recruits Asef2 to spines, and knockdown of spinophilin hinders spine and synapse formation in Asef2-expressing neurons. Furthermore, inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) activity blocks spinophilin-mediated localization of Asef2 to spines. These results collectively point to spinophilin-Asef2-Rac signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of dendritic spines and synapses. PMID:25750125

  15. Regulating the large Sec7 ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors: the when, where and how of activation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John; Kahn, Richard A.; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require selective sorting and transport of cargo between intracellular compartments. This is accomplished at least in part by vesicles that bud from a donor compartment, sequestering a subset of resident protein “cargos” destined for transport to an acceptor compartment. A key step in vesicle formation and targeting is the recruitment of specific proteins that form a coat on the outside of the vesicle in a process requiring the activation of regulatory GTPases of the ARF family. Like all such GTPases, ARFs cycle between inactive, GDP-bound, and membrane-associated active, GTP-bound, conformations. And like most regulatory GTPases the activating step is slow and thought to be rate limiting in cells, requiring the use of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEFs). ARF GEFs are characterized by the presence of a conserved, catalytic Sec7 domain, though they also contain motifs or additional domains that confer specificity to localization and regulation of activity. These domains have been used to define and classify five different sub-families of ARF GEFs. One of these, the BIG/GBF1 family, includes three proteins that are each key regulators of the secretory pathway. GEF activity initiates the coating of nascent vesicles via the localized generation of activated ARFs and thus these GEFs are the upstream regulators that define the site and timing of vesicle production. Paradoxically, while we have detailed molecular knowledge of how GEFs activate ARFs, we know very little about how GEFs are recruited and/or activated at the right time and place to initiate transport. This review summarizes the current knowledge of GEF regulation and explores the still uncertain mechanisms that position GEFs at “budding ready” membrane sites to generate highly localized activated ARFs. PMID:24728583

  16. Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 Increases Lung Cancer Cell Tumorigenesis via MMP-2 and Cyclin D1 Upregulation.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Wu, Wei; Yang, Kang; Tan, Deli; Tang, Meng; Liu, Hongxiang; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Shixin; Wang, Haidong

    2015-07-01

    We sought to elucidate the role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5) in tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma cells. ARHGEF5 protein levels were assessed in 91 human lung adenocarcinoma specimens, and A549 and NCI-H1650 cells, by IHC and Western blotting. In addition, ARHGEF5 mRNA expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Furthermore, ARHGEF5 long and short isoform coexpression was detected by immunofluorescence. Finally, flow cytometry; CCK8 and wound-healing assays; cell invasion, migration and adhesion; and xenografts were used to evaluate the biologic significance of ARHGEF5. ARHGEF5 was significantly increased in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines. Interestingly, ARHGEF5 levels were significantly associated with tumor grade and pathologic stage, but not age, gender, T stage, or lymph node metastasis status. ARHGEF5 knockdown by RNAi resulted in dramatically reduced proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migratory capability of A549 and NCI-H1650 cells. Likewise, protein levels of p-Src, p-Akt, and NF-κB were significantly decreased after ARHGEF5 knockdown. In parallel, increased S-phase population and MMP-2/cyclin D1 expression were observed in the cancer cells, which were not apoptotic. In addition, ARHGEF5 knockdown A549 and NCI-H1650 cells injected s.c. and i.v. into nude mice exhibited decreased xenograft volume and overtly reduced metastasis. Conversely, ARHGEF5 overexpression in A549 and NCI-H1650 cells increased their tumorigenicity in vitro. ARHGEF5 acts as a proto-oncogene in human lung adenocarcinoma cell tumorigenesis. PMID:25777963

  17. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders. PMID:25485589

  18. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  19. Defective Guanine Nucleotide Exchange in the Elongation Factor-like 1 (EFL1) GTPase by Mutations in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Protein*

    PubMed Central

    García-Márquez, Adrián; Gijsbers, Abril; de la Mora, Eugenio; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is orchestrated by the action of several accessory factors that provide time and directionality to the process. One such accessory factor is the GTPase EFL1 involved in the cytoplasmic maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. EFL1 and SBDS, the protein mutated in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), release the anti-association factor eIF6 from the surface of the ribosomal subunit 60S. Here we report a kinetic analysis of fluorescent guanine nucleotides binding to EFL1 alone and in the presence of SBDS using fluorescence stopped-flow spectroscopy. Binding kinetics of EFL1 to both GDP and GTP suggests a two-step mechanism with an initial binding event followed by a conformational change of the complex. Furthermore, the same behavior was observed in the presence of the SBDS protein irrespective of the guanine nucleotide evaluated. The affinity of EFL1 for GTP is 10-fold lower than that calculated for GDP. Association of EFL1 to SBDS did not modify the affinity for GTP but dramatically decreased that for GDP by increasing the dissociation rate of the nucleotide. Thus, SBDS acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for EFL1 promoting its activation by the release of GDP. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy measurements showed that the S143L mutation present in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome altered a surface epitope for EFL1 and largely decreased the affinity for it. These results suggest that loss of interaction between these proteins due to mutations in the disease consequently prevents the nucleotide exchange regulation the SBDS exerts on EFL1. PMID:25991726

  20. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; et al

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allostericmore » AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.« less

  1. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W; Gu, Xin; Tan, M H Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Together, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions. PMID:25412657

  2. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.

  3. Adenine nucleotide pool variations in intact Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells.

    PubMed

    Eigener, U

    1975-03-10

    1. The ATP pool in Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells was determined by means of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system and the ADP and AMP pools were measured after enzymatic conversion into ATP. 2. In the first 10 min after addition of nitrite to endogenously respiring cells, which had stood for 5--16 days after completion of the nitrite oxidation, the ATP pool dropped about 60%. 3. During the log phase the ATP pool was approx. 20--40 pmoles/5 mug cell-N. During growth it increased exponentially by 3--4 times the amount until the nitrite had been used up. Subsquently the ATP pool decreased at first rapidly and then more slowly without sinking to 0 in the first 2 months after nitrification. 4. Nitrite oxidizing cells had an energy charge of 0.37 during the log-phase. After approx. 90% of the substrate had been used up the energy charge had reached 0.57. 5. If the CO2 assimilation was inhibited in growing cultures by increased oxygen partial pressure, nitrite oxidation continued but the ATP pool increased. 6. The ATP pool and the activity of the endogenous respiration decreased by more than 50% during the first hours after the substrate had been used up. PMID:808183

  4. Nucleotide chloramines and neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernofsky, C

    1991-03-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxidant formed as an end product of the respiratory burst in activated neutrophils. It is responsible for killing bacteria and has been implicated in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury associated with the inflammatory process. Although hypochlorite is a potent cytotoxic agent, the primary mechanism by which it exerts its effect is unclear. This review examines evidence that the primary event in hypochlorite cytotoxicity is the loss of adenine nucleotides from the target cell. This loss appears to be mediated by the formation of adenine nucleotide chloramines which are reactive intermediates with a free radical character and are capable of forming stable ligands with proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:1848195

  5. Profilin Binding to Poly-l-Proline and Actin Monomers along with Ability to Catalyze Actin Nucleotide Exchange Is Required for Viability of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the ability of 87 profilin point mutations to complement temperature-sensitive and null mutations of the single profilin gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We compared the biochemical properties of 13 stable noncomplementing profilins with an equal number of complementing profilin mutants. A large quantitative database revealed the following: 1) in a profilin null background fission yeast grow normally with profilin mutations having >10% of wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline, but lower affinity for either ligand is incompatible with life; 2) in the cdc3-124 profilin ts background, fission yeast function with profilin having only 2–5% wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline; and 3) special mutations show that the ability of profilin to catalyze nucleotide exchange by actin is an essential function. Thus, poly-l-proline binding, actin binding, and actin nucleotide exchange are each independent requirements for profilin function in fission yeast. PMID:11294914

  6. Nuclear localization and molecular partners of BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Philip Ian; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2004-03-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein 1 (BIG1) is an approximately 200-kDa brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein that preferentially activates ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) and ARF3. BIG1 was found in cytosol in a multiprotein complex with a similar ARF-activating protein, BIG2, which is also an A kinase-anchoring protein. In HepG2 cells growing with serum, BIG1 was primarily cytosolic and Golgi-associated. After incubation overnight without serum, a large fraction of endogenous BIG1 was in the nuclei. By confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, BIG1 was localized with nucleoporin p62 at the nuclear envelope (probably during nucleocytoplasmic transport) and also in nucleoli, clearly visible against the less concentrated overall matrix staining. BIG1 was also identified by Western blot analyses in purified subnuclear fractions (e.g., nucleoli and nuclear matrix). Antibodies against BIG1, nucleoporin, or nucleolin coimmunoprecipitated the other two proteins from purified nuclei. In contrast, BIG2 was not associated with nuclear BIG1. Also of note, ARF was never detected among proteins precipitated from purified nuclei by anti-BIG1 antibodies, although microscopically the two proteins do appear sometimes to be colocalized in the nucleus. These data are consistent with independent intracellular movements and actions of BIG1 and BIG2, and they are also evidence of the participation of BIG1 in both Golgi and nuclear functions. PMID:14973189

  7. Cytosolic splice isoform of Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Fes1 is required for the degradation of misfolded proteins in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Masser, Anna E; Kang, Wenjing; Friedländer, Marc R; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-04-15

    Cells maintain proteostasis by selectively recognizing and targeting misfolded proteins for degradation. InSaccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Fes1 is essential for the degradation of chaperone-associated misfolded proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we show that theFES1transcript undergoes unique 3' alternative splicing that results in two equally active isoforms with alternative C-termini, Fes1L and Fes1S. Fes1L is actively targeted to the nucleus and represents the first identified nuclear Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor. In contrast, Fes1S localizes to the cytosol and is essential to maintain proteostasis. In the absence of Fes1S, the heat-shock response is constitutively induced at normally nonstressful conditions. Moreover, cells display severe growth defects when elevated temperatures, amino acid analogues, or the ectopic expression of misfolded proteins, induce protein misfolding. Importantly, misfolded proteins are not targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. These observations support the notion that cytosolic Fes1S maintains proteostasis by supporting the removal of toxic misfolded proteins by proteasomal degradation. This study provides key findings for the understanding of the organization of protein quality control mechanisms in the cytosol and nucleus. PMID:26912797

  8. Cytosolic splice isoform of Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Fes1 is required for the degradation of misfolded proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Masser, Anna E.; Kang, Wenjing; Friedländer, Marc R.; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Cells maintain proteostasis by selectively recognizing and targeting misfolded proteins for degradation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Fes1 is essential for the degradation of chaperone-associated misfolded proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we show that the FES1 transcript undergoes unique 3′ alternative splicing that results in two equally active isoforms with alternative C-termini, Fes1L and Fes1S. Fes1L is actively targeted to the nucleus and represents the first identified nuclear Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor. In contrast, Fes1S localizes to the cytosol and is essential to maintain proteostasis. In the absence of Fes1S, the heat-shock response is constitutively induced at normally nonstressful conditions. Moreover, cells display severe growth defects when elevated temperatures, amino acid analogues, or the ectopic expression of misfolded proteins, induce protein misfolding. Importantly, misfolded proteins are not targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. These observations support the notion that cytosolic Fes1S maintains proteostasis by supporting the removal of toxic misfolded proteins by proteasomal degradation. This study provides key findings for the understanding of the organization of protein quality control mechanisms in the cytosol and nucleus. PMID:26912797

  9. The Structure of RalF, an ADP-Ribosylation Factor Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor from Legionella pneumophila, Reveals the Presence of a Cap over the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Amor,J.; Swails, J.; Zhu, X.; Roy, C.; Nagai, H.; Ingmundson, A.; Cheng, X.; Kahn, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila protein RalF is secreted into host cytosol via the Dot/Icm type IV transporter where it acts to recruit ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) to pathogen-containing phagosomes in the establishment of a replicative organelle. The presence in RalF of the Sec7 domain, present in all Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, has suggested that recruitment of Arf is an early step in pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of RalF and of the isolated Sec7 domain and found that RalF is made up of two domains. The Sec7 domain is homologous to mammalian Sec7 domains. The C-terminal domain forms a cap over the active site in the Sec7 domain and contains a conserved folding motif, previously observed in adaptor subunits of vesicle coat complexes. The importance of the capping domain and of the glutamate in the 'glutamic finger,' conserved in all Sec7 domains, to RalF functions was examined using three different assays. These data highlight the functional importance of domains other than Sec7 in Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors to biological activities and suggest novel mechanisms of regulation of those activities.

  10. Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 regulate nonmuscle myosin IIA activity by anchoring myosin phosphatase complex

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kang; Li, Chun-Chun; Ye, Guan; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 activate, through their Sec7 domains, ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) by accelerating the replacement of Arf-bound GDP with GTP for initiation of vesicular transport or activation of specific enzymes that modify important phospholipids. They are also implicated in regulation of cell polarization and actin dynamics for directed migration. Reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous HeLa cell BIG1 and BIG2 with myosin IIA was demonstrably independent of Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor activity, because effects of BIG1 and BIG2 depletion were reversed by overexpression of the cognate BIG molecule C-terminal sequence that follows the Arf activation site. Selective depletion of BIG1 or BIG2 enhanced specific phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (T18/S19) and F-actin content, which impaired cell migration in Transwell assays. Our data are clear evidence of these newly recognized functions for BIG1 and BIG2 in transduction or integration of mechanical signals from integrin adhesions and myosin IIA-dependent actin dynamics. Thus, by anchoring or scaffolding the assembly, organization, and efficient operation of multimolecular myosin phosphatase complexes that include myosin IIA, protein phosphatase 1δ, and myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1, BIG1 and BIG2 serve to integrate diverse biophysical and biochemical events in cells. PMID:23918382

  11. Cloning and characterization of GEF-H1, a microtubule-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac and Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y; Li, R; Zheng, Y; Busch, H

    1998-12-25

    The Rho-related small GTPases are critical elements involved in regulation of signal transduction cascades from extracellular stimuli to cell nucleus and cytoskeleton. The Dbl-like guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF) have been implicated in direct activation of these GTPases. Here we have identified a new member of the Dbl family, GEF-H1, by screening a human HeLa cell cDNA library. GEF-H1 encodes a 100-kDa protein containing the conserved structural array of a Dbl homology domain in tandem with a pleckstrin homology domain and is most closely related to the lfc oncogene, but additionally it contains a unique coiled-coil domain at the carboxyl terminus. Biochemical analysis reveals that GEF-H1 is capable of stimulating guanine nucleotide exchange of Rac and Rho but is inactive toward Cdc42, TC10, or Ras. Moreover, GEF-H1 binds to Rac and Rho proteins in both the GDP- and guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate-bound states without detectable affinity for Cdc42 or Ras. Immunofluorescence reveals that GEF-H1 colocalizes with microtubules through the carboxyl-terminal coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of GEF-H1 in COS-7 cells results in induction of membrane ruffles. These results suggest that GEF-H1 may have a direct role in activation of Rac and/or Rho and in bringing the activated GTPase to specific target sites such as microtubules. PMID:9857026

  12. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (SosCat) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of SosCat, while SosCat also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  13. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (Sos(Cat)) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of Sos(Cat), while Sos(Cat) also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  14. Sharp switches between regular and swinger mitochondrial replication: 16S rDNA systematically exchanging nucleotides A<->T+C<->G in the mitogenome of Kamimuria wangi.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Swinger DNAs are sequences whose homology with known sequences is detected only by assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides. Nine symmetric (X<->Y, i.e. A<->C) and fourteen asymmetric (X->Y->Z, i.e. A->C->G) exchanges exist. All swinger DNA previously detected in GenBank follow the A<->T+C<->G exchange, while mitochondrial swinger RNAs distribute among different swinger types. Here different alignment criteria detect 87 additional swinger mitochondrial DNAs (86 from insects), including the first swinger gene embedded within a complete genome, corresponding to the mitochondrial 16S rDNA of the stonefly Kamimuria wangi. Other Kamimuria mt genome regions are "regular", stressing unanswered questions on (a) swinger polymerization regulation; (b) swinger 16S rDNA functions; and (c) specificity to rDNA, in particular 16S rDNA. Sharp switches between regular and swinger replication, together with previous observations on swinger transcription, suggest that swinger replication might be due to a switch in polymerization mode of regular polymerases and the possibility of swinger-encoded information, predicted in primordial genes such as rDNA. PMID:25865623

  15. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  16. Structural analysis of the Sil1-Bip complex reveals the mechanism for Sil1 to function as a nucleotide-exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ming; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2013-01-16

    Sil1 functions as a NEF (nucleotide-exchange factor) for the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) Hsp70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) Bip in eukaryotic cells. Sil1 may catalyse the ADP release from Bip by interacting directly with the ATPase domain of Bip. In the present study we show the complex crystal structure of the yeast Bip and the NEF Sil1 at the resolution of 2.3 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm). In the Sil1-Bip complex structure, the Sil1 molecule acts as a 'clamp' which binds lobe IIb of the Bip ATPase domain. The binding of Sil1 causes the rotation of lobe IIb {approx} 13.5{sup o} away from the ADP-binding pocket. The complex formation also induces lobe Ib to swing in the opposite direction by {approx} 3.7{sup o}. These conformational changes open up the nucleotide-binding pocket in the Bip ATPase domain and disrupt the hydrogen bonds between Bip and bound ADP, which may catalyse ADP release. Mutation of the Sil1 residues involved in binding the Bip ATPase domain compromise the binding affinity of Sil1 to Bip, and these Sil1 mutants also abolish the ability to stimulate the ATPase activity of Bip.

  17. Wsc1 and Mid2 Are Cell Surface Sensors for Cell Wall Integrity Signaling That Act through Rom2, a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Rho1

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Bevin; Levin, David E.

    2001-01-01

    Wsc1 and Mid2 are highly O-glycosylated cell surface proteins that reside in the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They have been proposed to function as mechanosensors of cell wall stress induced by wall remodeling during vegetative growth and pheromone-induced morphogenesis. These proteins are required for activation of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway that consists of the small G-protein Rho1, protein kinase C (Pkc1), and a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. We show here by two-hybrid experiments that the C-terminal cytoplasmic domains of Wsc1 and Mid2 interact with Rom2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho1. At least with regard to Wsc1, this interaction is mediated by the Rom2 N-terminal domain. This domain is distinct from the Rho1-interacting domain, suggesting that the GEF can interact simultaneously with a sensor and with Rho1. We also demonstrate that extracts from wsc1 and mid2 mutants are deficient in the ability to catalyze GTP loading of Rho1 in vitro, providing evidence that the function of the sensor-Rom2 interaction is to stimulate nucleotide exchange toward this G-protein. In a related line of investigation, we identified the PMT2 gene in a genetic screen for mutations that confer an additive cell lysis defect with a wsc1 null allele. Pmt2 is a member of a six-protein family in yeast that catalyzes the first step in O mannosylation of target proteins. We demonstrate that Mid2 is not mannosylated in a pmt2 mutant and that this modification is important for signaling by Mid2. PMID:11113201

  18. Structural basis for mutual relief of the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor DOCK2 and its partner ELMO1 from their autoinhibited forms.

    PubMed

    Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Mishima-Tsumagari, Chiemi; Akasaka, Ryogo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Tochio, Naoya; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Uruno, Takehito; Katakai, Tomoya; Kinashi, Tatsuo; Kohda, Daisuke; Fukui, Yoshinori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-02-28

    DOCK2, a hematopoietic cell-specific, atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor, controls lymphocyte migration through ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac) activation. Dedicator of cytokinesis 2-engulfment and cell motility protein 1 (DOCK2•ELMO1) complex formation is required for DOCK2-mediated Rac signaling. In this study, we identified the N-terminal 177-residue fragment and the C-terminal 196-residue fragment of human DOCK2 and ELMO1, respectively, as the mutual binding regions, and solved the crystal structure of their complex at 2.1-Å resolution. The C-terminal Pro-rich tail of ELMO1 winds around the Src-homology 3 domain of DOCK2, and an intermolecular five-helix bundle is formed. Overall, the entire regions of both DOCK2 and ELMO1 assemble to create a rigid structure, which is required for the DOCK2•ELMO1 binding, as revealed by mutagenesis. Intriguingly, the DOCK2•ELMO1 interface hydrophobically buries a residue which, when mutated, reportedly relieves DOCK180 from autoinhibition. We demonstrated that the ELMO-interacting region and the DOCK-homology region 2 guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain of DOCK2 associate with each other for the autoinhibition, and that the assembly with ELMO1 weakens the interaction, relieving DOCK2 from the autoinhibition. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal regions of ELMO1 reportedly cause its autoinhibition, and binding with a DOCK protein relieves the autoinhibition for ras homolog gene family, member G binding and membrane localization. In fact, the DOCK2•ELMO1 interface also buries the ELMO1 residues required for the autoinhibition within the hydrophobic core of the helix bundle. Therefore, the present complex structure reveals the structural basis by which DOCK2 and ELMO1 mutually relieve their autoinhibition for the activation of Rac1 for lymphocyte chemotaxis. PMID:22331897

  19. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  20. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  1. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  2. Association of guanine nucleotide-exchange protein BIG1 in HepG2 cell nuclei with nucleolin, U3 snoRNA, and fibrillarin.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Philip Ian; Uhart, Marina; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Peculis, Brenda A; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2008-03-01

    BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein, activates class I ADP-ribosylation factors (ARF1-3) by catalyzing the replacement of bound GDP by GTP, an action critical for the regulation of protein transport in eukaryotic cells. Our earlier report [Padilla PI, Pancheco-Rodriguez G, Moss J, Vaughan M (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:2752-2757] that BIG1 concentrated in nucleoli of serum-starved HepG2 cells prompted us to identify molecules associated with BIG1 in dynamic nucleolar structures. Antibodies against BIG1 or nucleolin coprecipitated both proteins from nuclei, which was abolished by the incubation of nuclei with RNase A or DNase, indicating that the interaction depended on nucleic acids. (32)P labeling of RNAs immunoprecipitated with BIG1 or nucleolin from nuclei revealed bands of approximately 210 bases that also hybridized with U3 small nucleolar (sno)RNA-specific oligonucleotides. Clones of U3 snoRNA cDNAs from the material precipitated by antibodies against BIG1 or nucleolin yielded identical nucleotide sequences that also were found in genomic DNA. Later analyses revealed the presence of fibrillarin, nucleoporin p62, and La in BIG1 and nucleolin immunoprecipitates. Our data demonstrate that BIG1, nucleolin, U3, the U3-binding protein fibrillarin, and the RNA-binding protein La may exist together in nuclear complexes, consistent with a potential role for BIG1 in nucleolar processes. Evidence that BIG1 and nucleolin, but not fibrillarin, can be present with p62 at the nuclear envelope confirms the presence of BIG1 and nucleolin in dynamic molecular complexes that change in composition while moving through nuclei. Nuclear functions of BIG1 remain to be determined. PMID:18292223

  3. ARNO3, a Sec7-domain guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1, is involved in the control of Golgi structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Michel; Boretto, Joëlle; Robineau, Sylviane; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Chardin, Pierre; Chavrier, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    Budding of transport vesicles in the Golgi apparatus requires the recruitment of coat proteins and is regulated by ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) 1. ARF1 activation is promoted by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the transition to GTP-bound ARF1. We recently have identified a human protein, ARNO (ARF nucleotide-binding-site opener), as an ARF1-GEF that shares a conserved domain with the yeast Sec7 protein. We now describe a human Sec7 domain-containing GEF referred to as ARNO3. ARNO and ARNO3, as well as a third GEF called cytohesin-1, form a family of highly related proteins with identical structural organization that consists of a central Sec7 domain and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. We show that all three proteins act as ARF1 GEF in vitro, whereas they have no effect on ARF6, an ARF protein implicated in the early endocytic pathway. Substrate specificity of ARNO-like GEFs for ARF1 depends solely on the Sec7 domain. Overexpression of ARNO3 in mammalian cells results in (i) fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) redistribution of Golgi resident proteins as well as the coat component β-COP, and (iii) inhibition of SEAP transport (secreted form of alkaline phosphatase). In contrast, the distribution of endocytic markers is not affected. This study indicates that Sec7 domain-containing GEFs control intracellular membrane compartment structure and function through the regulation of specific ARF proteins in mammalian cells. PMID:9707577

  4. Distinct subcellular localization of alternative splicing variants of EFA6D, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6, in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Masahiro; Ohta, Shingo; Hara, Yoshinobu; Tamaki, Hideaki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    EFA6D (guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP-ribosylation factor 6 [Arf6]D) is also known as EFA6R, Psd3, and HCA67. It is the fourth member of the EFA6 family with guanine nucleotide exchange activity for Arf6, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that regulates endosomal trafficking and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. We propose a classification and nomenclature of 10 EFA6D variants deposited in the GenBank database as EFA6D1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1s, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2s based on the combination of N-terminal and C-terminal insertions. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the expression of all EFA6D variants except for variants a and d in the adult mouse brain. Immunoblotting analysis with novel variant-specific antibodies showed the endogenous expression of EFA6D1b, EFA6D1c, and EFA6D1s at the protein level, with the highest expression being EFA6D1s, in the brain. Immunoblotting analysis of forebrain subcellular fractions showed the distinct subcellular distribution of EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed distinct but overlapping immunoreactive patterns between EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s in the mouse brain. In immunoelectron microscopic analyses of the hippocampal CA3 region, EFA6D1b/c was present predominantly in the mossy fiber axons of dentate granule cells, whereas EFA6D1s was present abundantly in the cell bodies, dendritic shafts, and spines of hippocampal pyramidal cells. These results provide the first anatomical evidence suggesting the functional diversity of EFA6D variants, particularly EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s, in neurons. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2531-2552, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241101

  5. GBF1, a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Arf, Is Crucial for Coxsackievirus B3 RNA Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Lanke, Kjerstin H. W.; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Belov, George A.; Feng, Qian; Duijsings, Daniël; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The replication of enteroviruses is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi network transport that blocks activation of guanine exchange factors (GEFs) of the Arf GTPases. Mammalian cells contain three BFA-sensitive Arf GEFs: GBF1, BIG1, and BIG2. Here, we show that coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) RNA replication is insensitive to BFA in MDCK cells, which contain a BFA-resistant GBF1 due to mutation M832L. Further evidence for a critical role of GBF1 stems from the observations that viral RNA replication is inhibited upon knockdown of GBF1 by RNA interference and that replication in the presence of BFA is rescued upon overexpression of active, but not inactive, GBF1. Overexpression of Arf proteins or Rab1B, a GTPase that induces GBF1 recruitment to membranes, failed to rescue RNA replication in the presence of BFA. Additionally, the importance of the interaction between enterovirus protein 3A and GBF1 for viral RNA replication was investigated. For this, the rescue from BFA inhibition of wild-type (wt) replicons and that of mutant replicons of both CVB3 and poliovirus (PV) carrying a 3A protein that is impaired in binding GBF1 were compared. The BFA-resistant GBF1-M832L protein efficiently rescued RNA replication of both wt and mutant CVB3 and PV replicons in the presence of BFA. However, another BFA-resistant GBF1 protein, GBF1-A795E, also efficiently rescued RNA replication of the wt replicons, but not that of mutant replicons, in the presence of BFA. In conclusion, this study identifies a critical role for GBF1 in CVB3 RNA replication, but the importance of the 3A-GBF1 interaction requires further study. PMID:19740986

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activates guanine nucleotide exchange factor GIV/Girdin to orchestrate migration–proliferation dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Deepali; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; To, Andrew; Lo, I-Chung; Aznar, Nicolas; Leyme, Anthony; Gupta, Vijay; Niesman, Ingrid; Maddox, Adam L.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Signals propagated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can drive cell migration and proliferation, two cellular processes that do not occur simultaneously—a phenomenon called “migration–proliferation dichotomy.” We previously showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling is skewed to favor migration over proliferation via noncanonical transactivation of Gαi proteins by the guanine exchange factor (GEF) GIV. However, what turns on GIV-GEF downstream of growth factor RTKs remained unknown. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism by which phosphorylation of GIV by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) triggers GIV's ability to bind and activate Gαi in response to growth factors and modulate downstream signals to establish a dichotomy between migration and proliferation. We show that CDK5 binds and phosphorylates GIV at Ser1674 near its GEF motif. When Ser1674 is phosphorylated, GIV activates Gαi and enhances promigratory Akt signals. Phosphorylated GIV also binds Gαs and enhances endosomal maturation, which shortens the transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, thereby limiting mitogenic MAPK signals. Consequently, this phosphoevent triggers cells to preferentially migrate during wound healing and transmigration of cancer cells. When Ser1674 cannot be phosphorylated, GIV cannot bind either Gαi or Gαs, Akt signaling is suppressed, mitogenic signals are enhanced due to delayed transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, and cells preferentially proliferate. These results illuminate how GIV-GEF is turned on upon receptor activation, adds GIV to the repertoire of CDK5 substrates, and defines a mechanism by which this unusual CDK orchestrates migration–proliferation dichotomy during cancer invasion, wound healing, and development. PMID:26286990

