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Sample records for adenine nucleotides atp

  1. Identification of a mitochondrial ATP synthase-adenine nucleotide translocator complex in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Detke, Siegfried; Elsabrouty, Rania

    2008-01-01

    The ATP synthasome is a macromolecular complex consisting of ATP synthase, adenine nucleotide translocator and phosphate carrier. To determine if this complex is evolutionary old or young, we searched for its presence in Leishmania, a mitochondria containing protozoan which evolved from the main eukaryote line soon after eukaryotes split from prokaryotes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that the distribution of ANT among the fractions coincided with the distribution of ATP synthase. In addition, ATP synthase co-precipitated with FLAG tagged and wild type adenine nucleotide translocator isolated with anti FLAG and anti adenine nucleotide translocator antibodies, respectively. These data indicate that the adenine nucleotide translocator interacted with the ATP synthase to form a stable structure referred to as the ATP synthasome. The presence of the ATP synthasome in Leishmania, an organism branching off the main line of eukaryotes early in the development of eukaryotes, as well as in higher eukaryotes suggests that the ATP synthasome is a phylogenetically ancient structure. PMID:17920025

  2. Applications of adenine nucleotide measurements in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm-Hansen, O.; Hodson, R.; Azam, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methodology involved in nucleotide measurements is outlined, along with data to support the premise that ATP concentrations in microbial cells can be extrapolated to biomass parameters. ATP concentrations in microorganisms and nucleotide analyses are studied.

  3. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  4. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  5. The rate of ATP export in the extramitochondrial phase via the adenine nucleotide translocator changes in aging in mitochondria isolated from heart left ventricle of either normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; Seccia, Teresa Maria; Marra, Ersilia; Passarella, Salvatore

    2011-10-01

    To find out whether and how deficit of cellular energy supply from mitochondria to cytosol occurs in aging and hypertension, we used mitochondria isolated from 5 to 72 week-old heart left ventricle of either normotensive (WKY) or spontaneous hypertensive (SH) rats as a model system. Measurements were made of the rate of ATP appearance outside mitochondria, due to externally added ADP, as an increase of NADPH absorbance which occurs when ATP is produced in the presence of glucose, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Such a rate proved to mirror the function of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) rather than other processes linked to the both oxidative and substrate level phosphorylation. The changes in both Ki for atractyloside and Km for ADP suggest the occurrence of modification of the ANT conformation during aging in which the ANT Vmax was found to decrease in normotensive but to increase under spontaneously hypertension in 24 week-old rats with a subsequent decrease in both cases. ANT function, as investigated in the ADP physiological range (20-60μM), is expected to decrease in normotensive, but to increase in hypertensive rats up to 48 weeks. Later a decrease in the ATP rate of export outside mitochondria should occur in both cases. PMID:21855562

  6. Phosphorus-31 NMR visibility and characterization of rat liver mitochondrial matrix adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Berkich, D.; Williams, G.D.; LaNoue, K.F.; Briggs, R.W. )

    1989-05-16

    Compartmentation and NMR visibility of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides were quantitated in isolated rat liver mitochondria respiring on succinate and glutamate in vitro at 8 and 25{degree}C. Intra- and extramitochondrial nucleotides were discriminated by adding the chelator trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (CDTA). T{sub 1} values of about 0.2-0.3 s for magnesium-bound matrix nucleotides were determined. Adenine nucleotide T{sub 1} values were influenced by the ionic environment; only magnesium-free ATP T{sub 1}'s were affected by temperature. Intra- and extramitochondrial adenine nucleotide ratios were varied in ATP-loaded mitochondria with added ATP and phosphate using the mitochondrial inhibitors oligomycin and carboxyatractyloside, and adenine nucleotides were quantitated by using NMR and enzymatic analysis. There was good agreement between matrix ATP concentrations (magnesium-bound ATP) calculated by using NMR and standard biochemical techniques. Although matrix ADP could be detected by NMR, it was difficult to quantitate accurately by NMR. The data indicate that mitochondrial ATP is NMR-visible in isolated mitochondria in vitro.

  7. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  8. ADENYLATE ENERGY CHARGE AND ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS AS INDICATORS OF STRESS IN THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, TREATED WITH DREDGED MATERIAL UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adenylate energy charge is an indication of the amount of energy available to an organism from the adenylate pool. t is calculated from measured concentrations of three adenine nucleotides, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP...

  9. Functional Linkage of Adenine Nucleotide Binding Sites in Mammalian Muscle 6-Phosphofructokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Brüser, Antje; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Kloos, Marco; Sträter, Norbert; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    6-Phosphofructokinases (Pfk) are homo- and heterooligomeric, allosteric enzymes that catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps of the glycolysis: the phosphorylation of fructose 6-phosphate at position 1. Pfk activity is modulated by a number of regulators including adenine nucleotides. Recent crystal structures from eukaryotic Pfk revealed several adenine nucleotide binding sites. Herein, we determined the functional relevance of two adenine nucleotide binding sites through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme kinetic studies. Subsequent characterization of Pfk mutants allowed the identification of the activating (AMP, ADP) and inhibitory (ATP, ADP) allosteric binding sites. Mutation of one binding site reciprocally influenced the allosteric regulation through nucleotides interacting with the other binding site. Such reciprocal linkage between the activating and inhibitory binding sites is in agreement with current models of allosteric enzyme regulation. Because the allosteric nucleotide binding sites in eukaryotic Pfk did not evolve from prokaryotic ancestors, reciprocal linkage of functionally opposed allosteric binding sites must have developed independently in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Pfk (convergent evolution). PMID:22474333

  10. Modulation by adenine nucleotides of epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ross, F M; Brodie, M J; Stone, T W

    1998-01-01

    Hippocampal slices (450 μm) generate epileptiform bursts of an interictal nature when perfused with a zero magnesium medium containing 4-aminopyridine (50 μM). The effect of adenine nucleotides on this activity was investigated.ATP and adenosine depressed this epileptiform activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with both purines being equipotent at concentrations above 10 μM.Adenosine deaminase 0.2 u ml−1, a concentration that annuls the effect of adenosine (50 μM), did not significantly alter the depression of activity caused by ATP (50 μM).8-Cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), an A1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the discharge rate significantly and inhibited the depressant effect of both ATP and adenosine such that the net effect of ATP or adenosine plus CPT was excitatory.Several ATP analogues were also tested: α, β-methyleneATP (α, β-meATP), 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP). Only α, β-meATP (10 μM) produced an increase in the frequency of spontaneous activity which suggests a lack of involvement of P2Y or P2U receptors.Suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′, 4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS), P2 receptor antagonists, failed to inhibit the depression produced by ATP (50 μM). The excitatory effect of α, β-meATP (10 μM) was inhibited by suramin (50 μM) and PPADS (5 μM).ATP therefore depresses epileptiform activity in this model in a manner which is not consistent with the activation of known P1 or P2 receptors, suggesting the involvement of a xanthine-sensitive nucleotide receptor. The results are also indicative of an excitatory P2X receptor existing in the hippocampal CA3 region. PMID:9484856

  11. Adenine nucleotide-dependent and redox-independent control of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is important for sustaining cellular growth and maintenance; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying individual processes in plant mitochondria remain largely uncharacterized. Previous redox-proteomics studies have suggested that mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and redox shuttling, is under thiol-based redox regulation as a target candidate of thioredoxin (Trx). In addition, the adenine nucleotide status may be another factor controlling mitochondrial metabolism, as respiratory ATP production in mitochondria is believed to be influenced by several environmental stimuli. Using biochemical and reverse-genetic approaches, we addressed the redox- and adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of mMDH in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant mMDH protein formed intramolecular disulfide bonds under oxidative conditions, but these bonds did not have a considerable effect on mMDH activity. Mitochondria-localized o-type Trx (Trx-o) did not facilitate re-reduction of oxidized mMDH. Determination of the in vivo redox state revealed that mMDH was stably present in the reduced form even in Trx-o-deficient plants. Accordingly, we concluded that mMDH is not in the class of redox-regulated enzymes. By contrast, mMDH activity was lowered by adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Each adenine nucleotide suppressed mMDH activity with different potencies and ATP exerted the largest inhibitory effect with a significantly lower K(I). Correspondingly, mMDH activity was inhibited by the increase in ATP/ADP ratio within the physiological range. These results suggest that mMDH activity is finely controlled in response to variations in mitochondrial adenine nucleotide balance. PMID:26946085

  12. Ethanol-induced activation of adenine nucleotide turnover. Evidence for a role of acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, J.G.; Fox, I.H.

    1984-09-01

    Consumption of alcohol causes hyperuricemia by decreasing urate excretion and increasing its production. Our previous studies indicate that ethanol administration increases uric acid production by increasing ATP degradation to uric acid precursors. To test the hypothesis that ethanol-induced increased urate production results from acetate metabolism and enhanced adenosine triphosphate turnover, we gave intravenous sodium acetate, sodium chloride and ethanol (0.1 mmol/kg per min for 1 h) to five normal subjects. Acetate plasma levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.01 mM (mean +/- SE) to peak values of 0.35 +/- 0.07 mM and to 0.08 +/- 0.01 mM during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary oxypurines increased to 223 +/- 13% and 316 +/- 44% of the base-line values during acetate and ethanol infusions, respectively. Urinary radioactivity from the adenine nucleotide pool labeled with (8-14C) adenine increased to 171 +/- 27% and to 128 +/- 8% of the base-line values after acetate and ethanol infusions. These data indicate that both ethanol and acetate increase purine nucleotide degradation by enhancing the turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool. They support the hypothesis that acetate metabolism contributes to the increased production of urate associated with ethanol intake.

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids. PMID:15737999

  14. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-10-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP(4-) (out) for ADP(3-) (in) + 0.5 phosphate(2-) (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated. PMID:283393

  15. Differences between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and HisP in the interaction with the adenine ring of ATP.

    PubMed

    Berger, A L; Welsh, M J

    2000-09-22

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. The most conserved features of this family are the nucleotide-binding domains. As in other members of this family, these domains bind and hydrolyze ATP; in CFTR this opens and closes the channel pore. The recent crystal structures of related bacterial transporters show that an aromatic residue interacts with the adenine ring of ATP to stabilize nucleotide binding. CFTR contains six aromatic residues that are candidates to coordinate the nucleotide base. We mutated each to cysteine and examined the functional consequences. None of the mutations disrupted channel function or the ability to discriminate between ATP, GTP, and CTP. We also applied [2-(triethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate to covalently modify the introduced cysteines. The mutant channels CFTR-F429C, F430C, F433C, and F1232C showed no difference from wild-type CFTR, indicating that either the residues were not accessible to modification, or cysteine modification did not affect function. Although modification inactivated CFTR-Y1219C more rapidly than wild-type CFTR, and inactivation of CFTR-F446C was nucleotide-dependent; failure of these mutations to alter gating suggested that Tyr(1219) and Phe(446) were not important for nucleotide binding. The results suggest that ATP binding may not involve the coordination of the adenine ring by an aromatic residue analogous to that in some bacterial transporters. Taken together with earlier work, this study points to a model in which most of the binding energy for ATP is contributed by the phosphate groups. PMID:10893239

  16. Relaxation of isolated taenia coli of guinea-pig by enantiomers of 2-azido analogues of adenosine and adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N. J.; Planker, M.

    1979-01-01

    1 2-Azido photoaffinity analogues of adenosine 5'triphosphate (ATP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine have been synthesized and tested on guinea-pig taenia coli. 2 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP were approximately 20 times more potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli, and required prolonged washout times before recovery of the muscle. 3 2-Azido-AMP and 2-azidoadenosine were 2 to 12 times more potent than ATP, but took much longer (up to 100 s) to reach maximal relaxation. This behaviour is different from that of AMP and adenosine which were much less potent than ATP. 4 L-Enantiomers of adenosine and adenine nucleotides were also tested. L-ATP and L-ADP were 3 to 6 times less potent than ATP and ADP, and L-AMP and L-adenosine were inactive. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-ADP were approximately 120 times less potent than 2-Azido-ATP and 6 times less potent than ATP as relaxants of taenia coli. 2-Azido-L-AMP and 2-azidio-L-adenosine were almost inactive. 5 2-Azido derivatives are photolysed by u.v. irradiation to reactive intermediates. 2-Azido-ATP and 2-azidoadenosine might be suitable photoaffinity ligands for labelling putative P2 and P1 purine receptors respectively. 2-Azido-L-ATP and 2-azido-L-adenosine could be useful controls for nonspecific labelling. PMID:497519

  17. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  18. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-08-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  19. Dual role for adenine nucleotides in the regulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor, guanylyl cyclase-A.

    PubMed

    Foster, D C; Garbers, D L

    1998-06-26

    The ability to both sensitize and desensitize a guanylyl cyclase receptor has not been previously accomplished in a broken cell or membrane preparation. The guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor is known to require both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and an adenine nucleotide for maximal cyclase activation. When membranes from NIH 3T3 cells stably overexpressing GC-A were incubated with ATP, AMPPNP, or ATPgammaS, only ATPgammaS dramatically potentiated ANP-dependent cyclase activity. When the membranes were incubated with ATPgammaS and then washed, GC-A now became sensitive to ANP/AMPPNP stimulation, suggestive that thiophosphorylation had sensitized GC-A to ligand and adenine nucleotide binding. Consistent with this hypo- thesis, the ATPgammaS effects were both time- and concentration-dependent. Protein phosphatase stability of thiophosphorylation (ATPgammaS) relative to phosphorylation (ATP) appeared to explain the differential effects of the two nucleotides since microcystin, beta-glycerol phosphate, or okadaic acid coincident with ATP or ATPgammaS effectively sensitized GC-A to ligand stimulation over prolonged periods of time in either case. GC-A was phosphorylated in the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, and the magnitude of the phosphorylation was increased by the addition of microcystin. Thus, the phosphorylation of GC-A correlates with the acquisition of ligand sensitivity. The establishment of an in vitro system to sensitize GC-A demonstrates that adenine nucleotides have a daul function in the regulation of GC-A through both phosphorylation of and binding to regulatory sites. PMID:9632692

  20. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  1. Purification and characterization of the reconstitutively active adenine nucleotide carrier from mitochondria of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Spagnoletta, Anna; De Santis, Aurelio; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2002-12-01

    The adenine nucleotide carrier from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers mitochondria was solubilized with Triton X-100 and purified by sequential chromatography on hydroxapatite and Matrex Gel Blue B in the presence of cardiolipin and asolectin. SDS gel electrophoresis of the purified fraction showed a single polypeptide band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa. When reconstituted in liposomes, the adenine nucleotide carrier catalyzed a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-sensitive ATP/ATP exchange. It was purified 75-fold with a recovery of 15% and a protein yield of 0.18% with respect to the mitochondrial extract. Among the various substrates and inhibitors tested, the reconstituted protein transported only ATP, ADP, and GTP and was inhibited by bongkrekate, phenylisothiocyanate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, mersalyl and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (but not N-ethylmaleimide). Atractyloside and carboxyatractyloside (at concentrations normally inhibitory in animal and plant mitochondria) were without effect in Jerusalem artichoke tubers mitochondria. Vmax of the reconstituted ATP/ATP exchange was determined to be 0.53 micromol/min per mg protein at 25 degrees C. The half-saturation constant Km and the corresponding inhibition constant Ki were 20.4 microM for ATP and 45 microM for ADP. The activation energy of the ATP/ATP exchange was 28 KJ/mol between 5 and 30 degrees C. The N-terminal amino acid partial sequence of the purified protein showed a partial homology with the ANT protein purified from mitochondria of maize shoots. PMID:12678438

  2. Adenine nucleotide translocator transports haem precursors into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Motoki; Kabe, Yasuaki; Kuramori, Chikanori; Kondo, Masao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Haem is a prosthetic group for haem proteins, which play an essential role in oxygen transport, respiration, signal transduction, and detoxification. In haem biosynthesis, the haem precursor protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) must be accumulated into the mitochondrial matrix across the inner membrane, but its mechanism is largely unclear. Here we show that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), the inner membrane transporter, contributes to haem biosynthesis by facilitating mitochondrial accumulation of its precursors. We identified that haem and PP IX specifically bind to ANT. Mitochondrial uptake of PP IX was inhibited by ADP, a known substrate of ANT. Conversely, ADP uptake into mitochondria was competitively inhibited by haem and its precursors, suggesting that haem-related porphyrins are accumulated into mitochondria via ANT. Furthermore, disruption of the ANT genes in yeast resulted in a reduction of haem biosynthesis by blocking the translocation of haem precursors into the matrix. Our results represent a new model that ANT plays a crucial role in haem biosynthesis by facilitating accumulation of its precursors into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:18728780

  3. Divalent phosphate is a counterion for carboxyatractyloside-insensitive adenine nucleotide transport in rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Nosek, M.T.; Aprille, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Unidirectional, carboxyatractyloside(CAT)-insensitive adenine nucleotide (AdN) fluxes have been studied in isolated rat liver mitochondria (mito). Previous work has shown that ATP x Mg transport in one direction is coupled to ATP x Mg or P/sub i/ transport in the opposite direction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether divalent HPO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ or monovalent H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ is the transported phosphate species. The authors used the monofluorophosphate (PO/sub 3/F/sup 2 -/) and difluorophosphate (PO/sub 2/F/sub 2//sup -/) analogues as potential counterions forAdN efflux. After a preincubation on ice with /sup 14/C-ADP to label the matrix AdN, efflux was measured at 30/sup 0/C, pH 7.4, in 225mM sucrose, 10mM KCl, 5mM MgCl/sub 2/, 5mM glutamate, 5mM malate, 10mM Tris, 0.5mM P/sub i/, 1mM ATP, and 5..mu..M CAT. With no other additions efflux was -0.62 +/- 0.20 nmole/minute/mg protein. The data supports the hypothesis that divalent but not monovalent phosphate can act as a counterion for ATPx Mg transport over this CAT-insensitive carrier.

  4. Content of Adenine Nucleotides and Orthophosphate in Exporting and Importing Mature Maize Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Eschrich, Walter; Fromm, Joerg

    1985-01-01

    Events of reactivation by re-illumination were studied in predarkened detached mature maize leaves, which were arranged as distal sources and proximal sinks; the latter were kept in CO2-free atmosphere and were either illuminated or darkened. Adenine nucleotide (AdN) content and orthophosphate (Pi) concentrations were measured 10 minutes, 30 minutes, and 2, 7, and 14 hours after the onset of re-illumination. For comparison, mature leaves attached to the plant were analyzed. The sum of AdN increased up to 7 hours of re-illumination, then dark sinks and their sources showed decreasing amounts of AdN, while the increase continued up to 14 hours in sources and illuminated sinks. In leaves attached to the plant, no further increase in AdN level followed the 7-hour mark. The amount of individual AdN (ATP, ADP, AMP) differed considerably in sources and sinks of the detached leaves. Although both the source supplying the illuminated sink and the source supplying the dark sink were treated the same, they showed striking differences in AdN contents. Such relations were also observed, when ATP/ADP ratios and Pi concentrations were compared. The influence a sink can exert on its source suggests a participation of the physiological events in the sink on the regulation of AdN and Pi metabolism in the source. PMID:16664246

  5. In vitro studies of release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from rat vascular endothelium in response to alpha 1-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, K; Hashimoto, M; Masumura, S; Bjur, R A; Westfall, D P; Hattori, K

    1994-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline-induced release of endogenous adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) and adenosine from both rat caudal artery and thoracic aorta was characterized, using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. 2. Noradrenaline, in a concentration-dependent manner, increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the caudal artery. The noradrenaline-induced release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from the caudal artery was abolished by bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by idazoxan, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, contracted caudal artery smooth muscle but did not induce release of adenine nucleotides or adenosine. 3. Noradrenaline also significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the thoracic aorta in the rat; however, the amount of adenine nucleotides and adenosine released from the aorta was considerably less than that released from the caudal artery. 4. Noradrenaline significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the aorta was also much less than that from cultured endothelial cells from the caudal artery. In cultured smooth muscle cells from the caudal artery, a significant release of ATP or its metabolites was not observed. 5. These results suggest that there are vascular endothelial cells that are able to release ATP by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism, but that these cells are not homogeneously distributed in the vasculature. PMID:7889273

  6. Release of adenine nucleotide metabolites by toxic concentrations of cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, W

    1994-01-01

    In isolated perfused guinea-pig hearts the effect of toxic concentrations of cardiac glycosides on the release of the adenine nucleotide metabolites adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid was investigated. Digoxin concentrations of 0.03-1 mumol.l-1 produced moderate to severe tachyarrhythmias. Large amounts of metabolites were released by concentrations of 0.1 mumol.l-1, and higher. Occurrence of glycoside-induced ventricular fibrillation was associated with a particularly high release. Metabolite release was also obtained when fibrillation was elicited electrically in normal control hearts, or in hearts receiving simultaneously a marginally toxic digoxin concentration (0.03 mumol.l-1). Digoxin-induced tachyarrhythmias and metabolite release were almost completely prevented by a high potassium concentration in the coronary perfusion fluid (8.1 mmol.l-1). The antiarrhythmic effect was also obtained with lidocaine (60 mumol.l-1), but the release was only partially antagonized. Similar results concerning arrhythmias and metabolite release as with digoxin were obtained with ouabain. The findings suggest that the decrease in myocardial ATP observed in glycoside-intoxicated heart preparations is partly due to the loss of nucleotide precursor substances. Moreover, it appears likely that liberated adenosine in the interstitium of severely intoxicated heart preparations reaches pharmacologically effective concentrations. PMID:7826306

  7. Adenine nucleotide pool variations in intact Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells.

    PubMed

    Eigener, U

    1975-03-10

    1. The ATP pool in Nitrobacter winogradskyi cells was determined by means of the luciferin-luciferase enzyme system and the ADP and AMP pools were measured after enzymatic conversion into ATP. 2. In the first 10 min after addition of nitrite to endogenously respiring cells, which had stood for 5--16 days after completion of the nitrite oxidation, the ATP pool dropped about 60%. 3. During the log phase the ATP pool was approx. 20--40 pmoles/5 mug cell-N. During growth it increased exponentially by 3--4 times the amount until the nitrite had been used up. Subsquently the ATP pool decreased at first rapidly and then more slowly without sinking to 0 in the first 2 months after nitrification. 4. Nitrite oxidizing cells had an energy charge of 0.37 during the log-phase. After approx. 90% of the substrate had been used up the energy charge had reached 0.57. 5. If the CO2 assimilation was inhibited in growing cultures by increased oxygen partial pressure, nitrite oxidation continued but the ATP pool increased. 6. The ATP pool and the activity of the endogenous respiration decreased by more than 50% during the first hours after the substrate had been used up. PMID:808183

  8. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  9. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  10. Analysis of functional coupling: mitochondrial creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Vendelin, Marko; Lemba, Maris; Saks, Valdur A

    2004-07-01

    The mechanism of functional coupling between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MiCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in isolated heart mitochondria is analyzed. Two alternative mechanisms are studied: 1), dynamic compartmentation of ATP and ADP, which assumes the differences in concentrations of the substrates between intermembrane space and surrounding solution due to some diffusion restriction and 2), direct transfer of the substrates between MiCK and ANT. The mathematical models based on these possible mechanisms were composed and simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. The first model, based on a dynamic compartmentation mechanism, was not sufficient to reproduce the measured values of apparent dissociation constants of MiCK reaction coupled to oxidative phosphorylation. The second model, which assumes the direct transfer of substrates between MiCK and ANT, is shown to be in good agreement with experiments--i.e., the second model reproduced the measured constants and the estimated ADP flux, entering mitochondria after the MiCK reaction. This model is thermodynamically consistent, utilizing the free energy profiles of reactions. The analysis revealed the minimal changes in the free energy profile of the MiCK-ANT interaction required to reproduce the experimental data. A possible free energy profile of the coupled MiCK-ANT system is presented. PMID:15240503

  11. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Scott J; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the bound

  12. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2’-OH group (2’-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP’s binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2’-deoxyATP’s binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2’-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  13. Probing the ATP site of GRP78 with nucleotide triphosphate analogs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hughes, Scott J.; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee -Won

    2016-05-04

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATPmore » analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the beta-gamma bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of

  14. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27048932

  15. Two Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Paralogues Involved in Cell Proliferation and Spermatogenesis in the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Jouraku, Akiya; Nakakura, Takayo; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) specifically acts in ADP/ATP exchange through the mitochondrial inner membrane. This transporter protein thereby plays a significant role in energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. Most mammals have four paralogous ANT genes (ANT1-4) and utilize these paralogues in different types of cells. The fourth paralogue of ANT (ANT4) is present only in mammals and reptiles and is exclusively expressed in testicular germ cells where it is required for meiotic progression in the spermatocytes. Here, we report that silkworms harbor two ANT paralogues, the homeostatic paralogue (BmANTI1) and the testis-specific paralogue (BmANTI2). The BmANTI2 protein has an N-terminal extension in which the positions of lysine residues in the amino acid sequence are distributed as in human ANT4. An expression analysis showed that BmANTI2 transcripts were restricted to the testis, suggesting the protein has a role in the progression of spermatogenesis. By contrast, BmANTI1 was expressed in all tissues tested, suggesting it has an important role in homeostasis. We also observed that cultured silkworm cells required BmANTI1 for proliferation. The ANTI1 protein of the lepidopteran Plutella xylostella (PxANTI1), but not those of other insect species (or PxANTI2), restored cell proliferation in BmANTI1-knockdown cells suggesting that ANTI1 has similar energy metabolism functions across the Lepidoptera. Our results suggest that BmANTI2 is evolutionarily divergent from BmANTI1 and has developed a specific role in spermatogenesis similar to that of mammalian ANT4. PMID:25742135

  16. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion. PMID:25605536

  17. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Hagan, William J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite is investigated in the presence of salts and Good's zwitterion buffers, PIPES and MES. The initial concentrations of nucleotide and the percent adsorbtion are used to calculate the adsorption isotherms, and the Langmuir adsorption equation is used for the analysis of data. The adsorption coefficient was found to be three times greater in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES than in its absence. In addition, basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction were increased by the buffer. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn(2+) complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. Mixed ligand complexes of this type are reminiscent of the complexes observed between metal ions and biological molecules in living systems.