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activates guanine nucleotide exchange factor GIV/Girdin to orchestrate migration-proliferation dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Deepali; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; To, Andrew; Lo, I-Chung; Aznar, Nicolas; Leyme, Anthony; Gupta, Vijay; Niesman, Ingrid; Maddox, Adam L; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-09-01

    Signals propagated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can drive cell migration and proliferation, two cellular processes that do not occur simultaneously--a phenomenon called "migration-proliferation dichotomy." We previously showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling is skewed to favor migration over proliferation via noncanonical transactivation of Gαi proteins by the guanine exchange factor (GEF) GIV. However, what turns on GIV-GEF downstream of growth factor RTKs remained unknown. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism by which phosphorylation of GIV by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) triggers GIV's ability to bind and activate Gαi in response to growth factors and modulate downstream signals to establish a dichotomy between migration and proliferation. We show that CDK5 binds and phosphorylates GIV at Ser1674 near its GEF motif. When Ser1674 is phosphorylated, GIV activates Gαi and enhances promigratory Akt signals. Phosphorylated GIV also binds Gαs and enhances endosomal maturation, which shortens the transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, thereby limiting mitogenic MAPK signals. Consequently, this phosphoevent triggers cells to preferentially migrate during wound healing and transmigration of cancer cells. When Ser1674 cannot be phosphorylated, GIV cannot bind either Gαi or Gαs, Akt signaling is suppressed, mitogenic signals are enhanced due to delayed transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, and cells preferentially proliferate. These results illuminate how GIV-GEF is turned on upon receptor activation, adds GIV to the repertoire of CDK5 substrates, and defines a mechanism by which this unusual CDK orchestrates migration-proliferation dichotomy during cancer invasion, wound healing, and development. PMID:26286990

  8. Oligomerization of the Sec7 domain Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor GBF1 is dispensable for Golgi localization and function but regulates degradation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jay M; Viktorova, Ekaterina G; Busby, Theodore; Wyrozumska, Paulina; Newman, Laura E; Lin, Helen; Lee, Eunjoo; Wright, John; Belov, George A; Kahn, Richard A; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-03-15

    Members of the large Sec7 domain-containing Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) family have been shown to dimerize through their NH2-terminal dimerization and cyclophilin binding (DCB) and homology upstream of Sec7 (HUS) domains. However, the importance of dimerization in GEF localization and function has not been assessed. We generated a GBF1 mutant (91/130) in which two residues required for oligomerization (K91 and E130 within the DCB domain) were replaced with A and assessed the effects of these mutations on GBF1 localization and cellular functions. We show that 91/130 is compromised in oligomerization but that it targets to the Golgi in a manner indistinguishable from wild-type GBF1 and that it rapidly exchanges between the cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. The 91/130 mutant appears active as it integrates within the functional network at the Golgi, supports Arf activation and COPI recruitment, and sustains Golgi homeostasis and cargo secretion when provided as a sole copy of functional GBF1 in cells. In addition, like wild-type GBF1, the 91/130 mutant supports poliovirus RNA replication, a process requiring GBF1 but believed to be independent of GBF1 catalytic activity. However, oligomerization appears to stabilize GBF1 in cells, and the 91/130 mutant is degraded faster than the wild-type GBF1. Our data support a model in which oligomerization is not a key regulator of GBF1 activity but impacts its function by regulating the cellular levels of GBF1. PMID:26718629

  9. Protein Kinase A (PKA) Type I Interacts with P-Rex1, a Rac Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor: EFFECT ON PKA LOCALIZATION AND P-Rex1 SIGNALING.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Vargas, Lydia; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel; Castillo-Kauil, Alejandro; Bruystens, Jessica G H; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Taylor, Susan S; Mochizuki, Naoki; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2016-03-18

    Morphology of migrating cells is regulated by Rho GTPases and fine-tuned by protein interactions and phosphorylation. PKA affects cell migration potentially through spatiotemporal interactions with regulators of Rho GTPases. Here we show that the endogenous regulatory (R) subunit of type I PKA interacts with P-Rex1, a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor that integrates chemotactic signals. Type I PKA holoenzyme interacts with P-Rex1 PDZ domains via the CNB B domain of RIα, which when expressed by itself facilitates endothelial cell migration. P-Rex1 activation localizes PKA to the cell periphery, whereas stimulation of PKA phosphorylates P-Rex1 and prevents its activation in cells responding to SDF-1 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). The P-Rex1 DEP1 domain is phosphorylated at Ser-436, which inhibits the DH-PH catalytic cassette by direct interaction. In addition, the P-Rex1 C terminus is indirectly targeted by PKA, promoting inhibitory interactions independently of the DEP1-PDZ2 region. A P-Rex1 S436A mutant construct shows increased RacGEF activity and prevents the inhibitory effect of forskolin on sphingosine 1-phosphate-dependent endothelial cell migration. Altogether, these results support the idea that P-Rex1 contributes to the spatiotemporal localization of type I PKA, which tightly regulates this guanine exchange factor by a multistep mechanism, initiated by interaction with the PDZ domains of P-Rex1 followed by direct phosphorylation at the first DEP domain and putatively indirect regulation of the C terminus, thus promoting inhibitory intramolecular interactions. This reciprocal regulation between PKA and P-Rex1 might represent a key node of integration by which chemotactic signaling is fine-tuned by PKA. PMID:26797121

  10. The Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZ-RhoGEF governs susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Pownall, Scott; Jensen, Thomas E; Mouaaz, Samar; Foltz, Warren; Zhou, Lily; Liadis, Nicole; Woo, Minna; Hao, Zhenyue; Dutt, Previn; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Mak, Tak; Stambolic, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is crucial for the maintenance of energy and metabolic homeostasis and its deregulation can lead to obesity and type II diabetes (T2D). Using gene disruption in the mouse, we discovered a function for a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZ-RhoGEF (Arhgef11) in white adipose tissue biology. While PDZ-RhoGEF was dispensable for a number of RhoA signaling-mediated processes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, including stress fiber formation and cell migration, it's deletion led to a reduction in their proliferative potential. On a whole organism level, PDZ-RhoGEF deletion resulted in an acute increase in energy expenditure, selectively impaired early adipose tissue development and decreased adiposity in adults. PDZ-RhoGEF-deficient mice were protected from diet-induced obesity and T2D. Mechanistically, PDZ-RhoGEF enhanced insulin/IGF-1 signaling in adipose tissue by controlling ROCK-dependent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Our results demonstrate that PDZ-RhoGEF acts as a key determinant of mammalian metabolism and obesity-associated pathologies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06011.001 PMID:26512886

  11. The Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZ-RhoGEF governs susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Pownall, Scott; Jensen, Thomas E; Mouaaz, Samar; Foltz, Warren; Zhou, Lily; Liadis, Nicole; Woo, Minna; Hao, Zhenyue; Dutt, Previn; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Mak, Tak; Stambolic, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is crucial for the maintenance of energy and metabolic homeostasis and its deregulation can lead to obesity and type II diabetes (T2D). Using gene disruption in the mouse, we discovered a function for a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZ-RhoGEF (Arhgef11) in white adipose tissue biology. While PDZ-RhoGEF was dispensable for a number of RhoA signaling-mediated processes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, including stress fiber formation and cell migration, it's deletion led to a reduction in their proliferative potential. On a whole organism level, PDZ-RhoGEF deletion resulted in an acute increase in energy expenditure, selectively impaired early adipose tissue development and decreased adiposity in adults. PDZ-RhoGEF-deficient mice were protected from diet-induced obesity and T2D. Mechanistically, PDZ-RhoGEF enhanced insulin/IGF-1 signaling in adipose tissue by controlling ROCK-dependent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Our results demonstrate that PDZ-RhoGEF acts as a key determinant of mammalian metabolism and obesity-associated pathologies. PMID:26512886

  12. FgMon1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of FgRab7, is important for vacuole fusion, autophagy and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Luping; Chen, Huaigu; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2015-01-01

    The Ccz1-Mon1 protein complex, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of the late endosomal Rab7 homolog Ypt7, is required for the late step of multiple vacuole delivery pathways, such as cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway and autophagy processes. Here, we identified and characterized the yeast Mon1 homolog in Fusarium graminearum, named FgMon1. FgMON1 encodes a trafficking protein and is well conserved in filamentous fungi. Targeted gene deletion showed that the ∆Fgmon1 mutant was defective in vegetative growth, asexual/sexual development, conidial germination and morphology, plant infection and deoxynivalenol production. Cytological examination revealed that the ∆Fgmon1 mutant was also defective in vacuole fusion and autophagy, and delayed in endocytosis. Yeast two hybrid and in vitro GST-pull down assays approved that FgMon1 physically interacts with a Rab GTPase FgRab7 which is also important for the development, infection, membrane fusion and autophagy in F. graminearum. FgMon1 likely acts as a GEF of FgRab7 and constitutively activated FgRab7 was able to rescue the defects of the ∆Fgmon1 mutant. In summary, our study provides evidences that FgMon1 and FgRab7 are critical components that modulate vesicle trafficking, endocytosis and autophagy, and thereby affect the development, plant infection and DON production of F. graminearum. PMID:26657788

  13. Nucleotide-induced conformational changes of tetradecameric GroEL mapped by H/D exchange monitored by FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Jin; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Zhang, Hui-Min; Xian, Feng; Young, Nicolas L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we employ hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to access E. coli chaperonin GroEL conformation. The ~800 kDa tetradecameric GroEL plays an essential role in the proper folding of many proteins. Previous studies of the structural dynamics of GroEL upon ATP binding have been inconsistent, showing either minimal or major allosteric changes. Our results, based on the native, non-mutated, protein under physiological conditions in solution demonstrate substantial changes in conformation and/or flexibility upon ATP binding. We capture the pivotal step in its functional cycle by use of a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog, ATPγS, to mimic the ATP-bound GroEL state. Comparison of HDX-MS results for apo GroEL and GroEL-ATPγS enables the characterization of the nucleotide-regulated conformational changes throughout the entire protein with high sequence resolution. The 14-mer GroEL complex is the largest protein assembly yet accessed by HDX-MS, with sequence resolution of segments of as few as five amino acids. PMID:23409238

  14. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it's functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila. PMID:27015411

  15. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock–ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis. PMID:25908317

  16. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness. PMID:23636892

  17. FgMon1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of FgRab7, is important for vacuole fusion, autophagy and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Luping; Chen, Huaigu; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2015-01-01

    The Ccz1-Mon1 protein complex, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of the late endosomal Rab7 homolog Ypt7, is required for the late step of multiple vacuole delivery pathways, such as cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway and autophagy processes. Here, we identified and characterized the yeast Mon1 homolog in Fusarium graminearum, named FgMon1. FgMON1 encodes a trafficking protein and is well conserved in filamentous fungi. Targeted gene deletion showed that the ∆Fgmon1 mutant was defective in vegetative growth, asexual/sexual development, conidial germination and morphology, plant infection and deoxynivalenol production. Cytological examination revealed that the ∆Fgmon1 mutant was also defective in vacuole fusion and autophagy, and delayed in endocytosis. Yeast two hybrid and in vitro GST-pull down assays approved that FgMon1 physically interacts with a Rab GTPase FgRab7 which is also important for the development, infection, membrane fusion and autophagy in F. graminearum. FgMon1 likely acts as a GEF of FgRab7 and constitutively activated FgRab7 was able to rescue the defects of the ∆Fgmon1 mutant. In summary, our study provides evidences that FgMon1 and FgRab7 are critical components that modulate vesicle trafficking, endocytosis and autophagy, and thereby affect the development, plant infection and DON production of F. graminearum. PMID:26657788

  18. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and marker exchange mutagenesis of the exo-poly-alpha-D-galacturonosidase-encoding pehX gene of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16.

    PubMed Central

    He, S Y; Collmer, A

    1990-01-01

    The pehX gene encoding extracellular exo-poly-alpha-D-galacturonosidase (exoPG; EC 3.2.1.82) was isolated from a genomic library of the pectate lyase-deficient Erwinia chrysanthemi mutant UM1005 (a Nalr Kanr delta pelABCE derivative of EC16) by immunoscreening 2,800 Escherichia coli HB101 transformants with an antibody against exoPG protein. The cloned pehX gene was expressed highly from its own promoter in E. coli, and most of the enzyme was localized in the periplasm. The nucleotide sequence of pehX revealed the presence of an amino-terminal signal peptide and an open reading frame encoding a preprotein of 64,608 daltons. The cloned pehX gene was insertionally inactivated with TnphoA and used to mutate the chromosomal pehX gene of E. chrysanthemi AC4150 (Nalr) and CUCPB5006 (Nalr Kans delta pelABCE) by marker exchange mutagenesis. Analysis of the resulting mutants, CUCPB5008 (Pel+ Peh-) and CUCPB5009 (Pel- Peh-), indicated that exoPG can contribute significantly to bacterial utilization of polygalacturonate and the induction of pectate lyase in the presence of extracellular pectic polymers. CUCPB5009 retained a slight ability to pit polygalacturonate semisolid agar and macerated chrysanthemum pith tissues when large numbers of bacteria were inoculated. Images PMID:2168372

  19. The Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor DRhoGEF2 Is a Genetic Modifier of the PI3K Pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Ju; Zhou, Lily; Binari, Richard; Manoukian, Armen; Mak, Tak; McNeill, Helen; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway mediates various physiological processes associated with human health. Components of this pathway are highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In Drosophila, the PTEN ortholog and its mammalian counterpart downregulate insulin/IGF signaling by antagonizing the PI3-kinase function. From a dominant loss-of-function genetic screen, we discovered that mutations of a Dbl-family member, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor DRhoGEF2 (DRhoGEF22(l)04291), suppressed the PTEN-overexpression eye phenotype. dAkt/dPKB phosphorylation, a measure of PI3K signaling pathway activation, increased in the eye discs from the heterozygous DRhoGEF2 wandering third instar larvae. Overexpression of DRhoGEF2, and it’s functional mammalian ortholog PDZ-RhoGEF (ArhGEF11), at various stages of eye development, resulted in both dPKB/Akt-dependent and -independent phenotypes, reflecting the complexity in the crosstalk between PI3K and Rho signaling in Drosophila. PMID:27015411

  20. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  1. The nucleotide sequence of the uvrD gene of E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, P W; Emmerson, P T

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned section of the E. coli chromosome containing the uvrD gene has been determined. The coding region for the UvrD protein consists of 2,160 nucleotides which would direct the synthesis of a polypeptide 720 amino acids long with a calculated molecular weight of 82 kd. The predicted amino acid sequence of the UvrD protein has been compared with the amino acid sequences of other known adenine nucleotide binding proteins and a common sequence has been identified, thought to contribute towards adenine nucleotide binding. PMID:6379604

  2. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  3. Rac1 Activation Caused by Membrane Translocation of a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor in Akt2-Mediated Insulin Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Nihata, Yuma; Satoh, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT4, which is translocated to the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation. Several lines of evidence suggested that the protein kinase Akt2 plays a key role in this insulin action. The small GTPase Rac1 has also been implicated as a regulator of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, acting downstream of Akt2. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates Rac1 activity remain obscure. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 has been identified as a direct regulator of Rac1 in Akt2-mediated signaling, but its characterization was performed mostly in cultured myoblasts. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FLJ00068 indeed acts downstream of Akt2 as a Rac1 regulator by using mouse skeletal muscle. Small interfering RNA knockdown of FLJ00068 markedly diminished GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma following insulin administration or ectopic expression of a constitutively activated mutant of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Akt2. Additionally, insulin and these constitutively activated mutants caused the activation of Rac1 as shown by immunofluorescent microscopy using a polypeptide probe specific to activated Rac1 in isolated gastrocnemius muscle fibers and frozen sections of gastrocnemius muscle. This Rac1 activation was also abrogated by FLJ00068 knockdown. Furthermore, we observed translocation of FLJ00068 to the cell periphery following insulin stimulation in cultured myoblasts. Localization of FLJ00068 in the plasma membrane in insulin-stimulated, but not unstimulated, myoblasts and mouse gastrocnemius muscle was further affirmed by subcellular fractionation and subsequent immunoblotting. Collectively, these results strongly support a critical role of FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation in mouse skeletal muscle insulin signaling. PMID:27163697

  4. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor αPIX Leads to Activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/Glycogen Phosphorylase Pathway in Interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Parada, Luis A.; Zugaza, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of the T cell antigen receptor. However, little is known about the IL-2-dependent Rac 1 activator molecules. For the first time, a signaling pathway leading to the activation of Rac 1/PYGM in response to IL-2-stimulated T cell proliferation is described. More specifically, αPIX, a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPases of the Rho family, preferentially Rac 1, mediates PYGM activation in Kit 225 T cells stimulated with IL-2. Using directed mutagenesis, phosphorylation of αPIX Rho-GEF serines 225 and 488 is required for activation of the Rac 1/PYGM pathway. IL-2-stimulated serine phosphorylation was corroborated in Kit 225 T cells cultures. A parallel pharmacological and genetic approach identified PKCθ as the serine/threonine kinase responsible for αPIX serine phosphorylation. The phosphorylated state of αPIX was required to activate first Rac 1 and subsequently PYGM. These results demonstrate that the IL-2 receptor activation, among other early events, leads to activation of PKCθ. To activate Rac 1 and consequently PYGM, PKCθ phosphorylates αPIX in T cells. The biological significance of this PKCθ/αPIX/Rac 1 GTPase/PYGM signaling pathway seems to be the control of different cellular responses such as migration and proliferation. PMID:25694429

  5. Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) Mediates Junctional Epithelium Attachment to Teeth via Integrin-ODAM-Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 (ARHGEF5)-RhoA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Ji, Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Choung, Han-Wool; Choi, Youngnim; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Park, Shin-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Adhesion of the junctional epithelium (JE) to the tooth surface is crucial for maintaining periodontal health. Although odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is expressed in the JE, its molecular functions remain unknown. We investigated ODAM function during JE development and regeneration and its functional significance in the initiation and progression of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. ODAM was expressed in the normal JE of healthy teeth but absent in the pathologic pocket epithelium of diseased periodontium. In periodontitis and peri-implantitis, ODAM was extruded from the JE following onset with JE attachment loss and detected in gingival crevicular fluid. ODAM induced RhoA activity and the expression of downstream factors, including ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), by interacting with Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5). ODAM-mediated RhoA signaling resulted in actin filament rearrangement. Reduced ODAM and RhoA expression in integrin β3- and β6-knockout mice revealed that cytoskeleton reorganization in the JE occurred via integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. Fibronectin and laminin activated RhoA signaling via the integrin-ODAM pathway. Finally, ODAM was re-expressed with RhoA in regenerating JE after gingivectomy in vivo. These results suggest that ODAM expression in the JE reflects a healthy periodontium and that JE adhesion to the tooth surface is regulated via fibronectin/laminin-integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. We also propose that ODAM could be used as a biomarker of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. PMID:25911094

  6. Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) Mediates Junctional Epithelium Attachment to Teeth via Integrin-ODAM-Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 (ARHGEF5)-RhoA Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Ji, Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Choung, Han-Wool; Choi, Youngnim; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Park, Shin-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of the junctional epithelium (JE) to the tooth surface is crucial for maintaining periodontal health. Although odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is expressed in the JE, its molecular functions remain unknown. We investigated ODAM function during JE development and regeneration and its functional significance in the initiation and progression of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. ODAM was expressed in the normal JE of healthy teeth but absent in the pathologic pocket epithelium of diseased periodontium. In periodontitis and peri-implantitis, ODAM was extruded from the JE following onset with JE attachment loss and detected in gingival crevicular fluid. ODAM induced RhoA activity and the expression of downstream factors, including ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), by interacting with Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5). ODAM-mediated RhoA signaling resulted in actin filament rearrangement. Reduced ODAM and RhoA expression in integrin β3- and β6-knockout mice revealed that cytoskeleton reorganization in the JE occurred via integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. Fibronectin and laminin activated RhoA signaling via the integrin-ODAM pathway. Finally, ODAM was re-expressed with RhoA in regenerating JE after gingivectomy in vivo. These results suggest that ODAM expression in the JE reflects a healthy periodontium and that JE adhesion to the tooth surface is regulated via fibronectin/laminin-integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. We also propose that ODAM could be used as a biomarker of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. PMID:25911094

  7. Cdc42 and the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Ect2 and Trio Mediate Fn14-Induced Migration and Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Shannon P.; Ennis, Matthew J.; Schumacher, Cassie A.; Zylstra-Diegel, Cassandra R.; Williams, Bart O.; Ross, Julianna T.D.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Loftus, Joseph C.; Symons, Marc H.; Tran, Nhan L.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioblastomas are characterized by their ability to infiltrate into normal brain. We previously reported that binding of the multifunctional cytokine TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) to its receptor fibroblast growth factor–inducible 14 (Fn14) induces glioblastoma cell invasion via Rac1 activation. Here, we show that Cdc42 plays an essential role in Fn14-mediated activation of Rac1. TWEAK-treated glioma cells display an increased activation of Cdc42, and depletion of Cdc42 using siRNA abolishes TWEAK-induced Rac1 activation and abrogates glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, Rac1 depletion does not affect Cdc42 activation by Fn14, showing that Cdc42 mediates TWEAK-stimulated Rac1 activation. Furthermore, we identified two guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF), Ect2 and Trio, involved in TWEAK-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, respectively. Depletion of Ect2 abrogates both TWEAK-induced Cdc42 and Rac1 activation, as well as subsequent TWEAK-Fn14–directed glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, Trio depletion inhibits TWEAK-induced Rac1 activation but not TWEAK-induced Cdc42 activation. Finally, inappropriate expression of Fn14 or Ect2 in mouse astrocytes in vivo using an RCAS vector system for glial-specific gene transfer in G-tva transgenic mice induces astrocyte migration within the brain, corroborating the in vitro importance of the TWEAK-Fn14 signaling cascade in glioblastoma invasion. Our results suggest that the TWEAK-Fn14 signaling axis stimulates glioma cell migration and invasion through two GEF-GTPase signaling units, Ect2-Cdc42 and Trio-Rac1. Components of the Fn14-Rho GEF-Rho GTPase signaling pathway present innovative drug targets for glioma therapy. PMID:22571869

  8. Architecture of the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex and its implications for the regulation of guanine nucleotide exchange on eIF2

    PubMed Central

    Kuhle, Bernhard; Eulig, Nora K.; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryal translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) acts as guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for eIF2 and forms a central target for pathways regulating global protein synthesis. eIF2B consists of five non-identical subunits (α–ϵ), which assemble into a catalytic subcomplex (γ, ϵ) responsible for the GEF activity, and a regulatory subcomplex (α, β, δ) which regulates the GEF activity under stress conditions. Here, we provide new structural and functional insight into the regulatory subcomplex of eIF2B (eIF2BRSC). We report the crystal structures of eIF2Bβ and eIF2Bδ from Chaetomium thermophilum as well as the crystal structure of their tetrameric eIF2B(βδ)2 complex. Combined with mutational and biochemical data, we show that eIF2BRSC exists as a hexamer in solution, consisting of two eIF2Bβδ heterodimers and one eIF2Bα2 homodimer, which is homologous to homohexameric ribose 1,5-bisphosphate isomerases. This homology is further substantiated by the finding that eIF2Bα specifically binds AMP and GMP as ligands. Based on our data, we propose a model for eIF2BRSC and its interactions with eIF2 that is consistent with previous biochemical and genetic data and provides a framework to better understand eIF2B function, the molecular basis for Gcn−, Gcd− and VWM/CACH mutations and the evolutionary history of the eIF2B complex. PMID:26384431

  9. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  10. Comparative structural analysis of eubacterial 5S rRNA by oxidation of adenines in the N-1 position.

    PubMed Central

    Pieler, T; Schreiber, A; Erdmann, V A

    1984-01-01

    Adenines in free 5S rRNA from Escherichia coli, Bacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus have been oxidized at their N-1 position using monoperphthalic acid. The determination of the number of adenine 1-N-oxides was on the basis of UV spectroscopic data of the intact molecule. Identification of the most readily accessible nucleotides by sequencing gel analysis reveals that they are located in conserved positions within loops, exposed hairpin loops and single-base bulge loops. Implications for the structure and function of 5S rRNA will be discussed on the basis of this comparative analysis. Images PMID:6201825

  11. Resonance assignments of non-exchangeable protons in B type DNA oligomers, an overview.

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, F J; Hilbers, C W

    1988-01-01

    The chemical shifts of 1H resonances of non exchangeable protons (except H5', H5" and adenine H2) of over six hundred nucleotides have been collected. The influence which the base of the nucleotide itself as well as the bases on its 5' and 3' side exert on the chemical shifts of the various resonances has been investigated. Most of the resonances appear to be predominantly influenced by only one base. For H2', H2", H3', H4' and H6/H8 this is the base of the central nucleotide, for H5(C) and CH3(T) it is the one on the 5' side and for H1' it is the one on the 3' side. Chemical shift distribution profiles are presented which allow an estimation of the probability of finding a particular resonance at a particular position in the spectrum. PMID:2840632

  12. The Levels of Soluble Nucleotides in Wheat Aleurone Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, G. G.; Jenner, C. F.; Paleg, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    The content of soluble nucleotides in aleurone layers isolated from mature wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Olympic) grain was investigated. The most abundant nucleotides were adenosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate, and uridine diphosphoglucose. Smaller amounts of guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were also identified. The levels of some of these nucleotides were increased after incubation of the tissue under certain conditions. Nucleotide levels were measured at intervals during incubation of aleurone layers in water. The changes observed are discussed in relation to a response by the tissue to wounding. PMID:16657969

  13. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  14. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  15. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-12-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine. PMID:27075339

  16. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  17. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  18. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  19. Excimer states in microhydrated adenine clusters.

    PubMed

    Smith, V R; Samoylova, E; Ritze, H-H; Radloff, W; Schultz, T

    2010-09-01

    We present femtosecond pump-probe mass and photoelectron spectra for adenine (A) and microhydrated A(m)(H(2)O)(n) clusters. Three distinct relaxation processes of photoexcited electronic states were distinguished: in unhydrated A, relaxation of the optically bright pipi* state occurred via the dark npi* state with respective lifetimes of <0.1 and 1.3 ps. In microhydrated clusters A(H(2)O)(n), relaxation via the npi* state is quenched by a faster relaxation process, probably involving pisigma* states. For the predominantly hydrogen-bonded adenine dimer (A(2)), excited state relaxation is dominated by monomer-like processes. When the adenine dimer is clustered with several water molecules, we observe a nanosecond lifetime from excimer states in pi-stacked clusters. From the electron spectra we estimate adiabatic ionization potentials of 8.32 eV (A), 8.27 eV (A(H(2)O)(1)), 8.19 eV (A(H(2)O)(2)), 8.10 eV (A(H(2)O)(3)), 8.18 eV (A(2)), and 8.0 eV (A(2)(H(2)O)(3-5)). PMID:20556283

  20. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  1. The Cellular Environment Stabilizes Adenine Riboswitch RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Jillian; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    There are large differences between the intracellular environment and the conditions widely used to study RNA structure and function in vitro. To assess the effects of the crowded cellular environment on RNA, we examined the structure and ligand-binding function of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain in healthy, growing Escherichia coli cells at single-nucleotide resolution on the minute timescale using SHAPE. The ligand-bound aptamer structure is essentially the same in cells and in buffer at 1 mM Mg2+, the approximate Mg2+ concentration we measured in cells. In contrast, the in-cell conformation of the ligand-free aptamer is much more similar to the fully folded ligand-bound state. Even adding high Mg2+ concentrations to the buffer used for in vitro analyses did not yield the conformation observed for the free aptamer in cells. The cellular environment thus stabilizes the aptamer significantly more than does Mg2+ alone. Our results show that the intracellular environment has a large effect on RNA structure that ultimately favors highly organized conformations. PMID:24215455

  2. [Degradation of purine nucleotides in patients with chronic obstruction to airflow].