  18. Effects of increased heart work on glycolysis and adenine nucleotides in the perfused heart of normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Opie, L. H.; Mansford, K. R. L.; Owen, Patricia

    1971-01-01

    1. In the isolated perfused rat heart, the contractile activity and the oxygen uptake were varied by altering the aortic perfusion pressure, or by the atrial perfusion technique (`working heart'). 2. The maximum increase in the contractile activity brought about an eightfold increase in the oxygen uptake. The rate of glycolytic flux rose, while tissue contents of hexose monophosphates, citrate, ATP and creatine phosphate decreased, and contents of ADP and AMP rose. 3. The changes in tissue contents of adenine nucleotides during increased heart work were time-dependent. The ATP content fell temporarily (30s and 2min) after the start of left-atrial perfusion; at 5 and 10min values were normal; and at 30 and 60min values were decreased. ADP and AMP values were increased in the first 15min, but were at control values 30 or 60min after the onset of increased heart work. 4. During increased heart work changes in the tissue contents of adenine nucleotide and of citrate appeared to play a role in altered regulation of glycolysis at the level of phosphofructokinase activity. 5. In recirculation experiments increased heart work for 30min was associated with increased entry of [14C]glucose (11.1mm) and glycogen into glycolysis and a comparable increase in formation of products of glycolysis (lactate, pyruvate and 14CO2). There was no major accumulation of intermediates. Glycogen was not a major fuel for respiration. 6. Increased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused and working hearts was obtained by the addition of insulin to the perfusion medium. The concomitant increases in the tissue values of hexose phosphates and of citrate contrasted with the decreased values of hexose monophosphates and of citrate during increased glycolytic flux obtained by increased heart work. 7. Decreased glycolytic flux in Langendorff perfused hearts was obtained by using acute alloxan-diabetic and chronic streptozotocin-diabetic rats; in the latter condition there were decreased tissue

  19. Pleiotropic effects of the yeast Sal1 and Aac2 carriers on mitochondrial function via an activity distinct from adenine nucleotide transport

    PubMed Central

    Kucejova, Blanka; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaowen; Giannattasio, Sergio; Chen, Xin Jie

    2009-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SAL1 encodes a Ca2+-binding mitochondrial carrier. Disruption of SAL1 is synthetically lethal with the loss of a specific function associated with the Aac2 isoform of the ATP/ADP translocase. This novel activity of Aac2 is defined as the V function (for Viability of aac2 sal1 double mutant), which is independent of the ATP/ADP exchange activity required for respiratory growth (the R function). We found that co-inactivation of SAL1 and AAC2 leads to defects in mitochondrial translation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Additionally, sal1Δ exacerbates the respiratory deficiency and mtDNA instability of ggc1Δ, shy1Δ and mtg1Δ mutants, which are known to reduce mitochondrial protein synthesis or protein complex assembly. The V function is complemented by the human Short Ca2+-binding Mitochondrial Carrier (SCaMC) protein, SCaMC-2, a putative ATP-Mg/Pi exchangers on the inner membrane. However, mitochondria lacking both Sal1p and Aac2p are not depleted of adenine nucleotides. The Aac2R252I and Aac2R253I variants mutated at the R252-254 triplet critical for nucleotide transport retain the V function. Likewise, Sal1p remains functionally active when the R479I and R481I mutations were introduced into the structurally equivalent R479-T480-R481 motif. Finally, we found that the naturally occurring V-R+ Aac1 isoform of adenine nucleotide translocase partially gains the V function at the expense of the R function by introducing the mutations P89L and A96V. Thus, our data support the view that the V function is independent of adenine nucleotide transport associated with Sal1p and Aac2p and this evolutionarily conserved activity affects multiple processes in mitochondria. PMID:18431598

  20. MICROCALORIMETRIC STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF MAGNESIUM COMPLEXES OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Belaich, J. P.; Sari, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Values for the thermodynamic quantities (ΔF, ΔH, ΔS) in reactions in which complexes of adenine nucleotides with magnesium ion (ATPMg--, ADPMg-, AMPMg) are formed have been obtained by a microcalorimetric technique by using an isothermic Calvet's apparatus. Experimental values measured at ionic strength μ = 0.2 indicate that complex formation reactions are driven by the entropic factor and that stability of complexes increases with length of the phosphate chain. PMID:5261047

  1. Effects of photofrin II and light on cellular adenine nucleotides and their modulation.

    PubMed

    Khanum, F; Jain, V

    1997-04-01

    Effects of photofrin II (PII) and light on the intra cellular nucleotide levels have been investigated using BHK-21 cell line. Results indicate that lower concentrations of photofrin II in dark increases ATP levels in a non linear manner, however, there has been no change in energy charge and levels of other nucleotides. Photoirradiation of PII-treated cells leads to a significant reduction in ATP levels and energy charge along with an increase in ATP breakdown products like ADP and AMP. The phosphorylation potential [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] also reduces upon photoirradiation of PII treated cells. Incubation conditions like pH of the medium and temperature modulate the cellular responses to a great extent. PMID:9315234

  2. Adenine Nucleotide Analogues Locked in a Northern Methanocarba Conformation: Enhanced Stability and Potency as P2Y1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Servos, Jörg; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lee, Kyeong; Maddileti, Savitri; Boyer, José L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Preference for the Northern (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of nucleotide 5′-triphosphate agonists at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y11 receptors, but not P2Y6 receptors, was established using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a 3.1.0-bicyclohexane) ring as a ribose substitute (Kim et al. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 208–218.). We have now combined the ring-constrained (N)-methanocarba modification of adenine nucleotides with other functionalities known to enhance potency at P2 receptors. The potency of the newly synthesized analogues was determined in the stimulation of phospholipase C through activation of turkey erythrocyte P2Y1 or human P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors stably expressed in astrocytoma cells. An (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio-ADP analogue displayed an EC50 at the hP2Y1 receptor of 0.40 nM and was 55-fold more potent than the corresponding triphosphate and 16-fold more potent than the riboside 5′-diphosphate. 2-Cl–(N)-methanocarba-ATP and its N6-Me analogue were also highly selective, full agonists at P2Y1 receptors. The (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio and 2-chloromonophosphate analogues were full agonists exhibiting micromolar potency at P2Y1 receptors, while the corresponding ribosides were inactive. Although β,γ-methylene-ATP was inactive at P2Y receptors, β,γ-methylene-(N)-methanocarba-ATP was a potent hP2Y1 receptor agonist with an EC50 of 160 nM and was selective versus hP2Y2 and hP2Y4 receptors. The rates of hydrolysis of Northern (N) and Southern (S) methanocarba analogues of AMP by rat 5′-ectonucleotidase were negligible. The rates of hydrolysis of the corresponding triphosphates by recombinant rat NTPDase1 and 2 were studied. Both isomers were hydrolyzed by NTPDase 1 at about half the rate of ATP hydrolysis. The (N) isomer was hardly hydrolyzed by NTPDase 2, while the (S) isomer was hydrolyzed at one-third of the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that new, more stable and selective nucleotide agonists may be designed on the basis of

  3. Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter-Mediated ATP Release Regulates Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Jessica C.; Corbin, Kathryn L.; Li, Qin; Feranchak, Andrew P.; Nunemaker, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular ATP plays a critical role in regulating insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. The ATP released from insulin secretory vesicles has been proposed to be a major source of extracellular ATP. Currently, the mechanism by which ATP accumulates into insulin secretory granules remains elusive. In this study, the authors identified the expression of a vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in mouse pancreas, isolated mouse islets, and MIN6 cells, a mouse β cell line. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed that VNUT colocalized extensively with insulin secretory granules. Functional studies showed that suppressing endogenous VNUT expression in β cells by small hairpin RNA knockdown greatly reduced basal- and glucose-induced ATP release. Importantly, knocking down VNUT expression by VNUT small hairpin RNA in MIN6 cells and isolated mouse islets dramatically suppressed basal insulin release and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Moreover, acute pharmacologic blockade of VNUT with Evans blue, a VNUT antagonist, greatly attenuated GSIS in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous ATP treatment effectively reversed the insulin secretion defect induced by both VNUT knockdown and functional inhibition, indicating that VNUT-mediated ATP release is essential for maintaining normal insulin secretion. In contrast to VNUT knockdown, overexpression of VNUT in β cells resulted in excessive ATP release and enhanced basal insulin secretion and GSIS. Elevated insulin secretion induced by VNUT overexpression was reversed by pharmacologic inhibition of P2X but not P2Y purinergic receptors. This study reveals VNUT is expressed in pancreatic β cells and plays an essential and novel role in regulating insulin secretion through vesicular ATP release and extracellular purinergic signaling. PMID:23254199

  4. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  5. Hypothesis on Skeletal Muscle Aging: Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Translocator Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species Production While Preserving Coupling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diolez, Philippe; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Calmettes, Guillaume; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Rouland, Richard; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production—but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius) of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling) or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating—in vivo—conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand), coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies. PMID:26733871

  6. Role of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, E. A.; Simakov, M. B.; Mal'Ko, I. L.; Dodonova, N. Ya.; Gontareva, N. B.

    With the use of high performance liquid chromatography the products of abiogenic synthesis of adenine nucleotides in solid films were indentified and estimated quantitatively. The main products of photosynthesis appeared to be adenosine and deoxyadenosine monophosphates. Maximal yield of these products in case of adenosine has been 0.36 for 5'AMP, 0.41% for 2'(3')AMP, 0.20 for 2'3'cAMP in case of deoxyadenosine 0.13% for 5'dAMP, 0.15% for 3'dAMP, 0.24% for 3'5'cdAMP. The destruction of initial adenosine and deoxyadenosine by the end of the experiment was 10 and 15%, respectively. By the increasing of irradiation dose, 5'AMP and 5'dAMP synthesized in the cource of VUV photolysis were destructed up to adenine, its yield being 15% in both cases.

  7. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. PMID:27062185

  8. Severity of cardiomyopathy associated with adenine nucleotide translocator-1 deficiency correlates with mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kevin A; DuBiner, Lauren; Simon, Mariella; Zaragoza, Michael; Sengupta, Partho P; Li, Peng; Narula, Navneet; Dreike, Sandra; Platt, Julia; Procaccio, Vincent; Ortiz-González, Xilma R; Puffenberger, Erik G; Kelley, Richard I; Morton, D Holmes; Narula, Jagat; Wallace, Douglas C

    2013-02-26

    Mutations of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded mitochondrial proteins can cause cardiomyopathy associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, the cardiac phenotype of nuclear DNA mitochondrial mutations might be modulated by mtDNA variation. We studied a 13-generation Mennonite pedigree with autosomal recessive myopathy and cardiomyopathy due to an SLC25A4 frameshift null mutation (c.523delC, p.Q175RfsX38), which codes for the heart-muscle isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocator-1. Ten homozygous null (adenine nucleotide translocator-1(-/-)) patients monitored over a median of 6 years had a phenotype of progressive myocardial thickening, hyperalaninemia, lactic acidosis, exercise intolerance, and persistent adrenergic activation. Electrocardiography and echocardiography with velocity vector imaging revealed abnormal contractile mechanics, myocardial repolarization abnormalities, and impaired left ventricular relaxation. End-stage heart disease was characterized by massive, symmetric, concentric cardiac hypertrophy; widespread cardiomyocyte degeneration; overabundant and structurally abnormal mitochondria; extensive subendocardial interstitial fibrosis; and marked hypertrophy of arteriolar smooth muscle. Substantial variability in the progression and severity of heart disease segregated with maternal lineage, and sequencing of mtDNA from five maternal lineages revealed two major European haplogroups, U and H. Patients with the haplogroup U mtDNAs had more rapid and severe cardiomyopathy than those with haplogroup H. PMID:23401503

  9. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry: pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mensonides, Femke I C; Bakker, Barbara M; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-09-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular monitors of the state of living cells, such as ATP, affect multiple enzymes of the former and that these interactions have gone unnoticed in enzymology. We test this hypothesis in terms of the effect that ATP, ADP, and AMP might have on the major free-energy delivering pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Assaying cell-free extracts, we collected a comprehensive set of quantitative kinetic data concerning the enzymes of the glycolytic and the ethanol fermentation pathways. We determined systematically the extent to which the enzyme activities depend on the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. We found that the effects of the adenine nucleotides on enzymes catalysing reactions in which they are not directly involved as substrate or product, are substantial. This includes effects on the Michaelis-Menten constants, adding new perspective on these, 100 years after their introduction. PMID:23856461

  10. ATP production from adenine by a self-coupling enzymatic process: high-level accumulation under ammonium-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, A; Fujio, T

    2001-03-01

    To improve ATP production from adenine, we optimized cultivation and reaction conditions for the ATP producing strain, Corynebacterium ammoniagenes KY13510. In the conventional method, 28% NH4OH has been used both to adjust pH during cultivation and reaction, and to provide nitrogen for cell growth. In the ATP-producing reaction, high concentrations of inorganic phosphate and magnesium ion are needed, which form magnesium ammonium phosphate (MgNH4PO4) precipitate. To keep inorganic phosphate and magnesium ions soluble in the reaction mixture, it was indispensable to add phytic acid as a chelating agent of divalent metal ions. Under such conditions, 37 mg/ml (61.2 mM) ATP was accumulated in 13 h (Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 21, 143 1985). If ammonium ion was depleted from the reaction mixture to avoid MgNH4 PO4 formation, we expected that there was no need to add phytic acid and ATP accumulation might be improved. Therefore, we obtained the cultured broth of C. ammoniagenes KY13510 strain with low ammonium ion content (less than 1 mg/ml as NH3) by the method that a part of alkali solution (28% NH4OH) for pH control was replaced with 10 N KOH. Using this culture broth, ATP producing reaction was done in 2-liter jar fermentor, controlling the pH of the reaction mixture with 10 N KOH. Under these conditions, the rate of ATP accumulation improved greatly, and 70.6 mg/ml (117 mM) ATP was accumulated in 28 h. The molar conversion ratio from adenine to ATP was about 82%. Phytic acid was slightly inhibitory to ATP formation under these ammonium-limited conditions. PMID:11330681

  11. The silencing of adenine nucleotide translocase isoform 1 induces oxidative stress and programmed cell death in ADF human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Vecchio, Donatella; Evangelista, Monica; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) are multitask proteins involved in several aspects of cell metabolism, as well as in the regulation of cell death/survival processes. We investigated the role played by ANT isoforms 1 and 2 in the growth of a human glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). The silencing of ANT2 isoform, by small interfering RNA, did not produce significant changes in ADF cell viability. By contrast, the silencing of ANT1 isoform strongly reduced ADF cell viability by inducing a non-apoptotic cell death process resembling paraptosis. We demonstrated that cell death induced by ANT1 depletion cannot be ascribed to the loss of the ATP/ADP exchange function of this protein. By contrast, our findings indicate that ANT1-silenced cells experience oxidative stress, thus allowing us to hypothesize that the effect of ANT1-silencing on ADF is mediated by the loss of the ANT1 uncoupling function. Several studies ascribe a pro-apoptotic role to ANT1 as a result of the observation that ANT1 overexpression sensitizes cells to mitochondrial depolarization or to apoptotic stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its pro-apoptotic function at a high expression level, the reduction of ANT1 density below a physiological baseline impairs fundamental functions of this protein in ADF cells, leading them to undertake a cell death process. PMID:20528917

  12. [Corrective effect of trimethylglycine on the nicotinamide coenzyme and adenine nucleotide content of the tissues in experimental atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zapadniuk, V I; Chekman, I S; Panteleĭmonova, T N; Tumanov, V A

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on adult rabbits with experimental atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol (0.25 g/kg for 90 days) showed that chronic administration of trimethylglycine (1.5 g/kg for 30 days) prevented a decrease of the liver and myocardium content of nicotinamide coenzymes and adenine nucleotides. PMID:3758334

  13. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  14. Changes in the expression of the human adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms condition cellular metabolic/proliferative status

    PubMed Central

    Mampel, Teresa; Viñas, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Human cells express four mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (hANT) isoforms that are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. hANT1 is mainly expressed in terminally differentiated muscle cells; hANT2 is growth-regulated and is upregulated in highly glycolytic and proliferative cells; and hANT3 is considered to be ubiquitous and non-specifically regulated. Here, we studied how the expression of hANT isoforms is regulated by proliferation and in response to metabolic stimuli, and examined the metabolic consequences of their silencing and overexpression. In HeLa and HepG2 cells, expression of hANT3 was upregulated by shifting metabolism towards oxidation or by slowed growth associated with contact inhibition or growth-factor deprivation, indicating that hANT3 expression is highly regulated. Under these conditions, changes in hANT2 mRNA expression were not observed in either HeLa or HepG2 cells, whereas in SGBS preadipocytes (which, unlike HeLa and HepG2 cells, are growth-arrest-sensitive cells), hANT2 mRNA levels decreased. Additionally, overexpression of hANT2 promoted cell growth and glycolysis, whereas silencing of hANT3 decreased cellular ATP levels, limited cell growth and induced a stress-like response. Thus, cancer cells require both hANT2 and hANT3, depending on their proliferation status: hANT2 when proliferation rates are high, and hANT3 when proliferation slows. PMID:26842067

  15. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Is Acetylated in Vivo in Human Muscle: Modeling Predicts a Decreased ADP Affinity and Altered Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics techniques have revealed that lysine acetylation is abundant in mitochondrial proteins. This study was undertaken (1) to determine the relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation and insulin sensitivity in human skeletal muscle, identifying key acetylated proteins, and (2) to use molecular modeling techniques to understand the functional consequences of acetylation of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 (ANT1), which we found to be abundantly acetylated. Eight lean and eight obese nondiabetic subjects had euglycemic clamps and muscle biopsies for isolation of mitochondrial proteins and proteomics analysis. A number of acetylated mitochondrial proteins were identified in muscle biopsies. Overall, acetylation of mitochondrial proteins was correlated with insulin action (r = 0.60; P < 0.05). Of the acetylated proteins, ANT1, which catalyzes ADP–ATP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane, was acetylated at lysines 10, 23, and 92. The extent of acetylation of lysine 23 decreased following exercise, depending on insulin sensitivity. Molecular dynamics modeling and ensemble docking simulations predicted the ADP binding site of ANT1 to be a pocket of positively charged residues, including lysine 23. Calculated ADP–ANT1 binding affinities were physiologically relevant and predicted substantial reductions in affinity upon acetylation of lysine 23. Insertion of these derived binding affinities as parameters into a complete mathematical description of ANT1 kinetics predicted marked reductions in adenine nucleotide flux resulting from acetylation of lysine 23. Therefore, acetylation of ANT1 could have dramatic physiological effects on ADP–ATP exchange. Dysregulation of acetylation of mitochondrial proteins such as ANT1 therefore could be related to changes in mitochondrial function that are associated with insulin resistance. PMID:24884163

  16. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on cape cod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (EC(A)) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T)) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free- living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. EC(A)s (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated EC(A)s (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although EC(A) and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture. These data suggest that the DNA content of groundwater bacteria may be more sensitive than their A(T) to the degree of carbon loading, which may have significant ramifications in the use of nucleic acids and adenine nucleotides for estimating the metabolic status of bacterial communities within more highly contaminated aquifers.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase in mitochondrial membrane patch.

    PubMed

    Karo, Jaanus; Peterson, Pearu; Vendelin, Marko

    2012-03-01

    Interaction between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) can play an important role in determining energy transfer pathways in the cell. Although the functional coupling between MtCK and ANT has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism of the coupling is not clear. To study the details of the coupling, we turned to molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce a new coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of a patch of the mitochondrial inner membrane containing a transmembrane ANT and an MtCK above the membrane. The membrane model consists of three major types of lipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cardiolipin) in a roughly 2:1:1 molar ratio. A thermodynamics-based coarse-grained force field, termed MARTINI, has been used together with the GROMACS molecular dynamics package for all simulated systems in this work. Several physical properties of the system are reproduced by the model and are in agreement with known data. This includes membrane thickness, dimension of the proteins, and diffusion constants. We have studied the binding of MtCK to the membrane and demonstrated the effect of cardiolipin on the stabilization of the binding. In addition, our simulations predict which part of the MtCK protein sequence interacts with the membrane. Taken together, the model has been verified by dynamical and structural data and can be used as the basis for further studies. PMID:22241474

  18. Inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocator by N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Timothy M. Oliveira, Paulo J.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-03-01

    N-alkyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides have been widely used as surfactants on fabrics and papers, fire retardants, and anti-corrosion agents, among many other commercial applications. The global distribution and environmental persistence of these compounds has generated considerable interest regarding potential toxic effects. We have previously reported that perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (FOSAA) and N-ethylperfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (N-EtFOSAA) induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in vitro. In this study we tested the hypothesis that FOSAA and N-EtFOSAA interact with the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) resulting in a functional inhibition of the translocator and induction of the MPT. Respiration and membrane potential of freshly isolated liver mitochondria from Sprague-Dawley rats were measured using an oxygen electrode and a tetraphenylphosphonium-selective (TPP{sup +}) electrode, respectively. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically. The ANT ligands bongkregkic acid (BKA) and carboxyatractyloside (cATR) inhibited uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration caused by 10 {mu}M N-EtFOSAA, 40 {mu}M FOSAA, and the positive control 8 {mu}M oleic acid. ADP-stimulated respiration and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential were inhibited by cATR, FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid, but not by FCCP. BKA inhibited calcium-dependent mitochondrial swelling induced by FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid. Seventy-five micromolar ADP also inhibited swelling induced by the test compounds, but cATR induced swelling was not inhibited by ADP. Results of this investigation indicate that N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides interact directly with the ANT to inhibit ADP translocation and induce the MPT, one or both of which may account for the metabolic dysfunction observed in vivo.

  19. Mitochondrial permeability transition as induced by cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Zazueta, C; Reyes-Vivas, H; Zafra, G; Sánchez, C A; Vera, G; Chávez, E

    1998-04-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is caused by the opening of a transmembrane pore whose chemical nature has not been well established yet. The present work was aimed to further contribute to the knowledge of the membrane entity comprised in the formation of the non-specific channel. The increased permeability was established by analyzing the inability of rat kidney mitochondria to take up and accumulate Ca2+, as well as their failure to build up a transmembrane potential, after the cross-linking of membrane proteins by copper plus ortho-phenanthroline. To identify the cross-linked proteins, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. The results are representative of at least three separate experiments. It is indicated that 30 microM Cu2+ induced the release of 4.3 nmol Ca2+ per mg protein. However, in the presence of 100 microM ortho-phenanthroline only 2 microM Cu2+ was required to attain the total release of the accumulated Ca2+; it should be noted that such a reaction is not inhibited by cyclosporin. The increased permeability corresponds to cross-linking of membrane proteins in which approximately 4 nmol thiol groups per mg protein appear to be involved. Such a linking process is inhibited by carboxyatractyloside. By using the fluorescent probe eosin-5-maleimide the label was found in a cross-linking 60 kDa dimer of two 30 kDa monomers. From the data presented it is concluded that copper-o-phenanthroline induces the intermolecular cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase which in turn is converted to non-specific pore. PMID:9675885

  20. Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 4 Is Expressed Within Embryonic Ovaries and Dispensable During Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Ho; Brower, Jeffrey V.; Resnick, James L.; Oh, S. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) facilitates the exchange of adenosine triphosphate across the mitochondrial inner membrane and plays a critical role for bioenergetics in eukaryotes. Mice have 3 Ant paralogs, Ant1 (Slc25a4), Ant2 (Slc25a5), and Ant4 (Slc25a31), which are expressed in a tissue-dependent manner. We previously identified that Ant4 was expressed exclusively in testicular germ cells in adult mice and essential for spermatogenesis and subsequently male fertility. Further investigation into the process of spermatogenesis revealed that Ant4 was particularly highly expressed during meiotic prophase I and indispensable for normal progression of leptotene spermatocytes to the stages thereafter. In contrast, the expression and roles of Ant4 in female germ cells have not previously been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the Ant4 gene is expressed during embryonic ovarian development during which meiotic prophase I occurs. We confirmed embryonic ovary-specific Ant4 expression using a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene. In contrast to male, however, Ant4 null female mice were fertile although the litter size was slightly decreased. They showed apparently normal ovarian development which was morphologically indistinguishable from the control animals. These data indicate that Ant4 is a meiosis-specific gene expressed during both male and female gametogenesis however indispensable only during spermatogenesis and not oogenesis. The differential effects of Ant4 depletion within the processes of male and female gametogenesis may be explained by meiosis-specific inactivation of the X-linked Ant2 gene in male, a somatic paralog of the Ant4 gene. PMID:25031318

  1. Differential Expression of Adenine Nucleotide Converting Enzymes in Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space: A Potential Role of Adenylate Kinase Isozyme 2 in Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanimura, Ayako; Horiguchi, Taigo; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide dynamics in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) play a key role in oxidative phosphorylation. In a previous study, Drosophila adenylate kinase isozyme 2 (Dak2) knockout was reported to cause developmental lethality at the larval stage in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, two other studies reported that AK2 is a responsible gene for reticular dysgenesis (RD), a human disease that is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency and deafness. Therefore, mitochondrial AK2 may play an important role in hematopoietic differentiation and ontogenesis. Three additional adenine nucleotide metabolizing enzymes, including mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1 and CKMT2) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase isoform D (NDPK-D), have been found in IMS. Although these kinases generate ADP for ATP synthesis, their involvement in RD remains unclear and still an open question. In this study, mRNA and protein expressions of these mitochondrial kinases were firstly examined in mouse ES cells, day 8 embryos, and 7-week-old adult mice. It was found that their expressions are spatiotemporally regulated, and Ak2 is exclusively expressed in bone marrow, which is a major hematopoietic tissue in adults. In subsequent experiments, we identified increased expression of both AK2 and CKMT1 during macrophage differentiation and exclusive production of AK2 during neutrophil differentiation using HL-60 cells as an in vitro model of hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, AK2 knockdown specifically inhibited neutrophil differentiation without affecting macrophage differentiation. These data suggest that AK2 is indispensable for neutrophil differentiation and indicate a possible causative link between AK2 deficiency and neutropenia in RD. PMID:24587121

  2. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  3. A weak pulsed magnetic field affects adenine nucleotide oscillations, and related parameters in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    PubMed

    Davies, E; Olliff, C; Wright, I; Woodward, A; Kell, D

    1999-02-01

    A model eukaryotic cell system was used to explore the effect of a weak pulsed magnetic field (PMF) on time-varying physiological parameters. Dictyostelium discoideum cells (V12 strain) were exposed to a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) of flux density 0.4 mT, generated via air-cored coils in trains of 2 ms pulses gated at 20 ms. This signal is similar to those used to treat non-uniting fractures. Samples were taken over periods of 20 min from harvested suspensions of amoebae during early aggregation phase, extracted and derivatised for HPLC fluorescent assay of adenine nucleotides. Analysis of variance showed a significant athermal damping effect (P < 0.002, n = 22) of the PMF on natural adenine nucleotide oscillations and some consistent changes in phase relationships. The technique of nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS) revealed a distinctive effect of PMF, caffeine and EGTA in modulating the cellular harmonic response to an applied weak signal. Light scattering studies also showed altered frequency response of cells to PMF, EGTA and caffeine. PMF caused a significant reduction of caffeine induced cell contraction (P < 0.0006, n = 19 by paired t-test) as shown by Malvern particle size analyser, suggesting that intracellular calcium may be involved in mediating the effect of the PMF. PMID:10228582

  4. Activation by ATP of a P2U 'nucleotide' receptor in an exocrine cell.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. C.; Shuttleworth, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. We employed the perforated patch whole-cell technique to investigate the effects of ATP and other related nucleotides on membrane conductances in avian exocrine salt gland cells. 2. ATP (10 microM-1 mM) evoked an increase in maxi-K+ and Cl- conductances with a reversal potential of -35 mV. At lower concentrations of ATP (< or = 100 microM) responses were generally oscillatory with a sustained response observed at higher concentrations (> or = 200 microM). 3. Both oscillatory and sustained responses were abolished by the removal of bath Ca2+. In cells preincubated in extracellular saline containing reduced Ca2+, the application of ATP resulted in a transient increase in current. 4. As increasing concentrations of ATP (and related nucleotides) evoked a graded sequence of events with little run-down we were able to establish a rank order of potency in single cells. The order of potency of ATP analogues and agonists of the various P2-receptor subtypes was UTP > ATP = 2-methylthio-ATP > ADP. Adenosine (1 microM-1 mM), AMP (1 microM-1 mM), alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (1 microM-1 mM) and beta,gamma-methylene-ATP (1 microM-1 mM) were without effect. 5. In conclusion, although unable to preclude a role for a P2Y-receptor, our results suggest that ATP binds to a P2U-receptor increasing [Ca2+]i and subsequently activating Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ and Cl- currents. PMID:7670734

  5. ATP half-sites in RadA and RAD51 recombinases bind nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Marsh, May E; Scott, Duncan E; Ehebauer, Matthias T; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Central to this process is a family of recombinases, including archeal RadA and human RAD51, which form nucleoprotein filaments on damaged single-stranded DNA ends and facilitate their ATP-dependent repair. ATP binding and hydrolysis are dependent on the formation of a nucleoprotein filament comprising RadA/RAD51 and single-stranded DNA, with ATP bound between adjacent protomers. We demonstrate that truncated, monomeric Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and monomerised human RAD51 retain the ability to bind ATP and other nucleotides with high affinity. We present crystal structures of both apo and nucleotide-bound forms of monomeric RadA. These structures reveal that while phosphate groups are tightly bound, RadA presents a shallow, poorly defined binding surface for the nitrogenous bases of nucleotides. We suggest that RadA monomers would be constitutively bound to nucleotides in the cell and that the bound nucleotide might play a structural role in filament assembly. PMID:27419043

  6. An adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) gene from Apostichopus japonicus; molecular cloning and expression analysis in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Chai, Xin-Yue; Tu, Jie; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Li, Chao-Feng; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The adenine nucleotide translocases (ANTs) play a vital role in energy metabolism via ADP/ATP exchange in eukaryotic cells. Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) is an important economic species in China. Here, a cDNA representing an ANT gene of A. japonicus was isolated and characterized from respiratory tree and named AjANT. The full-length AjANT cDNA is 1924 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 38 bp, 3'-UTR of 980 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 906 bp encoding a polypeptide of 301 amino acids. The protein contains three homologous repeat Mito_carr domains (Pfam00153). The deduced AjANT protein sequence has 49-81% in comparison to ANT proteins from other individuals. The predicted tertiary structure of AjANT protein is highly similar to animal ANT proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AjANT is closely related to Holothuroidea ANT genes. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AjANT expression is higher in the respiratory tree than in other examined tissues. After thermal stress or LPS challenge, expression of AjANT was significantly fluctuant compared to the control. These results suggested that changes in the expression of ANT gene might be involved in immune defense and in protecting A. japonicus against thermal stress. PMID:26706223

  7. Direct Monitoring of Nucleotide Turnover in Human Cell Extracts and Cells by Fluorogenic ATP Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Buntz, Annette; Zumbusch, Andreas; Marx, Andreas

    2015-11-20

    Nucleotides containing adenosine play pivotal roles in every living cell. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), for example, is the universal energy currency, and ATP-consuming processes also contribute to posttranslational protein modifications. Nevertheless, detecting the turnover of adenosine nucleotides in the complex setting of a cell remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate the use of fluorogenic analogs of ATP and adenosine tetraphosphate to study nucleotide hydrolysis in lysates of human cell lines and in intact human cells. We found that the adenosine triphosphate analog is completely stable in lysates of human cell lines, whereas the adenosine tetraphosphate analog is rapidly turned over. The observed activity in human cell lysates can be assigned to a single enzyme, namely, the human diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase NudT2. Since NudT2 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for breast cancer, the adenosine tetraphosphate analog might contribute to a better understanding of its involvement in cancerogenesis and allow the straightforward screening for inhibitors. Studying hydrolysis of the analogs in intact cells, we found that electroporation is a suitable method to deliver nucleotide analogs into the cytoplasm and show that high FRET efficiencies can be detected directly after internalization. Time-dependent experiments reveal that adenosine triphosphate and tetraphosphate analogs are both processed in the cellular environment. This study demonstrates that these nucleotide analogs indeed bear the potential to be powerful tools for the exploration of nucleotide turnover in the context of whole cells. PMID:26274552

  8. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:24740601

  9. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on Cape Cod.