    PubMed

    Mateos Antón, F; García Puig, J; Gómez Fernández, P; Ramos Hernández, T; López Jiménez, M

    1989-03-11

    The increase in hypoxanthine (Hx), xanthine (X), uric acid (VA) and total purines (TP) that may be found in several clinical conditions associated with tissue hypoxia has been attributed to an increase in adenine nucleotides degradation by a reduced ATP synthesis caused by oxygen deprivation. To test this hypothesis we have investigated the urinary excretion of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity elimination after labeling the adenine nucleotides with adenine (8-14C) in 5 patients with chronic airflow obstruction (CAFO), in the basal state and after oxygen therapy (FiO2, 24%). The results were compared with those from 4 normal individuals. Patients with COFA showed an increase of the renal elimination of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity, which was significantly different from the control group (p less than 0.05). Oxygen administration was associated with a significant reduction in the excretion of purines and radioactivity (p less than 0.01), which decreased to values similar to those found in normal individuals. These findings suggest that in patients with COFA and severe hypoxemia there is a marked increase in the degradation of adenine nucleotides. The normalization of the purine and radioactivity excretion after oxygen therapy points to a basic role of oxygen in the catabolism of adenine nucleotides. PMID:2716427

  3. The rat adenine receptor: pharmacological characterization and mutagenesis studies to investigate its putative ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Knospe, Melanie; Müller, Christa E; Rosa, Patrizia; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Thimm, Dominik; Schiedel, Anke C

    2013-09-01

    The rat adenine receptor (rAdeR) was the first member of a family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by adenine and designated as P0-purine receptors. The present study aimed at gaining insights into structural aspects of ligand binding and function of the rAdeR. We exchanged amino acid residues predicted to be involved in ligand binding (Phe110(3.24), Asn115(3.29), Asn173(4.60), Phe179(45.39), Asn194(5.40), Phe195(5.41), Leu201(5.47), His252(6.54), and Tyr268(7.32)) for alanine and expressed them in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells. Membrane preparations subjected to [(3)H]adenine binding studies revealed only minor effects indicating that none of the exchanged amino acids is part of the ligand binding pocket, at least in the inactive state of the receptor. Furthermore, we coexpressed the rAdeR and its mutants with mammalian Gi proteins in Sf9 insect cells to probe receptor activation. Two amino acid residues, Asn194(5.40) and Leu201(5.47), were found to be crucial for activation since their alanine mutants did not respond to adenine. Moreover we showed that-in contrast to most other rhodopsin-like GPCRs-the rAdeR does not contain essential disulfide bonds since preincubation with dithiothreitol neither altered adenine binding in Sf9 cell membranes, nor adenine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells transfected with the rAdeR. To detect rAdeRs by Western blot analysis, we developed a specific antibody. Finally, we were able to show that the extended N-terminal sequence of the rAdeR constitutes a putative signal peptide of unknown function that is cleaved off in the mature receptor. Our results provide important insights into this new, poorly investigated family of purinergic receptors. PMID:23413038

  4. Glutamate Synthase: Properties of the Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.; Larimore, Fred

    1974-01-01

    A reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent glutamate synthase has been detected and partially purified from crude extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme is specific for NADH, glutamine, and α-ketoglutarate (Km values of 2.6 μM, 1.0 mM, and 140 μM, respectively) and has a pH optimum between 7.1 and 7.7. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been determined as 2 mol of glutamate synthesized per mol of glutamine consumed. Glutamate synthase can be distinguished from either of the glutamate dehydrogenases of yeast on the basis of its substrate requirements and behavior during agarose gel and ion exchange chromatography. Variations in the specific activity of glutamate synthase, which occur in response to changes in the growth medium, are similar in character to those observed with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent (anabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:4362465

  5. In vitro selection of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Meli, Marc; Vergne, Jacques; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2003-03-14

    Adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes were isolated by in vitro selection from a degenerated hairpin ribozyme population. Two new adenine-dependent ribozymes catalyze their own reversible cleavage in the presence of free adenine. Both aptamers have Mg(2+) requirements for adenine-assisted cleavage similar to the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. Cleavage kinetics studies in the presence of various other small molecules were compared. The data suggest that adenine does not induce RNA self-cleavage in the same manner for both aptamers. In addition, investigations of pH effects on catalytic rates show that both adenine-dependent aptamers are more active in basic conditions, suggesting that they use new acid/base catalytic strategies in which adenine could be involved directly. The discovery of hairpin ribozymes dependent on adenine for their reversible self-cleavage presents considerable biochemical and evolutionary interests because we show that RNA is able to use exogenous reactive molecules to enhance its own catalytic activity. Such a mechanism may have been a means by which the ribozymes of the RNA world enlarged their chemical repertoire. PMID:12519767

  6. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed. PMID:26547179

  7. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  8. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  9. APPLICATION OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS FOR THE EVALUATION OF STRESS IN 'MYTILUS EDULIS' AND 'CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    After 10 weeks treatment with 10 micrograms Ni/kg seawater, the concentration of ATP in Mytilus edulis adductor muscles was significently less than that in muscles from control and 5 micrograms Ni/kg treated mussels. Mussels sampled in August after exposure for 12 weeks to pollut...

  10. Raw coffee based dietary supplements contain carboxyatractyligenin derivatives inhibiting mitochondrial adenine-nucleotide-translocase.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Fromme, Tobias; Beusch, Anja; Lang, Tatjana; Klingenspor, Martin; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Capsules, powders and tablets containing raw coffee extract are advertised to the consumer as antioxidant rich dietary supplements as part of a healthy diet. We isolated carboxyatractyligenin (4), 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin (6) and 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside (8) from green coffee and found strong inhibitory effects on phosphorylating respiration in isolated mitochondria similar to the effects of the known phytotoxin carboxyatractyloside. LC-MS/MS analysis of commercial green coffee based dietary supplements revealed the occurrence of carboxyatractyligenin, 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin in concentrations up to 4.0, 5.7, and 41.6μmol/g, respectively. These data might help to gain first insight into potential physiological side-effects of green coffee containing dietary supplement. PMID:24863614

  11. Copper induces permeability transition through its interaction with the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    García, Noemí; Martínez-Abundis, Eduardo; Pavón, Natalia; Correa, Francisco; Chávez, Edmundo

    2007-09-01

    In this work we examined the effect of low concentrations of Cu(2+) on the opening of the mitochondrial non-specific pore. The purpose was addressed to further contribute to the knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the open/closed cycles of the permeability transition pore. Membrane leakage was established by measuring matrix Ca(2+) efflux and mitochondrial swelling. The experimental results indicate that Cu(2+) at very low concentrations promoted the release of accumulated Ca(2+), as well as mitochondrial swelling, provided 1,10-phenanthroline has been added. Carboxyatractyloside and Cu(2+) exhibited additive effects on these parameters. After Cu(2+) titration of membrane thiols, it might be assumed that the blockage of 5.9nmol of SH/mg protein suffices to open the non-specific pore. Taking into account the reinforcing effect of carboxyatractyloside, the increasing ADP concentrations, and that N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the Cu(2+)-induced Ca(2+) efflux, it is proposed that the target site for Cu(2+) is located in the ADP/ATP carrier. PMID:17485229

  12. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:24740601

  13. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  14. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  15. Production and characterization of reduced NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Thuring, Jan W; Conway, Stuart J; Packman, Len; Holmes, Andrew B; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate) has been shown to act as a Ca2+-releasing intracellular messenger in a wide variety of systems from invertebrates to mammals and has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. NAADP is structurally very similar to its precursor, the endogenous coenzyme NADP and while much is known about the reduced form of NADP, NADPH, it is not known whether NAADP can also exist in a reduced state. Here we report that NAADP can be reduced to NAADPH by endogenous cellular enzymes and that NAADPH is functionally inert at the NAADP receptor. These data suggest that NAADPH could represent a mechanism for rapidly inactivating NAADP in cells. PMID:14606955

  16. Dynamics of Excess-Electron Transfer through Alternating Adenine:Thymine Sequences in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the sequence-dependent excess-electron transfer (EET) dynamics in DNA, which plays an important role in DNA damage/repair. There are many published studies on EET in consecutive adenine:thymine (A:T) sequences (Tn), but those in alternating A:T sequences (ATn) remain limited. Here, two series of functionalized DNA oligomers, Tn and ATn, were synthesized with a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, a trimer of ethylenedioxythiophene (3 E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA). Laser flash photolysis experiments showed that the EET rate constant of AT3 is two times lower than that of T3 due to the lack of π-stacking of Ts in AT3. Thus, it was indicated that excess-electron hopping is affected by the interaction between LUMOs of nucleotides. PMID:26398266

  17. Differences between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and HisP in the interaction with the adenine ring of ATP.

    PubMed

    Berger, A L; Welsh, M J

    2000-09-22

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. The most conserved features of this family are the nucleotide-binding domains. As in other members of this family, these domains bind and hydrolyze ATP; in CFTR this opens and closes the channel pore. The recent crystal structures of related bacterial transporters show that an aromatic residue interacts with the adenine ring of ATP to stabilize nucleotide binding. CFTR contains six aromatic residues that are candidates to coordinate the nucleotide base. We mutated each to cysteine and examined the functional consequences. None of the mutations disrupted channel function or the ability to discriminate between ATP, GTP, and CTP. We also applied [2-(triethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate to covalently modify the introduced cysteines. The mutant channels CFTR-F429C, F430C, F433C, and F1232C showed no difference from wild-type CFTR, indicating that either the residues were not accessible to modification, or cysteine modification did not affect function. Although modification inactivated CFTR-Y1219C more rapidly than wild-type CFTR, and inactivation of CFTR-F446C was nucleotide-dependent; failure of these mutations to alter gating suggested that Tyr(1219) and Phe(446) were not important for nucleotide binding. The results suggest that ATP binding may not involve the coordination of the adenine ring by an aromatic residue analogous to that in some bacterial transporters. Taken together with earlier work, this study points to a model in which most of the binding energy for ATP is contributed by the phosphate groups. PMID:10893239

  18. The Interplay between the Escherichia coli Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Effectors and the Mammalian RhoGEF Inhibitor EspH

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alexander R. C.; Clements, Abigail; Raymond, Benoit; Crepin, Valerie F.; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho GTPases are important regulators of many cellular processes. Subversion of Rho GTPases is a common infection strategy employed by many important human pathogens. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) translocate the effector EspH, which inactivates mammalian Rho guanine exchange factors (GEFs), as well as Map, EspT, and EspM2, which, by mimicking mammalian RhoGEFs, activate Rho GTPases. In this study we found that EspH induces focal adhesion disassembly, triggers cell detachment, activates caspase-3, and induces cytotoxicity. EspH-induced cell detachment and caspase-3 activation can be offset by EspT, EspM2, and the Salmonella Cdc42/Rac1 GEF effector SopE, which remain active in the presence of EspH. EPEC and EHEC therefore use a novel strategy of controlling Rho GTPase activity by translocating one effector to inactivate mammalian RhoGEFs, replacing them with bacterial RhoGEFs. This study also expands the functional range of bacterial RhoGEFs to include cell adhesion and survival. IMPORTANCE Many human pathogens use a type III secretion system to translocate effectors that can functionally be divided into signaling, disabling, and countervirulence effectors. Among the signaling effectors are those that activate Rho GTPases, which play a central role in coordinating actin dynamics. However, many pathogens also translocate effectors with antagonistic or counteractive functions. For example, Salmonella translocates SopE and SptP, which sequentially turn Rac1 and Cdc42 on and off. In this paper, we show that enteropathogenic E. coli translocates EspH, which inactivates mammalian RhoGEFs and triggers cytotoxicity and at the same time translocates the bacterial RhoGEFs EspM2 and EspT, which are insensitive to EspH, and so neutralizes EspH-induced focal adhesion disassembly, cell detachment, and caspase-3 activation. Our data point to an intriguing infection strategy in which EPEC and EHEC override cellular

  19. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  20. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S.; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Fan, Hao; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Lindahl, Paul A.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (kcat = 2.0 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn2+ prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 200 s−1 and 5 × 105 M−1s−1, respectively. The apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe2+, Zn2+, or Mn2+. In each case, two enzyme-equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member within the deaminase sub-family of the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [FeII/FeII]-ADE was oxidized to [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity and thus the di-ferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence for spin-coupling between metal ions was evident by EPR or Mössbauer spectroscopies. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and adenine was modeled into the active site based on homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Based on the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH rate profiles and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate limiting steps. PMID:21247091

  1. The bipartite rac1 Guanine nucleotide exchange factor engulfment and cell motility 1/dedicator of cytokinesis 180 (elmo1/dock180) protects endothelial cells from apoptosis in blood vessel development.

    PubMed

    Schäker, Kathrin; Bartsch, Susanne; Patry, Christian; Stoll, Sandra J; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Wieland, Thomas; Kroll, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1/dedicator of cytokinesis 180 (Elmo1/Dock180) is a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the monomeric GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). Elmo1/Dock180 regulates Rac1 activity in a specific spatiotemporal manner in endothelial cells (ECs) during zebrafish development and acts downstream of the Netrin-1/Unc5-homolog B (Unc5B) signaling cascade. However, mechanistic details on the pathways by which Elmo1/Dock180 regulates endothelial function and vascular development remained elusive. In this study, we aimed to analyze the vascular function of Elmo1 and Dock180 in human ECs and during vascular development in zebrafish embryos. In vitro overexpression of Elmo1 and Dock180 in ECs reduced caspase-3/7 activity and annexin V-positive cell number upon induction of apoptosis. This protective effect of Elmo1 and Dock180 is mediated by activation of Rac1, p21-activated kinase (PAK) and AKT/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. In zebrafish, Elmo1 and Dock180 overexpression reduced the total apoptotic cell and apoptotic EC number and promoted the formation of blood vessels during embryogenesis. In conclusion, Elmo1 and Dock180 protect ECs from apoptosis by the activation of the Rac1/PAK/AKT signaling cascade in vitro and in vivo. Thus, Elmo1 and Dock180 facilitate blood vessel formation by stabilization of the endothelium during angiogenesis. PMID:25586182

  2. The Bipartite Rac1 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Engulfment and Cell Motility 1/Dedicator of Cytokinesis 180 (Elmo1/Dock180) Protects Endothelial Cells from Apoptosis in Blood Vessel Development*

    PubMed Central

    Schäker, Kathrin; Bartsch, Susanne; Patry, Christian; Stoll, Sandra J.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Wieland, Thomas; Kroll, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1/dedicator of cytokinesis 180 (Elmo1/Dock180) is a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the monomeric GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). Elmo1/Dock180 regulates Rac1 activity in a specific spatiotemporal manner in endothelial cells (ECs) during zebrafish development and acts downstream of the Netrin-1/Unc5-homolog B (Unc5B) signaling cascade. However, mechanistic details on the pathways by which Elmo1/Dock180 regulates endothelial function and vascular development remained elusive. In this study, we aimed to analyze the vascular function of Elmo1 and Dock180 in human ECs and during vascular development in zebrafish embryos. In vitro overexpression of Elmo1 and Dock180 in ECs reduced caspase-3/7 activity and annexin V-positive cell number upon induction of apoptosis. This protective effect of Elmo1 and Dock180 is mediated by activation of Rac1, p21-activated kinase (PAK) and AKT/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. In zebrafish, Elmo1 and Dock180 overexpression reduced the total apoptotic cell and apoptotic EC number and promoted the formation of blood vessels during embryogenesis. In conclusion, Elmo1 and Dock180 protect ECs from apoptosis by the activation of the Rac1/PAK/AKT signaling cascade in vitro and in vivo. Thus, Elmo1 and Dock180 facilitate blood vessel formation by stabilization of the endothelium during angiogenesis. PMID:25586182

  3. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the Ecal DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, V; Venetianer, P; Kiss, A

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the GGTNACC specific Ecal DNA methyltransferase (M.Ecal) has been cloned in E. coli from Enterobacter cloacae and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. The ecalM gene codes for a protein of 452 amino acids (Mr: 51,111). It was determined that M.Ecal is an adenine methyltransferase. M.Ecal shows limited amino acid sequence similarity to other adenine methyltransferases. A clone that expresses Ecal methyltransferase at high level was constructed. Images PMID:2183182

  4. Updating Our View of Organelle Genome Nucleotide Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Organelle genomes show remarkable variation in architecture and coding content, yet their nucleotide composition is relatively unvarying across the eukaryotic domain, with most having a high adenine and thymine (AT) content. Recent studies, however, have uncovered guanine and cytosine (GC)-rich mitochondrial and plastid genomes. These sequences come from a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green plants and animals. Here, I review GC-rich organelle DNAs and the insights they have provided into the evolution of nucleotide landscape. I emphasize that GC-biased mitochondrial and plastid DNAs are more widespread than once thought, sometimes occurring together in the same species, and suggest that the forces biasing their nucleotide content can differ both among and within lineages, and may be associated with specific genome architectural features and life history traits. PMID:22973299

  5. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  6. Subunit-selective N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Signaling through Brefeldin A-resistant Arf Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors BRAG1 and BRAG2 during Synapse Maturation.

    PubMed

    Elagabani, Mohammad Nael; Briševac, Dušica; Kintscher, Michael; Pohle, Jörg; Köhr, Georg; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2016-04-22

    The maturation of glutamatergic synapses in the CNS is regulated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) that gradually change from a GluN2B- to a GluN2A-dominated subunit composition during postnatal development. Here we show that NMDARs control the activity of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) by consecutively recruiting two related brefeldin A-resistant Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, BRAG1 and BRAG2, in a GluN2 subunit-dependent manner. In young cortical cultures, GluN2B and BRAG1 tonically activated Arf6. In mature cultures, Arf6 was activated through GluN2A and BRAG2 upon NMDA treatment, whereas the tonic Arf6 activation was not detectable any longer. This shift in Arf6 regulation and the associated drop in Arf6 activity were reversed by a knockdown of BRAG2. Given their sequential recruitment during development, we examined whether BRAG1 and BRAG2 influence synaptic currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons using patch clamp recordings in acute slices from mice at different ages. The number of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) miniature events was reduced by depletion of BRAG1 but not by depletion of BRAG2 during the first 2 weeks after birth. In contrast, depletion of BRAG2 during postnatal weeks 4 and 5 reduced the number of AMPAR miniature events and compromised the quantal sizes of both AMPAR and NMDAR currents evoked at Schaffer collateral synapses. We conclude that both Arf6 activation through GluN2B-BRAG1 during early development and the transition from BRAG1- to BRAG2-dependent Arf6 signaling induced by the GluN2 subunit switch are critical for the development of mature glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26884337

  7. Crucial Role of Rapgef2 and Rapgef6, a Family of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Rap1 Small GTPase, in Formation of Apical Surface Adherens Junctions and Neural Progenitor Development in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Maeta, Kazuhiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Nishihara, Kaori; Ikutomo, Junji; Bilasy, Shymaa E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral neocortex development in mammals requires highly orchestrated events involving proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural progenitors and neurons. Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 constitute a unique family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1 small GTPase, which is known to play crucial roles in migration of postmitotic neurons. We previously reported that conditional knockout of Rapgef2 in dorsal telencephalon (Rapgef2-cKO) resulted in the formation of an ectopic cortical mass (ECM) resembling that of subcortical band heterotopia. Here we show that double knockout of Rapgef6 in Rapgef2-cKO mice (Rapgef2/6-dKO) results in marked enlargement of the ECM. While Rapgef2-cKO affects late-born neurons only, Rapgef2/6-dKO affects both early-born and late-born neurons. The Rapgef2-cKO cortex at embryonic day (E) 15.5, and the Rapgef2/6-dKO cortex at E13.5 and E15.5 show disruption of the adherens junctions (AJs) on the apical surface, detachment of radial glial cells (RGCs) from the apical surface and disorganization of the radial glial fiber system, which are accompanied by aberrant distribution of RGCs and intermediate progenitors, normally located in the ventricular zone and the subventricular zone, respectively, over the entire cerebral cortex. Moreover, intrauterine transduction of Cre recombinase into the Rapgef2flox/flox brains also results in the apical surface AJ disruption and the RGC detachment from the apical surface, both of which are effectively suppressed by cotransduction of the constitutively active Rap1 mutant Rap1G12V. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous role of the Rapgef2/6-Rap1 pathway in maintaining the apical surface AJ structures, which is necessary for the proper development of neural progenitor cells. PMID:27390776

  8. Tight Binding of the Phosphorylated α Subunit of Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2α) to the Regulatory Subunits of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor eIF2B Is Required for Inhibition of Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Thanuja; Pavitt, Graham D.; Zhang, Fan; Dever, Thomas E.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is a heterotrimeric protein that transfers methionyl-initiator tRNAMet to the small ribosomal subunit in a ternary complex with GTP. The eIF2 phosphorylated on serine 51 of its α subunit [eIF2(αP)] acts as competitive inhibitor of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eIF2B, impairing formation of the ternary complex and thereby inhibiting translation initiation. eIF2B is comprised of catalytic and regulatory subcomplexes harboring independent eIF2 binding sites; however, it was unknown whether the α subunit of eIF2 directly contacts any eIF2B subunits or whether this interaction is modulated by phosphorylation. We found that recombinant eIF2α (glutathione S-transferase [GST]–SUI2) bound to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex in vitro, in a manner stimulated by Ser-51 phosphorylation. Genetic data suggest that this direct interaction also occurred in vivo, allowing overexpressed SUI2 to compete with eIF2(αP) holoprotein for binding to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex. Mutations in SUI2 and in the eIF2B regulatory subunit GCD7 that eliminated inhibition of eIF2B by eIF2(αP) also impaired binding of phosphorylated GST-SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subunits. These findings provide strong evidence that tight binding of phosphorylated SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex is crucial for the inhibition of eIF2B and attendant downregulation of protein synthesis exerted by eIF2(αP). We propose that this regulatory interaction prevents association of the eIF2B catalytic subcomplex with the β and γ subunits of eIF2 in the manner required for GDP-GTP exchange. PMID:11438658

  9. Nucleotide Metabolism in Salt-Stressed Zea mays L. Root Tips

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd A.; Nieman, Richard H.; Clark, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Corn plants (Zea mays L. cv Pioneer 3906) were grown in a glass house on control and saline nutrient solutions, in winter and summer. There were two saline treatments, both with osmotic potential = −0.4 megapascal but with different Ca2+/Na+ ratios: 0.03 and 0.73. Root tips and shoot meristems (culm tissue) of 26 day-old plants were analyzed for nucleotides to ascertain if there were correlations between nucleotide pool size and the reduced growth on saline cultures. Several other cell components also were determined. Plants grown in winter were only half as large as those grown in summer mainly because of the lower light intensity and lower temperature. But the relative yield reduction on salt treatment compared to the control was similar in winter and summer. The two different salt treatments caused similar yield reductions. Neither salt treatment affected nucleotide pools in culm tissue, with the possible exception of UDPG in winter. In the case of root tips, salt treatment had little or no effect on nucleotide pool sizes in winter when many already seemed near a critical minimum, but in summer it reduced several pools including ATP, total adenine nucleotide, UTP, total uridine nucleotide, and UDP-glucose. The reductions were greatest on the salt treatment with low Ca2+/Na+. There was no simple correlation between the effects of salt stress on growth and on nucleotide pool size. The nucleotide pools of culm tissue indicated that in some respects this tissue was effectively insulated from the salt stress. Roots that were in direct contact with the saline solution indicated significant reductions in nucleotide pools only in the summer whereas growth was reduced both summer and winter. It is possible that the nucleotide concentrations of root cells in winter were already near a critical minimum so that nucleotide synthesis and growth were tightly linked. Significant reductions in nucleotide pools that would be expected to affect growth were more evident in summer

  10. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  11. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  12. Selective inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases by dinucleoside disulfide mimics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Sham, Yuk Yin; Chen, Liqiang; Felczak, Krzysztof; Bennett, Eric; Wilson, Daniel; Aldrich, Courtney; Yu, Jose S; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Magni, Giulio; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2009-08-01

    Diadenosine disulfide (5) was reported to inhibit NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex has been solved. We have synthesized tiazofurin adenosine disulfide (4) and the disulfide 5, and found that these compounds were moderate inhibitors of human NAD kinase (IC(50)=110 microM and IC(50)=87 microM, respectively) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD kinase (IC(50)=80 microM and IC(50)=45 microM, respectively). We also found that NAD mimics with a short disulfide (-S-S-) moiety were able to bind in the folded (compact) conformation but not in the common extended conformation, which requires the presence of a longer pyrophosphate (-O-P-O-P-O-) linkage. Since majority of NAD-dependent enzymes bind NAD in the extended conformation, selective inhibition of NAD kinases by disulfide analogues has been observed. Introduction of bromine at the C8 of the adenine ring restricted the adenosine moiety of diadenosine disulfides to the syn conformation making it even more compact. The 8-bromoadenosine adenosine disulfide (14) and its di(8-bromoadenosine) analogue (15) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of human (IC(50)=6 microM) and mycobacterium NAD kinase (IC(50)=14-19 microM reported so far. None of the disulfide analogues showed inhibition of lactate-, and inosine monophosphate-dehydrogenase (IMPDH), enzymes that bind NAD in the extended conformation. PMID:19596199

  13. The Role of Gene Duplication in the Evolution of Purine Nucleotide Salvage Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    Purine nucleotides are formed de novo by a widespread biochemical route that may be of monophyletic origin, or are synthesized from preformed purine bases and nucleosides through different salvage pathways. Three monophyletic sets of purine salvage enzymes, each of which catalyzes mechanistically similar reactions, can be identified: (a) adenine-, xanthine-, hypoxanthine- and guanine-phosphoribosyltransferases, which are all homologous among themselves, as well as to nucleoside phosphorylases; (b) adenine deaminase, adenosine deaminase, and adenosine monophophate deaminase; and (c) guanine reductase and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. These homologies support the idea that substrate specificity is the outcome of gene duplication, and that the purine nucleotide salvage pathways were assembled by a patchwork process that probably took place before the divergence of the three cell domains (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya). Based on the ability of adenine PRTase to catalyze the condensation of PRPP with 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide (AICA), a simpler scheme of purine nucleotide biosynthesis is presented. This hypothetical route requires the prior evolution of PRPP biosynthesis. Since it has been argued that PRPP, nucleosides, and nucleotides are susceptible to hydrolysis, they are very unlikely prebiotic compounds. If this is the case, it implies that many purine salvage pathways appeared only after the evolution of phosphorylated sugar biosynthetic pathways made ribosides available.

  14. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  15. Effect of Adenine on Clozapine-induced Neutropenia in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Kishi, Taro; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the utility of adenine for preventing clozapine-induced neutropenia. Methods This retrospective study examined the effect of adenine on clozapine-induced neutropenia in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and was conducted at Okehazama Hospital in Japan from July 2010 to June 2013. Adenine was available for use from June 2011 onwards. Twenty-one patients started receiving clozapine treatment from July 2010 to April 2011 (the pre-adenine adoption group), and 47 patients started receiving it from May 2011 to June 2013 (the post-adenine adoption group). The effects of adenine were assessed based on changes in the patients’ leukocyte counts and the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Results Sixty-eight patients were treated with clozapine from July 2010 to June 2013. Of the 21 patients in the pre-adenine adoption group, 4 discontinued treatment due to clozapine-induced neutropenia, whereas only 2 of the 47 patients in the post-adenine adoption group discontinued treatment. The frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia was significantly lower in post-adenine adoption group than in the pre-adenine adoption group (p=0.047). Conclusion Adenine decreased the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Our data suggest that combined treatment with clozapine and adenine is a safe and effective strategy against treatment-resistant schizophrenia. PMID:26243842

  16. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  17. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  18. Mutations in the GCD7 subunit of yeast guanine nucleotide exchange factor eIF-2B overcome the inhibitory effects of phosphorylated eIF-2 on translation initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez de Aldana, C R; Hinnebusch, A G

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2 alpha) impairs translation initiation by inhibiting the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for eIF-2, known as eIF-2B. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphorylation of eIF-2 alpha by the protein kinase GCN2 specifically stimulates translation of GCN4 mRNA in addition to reducing general protein synthesis. We isolated mutations in several unlinked genes that suppress the growth-inhibitory effect of eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation catalyzed by mutationally activated forms of GCN2. These suppressor mutations, affecting eIF-2 alpha and the essential subunits of eIF-2B encoded by GCD7 and GCD2, do not reduce the level of eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation in cells expressing the activated GCN2c kinase. Four GCD7 suppressors were shown to reduce the derepression of GCN4 translation in cells containing wild-type GCN2 under starvation conditions or in GCN2c strains. A fifth GCD7 allele, constructed in vitro by combining two of the GCD7 suppressors mutations, completely impaired the derepression of GCN4 translation, a phenotype characteristic of deletions in GCN1, GCN2, or GCN3. This double GCD7 mutation also completely suppressed the lethal effect of expressing the mammalian eIF-2 alpha kinase dsRNA-PK in yeast cells, showing that the translational machinery had been rendered completely insensitive to phosphorylated eIF-2. None of the GCD7 mutations had any detrimental effect on cell growth under nonstarvation conditions, suggesting that recycling of eIF-2 occurs efficiently in the suppressor strains. We propose that GCD7 and GCD2 play important roles in the regulatory interaction between eIF-2 and eIF-2B and that the suppressor mutations we isolated in these genes decrease the susceptibility of eIF-2B to the inhibitory effects of phosphorylated eIF-2 without impairing the essential catalytic function of eIF-2B in translation initiation. Images PMID:8164676

  19. Methemoglobinemia and eccentrocytosis in equine erythrocyte flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J W; Stockham, S L; Scott, M A; Johnson, P J; Donald, J J; Chandler, C J

    2003-11-01

    This report describes erythrocyte biochemical findings in an adult Spanish mustang mare that exhibited persistent methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis that were not related to the consumption or administration of an exogenous oxidant. The methemoglobinemia was attributed to a deficiency in cytochrome-b5 reductase (Cb5R) activity, and the eccentrocytes and pyknocytes were attributed to a marked deficiency in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity that resulted in decreased reduced glutathione concentration within erythrocytes. The GR activity increased to a near-normal value after addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the enzyme assay, indicating a deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes. The methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis were attributed to deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes because the GR and Cb5R enzymes use FAD as a cofactor. This deficiency in FAD results from a defect in erythrocyte riboflavin metabolism, which has not been documented previously in animals. PMID:14608016

  20. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac Exchanger 1 (PREX1) Rac-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Activity Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth via Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng-Jia; Ooms, Lisa M; Srijakotre, Nuthasuda; Man, Joey; Vieusseux, Jessica; Waters, JoAnne E; Feng, Yue; Bailey, Charles G; Rasko, John E J; Price, John T; Mitchell, Christina A

    2016-08-12

    PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac exchanger 1 (PREX1) is a Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) overexpressed in a significant proportion of human breast cancers that integrates signals from upstream ErbB2/3 and CXCR4 membrane surface receptors. However, the PREX1 domains that facilitate its oncogenic activity and downstream signaling are not completely understood. We identify that ERK1/2 MAPK acts downstream of PREX1 and contributes to PREX1-mediated anchorage-independent cell growth. PREX1 overexpression increased but its shRNA knockdown decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to EGF/IGF-1 stimulation, resulting in induction of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and p21(WAF1/CIP1) PREX1-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and cell migration were suppressed by inhibition of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling. PREX1 overexpression reduced staurosporine-induced apoptosis whereas its shRNA knockdown promoted apoptosis in response to staurosporine or the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen. Expression of wild-type but not GEF-inactive PREX1 increased anchorage-independent cell growth. In addition, mouse xenograft studies revealed that expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead PREX1 resulted in the formation of larger tumors that displayed increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but not AKT. The impaired anchorage-independent cell growth, apoptosis, and ERK1/2 signaling observed in stable PREX1 knockdown cells was restored by expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead-PREX1. Therefore, PREX1-Rac-GEF activity is critical for PREX1-dependent anchorage-independent cell growth and xenograft tumor growth and may represent a possible therapeutic target for breast cancers that exhibit PREX1 overexpression. PMID:27358402

  1. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). PMID:27163876

  2. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  3. OmpF, a nucleotide-sensing nanoprobe, computational evaluation of single channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, R. H.; Mobasheri, H.; Nikouee, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of highthroughput practical single channel experiments should be formulated and validated by signal analysis approaches to increase the recognition precision of translocating molecules. For this purpose, the activities of the single nano-pore forming protein, OmpF, in the presence of nucleotides were recorded in real time by the voltage clamp technique and used as a means for nucleotide recognition. The results were analyzed based on the permutation entropy of current Time Series (TS), fractality, autocorrelation, structure function, spectral density, and peak fraction to recognize each nucleotide, based on its signature effect on the conductance, gating frequency and voltage sensitivity of channel at different concentrations and membrane potentials. The amplitude and frequency of ion current fluctuation increased in the presence of Adenine more than Cytosine and Thymine in milli-molar (0.5 mM) concentrations. The variance of the current TS at various applied voltages showed a non-monotonic trend whose initial increasing slope in the presence of Thymine changed to a decreasing one in the second phase and was different from that of Adenine and Cytosine; e.g., by increasing the voltage from 40 to 140 mV in the 0.5 mM concentration of Adenine or Cytosine, the variance decreased by one third while for the case of Thymine it was doubled. Moreover, according to the structure function of TS, the fractality of current TS differed as a function of varying membrane potentials (pd) and nucleotide concentrations. Accordingly, the calculated permutation entropy of the TS, validated the biophysical approach defined for the recognition of different nucleotides at various concentrations, pd's and polarities. Thus, the promising outcomes of the combined experimental and theoretical methodologies presented here can be implemented as a complementary means in pore-based nucleotide recognition approaches.

  4. Molecular and Subcellular-Scale Modeling of Nucleotide Diffusion in the Cardiac Myofilament Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Liao, Tao; Gillette, Andrew K.; Hake, Johan E.; Zhang, Yongjie; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Contractile function of cardiac cells is driven by the sliding displacement of myofilaments powered by the cycling myosin crossbridges. Critical to this process is the availability of ATP, which myosin hydrolyzes during the cross-bridge cycle. The diffusion of adenine nucleotides through the myofilament lattice has been shown to be anisotropic, with slower radial diffusion perpendicular to the filament axis relative to parallel, and is attributed to the periodic hexagonal arrangement of the thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. We investigated whether atomistic-resolution details of myofilament proteins can refine coarse-grain estimates of diffusional anisotropy for adenine nucleotides in the cardiac myofibril, using homogenization theory and atomistic thin filament models from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate considerable anisotropy in ATP and ADP diffusion constants that is consistent with experimental measurements and dependent on lattice spacing and myofilament overlap. A reaction-diffusion model of the half-sarcomere further suggests that diffusional anisotropy may lead to modest adenine nucleotide gradients in the myoplasm under physiological conditions. PMID:24209858

  5. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  6. Nucleotide-protectable labeling of sulfhydryl groups in subunit I of the ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzner, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    The membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum was purified as described by Hochstein et al. (1987) and was incubated with C-14 labeled N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), with and without adenine nucleotides, to determine the effect of nucleotides on the enzyme labeling. It was found that NEM incorporates into the 87,000-Da subunit (subunit I) of the enzyme and that the conditions for enzyme modification are similar to those which result in the inhibition of the enzyme activity. The presence of ATP, ADP, and AMP was found to reduce both the inhibitor incorporation and enzyme inhibition. It was shown that the reaction involves a modification of thiol groups.

  7. Comparison of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Xudong; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-06-01

    The pyridine nucleotide nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a universal coenzyme in anabolic reactions and also functions in intracellular signaling by serving as a substrate for production of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). It has recently been shown that, in mammalian cells, cellular NADP can be released into the extracellular compartment (ECC) upon environmental stresses by active exocytosis or diffusion through transmembrane transporters in living cells or passive leakage across the membrane in dying cells. In the ECC, NADP can either serve as a substrate for production of NAADP or act directly on purinoceptors to activate transmembrane signaling. In the last several years, extracellular NADP has also been suggested to function in plant immune responses. Here, we compared exogenous NADP-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia and found that NADP addition induces salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling but not jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated defense responses. These results suggest the specificity of exogenous NADP-activated signaling in plants. PMID:27031653

  8. Influence of dietary nucleotide restriction on bacterial sepsis and phagocytic cell function in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A D; Fanslow, W C; Drath, D B; Rudolph, F B; Van Buren, C T

    1986-02-01

    Although enzyme defects in purine metabolism have revealed the importance of these substrates to maintenance of a normal immune response, the role of exogenous nucleotides on the cells that mediate the host defense system has remained largely unexplored. Recent investigations have revealed that dietary nucleotides are vital to the maintenance of cell-mediated responses to antigen stimulation. To test the influence of dietary nucleotide deprivation on resistance to infection, Balb/c mice were maintained on chow, a nucleotide-free (NF) diet, or an NF diet repleted with adenine, uracil, or RNA. Mice on the NF diet suffered 100% mortality following intravenous challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, while chow-fed and RNA- or uracil-repleted mice demonstrated significantly greater resistance to this bacterial challenge. Macrophages from mice on the NF diet had decreased phagocytic activity as measured by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria compared with mice maintained on the NF diet supplemented with adenine, uracil, or RNA. No change in S aureus antibody response was noted on the various diets. Although the mechanism of this suppression of nonspecific immunity remains unclear, provision of nucleotides to defined diets appears vital to maintain host resistance to bacterial challenge. PMID:3947217

  9. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  10. Ligation-triggered fluorescent silver nanoclusters system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Wang, Pei; Qiu, Xue; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a novel silver nanocluster-based fluorescent system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an important biological small molecule involved in a wide range of biological processes. A single-stranded dumbbell DNA probe was designed and used for the assay, which contained a nick in the stem, a poly-cytosine nucleotide loop close to 5' end as the template for the formation of highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and another loop close to 3' end. Only in the presence of NAD(+), the probe was linked at 5' and 3' ends by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, which blocked the DNA polymerase-based extension reaction, ensuring the formation of fluorescent Ag NCs. This technique provided a logarithmic linear relationship in the range of 1 pM-500 nM with a detection limit of as low as 1 pM NAD(+), and exhibited high selectivity against its analogues, and was then successfully used for the detection of NAD(+) level in four kinds of cell homogenates. In addition, this new approach was conducted in an isothermal and homogeneous condition without the need of any thermal cycling, washing, and separation steps, making it very simple. Overall, this label-free protocol offers a promising alternative for the detection of NAD(+), taking advantage of specificity, sensitivity, cost-efficiency, and simplicity. PMID:24442015

  11. Few-layer graphene sheets with embedded gold nanoparticles for electrochemical analysis of adenine

    PubMed Central

    Biris, Alexandru R; Pruneanu, Stela; Pogacean, Florina; Lazar, Mihaela D; Borodi, Gheorghe; Ardelean, Stefania; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the synthesis of few-layer graphene sheets embedded with various amounts of gold nanoparticles (Gr-Au-x) over an Aux/MgO catalytic system (where × = 1, 2, or 3 wt%). The sheet-like morphology of the Gr-Au-x nanostructures was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, which also demonstrated that the number of layers within the sheets varied from two to seven. The sample with the highest percentage of gold nanoparticles embedded within the graphitic layers (Gr-Au-3) showed the highest degree of crystallinity. This distinct feature, along with the large number of edge-planes seen in high resolution transmission electron microscopic images, has a crucial effect on the electrocatalytic properties of this material. The reaction yields (40%–50%) and the final purity (96%–98%) of the Gr-Au-x composites were obtained by thermogravimetric analysis. The Gr-Au-x composites were used to modify platinum substrates and subsequently to detect adenine, one of the DNA bases. For the bare electrode, no oxidation signal was recorded. In contrast, all of the modified electrodes showed a strong electrocatalytic effect, and a clear peak for adenine oxidation was recorded at approximately +1.05 V. The highest increase in the electrochemical signal was obtained using a platinum/Gr-Au-3-modified electrode. In addition, this modified electrode had an exchange current density (I0, obtained from the Tafel plot) one order of magnitude higher than that of the bare platinum electrode, which also confirmed that the transfer of electrons took place more readily at the Gr-Au-3-modified electrode. PMID:23610521

  12. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org) comprises three global partners committed to capturing, preserving and providing comprehensive public-domain nucleotide sequence information. The INSDC establishes standards, formats and protocols for data and metadata to make it easier for individuals and organisations to submit their nucleotide data reliably to public archives. This work enables the continuous, global exchange of information about living things. Here we present an update of the INSDC in 2015, including data growth and diversification, new standards and requirements by publishers for authors to submit their data to the public archives. The INSDC serves as a model for data sharing in the life sciences. PMID:26657633

  13. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  14. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules. PMID:27394096

  15. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  16. Orthophosphite-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Malacinski, George M.; Konetzka, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Information was obtained on the general properties and specificity of orthophosphite-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase. The enzyme was extracted from Pseudomonas fluorescens 195 grown in medium containing orthophosphite as the sole source of phosphorus. An enzyme preparation suitable for characterization was obtained from crude extracts by use of high-speed centrifugation, protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex gel filtration. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.0, and was inactivated within 6 min at 37 C. Arsenite, hypophosphite, nitrite, selenite, and tellurite were not oxidized by the enzyme. Sulfite inhibited the enzymatic oxidation of orthophosphite in an apparent competitive manner. PMID:4381632

  17. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  18. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  19. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  20. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  1. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  2. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  3. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  4. Fluorometric determination of adenosine nucleotide derivatives as measures of the microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial biomass and physiological status.

    PubMed

    Davis, W M; White, D C

    1980-09-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  5. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide–protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson–Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson–Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues. PMID:21737431

  6. The purine nucleotide cycle. A pathway for ammonia production in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bogusky, R T; Lowenstein, L M; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-01-01

    Particle-free extracts prepared from kidney cortex of rat catalyze the formation of ammonia via the purine nucleotide cycle. The cycle generates ammonia and fumarate from aspartate, using catalytic amounts of inosine monophosphate, adenylosuccinate, and adenosine monophosphate. The specific activities of the enzymes of the cycle are 1.27+/-0.27 nmol/mg protein per min (SE) for adenoylosuccinate synthetase, 1.38+/-0.16 for adenylosuccinase, and 44.0+/-3.3 for AMP deaminase. Compared with controls, extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed ammonium chloride for 2 days show a 60% increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity, and a greater and more rapid synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate. Extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed a potassium-deficient diet show a twofold increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity. In such extracts the rate of synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate is also increased. These results show that the reactions of the purine nucleotide cycle are present and can operate in extracts of kidney cortex. The operational capacity of the cycle is accelerated by ammonium chloride feeding and potassium depletion, conditions known to increase renal ammonia excretion. Extracts of kidney cortex convert inosine monophosphate to uric acid. This is prevented by addition of allopurinol of 1-pyrophosphoryl ribose 5-phosphate to the reaction mixture. PMID:821968

  7. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs. PMID:27318925

  8. Nucleotide diversity in gorillas.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ning; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of the levels of nucleotide diversity in humans and apes may provide valuable information for inferring the demographic history of these species, the effect of social structure on genetic diversity, patterns of past migration, and signatures of past selection events. Previous DNA sequence data from both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genomes suggested a much higher level of nucleotide diversity in the African apes than in humans. Noting that the nuclear DNA data from the apes were very limited, we previously conducted a DNA polymorphism study in humans and another in chimpanzees and bonobos, using 50 DNA segments randomly chosen from the noncoding, nonrepetitive parts of the human genome. The data revealed that the nucleotide diversity (pi) in bonobos (0.077%) is actually lower than that in humans (0.087%) and that pi in chimpanzees (0.134%) is only 50% higher than that in humans. In the present study we sequenced the same 50 segments in 15 western lowland gorillas and estimated pi to be 0.158%. This is the highest value among the African apes but is only about two times higher than that in humans. Interestingly, available mtDNA sequence data also suggest a twofold higher nucleotide diversity in gorillas than in humans, but suggest a threefold higher nucleotide diversity in chimpanzees than in humans. The higher mtDNA diversity in chimpanzees might be due to the unique pattern in the evolution of chimpanzee mtDNA. From the nuclear DNA pi values, we estimated that the long-term effective population sizes of humans, bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas are, respectively, 10,400, 12,300, 21,300, and 25,200. PMID:15082556

  9. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  10. Adenine, a hairpin ribozyme cofactor--high-pressure and competition studies.

    PubMed

    Ztouti, Myriam; Kaddour, Hussein; Miralles, Francisco; Simian, Christophe; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    The RNA world hypothesis assumes that life arose from ancestral RNA molecules, which stored genetic information and catalyzed chemical reactions. Although RNA catalysis was believed to be restricted to phosphate chemistry, it is now established that the RNA has much wider catalytic capacities. In this respect, we devised, in a previous study, two hairpin ribozymes (adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1 and adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 2) that require adenine as cofactor for their reversible self-cleavage. We have now used high hydrostatic pressure to investigate the role of adenine in the catalytic activity of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1. High-pressure studies are of interest because they make it possible to determine the volume changes associated with the reactions, which in turn reflect the conformational modifications and changes in hydration involved in the catalytic mechanism. They are also relevant in the context of piezophilic organisms, as well as in relation to the extreme conditions that prevailed at the origin of life. Our results indicate that the catalytic process involves a transition state whose formation is accompanied by a positive activation volume and release of water molecules. In addition, competition experiments with adenine analogs strongly suggest that exogenous adenine replaces the adenine present at the catalytic site of the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. PMID:19476496

  11. Characterization of photophysical and base-mimicking properties of a novel fluorescent adenine analogue in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dierckx, Anke; Dinér, Peter; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Kumar, Joshi Dhruval; Brown, Tom; Grøtli, Morten; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2011-01-01

    To increase the diversity of fluorescent base analogues with improved properties, we here present the straightforward click-chemistry-based synthesis of a novel fluorescent adenine-analogue triazole adenine (AT) and its photophysical characterization inside DNA. AT shows promising properties compared to the widely used adenine analogue 2-aminopurine. Quantum yields reach >20% and >5% in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively, and show dependence on neighbouring bases. Moreover, AT shows only a minor destabilization of DNA duplexes, comparable to 2-aminopurine, and circular dichroism investigations suggest that AT only causes minimal structural perturbations to normal B-DNA. Furthermore, we find that AT shows favourable base-pairing properties with thymine and more surprisingly also with normal adenine. In conclusion, AT shows strong potential as a new fluorescent adenine analogue for monitoring changes within its microenvironment in DNA. PMID:21278417

  12. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  13. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  14. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  15. Sirtuins and Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Maha

    2012-01-01

    The silencer information regulator (Sir) family of proteins has attracted much attention during the past decade due to their prominent role in metabolic homeostasis in mammals. The Sir1-4 proteins were first discovered in yeast as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, which through a gene silencing effect promoted longevity. The subsequent discovery of a homologous sirtuin (Sirt) family of proteins in the mammalian systems soon led to the realization that these molecules have beneficial effects in metabolism- and aging-related diseases. Through their concerted functions in the central nervous system, liver, pancreas, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, they regulate the body’s metabolism. Sirt1, -6, and -7 exert their functions, predominantly, through a direct effect on nuclear transcription of genes involved in metabolism, whereas Sirt3-5 reside in the mitochondrial matrix and regulate various enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles, oxidative phosphorylation, as well as reactive oxygen species production. An interesting aspect of sirtuin’s functionality involves their regulation by the circadian rhythm, which impacts their function via cyclically regulating systemic NAD+ availability, further establishing the link of these proteins to metabolism. In this review we will discuss the relation of sirtuins to NAD+ metabolism, their mechanism of function, and their role in metabolism and mitochondrial functions. In addition, we will describe their effects in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:22904043

  16. KATP channels process nucleotide signals in muscle thermogenic response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Santiago; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Alekseev, Alexey E.

    2014-01-01

    Uniquely gated by intracellular adenine nucleotides, sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels have been typically assigned to protective cellular responses under severe energy insults. More recently, KATP channels have been instituted in the continuous control of muscle energy expenditure under non-stressed, physiological states. These advances raised the question of how KATP channels can process trends in cellular energetics within a milieu where each metabolic system is set to buffer nucleotide pools. Unveiling the mechanistic basis of the KATP channel-driven thermogenic response in muscles thus invites the concepts of intracellular compartmentalization of energy and proteins, along with nucleotide signaling over diffusion barriers. Furthermore, it requires gaining insight into the properties of reversibility of intrinsic ATPase activity associated with KATP channel complexes. Notwithstanding the operational paradigm, the homeostatic role of sarcolemmal KATP channels can be now broadened to a wider range of environmental cues affecting metabolic well-being. In this way, under conditions of energy deficit such as ischemic insult or adrenergic stress, the operation of KATP channel complexes would result in protective energy saving, safeguarding muscle performance and integrity. Under energy surplus, downregulation of KATP channel function may find potential implications in conditions of energy imbalance linked to obesity, cold intolerance and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:20925594

  17. Adenine nucleoside diphosphates block adaptation of mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P G; Hudspeth, A J

    1993-04-01

    By adapting to sustained stimuli, hair cells in the internal ear retain their sensitivity to minute transient displacements. Because one model for adaptation asserts that this process is mediated by a myosin isozyme, we reasoned that we should be able to arrest adaptation by interfering with myosin's ATPase cycle though introduction of ADP into hair cells. During tight-seal, whole-cell recordings of transduction currents in cells isolated from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) sacculus, dialysis with 5-25 mM ADP gave variable results. In half of the cells examined, the rate of adaptation remained unchanged or even increased; adaptation was blocked in the remaining cells. Because we suspected that the variable effect of ADP resulted from the conversion of ADP to ATP by adenylate kinase, we employed the ADP analog adenosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (ADP[beta S]), which is not a substrate for adenylate kinase. Adaptation consistently disappeared in the presence of 1-10 mM ADP[beta S]; in addition, the transduction channels' open probability at rest grew from approximately 0.1 to 0.8 or more. Both effects could be reversed by 2 mM ATP. When used in conjunction with the adenylate kinase inhibitor P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), ADP had effects similar to those of ADP[beta S]. These results suggest that adaptation by hair cells involves adenine nucleotides, and they lend support to the hypothesis that the adaptation process is powered by a myosin motor. PMID:8464880

  18. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]adenine.

    PubMed

    Serafinowska, H T; Ashton, R J; Bailey, S; Harnden, M R; Jackson, S M; Sutton, D

    1995-04-14

    A number of esters and amides of the anti-HIV nucleotide analogue 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)-ethoxy]adenine (1) have been synthesized as potential prodrugs and evaluated for oral bioavailability in mice. Dialkyl esters 17-20 were prepared via a Mitsunobu coupling of alcohols 8-11 with 9-hydroxypurine 12 whereas (acyloxy)alkyl esters 25-33 and bis-[(alkoxycarbonyl)methyl] and bis(amidomethyl) esters 34-39 were obtained by reaction of 1 with a suitable alkylating agent. Phosphonodichloridate chemistry was employed for the preparation of dialkyl and diaryl esters 42-65, and bis(phosphonoamidates) 66 and 67. Following oral administration to mice, most of the dialkyl esters 17-20 were well-absorbed and then converted to the corresponding monoesters, but minimal further metabolism to 1 occurred. Bis[(pivaloyloxy)methyl] ester 25 displayed an oral bioavailability of 30% that was 15-fold higher than the bioavailability observed after dosing of 1. Methyl substitution at the alpha carbon of the bis[(pivaloyloxy)methyl] ester 25 (33) increased the oral bioavailability of 1 to 74%. Some of the diaryl esters also showed improved absorption properties in comparison with that of 1. In particular, the crystalline hydrochloride salt of diphenyl ester 55 was well-absorbed and efficiently converted to the parent compound with an oral bioavailability of 50%. On the basis of these results as well as the physicochemical properties of the prodrugs and their stability in mouse duodenal contents, the hydrochloride salt of diphenyl ester 55 was identified as the preferred prodrug of 1. PMID:7731022

  19. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine decreases intestinal permeability and protects against experimental sepsis: a prospective, randomised laboratory investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Nalan; Funke, Benjamin; Conzelmann, Lars Oliver; Winkler, Harald; Hofer, Stefan; Steppan, Jochen; Schmidt, Heinfried; Bardenheuer, Hubert; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Weigand, Markus A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of septic conditions in critically ill patients is still one of medicine's major challenges. Cyclic nucleotides, adenosine and its receptors play a pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory responses and in limiting inflammatory tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that adenosine deaminase-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate-stimulated phosphodiesterase inhibition by erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine could be beneficial in experimental endotoxicosis/sepsis. Method We used two established animal models for endotoxicosis and sepsis. Twenty-four male Wistar rats that had been given intravenous endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide) were treated with either erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine infusion or 0.9% saline during a study length of 120 minutes. Sepsis in 84 female C57BL/6 mice was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Animals were treated with repeated erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine injections after 0, 12 and 24 hours or 4, 12 and 24 hours for delayed treatment. Results In endotoxaemic rats, intestinal production of hypoxanthine increased from 9.8 +/- 90.2 μmol/l at baseline to 411.4 +/- 124.6 μmol/l and uric acid formation increased from 1.5 +/- 2.3 mmol/l to 13.1 +/- 2.7 mmol/l after 120 minutes. In endotoxaemic animals treated with erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine, we found no elevation of adenosine metabolites. The lactulose/L-rhamnose ratio (14.3 versus 4.2 in control animals; p = 2.5 × 10-7) reflects a highly permeable small intestine and through the application of erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine, intestinal permeability could be re-established. The lipopolysaccharide animals had decreased L-rhamnose/3-O-methyl-D-glucose urine excretion ratios. Erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine reduced this effect. The mucosa damage score of the septic animals was higher compared with control and therapy animals (p < 0.05). Septic shock induction by caecal

  20. Cytochrome b nucleotide sequence variation among the Atlantic Alcidae.

    PubMed

    Friesen, V L; Montevecchi, W A; Davidson, W S

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cytochrome b nucleotide sequences of the six extant species of Atlantic alcids and a gull revealed an excess of adenines and cytosines and a deficit of guanines at silent sites on the coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the sequences of the common (Uria aalge) and Brünnich's (U. lomvia) guillemots, followed by the razorbill (Alca torda) and little auk (Alle alle). The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) sequence formed a sister taxon, and the puffin (Fratercula arctica) fell outside the other alcids. Phylogenetic comparisons of substitutions indicated that mutabilities of bases did not differ, but that C was much more likely to be incorporated than was G. Imbalances in base composition appear to result from a strand bias in replication errors, which may result from selection on secondary RNA structure and/or the energetics of codon-anticodon interactions. PMID:7916741

  1. Complementary effects of extracellular nucleotides and platelet-derived extracts on angiogenesis of vasa vasorum endothelial cells in vitro and subcutaneous Matrigel plugs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelets contribute to vascular homeostasis and angiogenesis through the release of multiple growth factors, cytokines and nucleotides, such as ATP and ADP. Recent reports have demonstrated a marked growth-promoting effect of total platelet extracts and selected platelet growth factors on therapeutic angiogenesis. However, since endogenous adenine nucleotides are rapidly degraded during the platelet isolation and storage, we examined whether supplementing a platelet-derived extract with exogenous adenine nucleotides would augment their pro-angiogenic effects. Methods Pulmonary artery vasa vasorum endothelial cells (VVEC) were used to examine the effects of dialyzed platelet-derived soluble extracts and extracellular adenine nucleotides on proliferation, migration and tube formation. In addition, an in vivo Matrigel plug assay was used to examine the effects of platelet extracts and adenine nucleotides on neovascularization of plugs subcutaneously placed in 50 ICR mice. The number of vascular structures in Matrigel plugs were evaluated by histological and statistical methods. Results Platelet extracts (6.4-64 μg/ml) significantly induced DNA synthesis and at a concentration of 64 μg/ml had a biphasic effect on VVEC proliferation (an increase at 48 hrs followed by a decrease at 60 hrs). Stimulation of VVEC with platelet extracts also significantly (up to several-fold) increased cell migration and tube formation on Matrigel. Stimulation of VVEC with extracellular ATP (100 μM) dramatically (up to ten-fold) increased migration and tube formation on Matrigel; however, no significant effects on cell proliferation were observed. We also found that ATP moderately diminished platelet extract-induced VVEC proliferation (48 hrs) and migration, but potentiated tube formation. Neither ATP, or a mixture of non-hydrolyzable nucleotides (ATPγS, ADPβS, MeSATP, MeSADP) induced vascularization of Matrigel plugs subcutaneously injected in mice, however, the combination

  2. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  3. Effect of antiretroviral therapy in thromboregulation through the hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides in platelets of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Rezer, João Felipe P; Souza, Viviane C G; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza P; Ruchel, Jader B; Bertoldo, Tatiana M D; Zanini, Daniela; Silveira, Karine L; Leal, Claudio A M; Passos, Daniela F; Gonçalves, Jamile F; Abdalla, Fátima H; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in biochemical and vascular dysfunctions. The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) markedly reduces mortality and opportunistic diseases associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This increased survival time predisposes the development of cardiovascular diseases. Platelets present purinergic system ectoenzymes such as E-NTPDase, E-5'-nucleotidase and E-ADA on its surface. In view of this, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of these ectoenzymes in platelets as well as the platelet aggregation and lipid profile of patients with HIV infection and also patients receiving HAART. The results showed an increase in the E-NTPDase activity for ATP hydrolysis in the HIV group compared with the control group and the HIV/HAART group. When assessing the activity E-NTPDase hydrolysis to ADP, the results revealed an increase in activity in the HIV group when compared to the control group, and a decrease in activity when in the HIV/HAART group when compared to the control and HIV groups. The activity of E-5'-nucleotidase revealed an increase in AMP hydrolysis in the HIV group, as the results from control and HIV/HAART groups showed no statistical difference. Regarding the E-ADA activity, the HIV and HIV/HAART groups revealed a decreased deamination of adenosine when compared with the control group. Furthermore, we observed an increased platelet aggregation of HIV/HAART group compared with the control group. Thus, our results suggest that antiretroviral treatment against HIV has a significant effect on the activity of purinergic system ectoenzymes demonstrating that thromboregulation is involved in the process. PMID:27044844

  4. Alterations in erythrocyte plasma membrane ATPase activity and adenine nucleotide content in a spontaneously diabetic subline of the Chinese hamster.