    PubMed Central

    Metge, D W; Brooks, M H; Smith, R L; Harvey, R W

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (ECA) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free-living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. ECAS (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated ECAS (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although ECA and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8357263

  10. Low-molecular-weight constituents of isolated insulin-secretory granules. Bivalent cations, adenine nucleotides and inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, J C; Penn, E J; Peshavaria, M

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of Zn2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Pi and adenine nucleotides were determined in insulin-secretory granules prepared from a transplantable rat insulinoma. Differential and density-gradient centrifugation analyses revealed that Zn2+ in this tissue was principally localized in the secretory granule, a second major fraction being found in association with cytosolic proteins. Pi was principally recovered in the latter fraction, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ were more widely distributed. Intragranular ion-distribution experiments suggested that Zn2+ was complexed mainly to insulin and its precursor forms and remained in the granule in an insoluble state. The Zn2+/insulin ratio (0.54) was greater than that expected for insulin molecules having two centrally co-ordinated Zn2+ atoms/hexamer, but less than the maximal Zn2+-binding capacity of the molecule. Most of the granular Ca2+, Mg2+ and Pi was released in a soluble form when granules were disrupted by sonication. Simulation in vitro of the ionic composition of the granule suggested that up to 90% of its Ca2+ was complexed to Pi and adenine nucleotides. Granular macromolecules also bound Ca2+, as shown by equilibrium-dialysis studies of granule lysates. However, such binding was displaced by Mg2+. Examination of the efflux of Ca2+ from granules incubated in iso-osmotic suspensions at 37 degrees C suggested that the passive permeability of the granule membrane to Ca2+ was very low. Nevertheless, more than 50% of the granular Ca2+ was rapidly released in an ionized form on hypo-osmotic or detergent-induced disruption of the granule membrane. This may represent a potentially mobilizable pool of Ca2+ in vivo. PMID:6344863

  11. APPLICATION OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS FOR THE EVALUATION OF STRESS IN 'MYTILUS EDULIS' AND 'CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    After 10 weeks treatment with 10 micrograms Ni/kg seawater, the concentration of ATP in Mytilus edulis adductor muscles was significently less than that in muscles from control and 5 micrograms Ni/kg treated mussels. Mussels sampled in August after exposure for 12 weeks to pollut...

  12. Gating of the CFTR Cl- channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl- channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  13. Gating of the CFTR Cl− channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl− channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  14. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, …), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m < 1 suggests that the ATP/apatite adsorption process is mostly guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard ΔGads ° was estimated to only -4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective ΔGads values down to -33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, …).

  16. [Dependence of creatine kinase and glycogen synthetase activities of skeletal muscles on state of adenine nucleotide phosphorylation and cAMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, N N; Chagovets, N R; Maksimova, L V

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the contents of adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate, creatine, glucose-6-phosphate and glycogen and the activity of adenylate cyclase, creatine kinase, glycogen phosphorylase 31:51-AMP-phosphodiesterase and glycogen synthetase in muscles and of blood catecholamines were studied in adult rats before loading, immediately after the cessation of the muscular activity, and at rest. Adenine nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes nucleotides are established to play a regulatory role in catabolic and anabolic processes related to the muscular activity. It is established that compensation and supercompensation of the working losses of muscular creatine phosphate and glycogen are due to activation of anabolic processes under conditions of higher phosphorylation of the adenylic system. PMID:6247797

  17. Copper induces permeability transition through its interaction with the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    García, Noemí; Martínez-Abundis, Eduardo; Pavón, Natalia; Correa, Francisco; Chávez, Edmundo

    2007-09-01

    In this work we examined the effect of low concentrations of Cu(2+) on the opening of the mitochondrial non-specific pore. The purpose was addressed to further contribute to the knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the open/closed cycles of the permeability transition pore. Membrane leakage was established by measuring matrix Ca(2+) efflux and mitochondrial swelling. The experimental results indicate that Cu(2+) at very low concentrations promoted the release of accumulated Ca(2+), as well as mitochondrial swelling, provided 1,10-phenanthroline has been added. Carboxyatractyloside and Cu(2+) exhibited additive effects on these parameters. After Cu(2+) titration of membrane thiols, it might be assumed that the blockage of 5.9nmol of SH/mg protein suffices to open the non-specific pore. Taking into account the reinforcing effect of carboxyatractyloside, the increasing ADP concentrations, and that N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the Cu(2+)-induced Ca(2+) efflux, it is proposed that the target site for Cu(2+) is located in the ADP/ATP carrier. PMID:17485229

  18. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  19. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  20. The effect of antidepressive drugs and some related compounds on the levels of adenine nucleotides, inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J. J.; Van Petten, G. R.

    1963-01-01

    The effects upon levels of adenine nucleotides, phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate of iproniazid, isoniazid, phenelzine, pheniprazine, tranylcypromine, harmine, imipramine, amitriptyline, orphenadrine, diphenhydramine and cocaine have been studied. With the exception of harmine and diphenhydramine, each of these compounds increased the brain level of adenosine triphosphate and, with the exception of imipramine and cocaine, the level of adenosine diphosphate decreased. Harmine had no effect on levels of adenine nucleotides and, in the case of diphenhydramine, the level of adenosine diphosphate increased and the level of adenosine triphosphate tended to decrease. There appears to be a relationship between the ability of the drugs to cause behavioural signs of central nervous stimulation and to produce an increase in the adenosine triphosphate/diphosphate ratio. This effect may be a factor in the action of antidepressive drugs. PMID:19108178

  1. Extremely Conserved ATP- or ADP-dependent Enzymatic System for Nicotinamide Nucleotide Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Marbaix, Alexandre Y.; Noël, Gaëtane; Detroux, Aline M.; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The reduced forms of NAD and NADP, two major nucleotides playing a central role in metabolism, are continuously damaged by enzymatic or heat-dependent hydration. We report the molecular identification of the eukaryotic dehydratase that repairs these nucleotides and show that this enzyme (Carkd in mammals, YKL151C in yeast) catalyzes the dehydration of the S form of NADHX and NADPHX, at the expense of ATP, which is converted to ADP. Surprisingly, the Escherichia coli homolog, YjeF, a bidomain protein, catalyzes a similar reaction, but using ADP instead of ATP. The latter reaction is ascribable to the C-terminal domain of YjeF. This represents an unprecedented example of orthologous enzymes using either ADP or ATP as phosphoryl donor. We also show that eukaryotic proteins homologous to the N-terminal domain of YjeF (apolipoprotein A-1-binding protein (AIBP) in mammals, YNL200C in yeast) catalyze the epimerization of the S and R forms of NAD(P)HX, thereby allowing, in conjunction with the energy-dependent dehydratase, the repair of both epimers of NAD(P)HX. Both enzymes are very widespread in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, which together with the ADP dependence of the dehydratase in some species indicates the ancient origin of this repair system. PMID:21994945

  2. The Emerging Roles of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair in eukaryotic cells takes place in the context of chromatin, where DNA, including damaged DNA, is tightly packed into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin intrinsically restricts accessibility of DNA repair proteins to the damaged DNA and impacts upon the overall rate of DNA repair. Chromatin is highly responsive to DNA damage and undergoes specific remodeling to facilitate DNA repair. How damaged DNA is accessed, repaired and restored to the original chromatin state, and how chromatin remodeling coordinates these processes in vivo, remains largely unknown. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACRs) are the master regulators of chromatin structure and dynamics. Conserved from yeast to humans, ACRs utilize the energy of ATP to reorganize packing of chromatin and control DNA accessibility by sliding, ejecting or restructuring nucleosomes. Several studies have demonstrated that ATP-dependent remodeling activity of ACRs plays important roles in coordination of spatio-temporal steps of different DNA repair pathways in chromatin. This review focuses on the role of ACRs in regulation of various aspects of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in the context of chromatin. We discuss current understanding of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by various subfamilies of remodelers and regulation of the NER pathway in vivo. PMID:23109894

  3. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  4. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  5. sup 31 P NMR saturation-transfer study of the in situ kinetics of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    SciTech Connect

    Masiakos, P.T.; Williams, G.D.; Berkich, D.A.; Smith, M.B.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-08-27

    The exchange of intramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub in}) for extramitochondrial ATP (ATP{sub out}) was measured by using {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures in isolated rat liver mitochondria oxidizing glutamate and succinate in the presence of external ATP but no added ADP (state 4). The rate of this exchange is more than an order of magnitude faster than rates reported previously that were determined by using isotopic techniques in the presence of oligomycin, the potent ATPase inhibitor. Differences are ascribed in part to the low levels of matrix ATP present in oligomycin-treated mitochondrial. Intramitochondrial ATP content regulates the rate of the ATP{sub in}/ATP{sub out} exchange. At 18C, the concentration of internal ATP that produces half-maximal transport rate is 6.6{plus minus}0.12 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. The relationship between substrate concentration and flux is sigmoidal and is 90% saturated at 11.3{plus minus}0.18 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein. Since the measured rates of exchange of ATP{sub in} for ATP{sub out} are almost 10 times faster than the ATP synthase (ATP/P{sub i}) exchange rates, the translocase cannot limit net ATP/P{sub i} exchange in state 4. It may, nonetheless, limit net synthesis of ATP under other conditions when matrix ATP concentration is lower than in state 4 and when external ADP is present at higher concentrations than in these experiments.

  6. Adenine-DNA adducts derived from the highly tumorigenic dibenzo[a,l]pyrene are resistant to nucleotide excision repair while guanine adducts are not

    PubMed Central

    Kropachev, Konstantin; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Yuqin; Zhang, Lu; Schwaid, Adam G.; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Ding, Shuang; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    The structural origins of differences in susceptibilities of various DNA lesions to nucleotide excision repair (NER) are poorly understood. Here we compared, in the same sequence context, the relative NER dual incision efficiencies elicited by two stereochemically distinct pairs of guanine (N2-dG) and adenine (N6-dA) DNA lesions, derived from enantiomeric genotoxic diol epoxides of the highly tumorigenic fjord region polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). Remarkably, in cell-free HeLa cell extracts, the guanine adduct with R absolute chemistry at the N2-dG linkage site is ~ 35 times more susceptible to NER dual incisions than the stereochemically identical N6-dA adduct. For the guanine and adenine adducts with S stereochemistry, a similar, but somewhat smaller effect (factor of ~15) is observed. The striking resistance of the bulky N6-dA in contrast to the modest to good susceptibilities of the N2-dG adducts to NER are interpreted in terms of the balance between lesion-induced DNA-distorting and DNA-stabilizing van der Waals interactions in their structures, that are partly reflected in the overall thermal stabilities of the modified duplexes. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the high genotoxic activity of DB[a,l]P is related to the formation of NER-resistant and persistent DB[a,l]P-derived adenine adducts in cellular DNA. PMID:23570232

  7. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  8. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Korotkov, Sergey M.

    2016-01-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  9. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M

    2016-06-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) 'c' conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca(2+)-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25-75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca(2+). The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca(2+) alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca(2+)-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in 'm' conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript "To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria" (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  10. Effect of ATP on actin filament stiffness.

    PubMed

    Janmey, P A; Hvidt, S; Oster, G F; Lamb, J; Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1990-09-01

    Actin is an adenine nucleotide-binding protein and an ATPase. The bound adenine nucleotide stabilizes the protein against denaturation and the ATPase activity, although not required for actin polymerization, affects the kinetics of this assembly Here we provide evidence for another effect of adenine nucleotides. We find that actin filaments made from ATP-containing monomers, the ATPase activity of which hydrolyses ATP to ADP following polymerization, are stiff rods, whereas filaments prepared from ADP-monomers are flexible. ATP exchanges with ADP in such filaments and stiffens them. Because both kinds of actin filaments contain mainly ADP, we suggest the alignment of actin monomers in filaments that have bound and hydrolysed ATP traps them conformationally and stores elastic energy. This energy would be available for release by actin-binding proteins that transduce force or sever actin filaments. These data support earlier proposals that actin is not merely a passive cable, but has an active mechanochemical role in cell function. PMID:2168523

  11. A Chimeric ATP-Linked Nucleotide Enables Luminescence Signaling of Damage Surveillance by MTH1, a Cancer Target.

    PubMed

    Ji, Debin; Beharry, Andrew A; Ford, James M; Kool, Eric T

    2016-07-27

    The enzyme MTH1 cleanses the cellular nucleotide pool of oxidatively damaged 8-oxo-dGTP, preventing mutagenesis by this nucleotide. The enzyme is considered a promising therapeutic target; however, methods to measure its activity are indirect and laborious and have low sensitivity. Here we describe a novel ATP-linked chimeric nucleotide (ARGO) that enables luminescence signaling of the enzymatic reaction, greatly simplifying the measurement of MTH1 activity. We show that the reporting system can be used to identify inhibitors of MTH1, and we use it to quantify enzyme activity in eight cell lines and in colorectal tumor tissue. The ARGO reporter is likely to have considerable utility in the study of the biology of MTH1 and potentially in analyzing patient samples during clinical testing. PMID:27413803

  12. Alterations in erythrocyte plasma membrane ATPase activity and adenine nucleotide content in a spontaneously diabetic subline of the Chinese hamster.

    PubMed

    Bettin, D; Klöting, I; Kohnert, K D

    1996-01-01

    The CHIG/Han subline of the Chinese hamster develops noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperinsulinemia and different degrees of glucose intolerance. To study whether these abnormalities could affect transmembrane cation transport activity, we determined membrane ATPase activity and ATP concentrations in red blood cells of diabetes-resistant CHIA and diabetes-susceptible CHIG sublines of the Chinese hamster. Mg(2+)-ATPase activity was increased in red blood cell membranes of diabetic hamsters compared with that of nondiabetic CHIG and the diabetes-resistant CHIA animals and correlated with plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+/K+ATPase activity were not significantly different between diabetic and nondiabetic hamsters, but for the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, Km was decreased and the Vmax value increased in membrane preparations from severely diabetic hamsters. Both ATP and ADP content were lower in erythrocytes from diabetic than nondiabetic hamsters. Independently of the levels of glycemia, AMP concentrations were higher in CHIG than in CHIA hamsters. While ATP/AMP ratios were found to be decreased in erythrocytes from diabetes-susceptible CHIG hamsters compared to the diabetes-resistant CHIA animals, they were significantly correlated with the levels of glycemia. Furthermore, the relationship between blood glucose levels and kidney weight in hamsters of the diabetes-susceptible CHIG subline was such, that severely hyperglycemic animals displayed the greatest increase in kidney wet weight. These results indicate that the progressive metabolic deterioration in the development of noninsulin-dependent diabetes is associated with significant changes in the activity and kinetic parameters of cellular ATPases which could probably indicate early membrane alterations which may eventually result in the late microangiopathic complications of diabetes. PMID:8820985

  13. The activation of non-phosphorylating electron transport by adenine nucleotides in Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibandhu, R; Palmer, J M

    1975-01-01

    In isolated plant mitochondria the oxidation of both succinate and exogenous NADH responded in the expected manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents, and the uncoupled rate of respiration was often in excess of the rate obtained in the presence of ADP. However, the oxidation of NAD+-linked substrates responded in a much more complex manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate plus malate failed to result in a reliable stimulation; this uncoupled rate could be stimulated by adding AMP or ADP in the presence of oligomycin or bongkrekic acid. Spectrophometric measurements showed that the addition of AMP or ADP resulted in the simultaneous oxidation of endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide and the reduction of cytochrome b. ADP was only effective in bringing about these changes in redox state in the presence of Mg2+ whereas AMP did not require Mg2+. It was concluded that AMP activated the flow of electrons from endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide to cytochrome b, possible at the level of the internal NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:1227506

  14. Stimulation by the nucleotides, ATP and UTP of mitogen-activated protein kinase in EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Kennedy, C; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-03-01

    1. We have investigated the characteristics of activation of the 42kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in response to various nucleotides in the endothelial cell line EAhy 926. 2. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the concentration range 0.1-100 microM stimulated the rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the 42 kDa isoform of MAP kinase in EAhy 926 endothelial cells which peaked at 2 min and returned to basal values by 60 min. ATP also stimulated a similar response in primary cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. 3. Uridine 5' triphosphate (UTP) also stimulated the 42 kDa isoform of MAP kinase with similar potency to ATP (EC50 values 5.1 +/- 0.2 microM for UTP; 2.9 +/- 0.8 microM for ATP), whilst the selective P2Y-purinoceptor agonist, 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) was without effect up to concentrations of 100 microM. In bovine aortic endothelial cells however, UTP and 2-meSATP both stimulated MAP kinase. 4. Pretreatment of cells for 24 h with 12-O tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate resulted in the loss of the alpha and epsilon isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) and virtual abolition of nucleotide-stimulated MAP kinase activity (> 90% inhibition). 5. Preincubation for 30 min with the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31 8220 (10 microM) reduced MAP-kinase activation at 2 min but potentiated the response at 60 min. 6. Removal of extracellular calcium in the presence of EGTA reduced the MAP kinase activation in response to UTP by approximately 30-50%. 7. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (18 h, 50 ng ml-1) did not significantly affect the UTP-mediated activation of pp42 MAP kinase. 8. These results show that in the EAhy 926 endothelial cell line, nucleotides stimulate activation of MAP kinase in a protein kinase C-dependent manner through interaction with a P2U-purinoceptor. PMID:8882634

  15. Stimulation by the nucleotides, ATP and UTP of mitogen-activated protein kinase in EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A.; McLees, A.; Kennedy, C.; Gould, G. W.; Plevin, R.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the characteristics of activation of the 42kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in response to various nucleotides in the endothelial cell line EAhy 926. 2. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the concentration range 0.1-100 microM stimulated the rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the 42 kDa isoform of MAP kinase in EAhy 926 endothelial cells which peaked at 2 min and returned to basal values by 60 min. ATP also stimulated a similar response in primary cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. 3. Uridine 5' triphosphate (UTP) also stimulated the 42 kDa isoform of MAP kinase with similar potency to ATP (EC50 values 5.1 +/- 0.2 microM for UTP; 2.9 +/- 0.8 microM for ATP), whilst the selective P2Y-purinoceptor agonist, 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) was without effect up to concentrations of 100 microM. In bovine aortic endothelial cells however, UTP and 2-meSATP both stimulated MAP kinase. 4. Pretreatment of cells for 24 h with 12-O tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate resulted in the loss of the alpha and epsilon isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) and virtual abolition of nucleotide-stimulated MAP kinase activity (> 90% inhibition). 5. Preincubation for 30 min with the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31 8220 (10 microM) reduced MAP-kinase activation at 2 min but potentiated the response at 60 min. 6. Removal of extracellular calcium in the presence of EGTA reduced the MAP kinase activation in response to UTP by approximately 30-50%. 7. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (18 h, 50 ng ml-1) did not significantly affect the UTP-mediated activation of pp42 MAP kinase. 8. These results show that in the EAhy 926 endothelial cell line, nucleotides stimulate activation of MAP kinase in a protein kinase C-dependent manner through interaction with a P2U-purinoceptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8882634

  16. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds. PMID:26835787

  17. Adenine nucleotide translocator isoforms 1 and 2 are differently distributed in the mitochondrial inner membrane and have distinct affinities to cyclophilin D.

    PubMed Central

    Vyssokikh, M Y; Katz, A; Rueck, A; Wuensch, C; Dörner, A; Zorov, D B; Brdiczka, D

    2001-01-01

    Different isoforms of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. It was assumed that ANT-1 and ANT-2 co-exist in every single mitochondrion and might be differently distributed within the membrane structures that constitute the peripheral inner membrane or the crista membrane. To discriminate between ANT originating from peripheral or from cristal inner membranes we made use of the fact that complexes between porin, the outer-membrane pore protein, and the ANT can be generated. Such complexes between porin and the ANT in the peripheral inner membrane were induced in rat heart mitochondria and isolated from rat brain and kidney. Using ANT-isotype-specific antibodies and sequence analysis of the N-terminal end, it was discovered that the peripheral inner membrane contained ANT-1 and ANT-2, whereas the cristal membrane contained exclusively ANT-2. Cyclophilin was co-purified with the porin-ANT complexes, whereas it was absent in the crista-derived ANT. This suggested that ANT-1 might have a higher affinity for cyclophilin. This specific intra-mitochondrial distribution of the two ANT isotypes and cyclophilin D suggests specific functions of the peripheral and crista-forming parts of the inner membrane and the two ANT isotypes therein. PMID:11513733

  18. Effect of antiretroviral therapy in thromboregulation through the hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides in platelets of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Rezer, João Felipe P; Souza, Viviane C G; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza P; Ruchel, Jader B; Bertoldo, Tatiana M D; Zanini, Daniela; Silveira, Karine L; Leal, Claudio A M; Passos, Daniela F; Gonçalves, Jamile F; Abdalla, Fátima H; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in biochemical and vascular dysfunctions. The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) markedly reduces mortality and opportunistic diseases associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This increased survival time predisposes the development of cardiovascular diseases. Platelets present purinergic system ectoenzymes such as E-NTPDase, E-5'-nucleotidase and E-ADA on its surface. In view of this, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of these ectoenzymes in platelets as well as the platelet aggregation and lipid profile of patients with HIV infection and also patients receiving HAART. The results showed an increase in the E-NTPDase activity for ATP hydrolysis in the HIV group compared with the control group and the HIV/HAART group. When assessing the activity E-NTPDase hydrolysis to ADP, the results revealed an increase in activity in the HIV group when compared to the control group, and a decrease in activity when in the HIV/HAART group when compared to the control and HIV groups. The activity of E-5'-nucleotidase revealed an increase in AMP hydrolysis in the HIV group, as the results from control and HIV/HAART groups showed no statistical difference. Regarding the E-ADA activity, the HIV and HIV/HAART groups revealed a decreased deamination of adenosine when compared with the control group. Furthermore, we observed an increased platelet aggregation of HIV/HAART group compared with the control group. Thus, our results suggest that antiretroviral treatment against HIV has a significant effect on the activity of purinergic system ectoenzymes demonstrating that thromboregulation is involved in the process. PMID:27044844

  19. Formation of ternary complexes by coordination of (diethylenetriamine)-platinum(II) to N1 or N7 of the adenine moiety of the antiviral nucleotide analogue 9.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Lüth, M S; Kapinos, L E; Müller, J; Holý, A; Lippert, B; Sigel, H

    2001-05-01

    are somewhat less stable, but again Cu2+ and Zn2+ also form with this ligand comparable amounts of the mentioned five-membered chelates. In contrast, both M[(Dien)Pt(PMEA-N1/N7)]2+ complexes differ from the parent M(PMEA) complexes considerably; in the latter instance the formation of the five-membered chelates is of significance for all divalent metal ions studied. The observation that divalent metal-ion binding to the phosphonate group of (Dien)Pt(PMEA-N1) and (Dien)Pt(PMEA-N7) is only moderately inhibited (about 0.2-0.4 log units) by the twofold positively charged (Dien)Pt2+ unit at the adenine residue allows the general conclusion, considering that PMEA is a nucleotide analogue, that this is also true for nucleotides and that consequently participation of, for example, two metal ions in an enzymatic process involving nucleotides is not seriously hampered by charge repulsion. PMID:11405468