    PubMed

    Bettin, D; Klöting, I; Kohnert, K D

    1996-01-01

    The CHIG/Han subline of the Chinese hamster develops noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperinsulinemia and different degrees of glucose intolerance. To study whether these abnormalities could affect transmembrane cation transport activity, we determined membrane ATPase activity and ATP concentrations in red blood cells of diabetes-resistant CHIA and diabetes-susceptible CHIG sublines of the Chinese hamster. Mg(2+)-ATPase activity was increased in red blood cell membranes of diabetic hamsters compared with that of nondiabetic CHIG and the diabetes-resistant CHIA animals and correlated with plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+/K+ATPase activity were not significantly different between diabetic and nondiabetic hamsters, but for the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, Km was decreased and the Vmax value increased in membrane preparations from severely diabetic hamsters. Both ATP and ADP content were lower in erythrocytes from diabetic than nondiabetic hamsters. Independently of the levels of glycemia, AMP concentrations were higher in CHIG than in CHIA hamsters. While ATP/AMP ratios were found to be decreased in erythrocytes from diabetes-susceptible CHIG hamsters compared to the diabetes-resistant CHIA animals, they were significantly correlated with the levels of glycemia. Furthermore, the relationship between blood glucose levels and kidney weight in hamsters of the diabetes-susceptible CHIG subline was such, that severely hyperglycemic animals displayed the greatest increase in kidney wet weight. These results indicate that the progressive metabolic deterioration in the development of noninsulin-dependent diabetes is associated with significant changes in the activity and kinetic parameters of cellular ATPases which could probably indicate early membrane alterations which may eventually result in the late microangiopathic complications of diabetes. PMID:8820985

  5. Standard role for a conserved aspartate or more direct involvement in deglycosylation? An ONIOM and MD investigation of adenine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kellie, Jennifer L; Wilson, Katie A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2013-12-01

    8-Oxoguanine (OG) is one of the most frequently occurring forms of DNA damage and is particularly deleterious since it forms a stable Hoogsteen base pair with adenine (A). The repair of an OG:A mispair is initiated by adenine-DNA glycosylase (MutY), which hydrolyzes the sugar-nucleobase bond of the adenine residue before the lesion is processed by other proteins. MutY has been proposed to use a two-part chemical step involving protonation of the adenine nucleobase, followed by SN1 hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. However, differences between a recent (fluorine recognition complex, denoted as the FLRC) crystal structure and the structure on which most mechanistic conclusions have been based to date (namely, the lesion recognition complex or LRC) raise questions regarding the mechanism used by MutY and the discrete role of various active-site residues. The present work uses both molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (ONIOM) models to compare the active-site conformational dynamics in the two crystal structures, which suggests that only the understudied FLRC leads to a catalytically competent reactant. Indeed, all previous computational studies on MutY have been initiated from the LRC structure. Subsequently, for the first time, various mechanisms are examined with detailed ONIOM(M06-2X:PM6) reaction potential energy surfaces (PES) based on the FLRC structure, which significantly extends the mechanistic picture. Specifically, our work reveals that the reaction proceeds through a different route than the commonly accepted mechanism and the catalytic function of various active-site residues (Geobacillus stearothermophilus numbering). Specifically, contrary to proposals based on the LRC, E43 is determined to solely be involved in the initial adenine protonation step and not the deglycosylation reaction as the general base. Additionally, a novel catalytic role is proposed for Y126, whereby this residue plays a significant role in stabilizing the highly charged

  6. Generation of reducing power in chemosynthesis. 3. Energy-linked reduction of pyridine nucleotides in Thiobacillus novellus.

    PubMed

    Aleem, M I

    1966-02-01

    Aleem, M. I. H. (Research Institute for Advanced Studies, Baltimore, Md.). Generation of reducing power in chemosynthesis. III. Energy-linked reduction of pyridine nucleotides in Thiobacillus novellus. J. Bacteriol. 91:729-736. 1966.-Cell-free extracts from Thiobacillus novellus. catalyzed an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent reduction of pyridine nucleotides anaerobically, or aerobically when the respiratory chain was inhibited by azide. The exogenous electron donor employed for the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) was thiosulfate, formate, or mammalian ferrocytochrome c. In the latter case, the oxidation of ferrocytochrome c was observed with the concomitant reduction of the pyridine nucleotide. Values calculated for the molar ratios of ATP utilized-NADP reduced and of cytochrome c oxidized-NADP reduced were 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The energy-dependent reduction of the pyridine nucleotides was inhibited by Atabrine or amytal and by low concentrations of the uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation such as 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Evidence is presented showing that the reduced pyridine nucleotides are essential for providing the reducing power for the energy-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide in T. novellus. PMID:4379907

  7. Novel electrochemical sensor based on functionalized graphene for simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Sun, Jun-Yong; Han, Cong-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yan-Li; Xiong, Xiao-Qin

    2011-02-01

    A nano-material carboxylic acid functionalized graphene (graphene-COOH) was prepared and used to construct a novel biosensor for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. The direct electrooxidation behaviors of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode (graphene-COOH/GCE) were carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicated that both adenine and guanine showed the increase of the oxidation peak currents with the negative shift of the oxidation peak potentials in contrast to that on the bare glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical parameters of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH/GCE were calculated and a simple and reliable electroanalytical method was developed for the detection of adenine and guanine, respectively. The modified electrode exhibited good behaviors in the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine with the peak separation as 0.334V. The detection limit for individual determination of guanine and adenine was 5.0×10(-8)M and 2.5×10(-8)M (S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the measurements of thermally denatured single-stranded DNA were carried out and the value of (G+C)/(A+T) of single-stranded DNA was calculated as 0.80. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:21050729

  8. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  9. PEP Carboxykinase Exchange Reaction in Photosynthetic Bacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, T. G.; Benedict, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    This paper describes some new characteristics of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in purified preparations of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzymatic activity has been purified 169-fold. Nucleotide diphosphates substitute for nucleotide triphosphates in the exchange reaction. Nucleotide diphosphates will not support the synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate from oxaloacetate. This reaction differs significantly from the CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in higher plants and animals. PMID:5661493

  10. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  11. Intermolecular interactions of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Junaid Farooqi, M.; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^+/NADH) is a coenzyme involved in cellular respiration as an electron transporter. In aqueous solution, the molecule exhibits a folding transition characterized by the stacking of its aromatic moieties. A transition to an unfolded conformation is possible using chemical denaturants like methanol. Because the reduced NADH form is fluorescent, the folding transition can be monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy, e.g., via a blue-shift in the UV-excited emission peak upon methanol unfolding. Here we present evidence of interactions between NADH molecules in solution. We measure the excited-state emission from NADH at various concentrations (1-100 μM in MOPS buffer, pH 7.5; 337-nm wavelength excitation). Unlike for the folded form, the emission peak wavelength of the unfolded form is concentration dependent, exhibiting a red-shift with higher NADH concentration, suggesting the presence of intermolecular interactions. An understanding of NADH spectra in solution would assist in interpreting intercellular NADH measurements used for the in vivo monitoring cellular energy metabolism.

  12. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and Ca2+ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Miklós; Bak, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological processes are controlled by a great diversity of Ca2+ signals that depend on Ca2+ entry into the cell and/or Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores is gated by a family of messengers including inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). There is increasing evidence for a novel intracellular Ca2+ release channel that may be targeted by NAADP and that displays properties distinctly different from the well-characterized InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. These channels appear to localize on a wider range of intracellular organelles, including the acidic Ca2+ stores. Activation of the NAADP-sensitive Ca2+ channels evokes complex changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels by means of channel chatter with other intracellular Ca2+ channels. The recent demonstration of changes in intracellular NAADP levels in response to physiologically relevant extracellular stimuli highlights the significance of NAADP as an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:18569524

  13. Cardiac Na+ Current Regulation by Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Sanyal, Shamarendra; Gao, Ge; Gurung, Iman S.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Gaconnet, Georgia; Kerchner, Laurie J.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Huang, Christopher L-H.; Grace, Andrew; London, Barry; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1-L) protein reduce cardiac Na+ current (INa) and cause Brugada Syndrome (BrS). GPD1-L has >80% amino acid homology with glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent energy metabolism. Objective Therefore, we tested whether NAD(H) could regulate human cardiac sodium channels (Nav1.5). Methods and Results HEK293 cells stably expressing Nav1.5 and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were used. The influence of NADH/NAD+ on arrhythmic risk was evaluated in wild-type or SCN5A+/− mouse heart. A280V GPD1-L caused a 2.48 ± 0.17-fold increase in intracellular NADH level (P<0.001). NADH application or co-transfection with A280V GPD1-L resulted in decreased INa (0.48 ± 0.09 or 0.19 ±0.04 of control group, respectively; P<0.01), which was reversed by NAD+, chelerythrine, or superoxide dismutase (SOD). NAD+ antagonism of the Na+ channel downregulation by A280V GPD1-L or NADH was prevented by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, PKAI6–22. The effects of NADH and NAD+ were mimicked by a phorbol ester and forskolin, respectively. Increasing intracellular NADH was associated with an increased risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in wild-type mouse hearts. Extracellular application of NAD+ to SCN5A+/− mouse hearts ameliorated the risk of VT. Conclusions Our results show that Nav1.5 is regulated by pyridine nucleotides, suggesting a link between metabolism and INa. This effect required protein kinase C (PKC) activation and was mediated by oxidative stress. NAD+ could prevent this effect by activating PKA. Mutations of GPD1-L may downregulate Nav1.5 by altering the oxidized to reduced NAD(H) balance. PMID:19745168

  14. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  15. Binding of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotides to diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, L.; Sperti, Simonetta

    1967-01-01

    1. Changes in protein fluorescence have been utilized in determining the stoicheiometry and dissociation constants of the complexes of diphtheria toxin with NADH2, NAD, NADPH2 and NADP. 2. The binding stoicheiometry is 2moles of NADH2 and 1mole of NADPH2/mole of diphtheria toxin. The binding sites for NADH2 appear to be equivalent and independent. 3. The toxin shows a higher affinity for the reduced than for the oxidized forms of the nucleotides. 4. Dissociation constants at 0·01I, pH7 and 25° are 0·7×10−6m for NADH2 and 0·45×10−6m for NADPH2. Dissociation constants increase with increasing ionic strength, indicating that the binding is mainly electrostatic. 5. Bound NADH2 and NADPH2 may be activated to fluoresce by the transfer of energy from the excited aromatic amino acids of the toxin. Activation and emission spectra of bound and free nucleotides are compared. 6. Since NAD and NADH2 are cofactors specifically required for the inhibition of protein synthesis by diphtheria toxin, the possible role of toxin–nucleotide complexes is discussed in this regard. PMID:4384596

  16. Protonation mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malic enzyme reaction from isotope effects and pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1986-01-14

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and the primary deuterium isotope effects with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and also thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) as the nucleotide substrates were determined in order to obtain information about the chemical mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction. The maximum velocity with thio-NAD as the nucleotide is pH-independent from pH 4.2 to 9.6, while with NAD, V decreases below a pK of 4.8. V/K for both nucleotides decreases below a pK of 5.6 and above a pK of 8.9. Both the tartronate pKi and V/Kmalate decrease below a pK of 4.8 and above a pK of 8.9. Oxalate is competitive vs. malate above pH 7 and noncompetitive below pH 7 with NAD as the nucleotide. The oxalate Kis increases from a constant value above a pK of 4.9 to another constant value above a pK of 6.7. The oxalate Kii also increases above a pK of 4.9, and this inhibition is enhanced by NADH. In the presence of thio-NAD the inhibition by oxalate is competitive vs. malate below pH 7. For thio-NAD, both DV and D(V/K) are pH-independent and equal to 1.7. With NAD as the nucleotide, DV decreases to 1.0 below a pK of 4.9, while D(V/KNAD) and D(V/Kmalate) are pH-independent. Above pH 7 the isotope effects on V and the V/K values for NAD and malate are equal to 1.45, the pH-independent value of DV above pH 7. Results indicate that substrates bind to only the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Two enzyme groups are necessary for binding of substrates and catalysis. Both NAD and malate are released from the Michaelis complex at equal rates which are equal to the rate of NADH release from E-NADH above pH 7. Below pH 7 NADH release becomes more rate-determining as the pH decreases until at pH 4.0 it completely limits the overall rate of the reaction.

  17. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  18. RasGRP1 overexpression in T-ALL increases basal nucleotide exchange on Ras rendering the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway responsive to protumorigenic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ksionda, O; Melton, A A; Bache, J; Tenhagen, M; Bakker, J; Harvey, R; Winter, S S; Rubio, I; Roose, J P

    2016-07-14

    Ras GTPases are activated by RasGEFs and inactivated by RasGAPs, which stimulate the hydrolysis of RasGTP to inactive RasGDP. GTPase-impairing somatic mutations in RAS genes, such as KRAS(G12D), are among the most common oncogenic events in metastatic cancer. A different type of cancer Ras signal, driven by overexpression of the RasGEF RasGRP1 (Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein 1), was recently implicated in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and murine models, in which RasGRP1 T-ALLs expand in response to treatment with interleukins (ILs) 2, 7 and 9. Here, we demonstrate that IL-2/7/9 stimulation activates Erk and Akt pathways downstream of Ras in RasGRP1 T-ALL but not in normal thymocytes. In normal lymphocytes, RasGRP1 is recruited to the membrane by diacylglycerol (DAG) in a phospholipase C-γ (PLCγ)-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we find that leukemic RasGRP1-triggered Ras-Akt signals do not depend on acute activation of PLCγ to generate DAG but rely on baseline DAG levels instead. In agreement, using three distinct assays that measure different aspects of the RasGTP/GDP cycle, we established that overexpression of RasGRP1 in T-ALLs results in a constitutively high GTP-loading rate of Ras, which is constantly counterbalanced by hydrolysis of RasGTP. KRAS(G12D) T-ALLs do not show constitutive GTP loading of Ras. Thus, we reveal an entirely novel type of leukemogenic Ras signals that is based on a RasGRP1-driven increased in flux through the RasGTP/GDP cycle, which is mechanistically very different from KRAS(G12D) signals. Our studies highlight the dynamic balance between RasGEF and RasGAP in these T-ALLs and put forth a new model in which IL-2/7/9 decrease RasGAP activity. PMID:26549032

  19. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  20. Ototoxic Model of Oxaliplatin and Protection from Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Dalian, Ding; Haiyan, Jiang; Yong, Fu; Yongqi, Li; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 μM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 μM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initially increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+ would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 μM or 50 μM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 μM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 μM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apoptotic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+ treatment greatly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+ provides significant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply. PMID:25419212

  1. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  2. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion. PMID:25605536

  3. Nucleotide discrimination with DNA immobilized in the MspA nanopore.

    PubMed

    Manrao, Elizabeth A; Derrington, Ian M; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H

    2011-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a fast and low-cost DNA sequencing platform. An ionic current passing through a small pore would directly map the sequence of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) driven through the constriction. The pore protein, MspA, derived from Mycobacterium smegmatis, has a short and narrow channel constriction ideally suited for nanopore sequencing. To study MspA's ability to resolve nucleotides, we held ssDNA within the pore using a biotin-NeutrAvidin complex. We show that homopolymers of adenine, cytosine, thymine, and guanine in MspA exhibit much larger current differences than in α-hemolysin. Additionally, methylated cytosine is distinguishable from unmethylated cytosine. We establish that single nucleotide substitutions within homopolymer ssDNA can be detected when held in MspA's constriction. Using genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms, we demonstrate that single nucleotides within random DNA can be identified. Our results indicate that MspA has high signal-to-noise ratio and the single nucleotide sensitivity desired for nanopore sequencing devices. PMID:21991340

  4. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  5. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  6. A computational study of adenine, uracil, and cytosine adsorption upon AlN and BN nano-cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baei, Mohammad T.; Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Soltani, Alireza

    Density-functional theory calculations are used to investigate the interaction of Al12N12 and B12N12 clusters with the adenine (A), uracil (U), and cytosine (C) molecules. The current calculations demonstrate that these hybrid adsorbent materials are able to adsorb the adenine, uracil, and cytosine molecules through exothermic processes. Our theoretical results reveal improvement in the adsorption of adenine, uracil, and cytosine on Al12N12 and B12N12. It is observed that B12N12 is highly sensitive to adenine, uracil, and cytosine compared with Al12N12 to serve as a biochemical sensor.

  7. Absolute effective cross sections of ionization of adenine and guanine molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranyosh, I. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu.; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Effective cross sections of the formation of positive ions of nitrous nucleic acids of adenine and guanine are determined by the crossed electron and molecular beam method in the energy interval from the threshold to 200 eV. It is found that the maximal value of the total cross section of adenine ionization is attained at an energy of 90 eV and is equal to (2.8 ± 0.6) × 10-15 cm2. The maximal value of the total cross section of guanine ionization is equal to (3.2 ± 0.7) × 10-15 cm2 and is observed at an energy of 88 eV. The energy ionization thresholds are determined, which amount to (8.8 ± 0.2) eV for adenine and to (8.3 ± 0.2) eV for guanine. The adenine and guanine mass spectra are measured. The absolute values of partial ionization cross sections of adenine and guanine molecules are determined.

  8. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region. PMID:25660103

  9. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  10. Regulation of photolyase in Escherichia coli K-12 during adenine deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, J L; Rupert, C S

    1990-01-01

    DNA photolyase, a DNA repair enzyme encoded by the phr gene of Escherichia coli, is normally regulated at 10 to 20 active molecules per cell. In purA mutants deprived of adenine, this amount increased sixfold within 2 h. Operon fusions placing lacZ under transcriptional control of phr promoters indicated no change in transcription rate during adenine deprivation, and gene fusions of phr with lacZ showed a nearly constant level of translation as well. Immunoblot analysis indicated that the total amount of photolyase protein remained constant during enzyme amplification. On the other hand, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol during the adenine deprivation prevented any increase. DNA regions lying 1.3 to 4.2 kb upstream of the phr coding sequences were necessary for this amplification to occur and for this purpose would function in trans. These results suggest that adenine deprivation leads to a posttranslational change, involving synthesis of protein encoded by sequences lying upstream of phr, which increases photolyase activity. The amplification in activity was found to be reversible, for when adenine was restored, the photolyase activity declined before cell growth resumed. Images PMID:2254263

  11. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  12. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  13. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  15. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  16. Recent Trends in Nucleotide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Béatrice; Depaix, Anaïs; Périgaud, Christian; Peyrottes, Suzanne

    2016-07-27

    Focusing on the recent literature (since 2000), this review outlines the main synthetic approaches for the preparation of 5'-mono-, 5'-di-, and 5'-triphosphorylated nucleosides, also known as nucleotides, as well as several derivatives, namely, cyclic nucleotides and dinucleotides, dinucleoside 5',5'-polyphosphates, sugar nucleotides, and nucleolipids. Endogenous nucleotides and their analogues can be obtained enzymatically, which is often restricted to natural substrates, or chemically. In chemical synthesis, protected or unprotected nucleosides can be used as the starting material, depending on the nature of the reagents selected from P(III) or P(V) species. Both solution-phase and solid-support syntheses have been developed and are reported here. Although a considerable amount of research has been conducted in this field, further work is required because chemists are still faced with the challenge of developing a universal methodology that is compatible with a large variety of nucleoside analogues. PMID:27319940

  17. Intramolecular interactions in aminoacyl nucleotides: Implications regarding the origin of genetic coding and protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.; Hall, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular organisms store information as sequences of nucleotides in double stranded DNA. This information is useless unless it can be converted into the active molecular species, protein. This is done in contemporary creatures first by transcription of one strand to give a complementary strand of mRNA. The sequence of nucleotides is then translated into a specific sequence of amino acids in a protein. Translation is made possible by a genetic coding system in which a sequence of three nucleotides codes for a specific amino acid. The origin and evolution of any chemical system can be understood through elucidation of the properties of the chemical entities which make up the system. There is an underlying logic to the coding system revealed by a correlation of the hydrophobicities of amino acids and their anticodonic nucleotides (i.e., the complement of the codon). Its importance lies in the fact that every amino acid going into protein synthesis must first be activated. This is universally accomplished with ATP. Past studies have concentrated on the chemistry of the adenylates, but more recently we have found, through the use of NMR, that we can observe intramolecular interactions even at low concentrations, between amino acid side chains and nucleotide base rings in these adenylates. The use of this type of compound thus affords a novel way of elucidating the manner in which amino acids and nucleotides interact with each other. In aqueous solution, when a hydrophobic amino acid is attached to the most hydrophobic nucleotide, AMP, a hydrophobic interaction takes place between the amino acid side chain and the adenine ring. The studies to be reported concern these hydrophobic interactions.

  18. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  19. Bioenergetics and Gene Silencing Approaches for Unraveling Nucleotide Recognition by the Human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Al-Taher, Abdullah; Nakashima, Remi; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Kandeel, Ali; Nagaya, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2) is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3′-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3′-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine), whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain. PMID:24788663

  20. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in Thais.

    PubMed

    Thongngam, Punlop; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Bhoopat, Tanin; Sangthong, Padchanee

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the hypervariable region III (HVRIII) of mitochondrial DNA in Thai individuals. Buccal swab samples were randomly obtained from 100 healthy, unrelated, adult (18-60 years old), volunteer donors living in Thailand. Eighteen different haplotypes were found, of which 11 haplotypes were unique. The most frequent haplotypes observed were 522D-523D. Nucleotide transition from Thymine (T) to Cytosine (C) at position 489 (43%) was the most frequent substitution. Nucleotide transversions were also observed at position 433 (Adenine (A) to C, 1%) and position 499 (Guanine (G) to C, 1%). Fifty-three samples presented nucleotide insertion and deletion of C and A (CA) at position 514-523. Insertion of 1AC (3%) and 2AC (2%) were observed. Deletion of 1CA (53%) and 2CA (2%) at position 514-523 were revealed. The deletion of T at position 459 was observed. The haplotype diversity, random match probability, and discrimination power were calculated to be 0.7770, 0.2308, and 0.7692, respectively. PMID:27107562

  1. Dietary nucleotides prevent decrease in cellular immunity in ground-based microgravity analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Keiko; Hales, Nathan W.; Robinson, Sandra M.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Ramesh, Vani; Pellis, Neal R.; Kulkarni, Anil D.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity and stress of spaceflights result in immune dysfunction. The role of nutrition, especially nucleotide supplementation, has become an area of intensive research and significant interest in immunomodulation for maintenance of cellular immune responses. The studies presented here evaluate the plausibility of administering nucleotides to obviate immune dysfunction in an Earth-based in vivo analog of microgravity as studied in anti-orthostatic tail suspension (AOS) of mice. Mice were divided into three housing groups: group, isolation, and AOS. Mice were fed either control chow diet (CD), or RNA-, adenine-, or uracil-supplemented CD for the 1-wk duration of the experiments. In AOS mice, supplemental nucleotides significantly increased in vivo lymph node proliferation and ex vivo lymphoproliferation response to alloantigen and mitogens, respectively, and interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma production. A lower corticosterone level was observed in uracil-supplemented CD compared with CD. These results suggest that exogenous nucleotide supplementation, especially uracil, of normal diet is beneficial in the maintenance and restoration of the immune response during the microgravity analog conditions.

  2. Effects of adenine arabinoside on lymphocytes infected with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, W C; Siegel, P J; Baer, J

    1978-01-01

    Low concentrations of adenine arabinoside inhibited growth of two Epstein-Barr virus producer cell lines in culture, while not significantly affecting a nonproducer cell line and a B-cell-negative line. These observations were extended to include freshly infected cells. Mitogen-stimulated human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes were unaffected by the drug at concentration levels that inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated cells. DNA synthesis in Epstein-Barr virus-superinfected Raji cells was also adversely affected by adenine arabinoside. However, these same low concentrations of adenine arabinoside in the triphosphate form produced less effect on DNA synthesis in nuclear systems and DNA polymerase assays than on growth or DNA synthesis in whole cells. Therefore the effects reported here of low concentrations of the drug on whole cells may be only in part related to DNA polymerase inhibition. The work reported here suggests that adenine arabinoside has multiple sites of action in infected cells. PMID:212577

  3. Assembly of an antiparallel homo-adenine DNA duplex by small-molecule binding.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Santai, Catherine T; Jain, Swapan S; Hud, Nicholas V

    2004-07-21

    Molecules that reversibly bind DNA and trigger the formation of non-Watson-Crick secondary structures would be useful in the design of dynamic DNA nanostructures and as potential leads for new therapeutic agents. We demonstrate that coralyne, a small crescent-shaped molecule, promotes the formation of a duplex secondary structure from homo-adenine oligonucleotides. AFM studies reveal that the staggered alignment of homo-adenine oligonucleotides upon coralyne binding produces polymers of micrometers in length, but only 2 nm in height. A DNA duplex was also studied that contained eight A.A mismatches between two flanking 7-bp Watson-Crick helices. CD spectra confirm that the multiple A.A mismatches of this duplex bind coralyne in manner similar to that of homo-adenine oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the melting temperature of this hybrid duplex increases by 13 degrees C upon coralyne binding. These observations illustrate that the helical structure of the homo-adenine-coralyne duplex is compatible with the B-form DNA helix. PMID:15250704

  4. The First Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Is a Site of Stable Nucleotide Interaction, whereas the Second Is a Site of Rapid Turnover.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R

    2002-05-01

    As in other adenine nucleotide binding cassette (ABC) proteins the nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bind and hydrolyze ATP and in some manner regulate CFTR ion channel gating. Unlike some other ABC proteins, however, there are preliminary indications that the two domains of CFTR are nonequivalent in their nucleotide interactions (Szabo, K., Szakacs, G., Hegeds, T., and Sarkadi, B. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12209-12212; Aleksandrov, L., Mengos, A., Chang, X., Aleksandrov, A., and Riordan, J. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12918-12923). We have now characterized the interactions of the 8-azido-photoactive analogues of ATP, ADP, and 5'-adenyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) with the two domains of functional membrane-bound CFTR. The results show that the two domains appear to act independently in the binding and hydrolysis of 8-azido-ATP. At NBD1 binding does not require a divalent cation. This binding is followed by minimal Mg(2+)-dependent hydrolysis and retention of the hydrolysis product, 8-azido-ADP, but not as a vanadate stabilized post-hydrolysis transition state complex. In contrast, at NBD2, MgN(3)ATP is hydrolyzed as rapidly as it is bound and the nucleoside diphosphate hydrolysis product dissociates immediately. Confirming this characterization of NBD1 as a site of more stable nucleotide interaction and NBD2 as a site of fast turnover, the non-hydrolyzable N(3)AMP-PNP bound preferentially to NBD1. This demonstration of NBD2 as the rapid nucleotide turnover site is consistent with the strong effect on channel gating kinetics of inactivation of this domain by mutagenesis. PMID:11861646

  5. Different Effects of Guanine Nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on Protein-Mediated Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M.; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP. PMID:24904988

  6. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  7. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  8. Mathematical model of nucleotide regulation on airway epithelia. Implications for airway homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peiying; Picher, Maryse; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2008-09-26

    In the airways, adenine nucleotides support a complex signaling network mediating host defenses. Released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) layer, they regulate mucus clearance through P2 (ATP) receptors, and following surface metabolism through P1 (adenosine; Ado) receptors. The complexity of ASL nucleotide regulation provides an ideal subject for biochemical network modeling. A mathematical model was developed to integrate nucleotide release, the ectoenzymes supporting the dephosphorylation of ATP into Ado, Ado deamination into inosine (Ino), and nucleoside uptake. The model also includes ecto-adenylate kinase activity and feed-forward inhibition of Ado production by ATP and ADP. The parameters were optimized by fitting the model to experimental data for the steady-state and transient concentration profiles generated by adding ATP to polarized primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The model captures major aspects of ATP and Ado regulation, including their >4-fold increase in concentration induced by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing. The model also confirmed the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on the ASL volume, an important regulator of airway clearance. An interactive approach between simulations and assays revealed that feed-forward inhibition is mediated by selective inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Importantly, the model identifies ecto-adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ASL ATP and proposes novel strategies for the treatment of airway diseases characterized by impaired nucleotide-mediated clearance. These new insights into the biochemical processes supporting ASL nucleotide regulation illustrate the potential of this mathematical model for fundamental and clinical research. PMID:18662982

  9. [Interaction of divalent cadmium ions with nucleotides and native DNA].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Valeev, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Sysa, I V

    1997-01-01

    Complex formation of Cd2+ ions with 2'-deoxy-5'-phosphates of canonical bases and their riboanalogues in water solution is studied by the method of differential UV-spectroscopy. It is stated that the atoms coordinating Cd2+ in complexes are N7 of dGMP and GMP, dAMP and AMP, N1 of adenine derivatives, N3 of dCMP. No interaction with base heteroatoms of UMP and dTMP is found. O2' present in the structure of the sugar ring has a weak influence on the Cd2+ ion binding to purine nucleotides. It manifests itself strongly in the complexes with cytosine derivatives: cadmium does not interact with N3 of CMP and poly-C practically. In the last case O2 is a centre coordinating Cd2+ ions. The interaction with this atom induces the melting of polynucleotide helical parts. At the high cadmium concentration poly-C forms compact particles. The main centre binding Cd2+ ions in DNA is N7 of guanines. Noncooperative interaction with these centres results in the internal protonation of N3C of GC-pairs. This is not followed with the disordering of the DNA helical structure. PMID:9181783

  10. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, G; Tuli, M A; Lopez, R; Sterk, P

    1999-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl.html) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. Main sources for DNA and RNA sequences are direct submissions from individual researchers, genome sequencing projects and patent applications. While automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO), the preferred submission tool for individual submitters is Webin (WWW). Through all stages, dataflow is monitored by EBI biologists communicating with the sequencing groups. In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. Network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a Network Browser for Databanks in Molecular Biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases, plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, Blast etc) are available for external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. PMID:9847133

  11. Effect of l-Methionine and S-Adenosylmethionine on Growth of an Adenine Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yall, Irving; Norrell, Stephen A.; Joseph, Ronald; Knudsen, Richard C.

    1967-01-01

    A pink, adenine-requiring yeast utilized adenine, hypoxanthine, or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), in quantities up to 3 μmoles per 100 ml of medium, as equivalent sources of purine for cell growth, but not methylthioadenosine or S-adenosylhomocysteine. Utilization of SAM for growth was inhibited by the presence of l-methionine in quantities greater than 0.6 μmole per 100 ml of medium. However, 6 μmoles of l-methionine had no effect on growth when adenine or hypoxanthine was the source of purine. These sources also reversed the inhibitory effects of 6 μmoles of the amino acid on the utilization of SAM. The presence of 400 μmoles of the amino acid resulted in some inhibition of growth when the organisms were grown with adenine, hypoxanthine, or adenine plus SAM but had no effect on the total uptake of adenine-8-14C. Studies on the uptake of radioactivity from a mixture of SAM-adenine-8-14C and 3H-labeled SAM-methyl indicated that these components were taken into the cells at different rates which were altered by the presence of l-methionine. The fixation of 35S from 35S-labeled adenosylmethionine into the cells was inhibited by the presence of the amino acid. The cells synthesized and accumulated SAM in the presence of 400 μmoles of l-methionine plus adenine even when exogenous SAM was supplied. Approximately 47% of radioactivity fixed from exogenous SAM-adenine-8-14C and 12% from 3H-labeled SAM-methyl were found in reisolated SAM. PMID:6025443

  12. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  13. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  14. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding. PMID:26004863

  15. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungwoo; Hwang, Seungwoo; Yu, Hee Jeong; Oh, Dayoung; Choi, Yu Jung; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yongbaek; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition. PMID:26731407

  16. Expression of microRNAs in Horse Plasma and Their Characteristic Nucleotide Composition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoo; Hwang, Seungwoo; Yu, Hee Jeong; Oh, Dayoung; Choi, Yu Jung; Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Yongbaek; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in blood plasma are stable under high levels of ribonuclease activity and could function in tissue-to-tissue communication, suggesting that they may have distinctive structural characteristics compared with non-circulating miRNAs. In this study, the expression of miRNAs in horse plasma and their characteristic nucleotide composition were examined and compared with non-plasma miRNAs. Highly expressed plasma miRNA species were not part of the abundant group of miRNAs in non-plasma tissues, except for the eca-let-7 family. eca-miR-486-5p, -92a, and -21 were among the most abundant plasma miRNAs, and their human orthologs also belong to the most abundant group of miRNAs in human plasma. Uracil and guanine were the most common nucleotides of both plasma and non-plasma miRNAs. Cytosine was the least common in plasma and non-plasma miRNAs, although levels were higher in plasma miRNAs. Plasma miRNAs also showed higher expression levels of miRNAs containing adenine and cytosine repeats, compared with non-plasma miRNAs. These observations indicate that miRNAs in the plasma have a unique nucleotide composition. PMID:26731407

  17. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. PMID:26596516

  18. Synthesis of metal-adeninate frameworks with high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Nan; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    By introducing isophthalic acid or 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid to assemble with adenine and cadmium salt, two isostructural and anionic porous metal-organic frameworks (1 and 2) possessing the novel (4,8)-connected sqc topology are presented here. 1 shows permanent porosity with Langmuir surface area of 770.1 m2/g and exhibits high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons.

  19. Femtosecond decay dynamics of intact adenine and thymine base pairs in a supersonic jet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Joon; Chang, Jinyoung; Kim, Hyung Min; Kang, Hyuk; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Heo, Jiyoung; Kim, Seong Keun

    2011-07-11

    We investigated the decay dynamics of the DNA base pairs adenine-adenine (A(2)), adenine-thymine (AT), and thymine-thymine (T(2)) produced in a supersonic jet by femtosecond (fs) time-resolved photoionization spectroscopy. The base pair was excited by a fs pump pulse at 267 nm and the population change of its excited state was monitored by non-resonant three-photon ionization using a fs probe pulse at 800 nm after a certain time delay. All of the transients recorded in the mass channel of the parent ion exhibited a tri-exponential decay, with time constants ranging from 100 fs to longer than 100 ps. Most of these time constants coincide well with the previous values deduced indirectly from the transients of protonated adenine (AH(+)) and thymine (TH(+)), which were assumed to be produced by fragmentation of the base-pair ions. Notably, for the transient of T(2), we observed a new decay component with a time constant of 2.3 ps, which was absent in the transient of TH(+). We suggest that the new decay component arises from the decay of stacked T(2) dimers that are mostly ionized to T(2)(+), whereas the decay signal recorded in the mass channel of TH(+) is merely from the relaxation of hydrogen-bonded T(2) dimers. From the amplitude of the new decay component, the population of the stacked T(2) dimers relative to the hydrogen-bonded dimers was estimated to be ∼2 % in the supersonic jet, which is about fifteen times higher than the theoretical value. PMID:21710523

  20. Profiles of the biosynthesis and metabolism of pyridine nucleotides in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    As part of a research program on nucleotide metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.), profiles of pyridine (nicotinamide) metabolism were examined based on the in situ metabolic fate of radio-labelled precursors and the in vitro activities of enzymes. In potato tubers, [(3)H]quinolinic acid, which is an intermediate of de novo pyridine nucleotide synthesis, and [(14)C]nicotinamide, a catabolite of NAD, were utilised for pyridine nucleotide synthesis. The in situ tracer experiments and in vitro enzyme assays suggest the operation of multiple pyridine nucleotide cycles. In addition to the previously proposed cycle consisting of seven metabolites, we found a new cycle that includes newly discovered nicotinamide riboside deaminase which is also functional in potato tubers. This cycle bypasses nicotinamide and nicotinic acid; it is NAD --> nicotinamide mononucleotide --> nicotinamide riboside --> nicotinic acid riboside --> nicotinic acid mononucleotide --> nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide --> NAD. Degradation of the pyridine ring was extremely low in potato tubers. Nicotinic acid glucoside is formed from nicotinic acid in potato tubers. Comparative studies of [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid metabolism indicate that nicotinic acid is converted to nicotinic acid glucoside in all organs of potato plants. Trigonelline synthesis from [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid was also found. Conversion was greater in green parts of plants, such as leaves and stem, than in underground parts of potato plants. Nicotinic acid utilised for the biosynthesis of these conjugates seems to be derived not only from the pyridine nucleotide cycle, but also from the de novo synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide. PMID:19820966

  1. Nucleotide sequences 1986/1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    These eight volumes are the third annual published compendium of nucleic acid sequences included in the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Data Library and the GenBank Genetic Sequences Data Bank. Each volume surveys one or more subdivisions of the database. The volume subtitles are: Primates; Rodents; Other Vertebrates and Invertebrates, Plants and Organelles, Bacteria and Bacteriophage, Viruses, Structural RNA, Synthetic and Unannotated Sequences, and Database Directory and Master Indices.

  2. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  3. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine. PMID:25245205

  4. Nucleotides in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M Teresa; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Gualix, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, Juan Ignacio; Artalejo, Antonio R; Ortega, Felipe; Delicado, Esmerilda G; Perez-Sen, Raquel

    2016-05-01

    Brain injury generates the release of a multitude of factors including extracellular nucleotides, which exhibit bi-functional properties and contribute to both detrimental actions in the acute phase and also protective and reparative actions in the later recovery phase to allow neuroregeneration. A promising strategy toward restoration of neuronal function is based on activation of endogenous adult neural stem/progenitor cells. The implication of purinergic signaling in stem cell biology, including regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and cell death has become evident in the last decade. In this regard, current strategies of acute transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells after spinal cord injury restore altered expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and improve functional locomotor recovery. The expression of both receptors is transcriptionally regulated by Sp1 factor, which plays a key role in the startup of the transcription machinery to induce regeneration-associated genes expression. Finally, general signaling pathways triggered by nucleotide receptors in neuronal populations converge on several intracellular kinases, such as PI3K/Akt, GSK3 and ERK1,2, as well as the Nrf-2/heme oxigenase-1 axis, which specifically link them to neuroprotection. In this regard, regulation of dual specificity protein phosphatases can become novel mechanism of actions for nucleotide receptors that associate them to cell homeostasis regulation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26359530

  5. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited. PMID:25843217

  6. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-10-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids. PMID:25985129

  7. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  8. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  9. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  10. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  11. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  12. Chemical evolution: The mechanism of the formation of adenine under prebiotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjani; Najafian, Katayoun; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental building blocks of life have been detected extraterrestrially, even in interstellar space, and are known to form nonenzymatically. Thus, the HCN pentamer, adenine (a base present in DNA and RNA), was first isolated in abiogenic experiments from an aqueous solution of ammonia and HCN in 1960. Although many variations of the reaction conditions giving adenine have been reported since then, the mechanistic details remain unexplored. Our predictions are based on extensive computations of sequences of reaction steps along several possible mechanistic routes. H2O- or NH3-catalyzed pathways are more favorable than uncatalyzed neutral or anionic alternatives, and they may well have been the major source of adenine on primitive earth. Our report provides a more detailed understanding of some of the chemical processes involved in chemical evolution, and a partial answer to the fundamental question of molecular biogenesis. Our investigation should trigger similar explorations of the detailed mechanisms of the abiotic formation of the remaining nucleic acid bases and other biologically relevant molecules. PMID:17951429

  13. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João P. T.; Nabeshima, Henrique S.; da Costa, Marcello F.; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr2+ promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+ of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4dbnd C5 and C6dbnd O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310 cm-1 was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  14. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  15. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  16. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  17. Effects of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and Diadenosine Tetraphosphate (Ap4A) on Electrical Activity of Working and Pacemaker Atrial Myocardium in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, K B; Abramochkin, D V

    2016-04-01

    Effects of nucleotide polyphosphate compounds (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD(+); diadenosine tetraphosphate, Ap4A) on the confi guration of action potentials were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig sinoatrial node and right atrial appendage (auricle). In the working myocardium, NAD(+) and Ap4A in concentrations of 10(-5) and 10(-4) M had no effect on resting potential, but significantly reduced the duration of action potentials; the most pronounced decrease was found at 25% repolarization. In the primary pacemaker of the sinoatrial node, both concentrations of NAD(+) and Ap4A induced hyperpolarization and reduction in the rate of slow diastolic depolarization, but significant slowing of the sinus rhythm was produced by these substances only in the concentration of 10(-4) M. Moreover, AP shortening and marked acceleration of AP upstroke were observed in the pacemaker myocardium after application of polyphosphates. Comparative analysis of the effects of NAD(+) and Ap4A in the working and pacemaker myocardium drove us to a hypothesis on inhibitory effects of these substances on L-type calcium current accompanied by stimulation of one or several potassium currents, which induce enhancement of repolarization and hyperpolarization of membranes probably mediated by the activation of purine receptors. PMID:27165058

  18. The importance of helix P1 stability for structural pre-organization and ligand binding affinity of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain

    PubMed Central

    Nozinovic, Senada; Reining, Anke; Kim, Yong-Boum; Noeske, Jonas; Schlepckow, Kai; Wöhnert, Jens; Schwalbe, Harald

    2014-01-01

    We report here an in-depth characterization of the aptamer domain of the transcriptional adenine-sensing riboswitch (pbuE) by NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. By NMR studies, the structure of two aptamer sequences with different lengths of the helix P1, the central element involved in riboswitch conformational switching, was characterized. Hydrogen-bond interactions could be mapped at nucleotide resolution providing information about secondary and tertiary structure, structure homogeneity and dynamics. Our study reveals that the elongation of helix P1 has pronounced effects not only on the local but on the global structure of the apo aptamer domain. The structural differences induced by stabilizing helix P1 were found to be linked to changes of the ligand binding affinity as revealed from analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence studies. The results provide new insight into the sequence-dependent fine tuning of the structure and function of purine-sensing riboswitches. PMID:24921630

  19. Insights into the Influence of Nucleotides on Actin Family Proteins from Seven Structures of Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen,B.; Pollard, T.

    2007-01-01

    ATP is required for nucleation of actin filament branches by Arp2/3 complex, but the influence of ATP binding and hydrolysis are poorly understood. We determined crystal structures of bovine Arp2/3 complex cocrystalized with various bound adenine nucleotides and cations. Nucleotide binding favors closure of the nucleotide binding cleft of Arp3, but no large scale conformational changes in the complex. Thus, ATP binding does not directly activate Arp2/3 complex, but is part of a network of interactions that contribute to nucleation. We compared nucleotide-induced conformational changes of residues lining the cleft in Arp3 and actin structures to construct a movie depicting the proposed ATPase cycle for the actin family. Chemical crosslinking stabilized subdomain 1 of Arp2, revealing new electron density for 69 residues in this subdomain. Steric clashes with Arp3 appear to be responsible for intrinsic disorder of subdomains 1 and 2 of Arp2 in inactive Arp2/3 complex.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the fadR gene, a multifunctional regulator of fatty acid metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    DiRusso, C C

    1988-01-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR gene is a multifunctional regulator of fatty acid and acetate metabolism. In the present work the nucleotide sequence of the 1.3 kb DNA fragment which encodes FadR has been determined. The coding sequence of the fadR gene is 714 nucleotides long and is preceded by a typical E. coli ribosome binding site and is followed by a sequence predicted to be sufficient for factor-independent chain termination. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that the transcription of the fadR gene initiates with an adenine nucleotide 33 nucleotides upstream from the predicted start of translation. The derived fadR peptide has a calculated molecular weight of 26,972. This is in reasonable agreement with the apparent molecular weight of 29,000 previously estimated on the basis of maxi-cell analysis of plasmid encoded proteins. There is a segment of twenty amino acids within the predicted peptide which resembles the DNA recognition and binding site of many transcriptional regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2843809

  1. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  2. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2016-08-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues-mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations-to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377720

  3. Guanosine nucleotide precursor for flavinogenesis of Eremothecium Ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, H; Nakajima, K

    1975-01-01

    The purine precursor in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Eremothecium ashbyii was examined using a guanine analogue, 8-azaguanine, with non-growing cell systems. 1. Riboflavin formation in the culture filtrate was determined at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr after start of the incubation of the non-growing cells in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine (1 mM, respectively). At 20 hr of incubation, the addition of xanthine stimulated riboflavin formation by 36% and the addition of 8-azaguanine inhibited the formation by 57%. 2. Acid soluble nucleotide pools in the cells were followed at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr of the incubation period in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine by means of anion exchange column chromatography. The result showed that the GTP pool changed markedly despite the fact that the adenosine nucleotide pool was almost constant irrespective of the presence or absence of these purines till 10 hr of incubation. But, the decrease of the former was overcome in part by the addition of flavinogenic xanthine. Furthermore, the total amounts of GTP and guanosine accumulated in cells in the presence of 8-azaguanine reached the maximum already at 5 hr, attaining a level twice as much as the GTP contents of the control. 3. The role of guanosine nucleotide pool in riboflavin formation was further examined using 8-azaguanine. In this experiment the drug was added to the suspension of non-growing cells at 3 hr or 6 hr after the incubation was started and the reaction was continued till the 12th hr. A more clear-cut correlationship between riboflavin formation and guanosine nucleotide pool was oberved by this experiment. The guanosine nucleotide pool (consisting of GMP, GDP and GTP) increased simultaneously with the inhibition of riboflavin formation. Of the guanosine nucleotides pools, the GMP pool increased 2.7 times above normal upon the addition of 8-azaguanine during the incubation for 6 hr and 5.3 fold for 9 hr. While, the GTP pool increased 1.9 fold above

  4. An asparagine residue mediates intramolecular communication in nucleotide-regulated pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Anashkin, Viktor A; Salminen, Anu; Vorobjeva, Natalia N; Lahti, Reijo; Baykov, Alexander A

    2016-07-15

    Many prokaryotic soluble PPases (pyrophosphatases) contain a pair of regulatory adenine nucleotide-binding CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) domains that act as 'internal inhibitors' whose effect is modulated by nucleotide binding. Although such regulatory domains are found in important enzymes and transporters, the underlying regulatory mechanism has only begun to come into focus. We reported previously that CBS domains bind nucleotides co-operatively and induce positive kinetic co-operativity (non-Michaelian behaviour) in CBS-PPases (CBS domain-containing PPases). In the present study, we demonstrate that a homodimeric ehPPase (Ethanoligenens harbinense PPase) containing an inherent mutation in an otherwise conserved asparagine residue in a loop near the active site exhibits non-co-operative hydrolysis kinetics. A similar N312S substitution in 'co-operative' dhPPase (Desulfitobacterium hafniense PPase) abolished kinetic co-operativity while causing only minor effects on nucleotide-binding affinity and co-operativity. However, the substitution reversed the effect of diadenosine tetraphosphate, abolishing kinetic co-operativity in wild-type dhPPase, but restoring it in the variant dhPPase. A reverse serine-to-asparagine replacement restored kinetic co-operativity in ehPPase. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the asparagine substitution resulted in a change in the hydrogen-bonding pattern around the asparagine residue and the subunit interface, allowing greater flexibility at the subunit interface without a marked effect on the overall structure. These findings identify this asparagine residue as lying at the 'crossroads' of information paths connecting catalytic and regulatory domains within a subunit and catalytic sites between subunits. PMID:27208172

  5. 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue, is a probe of base flipping by DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kongsheng; Matsika, Spiridoula; Stanley, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are formed between adjacent pyrimidines in DNA when it absorbs ultraviolet light. CPDs can be directly repaired by DNA photolyase (PL) in the presence of visible light. How PL recognizes and binds its substrate is still not well understood. Fluorescent nucleic acid base analogues are powerful probes of DNA structure. We have used the fluorescent adenine analogue 6MAP, a pteridone, to probe the local double helical structure of the CPD substrate when bound by photolyase. Duplex melting temperatures were obtained by both UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies to ascertain the effect of the probe and the CPD on DNA stability. Steady-state fluorescence measurements of 6MAP-containing single-stranded and doubled-stranded oligos with and without protein show that the local region around the CPD is significantly disrupted. 6MAP shows a different quenching pattern compared to 2-aminopurine, another important adenine analogue, although both probes show that the structure of the complementary strand opposing the 5'-side of the CPD lesion is more destacked than that opposing the 3'-side in substrate/protein complexes. We also show that 6MAP/CPD duplexes are substrates for PL. Vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moment directions for 6MAP were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. Using these results, the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency between the individual adenine analogues and the oxidized flavin cofactor was calculated to account for the observed intensity pattern. These calculations suggest that energy transfer is highly efficient for the 6MAP probe and less so for the 2Ap probe. However, no experimental evidence for this process was observed in the steady-state emission spectra. PMID:17696385

  6. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  7. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  8. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  9. Nucleotide-binding flexibility in ultrahigh-resolution structures of the SRP GTPase Ffh

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Ursula D.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2008-10-01

    Crystal structures of the Ffh NG GTPase domain at < 1.24 Å resolution reveal multiple overlapping nucleotide binding modes. Two structures of the nucleotide-bound NG domain of Ffh, the GTPase subunit of the bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP), have been determined at ultrahigh resolution in similar crystal forms. One is GDP-bound and one is GMPPCP-bound. The asymmetric unit of each structure contains two protein monomers, each of which exhibits differences in nucleotide-binding conformation and occupancy. The GDP-bound Ffh NG exhibits two binding conformations in one monomer but not the other and the GMPPCP-bound protein exhibits full occupancy of the nucleotide in one monomer but only partial occupancy in the other. Thus, under the same solution conditions, each crystal reveals multiple binding states that suggest that even when nucleotide is bound its position in the Ffh NG active site is dynamic. Some differences in the positioning of the bound nucleotide may arise from differences in the crystal-packing environment and specific factors that have been identified include the relative positions of the N and G domains, small conformational changes in the P-loop, the positions of waters buried within the active site and shifts in the closing loop that packs against the guanine base. However, ‘loose’ binding may have biological significance in promoting facile nucleotide exchange and providing a mechanism for priming the SRP GTPase prior to its activation in its complex with the SRP receptor.

  10. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  11. Sample preparation workflow for the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based analysis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate cofactors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ortmayr, Karin; Nocon, Justyna; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2014-08-01

    The accurate quantification of the highly unstable intracellular cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in its oxidized and reduced forms demands a thorough evaluation of the analytical workflow and dedicated methods reflecting their solution chemistry as well as the biological importance of their ratio. In this work, we present a workflow for the analysis of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in the yeast Pichia pastoris, including hot aqueous extraction, chromatographic separation in reversed-phase conditions employing a 100% wettable stationary phase, and subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A thorough evaluation and optimization of the sample preparation procedure resulted in excellent biological repeatabilities (on average <10%, N = 3) without employing an internal standardization approach. As a consequence, the methodology proved to be appropriate for the relative assessment of intracellular levels of oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate in different P. pastoris strains. The ratio of reduced versus oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was significantly higher in an engineered strain overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase than in the corresponding wildtype strain. Interestingly, a difference was also observed in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate pool size, which was significantly higher in the wildtype than in the modified strain. PMID:24841212

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  13. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent.

    PubMed

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-25

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]⋅SO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes. PMID:25150436

  15. Comparative Study between Transcriptionally- and Translationally-Acting Adenine Riboswitches Reveals Key Differences in Riboswitch Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Simon; Heppell, Benoit; Bastet, Laurène; St-Pierre, Patrick; Massé, Eric; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic). While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21283784

  16. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  17. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  18. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  19. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  20. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  1. Nucleotides critical for the interaction of the Streptococcus pyogenes Mga virulence regulator with Mga-regulated promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    Hause, Lara L; McIver, Kevin S

    2012-09-01

    The Mga regulator of Streptococcus pyogenes directly activates the transcription of a core regulon that encodes virulence factors such as M protein (emm), C5a peptidase (scpA), and streptococcal inhibitor of complement (sic) by directly binding to a 45-bp binding site as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I protection. However, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of all established Mga binding sites, we found that they exhibit only 13.4% identity with no discernible symmetry. To determine the core nucleotides involved in functional Mga-DNA interactions, the M1T1 Pemm1 binding site was altered and screened for nucleotides important for DNA binding in vitro and for transcriptional activation using a plasmid-based luciferase reporter in vivo. Following this analysis, 34 nucleotides within the Pemm1 binding site that had an effect on Mga binding, Mga-dependent transcriptional activation, or both were identified. Of these critical nucleotides, guanines and cytosines within the major groove were disproportionately identified clustered at the 5' and 3' ends of the binding site and with runs of nonessential adenines between the critical nucleotides. On the basis of these results, a Pemm1 minimal binding site of 35 bp bound Mga at a level comparable to the level of binding of the larger 45-bp site. Comparison of Pemm with directed mutagenesis performed in the M1T1 Mga-regulated PscpA and Psic promoters, as well as methylation interference analysis of PscpA, establish that Mga binds to DNA in a promoter-specific manner. PMID:22773785

  2. Paramagnetic Effects on Nuclear Relaxation in Enzyme-Bound Co(II)-Adenine Nucleotide Complexes: Relative Contributions of Dipolar and Scalar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bruce D.; Jarori, Gotam K.; Nageswara Rao, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    31P NMR measurements on CoADP bound to creatine kinase designed to estimate the relative contribution of scalar and dipolar interactions to31P spin relaxation rates show that these rates are primarily due to distance-dependent dipolar interactions and that the contribution of the scalar interaction is negligible.