  20. The Transmembrane Prolines of the Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Are Involved in Nucleotide Binding and Transport and Its Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Babot, Marion; Blancard, Corinne; Pelosi, Ludovic; Lauquin, Guy J.-M.; Trézéguet, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (Ancp) is a paradigm of the mitochondrial carrier family, which allows cross-talk between mitochondria, where cell energy is mainly produced, and cytosol, where cell energy is mainly consumed. The members of this family share numerous structural and functional characteristics. Resolution of the atomic structure of the bovine Ancp, in a complex with one of its specific inhibitors, revealed interesting features and suggested the involvement of some particular residues in the movements of the protein to perform translocation of nucleotides from one side of the membrane to the other. They correspond to three prolines located in the odd-numbered transmembrane helices (TMH), Pro-27, Pro-132, and Pro-229. The corresponding residues of the yeast Ancp (Pro-43, Ser-147, and Pro-247) were mutated into alanine or leucine, one at a time and analysis of the various mutants evidenced a crucial role of Pro-43 and Pro-247 during nucleotide transport. Beside, replacement of Ser-147 with proline does not inactivate Ancp and this is discussed in view of the conservation of the three prolines at equivalent positions in the Ancp sequences. These prolines belong to the signature sequences of the mitochondrial carriers and we propose they play a dual role in the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier function and biogenesis. Unexpectedly their mutations cause more general effects on mitochondrial biogenesis and morphology, as evidenced by measurements of respiratory rates, cytochrome contents, and also clearly highlighted by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22334686

  1. Study of the ATP-binding site of helicase IV from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dubaele, Sandy; Lourdel, Claude; Chène, Patrick

    2006-03-17

    Helicases contain conserved motifs involved in ATP/magnesium/nucleic acid binding and in the mechanisms coupling nucleotide hydrolysis to duplex unwinding. None of these motifs are located at the adenine-binding pocket of the protein. We show here that the superfamily I helicase, helicase IV from Escherichia coli, utilizes a conserved glutamine and conserved aromatic residue to interact with ATP. Other superfamily I helicases such as, UvrD/Rep/PcrA also possess these residues but in addition they interact with adenine via a conserved arginine, which is replaced by a serine in helicase IV. Mutation of this serine residue in helicase IV into histidine or methionine leads to proteins with unaffected ATPase and DNA-binding activities but with low helicase activity. This suggests that residues located at the adenine-binding pocket, in addition to be involved in ATP-binding, are important for efficient coupling between ATP hydrolysis and DNA unwinding. PMID:16442499

  2. Effect of genetic and physiological manipulations onthe kinetic and binding parameters of the adenine nucleotide translocator in Saccharomyces cervisiae and Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Lauquin, G; Lunardi, J; Vignais, P V

    1976-01-01

    1. Ghe kinetic and binding parameters of adenine-nucleotide transport have been studied in mitochondria isolated from yeast cells in which the mitochondrial protein-synthetizing system had been inhibited by growth in the presence of erythromycin. These parameters have also been studied in promitochondria isolated from yeast grown in anaerobiosis aesence of ethidium bromide results in a loss of cytochromes b, alpha and alpha 3, but it does not affect the rate constant of ADP transport in isolated mitochondria, nor the number of binding sites for atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP. 3. Promitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in anaerobiosis, mitochondria from a qo mutant (qo mitochondria) and mitochondria from S. cerevisiae grown in the presence of erythromycin (ERY-mitochondria) are able to transport ADP by the same exchange-diffusion mechanism, sensitive to carboxy-atractyloside, and with the same rate constant as the wild type mitochondria. Promitochondria, qo mitochondria and ERY-mitochondria bind atractyloside, bongkrekic acid and ADP with the same high affinity as the wild type mitochondria. They only differ from the wild type mitochondria by a lower number of binding sites for ADP and for specific inhibitors of ADP transport. 4. Mitochondria isolated from the nuclear mutant p9 of S. cerevisae, called also op1, are characterized by a much lower affinity for bongkrekic acid than mitochondria from the wild type (20 times less). 5. Manipulation of the fatty acid composition of the mitochondrial membranes in the desaturase auxotroph mutant KD115 does not modify the number of sites, no their affinity of bongkrekic acid. 6. The above results are interpreted to mean that the structure and function of the mitochondrial adN translocator are not affected by any change in the mitochondrial protein synthetizing system. PMID:795470

  3. Structure of the nucleotide-binding subunit B of the energy producer A1A0 ATP synthase in complex with adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Grüber, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    A1A0 ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Like the related prokaryotic and eukaryotic F1F0 ATP synthases, they are responsible for most of the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. The catalytic events of A1A0 ATP synthases take place inside the A3B3 hexamer of the A1 domain. Recently, the crystallographic structure of the nucleotide-free subunit B of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1A0 ATP synthase has been determined at 1.5 A resolution. To understand more about the nucleotide-binding mechanism, a protocol has been developed to crystallize the subunit B-ADP complex. The crystallographic structure of this complex has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. The ADP occupies a position between the essential phosphate-binding loop and amino-acid residue Phe149, which are involved in the binding of the antibiotic efrapeptin in the related F1F0 ATP synthases. This trapped ADP location is about 13 A distant from its final binding site and is therefore called the transition ADP-binding position. In the trapped ADP position the structure of subunit B adopts a different conformation, mainly in its C-terminal domain and also in the final nucleotide-binding site of the central alphabeta-domain. This atomic model provides insight into how the substrate enters into the nucleotide-binding protein and thereby into the catalytic A3B3 domain. PMID:19020348

  4. Activation of the phospholipase C pathway by ATP is mediated exclusively through nucleotide type P2-purinoceptors in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, R. H.; Duin, M.; den Hertog, A.; Nelemans, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The presence of a nucleotide receptor and a discrete ATP-sensitive receptor on C2C12 myotubes has been shown by electrophysiological experiments. In this study, the ATP-sensitive receptors of C2C12 myotubes were further characterized by measuring the formation of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) and internal Ca2+. 2. The nucleotides ATP and UTP caused a concentration-dependent increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 content with comparable time courses (EC50: ATP 33 +/- 2 microM, UTP 80 +/- 4 microM). ADP was less effective in increasing Ins(1,4,5)P3 content of the cells, while selective agonists for P1-, P2X- and P2Y-purinoceptors, adenosine, alpha,beta-methylene ATP and 2-methylthio ATP, appeared to be ineffective. 3. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions, the basal level of Ins(1,4,5)P3 was lower than in the presence of Ca2+, and the ATP- and UTP-induced formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 was diminished. 4. The Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation induced by optimal ATP and UTP concentrations was not additive. ATP- and UTP-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation showed cross-desensitization, whereas cross-desensitization was absent in responses elicited by one of the nucleotides and bradykinin. 5. The change in Ins(1,4,5)P3 content induced by effective nucleotides was inhibited by suramin. Schild plots for suramin inhibition of Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation in ATP- and UTP-stimulated myotubes showed slopes greater than unity (1.63 +/- 0.09 and 1.37 +/- 0.11, respectively). Apparent pA2 values were 4.50 +/- 0.48 and 4.41 +/- 0.63 for ATP and UTP, respectively. 6. Stimulation of the cells with ATP or UTP induced a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+, followed by a slow decline to basal levels. Ca2+ responses reached lower maximal values and did not show the slow phase in the absence of extracellular Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242247

  5. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54-RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-12-10

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules.

  6. High affinity ATP/ADP analogues as new tools for studying CFTR gating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Min; Sohma, Yoshiro; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and hydrolysis-deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutants have indicated that ATP hydrolysis precedes channel closing. Our recent data suggest that ATP binding is also important in modulating the closing rate. This latter hypothesis predicts that ATP analogues with higher binding affinities should stabilize the open state more than ATP. Here we explore the possibility of using N6-modified ATP/ADP analogues as high-affinity ligands for CFTR gating, since these analogues have been shown to be more potent than native ATP/ADP in other ATP-binding proteins. Among the three N6-modified ATP analogues tested, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) was the most potent, with a K(1/2) of 1.6 +/- 0.4 microm (>50-fold more potent than ATP). The maximal open probability (P(o)) in the presence of P-ATP was approximately 30% higher than that of ATP, indicating that P-ATP also has a higher efficacy than ATP. Single-channel kinetic analysis showed that as [P-ATP] was increased, the opening rate increased, whereas the closing rate decreased. The fact that these two kinetic parameters have different sensitivities to changes of [P-ATP] suggests an involvement of two different ATP-binding sites, a high-affinity site modulating channel closing and a low affinity site controlling channel opening. The effect of P-ATP on the stability of open states was more evident when ATP hydrolysis was abolished, either by mutating the nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) Walker B glutamate (i.e. E1371) or by using the non-hydrolysable ATP analogue AMP-PNP. Similar strategies to develop nucleotide analogues with a modified adenine ring could be valuable for future studies of CFTR gating. PMID:16223764

  7. High affinity ATP/ADP analogues as new tools for studying CFTR gating

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Min; Sohma, Yoshiro; Zou, Xiaoqin; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and hydrolysis-deficient cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutants have indicated that ATP hydrolysis precedes channel closing. Our recent data suggest that ATP binding is also important in modulating the closing rate. This latter hypothesis predicts that ATP analogues with higher binding affinities should stabilize the open state more than ATP. Here we explore the possibility of using N6-modified ATP/ADP analogues as high-affinity ligands for CFTR gating, since these analogues have been shown to be more potent than native ATP/ADP in other ATP-binding proteins. Among the three N6-modified ATP analogues tested, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) was the most potent, with a K½ of 1.6 ± 0.4 μm (>50-fold more potent than ATP). The maximal open probability (Po) in the presence of P-ATP was ∼30% higher than that of ATP, indicating that P-ATP also has a higher efficacy than ATP. Single-channel kinetic analysis showed that as [P-ATP] was increased, the opening rate increased, whereas the closing rate decreased. The fact that these two kinetic parameters have different sensitivities to changes of [P-ATP] suggests an involvement of two different ATP-binding sites, a high-affinity site modulating channel closing and a low affinity site controlling channel opening. The effect of P-ATP on the stability of open states was more evident when ATP hydrolysis was abolished, either by mutating the nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) Walker B glutamate (i.e. E1371) or by using the non-hydrolysable ATP analogue AMP-PNP. Similar strategies to develop nucleotide analogues with a modified adenine ring could be valuable for future studies of CFTR gating. PMID:16223764

  8. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  9. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-12-15

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  10. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kerem, B S; Zielenski, J; Markiewicz, D; Bozon, D; Gazit, E; Yahav, J; Kennedy, D; Riordan, J R; Collins, F S; Rommens, J M

    1990-01-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation (delta F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-delta F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward. Images PMID:2236053

  11. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kerem, B.; Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Bozon, D.; Kennedy, D.; Rommens, J.M. ); Gazit, E. ); Yahav, J. ); Riordan, J.R. ); Collins, F.S. ); Tsui, Lapchee Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1990-11-01

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation ({delta}F508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-{delta}F508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward.

  12. Mg2+ -dependent ATP occlusion at the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR does not require the second (NBD2).

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Riordan, John R

    2008-11-15

    ATP binding to the first and second NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) are bivalent-cation-independent and -dependent steps respectively [Aleksandrov, Aleksandrov, Chang and Riordan (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 15419-15425]. Subsequent to the initial binding, Mg(2+) drives rapid hydrolysis at the second site, while promoting non-exchangeable trapping of the nucleotide at the first site. This occlusion at the first site of functional wild-type CFTR is somewhat similar to that which occurs when the catalytic glutamate residues in both of the hydrolytic sites of P-glycoprotein are mutated, which has been proposed to be the result of dimerization of the two NBDs and represents a transient intermediate formed during ATP hydrolysis [Tombline and Senior (2005) J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 37, 497-500]. To test the possible relevance of this interpretation to CFTR, we have now characterized the process by which NBD1 occludes [(32)P]N(3)ATP (8-azido-ATP) and [(32)P]N(3)ADP (8-azido-ADP). Only N(3)ATP, but not N(3)ADP, can be bound initially at NBD1 in the absence of Mg(2+). Despite the lack of a requirement for Mg(2+) for ATP binding, retention of the NTP at 37 degrees C was dependent on the cation. However, at reduced temperature (4 degrees C), N(3)ATP remains locked in the binding pocket with virtually no reduction over a 1 h period, even in the absence of Mg(2+). Occlusion occurred identically in a DeltaNBD2 construct, but not in purified recombinant NBD1, indicating that the process is dependent on the influence of regions of CFTR in addition to NBD1, but not NBD2. PMID:18605986

  13. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  14. Fluorometric determination of adenosine nucleotide derivatives as measures of the microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial biomass and physiological status.

    PubMed

    Davis, W M; White, D C

    1980-09-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  15. Binding Stoichiometry of a Recombinant Selenophosphate Synthetase with One Synonymic Substitution E197D to a Fluorescent Nucleotide Analog of ATP, TNP-ATP.

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskaya, Y V; Stenko, A I; Shvarts, M V; Lugovtsev, V Y

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of the strain DH5α (TM)-T1(R) with plasmid vector pET11a containing the cloned gene of bacterial selenophosphate synthetase (SPS), selD, from the E. coli BL21-Gold (DE3) strain gives an overproducing strain of SPS with one synonymic substitution, E197D. The transformation efficiency was estimated as 8 × 10(8) CFU/ μ g plasmid DNA. 28 mg of highly purified preparation of recombinant SPS capable of binding TNP-ATP was eluted from DEAE-Sephadex column in amount of 15 % from the total soluble protein in crude extract. The fluorescent derivative of ATP, 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), was used as a synthetic analog of the substrate for the monitoring and quantitative analysis of the functional activity of SPS. The non-linear regression analysis of the saturation curve of TNP-ATP binding to D197 SPS with GraphPad Prism software fits to a model with 2 distinct binding sites with KDs different in order. The SPS existence in a form of tetramer in given reaction conditions, in accordance with the concentration stoichiometry of 4 moles of TNP-ATP to 1 mole of recombinant protein, is being discussed. The tetramer structure was predicted with molecular modelling software YASARA and modelled in vacuum using steepest descent minimization energy method. We hypothesize here the recombinant SPS exists as a dimer in solution with two active sites capable of ATP binding in each subunit. PMID:24719756

  16. Structural basis for the hydrolysis of ATP by a nucleotide binding subunit of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Devi, Seenivasan Karthiga; Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka Reddy; Jeyakanthan, J; Velmurugan, D; Sivaraman, J

    2015-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a major family of small molecule transporter proteins, and their deregulation is associated with several diseases, including cancer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus (TTHA1159) in its apo form and as a complex with ADP along with functional studies. TTHA1159 is a putative arginine ABC transporter. The apo-TTHA1159 was crystallized in dimeric form, a hitherto unreported form of an apo NBD. Structural comparison of the apo and ADP-Mg(2+) complexes revealed that Phe14 of TTHA1159 undergoes a significant conformational change to accommodate ADP, and that the bound ADP interacts with the P-loop (Gly40-Thr45). Modeling of ATP-Mg(2+):TTHA1159 complex revealed that Gln86 and Glu164 are involved in water-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts and Asp163 in Mg(2+) ion-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts with the γ-phosphate of ATP, consistent with the findings of other ABC transporters. Mutational studies confirmed the necessity of each of these residues, and a comparison of the apo/ADP Mg(2+):TTHA1159 with its ATP-complex model suggests the likelihood of a key conformational change to the Gln86 side chain for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:25916755

  17. RNAi: double-stranded RNA directs the ATP-dependent cleavage of mRNA at 21 to 23 nucleotide intervals.

    PubMed

    Zamore, P D; Tuschl, T; Sharp, P A; Bartel, D P

    2000-03-31

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directs the sequence-specific degradation of mRNA through a process known as RNA interference (RNAi). Using a recently developed Drosophila in vitro system, we examined the molecular mechanism underlying RNAi. We find that RNAi is ATP dependent yet uncoupled from mRNA translation. During the RNAi reaction, both strands of the dsRNA are processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length. Processing of the dsRNA to the small RNA fragments does not require the targeted mRNA. The mRNA is cleaved only within the region of identity with the dsRNA. Cleavage occurs at sites 21-23 nucleotides apart, the same interval observed for the dsRNA itself, suggesting that the 21-23 nucleotide fragments from the dsRNA are guiding mRNA cleavage. PMID:10778853

  18. Simultaneous determination of purine nucleotides, their metabolites and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cerebellar granule cells by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Gagliardi, Sara; Samaja, Michele; Marra, Ersilia

    2003-02-01

    The method described here allows the quantitative simultaneous determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine, guanosine 5'-triphosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. The chromatographic analysis requires 26 min per sample and allows the separation of the mentioned metabolites in a time as short as 16 min. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing 25 mM KCl for 1.5-48 h and their acid extracts were injected onto column. Uric acid, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate were identified and quantified, while hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanosine were below the detection limit. This method makes use of a single-step sample pre-treatment procedure which allows a greater than 91% recovery of the compounds of interest and provides the assay of the metabolites of interest in little amounts of cell extracts. Therefore, this method is suitable to evaluate the energetic state in a variety of cell types, both under normal and dismetabolic conditions, such as after the induction of apoptosis or necrosis. PMID:12565687

  19. Increased levels of extracellular ATP in glaucomatous retinas: Possible role of the vesicular nucleotide transporter during the development of the pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Lara, María J.; Guzmán-Aránguez, Ana; de la Villa, Pedro; Díaz-Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study retinal extracellular ATP levels and to assess the changes in the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) expression in a murine model of glaucoma during the development of the disease. Methods Retinas were obtained from glaucomatous DBA/2J mice at 3, 9, 15, and 22 months together with C57BL/6J mice used as age-matched controls. To study retinal nucleotide release, the retinas were dissected and prepared as flattened whole mounts and stimulated in Ringer buffer with or without 59 mM KCl. To investigate VNUT expression, sections of the mouse retinas were evaluated with immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis using newly developed antibodies against VNUT. All images were examined and photographed under confocal microscopy. Electroretinogram (ERG) recordings were performed on the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice to analyze the changes in the electrophysiological response; a decrease in the scotopic threshold response was observed in the 15-month-old DBA/2J mice. Results In the 15-month-old control and glaucomatous mice, electrophysiological changes of 42% were observed. In addition, 50% increases in the intraocular pressure (IOP) were observed when the pathology was fully established. The responses in the retinal ATP net release as the pathology progressed varied from 0.32±0.04 pmol/retina (3 months) to 1.10±0.06 pmol/retina (15 months; threefold increase). Concomitantly, VNUT expression was significantly increased during glaucoma progression in the DBA/2J mice (58%) according to the immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. Conclusions These results may indicate a possible correlation between retinal dysfunction and increased levels of extracellular ATP and nucleotide transporter. These data support an excitotoxicity role for ATP via P2X7R in glaucoma. This modified cellular environment could contribute to explaining the functional and biochemical alterations observed during the development of the pathology. PMID:26392744

  20. Structure of the 26S proteasome with ATP-γS bound provides insights into the mechanism of nucleotide-dependent substrate translocation

    PubMed Central

    Śledź, Paweł; Unverdorben, Pia; Beck, Florian; Pfeifer, Günter; Schweitzer, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa, ATP-dependent multisubunit proteolytic complex that processively destroys proteins carrying a degradation signal. The proteasomal ATPase heterohexamer is a key module of the 19S regulatory particle; it unfolds substrates and translocates them into the 20S core particle where degradation takes place. We used cryoelectron microscopy single-particle analysis to obtain insights into the structural changes of 26S proteasome upon the binding and hydrolysis of ATP. The ATPase ring adopts at least two distinct helical staircase conformations dependent on the nucleotide state. The transition from the conformation observed in the presence of ATP to the predominant conformation in the presence of ATP-γS induces a sliding motion of the ATPase ring over the 20S core particle ring leading to an alignment of the translocation channels of the ATPase and the core particle gate, a conformational state likely to facilitate substrate translocation. Two types of intersubunit modules formed by the large ATPase domain of one ATPase subunit and the small ATPase domain of its neighbor exist. They resemble the contacts observed in the crystal structures of ClpX and proteasome-activating nucleotidase, respectively. The ClpX-like contacts are positioned consecutively and give rise to helical shape in the hexamer, whereas the proteasome-activating nucleotidase-like contact is required to close the ring. Conformational switching between these forms allows adopting different helical conformations in different nucleotide states. We postulate that ATP hydrolysis by the regulatory particle ATPase (Rpt) 5 subunit initiates a cascade of conformational changes, leading to pulling of the substrate, which is primarily executed by Rpt1, Rpt2, and Rpt6. PMID:23589842

  1. The hydrolysis of extracellular adenine nucleotides by cultured endothelial cells from pig aorta. Feed-forward inhibition of adenosine production at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E L; Pearson, J D; Slakey, L L

    1986-11-25

    The time course of the extracellular reaction sequence ATP----ADP----AMP----adenosine has been examined during recirculation of substrate solutions over cultured pig aortic endothelial cells attached to polystyrene beads. This permits the study of reactions at volume to cell surface ratios approaching those of small blood vessels. When endothelial cells were presented with an initial bolus of ATP, high concentrations of the intermediates ADP and AMP developed before significant conversion of AMP to adenosine occurred. Further, the higher the initial ATP concentration, the slower the conversion of AMP to adenosine. Kinetic constants for each reaction were estimated by fitting simulated reaction curves to observed time courses. Apparent Km values estimated in this way agreed well with those reported for initial velocity measurements (ATPase = 300 microM; ADPase = 240 microM; and 5'-nucleotidase = 26 microM). The ratio of maximum velocities was ATPase:ADPase:AMPase = 6:1.5:1, with absolute values varying among cell batches. The data could only be fitted if the model incorporated inhibition of 5'-nucleotidase by ATP or ADP, and satisfactory fitting was achieved with a Ki value for ADP of 5 microM. These kinetic properties maximize the time separation of the intermediate pools. In vivo, at sites of platelet degranulation, they would create a time gap proportional to the size of the initial release between release of ADP (a proaggregatory milieu) and the appearance of adenosine (an anti-aggregatory milieu). PMID:3023320

  2. Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Mutations in Sulfonylurea Receptor 1: Interplay between Expression and Mg-Nucleotide Gating Defects of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Garin, Intza; Castaño, Luis; Argente, Jesús; Muñoz-Calvo, Ma. Teresa; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Context: ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels regulate insulin secretion by coupling glucose metabolism to β-cell membrane potential. Gain-of-function mutations in the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) or Kir6.2 channel subunit underlie neonatal diabetes. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the mechanisms by which two SUR1 mutations, E208K and V324M, associated with transient neonatal diabetes affect KATP channel function. Design: E208K or V324M mutant SUR1 was coexpressed with Kir6.2 in COS cells, and expression and gating properties of the resulting channels were assessed biochemically and electrophysiologically. Results: Both E208K and V324M augment channel response to MgADP stimulation without altering sensitivity to ATP4− or sulfonylureas. Surprisingly, whereas E208K causes only a small increase in MgADP response consistent with the mild transient diabetes phenotype, V324M causes a severe activating gating defect. Unlike E208K, V324M also impairs channel expression at the cell surface, which is expected to dampen its functional impact on β-cells. When either mutation was combined with a mutation in the second nucleotide binding domain of SUR1 previously shown to abolish Mg-nucleotide response, the activating effect of E208K and V324M was also abolished. Moreover, combination of E208K and V324M results in channels with Mg-nucleotide sensitivity greater than that seen in individual mutations alone. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that E208K and V324M, located in distinct domains of SUR1, enhance transduction of Mg-nucleotide stimulation from the SUR1 nucleotide binding folds to Kir6.2. Furthermore, they suggest that diabetes severity is determined by interplay between effects of a mutation on channel expression and channel gating. PMID:20810569

  3. Quaternary structure of K[ssubscript ATP] channel SUR2A nucleotide binding domains resolved by synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre

    2010-05-25

    Heterodimeric nucleotide binding domains NBD1/NBD2 distinguish the ATP-binding cassette protein SUR2A, a recognized regulatory subunit of cardiac ATP-sensitive K{sup +} (K{sub ATP}) channels. The tandem function of these core domains ensures metabolism-dependent gating of the Kir6.2 channel pore, yet their structural arrangement has not been resolved. Here, purified monodisperse and interference-free recombinant particles were subjected to synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution. Intensity function analysis of SAXS profiles resolved NBD1 and NBD2 as octamers. Implemented by ab initio simulated annealing, shape determination prioritized an oblong envelope wrapping NBD1 and NBD2 with respective dimensions of 168 x 80 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} and 175 x 81 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} based on symmetry constraints, validated by atomic force microscopy. Docking crystal structure homology models against SAXS data reconstructed the NBD ensemble surrounding an inner cleft suitable for Kir6.2 insertion. Human heart disease-associated mutations introduced in silico verified the criticality of the mapped protein-protein interface. The resolved quaternary structure delineates thereby a macromolecular arrangement of K{sub ATP} channel SUR2A regulatory domains.

  4. In vitro studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (BiP, GRP78). Interactions of BiP with newly synthesized proteins and adenine nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Kassenbrock, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Here we examine the interaction of BiP with newly synthesized polypeptides in an in vitro protein translations-translocation system. We find that BiP forms tight complexes with nonglycosylated yeast invertase and incorrectly disulfide-bonded prolactin but not with glycosylated invertase or correctly disulfide-bonded prolactin. Moreover, BiP associates detectably only with completed chains of prolactin, not with chains undergoing synthesis. We conclude that BiP recognizes and binds with high affinity to aberrantly folded or aberrantly glycosylated polypeptides in vitro, but not to all nascent chains as they are folding. BiP also binds APT and can be purified by APT affinity chromatography. We show that submicromolar levels of ATP or ADP decrease the rate of absorption of {sup 125}I-BiP to nitrocellulose filters coated with protein or nonionic detergents. ATP and ADP also protect portions of BiP from proteolytic degradation. In contrast, micromolar levels of AMP increase the rate of adsorption and the rate of proteolytic degradation of BiP. We also show that an ATPase activity co-purifies with BiP, but its slow turnover number suggests a regulatory, rather than a functional role. The BiP-associated ATPase shares several properties with the related cytoplasmic protein, HSC70/clathrin uncoating ATPase.

  5. [Degradation of purine nucleotides in patients with chronic obstruction to airflow].

    PubMed

    Mateos Antón, F; García Puig, J; Gómez Fernández, P; Ramos Hernández, T; López Jiménez, M

    1989-03-11

    The increase in hypoxanthine (Hx), xanthine (X), uric acid (VA) and total purines (TP) that may be found in several clinical conditions associated with tissue hypoxia has been attributed to an increase in adenine nucleotides degradation by a reduced ATP synthesis caused by oxygen deprivation. To test this hypothesis we have investigated the urinary excretion of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity elimination after labeling the adenine nucleotides with adenine (8-14C) in 5 patients with chronic airflow obstruction (CAFO), in the basal state and after oxygen therapy (FiO2, 24%). The results were compared with those from 4 normal individuals. Patients with COFA showed an increase of the renal elimination of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity, which was significantly different from the control group (p less than 0.05). Oxygen administration was associated with a significant reduction in the excretion of purines and radioactivity (p less than 0.01), which decreased to values similar to those found in normal individuals. These findings suggest that in patients with COFA and severe hypoxemia there is a marked increase in the degradation of adenine nucleotides. The normalization of the purine and radioactivity excretion after oxygen therapy points to a basic role of oxygen in the catabolism of adenine nucleotides. PMID:2716427

  6. Photo-excitation of adenine cation radical [A•+] in the near UV-vis region produces sugar radicals in Adenosine and in its nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report the formation of ribose sugar radicals in high yields (85 – 100%) via photo-excitation of adenine cation radical (A•+) in Ado and its ribonucleotides. Photo-excitation of A•+ at low temperatures in homogenous aqueous glassy samples of Ado, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and 5′-AMP forms sugar radicals predominantly at C5′- and also at C3′-sites. The C5′• and C3′• sugar radicals were identified employing Ado deuterated at specific carbon sites: C1′, C2′, and at C5′. Phosphate substitution is found to deactivate sugar radical formation at the site of substitution. Thus, in 5′-AMP, C3′• is observed to be the main radical formed via photo-excitation at ca. 143 K whereas in 3′-AMP, C5′• is the only species found. These results were supported by results obtained employing 5′-AMP with specific deuteration at C5′-site (i.e., 5′,5′-D,D-5′-AMP). Moreover, contrary to the C5′• observed in 3′-dAMP, we find that C5′• in 3′-AMP shows a clear pH dependent conformational change as evidenced by a large increase in the C4′ β–hyperfine coupling on increasing the pH from 6 to 9. Calculations performed employing DFT (B3LYP/6-31G*) for C5′• in 3′-AMP show that the two conformations of C5′• result from strong hydrogen bond formation between the O5′-H and the 3′-phosphate dianion at higher pHs. Employing time-dependent density functional theory [TD-DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(d)] we show that in the excited state, the hole transfers to the sugar moiety and has significant hole localization at the C5′-site in a number of allowed transitions. This hole localization is proposed to lead to the formation of the neutral C5′-radical (C5′•) via deprotonation. PMID:19367991

  7. An Adenine-DNA Adduct Derived from Nitroreduction of 6-Nitrochrysene is more Resistant to Nucleotide Excision Repair than Guanine-DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Jacek; Kropachev, Konstantin; Reeves, Dara; Kolbanovskiy, Aleksandr; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Chen, Kun-Ming; Sharma, Arun K.; Geacintov, Nicholas; Amin, Shantu; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in rats, mice and in vitro systems showed that 6-NC can be metabolically activated by two major pathways: 1) the formation of N-hydroxy-6-aminochrysene by nitroreduction to yield three major adducts: N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC, 5-(dG-N2-yl)-6-AC and N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC, and 2) the formation of trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydro-6-hydroxylaminochrysene (1,2-DHD-6-NHOH-C) by a combination of nitroreduction and ring oxidation pathways to yield: N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC, 5-(dG-N2-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC and N-(dA-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC. These DNA lesions are likely to cause mutations if they are not removed by cellular defense mechanisms before DNA replication occurs. Here we compared for the first time, in HeLa cell extracts in vitro, the relative nucleotide excision repair (NER) efficiencies of DNA lesions derived from simple nitroreduction and from a combination of nitroreduction and ring oxidation pathways. We show that the N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC adduct is more resistant to NER than the N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC adduct by a factor of ~2. Furthermore, the N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC is much more resistant to repair since its NER efficiency is ~ 8-fold lower than that of the N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC adduct. On the basis of our previous study and the present investigation, lesions derived from 6-NC and benzo[a]pyrene can be ranked from the most to the least resistant lesion as follows: N-(dA-8-yl)-6-AC > N-(dG-8-yl)-1,2-DHD-6-AC > 5-(dG-N2-yl)-6-AC ~ N-(dG-8-yl)-6-AC ~ (+)-7R,8S,9S,10S-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-derived trans-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N2-dG adduct. The slow repair of the various lesions derived from 6-NC and thus their potential persistence in mammalian tissue, could in part account for the powerful carcinogenicity of 6-NC as compared to B[a]P in the rat mammary gland. PMID:24112095

  8. Biochemical evidence of the interactions of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) with adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT): potential implications linking proteolysis with energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Radichev, Ilian A; Remacle, Albert G; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Rozanov, Dmitri V; Zhu, Wenhong; Golubkova, Natalya V; Postnova, Tatiana I; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Strongin, Alex Y

    2009-05-15

    Invasion-promoting MT1-MMP (membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase) is a key element in cell migration processes. To identify the proteins that interact and therefore co-precipitate with this proteinase from cancer cells, we used the proteolytically active WT (wild-type), the catalytically inert E240A and the C-end truncated (tailless; DeltaCT) MT1-MMP-FLAG constructs as baits. The identity of the pulled-down proteins was determined by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem MS) and then confirmed by Western blotting using specific antibodies. We determined that, in breast carcinoma MCF cells (MCF-7 cells), ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator) efficiently interacted with the WT, E240A and DeltaCT constructs. The WT and E240A constructs also interacted with alpha-tubulin, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In turn, tubulin did not co-precipitate with the DeltaCT construct because of the inefficient endocytosis of the latter, thus suggesting a high level of selectivity of our test system. To corroborate these results, we then successfully used the ANT2-FLAG construct as a bait to pull-down MT1-MMP, which was naturally produced by fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. We determined that the presence of the functionally inert catalytic domain alone was sufficient to cause the proteinase to interact with ANT2, thus indicating that there is a non-proteolytic mode of these interactions. Overall, it is tempting to hypothesize that by interacting with pro-invasive MT1-MMP, ANT plays a yet to be identified role in a coupling mechanism between energy metabolism and pericellular proteolysis in migrating cancer cells. PMID:19232058

  9. The specialized Hsp70 (HscA) interdomain linker binds to its nucleotide-binding domain and stimulates ATP hydrolysis in both cis and trans configurations.

    PubMed

    Alderson, T Reid; Kim, Jin Hae; Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2014-11-25

    Proteins from the isc operon of Escherichia coli constitute the machinery used to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters for delivery to recipient apoproteins. Efficient and rapid [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from the holo-scaffold protein IscU depends on ATP hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of HscA, a specialized Hsp70-type molecular chaperone with low intrinsic ATPase activity (0.02 min(-1) at 25 °C, henceforth reported in units of min(-1)). HscB, an Hsp40-type cochaperone, binds to HscA and stimulates ATP hydrolysis to promote cluster transfer, yet while the interactions between HscA and HscB have been investigated, the role of HscA's interdomain linker in modulating ATPase activity has not been explored. To address this issue, we created three variants of the 40 kDa NBD of HscA: NBD alone (HscA386), NBD with a partial linker (HscA389), and NBD with the full linker (HscA395). We found that the rate of ATP hydrolysis of HscA395 (0.45 min(-1)) is nearly 15-fold higher than that of HscA386 (0.035 min(-1)), although their apparent affinities for ATP are equivalent. HscA395, which contains the full covalently linked linker peptide, exhibited intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission and basal thermostability that were higher than those of HscA386. Furthermore, HscA395 displayed narrower (1)H(N) line widths in its two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC spectrum in comparison to HscA386, indicating that the peptide in the cis configuration binds to and stabilizes the structure of the NBD. The addition to HscA386 of a synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of the interdomain linker (L(387)LLDVIPLS(395)) stimulated its ATPase activity and induced widespread NMR chemical shift perturbations indicative of a binding interaction in the trans configuration. PMID:25372495

  10. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Jena, Itishree; Parida, Arunima; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  11. Structural Models of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT Domains Suggest Differential ATP Binding Orientations: Insights from Computational Modeling, Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Bej, Aritra; Sahoo, Jyoti Ranjan; Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Martha, Sushma Rani; Balabantray, Sucharita; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Behera, Bijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved ‘Lysine’ at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and Aspartic acid (Walker B) formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. ‘Proline’ of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2) interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2. PMID:25811192

  12. Nucleotide Metabolism in Salt-Stressed Zea mays L. Root Tips

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd A.; Nieman, Richard H.; Clark, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Corn plants (Zea mays L. cv Pioneer 3906) were grown in a glass house on control and saline nutrient solutions, in winter and summer. There were two saline treatments, both with osmotic potential = −0.4 megapascal but with different Ca2+/Na+ ratios: 0.03 and 0.73. Root tips and shoot meristems (culm tissue) of 26 day-old plants were analyzed for nucleotides to ascertain if there were correlations between nucleotide pool size and the reduced growth on saline cultures. Several other cell components also were determined. Plants grown in winter were only half as large as those grown in summer mainly because of the lower light intensity and lower temperature. But the relative yield reduction on salt treatment compared to the control was similar in winter and summer. The two different salt treatments caused similar yield reductions. Neither salt treatment affected nucleotide pools in culm tissue, with the possible exception of UDPG in winter. In the case of root tips, salt treatment had little or no effect on nucleotide pool sizes in winter when many already seemed near a critical minimum, but in summer it reduced several pools including ATP, total adenine nucleotide, UTP, total uridine nucleotide, and UDP-glucose. The reductions were greatest on the salt treatment with low Ca2+/Na+. There was no simple correlation between the effects of salt stress on growth and on nucleotide pool size. The nucleotide pools of culm tissue indicated that in some respects this tissue was effectively insulated from the salt stress. Roots that were in direct contact with the saline solution indicated significant reductions in nucleotide pools only in the summer whereas growth was reduced both summer and winter. It is possible that the nucleotide concentrations of root cells in winter were already near a critical minimum so that nucleotide synthesis and growth were tightly linked. Significant reductions in nucleotide pools that would be expected to affect growth were more evident in summer

  13. Nucleotide-protectable labeling of sulfhydryl groups in subunit I of the ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzner, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    The membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum was purified as described by Hochstein et al. (1987) and was incubated with C-14 labeled N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), with and without adenine nucleotides, to determine the effect of nucleotides on the enzyme labeling. It was found that NEM incorporates into the 87,000-Da subunit (subunit I) of the enzyme and that the conditions for enzyme modification are similar to those which result in the inhibition of the enzyme activity. The presence of ATP, ADP, and AMP was found to reduce both the inhibitor incorporation and enzyme inhibition. It was shown that the reaction involves a modification of thiol groups.

  14. Control of ATP homeostasis during the respiro-fermentative transition in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Thomas; Novo, Maite; Rössger, Katrin; Létisse, Fabien; Loret, Marie-Odile; Portais, Jean-Charles; François, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Respiring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to a sudden increase in glucose concentration by a pronounced drop of their adenine nucleotide content ([ATP]+[ADP]+[AMP]=[AXP]). The unknown fate of ‘lost' AXP nucleotides represented a long-standing problem for the understanding of the yeast's physiological response to changing growth conditions. Transient accumulation of the purine salvage pathway intermediate, inosine, accounted for the apparent loss of adenine nucleotides. Conversion of AXPs into inosine was facilitated by AMP deaminase, Amd1, and IMP-specific 5′-nucleotidase, Isn1. Inosine recycling into the AXP pool was facilitated by purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Pnp1, and joint action of the phosphoribosyltransferases, Hpt1 and Xpt1. Analysis of changes in 24 intracellular metabolite pools during the respiro-fermentative growth transition in wild-type, amd1, isn1, and pnp1 strains revealed that only the amd1 mutant exhibited significant deviations from the wild-type behavior. Moreover, mutants that were blocked in inosine production exhibited delayed growth acceleration after glucose addition. It is proposed that interconversion of adenine nucleotides and inosine facilitates rapid and energy-cost efficient adaptation of the AXP pool size to changing environmental conditions. PMID:20087341

  15. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems. PMID:17116

  16. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  17. Molecular and Subcellular-Scale Modeling of Nucleotide Diffusion in the Cardiac Myofilament Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Liao, Tao; Gillette, Andrew K.; Hake, Johan E.; Zhang, Yongjie; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Contractile function of cardiac cells is driven by the sliding displacement of myofilaments powered by the cycling myosin crossbridges. Critical to this process is the availability of ATP, which myosin hydrolyzes during the cross-bridge cycle. The diffusion of adenine nucleotides through the myofilament lattice has been shown to be anisotropic, with slower radial diffusion perpendicular to the filament axis relative to parallel, and is attributed to the periodic hexagonal arrangement of the thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. We investigated whether atomistic-resolution details of myofilament proteins can refine coarse-grain estimates of diffusional anisotropy for adenine nucleotides in the cardiac myofibril, using homogenization theory and atomistic thin filament models from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate considerable anisotropy in ATP and ADP diffusion constants that is consistent with experimental measurements and dependent on lattice spacing and myofilament overlap. A reaction-diffusion model of the half-sarcomere further suggests that diffusional anisotropy may lead to modest adenine nucleotide gradients in the myoplasm under physiological conditions. PMID:24209858

  18. Fate of prebiotic adenine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, C A; Hansson, T K; Larsson, H S; Sowerby, S J; Holm, N G

    2001-01-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm data for the purine base adenine has been obtained on several prebiotically relevant minerals by frontal analysis using water as a mobile phase. Adenine is far displaced toward adsorption on pyrite (FeS2), quartz (SiO2), and pyrrhotite (FeS), but somewhat less for magnetite (Fe3O4) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The prebiotic prevalence of these minerals would have allowed them to act as a sink for adenine; removal from the aqueous phase would confer protection from hydrolysis as well, establishing a nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework for increased adenine synthesis. Our results provide evidence that adsorption phenomena may have been critical for the primordial genetic architecture. PMID:12448980

  19. Complementary effects of extracellular nucleotides and platelet-derived extracts on angiogenesis of vasa vasorum endothelial cells in vitro and subcutaneous Matrigel plugs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelets contribute to vascular homeostasis and angiogenesis through the release of multiple growth factors, cytokines and nucleotides, such as ATP and ADP. Recent reports have demonstrated a marked growth-promoting effect of total platelet extracts and selected platelet growth factors on therapeutic angiogenesis. However, since endogenous adenine nucleotides are rapidly degraded during the platelet isolation and storage, we examined whether supplementing a platelet-derived extract with exogenous adenine nucleotides would augment their pro-angiogenic effects. Methods Pulmonary artery vasa vasorum endothelial cells (VVEC) were used to examine the effects of dialyzed platelet-derived soluble extracts and extracellular adenine nucleotides on proliferation, migration and tube formation. In addition, an in vivo Matrigel plug assay was used to examine the effects of platelet extracts and adenine nucleotides on neovascularization of plugs subcutaneously placed in 50 ICR mice. The number of vascular structures in Matrigel plugs were evaluated by histological and statistical methods. Results Platelet extracts (6.4-64 μg/ml) significantly induced DNA synthesis and at a concentration of 64 μg/ml had a biphasic effect on VVEC proliferation (an increase at 48 hrs followed by a decrease at 60 hrs). Stimulation of VVEC with platelet extracts also significantly (up to several-fold) increased cell migration and tube formation on Matrigel. Stimulation of VVEC with extracellular ATP (100 μM) dramatically (up to ten-fold) increased migration and tube formation on Matrigel; however, no significant effects on cell proliferation were observed. We also found that ATP moderately diminished platelet extract-induced VVEC proliferation (48 hrs) and migration, but potentiated tube formation. Neither ATP, or a mixture of non-hydrolyzable nucleotides (ATPγS, ADPβS, MeSATP, MeSADP) induced vascularization of Matrigel plugs subcutaneously injected in mice, however, the combination

  20. Mathematical model of nucleotide regulation on airway epithelia. Implications for airway homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peiying; Picher, Maryse; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2008-09-26

    In the airways, adenine nucleotides support a complex signaling network mediating host defenses. Released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) layer, they regulate mucus clearance through P2 (ATP) receptors, and following surface metabolism through P1 (adenosine; Ado) receptors. The complexity of ASL nucleotide regulation provides an ideal subject for biochemical network modeling. A mathematical model was developed to integrate nucleotide release, the ectoenzymes supporting the dephosphorylation of ATP into Ado, Ado deamination into inosine (Ino), and nucleoside uptake. The model also includes ecto-adenylate kinase activity and feed-forward inhibition of Ado production by ATP and ADP. The parameters were optimized by fitting the model to experimental data for the steady-state and transient concentration profiles generated by adding ATP to polarized primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The model captures major aspects of ATP and Ado regulation, including their >4-fold increase in concentration induced by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing. The model also confirmed the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on the ASL volume, an important regulator of airway clearance. An interactive approach between simulations and assays revealed that feed-forward inhibition is mediated by selective inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Importantly, the model identifies ecto-adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ASL ATP and proposes novel strategies for the treatment of airway diseases characterized by impaired nucleotide-mediated clearance. These new insights into the biochemical processes supporting ASL nucleotide regulation illustrate the potential of this mathematical model for fundamental and clinical research. PMID:18662982

  1. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  2. The assisted self-association of ATP4- by a poly(amino acid) [poly(Lys)] and its significance for cell organelles that contain high concentrations of nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sigel, H; Corfù, N A

    1996-09-15

    The occurrence of high concentrations of ATP in certain cell organelles prompted us to study the self-association of ATP via the concentration dependence of the 1H-NMR chemical shifts for H2, H8 and H1' in D2O at pD 8.4 (25 degrees C) in the range 0.0025-0.4 M in the presence and absence of poly(alpha, L-lysine), where [Lys units] was 0.4 M. The experiment in the presence of poly(Lys) was repeated at pD 12.1. At pD 8.4, the poly(amino acid) is protonated, i.e. poly(H.Lys)n+, whereas at pD 12.1 only approximately 10% of the epsilon-amino groups are positively charged. The results in all three systems are consistent with the isodesmic model of indefinite non-cooperative stacking. The stacking tendency follows the series: ATP4- (K = 1.3 M-1; pD 8.4) < ATP4-/poly(H.Lys)n+ (K = 11.5 M-1; pD 8.4) > ATP4-/90% poly(Lys)/10% poly(H.Lys)n+ (K = 3.1 M-1; pD 12.1). It is evident that poly(H.Lys)n+ assists the association of ATP by a factor of approximately 10, and it is suggested that, via its positively charged epsilon-ammonium groups, poly(H.Lys)n+ acts as a matrix by aligning ATP4- ions via ionic interactions with the negatively charged phosphate residues. The intragranular concentrations of various constituents of several storage or secretory cell organelles, as reported in the literature, are tabulated. The chromaffin granules of the adrenal medulla and the dense granules of blood platelets contain particularly high concentrations of nucleotides ([ATP] is approximately 0.14 M in the chromaffin granules and 0.5 M in the dense granules of rabbit blood platelets) and amines, such as epinephrine or 5-hydroxytryptamine. These granules, and probably also the storage vesicles of certain neurons (which seem to have a similar composition), appear, if the total concentrations of the various solutes are considered, to be osmotically unstable, which means that the intragranular solutes must be associated. This aggregation is discussed, especially with regard to the nucleotides. PMID

  3. ATP/ADP Ratio, the Missed Connection between Mitochondria and the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Eduardo N.; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells generate the bulk of cellular ATP by fully oxidizing respiratory substrates in mitochondria. Respiratory substrates cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through only one channel, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC). Once in the matrix, respiratory substrates are oxidized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle to generate mostly NADH that is further oxidized in the respiratory chain to generate a proton motive force comprised mainly of membrane potential (ΔΨ) to synthesize ATP. Mitochondrial ΔΨ then drives release of ATP−4 from the matrix in exchange for ADP−3 in the cytosol via the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Thus, mitochondrial function in non-proliferating cells drives a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio, essential to inhibit glycolysis. By contrast, the bioenergetics of the Warburg phenotype of proliferating cells is characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial metabolism. Suppressed mitochondrial function leads to lower production of mitochondrial ATP and hence lower cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios that favor enhanced glycolysis. Thus, cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio is a key feature that determines if cell metabolism is predominantly oxidative or glycolytic. Here, we describe two novel mechanisms to explain the suppression of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: the relative closure of VDAC by free tubulin and inactivation of ANT. Both mechanisms contribute to low ATP/ADP ratios that activate glycolysis. PMID:25229666

  4. Generation of reducing power in chemosynthesis. 3. Energy-linked reduction of pyridine nucleotides in Thiobacillus novellus.

    PubMed

    Aleem, M I

    1966-02-01

    Aleem, M. I. H. (Research Institute for Advanced Studies, Baltimore, Md.). Generation of reducing power in chemosynthesis. III. Energy-linked reduction of pyridine nucleotides in Thiobacillus novellus. J. Bacteriol. 91:729-736. 1966.-Cell-free extracts from Thiobacillus novellus. catalyzed an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent reduction of pyridine nucleotides anaerobically, or aerobically when the respiratory chain was inhibited by azide. The exogenous electron donor employed for the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) was thiosulfate, formate, or mammalian ferrocytochrome c. In the latter case, the oxidation of ferrocytochrome c was observed with the concomitant reduction of the pyridine nucleotide. Values calculated for the molar ratios of ATP utilized-NADP reduced and of cytochrome c oxidized-NADP reduced were 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The energy-dependent reduction of the pyridine nucleotides was inhibited by Atabrine or amytal and by low concentrations of the uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation such as 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Evidence is presented showing that the reduced pyridine nucleotides are essential for providing the reducing power for the energy-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide in T. novellus. PMID:4379907

  5. The nucleotide exchange factor MGE exerts a key function in the ATP-dependent cycle of mt-Hsp70-Tim44 interaction driving mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H C; Westermann, B; Neupert, W; Brunner, M

    1996-01-01

    Import of preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix is driven by the ATP-dependent interaction of mt-Hsp70 with the peripheral inner membrane import protein Tim44 and the preprotein in transit. We show that Mge1p, a co-chaperone of mt-Hsp70, plays a key role in the ATP-dependent import reaction cycle in yeast. Our data suggest a cycle in which the mt-Hsp70-Tim44 complex forms with ATP: Mge1p promotes assembly of the complex in the presence of ATP. Hydrolysis of ATP by mt-Hsp70 occurs in complex with Tim44. Mge1p is then required for the dissociation of the ADP form of mt-Hsp70 from Tim44 after release of inorganic phosphate but before release of ADP. ATP hydrolysis and complex dissociation are accompanied by tight binding of mt-Hsp70 to the preprotein in transit. Subsequently, the release of mt-Hsp70 from the polypeptide chain is triggered by Mge1p which promotes release of ADP from mt-Hsp70. Rebinding of ATP to mt-Hsp70 completes the reaction cycle. Images PMID:8918457

  6. Interaction between ATP, metal ions, glycine, and several minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishpon, J.; Ohara, P. J.; Lawless, J. G.; Lahav, N.

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between ATP, glycine and montmorillonite and kaolinite clay minerals in the presence of various metal cations are investigated. The adsorption of adenine nucleotides on clays and Al(OH)3 was measured as a function of pH, and glycine condensation was followed in the presence of ATP, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and either kaolinite or montmorillonite. The amounts of ATP and ADP adsorbed are found to decrease with increasing Ph, and to be considerably enhanced in experiments with Mg(2+)- and Zn(2+)-montmorillonite with respect to Na(+)-montmorillonite. The effects of divalent cations are less marked in kaolinite. Results for Al(OH)3 show the importance of adsorption at clay platelet edges at high pH. The decomposition of ATP during drying at high temperature is observed to be inhibited by small amounts of clay, vacuum, or Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions, and to be accompanied by peptide formation in the presence of glycine. Results suggest the importance of Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) in chemical evolution.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations and coupled nucleotide substitution experiments indicate the nature of A·A base pairing and a putative structure of the coralyne-induced homo-adenine duplex

    PubMed Central

    Hud, Nicholas V.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Coralyne is an alkaloid drug that binds homo-adenine DNA (and RNA) oligonucleotides more tightly than it does Watson–Crick DNA. Hud’s laboratory has shown that poly(dA) in the presence of coralyne forms an anti-parallel duplex, however attempts to determine the structure by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography have been unsuccessful. Assuming adenine–adenine hydrogen bonding between the two poly(dA) strands, we constructed 40 hypothetical homo-(dA) anti-parallel duplexes and docked coralyne into the six most favorable duplex structures. The two most stable structures had trans glycosidic bonds, but distinct pairing geometries, i.e. either Watson–Crick Hoogsteen (transWH) or Watson–Crick Watson–Crick (transWW) with stability of transWH > transWW. To narrow down the possibilities, 7-deaza adenine base substitutions (dA→7) were engineered into homo-(dA) sequences. These substitutions significantly reduced the thermal stability of the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) structure. These experiments strongly suggest the involvement of N7 in the coralyne-induced A·A base pairs. Moreover, due to the differential effect on melting as a function of the location of the dA→7 mutations, these results are consistent with the N1–N7 base pairing of the transWH pairs. Together, the simulation and base substitution experiments predict that the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) duplex structure adopts the transWH geometry. PMID:19850721

  8. The complete nucleotide sequence of the cassava (Manihot esculenta) chloroplast genome and the evolution of atpF in Malpighiales: RNA editing and multiple losses of a group II intron

    PubMed Central

    Wurdack, Kenneth J.; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Lee, Seung-Bum; Saski, Christopher; Jansen, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    The complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of cassava (Manihot esculenta, Euphorbiaceae) has been determined. The genome is 161,453 bp in length and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 26,954 bp. The genome includes 128 genes; 96 are single copy and 16 are duplicated in the IR. There are four rRNA genes and 30 distinct tRNAs, seven of which are duplicated in the IR. The infA gene is absent; expansion of IRb has duplicated 62 amino acids at the 3′ end of rps19 and a number of coding regions have large insertions or deletions, including insertions within the 23S rRNA gene. There are 17 intron-containing genes in cassava, 15 of which have a single intron while two (clpP, ycf3) have two introns. The usually conserved atpF group II intron is absent and this is the first report of its loss from land plant chloroplast genomes. The phylogenetic distribution of the atpF intron loss was determined by a PCR survey of 251 taxa representing 34 families of Malpighiales and 16 taxa from closely related rosids. The atpF intron is not only missing in cassava but also from closely related Euphorbiaceae and other Malpighiales, suggesting that there have been at least seven independent losses. In cassava and all other sequenced Malphigiales, atpF gene sequences showed a strong association between C-to-T substitutions at nucleotide position 92 and the loss of the intron, suggesting that recombination between an edited mRNA and the atpF gene may be a possible mechanism for the intron loss. PMID:18214421

  9. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  10. E-NTPDase 3 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) from cardiomyocytes, activity and expression are modulated by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli; Cotomacci, Guilherme; Júnior, Marconi Barbosa Coutinho; Sarkis, João José Freitas

    2006-06-01

    Degradation of adenine nucleotides by myocardial cells occurs, in part, by a cascade of surface-located enzymes converting ATP into adenosine that has important implications for the regulation of the nucleotide/nucleoside ratio modulating the cardiac functions. Thyroid hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular system, as observed in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Combined biochemical parameters and gene expression analysis approaches were used to investigate the influence of tri-iodothyronine (T3) on ATP and ADP hydrolysis by isolated myocytes. Cultures of cardiomyocytes were submitted to increasing doses of T3 for 24h. Enzymatic activity and expression were evaluated. T3 (0.1 nM) caused an increase in ATP and ADP hydrolysis. Experiments with specific inhibitors suggest the involvement of an NTPDase, which was confirmed by an increase in NTPDase 3 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Since T3 promotes an increase in the contractile protein, leading to cardiac hypertrophy, it is tempting to postulate that the increase in ATP hydrolysis and the decrease in the extracellular levels signify an important factor for prevention of excessive contractility. PMID:16584835

  11. The First Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Is a Site of Stable Nucleotide Interaction, whereas the Second Is a Site of Rapid Turnover.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R

    2002-05-01

    As in other adenine nucleotide binding cassette (ABC) proteins the nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bind and hydrolyze ATP and in some manner regulate CFTR ion channel gating. Unlike some other ABC proteins, however, there are preliminary indications that the two domains of CFTR are nonequivalent in their nucleotide interactions (Szabo, K., Szakacs, G., Hegeds, T., and Sarkadi, B. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12209-12212; Aleksandrov, L., Mengos, A., Chang, X., Aleksandrov, A., and Riordan, J. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12918-12923). We have now characterized the interactions of the 8-azido-photoactive analogues of ATP, ADP, and 5'-adenyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) with the two domains of functional membrane-bound CFTR. The results show that the two domains appear to act independently in the binding and hydrolysis of 8-azido-ATP. At NBD1 binding does not require a divalent cation. This binding is followed by minimal Mg(2+)-dependent hydrolysis and retention of the hydrolysis product, 8-azido-ADP, but not as a vanadate stabilized post-hydrolysis transition state complex. In contrast, at NBD2, MgN(3)ATP is hydrolyzed as rapidly as it is bound and the nucleoside diphosphate hydrolysis product dissociates immediately. Confirming this characterization of NBD1 as a site of more stable nucleotide interaction and NBD2 as a site of fast turnover, the non-hydrolyzable N(3)AMP-PNP bound preferentially to NBD1. This demonstration of NBD2 as the rapid nucleotide turnover site is consistent with the strong effect on channel gating kinetics of inactivation of this domain by mutagenesis. PMID:11861646

  12. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Cytidine Triphosphate Synthetase, a Nucleotide-Regulated Glutamine Amidotransferase/ATP-Dependent Amidoligase Fusion Protein and Homologue of Anticancer and Antiparasitic Drug Targets†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, James A.; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M.; Baldwin, Enoch P.