  3. Activation of human neutrophil nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (triphosphopyridine nucleotide, reduced) oxidase by arachidonic acid in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Curnutte, J T

    1985-01-01

    Sonicates from unstimulated human neutrophils produce no measurable superoxide since the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase, is inactive in these preparations. Previous attempts to activate the oxidase in disrupted cells with conventional neutrophil stimuli have been unsuccessful. This report describes a cell-free system in which arachidonic acid (82 microM) was able to activate superoxide generation that was dependent upon the presence of NADPH and the sonicate. For activation to occur, both the particulate and supernatant fractions of the sonicate must be present. Calcium ions, which are required for activation of intact neutrophils by arachidonate, were not necessary in the cell-free system. In quantitative terms, the superoxide-generating activity in the cell-free system could account for at least 20-50% of the superoxide rate observed in intact neutrophils stimulated with arachidonate. Sonicates from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) could not be activated by arachidonic acid in the cell-free system. In three patients representing both genetic forms of CGD, the defect appeared to reside in the particulate fraction. The soluble cofactor was normal in all three patients and could be used to activate normal neutrophil pellets in the presence of arachidonic acid. Thus, at least a portion of the activation mechanism in the neutrophil, that residing in the soluble phase, appeared to be normal in patients with CGD. PMID:2987311

  4. In vitro studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BiP, GRP78). Interactions of BiP with newly synthesized proteins and adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Kassenbrock, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Here we examine the interaction of BiP with newly synthesized polypeptides in an in vitro protein translations-translocation system. We find that BiP forms tight complexes with nonglycosylated yeast invertase and incorrectly disulfide-bonded prolactin but not with glycosylated invertase or correctly disulfide-bonded prolactin. Moreover, BiP associates detectably only with completed chains of prolactin, not with chains undergoing synthesis. We conclude that BiP recognizes and binds with high affinity to aberrantly folded or aberrantly glycosylated polypeptides in vitro, but not to all nascent chains as they are folding. BiP also binds APT and can be purified by APT affinity chromatography. We show that submicromolar levels of ATP or ADP decrease the rate of absorption of {sup 125}I-BiP to nitrocellulose filters coated with protein or nonionic detergents. ATP and ADP also protect portions of BiP from proteolytic degradation. In contrast, micromolar levels of AMP increase the rate of adsorption and the rate of proteolytic degradation of BiP. We also show that an ATPase activity co-purifies with BiP, but its slow turnover number suggests a regulatory, rather than a functional role. The BiP-associated ATPase shares several properties with the related cytoplasmic protein, HSC70/clathrin uncoating ATPase.

  5. Ternary Copper(II) Complexes in Solution[1,2] Formed With 8-Aza Derivatives of the Antiviral Nucleotide Analogue 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)Ethyl]Adenine (PMEA)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Coca, Raquel B.; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Holý, Antonín; Vilaplana, Rosario A.; González-Vílchez, Francisco

    2000-01-01

    The stability constants of the mixed-ligand complexes formed between Cu(Arm)2+, where Arm= 2,2'-bipyridine (Bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen), and the dianions of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]-8-azaadenine (9,8aPMEA) and 8-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]-8-azaadenine (8,8aPMEA) (both also abbreviated as PA2-) were determined by potentiometric pH titrations in aqueous solution (25 °C; I = 0.1 M, NaNO3). All four ternary Cu(Arm)(PA) complexes are considerably more stable than corresponding Cu(Arm)(R-PO3) species, where R-PO32- represents a phosph(on)ate ligand with a group R that is unable to participate in any kind of interaction within the complexes. The increased stability is attributed to intramolecular stack formation in the Cu(Arm)(PA) complexes and also to the formation of 5-membered chelates involving the ether oxygen present in the -CH2-O-CH2-PO32- residue of the azaPMEAs. A quantitative analysis of the intramolecular equilibria involving three structurally different Cu(Arm)(PA) species is carried out. For example, about 5% of the Cu(Bpy)(8,8aPMEA) system exist with the metal ion solely coordinated to the phosphonate group, 14% as a 5-membered chelate involving the -CH2-O-CH2-PO32-residue, and 81% with an intramolecular stack between the 8-azapurine moiety and the aromatic rings of Bpy. The results for the other systems are similar though with Phen a formation degree of about 90% for the intramolecular stack is reached. The existence of the stacked species is also proven by spectrophotometric measurements. In addition, the Cu(Arm)(PA) complexes may be protonated, leading to Cu(Arm)(H;PA)+ species for which it is concluded that the proton is located at the phosphonate group and that the complexes are mainly formed by a stacking adduct between Cu(Arm)2+ and H(PA)-. Conclusions regarding the biological properties of these azaPMEAs are shortly indicated. PMID:18475963

  6. The hydrolysis of extracellular adenine nucleotides by cultured endothelial cells from pig aorta. Feed-forward inhibition of adenosine production at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E L; Pearson, J D; Slakey, L L

    1986-11-25

    The time course of the extracellular reaction sequence ATP----ADP----AMP----adenosine has been examined during recirculation of substrate solutions over cultured pig aortic endothelial cells attached to polystyrene beads. This permits the study of reactions at volume to cell surface ratios approaching those of small blood vessels. When endothelial cells were presented with an initial bolus of ATP, high concentrations of the intermediates ADP and AMP developed before significant conversion of AMP to adenosine occurred. Further, the higher the initial ATP concentration, the slower the conversion of AMP to adenosine. Kinetic constants for each reaction were estimated by fitting simulated reaction curves to observed time courses. Apparent Km values estimated in this way agreed well with those reported for initial velocity measurements (ATPase = 300 microM; ADPase = 240 microM; and 5'-nucleotidase = 26 microM). The ratio of maximum velocities was ATPase:ADPase:AMPase = 6:1.5:1, with absolute values varying among cell batches. The data could only be fitted if the model incorporated inhibition of 5'-nucleotidase by ATP or ADP, and satisfactory fitting was achieved with a Ki value for ADP of 5 microM. These kinetic properties maximize the time separation of the intermediate pools. In vivo, at sites of platelet degranulation, they would create a time gap proportional to the size of the initial release between release of ADP (a proaggregatory milieu) and the appearance of adenosine (an anti-aggregatory milieu). PMID:3023320

  7. Time evolution of the Infrared Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L.; Rubio, L.; Camacho, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) of DNA bases Guanine and Adenine was studied using a high-power CO2 pulsed laser ( λ=10.591 μm, τ FWHM=64 ns and fluences ranging from 25 to 70 J/cm2). The strong emission of the adenine and guanine plasma, collected using a high-resolution spectrometer, at medium-vacuum conditions (4 Pa) and at 1 mm from the target, exhibits excited molecular bands of CN (B2 Σ +-X2 Σ +) and excited neutral H and ionized N+ and C+. The medium-weak emission is due to excited species C2+, C3+, N, O, O+, O2+ and molecular band systems of C2(d3\\varPig{-}a3\\varPiu; D1\\varSigmau+{-}X1\\varSigmag+), OH(A2 Σ +-X2 Π), NH(A3 Π-X3 Σ -), CH(A2 Π-X2 Π), N2+(B2\\varSigmau+{-} X2\\varSigmag+) and N2(C3 Π u-B3 Π g). We focus our attention on the temporal evolution of different atomic/ionic and molecular species. The velocity distributions for various (different) species were obtained from time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Intensities of some lines from C+ were used for determining electron temperature and their Stark-broadened profiles were employed to estimate the temporal evolution of electron density.

  8. Quantitative investigation of the poly-adenine DNA dissociation from the surface of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weiwen; Wang, Lihua; Li, Jiang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Ziang; Shi, Jiye; Zuo, Xiaolei; Pan, Dun

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, poly adenine (polyA) DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) free of modifications was fabricated with high density of DNA attachment and high hybridization ability similar to those of its thiolated counterpart. This nanoconjugate utilized poly adenine as an anchoring block for binding with the AuNPs surface thereby facilitated the appended recognition block a better upright conformation for hybridization, demonstrating its great potential to be a tunable plasmonic biosensor. It’s one of the key points for any of the practical applications to maintaining stable conjugation between DNA oligonucleotides and gold nanoparticles under various experimental treatments. Thus, in this research, we designed a simple but sensitive fluorescence turn-on strategy to systematically investigate and quantified the dissociation of polyA DNA on gold nanoparticles in diverse experimental conditions. DNA desorbed spontaneously as a function of elevated temperature, ion strength, buffer pH, organic solvents and keeping time. What’s more, evaluating this conjugate stability as affected by the length of its polyA anchor was another crucial aspect in our study. With the improved understanding from these results, we were able to control some of our experimental conditions to maintain a good stability of this kind of polyA DNA-AuNPs nanoconjugates.

  9. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m6A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m6A residue in the center. The m6A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m6A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  10. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-09-23

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m(6)A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m(6)A residue in the center. The m(6)A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m(6)A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  11. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    PubMed Central

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (εΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs. PMID:26227585

  12. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  13. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  14. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features. PMID:27409976

  15. Theoretical study on the static and dynamic first-order hyperpolarisabilities of adenine tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Static and dynamic electronic and vibrational first-order hyperpolarisabilities (β) of the lowest energy neutral adenine tautomers (amine forms A7 and A9) were obtained in gaseous and aqueous phases by using Hartree-Fock, Møller-Plesset second-order and fourth-order perturbation theory (MP2 and MP4-SDQ) and conventional and long-range corrected density functional theory methods with the Dunning's correlation-consistent cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ and d-aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Frequency-dependent properties were calculated at the characteristic wavelength of the Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) for the second harmonic generation and electro-optical Pockels effect nonlinear optical processes. Solvent effects were introduced under the polarised continuum model approximation. The electronic βe values of the investigated isomers are noticeably affected by the theoretical level, basis set and solvation. In vacuum, the static and dynamic βe values of A9 are greater than the corresponding data of A7, whereas the contribution of the solvent significantly enhances the hyperpolarisabilities of the A7 tautomer, resulting in βe(A9)/βe(A7) ratios between 0.5 and 0.6. The vibrational hyperpolarisabilities of the adenine tautomers are quite close to each other.

  16. Probing ultrafast dynamics in adenine with mid-UV four-wave mixing spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2011-08-11

    Heterodyne-detected transient grating (TG) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectroscopies are extended to the mid-UV spectral range in this investigation of photoinduced relaxation processes of adenine in aqueous solution. These experiments are the first to combine a new method for generating 25 fs laser pulses (at 263 nm) with the passive phase stability afforded by diffractive optics-based interferometry. We establish a set of conditions (e.g., laser power density, solute concentration) appropriate for the study of dynamics involving the neutral solute. Undesired solute photoionization is shown to take hold at higher peak powers of the laser pulses. Signatures of internal conversion and vibrational cooling dynamics are examined using TG measurements with signal-to-noise ratios as high as 350 at short delay times. In addition, 2DPE line shapes reveal correlations between excitation and emission frequencies in adenine, which reflect electronic and nuclear relaxation processes associated with particular tautomers. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of techniques that will hold many advantages for the study of biomolecules whose lowest-energy electronic resonances are found in the mid-UV (e.g., DNA bases, amino acids). PMID:21756005

  17. Ultraviolet photolysis of adenine: Dissociation via the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} state

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Michael G. D.; Devine, Adam L.; Cronin, Brid; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2007-03-28

    High resolution total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra of the H atom fragments resulting from photodissociation of jet-cooled adenine molecules at 17 wavelengths in the range 280>{lambda}{sub phot}>214 nm are reported. TKER spectra obtained at {lambda}{sub phot}>233 nm display broad, isotropic profiles that peak at low TKER ({approx}1800 cm{sup -1}) and are largely insensitive to the choice of excitation wavelength. The bulk of these products is attributed to unintended multiphoton dissociation processes. TKER spectra recorded at {lambda}{sub phot}{<=}233 nm display additional fast structure, which is attributed to N{sub 9}-H bond fission on the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} potential energy surface (PES). Analysis of the kinetic energies and recoil anisotropies of the H atoms responsible for the fast structure suggests excitation to two {sup 1}{pi}{pi}{sup *} excited states (the {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}B{sub b} states) at {lambda}{sub phot}{approx}230 nm, both of which dissociate to yield H atoms together with ground state adeninyl fragments by radiationless transfer through conical intersections with the {sup 1}{pi}{sigma}{sup *} PES. Parallels with the photochemistry exhibited by other, smaller heteroaromatics (pyrrole, imidazole, phenol, etc.) are highlighted, as are inconsistencies between the present conclusions and those reached in two other recent studies of excited state adenine molecules.

  18. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    PubMed

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  19. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  20. Nucleotide recognition by CopA, a Cu+-transporting P-type ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takeo; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal pumps constitute a large subgroup in P-type ion-transporting ATPases. One of the outstanding features is that the nucleotide binding N-domain lacks residues critical for ATP binding in other well-studied P-type ATPases. Instead, they possess an HP-motif and a Gly-rich sequence in the N-domain, and their mutations impair ATP binding. Here, we describe 1.85 Å resolution crystal structures of the P- and N-domains of CopA, an archaeal Cu+-transporting ATPase, with bound nucleotides. These crystal structures show that CopA recognises the adenine ring completely differently from other P-type ATPases. The crystal structure of the His462Gln mutant, in the HP-motif, a disease-causing mutation in human Cu+-ATPases, shows that the Gln side chain mimics the imidazole ring, but only partially, explaining the reduction in ATPase activity. These crystal structures lead us to propose a role of the His and a mechanism for removing Mg2+ from ATP before phosphoryl transfer. PMID:19478797

  1. Age-related alterations in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in dystrophic mouse leg muscle.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Previous reports have described both increased and decreased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in dystrophic muscle. Total PDE activity was measured in hind leg muscle from a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx) and a genetic control strain at 5, 8, 10, and 15 weeks of age. Total PDE activity declined in fractions isolated from mdx muscle over this time period, but was stable in fractions from control mice. Compared with age-matched controls, younger mdx muscle had higher cAMP and cGMP PDE activity. However, at 15 weeks, fractions from both strains had similar cGMP PDE activity and mdx fractions had lower cAMP PDE activity than controls. Particulate fractions from mdx muscle showed an age-related decline in sensitivity to the PDE4 inhibitor RO 20-1724. A similar loss of sensitivity to the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) was seen in a particulate fraction from mdx muscle and to a lesser degree in control muscle. These results suggest that the earlier disagreement regarding altered cyclic nucleotide metabolism in dystrophic muscle may be due to changes with age in PDE activity of dystrophic tissue. The age-related decline in particulate PDE activity seen in dystrophic muscle appears to be isozyme-specific and not due to a generalized decrease in total PDE activity. PMID:16391714

  2. Valence anions in complexes of adenine and 9-methyladenine with formic acid: stabilization by intermolecular proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Harańczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej; Rak, Janusz; Radisic, Dunja; Eustis, Soren N; Wang, Di; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-02-01

    Photoelectron spectra of adenine-formic acid (AFA(-)) and 9-methyladenine-formic acid (MAFA(-)) anionic complexes have been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. These spectra reveal broad features with maxima at 1.5-1.4 eV that indicate formation of stable valence anions in the gas phase. The neutral and anionic complexes of adenine/9-methyladenine and formic acid were also studied computationally at the B3LYP, second-order Møller-Plesset, and coupled-cluster levels of theory with the 6-31++G** and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds, and the most stable dimers are bound by 17.7 and 16.0 kcal/mol for AFA and MAFA, respectively. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in both AFA(-) and MAFA(-) occupies a pi* orbital localized on adenine/9-methyladenine, and the adiabatic stability of the most stable anions amounts to 0.67 and 0.54 eV for AFA(-) and MAFA(-), respectively. The attachment of the excess electron to the complexes induces a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of formic acid to a N atom of adenine or 9-methyladenine. As a result, the most stable structures of the anionic complexes can be characterized as neutral radicals of hydrogenated adenine (9-methyladenine) solvated by a deprotonated formic acid. The BFPT to the N atoms of adenine may be biologically relevant because some of these sites are not involved in the Watson-Crick pairing scheme and are easily accessible in the cellular environment. We suggest that valence anions of purines might be as important as those of pyrimidines in the process of DNA damage by low-energy electrons. PMID:17263404

  3. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon.

    PubMed

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut. PMID:25755826

  4. Development of a new model for the induction of chronic kidney disease via intraperitoneal adenine administration, and the effect of treatment with gum acacia thereon

    PubMed Central

    Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Al Busaidi, Mahfouda; Yasin, Javid; Schupp, Nicole; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-01-01

    Oral adenine (0.75% w/w in feed), is an established model for human chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gum acacia (GA) has been shown to be a nephroprotective agent in this model. Here we aimed at developing a new adenine-induced CKD model in rats via a systemic route (intraperitoneal, i.p.) and to test it with GA to obviate the possibility of a physical interaction between GA and adenine in the gut. Adenine was injected i.p. (50 or 100 mg/Kg for four weeks), and GA was given concomitantly in drinking water at a concentration of 15%, w/v. Several plasma and urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured and the renal damage was assessed histopathologically. Adenine, at the two given i.p. doses, significantly reduced body weight, and increased relative kidney weight, water intake and urine output. It dose-dependently increased plasma and urinary inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, and caused morphological and histological damage resembling that which has been reported with oral adenine. Concomitant treatment with GA significantly mitigated almost all the above measured indices. Administration of adenine i.p. induced CKD signs very similar to those induced by oral adenine. Therefore, this new model is quicker, more practical and accurate than the original (oral) model. GA ameliorates the CKD effects caused by adenine given i.p. suggesting that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties possessed by oral GA are the main mechanism for its salutary action in adenine-induced CKD, an action that is independent of its possible interaction with adenine in the gut. PMID:25755826

  5. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Analogs Substituted on the Nicotinic Acid and Adenine Ribosides. Effects on Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Trabbic, Christopher J.; Zhang, Fan; Walseth, Timothy F.; Slama, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca2+ releasing intracellular second messenger in both mammals and echinoderms. We report that large functionalized substituents introduced at the nicotinic acid 5-position are recognized by the sea urchin receptor, albeit with a 20–500 fold loss in agonist potency. 5-(3-Azidopropyl)-NAADP was shown to release Ca2+ with an EC50 of 31 µM and to compete with NAADP for receptor binding with an IC50 of 56 nM. Attachment of charged groups to the nicotinic acid of NAADP is associated with loss of activity, suggesting that the nicotinate riboside moiety is recognized as a neutral zwitterion. Substituents (Br- and N3-) can be introduced at the 8-adenosyl position of NAADP while preserving high potency and agonist efficacy and an NAADP derivative substituted at both the 5-position of the nicotinic acid and at the 8-adenosyl position was also recognized although the agonist potency was significantly reduced. PMID:25826221

  6. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-03-01

    DNA SEQUENCES have been analysed using models, such as an it-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations1. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  7. Automated Identification of Nucleotide Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George; Zhu, Dian-Hui

    2007-01-01

    STITCH is a computer program that processes raw nucleotide-sequence data to automatically remove unwanted vector information, perform reverse-complement comparison, stitch shorter sequences together to make longer ones to which the shorter ones presumably belong, and search against the user s choice of private and Internet-accessible public 16S rRNA databases. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] In STITCH, a template 16S rRNA sequence is used to position forward and reverse reads. STITCH then automatically searches known 16S rRNA sequences in the user s chosen database(s) to find the sequence most similar to (the sequence that lies at the smallest edit distance from) each spliced sequence. The result of processing by STITCH is the identification of the most similar well-described bacterium. Whereas previously commercially available software for analyzing genetic sequences operates on one sequence at a time, STITCH can manipulate multiple sequences simultaneously to perform the aforementioned operations. A typical analysis of several dozen sequences (length of the order of 103 base pairs) by use of STITCH is completed in a few minutes, whereas such an analysis performed by use of prior software takes hours or days.

  8. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco E-mail: marco.garavelli@ens-lyon.fr

    2015-06-07

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040–1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  9. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  10. Modeling the high-energy electronic state manifold of adenine: Calibration for nonlinear electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenov, Artur; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Cerullo, Giulio; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Pump-probe electronic spectroscopy using femtosecond laser pulses has evolved into a standard tool for tracking ultrafast excited state dynamics. Its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart is becoming an increasingly available and promising technique for resolving many of the limitations of pump-probe caused by spectral congestion. The ability to simulate pump-probe and 2D spectra from ab initio computations would allow one to link mechanistic observables like molecular motions and the making/breaking of chemical bonds to experimental observables like excited state lifetimes and quantum yields. From a theoretical standpoint, the characterization of the electronic transitions in the visible (Vis)/ultraviolet (UV), which are excited via the interaction of a molecular system with the incoming pump/probe pulses, translates into the determination of a computationally challenging number of excited states (going over 100) even for small/medium sized systems. A protocol is therefore required to evaluate the fluctuations of spectral properties like transition energies and dipole moments as a function of the computational parameters and to estimate the effect of these fluctuations on the transient spectral appearance. In the present contribution such a protocol is presented within the framework of complete and restricted active space self-consistent field theory and its second-order perturbation theory extensions. The electronic excited states of adenine have been carefully characterized through a previously presented computational recipe [Nenov et al., Comput. Theor. Chem. 1040-1041, 295-303 (2014)]. A wise reduction of the level of theory has then been performed in order to obtain a computationally less demanding approach that is still able to reproduce the characteristic features of the reference data. Foreseeing the potentiality of 2D electronic spectroscopy to track polynucleotide ground and excited state dynamics, and in particular its expected ability to provide

  11. A DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for label-free, turn-on fluorescence-based screening of homo-adenine binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-02-15

    A novel, label-free, turn-on fluorescence strategy to detect molecules that bind to adenine-rich DNA sequences has been developed. The probe employs DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the key detection component. The new strategy relies on the formation of non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex, triggered by strong interactions with homo-adenine binding molecules, which brings a guanine-rich sequence in one strand close to DNA-AgNCs located on the opposite strand. This phenomenon transforms weakly fluorescent AgNCs into highly emissive species that display bright red fluorescence. Finally, we have shown that the new fluorescence turn-on strategy can be employed to detect coralyne, the most representative homo-adenine binding molecule that triggers formation of a non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex. PMID:25441410

  12. Fluorescent xDNA nucleotides as efficient substrates for a template-independent polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K.; Krueger, Andrew T.; Liu, Haibo; Gao, Jianmin; Kool, Eric T.

    2011-01-01

    Template independent polymerases, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) in particular, have been widely used in enzymatic labeling of DNA 3′-ends, yielding fluorescently-labeled polymers. The majority of fluorescent nucleotides used as TdT substrates contain tethered fluorophores attached to a natural nucleotide, and can be hindered by undesired fluorescence characteristics such as self-quenching. We previously documented the inherent fluorescence of a set of four benzo-expanded deoxynucleoside analogs (xDNA) that maintain Watson–Crick base pairing and base stacking ability; however, their substrate abilities for standard template-dependent polymerases were hampered by their large size. However, it seemed possible that a template-independent enzyme, due to lowered geometric constraints, might be less restrictive of nucleobase size. Here, we report the synthesis and study of xDNA nucleoside triphosphates, and studies of their substrate abilities with TdT. We find that this polymerase can incorporate each of the four xDNA monomers with kinetic efficiencies that are nearly the same as those of natural nucleotides, as measured by steady-state methods. As many as 30 consecutive monomers could be incorporated. Fluorescence changes over time could be observed in solution during the enzymatic incorporation of expanded adenine (dxATP) and cytosine (dxCTP) analogs, and after incorporation, when attached to a glass solid support. For (dxA)n polymers, monomer emission quenching and long-wavelength excimer emission was observed. For (dxC)n, fluorescence enhancement was observed in the polymer. TdT-mediated synthesis may be a useful approach for creating xDNA labels or tags on DNA, making use of the fluorescence and strong hybridization properties of the xDNA. PMID:20947563

  13. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  14. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fasullo, Michael; Endres, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases. PMID:25923076

  15. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  16. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-05-05

    The /sup 13/C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO/sub 2/ with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources.

  17. Animal models of pediatric chronic kidney disease. Is adenine intake an appropriate model?

    PubMed

    Claramunt, Débora; Gil-Peña, Helena; Fuente, Rocío; Hernández-Frías, Olaya; Santos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) has peculiar features. In particular, growth impairment is a major clinical manifestation of CKD that debuts in pediatric age because it presents in a large proportion of infants and children with CKD and has a profound impact on the self-esteem and social integration of the stunted patients. Several factors associated with CKD may lead to growth retardation by interfering with the normal physiology of growth plate, the organ where longitudinal growth rate takes place. The study of growth plate is hardly possible in humans and justifies the use of animal models. Young rats made uremic by 5/6 nephrectomy have been widely used as a model to investigate growth retardation in CKD. This article examines the characteristics of this model and analyzes the utilization of CKD induced by high adenine diet as an alternative research protocol. PMID:26522663

  18. [Absolute bioavailability of the adenine derivative VMA-99-82 possessing antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, L A; Suchkov, E A; Riabukha, A F; Kuznetsov, K A; Ozerov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of the main pharmacokinetic parameters of adenine derivative VMA-99-82 in rats showed large values of the half-life (T1/2 = 11.03 h) and the mean retention time of drug molecules in the organism (MRT = 9.53 h). A high rate of the drug concentration decrease in the plasma determines a small value of the area under the pharmacokinetic curve (AUC = 74.96 mg h/ml). The total distribution volume (V(d) = 10.61 l/kg) is 15.8 times greater than the volume of extracellular fluid in the body of rat, which is indicative of a high ability of VMA-99-82 to be distributed and accumulated in the organs and tissues. The absolute bioavailability of VMA-99-82 is 66%. PMID:24605425

  19. Prebiotic Synthesis of Adenine and Amino Acids Under Europa-like Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Matthew; Miller, Stanley L.; Brinton, Karen; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites. we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 year at -20 and -78 C. In addition the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20%. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be m der than previously thought.

  20. Prebiotic synthesis of adenine and amino acids under Europa-like conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Brinton, K.; Bada, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    In order to simulate prebiotic synthetic processes on Europa and other ice-covered planets and satellites, we have investigated the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds from dilute solutions of NH4CN frozen for 25 years at -20 and -78 degrees C. In addition, the aqueous products of spark discharge reactions from a reducing atmosphere were frozen for 5 years at -20 degrees C. We find that both adenine and guanine, as well as a simple set of amino acids dominated by glycine, are produced in substantial yields under these conditions. These results indicate that some of the key components necessary for the origin of life may have been available on Europa throughout its history and suggest that the circumstellar zone where life might arise may be wider than previously thought.

  1. Sites of adsorption of adenine, uracil, and their corresponding derivatives on sodium montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Perezgasga, L; Serrato-Díaz, A; Negrón-Mendoza, A; De Pablo Galán, L; Mosqueira, F G

    2005-04-01

    Clay minerals are considered important to chemical evolution processes due to their properties, ancient origin, and wide distribution. To extend the knowledge of their role in the prebiotic epoch, the adsorption sites of adenine, adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP, Poly A, uracil, uridine, UMP, UDP, UTP and Poly U on sodium montmorillonite are investigated. X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy studies indicate that these molecules distribute into the interlamellar channel and the edge of the clay crystals. Monomers are adsorbed predominantly in the interlamellar channel, whereas polymers adsorb along the crystal edges. Such behavior is discussed mainly in terms of bulk pH, pK(a) of the adsorbate, and Van der Waals interactions. PMID:16010992

  2. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    PubMed

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described. PMID:26774092

  3. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  4. External electric field promotes proton transfer in the radical cation of adenine-thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiqing; Xie, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    According to pKa measurements, it has been predicted that proton transfer would not occur in the radical cation of adenine-thymine (A:T). However, recent theoretical calculations indicate that proton transfer takes place in the base pair in water below the room temperature. We have performed simulations of proton transfer in the cation of B-DNA stack composed of 10 A:T base pairs in water from 20 K to 300 K. Proton transfer occurs below the room temperature, meanwhile it could also be observed at the room temperature under the external electric field. Another case that interests us is that proton transfer bounces back after ˜300 fs from the appearance of proton transfer at low temperatures.

  5. The effects of tautomerization and protonation on the adenine-cytosine mismatches: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Hamid Reza; Bagheri, Sotoodeh; Abareghi, Mahsa

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the results of a theoretical study concerned with the question how tautomerization and protonation of adenine affect the various properties of adenine-cytosine mismatches. The calculations, in gas phase and in water, are performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In gas phase, it is observed that any tautomeric form of investigated mismatches is more stabilized when adenine is protonated. As for the neutral mismatches, the mismatches containing amino form of cytosine and imino form of protonated adenine are more stable. The role of aromaticity on the stability of tautomeric forms of mismatches is investigated by NICS(1)ZZ index. The stability of mispairs decreases by going from gas phase to water. It can be explained using dipole moment parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonds on the stability of mismatches is examined by atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. In addition to geometrical parameters and binding energies, the study of the topological properties of electron charge density aids in better understanding of these mispairs. PMID:26198186

  6. Formation of Adenine from the Soft X-Ray Photo-Irradiation of N2-CH4 Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Andrade, D. P. P.; Neto, A. C.; Rittner, R.; de Brito, A. N.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present an experimental study of the chemical alteration produced by the interaction of soft X-rays (and secondary electrons) on Titan aerosol analogs producing prebiotic compounds such as adenine, one the constituents of the DNA molecule.