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) produce CTP from UTP and glutamine, and regulate intracellular CTP levels through interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. We solved the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of Escherichia coli CTPS using Hg-MAD phasing. The structure reveals a nearly symmetric 222 tetramer, in which each bifunctional monomer contains a dethiobiotin synthetase-like amidoligase N-terminal domain and a Type 1 glutamine amidotransferase C-terminal domain. For each amidoligase active site, essential ATP- and UTP-binding surfaces are contributed by three monomers, suggesting that activity requires tetramer formation, and that a nucleotide-dependent dimer–tetramer equilibrium contributes to the observed positive cooperativity. A gated channel that spans 25 Å between the glutamine hydrolysis and amidoligase active sites provides a path for ammonia diffusion. The channel is accessible to solvent at the base of a cleft adjoining the glutamine hydrolysis active site, providing an entry point for exogenous ammonia. Guanine nucleotide binding sites of structurally related GTPases superimpose on this cleft, providing insights into allosteric regulation by GTP. Mutations that confer nucleoside drug resistance and release CTP inhibition map to a pocket that neighbors the UTP-binding site and can accommodate a pyrimidine ring. Its location suggests that competitive feedback inhibition is affected via a distinct product/drug binding site that overlaps the substrate triphosphate binding site. Overall, the E. coli structure provides a framework for homology modeling of other CTPSs and structure-based design of anti-CTPS therapeutics. PMID:15157079

  13. Evidence that adenosine triphosphate or a related nucleotide is the transmitter substance released by non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Burnstock, G; Campbell, G; Satchell, D; Smythe, ANNE

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the vagal non-adrenergic inhibitory innervation caused the release of adenosine and inosine into vascular perfusates from the stomachs of guinea-pigs and toads. Stimulation of portions of Auerbach's plexus isolated from turkey gizzard caused the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). ATP, added to solutions perfused through the toad stomach vasculature, was broken down to adenosine, inosine and adenine. Of a series of purine and pyrimidine derivatives tested for inhibitory activity on the guinea-pig isolated taenia coli, ATP and ADP were the most potent. ATP caused inhibition of twelve other gut preparations previously shown to contain non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves. The inhibitory action of ATP was not prevented by tetrodotoxin. Quinidine antagonized relaxations of the guinea-pig taenia coli caused by catecholamines or adrenergic nerve stimulation. Higher concentrations of quinidine antagonized relaxations caused by ATP or non-adrenergic inhibitory nerve stimulation. When tachyphylaxis to ATP had been produced in the rabbit ileum, there was a consistent depression of the responses to non-adrenergic inhibitory nerve stimulation but not of responses to adrenergic nerve stimulation. It is suggested that ATP or a related nucleotide is the transmitter substance released by the non-adrenergic inhibitory innervation of the gut. PMID:9142414

  14. Insights into the Influence of Nucleotides on Actin Family Proteins from Seven Structures of Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen,B.; Pollard, T.

    2007-01-01

    ATP is required for nucleation of actin filament branches by Arp2/3 complex, but the influence of ATP binding and hydrolysis are poorly understood. We determined crystal structures of bovine Arp2/3 complex cocrystalized with various bound adenine nucleotides and cations. Nucleotide binding favors closure of the nucleotide binding cleft of Arp3, but no large scale conformational changes in the complex. Thus, ATP binding does not directly activate Arp2/3 complex, but is part of a network of interactions that contribute to nucleation. We compared nucleotide-induced conformational changes of residues lining the cleft in Arp3 and actin structures to construct a movie depicting the proposed ATPase cycle for the actin family. Chemical crosslinking stabilized subdomain 1 of Arp2, revealing new electron density for 69 residues in this subdomain. Steric clashes with Arp3 appear to be responsible for intrinsic disorder of subdomains 1 and 2 of Arp2 in inactive Arp2/3 complex.

  15. A nucleotide-analogue-induced gain of function corrects the error-prone nature of human DNA polymerase iota.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-06-27

    Y-family DNA polymerases participate in replication stress and DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. The properties that allow these enzymes to copy past bulky adducts or distorted template DNA can result in a greater propensity for them to make mistakes. Of the four human Y-family members, human DNA polymerase iota (hpol ι) is the most error-prone. In the current study, we elucidate the molecular basis for improving the fidelity of hpol ι through use of the fixed-conformation nucleotide North-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine triphosphate (N-MC-dATP). Three crystal structures were solved of hpol ι in complex with DNA containing a template 2'-deoxythymidine (dT) paired with an incoming dNTP or modified nucleotide triphosphate. The ternary complex of hpol ι inserting N-MC-dATP opposite dT reveals that the adenine ring is stabilized in the anti orientation about the pseudo-glycosyl torsion angle, which mimics precisely the mutagenic arrangement of dGTP:dT normally preferred by hpol ι. The stabilized anti conformation occurs without notable contacts from the protein but likely results from constraints imposed by the bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold of the modified nucleotide. Unmodified dATP and South-MC-dATP each adopt syn glycosyl orientations to form Hoogsteen base pairs with dT. The Hoogsteen orientation exhibits weaker base-stacking interactions and is less catalytically favorable than anti N-MC-dATP. Thus, N-MC-dATP corrects the error-prone nature of hpol ι by preventing the Hoogsteen base-pairing mode normally observed for hpol ι-catalyzed insertion of dATP opposite dT. These results provide a previously unrecognized means of altering the efficiency and the fidelity of a human translesion DNA polymerase. PMID:22632140

  16. A Nucleotide-Analogue-Induced Gain of Function Corrects the Error-Prone Nature of Human DNA Polymerase iota

    SciTech Connect

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K.; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E.; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L.

    2012-10-25

    Y-family DNA polymerases participate in replication stress and DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. The properties that allow these enzymes to copy past bulky adducts or distorted template DNA can result in a greater propensity for them to make mistakes. Of the four human Y-family members, human DNA polymerase iota (hpol{iota}) is the most error-prone. In the current study, we elucidate the molecular basis for improving the fidelity of hpol{iota} through use of the fixed-conformation nucleotide North-methanocarba-2{prime}-deoxyadenosine triphosphate (N-MC-dATP). Three crystal structures were solved of hpol{iota} in complex with DNA containing a template 2{prime}-deoxythymidine (dT) paired with an incoming dNTP or modified nucleotide triphosphate. The ternary complex of hpol{iota} inserting N-MC-dATP opposite dT reveals that the adenine ring is stabilized in the anti orientation about the pseudo-glycosyl torsion angle, which mimics precisely the mutagenic arrangement of dGTP:dT normally preferred by hpol{iota}. The stabilized anti conformation occurs without notable contacts from the protein but likely results from constraints imposed by the bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold of the modified nucleotide. Unmodified dATP and South-MC-dATP each adopt syn glycosyl orientations to form Hoogsteen base pairs with dT. The Hoogsteen orientation exhibits weaker base-stacking interactions and is less catalytically favorable than anti N-MC-dATP. Thus, N-MC-dATP corrects the error-prone nature of hpol{iota} by preventing the Hoogsteen base-pairing mode normally observed for hpol{iota}-catalyzed insertion of dATP opposite dT. These results provide a previously unrecognized means of altering the efficiency and the fidelity of a human translesion DNA polymerase.

  17. Chemotherapeutic Drugs Induce ATP Release via Caspase-gated Pannexin-1 Channels and a Caspase/Pannexin-1-independent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Penuela, Silvia; Laird, Dale W.; Dubyak, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tumor immune responses have been linked to the regulated release of ATP from apoptotic cancer cells to engage P2 purinergic receptor signaling cascades in nearby leukocytes. We used the Jurkat T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia model to characterize the role of pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels in the release of nucleotides during chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis. Diverse pro-apoptotic drugs, including topoisomerase II inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, and proteosome inhibitors, induced functional activation of Panx1 channels via caspase-3-mediated cleavage of the Panx1 autoinhibitory C-terminal domain. The caspase-activated Panx1 channels mediated efflux of ATP, but also ADP and AMP, with the latter two comprising >90% of the released adenine nucleotide pool as cells transitioned from the early to late stages of apoptosis. Chemotherapeutic drugs also activated an alternative caspase- and Panx1-independent pathway for ATP release from Jurkat cells in the presence of benzyloxycarbonyl-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor. Comparison of Panx1 levels indicated much higher expression in leukemic T lymphocytes than in normal, untransformed T lymphoblasts. This suggests that signaling roles for Panx1 may be amplified in leukemic leukocytes. Together, these results identify chemotherapy-activated pannexin-1 channels and ATP release as possible mediators of paracrine interaction between dying tumor cells and the effector leukocytes that mediate immunogenic anti-tumor responses. PMID:25112874

  18. The two ATP binding sites of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) play distinct roles in gating kinetics and energetics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  19. The Two ATP Binding Sites of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Play Distinct Roles in Gating Kinetics and Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase–dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing. PMID:16966475

  20. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Steven P D; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  1. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P.D.; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  2. The bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 Tyr581Ser single-nucleotide polymorphism increases milk secretion of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; de la Fuente, Álvaro; Prieto, Julio G; Marqués, Margarita; Álvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-03-01

    The bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein) polymorphism Tyr581Ser (Y581S) has recently been shown to increase in vitro transepithelial transport of antibiotics. Since this transporter has been extensively related to the active secretion of drugs into milk, the potential in vivo effect of this polymorphism on secretion of xenobiotics in livestock could have striking consequences for milk production, the dairy industry, and public health. Our purpose was to study the in vivo effect of this polymorphism on the secretion of danofloxacin, a widely used veterinary antibiotic, into milk. Danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg) was administered to six Y/Y 581 homozygous and six Y/S 581 heterozygous lactating cows, and plasma and milk samples were collected and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No differences were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of danofloxacin in plasma between the two groups of animals. In contrast, Y/S heterozygous cows showed a 2-fold increase in danofloxacin levels in milk. In addition, the pharmacokinetic elimination parameters, mean residence time and elimination half-life, were significantly lower in the milk of the animals carrying the Y/S polymorphism. These in vivo results are in agreement with our previously published in vitro data, which showed a greater capacity of the S581 variant in accumulation assays, and demonstrate, for the first time, an important effect of the Y581S single-nucleotide polymorphism on antibiotic secretion into cow milk. These findings could be extended to other ABCG2 substrates, and may be relevant for the treatment of mastitis and for the design of accurate and novel strategies to handle milk residues. PMID:23230133

  3. KATP channels process nucleotide signals in muscle thermogenic response

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Santiago; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Alekseev, Alexey E.

    2014-01-01

    Uniquely gated by intracellular adenine nucleotides, sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels have been typically assigned to protective cellular responses under severe energy insults. More recently, KATP channels have been instituted in the continuous control of muscle energy expenditure under non-stressed, physiological states. These advances raised the question of how KATP channels can process trends in cellular energetics within a milieu where each metabolic system is set to buffer nucleotide pools. Unveiling the mechanistic basis of the KATP channel-driven thermogenic response in muscles thus invites the concepts of intracellular compartmentalization of energy and proteins, along with nucleotide signaling over diffusion barriers. Furthermore, it requires gaining insight into the properties of reversibility of intrinsic ATPase activity associated with KATP channel complexes. Notwithstanding the operational paradigm, the homeostatic role of sarcolemmal KATP channels can be now broadened to a wider range of environmental cues affecting metabolic well-being. In this way, under conditions of energy deficit such as ischemic insult or adrenergic stress, the operation of KATP channel complexes would result in protective energy saving, safeguarding muscle performance and integrity. Under energy surplus, downregulation of KATP channel function may find potential implications in conditions of energy imbalance linked to obesity, cold intolerance and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:20925594

  4. Nucleotide recognition by CopA, a Cu+-transporting P-type ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takeo; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal pumps constitute a large subgroup in P-type ion-transporting ATPases. One of the outstanding features is that the nucleotide binding N-domain lacks residues critical for ATP binding in other well-studied P-type ATPases. Instead, they possess an HP-motif and a Gly-rich sequence in the N-domain, and their mutations impair ATP binding. Here, we describe 1.85 Å resolution crystal structures of the P- and N-domains of CopA, an archaeal Cu+-transporting ATPase, with bound nucleotides. These crystal structures show that CopA recognises the adenine ring completely differently from other P-type ATPases. The crystal structure of the His462Gln mutant, in the HP-motif, a disease-causing mutation in human Cu+-ATPases, shows that the Gln side chain mimics the imidazole ring, but only partially, explaining the reduction in ATPase activity. These crystal structures lead us to propose a role of the His and a mechanism for removing Mg2+ from ATP before phosphoryl transfer. PMID:19478797

  5. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  6. Factors influencing the rate of non-enzymatic activation of carboxylic and amino acids by ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The nonenzymatic formation of adenylate anhydrides of carboxylic and amino acids is discussed as a necessary step in the origin of the genetic code and protein biosynthesis. Results of studies are presented which have shown the rate of activation to depend on the pKa of the carboxyl group, the pH of the medium, temperature, the divalent metal ion catalyst, salt concentration, and the nature of the amino acid. In particular, it was found that of the various amino acids investigated, phenylalanine had the greatest affinity for the adenine derivatives adenosine and ATP. Results thus indicate that selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides were important during prebiotic chemical evolution, and may have played a major role in the origin of protein synthesis and genetic coding.

  7. Adenine nucleoside diphosphates block adaptation of mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P G; Hudspeth, A J

    1993-04-01

    By adapting to sustained stimuli, hair cells in the internal ear retain their sensitivity to minute transient displacements. Because one model for adaptation asserts that this process is mediated by a myosin isozyme, we reasoned that we should be able to arrest adaptation by interfering with myosin's ATPase cycle though introduction of ADP into hair cells. During tight-seal, whole-cell recordings of transduction currents in cells isolated from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) sacculus, dialysis with 5-25 mM ADP gave variable results. In half of the cells examined, the rate of adaptation remained unchanged or even increased; adaptation was blocked in the remaining cells. Because we suspected that the variable effect of ADP resulted from the conversion of ADP to ATP by adenylate kinase, we employed the ADP analog adenosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (ADP[beta S]), which is not a substrate for adenylate kinase. Adaptation consistently disappeared in the presence of 1-10 mM ADP[beta S]; in addition, the transduction channels' open probability at rest grew from approximately 0.1 to 0.8 or more. Both effects could be reversed by 2 mM ATP. When used in conjunction with the adenylate kinase inhibitor P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), ADP had effects similar to those of ADP[beta S]. These results suggest that adaptation by hair cells involves adenine nucleotides, and they lend support to the hypothesis that the adaptation process is powered by a myosin motor. PMID:8464880

  8. Different Effects of Guanine Nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on Protein-Mediated Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M.; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP. PMID:24904988

  9. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  10. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; et al

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allostericmore » AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.« less

  11. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W; Gu, Xin; Tan, M H Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Together, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions. PMID:25412657

  12. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by adenine nucleotides and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Lili; Zhou, X. Edward; Ke, Jiyuan; de Waal, Parker W.; Gu, Xin; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Wang, Dongye; Wu, Donghai; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2014-11-21

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central cellular energy sensor and regulator of energy homeostasis, and a promising drug target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Here we present low-resolution crystal structures of the human α1β2γ1 holo-AMPK complex bound to its allosteric modulators AMP and the glycogen-mimic cyclodextrin, both in the phosphorylated (4.05 Å) and non-phosphorylated (4.60 Å) state. In addition, we have solved a 2.95 Å structure of the human kinase domain (KD) bound to the adjacent autoinhibitory domain (AID) and have performed extensive biochemical and mutational studies. Altogether, these studies illustrate an underlying mechanism of allosteric AMPK modulation by AMP and glycogen, whose binding changes the equilibria between alternate AID (AMP) and carbohydrate-binding module (glycogen) interactions.

  13. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J P; Hagan, W J

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite was investigated in the presence of buffers and salts. Good's buffers, piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonate) [PIPES] and morpholine-N-2-ethanesulfonate [MES], perturbed the exchangeable cations to a lesser extent (only 9% of Zn2+ displaced by 0.2 M buffer) than was observed with imidazole and lutidine buffers or NaCl and KCl salts (up to 80% of Zn2+ displaced). AMP adsorption isotherms measured in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES, MES, or Na2SO4 exhibited normal Langmuir-type behavior. The adsorption coefficient, KL, is 3-fold greater in the presence of HEPES or PIPES than it is in the absence of buffers. Basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction for Zn(2+)-montmorillonite are 13 and 15 angstroms in the presence of PIPES, while a value of 12.8 angstroms was determined in the absence of PIPES. These data are interpreted in a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn2+ complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. The type of exchangeable cation does not affect the ability of the lattice-bound Fe3+ in the montmorillonite to oxidize diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN). Exchangeable Cu2+ oxidizes DAMN, but exchangeable Fe3+ is nearly ineffective as an oxidant. The addition of DISN to 3'-AMP bound to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES resulted in a higher yield of 2',3'-cAMP than is observed with a comparable concentration of Zn2+, a result which inplicates surface catalysis by the montmorillonite. PMID:11540864

  14. Nucleotide chloramines and neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernofsky, C

    1991-03-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxidant formed as an end product of the respiratory burst in activated neutrophils. It is responsible for killing bacteria and has been implicated in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury associated with the inflammatory process. Although hypochlorite is a potent cytotoxic agent, the primary mechanism by which it exerts its effect is unclear. This review examines evidence that the primary event in hypochlorite cytotoxicity is the loss of adenine nucleotides from the target cell. This loss appears to be mediated by the formation of adenine nucleotide chloramines which are reactive intermediates with a free radical character and are capable of forming stable ligands with proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:1848195

  15. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  16. Distinct Conformation of ATP Molecule in Solution and on Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Eri; Yura, Kei; Nagai, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile molecule used mainly for energy and a phosphate source. The hydrolysis of γ phosphate initiates the reactions and these reactions almost always start when ATP binds to protein. Therefore, there should be a mechanism to prevent spontaneous hydrolysis reaction and a mechanism to lead ATP to a pure energy source or to a phosphate source. To address these questions, we extensively analyzed the effect of protein to ATP conformation based on the sampling of the ATP solution conformations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation and the sampling of ATP structures bound to protein found in a protein structure database. The comparison revealed mainly the following three points; 1) The ribose ring in ATP molecule, which puckers in many ways in solution, tends to assume either C2′ exo or C2′ endo when it binds to protein. 2) The adenine ring in ATP molecule, which takes open-book motion with the two ring structures, has two distinct structures when ATP binds to protein. 3) The glycosyl-bond and the bond between phosphate and the ribose have unique torsion angles, when ATP binds to protein. The combination of torsion angles found in protein-bound forms is under-represented in ATP molecule in water. These findings suggest that ATP-binding protein exerts forces on ATP molecule to assume a conformation that is rarely found in solution, and that this conformation change should be a trigger for the reactions on ATP molecule. PMID:27493535

  17. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  18. 8-BuS-ATP derivatives as specific NTPDase1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lecka, Joanna; Gillerman, Irina; Fausther, Michel; Salem, Mabrouka; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Brosseau, Jean-Philippe; Cadot, Christine; Martín-Satué, Mireia; d'Orléans-Juste, Pedro; Rousseau, Éric; Poirier, Donald; Künzli, Beat; Fischer, Bilha; Sévigny, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ectonucleotidases control extracellular nucleotide levels and consequently, their (patho)physiological responses. Among these enzymes, nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1), −2, −3 and −8 are the major ectonucleotidases responsible for nucleotide hydrolysis at the cell surface under physiological conditions, and NTPDase1 is predominantly located at the surface of vascular endothelial cells and leukocytes. Efficacious inhibitors of NTPDase1 are required to modulate responses induced by nucleotides in a number of pathological situations such as thrombosis, inflammation and cancer. Experimental Approach Here, we present the synthesis and enzymatic characterization of five 8-BuS-adenine nucleotide derivatives as potent and selective inhibitors of NTPDase1. Key Results The compounds 8-BuS-AMP, 8-BuS-ADP and 8-BuS-ATP inhibit recombinant human and mouse NTPDase1 by mixed type inhibition, predominantly competitive with Ki values <1 μM. In contrast to 8-BuS-ATP which could be hydrolyzed by other NTPDases, the other BuS derivatives were resistant to hydrolysis by either NTPDase1, −2, −3 or −8. 8-BuS-AMP and 8-BuS-ADP were the most potent and selective inhibitors of NTPDase1 expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as in situ in human and mouse tissues. As expected, as a result of their inhibition of recombinant human NTPDase1, 8-BuS-AMP and 8-BuS-ADP impaired the ability of this enzyme to block platelet aggregation. Importantly, neither of these two inhibitors triggered platelet aggregation nor prevented ADP-induced platelet aggregation, in support of their inactivity towards P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors. Conclusions and Implications The 8-BuS-AMP and 8-BuS-ADP have therefore potential to serve as drugs for the treatment of pathologies regulated by NTPDase1. PMID:23425137

  19. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Rahul; Vasudevan, Sona; Patil, Digvijay; Ashoura, Norah; Grimwade, Julia E.; Crooke, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC) to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC) at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). PMID:26610483

  20. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rahul; Vasudevan, Sona; Patil, Digvijay; Ashoura, Norah; Grimwade, Julia E; Crooke, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC) to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC) at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). PMID:26610483

  1. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms. PMID:25839341

  2. Phosphate exchange and ATP synthesis by DMSO-pretreated purified bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Beharry, S; Bragg, P D

    2001-01-01

    Purified soluble bovine mitochondrial F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase contained 2 mol of ATP, 2 mol of ADP and 6 mol of P(i)/mol. Incubation of this enzyme with 1 mM [(32)P]P(i) caused the exchange of 2 mol of P(i)/mol of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. The labelled phosphates were not displaced by ATP. Transfer of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase to a buffer containing 30% (v/v) DMSO and 1 mM [(32)P]P(i) resulted in the loss of bound nucleotides with the retention of 1 mol of ATP/mol of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. Six molecules of [(32)P]P(i) were incorporated by exchange with the existing bound phosphate. Removal of the DMSO by passage of the enzyme through a centrifuged column of Sephadex G-50 resulted in the exchange of one molecule of bound [(32)P]P(i) into the bound ATP. Azide did not prevent this [(32)P]P(i)<-->ATP exchange reaction. The bound labelled ATP could be displaced from the enzyme by exogenous ATP. Addition of ADP to the DMSO-pretreated F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase in the original DMSO-free buffer resulted in the formation of an additional molecule of bound ATP. It was concluded that following pretreatment with and subsequent removal of DMSO the F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase contained one molecule of ATP at a catalytic site which was competent to carry out a phosphate-ATP exchange reaction using enzyme-bound inorganic radiolabelled phosphate. In the presence of ADP an additional molecule of labelled ATP was formed from enzyme-bound P(i) at a second catalytic site. The bound phosphate-ATP exchange reaction is not readily accommodated by current mechanisms for the ATP synthase. PMID:11139383

  3. Intramolecular interactions in aminoacyl nucleotides: Implications regarding the origin of genetic coding and protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.; Hall, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular organisms store information as sequences of nucleotides in double stranded DNA. This information is useless unless it can be converted into the active molecular species, protein. This is done in contemporary creatures first by transcription of one strand to give a complementary strand of mRNA. The sequence of nucleotides is then translated into a specific sequence of amino acids in a protein. Translation is made possible by a genetic coding system in which a sequence of three nucleotides codes for a specific amino acid. The origin and evolution of any chemical system can be understood through elucidation of the properties of the chemical entities which make up the system. There is an underlying logic to the coding system revealed by a correlation of the hydrophobicities of amino acids and their anticodonic nucleotides (i.e., the complement of the codon). Its importance lies in the fact that every amino acid going into protein synthesis must first be activated. This is universally accomplished with ATP. Past studies have concentrated on the chemistry of the adenylates, but more recently we have found, through the use of NMR, that we can observe intramolecular interactions even at low concentrations, between amino acid side chains and nucleotide base rings in these adenylates. The use of this type of compound thus affords a novel way of elucidating the manner in which amino acids and nucleotides interact with each other. In aqueous solution, when a hydrophobic amino acid is attached to the most hydrophobic nucleotide, AMP, a hydrophobic interaction takes place between the amino acid side chain and the adenine ring. The studies to be reported concern these hydrophobic interactions.

  4. Impaired mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in respiratory chain-deficient cells but efficient compensation of energetic disadvantage by enhanced anaerobic glycolysis due to low ATP steady state levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kleist-Retzow, Juergen-Christoph von ||. E-mail: juergen-christoph.vonkleist@uk-koeln.de; Hue-Tran Hornig-Do; Schauen, Matthias; Eckertz, Sabrina; Tuan Anh Duong Dinh; Stassen, Frank; Lottmann, Nadine; Bust, Maria; Galunska, Bistra; Wielckens, Klaus; Hein, Wolfgang; Beuth, Joseph; Braun, Jan-Matthias; Fischer, Juergen H.; Ganitkevich, Vladimir Y. |; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Wiesner, Rudolf J. |

    2007-08-15

    Energy-producing pathways, adenine nucleotide levels, oxidative stress response and Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis were investigated in cybrid cells incorporating two pathogenic mitochondrial DNA point mutations, 3243A > G and 3302A > G in tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)}, as well as Rho{sup 0} cells and compared to their parental 143B osteosarcoma cell line. All cells suffering from a severe respiratory chain deficiency were able to proliferate as fast as controls. The major defect in oxidative phosphorylation was efficiently compensated by a rise in anaerobic glycolysis, so that the total ATP production rate was preserved. This enhancement of glycolysis was enabled by a considerable decrease of cellular total adenine nucleotide pools and a concomitant shift in the AMP + ADP/ATP ratios, while the energy charge potential was still in the normal range. Further important consequences were an increased production of superoxide which, however, was neither escorted by major changes in the antioxidative defence systems nor was it leading to substantial oxidative damage. Most interestingly, the lowered mitochondrial membrane potential led to a disturbed intramitochondrial calcium homeostasis, which most likely is a major pathomechanism in mitochondrial diseases.

  5. Detection of ATP and NADH: A Bioluminescent Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selig, Ted C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Described is a bioluminescent assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduced nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) that meets the requirements of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. The 3-hour experiment provides students with experience in bioluminescence and analytical biochemistry yet requires limited instrumentation,…

  6. The effect of systemic hypoxia on interstitial and blood adenosine, AMP, ADP and ATP in dog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mo, F M; Ballard, H J

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of moderate systemic hypoxia on the arterial, venous and interstital concentration of adenosine and adenine nucleotides in the neurally and vascularly isolated, constant-flow perfused gracilis muscles of anaesthetized dogs. Systemic hypoxia reduced arterial PO2 from 129 to 28 mmHg, venous PO2 from 63 to 23 mmHg, arterial pH from 7.43 to 7.36 and venous pH from 7.38 to 7.32. Neither arterial nor venous PCO2 were changed. Arterial perfusion pressure remained at 109 ± 8 mmHg for the first 5 min of hypoxia, then increased to 131 ± 11 mmHg by 9 min, and then decreased again throughout the rest of the hypoxic period. Arterial adenosine (427 ± 98 nm) did not change during hypoxia, but venous adenosine increased from 350 ± 52 to 518 ± 107 nm. Interstitial adenosine concentration did not increase (339 ± 154 nm in normoxia and 262 ± 97 nm in hypoxia). Neither arterial nor venous nor interstitial concentrations of adenine nucleotides changed significantly in hypoxia. Interstitial adenosine, AMP, ADP and ATP increased from 194 ± 40, 351 ± 19, 52 ± 7 and 113 ± 36 to 764 ± 140, 793 ± 119, 403 ± 67 and 574 ± 122 nm, respectively, during 2 Hz muscle contractions. Adenosine, AMP, ADP and ATP infused into the arterial blood did not elevate the interstitial concentration until the arterial concentration exceeded 10 μm. We conclude that the increased adenosine in skeletal muscle during systemic hypoxia is formed by the vascular tissue or the blood cells, and that adenosine is formed intracellularly by these tissues. On the other hand, adenosine formation takes place extracellularly in the interstitial space during muscle contractions. PMID:11600692

  7. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  8. Purification and characterization of TnsC, a Tn7 transposition protein that binds ATP and DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gamas, P; Craig, N L

    1992-01-01

    The bacterial transposon Tn7 encodes five transposition genes tnsABCDE. We report a simple and rapid procedure for the purification of TnsC protein. We show that purified TnsC is active in and required for Tn7 transposition in a cell-free recombination system. This finding demonstrates that TnsC participates directly in Tn7 transposition and explains the requirement for tnsC function in Tn7 transposition. We have found that TnsC binds adenine nucleotides and is thus a likely site of action of the essential ATP cofactor in Tn7 transposition. We also report that TnsC binds non-specifically to DNA in the presence of ATP or the generally non-hydrolyzable analogues AMP-PNP and ATP-gamma-S, and that TnsC displays little affinity for DNA in the presence of ADP. We speculate that TnsC plays a central role in the selection of target DNA during Tn7 transposition. Images PMID:1317955

  9. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  10. Role of the c subunit of the FO ATP synthase in mitochondrial permeability transition

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Massimo; Bononi, Angela; De Marchi, Elena; Giorgi, Carlotta; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Marchi, Saverio; Patergnani, Simone; Rimessi, Alessandro; Suski, Jan M.; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pinton, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The term “mitochondrial permeability transition” (MPT) refers to an abrupt increase in the permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane to low molecular weight solutes. Due to osmotic forces, MPT is paralleled by a massive influx of water into the mitochondrial matrix, eventually leading to the structural collapse of the organelle. Thus, MPT can initiate mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), promoting the activation of the apoptotic caspase cascade as well as of caspase-independent cell death mechanisms. MPT appears to be mediated by the opening of the so-called “permeability transition pore complex” (PTPC), a poorly characterized and versatile supramolecular entity assembled at the junctions between the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. In spite of considerable experimental efforts, the precise molecular composition of the PTPC remains obscure and only one of its constituents, cyclophilin D (CYPD), has been ascribed with a crucial role in the regulation of cell death. Conversely, the results of genetic experiments indicate that other major components of the PTPC, such as voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), are dispensable for MPT-driven MOMP. Here, we demonstrate that the c subunit of the FO ATP synthase is required for MPT, mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death as induced by cytosolic calcium overload and oxidative stress in both glycolytic and respiratory cell models. Our results strongly suggest that, similar to CYPD, the c subunit of the FO ATP synthase constitutes a critical component of the PTPC. PMID:23343770

  11. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  12. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  13. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2016-08-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues-mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations-to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377720

  14. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  15. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  16. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation. PMID:26986520

  17. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  18. The nucleotide sequence of the uvrD gene of E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, P W; Emmerson, P T

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned section of the E. coli chromosome containing the uvrD gene has been determined. The coding region for the UvrD protein consists of 2,160 nucleotides which would direct the synthesis of a polypeptide 720 amino acids long with a calculated molecular weight of 82 kd. The predicted amino acid sequence of the UvrD protein has been compared with the amino acid sequences of other known adenine nucleotide binding proteins and a common sequence has been identified, thought to contribute towards adenine nucleotide binding. PMID:6379604

  19. Inhibition of ATP Synthase by Chlorinated Adenosine Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisa S.; Nowak, Billie J.; Ayres, Mary L.; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.; Zhang, Shuxing; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    8-Chloroadenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribonucleoside analogue that is currently in clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Based on the decline in cellular ATP pool following 8-Cl-Ado treatment, we hypothesized that 8-Cl-ADP and 8-Cl-ATP may interfere with ATP synthase, a key enzyme in ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is composed of two major parts; FO intermembrane base and F1 domain, containing α and β subunits. Crystal structures of both α and β subunits that bind to the substrate, ADP, are known in tight binding (αdpβdp) and loose binding (αtpβtp) states. Molecular docking demonstrated that 8-Cl-ADP/8-Cl-ATP occupied similar binding modes as ADP/ATP in the tight and loose binding sites of ATP synthase, respectively, suggesting that the chlorinated nucleotide metabolites may be functional substrates and inhibitors of the enzyme. The computational predictions were consistent with our whole cell biochemical results. Oligomycin, an established pharmacological inhibitor of ATP synthase, decreased both ATP and 8-Cl-ATP formation from exogenous substrates, however, did not affect pyrimidine nucleoside analogue triphosphate accumulation. Synthesis of ATP from ADP was inhibited in cells loaded with 8-Cl-ATP. These biochemical studies are in consent with the computational modeling; in the αtpβtp state 8-Cl-ATP occupies similar binding as ANP, a non-hydrolyzable ATP mimic that is a known inhibitor. Similarly, in the substrate binding site (αdpβdp) 8-Cl-ATP occupies a similar position as ATP mimic ADP-BeF3 −. Collectively, our current work suggests that 8-Cl-ADP may serve as a substrate and the 8-Cl-ATP may be an inhibitor of ATP synthase. PMID:19477165

  20. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bjaelde, Randi G.; Arnadottir, Sigrid S.; Overgaard, Morten T.; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2013-01-01

    Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30), which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1) cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin) reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%)-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1) and vesicular transport (nocodazole). These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ~90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP) or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50%) or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8 and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells. PMID:24065923

  1. Inhibition of erythrocyte plasma membrane NADH dehydrogenase by nucleotides and uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Howland, J L; Osrin, D; Donatelli, M; Theofrastous, J P

    1984-12-19

    Erythrocyte ghost NADH dehydrogenase is inhibited in a competitive fashion by ATP and ADP whereas other nucleoside di- and triphosphates, cyclic nucleosides, as well as non-phosphorylating ATP analogs are relatively ineffective. In addition, this enzyme, measured with ferricyanide as electron acceptor, is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (proton-conducting reagents), the inhibition being competitive in character (i.e., the uncouplers were without influence upon maximum velocity). The effectiveness of the uncouplers was in the order of their hydrophobic character with the presence of the alkyl side chain rendering nonyl-dinitrophenol much more active than 2,6-dinitrophenol itself. Hydrophobic compounds that are not protonophores (e.g., eosin, proflavin or valinomycin) were not inhibitory. Whereas adenine nucleotides probably inhibit NADH oxidation competitively through structural similarity with the substrate, it appears unlikely that uncouplers compete at the NADH site directly. Rather, the apparently-competitive inhibition in the latter case may reflect competition for proton transfer to an acceptor residing in a hydrophobic region of the enzyme complex. PMID:6509043

  2. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion. PMID:26536353

  3. Comparative structural analysis of eubacterial 5S rRNA by oxidation of adenines in the N-1 position.

    PubMed Central

    Pieler, T; Schreiber, A; Erdmann, V A

    1984-01-01

    Adenines in free 5S rRNA from Escherichia coli, Bacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus have been oxidized at their N-1 position using monoperphthalic acid. The determination of the number of adenine 1-N-oxides was on the basis of UV spectroscopic data of the intact molecule. Identification of the most readily accessible nucleotides by sequencing gel analysis reveals that they are located in conserved positions within loops, exposed hairpin loops and single-base bulge loops. Implications for the structure and function of 5S rRNA will be discussed on the basis of this comparative analysis. Images PMID:6201825

  4. The Levels of Soluble Nucleotides in Wheat Aleurone Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, G. G.; Jenner, C. F.; Paleg, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    The content of soluble nucleotides in aleurone layers isolated from mature wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Olympic) grain was investigated. The most abundant nucleotides were adenosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate, and uridine diphosphoglucose. Smaller amounts of guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were also identified. The levels of some of these nucleotides were increased after incubation of the tissue under certain conditions. Nucleotide levels were measured at intervals during incubation of aleurone layers in water. The changes observed are discussed in relation to a response by the tissue to wounding. PMID:16657969

  5. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°ref=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pHin or pHout) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F0 to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F1, is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase. PMID:26940516

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  7. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  8. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  9. sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF sub 1 ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, C.C.; Grisham, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their complexes with Mn{sup 2+} bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF{sub 1} ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn{sup 2+}-CF{sub 1} complexes with ATP, ADP, P{sub i}, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ATP, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ADP, and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF{sub 1} by Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF{sub 1} and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn{sup 2+} site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the {beta}-P and {gamma}-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn{sup 2+} to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  10. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-12-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine. PMID:27075339

  11. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  12. Binding of ATP by pertussis toxin and isolated toxin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, S.Z.; Manclark, C.R.; Burns, D.L. )

    1990-07-03

    The binding of ATP to pertussis toxin and its components, the A subunit and B oligomer, was investigated. Whereas, radiolabeled ATP bound to the B oligomer and pertussis toxin, no binding to the A subunit was observed. The binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin and the B oligomer was inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides was shown to be ATP > GTP > CTP > TTP for pertussis toxin and ATP > GTP > TTP > CTP for the B oligomer. Phosphate ions inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin in a competitive manner; however, the presence of phosphate ions was essential for binding of ATP to the B oligomer. The toxin substrate, NAD, did not affect the binding of ({sup 3}H)ATP to pertussis toxin, although the glycoprotein fetuin significantly decreased binding. These results suggest that the binding site for ATP is located on the B oligomer and is distinct from the enzymatically active site but may be located near the eukaryotic receptor binding site.

  13. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone. PMID:27133024

  14. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  15. Metabolic fate of 14C-labelled nicotinamide and adenine in germinating propagules of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the metabolic fate of [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide and [8-(14)C]adenine in segments taken from young and developing leaves, stem, hypocotyls, and roots of a shoot-root type emerging propagule of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Thin-layer chromatography was used together with a bioimaging analyser system. During 4 h of incubation, incorporation of radioactivity from [carbonyl-14C]nicotinamide into NAD and trigonelline was found in all parts of the propagules; the highest incorporation rates into NAD and trigonelline were found in newly emerged stem and young leaves, respectively. Radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine was distributed mainly in the salvage products (adenine nucleotides and RNA), and incorporation was less in catabolites (allantoin, allantoic acid, and CO2). Adenine salvage activity was higher in young leaves and stem than in hypocotyls and roots. Over a short time, the effect of 500 mM NaCl on nicotinamide and adenine metabolism indicated that NaCl inhibits both salvage and degradation activities in roots. PMID:22888538

  16. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  17. Increased Intracellular [dATP] Enhances Cardiac Contraction in Embryonic Chick Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schoffstall, Brenda; Chase, P. Bryant

    2016-01-01

    Although ATP is the physiological substrate for cardiac contraction, cardiac contractility is significantly enhanced in vitro when only 10% of ATP substrate is replaced with 2’-deoxy-ATP (dATP). To determine the functional effects of increased intracellular [dATP] ([dATP]i) within living cardiac cells, we used hypertonic loading with varying exogenous dATP/ATP ratios, but constant total nucleotide concentration, to elevate [dATP]i in contractile monolayers of embryonic chick cardiomyocytes. The increase in [dATP]i was estimated from dilution of dye added in parallel with dATP. Cell viability, average contractile amplitude, rates of contraction/relaxation, spontaneous beat frequency, and Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics were examined. At total [dATP]i above ~70 μM, spontaneous contractions ceased, and above ~100 μM [dATP]i, membrane blebbing was also observed, consistent with apoptosis. Interestingly, [dATP]i of ~60 μM (~40% increase over basal [dATP]i levels) enhanced both amplitude of contraction and the rates of contraction and relaxation without affecting beat frequency. With total [dATP]i of ~60 μM or less, we found no significant change in Ca2+ transients. These data indicate that there is an “optimal” concentration of exogenously loaded [dATP]i that under controlled conditions can enhance contractility in living cardiomyocytes without affecting beat frequency or Ca2+ transients. PMID:18452163

  18. Interaction of Human DNA Polymerase α and DNA Polymerase I from Bacillus stearothermophilus with Hypoxanthine and 8-Oxoguanine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Jennifer N.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how DNA polymerases interact with mutagenic bases, we examined how human DNA polymerase α (pol α), a B family enzyme, and DNA polymerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BF), an A family enzyme, generate adenine:hypoxanthine and adenine:8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) base pairs. Pol α strongly discriminated against polymerizing dATP opposite 8-oxoG, and removing N1, N6, or N7 further inhibited incorporation, whereas removing N3 from dATP dramatically increased incorporation (32-fold). Eliminating N6 from 3-deaza-dATP now greatly reduced incorporation, suggesting that incorporation of dATP (analogues) opposite 8-oxoguanine proceeds via a Hoogsteen base-pair and that pol α uses N3 of a purine dNTP to block this incorporation. Pol α also polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP across from a templating A, and removing N6 from the template adenine inhibited incorporation of 8-oxoG. The effects of N1, N6, and N7 demonstrated a strong interdependence during formation of adenine:hypoxanthine base-pairs by pol α and N3 of dATP again helps prevent polymerization opposite a templating hypoxanthine. BF very efficiently polymerized 8-oxo-dGTP opposite adenine, and N1 and N7 of adenine appear to play important roles. BF incorporates dATP opposite 8-oxoG less efficiently, and modifying N1, N6, or N7 greatly inhibits incorporation. N6, and to a lesser extent N1, help drive hypoxanthine:adenine base pair formation by BF. The mechanistic implications of these results showing that different polymerases interact very differently with base lesions are discussed. PMID:19642651

  19. ATP metabolism in rat liver chronically treated with ethanol and high fat

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; French, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Five pairs of Wistar male rats weighing about 350 g were continuously infused with a liquid diet in which 25-35% of total calories was derived from fat, plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose through gastrostomy cannulas for 3 wks to 3.5 mos. Mean ethanol intake was 12.9 +/- 0.7 g/kg B.W. (55% of total calories). High blood alcohol levels (BAL, 342 +/- 151 mg/dl) were maintained. The liver showed severe steatosis (4+) in all the ethanol-fed rats (ER). Two had mild focal mononuclear cell infiltration, one had mild fibrosis and one had spotty necrosis. Mild steatosis (1+) was seen in 4 out of 5 pair-fed control rats (CR). Serum ALT was significantly higher in ER (129 +/- 44 U) compared with Cr (59 +/- 30 U) or rats fed chow ad lib (NR) (48 +/- 26 U). Biopsied liver tissue was used to measure the concentration of adenine nucleotides by HPLC (6 pairs). There was a significant decrease of ATP in ER (1.7 +/- 0.3 ..mu..mol/g liver) as compared to CR (2.5 +/- 0.5 ..mu..mol/g) or NR (2.8 +/- 0.2 ..mu..mol/g, n = 6). There was no significant change in the ADP or AMP content, however. The total adenylate pool of the liver was also significantly reduced in ER when compared to that of CR or NR (3.2 +/- 0.4, 4.0 +/- 0.5 and 4.3 +/- 0.2 ..mu..mol/g liver, respectively). Adeynlate energy charge (E.C.) of the ER livers (0.71 +/- 0.05) was significantly reduced compared to NR (0.77 +/- 0.02) but not with CR (0.75 +/- 0.06). The results indicate that ethanol decreases the level of ATP as well as the biological mechanism to compensate for the lowered level.

  20. Sal1p, a calcium-dependent carrier protein that suppresses an essential cellular function associated With the Aac2 isoform of ADP/ATP translocase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin Jie

    2004-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (Ant) catalyzes ADP/ATP exchange between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix. It is also proposed to form or regulate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, a megachannel of high conductancy on the mitochondrial membranes. Eukaryotic genomes generally contain multiple isoforms of Ant. In this study, it is shown that the Ant isoforms are functionally differentiated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the three yeast Ant proteins can equally support respiration (the R function), Aac2p and Aac3p, but not Aac1p, have an additional physiological function essential for cell viability (the V function). The loss of V function in aac2 mutants leads to a lethal phenotype under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The lethality is suppressed by a strain-polymorphic locus, named SAL1 (for Suppressor of aac2 lethality). SAL1 was identified to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein of the mitochondrial carrier family. Notably, the Sal1 protein was shown to bind calcium through two EF-hand motifs located on its amino terminus. Calcium binding is essential for the suppressor activity. Finally, Sal1p is not required for oxidative phosphorylation and its overexpression does not complement the R(-) phenotype of aac2 mutants. On the basis of these observations, it is proposed that Aac2p and Sal1p may define two parallel pathways that transport a nucleotide substrate in an operational mode distinct from ADP/ATP exchange. PMID:15238515

  1. Excimer states in microhydrated adenine clusters.

    PubMed

    Smith, V R; Samoylova, E; Ritze, H-H; Radloff, W; Schultz, T

    2010-09-01

    We present femtosecond pump-probe mass and photoelectron spectra for adenine (A) and microhydrated A(m)(H(2)O)(n) clusters. Three distinct relaxation processes of photoexcited electronic states were distinguished: in unhydrated A, relaxation of the optically bright pipi* state occurred via the dark npi* state with respective lifetimes of <0.1 and 1.3 ps. In microhydrated clusters A(H(2)O)(n), relaxation via the npi* state is quenched by a faster relaxation process, probably involving pisigma* states. For the predominantly hydrogen-bonded adenine dimer (A(2)), excited state relaxation is dominated by monomer-like processes. When the adenine dimer is clustered with several water molecules, we observe a nanosecond lifetime from excimer states in pi-stacked clusters. From the electron spectra we estimate adiabatic ionization potentials of 8.32 eV (A), 8.27 eV (A(H(2)O)(1)), 8.19 eV (A(H(2)O)(2)), 8.10 eV (A(H(2)O)(3)), 8.18 eV (A(2)), and 8.0 eV (A(2)(H(2)O)(3-5)). PMID:20556283

  2. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  3. ATP transport in saccular cerebral aneurysms at arterial bends.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yohsuke; Sato, Kodai; Ishikawa, Takuji; Comerford, Andrew; David, Tim; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2010-03-01

    ATP acts as an extracellular signaling molecule in purinergic signaling that regulates vascular tone. ATP binds purinergic P2 nucleotide receptors on endothelial cells. Understanding the mass transport of ATP to endothelial cells by blood flow is thus important to predict functional changes in aneurysmal walls. While some clinical observations indicate a difference of wall pathology between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, no study has focused on the mass transport in aneurysms. We investigated the characteristics of ATP concentration at aneurysmal wall using a numerical model of ATP transport in aneurysms formed at arterial bends. The magnitude of ATP concentration at the aneurysmal wall was significantly smaller than that at the arterial wall. In particular, significantly low concentration was predicted at the proximal side of the aneurysmal sac. A strong correlation was revealed between the inflow flux at the aneurysmal neck and the resultant concentration at the aneurysmal wall. PMID:20012692

  4. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  5. Fluorescent xDNA nucleotides as efficient substrates for a template-independent polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K.; Krueger, Andrew T.; Liu, Haibo; Gao, Jianmin; Kool, Eric T.

    2011-01-01

    Template independent polymerases, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) in particular, have been widely used in enzymatic labeling of DNA 3′-ends, yielding fluorescently-labeled polymers. The majority of fluorescent nucleotides used as TdT substrates contain tethered fluorophores attached to a natural nucleotide, and can be hindered by undesired fluorescence characteristics such as self-quenching. We previously documented the inherent fluorescence of a set of four benzo-expanded deoxynucleoside analogs (xDNA) that maintain Watson–Crick base pairing and base stacking ability; however, their substrate abilities for standard template-dependent polymerases were hampered by their large size. However, it seemed possible that a template-independent enzyme, due to lowered geometric constraints, might be less restrictive of nucleobase size. Here, we report the synthesis and study of xDNA nucleoside triphosphates, and studies of their substrate abilities with TdT. We find that this polymerase can incorporate each of the four xDNA monomers with kinetic efficiencies that are nearly the same as those of natural nucleotides, as measured by steady-state methods. As many as 30 consecutive monomers could be incorporated. Fluorescence changes over time could be observed in solution during the enzymatic incorporation of expanded adenine (dxATP) and cytosine (dxCTP) analogs, and after incorporation, when attached to a glass solid support. For (dxA)n polymers, monomer emission quenching and long-wavelength excimer emission was observed. For (dxC)n, fluorescence enhancement was observed in the polymer. TdT-mediated synthesis may be a useful approach for creating xDNA labels or tags on DNA, making use of the fluorescence and strong hybridization properties of the xDNA. PMID:20947563

  6. Pyruvate kinase and the "high ATP syndrome".

    PubMed Central

    Staal, G E; Jansen, G; Roos, D

    1984-01-01

    The erythrocytes of a patient with the so-called "high ATP syndrome" were characterized by a high ATP content and low 2,3-diphosphoglycerate level. The pyruvate kinase activity was specifically increased (about twice the normal level). After separation of the erythrocytes according to age by discontinuous Percoll density centrifugation, the pyruvate kinase activity was found to be increased in all Percoll fractions. Pyruvate kinase of the patient's cells was characterized by a decreased K0.5 for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate and no inhibition by ATP. The Michaelis constant (Km) value for ADP, the nucleotide specificity, the thermostability, pH optimum, and immunological specific activity were normal. It is concluded that the high pyruvate kinase activity is due to a shift in the R(elaxed) in equilibrium T(ight) equilibrium to the R(elaxed) form. PMID:6736249

  7. The Cellular Environment Stabilizes Adenine Riboswitch RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Jillian; McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    There are large differences between the intracellular environment and the conditions widely used to study RNA structure and function in vitro. To assess the effects of the crowded cellular environment on RNA, we examined the structure and ligand-binding function of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain in healthy, growing Escherichia coli cells at single-nucleotide resolution on the minute timescale using SHAPE. The ligand-bound aptamer structure is essentially the same in cells and in buffer at 1 mM Mg2+, the approximate Mg2+ concentration we measured in cells. In contrast, the in-cell conformation of the ligand-free aptamer is much more similar to the fully folded ligand-bound state. Even adding high Mg2+ concentrations to the buffer used for in vitro analyses did not yield the conformation observed for the free aptamer in cells. The cellular environment thus stabilizes the aptamer significantly more than does Mg2+ alone. Our results show that the intracellular environment has a large effect on RNA structure that ultimately favors highly organized conformations. PMID:24215455

  8. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  9. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp. PMID:27006518

  10. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp. PMID:27006518

  11. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  12. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  13. ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) adenylate kinase cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at separate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Elcock, Adrian H; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-09-20

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP &lrarr2; 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  14. Properties of the manganese(II) binding site in ternary complexes of Mnter dot ADP and Mnter dot ATP with chloroplast coupling factor 1: Magnetic field dependence of solvent sup 1 H and sup 2 H NMR relaxation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, A.E.; Frasch, W.D.; Sharp, R.R. )

    1989-05-02

    The influence of the binding of ADP and ATP on the high-affinity Mn(II) binding site of chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF{sub 1}) was studied by analysis of field-dependent solvent proton and deuteron spin-lattice relaxation data. In order to characterize metal-nucleotide complexes of CF{sub 1} under conditions similar to those of the NMR experiments, the enzyme was analyzed for bound nucleotides and Mn(II) after incubation with AdN and MnCl{sub 2} and removal of labile ligands by extensive gel filtration chromatography. In the field-dependent NMR experiments, the Mn(II) binding site of CF{sub 1} was studied for three mole ratios of added Mn(II) to CF{sub 1}, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5, in the presence of an excess of either ADP or ATP. The results were extrapolated to zero Mn(II) concentration to characterize the environment of the first Mn(II) binding site of Cf{sub 1}. In the presence of both adenine nucleotides, pronounced changes in the Mn(II) environment relative to that in Mn(II)-CF{sub 1} were evident; the local relaxation rate maxima were more pronounced and shifted to higher field strengths, and the relaxation rate per bound Mn(II) increased at all field strengths. Analysis of the data revealed that the number of exchangeable water molecules liganded to bound Mn(II) increased from one in the binary Mn(II)-CF{sub 1} complex to three and two in the ternary Mn(II)-ADP-CF{sub 1} and Mn(II)-ATP-CF{sub 1} complexes, respectively; these results suggest that a water ligand to bound Mn(II) in the Mn(II)-ADP-CF{sub 1} complex is replaced by the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP in the Mn(II)-ATP-CF{sub 1} complex. A binding model is presented to account for these observations.