  7. Mechanism of bracken fern carcinogenesis: evidence for H-ras activation via initial adenine alkylation by ptaquiloside.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Pereira, T N; Smith, B L; Shaw, G; Seawright, A A

    1996-01-01

    Bracken fern (Pteridium spp.) causes cancer of the oesophagus and the urinary bladder in cattle and sheep. Ptaquiloside (PT) is believed to be the carcinogenic principle which alkylates DNA when activated to its unstable dienone form (APT) under alkaline conditions. In this report we present evidence for the presence of PT-DNA adducts in the ileum of bracken fem-fed calves using the 32P-postlabelling assay. H-ras mutations were also observed in the ileum using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. Mutations corresponding to adenine to pyrimidine transversions in the codon 61 of H-ras were identified by the cycle sequencing method. In vitro DNA alkylation studies showed that APT alkylated H-ras primarily at the adenines. In addition, the rate of depurination of alkylated adenine was sequence dependent. Investigation of DNA template activity using a plasmid DNA showed that DNA synthesis by T7 DNA polymerase was terminated by the presence of all alkylated bases but certain apurinic sites allowed the DNA synthesis to continue. These results suggest that initial alkylation of adenine by PT in codon 61 followed by depurination and error in DNA synthesis lead to activation of H-ras proto-oncogene. PMID:8946397

  8. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Standish; O'Carra, Pádraig

    1973-01-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD+ through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD+ (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm–agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD+ derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD+. Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD+-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  9. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum: Purification and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Andreesen, Jan R.; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    1974-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Clostridium thermoaceticum used, in addition to its natural electron acceptor, methyl and benzyl viologen. The enzyme was purified to a specific activity of 34 (micromoles per minute per milligram of protein) with NADP as electron acceptor. Disc gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme yielded two major and two minor protein bands, and during centrifugation in sucrose gradients two components of apparent molecular weights of 270,000 and 320,000 were obtained, both having formate dehydrogenase activity. The enzyme preparation catalyzed the reduction of riboflavine 5′-phosphate flavine adenine dinucleotide and methyl viologen by using reduced NADP as a source of electrons. It also had reduced NADP oxidase activity. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by cyanide and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. It was also inhibited by hypophosphite, an inhibition that was reversed by formate. Sulfite inhibited the activity with NADP but not with methyl viologen as acceptor. The apparent Km at 55 C and pH 7.5 for formate was 2.27 × 10−4 M with NADP and 0.83 × 10−4 with methyl viologen as acceptor. The apparent Km for NADP was 1.09 × 10−4 M and for methyl viologen was 2.35 × 10−3 M. NADP showed substrate inhibition at 5 × 10−3 M and higher concentrations. With NADP as electron acceptor, the enzyme had a broad pH optimum between 7 and 9.5. The apparent temperature optimum was 85 C. In the absence of substrates, the enzyme was stable at 70 C but was rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 73 C. The enzyme was very sensitive to oxygen but was stabilized by thiol-iron complexes and formate. PMID:4154039

  10. Adenine Synthesis in Interstellar Space: Mechanisms of Prebiotic Pyrimidine-Ring Formation of Monocyclic HCN-Pentamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Rainer; Hodgen, Brian; Farrelly, Dean; McKee, Elliot

    2007-06-01

    The question whether the nucleobases can be synthesized in interstellar space is of fundamental significance in considerations of the origin of life. Adenine is formally the HCN pentamer, and experiments have demonstrated that adenine is formed under certain conditions by HCN pentamerization in gas, liquid, and condensed phases. Most mechanistic proposals invoke the intermediacy of the HCN tetramer AICN (4), and it is thought that adenine synthesis is completed by addition of the 5th HCN to 4 to form amidine 5 and subsequent pyrimidine cyclization. In this context, we have been studying the mechanism for prebiotic pyrimidine-ring formation of monocyclic HCN-pentamers with ab initio electronic structure theory. The calculations model gas phase chemistry, and the results primarily inform discussions of adenine synthesis in interstellar space. Purine formation requires tautomerization of 5 to the conjugated amidine 6 (via hydrogen-tunneling, thermally with H+ -catalysis, or by photolysis) or to keteneimine 7 (by photolysis). It was found that 5-(N'-formamidinyl)-1H-imidazole-4-carbonitrile (6) can serve as a substrate for proton-catalyzed purine formation under photolytic conditions and N-(4-(iminomethylene)-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ylidene)formamidine (7) can serve as a substrate for uncatalyzed purine formation under photolytic conditions. The absence of any sizeable activation barrier for the cyclization of 7 to the (Z)-imino form of 9H-adenine (Z)-2 is quite remarkable, and it is this feature that allows for the formation of the purine skeleton from 7 without any further activation.

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  12. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  13. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  14. In vitro incorporation of LNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An LNA modified nucleoside triphosphate 1 was synthesized in order to investigate its potential to act as substrate for DNA strand synthesis by polymerases. Primer extension assays for the incorporation experiments revealed that Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase is an efficient enzyme for incorporation of the LNA nucleotide and for extending strand to full length. It was also observed that pfu DNA polymerase could incorporate the LNA nucleotide but it failed to extend the strand to a full length product. PMID:18058567

  15. Regulation of mammalian nucleotide metabolism and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides are required for a wide variety of biological processes and are constantly synthesized de novo in all cells. When cells proliferate, increased nucleotide synthesis is necessary for DNA replication and for RNA production to support protein synthesis at different stages of the cell cycle, during which these events are regulated at multiple levels. Therefore the synthesis of the precursor nucleotides is also strongly regulated at multiple levels. Nucleotide synthesis is an energy intensive process that uses multiple metabolic pathways across different cell compartments and several sources of carbon and nitrogen. The processes are regulated at the transcription level by a set of master transcription factors but also at the enzyme level by allosteric regulation and feedback inhibition. Here we review the cellular demands of nucleotide biosynthesis, their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of regulation during the cell cycle. The use of stable isotope tracers for delineating the biosynthetic routes of the multiple intersecting pathways and how these are quantitatively controlled under different conditions is also highlighted. Moreover, the importance of nucleotide synthesis for cell viability is discussed and how this may lead to potential new approaches to drug development in diseases such as cancer. PMID:25628363

  16. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  17. Insight into G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme/RNAzyme: adjacent adenine as the intramolecular species for remarkable enhancement of enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Li, Yong; Liu, Zhuoliang; Lin, Bin; Yi, Haibo; Xu, Feng; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) with stacked G-tetrads structure is able to bind hemin (iron (III)-protoporphyrin IX) to form a unique type of DNAzyme/RNAzyme with peroxidase-mimicking activity, which has been widely employed in multidisciplinary fields. However, its further applications are hampered by its relatively weak activity compared with protein enzymes. Herein, we report a unique intramolecular enhancement effect of the adjacent adenine (EnEAA) at 3′ end of G4 core sequences that significantly improves the activity of G4 DNAzymes. Through detailed investigations of the EnEAA, the added 3′ adenine was proved to accelerate the compound I formation in catalytic cycle and thus improve the G4 DNAzyme activity. EnEAA was found to be highly dependent on the unprotonated state of the N1 of adenine, substantiating that adenine might function as a general acid–base catalyst. Further adenine analogs analysis supported that both N1 and exocyclic 6-amino groups in adenine played key role in the catalysis. Moreover, we proved that EnEAA was generally applicable for various parallel G-quadruplex structures and even G4 RNAzyme. Our studies implied that adenine might act analogously as the distal histidine in protein peroxidases, which shed light on the fundamental understanding and rational design of G4 DNAzyme/RNAzyme catalysts with enhanced functions. PMID:27422869

  18. Interaction of pigeon-liver nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide kinase with cibacron blue F3GA.

    PubMed Central

    Apps, D K; Gleed, C D

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of pigeon liver NAD kinase with Cibacron Blue F3GA was investigated. By using steady-state rate measurements, spectrophotometric titration and chromatography of the enzyme on immobilized dye, it was shown that binding occurs at two nucleotide sites with different affinities, and also at a site distinct from the substrate-binding region. PMID:187176

  19. Activated Ras interacts with the Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, F; Fields, S; Schneider, C; Martin, G S

    1994-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify proteins that interact with Ras. The H-Ras protein was found to interact with a guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (GDS) that has been previously shown to regulate guanine nucleotide exchange on another member of the Ras protein family, Ral. The interaction is mediated by the C-terminal, noncatalytic segment of the RalGDS and can be detected both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, with purified recombinant proteins. The interaction of the RalGDS C-terminal segment with Ras is specific, dependent on activation of Ras by GTP, and blocked by a mutation that affects Ras effector function. These characteristics are similar to those previously demonstrated for the interaction between Ras and its putative effector, Raf, suggesting that the RalGDS may also be a Ras effector. Consistent with this idea, the RalGDS was found to inhibit the binding of Raf to Ras. Images PMID:7972015

  20. Nucleotide Substitution and Recombination at Orthologous Loci in Staphylococcus aureus†

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Friedman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The pattern of nucleotide substitution was examined at 2,129 orthologous loci among five genomes of Staphylococcus aureus, which included two sister pairs of closely related genomes (MW2/MSSA476 and Mu50/N315) and the more distantly related MRSA252. A total of 108 loci were unusual in lacking any synonymous differences among the five genomes; most of these were short genes encoding proteins highly conserved at the amino acid sequence level (including many ribosomal proteins) or unknown predicted genes. In contrast, 45 genes were identified that showed anomalously high divergence at synonymous sites. The latter genes were evidently introduced by homologous recombination from distantly related genomes, and in many cases, the pattern of nucleotide substitution made it possible to reconstruct the most probable recombination event involved. These recombination events introduced genes encoding proteins that differed in amino acid sequence and thus potentially in function. Several of the proteins are known or likely to be involved in pathogenesis (e.g., staphylocoagulase, exotoxin, Ser-Asp fibrinogen-binding bone sialoprotein-binding protein, fibrinogen and keratin-10 binding surface-anchored protein, fibrinogen-binding protein ClfA, and enterotoxin P). Therefore, the results support the hypothesis that exchange of homologous genes among S. aureus genomes can play a role in the evolution of pathogenesis in this species. PMID:15805516

  1. Minor groove site coordination of adenine by platinum group metal ions: effects on basicity, base pairing, and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Amantia, David; Price, Clayton; Shipman, Michelle A; Elsegood, Mark R J; Clegg, William; Houlton, Andrew

    2003-05-01

    Dithioether- or diamine-tethered adenine derivatives react with Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) ions to give N3-coordinated complexes of the types [MCl(SSN)](+) (M = Pt or Pd), [RhCl(3)(SSN)], or [RhCl(3)(NNN)] (where SSN = 1-(N9-adenine)-3,6-dithia-heptane or 1-(N9-adenine)-4,7-dithia-octane; NNN = ethylenediamine-N,9-ethyladenine). Single-crystal X-ray analysis confirms the nature of the metal-nucleobase interaction and highlights a conserved intermolecular hydrogen-bonding motif for all the complexes, irrespective of the metal-ion geometry. Coordination significantly reduces the basicity of the adeninyl group, as indicated by a pK(a) value of -0.16 for [PtCl(N3-1-(N9-adenine)-3,6-dithia-heptane)]BF(4), compared to a pK(a) value of 4.2 for 9-ethyladenine. The site of proton binding, N1 or N7, could not be unambiguously assigned from the (1)H NMR data, because of the similar effect on the chemical shifts of the H2 and H8 protons. Density functional calculations at the BP-LACVP level suggest N1 as the site of protonation for this type of complex. This is in contrast to the N7-protonation reported for [Pt(dien)(N3-6,6',9-trimethyladenine)](2+), as reported elsewhere (Meiser et al., Chem.-Eur. J. 1997, 3, 388). However, further electronic structure calculations in the gas phase reveal that the preferred site for protonation for N3-bound complexes is conformationally dependent. N3 coordination was also found to reduce the extent of base pairing between adenine and thymine in dimethylsulfoxide for the self-complementary complex [PtCl(L3)](+) (L3 = 1-(N9-adenine)-3,6-dithia-9-(N1-thymine)nonane), compared to that for the uncomplexed ligand. PMID:12716200

  2. Adsorption of nucleotides onto Fe-Mg-Al rich swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillie, Cécile; Daniel, Isabelle; Michot, Laurent J.; Pedreira-Segade, Ulysse

    2013-11-01

    Mineral surfaces may have played a role in the origin of the first biopolymers, by concentrating organic monomers from a dilute ocean. Swelling clays provide a high surface area for the concentration of prebiotic monomers, and have therefore been the subject of numerous investigations. In that context, montmorillonite, the most abundant swelling clay in modern environments, has been extensively studied with regard to adsorption and polymerization of nucleic acids. However, montmorillonite was probably rather marginal on the primitive ocean floor compared to iron-magnesium rich phyllosilicates such as nontronite that results from the hydrothermal alteration of a mafic or ultramafic oceanic crust. In the present paper, we study the adsorption of nucleotides on montmorillonite and nontronite, at various pH and ionic strength conditions plausible for Archean sea-water. A thorough characterization of the mineral surfaces shows that nucleotide adsorb mainly on the edge faces of the smectites by ligand exchange between the phosphate groups of the nucleotides and the -OH groups from the edge sites over a wide pH range (4-10). Nontronite is more reactive than montmorillonite. At low pH, additional ion exchange may play a role as the nucleotides become positively charged.

  3. Rigid Adenine Nucleoside Derivatives as Novel Modulators of the Human Sodium Symporters for Dopamine and Norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, Aaron; Tosh, Dilip K; Eshleman, Amy J; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-01

    Thirty-two congeneric rigid adenine nucleoside derivatives containing a North (N)-methanocarba ribose substitution and a 2-arylethynyl group either enhanced (up to 760% of control) or inhibited [(125)I] methyl (1R,2S,3S)-3-(4-iodophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylate (RTI-55) binding at the human dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and inhibited DA uptake. Several nucleosides also enhanced [(3)H]mazindol [(±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,5-dihydro-2H-imidazo[2,1-a]isoindol-5-ol] binding to the DAT. The combination of binding enhancement and functional inhibition suggests possible allosteric interaction with the tropanes. The structure-activity relationship of this novel class of DAT ligands was explored: small N(6)-substition (methyl or ethyl) was favored, while the N1 of the adenine ring was essential. Effective terminal aryl groups include thien-2-yl (compounds 9 and 16), with EC50 values of 35.1 and 9.1 nM, respectively, in [(125)I]RTI-55 binding enhancement, and 3,4-difluorophenyl as in the most potent DA uptake inhibitor (compound 6) with an IC50 value of 92 nM (3-fold more potent than cocaine), but not nitrogen heterocycles. Several compounds inhibited or enhanced binding at the norepinephrine transporter (NET) and serotonin transporter (SERT) and inhibited function in the micromolar range; truncation at the 4'-position in compound 23 allowed for weak inhibition of the SERT. We have not yet eliminated adenosine receptor affinity from this class of DAT modulators, but we identified modifications that remove DAT inhibition as an off-target effect of potent adenosine receptor agonists. Thus, we have identified a new class of allosteric DAT ligands, rigidified adenosine derivatives, and explored their initial structural requirements. They display a very atypical pharmacological profile, i.e., either enhancement by increasing affinity or inhibition of radioligand binding at the DAT, and in some cases the NET and SERT, and inhibition of neurotransmitter

  4. Poly-adenine-based programmable engineering of gold nanoparticles for highly regulated spherical DNAzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Rahaman, Mostafizur; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2015-11-01

    Enzyme complexes are assembled at the two-dimensional lipid membrane or prearranged on three-dimensional scaffolding proteins to regulate their catalytic activity in cells. Inspired by nature, we have developed gold nanoparticle-based spherical DNAzymes (SNAzymes) with programmably engineered activities by exploiting poly-adenine (polyA)-Au interactions. In a SNAzyme, AuNPs serve as the metal core, which is decorated with a functional shell of DNAzymes. Conventional thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly leads to disordered structures with suppressed activity. In contrast, by using an anchoring block of polyA tails, we find that the activity of SNAzymes can be programmably regulated. By using a polyA30 tail, SNAzymes demonstrated remarkably enhanced binding affinity compared to the thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly (~75-fold) or individual DNAzymes in the solution phase (~10-fold). More significantly, this increased affinity is directly translated to the sensitivity improvement in the SNAzyme-based lead sensor. Hence, this design of SNAzymes may provide new opportunities for developing biosensors and bioimaging probes for theranostic applications.Enzyme complexes are assembled at the two-dimensional lipid membrane or prearranged on three-dimensional scaffolding proteins to regulate their catalytic activity in cells. Inspired by nature, we have developed gold nanoparticle-based spherical DNAzymes (SNAzymes) with programmably engineered activities by exploiting poly-adenine (polyA)-Au interactions. In a SNAzyme, AuNPs serve as the metal core, which is decorated with a functional shell of DNAzymes. Conventional thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly leads to disordered structures with suppressed activity. In contrast, by using an anchoring block of polyA tails, we find that the activity of SNAzymes can be programmably regulated. By using a polyA30 tail, SNAzymes demonstrated remarkably enhanced binding affinity compared to the thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly (~75-fold) or

  5. Rigid Adenine Nucleoside Derivatives as Novel Modulators of the Human Sodium Symporters for Dopamine and Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Dilip K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-two congeneric rigid adenine nucleoside derivatives containing a North (N)-methanocarba ribose substitution and a 2-arylethynyl group either enhanced (up to 760% of control) or inhibited [125I] methyl (1R,2S,3S)-3-(4-iodophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylate (RTI-55) binding at the human dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and inhibited DA uptake. Several nucleosides also enhanced [3H]mazindol [(±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,5-dihydro-2H-imidazo[2,1-a]isoindol-5-ol] binding to the DAT. The combination of binding enhancement and functional inhibition suggests possible allosteric interaction with the tropanes. The structure-activity relationship of this novel class of DAT ligands was explored: small N6-substition (methyl or ethyl) was favored, while the N1 of the adenine ring was essential. Effective terminal aryl groups include thien-2-yl (compounds 9 and 16), with EC50 values of 35.1 and 9.1 nM, respectively, in [125I]RTI-55 binding enhancement, and 3,4-difluorophenyl as in the most potent DA uptake inhibitor (compound 6) with an IC50 value of 92 nM (3-fold more potent than cocaine), but not nitrogen heterocycles. Several compounds inhibited or enhanced binding at the norepinephrine transporter (NET) and serotonin transporter (SERT) and inhibited function in the micromolar range; truncation at the 4′-position in compound 23 allowed for weak inhibition of the SERT. We have not yet eliminated adenosine receptor affinity from this class of DAT modulators, but we identified modifications that remove DAT inhibition as an off-target effect of potent adenosine receptor agonists. Thus, we have identified a new class of allosteric DAT ligands, rigidified adenosine derivatives, and explored their initial structural requirements. They display a very atypical pharmacological profile, i.e., either enhancement by increasing affinity or inhibition of radioligand binding at the DAT, and in some cases the NET and SERT, and inhibition of neurotransmitter uptake

  6. Kinetic approach for the purification of nucleotides with magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Tural, Servet; Tural, Bilsen; Ece, Mehmet Şakir; Yetkin, Evren; Özkan, Necati

    2014-11-01

    The isolation of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide is of great importance since it is widely used in different scientific and technologic fields such as biofuel cells, sensor technology, and hydrogen production. In order to isolate β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, first 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were prepared to serve as a magnetic solid support and subsequently they were used for reversible adsorption/desorption of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in a batch fashion. The loading capacity of the 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized nanoparticles for β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide adsorption was 13.0 μmol/g. Adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies showed that the adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the experimental data can be represented using Langmuir isotherm model. The 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were proposed as an alternative support for the β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide purification. The results elucidated the significance of magnetic separation as a fast, relatively simple, and low-cost technique. Furthermore, the magnetic supports can be reused at least five times for purification processes. PMID:25199632

  7. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  8. Photoinitiator Nucleotide for Quantifying Nucleic Acid Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leah M.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    This first report of a photoinitiator-nucleotide conjugate demonstrates a novel approach for sensitive, rapid and visual detection of DNA hybridization events. This approach holds potential for various DNA labeling schemes and for applications benefiting from selective DNA-based polymerization initiators. Here, we demonstrate covalent, enzymatic incorporation of an eosin-photoinitiator 2′-deoxyuridine-5′-triphosphate (EITC-dUTP) conjugate into surface-immobilized DNA hybrids. Subsequent radical chain photoinitiation from these sites using an acrylamide/bis-acrylamide formulation yields a dynamic detection range between 500pM and 50nM of DNA target. Increasing EITC-nucleotide surface densities leads to an increase in surface-based polymer film heights until achieving a film height plateau of 280nm ±20nm at 610 ±70 EITC-nucleotides/μm2. Film heights of 10–20 nm were obtained from eosin surface densities of approximately 20 EITC-nucleotides/μm2 while below the detection limit of ~10 EITC-nucleotides/μm2, no detectable films were formed. This unique threshold behavior is utilized for instrument-free, visual quantification of target DNA concentration ranges. PMID:20337438

  9. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22643861

  10. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighbouring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22551978

  11. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  12. Kinetics of nucleotide transport in rat heart mitochondria studied by a rapid filtration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Brandolin, G.; Marty, I.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1990-10-01

    A rapid filtration technique has been used to measure at room temperature the kinetics of ADP and ATP transport in rat heart mitochondria in the millisecond time range. Transport was stopped by cessation of the nucleotide supply, without the use of a transport inhibitor, thus avoiding any quenching delay. The kinetics of ({sup 14}C)ADP transport in energized mitochondria were apparently monophasic. The rate of transport of ({sup 14}C)ATP in energized mitochondria was 5-10 times lower than that of ({sup 14}C)ADP. Upon uncoupling, the rate of ({sup 14}C)ATP uptake was enhanced, and that of ({sup 14}C)ADP uptake was decreased. However, the two rates did not equalize, indicating that transport was not exclusively electrogenic. Transport of ({sup 14}C)ADP and ({sup 14}C)ATP by resting mitochondria followed biphasic kinetics. Depletion of nucleotides in resting mitochondria resulted in a greater decrease in the extent of the slow phase than of the rapid one. In addition, about half of the nucleotides taken up at the end of the rapid phase were not discharged into the medium upon addition of carboxyatractyloside. This suggested that matricial nucleotides are compartmentalized in two pools which are exchangeable at different rates with external nucleotides.

  13. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  14. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  15. Conversion of adenine to 5-amino-4-pyrimidinylimidazole caused by acetyl capping during solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Andrew A; Cedillo, Isaiah; McPherson, Andrew K

    2016-08-01

    The acetyl capping reaction used throughout solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis is meant to minimize n-1 deletionmer impurities by terminating sequences that fail to couple to a phosphoramidite. However, the reaction is also responsible for the formation of a number of impurities. One capping-related impurity has an additional mass of 98amu from the parent oligonucleotide. The n+98 amu impurity was found to result from modification of an adenine nucleobase. The structure of the impurity was determined by preparation of an oligonucleotide enriched in n+98 amu, enzymatic digestion to individual nucleosides, isolation of the pure nucleoside+98 amu species, crystallization, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. The n+98 amu impurity is an oligonucleotide in which one adenine residue has been converted to 5-amino-4-pyrimidinylimidazole. The mechanism of formation of the impurity was investigated, and a mechanism is proposed. PMID:27353533

  16. The contribution of adenines in the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme improved by the 6-amino group modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Yang; He, Junlin

    2016-09-15

    In the catalytic core of 10-23 DNAzyme, its five adenine residues are moderate conservative, but with highly conserved functional groups like 6-amino group and 7-nitrogen atom. It is this critical conservation that these two groups could be modified for better contribution. With 2'-deoxyadenosine analogues, several functional groups were introduced at the 6-amino group of the five adenine residues. 3-Aminopropyl substituent at 6-amino group of A15 resulted in a five-fold increase of kobs. More efficient DNAzymes are expected by delicate design of the linkage and the external functional groups for this 6-amino group of A15. With this modification approach, other functional groups or residues could be optimized for 10-23 DNAzyme. PMID:27506560

  17. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  18. Adenine methylation in eukaryotes: Apprehending the complex evolutionary history and functional potential of an epigenetic modification.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Zhang, Dapeng; Aravind, L

    2016-01-01

    While N(6) -methyladenosine (m(6) A) is a well-known epigenetic modification in bacterial DNA, it remained largely unstudied in eukaryotes. Recent studies have brought to fore its potential epigenetic role across diverse eukaryotes with biological consequences, which are distinct and possibly even opposite to the well-studied 5-methylcytosine mark. Adenine methyltransferases appear to have been independently acquired by eukaryotes on at least 13 occasions from prokaryotic restriction-modification and counter-restriction systems. On at least four to five instances, these methyltransferases were recruited as RNA methylases. Thus, m(6) A marks in eukaryotic DNA and RNA might be more widespread and diversified than previously believed. Several m(6) A-binding protein domains from prokaryotes were also acquired by eukaryotes, facilitating prediction of potential readers for these marks. Further, multiple lineages of the AlkB family of dioxygenases have been recruited as m(6) A demethylases. Although members of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases have also been suggested to be m(6) A demethylases, this proposal needs more careful evaluation. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26660621

  19. DNA methyltransferase detection based on digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine DNA with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Haiyan; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2016-06-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) has received a large amount of attention due to its catalyzation of DNA methylation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which has a close relationship to cancer and bacterial diseases. Herein, a novel electrochemical strategy based on Dpn I digestion triggering the combination of poly adenine (polyA) DNA with a gold nanoparticles functioned glassy carbon electrode (AuNPs/GCE), is developed for the simple and efficient detection of DNA MTase and inhibitor screening. Only one methylene blue (MB)-labeled DNA hairpin probe and two enzymes are involved in this designed method. In the presence of Dam MTase, the hairpin probe can be methylated and then cleaved by the restriction endonuclease. Thus, a MB-labeled polyA signal-stranded DNA product is introduced to the surface of AuNPs/GCE through the effect between polyA and AuNPs, resulting in an obvious electrochemical signal. On the contrary, in the absence of Dam MTase, the DNA probe cannot be cleaved and a relatively small electrochemical response can be observed. As a result, the as-proposed biosensor offered an efficient way for Dam MTase activity monitoring with a low detection of 0.27U/mL, a wide linear range and good stability. Additionally, this assay holds great potential for further application in real biological matrices and inhibitors screening, which is expected to be useful in disease diagnosis and drug discovery. PMID:26807517

  20. Tools for DNA adenine methyltransferase identification analysis of nuclear organization during C. elegans development.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Ritler, Dominic; Meister, Peter

    2016-04-01

    C. elegans has recently emerged as a valuable model to understand the link between nuclear organization and cell fate, by combining microscopy approaches, genome-wide mapping techniques with advanced genetics. Crucial to these analyses are techniques to determine the genome-wide interaction pattern of proteins with DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation has proven valuable but it requires considerable amounts of starting material. This is sometimes difficult to achieve, in particular for specific genotypes (balanced strains, different sexes, severe phenotypes…). As an alternative to ChIP, DNA adenine methyltransferase identification by sequencing (DamID-seq) was recently shown to be able to characterize binding sites in single mammalian cells. Additionally, DamID can be achieved for cell-type specific analysis by expressing Dam fusion proteins under tissue specific promoters in a controlled manner. In this report, we present a user-friendly pipeline to analyse DamID-seq data in C. elegans. Based upon this pipeline, we provide a comparative analysis of libraries generated with different starting material and discuss important library features. Moreover, we introduce an adaptation of an imaging based tool to visualize in vivo the cell-specific tridimensional binding pattern of any protein of interest. genesis 54:151-159, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26845390

  1. Identification of the active oligomeric state of an essential adenine DNA methyltransferase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Shier, V K; Hancey, C J; Benkovic, S J

    2001-05-01

    Caulobacter crescentus contains one of the two known prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases that lacks a cognate endonuclease. This endogen