  15. In vitro selection of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Meli, Marc; Vergne, Jacques; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2003-03-14

    Adenine-dependent hairpin ribozymes were isolated by in vitro selection from a degenerated hairpin ribozyme population. Two new adenine-dependent ribozymes catalyze their own reversible cleavage in the presence of free adenine. Both aptamers have Mg(2+) requirements for adenine-assisted cleavage similar to the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. Cleavage kinetics studies in the presence of various other small molecules were compared. The data suggest that adenine does not induce RNA self-cleavage in the same manner for both aptamers. In addition, investigations of pH effects on catalytic rates show that both adenine-dependent aptamers are more active in basic conditions, suggesting that they use new acid/base catalytic strategies in which adenine could be involved directly. The discovery of hairpin ribozymes dependent on adenine for their reversible self-cleavage presents considerable biochemical and evolutionary interests because we show that RNA is able to use exogenous reactive molecules to enhance its own catalytic activity. Such a mechanism may have been a means by which the ribozymes of the RNA world enlarged their chemical repertoire. PMID:12519767

  16. Reinterpreting the action of ATP analogs on K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, David; Gossack, Lindsay; Quast, Ulrich; Bryan, Joseph

    2013-06-28

    Neuroendocrine-type K(ATP) channels, (SUR1/Kir6.2)4, couple the transmembrane flux of K(+), and thus membrane potential, with cellular metabolism in various cell types including insulin-secreting β-cells. Mutant channels with reduced activity are a cause of congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas hyperactive channels are a cause of neonatal diabetes. A current regulatory model proposes that ATP hydrolysis is required to switch SUR1 into post-hydrolytic conformations able to antagonize the inhibitory action of nucleotide binding at the Kir6.2 pore, thus coupling enzymatic and channel activities. Alterations in SUR1 ATPase activity are proposed to contribute to neonatal diabetes and type 2 diabetes risk. The regulatory model is partly based on the reduced ability of ATP analogs such as adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) and adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPγS) to stimulate channel activity, presumably by reducing hydrolysis. This study uses a substitution at the catalytic glutamate, SUR(1E1507Q), with a significantly increased affinity for ATP, to probe the action of these ATP analogs on conformational switching. ATPγS, a slowly hydrolyzable analog, switches SUR1 conformations, albeit with reduced affinity. Nonhydrolyzable AMP-PNP and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-methylenetriphosphate) (AMP-PCP) alone fail to switch SUR1, but do reverse ATP-induced switching. AMP-PCP displaces 8-azido-[(32)P]ATP from the noncanonical NBD1 of SUR1. This is consistent with structural data on an asymmetric bacterial ABC protein that shows that AMP-PNP binds selectively to the noncanonical NBD to prevent conformational switching. The results imply that MgAMP-PNP and MgAMP-PCP (AMP-PxP) fail to activate K(ATP) channels because they do not support NBD dimerization and conformational switching, rather than by limiting enzymatic activity. PMID:23665564

  17. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  18. Sites of adsorption of adenine, uracil, and their corresponding derivatives on sodium montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Perezgasga, L; Serrato-Díaz, A; Negrón-Mendoza, A; De Pablo Galán, L; Mosqueira, F G

    2005-04-01

    Clay minerals are considered important to chemical evolution processes due to their properties, ancient origin, and wide distribution. To extend the knowledge of their role in the prebiotic epoch, the adsorption sites of adenine, adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP, Poly A, uracil, uridine, UMP, UDP, UTP and Poly U on sodium montmorillonite are investigated. X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy studies indicate that these molecules distribute into the interlamellar channel and the edge of the clay crystals. Monomers are adsorbed predominantly in the interlamellar channel, whereas polymers adsorb along the crystal edges. Such behavior is discussed mainly in terms of bulk pH, pK(a) of the adsorbate, and Van der Waals interactions. PMID:16010992

  19. The Effect of ATP on the Photoconversion of Protochlorophyllide in Isolated Etioplasts of Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Peter; Leech, Rachel M.

    1975-01-01

    The transformation of protochlorophyllide (PChle) into chlorophyllide (Chle) has been studied in isolated etioplasts from Zea mays. ATP (1.5mm) prevented the transformation of photoconvertible PChle 650 to PChle 630 in aged etioplasts. Curve analysis indicated that the ATP effect on photoconvertibility could be entirely accounted for by changes in the proportions of PChle 630 and PChle 650 and examination of the isolated pigments revealed that only unphytylated PChle could be activated for photoconversion by ATP. In etioplasts aged for 5 hours, ATP also stimulated photoconversion of PChle 630 into Chle 670. The process was temperature-sensitive and involved PChle 650 and Chle 680 as intermediates. AMP alone had no effect, but inhibited ATP retardation of PChle loss. ADP had a similar but lesser effect than ATP. The ADP response, but not the ATP response, was considerably enhanced in the presence of an ATP-generating system (phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate kinase). UTP, GTP, and CTP gave 40 to 50% of the ATP response with intact etioplasts. In envelope-free etioplasts, ATP gave the greatest response but the other nucleotides were now 80% as effective as ATP. After primary photoconversion, ATP stimulated resynthesis of PChle 650. It is proposed that ATP both gives the holochrome the ability to bind to the PChle molecule and enables additional association of the pigment-protein complex to form PChle 650. PMID:16659239

  20. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fasullo, Michael; Endres, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases. PMID:25923076

  1. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed. PMID:26547179

  2. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  3. Mechanism of G551D-CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) potentiation by a high affinity ATP analog.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2008-02-29

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its nucleotide binding domains (NBD). The NBDs dimerize in a head-to-tail configuration, forming two ATP binding pockets (ABP) with the ATP molecules buried at the dimer interface. Previous studies have indicated that ABP2, formed by the Walker A and B motifs of NBD2 and the signature sequence of NBD1, is the site critical for the ATP-dependent opening of CFTR. The G551D mutation in ABP2, the third most common cystic fibrosis-associated mutation, abolishes ATP-dependent gating, resulting in an open probability that is approximately 100-fold lower than that of wild-type channels. Interestingly, we found that the ATP analog N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) increases G551D currents mainly by increasing the open time of the channel. This effect is reduced when P-ATP is applied together with ATP, suggesting a competition between ATP and P-ATP for a common binding site. Introducing mutations that lower the nucleotide binding affinity at ABP2 did not alter significantly the effects of P-ATP on G551D-CFTR, whereas an equivalent mutation at ABP1 (consisting of the Walker A and B motifs of NBD1 and the signature sequence of NBD2) dramatically decreased the potency of P-ATP, indicating that ABP1 is the site where P-ATP binds to increase the activity of G551D-CFTR. These results substantiate the idea that nucleotide binding at ABP1 stabilizes the open channel conformation. Our observation that P-ATP enhances the G551D activity by binding at ABP1 implicates that ABP1 can potentially be a target for drugs to bind and increase the channel activity. PMID:18167357

  4. Regulation of CFTR Cl- channel gating by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ikuma, M; Welsh, M J

    2000-07-18

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains (NBD). Although ATP hydrolysis by the NBDs is required for normal gating, the influence of ATP binding versus hydrolysis on specific steps in the gating cycle remains uncertain. Earlier work showed that the absence of Mg(2+) prevents hydrolysis. We found that even in the absence of Mg(2+), ATP could support channel activity, albeit at a reduced level compared with the presence of Mg(2+). Application of ATP with a divalent cation, including the poorly hydrolyzed CaATP complex, increased the rate of opening. Moreover, in CFTR variants with mutations that disrupt hydrolysis, ATP alone opened the channel and Mg(2+) further enhanced ATP-dependent opening. These data suggest that ATP alone can open the channel and that divalent cations increase ATP binding. Consistent with this conclusion, when we mutated an aspartate thought to bind Mg(2+), divalent cations failed to increase activity compared with ATP alone. Two observations suggested that divalent cations also stabilize the open state. In wild-type CFTR, CaATP generated a long duration open state, whereas ATP alone did not. With a CFTR variant in which hydrolysis was disrupted, MgATP, but not ATP alone, produced long openings. These results suggest a gating cycle for CFTR in which ATP binding opens the channel and either hydrolysis or dissociation leads to channel closure. In addition, the data suggest that ATP binding and hydrolysis by either NBD can gate the channel. PMID:10880569

  5. Regulation of CFTR Cl− channel gating by ATP binding and hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains (NBD). Although ATP hydrolysis by the NBDs is required for normal gating, the influence of ATP binding versus hydrolysis on specific steps in the gating cycle remains uncertain. Earlier work showed that the absence of Mg2+ prevents hydrolysis. We found that even in the absence of Mg2+, ATP could support channel activity, albeit at a reduced level compared with the presence of Mg2+. Application of ATP with a divalent cation, including the poorly hydrolyzed CaATP complex, increased the rate of opening. Moreover, in CFTR variants with mutations that disrupt hydrolysis, ATP alone opened the channel and Mg2+ further enhanced ATP-dependent opening. These data suggest that ATP alone can open the channel and that divalent cations increase ATP binding. Consistent with this conclusion, when we mutated an aspartate thought to bind Mg2+, divalent cations failed to increase activity compared with ATP alone. Two observations suggested that divalent cations also stabilize the open state. In wild-type CFTR, CaATP generated a long duration open state, whereas ATP alone did not. With a CFTR variant in which hydrolysis was disrupted, MgATP, but not ATP alone, produced long openings. These results suggest a gating cycle for CFTR in which ATP binding opens the channel and either hydrolysis or dissociation leads to channel closure. In addition, the data suggest that ATP binding and hydrolysis by either NBD can gate the channel. PMID:10880569

  6. Nucleotide-dependent displacement and dynamics of the α-1 helix in kinesin revealed by site-directed spin labeling EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Yanagi, Takanori; Yamada, Masafumi D.; Ueki, Shoji; Maruta, Shinsaku; Inoue, Akio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Dipolar EPR detects the distance between the spin-labeled kinesin α-1 and α-2 helices. •The distance has at least two populations: 1.5 nm (in crystal form: 20%) and >2.5 nm. •The short distance conformer was populated 40% in the apo state with microtubules. •ATP analog or ADP binding caused the 1.5 nm distance to be less populated (∼20%). •The α-1 helix moves closer to the neck-linker (away from α-2) to facilitate docking. -- Abstract: In kinesin X-ray crystal structures, the N-terminal region of the α-1 helix is adjacent to the adenine ring of the bound nucleotide, while the C-terminal region of the helix is near the neck-linker (NL). Here, we monitor the displacement of the α-1 helix within a kinesin monomer bound to microtubules (MTs) in the presence or absence of nucleotides using site-directed spin labeling EPR. Kinesin was doubly spin-labeled at the α-1 and α-2 helices, and the resulting EPR spectrum showed dipolar broadening. The inter-helix distance distribution showed that 20% of the spins have a peak characteristic of 1.4–1.7 nm separation, which is similar to what is predicted from the X-ray crystal structure, albeit 80% were beyond the sensitivity limit (>2.5 nm) of the method. Upon MT binding, the fraction of kinesin exhibiting an inter-helix distance of 1.4–1.7 nm in the presence of AMPPNP (a non-hydrolysable ATP analog) and ADP was 20% and 25%, respectively. In the absence of nucleotide, this fraction increased to 40–50%. These nucleotide-induced changes in the fraction of kinesin undergoing displacement of the α-1 helix were found to be related to the fraction in which the NL undocked from the motor core. It is therefore suggested that a shift in the α-1 helix conformational equilibrium occurs upon nucleotide binding and release, and this shift controls NL docking onto the motor core.

  7. Differential interactions of nucleotides at the two nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, L; Mengos, A; Chang, X; Aleksandrov, A; Riordan, J R

    2001-04-20

    After phosphorylation by protein kinase A, gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Models of this gating regulation have proposed that ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and NBD2 may drive channel opening and closing, respectively (reviewed in Nagel, G. (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1461, 263-274). However, as yet there has been little biochemical confirmation of the predictions of these models. We have employed photoaffinity labeling with 8-azido-ATP, which supports channel gating as effectively as ATP to evaluate interactions with each NBD in intact membrane-bound CFTR. Mutagenesis of Walker A lysine residues crucial for azido-ATP hydrolysis to generate the azido-ADP that is trapped by vanadate indicated a greater role of NBD1 than NBD2. Separation of the domains by limited trypsin digestion and enrichment by immunoprecipitation confirmed greater and more stable nucleotide trapping at NBD1. This asymmetry of the two domains in interactions with nucleotides was reflected most emphatically in the response to the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), which in the gating models was proposed to bind with high affinity to NBD2 causing inhibition of ATP hydrolysis there postulated to drive channel closing. Instead we found a strong competitive inhibition of nucleotide hydrolysis and trapping at NBD1 and a simultaneous enhancement at NBD2. This argues strongly that AMP-PNP does not inhibit ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 and thereby questions the relevance of hydrolysis at that domain to channel closing. PMID:11279083

  8. Subtype-specific control of P2X receptor channel signaling by ATP and Mg2+

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mufeng; Silberberg, Shai D.; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2013-01-01

    The identity and forms of activating ligands for ion channels are fundamental to their physiological roles in rapid electrical signaling. P2X receptor channels are ATP-activated cation channels that serve important roles in sensory signaling and inflammation, yet the active forms of the nucleotide are unknown. In physiological solutions, ATP is ionized and primarily found in complex with Mg2+. Here we investigated the active forms of ATP and found that the action of MgATP2− and ATP4− differs between subtypes of P2X receptors. The slowly desensitizing P2X2 receptor can be activated by free ATP, but MgATP2− promotes opening with very low efficacy. In contrast, both free ATP and MgATP2− robustly open the rapidly desensitizing P2X3 subtype. A further distinction between these two subtypes is the ability of Mg2+ to regulate P2X3 through a distinct allosteric mechanism. Importantly, heteromeric P2X2/3 channels present in sensory neurons exhibit a hybrid phenotype, characterized by robust activation by MgATP2− and weak regulation by Mg2+. These results reveal the existence of two classes of homomeric P2X receptors with differential sensitivity to MgATP2− and regulation by Mg2+, and demonstrate that both restraining mechanisms can be disengaged in heteromeric channels to form fast and sensitive ATP signaling pathways in sensory neurons. PMID:23959888

  9. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'→5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  10. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) mitochondrial ATP synthase ATP5G1.

    PubMed

    Hou, W-R; Hou, Y-L; Ding, X; Wang, T

    2012-01-01

    The ATP5G1 gene is one of the three genes that encode mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c of the proton channel. We cloned the cDNA and determined the genomic sequence of the ATP5G1 gene from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cloned cDNA fragment contains an open reading frame of 411 bp encoding 136 amino acids; the length of the genomic sequence is of 1838 bp, containing three exons and two introns. Alignment analysis revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced protein sequence are highly conserved compared to Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos taurus, and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of the giant panda ATP5G1 to those of these species are 93.92, 92.21, 92.46, 93.67, and 92.46%, respectively, and the homologies for amino acid sequences are 90.44, 95.59, 93.38, 94.12, and 91.91%, respectively. Topology prediction showed that there is one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, five N-myristoylation sites, and one ATP synthase c subunit signature in the ATP5G1 protein of the giant panda. The cDNA of ATP5G1 was transfected into Escherichia coli, and the ATP5G1 fused with the N-terminally GST-tagged protein gave rise to accumulation of an expected 40-kDa polypeptide, which had the characteristics of the predicted protein. PMID:23007995

  11. Raw coffee based dietary supplements contain carboxyatractyligenin derivatives inhibiting mitochondrial adenine-nucleotide-translocase.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Fromme, Tobias; Beusch, Anja; Lang, Tatjana; Klingenspor, Martin; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Capsules, powders and tablets containing raw coffee extract are advertised to the consumer as antioxidant rich dietary supplements as part of a healthy diet. We isolated carboxyatractyligenin (4), 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin (6) and 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside (8) from green coffee and found strong inhibitory effects on phosphorylating respiration in isolated mitochondria similar to the effects of the known phytotoxin carboxyatractyloside. LC-MS/MS analysis of commercial green coffee based dietary supplements revealed the occurrence of carboxyatractyligenin, 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin in concentrations up to 4.0, 5.7, and 41.6μmol/g, respectively. These data might help to gain first insight into potential physiological side-effects of green coffee containing dietary supplement. PMID:24863614

  12. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  13. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  14. Production and characterization of reduced NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Thuring, Jan W; Conway, Stuart J; Packman, Len; Holmes, Andrew B; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide NAADP (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate) has been shown to act as a Ca2+-releasing intracellular messenger in a wide variety of systems from invertebrates to mammals and has been implicated in a number of cellular processes. NAADP is structurally very similar to its precursor, the endogenous coenzyme NADP and while much is known about the reduced form of NADP, NADPH, it is not known whether NAADP can also exist in a reduced state. Here we report that NAADP can be reduced to NAADPH by endogenous cellular enzymes and that NAADPH is functionally inert at the NAADP receptor. These data suggest that NAADPH could represent a mechanism for rapidly inactivating NAADP in cells. PMID:14606955

  15. Dynamics of Excess-Electron Transfer through Alternating Adenine:Thymine Sequences in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the sequence-dependent excess-electron transfer (EET) dynamics in DNA, which plays an important role in DNA damage/repair. There are many published studies on EET in consecutive adenine:thymine (A:T) sequences (Tn), but those in alternating A:T sequences (ATn) remain limited. Here, two series of functionalized DNA oligomers, Tn and ATn, were synthesized with a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, a trimer of ethylenedioxythiophene (3 E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA). Laser flash photolysis experiments showed that the EET rate constant of AT3 is two times lower than that of T3 due to the lack of π-stacking of Ts in AT3. Thus, it was indicated that excess-electron hopping is affected by the interaction between LUMOs of nucleotides. PMID:26398266

  16. Nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Flavin, M

    1976-01-10

    Nucleotides have at least two functions in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. ATP, originating in the cells, is utilized for motility by energy-transducing protein(s) called dynein, and the binding of guanine nucleotides to tubulin, and probably certain transformations of the bound nucleotides, are prerequisites for the assembly of microtubules. Besides dynein, which can be solubulized from Chlamydomonas flagella as a heterogeneous, Mg2+ or Ca2+-activated ATPase, we have purified and characterized five other flagellar enzymes involved in nucleotide transformations. A homogeneous, low molecular weight, Ca2+-specific adenosine triphosphatase was isolated, which was inhibited by Mg2+ and was not specific for ATP. This enzyme was not formed by treating purified dynein with proteases. It was absent from extracts of Tetrahymena cilia. Its function might be an auxiliary energy transducer, or in steering or tactic responses. Two species of adenylate kinase were isolated, one of which was much elevated in regenerating flagella; the latter was also present in cell bodies. A large part of flagellar nucleoside diphosphokinase activity could not be solubilized. Two soluble enzyme species were identified, one of which was also present in cell bodies. Since these enzymes are of interest because they might function in microtubule assembly, we studied the extent to which brain nucleoside diphosphokinase co-polymerizes with tubulin purified by repeated cycles of polymerization. Arginine kinase was not detected in Chlamydomonas flagellar extracts. PMID:397

  17. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  18. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S.; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Fan, Hao; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Lindahl, Paul A.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (kcat = 2.0 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.5 × 103 M−1 s−1). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn2+ prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 200 s−1 and 5 × 105 M−1s−1, respectively. The apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe2+, Zn2+, or Mn2+. In each case, two enzyme-equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member within the deaminase sub-family of the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [FeII/FeII]-ADE was oxidized to [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [FeIII/FeIII]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity and thus the di-ferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence for spin-coupling between metal ions was evident by EPR or Mössbauer spectroscopies. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and adenine was modeled into the active site based on homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Based on the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH rate profiles and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the identity of the rate limiting steps. PMID:21247091

  19. Loss of the gene for the alpha subunit of ATP synthase (ATP5A1) from the W chromosome in the African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    de Kloet, S R

    2001-08-01

    This study describes the results of an analysis using Southern blotting, the polymerase chain reaction, and sequencing which shows that the African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) lacks the W-chromosomal gene for the alpha subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATP5A1W). Additional evidence shows that in other psittacines a fragment of the ATP5A1W gene contains five times as many nonsynonymous nucleotide replacements as the homologous fragment of the Z gene. Therefore, whereas in these other psittacines the corresponding ATP5A1Z protein fragment is highly conserved and varies by only a few, moderately conservative amino acid substitutions, the homologous ATP5A1W fragments contain a considerable number of, sometimes highly nonconservative, amino acid replacements. In one of these species, the ringneck parakeet (Psittacula krameri), the ATP5A1W gene is present in an inactive form because of the presence of a nonsense codon. Other changes, possibly leading to an inactive ATP5A1W gene product, involve the substitution of arginine residues by cysteine in the ATP5A1W protein of the mitred conure (Aratinga mitrata) and the blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna). The data suggest also that although the divergence of the psittacine ATP5A1W and ATP5A1Z genes preceded the origin of the psittacidae, this divergence occurred independently of a similar process in the myna (Gracula religiosa), the outgroup used in this study. PMID:11479684

  20. Absence of Ca2+-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition but Presence of Bongkrekate-Sensitive Nucleotide Exchange in C. crangon and P. serratus

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Torocsik, Beata; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria from the embryos of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) do not undergo Ca2+-induced permeability transition in the presence of a profound Ca2+ uptake capacity. Furthermore, this crustacean is the only organism known to exhibit bongkrekate-insensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide exchange, prompting the conjecture that refractoriness to bongkrekate and absence of Ca2+-induced permeability transition are somehow related phenomena. Here we report that mitochondria isolated from two other crustaceans, brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) and common prawn (Palaemon serratus) exhibited bongkrekate-sensitive mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport, but lacked a Ca2+-induced permeability transition. Ca2+ uptake capacity was robust in the absence of adenine nucleotides in both crustaceans, unaffected by either bongkrekate or cyclosporin A. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ca2+-loaded mitochondria showed needle-like formations of electron-dense material strikingly similar to those observed in mitochondria from the hepatopancreas of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and the embryos of Artemia franciscana. Alignment analysis of the partial coding sequences of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) expressed in Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus versus the complete sequence expressed in Artemia franciscana reappraised the possibility of the 208-214 amino acid region for conferring sensitivity to bongkrekate. However, our findings suggest that the ability to undergo Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and the sensitivity of adenine nucleotide translocase to bongkrekate are not necessarily related phenomena. PMID:22768139

  1. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR's opening-closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N(3)-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1-NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP-bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a "partial NBD dimer" state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and "partial" separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR's NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  2. Structural Basis for a Unique ATP Synthase Core Complex from Nanoarcheaum equitans.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumya; Jobichen, Chacko; Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka Reddy; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Low, Boon Chuan; Hogue, Christopher W V; Sivaraman, J

    2015-11-01

    ATP synthesis is a critical and universal life process carried out by ATP synthases. Whereas eukaryotic and prokaryotic ATP synthases are well characterized, archaeal ATP synthases are relatively poorly understood. The hyperthermophilic archaeal parasite, Nanoarcheaum equitans, lacks several subunits of the ATP synthase and is suspected to be energetically dependent on its host, Ignicoccus hospitalis. This suggests that this ATP synthase might be a rudimentary machine. Here, we report the crystal structures and biophysical studies of the regulatory subunit, NeqB, the apo-NeqAB, and NeqAB in complex with nucleotides, ADP, and adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (non-hydrolysable analog of ATP). NeqB is ∼20 amino acids shorter at its C terminus than its homologs, but this does not impede its binding with NeqA to form the complex. The heterodimeric NeqAB complex assumes a closed, rigid conformation irrespective of nucleotide binding; this differs from its homologs, which require conformational changes for catalytic activity. Thus, although N. equitans possesses an ATP synthase core A3B3 hexameric complex, it might not function as a bona fide ATP synthase. PMID:26370083

  3. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the Ecal DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, V; Venetianer, P; Kiss, A

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the GGTNACC specific Ecal DNA methyltransferase (M.Ecal) has been cloned in E. coli from Enterobacter cloacae and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. The ecalM gene codes for a protein of 452 amino acids (Mr: 51,111). It was determined that M.Ecal is an adenine methyltransferase. M.Ecal shows limited amino acid sequence similarity to other adenine methyltransferases. A clone that expresses Ecal methyltransferase at high level was constructed. Images PMID:2183182

  4. Updating Our View of Organelle Genome Nucleotide Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Organelle genomes show remarkable variation in architecture and coding content, yet their nucleotide composition is relatively unvarying across the eukaryotic domain, with most having a high adenine and thymine (AT) content. Recent studies, however, have uncovered guanine and cytosine (GC)-rich mitochondrial and plastid genomes. These sequences come from a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green plants and animals. Here, I review GC-rich organelle DNAs and the insights they have provided into the evolution of nucleotide landscape. I emphasize that GC-biased mitochondrial and plastid DNAs are more widespread than once thought, sometimes occurring together in the same species, and suggest that the forces biasing their nucleotide content can differ both among and within lineages, and may be associated with specific genome architectural features and life history traits. PMID:22973299

  5. Increase of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime precedes mitochondrial dysfunction in staurosporine-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Sin; Guo, Han-Wen; Wang, Chih-Hao; Wei, Yau-Huei; Wang, Hsing-Wen

    2011-03-01

    In vivo noninvasive detection of apoptosis represents a new tool that may yield a more definite diagnosis, a more accurate prognosis, and help improve therapies for human diseases. The intrinsic fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be a potential optical biomarker for the apoptosis detection because NADH is involved in the respiration for the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) formation and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, and the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP level is the hallmark of apoptosis. We have previously observed the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with staurosporine (STS)-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. However, its relationship with mitochondrial functions such as ΔΨ, ATP, and oxygen consumption rate is not clear. In this study, we investigated this relationship. Our results indicate that the NADH fluorescence lifetime increased when ΔΨ and ATP levels were equal to or higher than their values of controls and decreased before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP, and the oxygen consumption rate did not change. These findings suggest that the increased NADH fluorescence lifetime in STS-induced cell death occurred before the depletion of ΔΨ and ATP and activation of caspase 3, and was not simply caused by cellular metabolic change. Furthermore, the NADH fluorescence lifetime change is associated with the pace of apoptosis.

  6. ATP-binding sites in brain p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), a multifunctional AAA ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2003-01-01

    VCP (valosin-containing protein) or p97 is a member of the AAA family (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities family), a diverse group of proteins sharing a key conserved AAA module containing duplicate putative ATP-binding sites. Although the functions of the AAA family are related to their putative ATP-binding sites, the binding of ATP to these sites has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, the ATP-binding site(s) of brain VCP was characterized using the photoreactive ATP analogue, BzATP [3'- O -(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP]. Photo-activation of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP resulted in its covalent binding to a 97-kDa purified soluble or membrane-associated protein, identified by amino acid sequencing as VCP. Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP covalently bound to the purified homo-hexameric VCP with an apparent high affinity (74-111 nM). A molar stoichiometry of 2.23+/-0.14 BzATP bound per homo-hexameric VCP (n =6) was determined using different methods for analysis of radiolabelling and protein determination. Nucleotides inhibited the binding of Bz-[alpha-(32)P]ATP to VCP with the following efficiency: BzATP>ATP>ADP>>adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate>or=adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, whereas AMP, GTP and CTP were ineffective. VCP was observed to possess very low ATPase activity, with nucleotide specificity similar to that for BzATP binding. Conformational changes induced by an alternating site mechanism for ATP binding are suggested as a molecular mechanism for coupling ATP binding to the diverse activities of the AAA family. PMID:12747802

  7. ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Leshinsky, E; Ganoth, D; Heller, H

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-requiring conjugation of ubiquitin with proteins plays a role in the energy-dependent degradation of intracellular proteins. To examine whether such conjugates are indeed intermediates in protein breakdown, conjugates of 125I-labeled lysozyme with ubiquitin were isolated and incubated with a fraction of reticulocyte extract that lacks the enzymes that carry out ubiquitin-protein conjugation. ATP markedly stimulated degradation of the lysozyme moiety of ubiquitin conjugates to products soluble in trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, free 125I-labeled lysozyme was not degraded under these conditions, unless ubiquitin and the three enzymes required for ubiquitin conjugation were supplemented. Mg2+ was absolutely required for conjugate breakdown. Of various nucleotides, only CTP replaced ATP. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were not effective. In the absence of ATP, free lysozyme is released from ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates by isopeptidases present in the extract. Thus, ATP is involved in both the formation and the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Images PMID:6324208

  8. Structural basis for the ATP-induced isomerization of kinesin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Nitta, Ryo; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2013-06-12

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are microtubule-based molecular motors driven by the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP. Previous studies have revealed that the ATP binding step is crucial both for the power stroke to produce motility and for the inter-domain regulation of ATPase activity to guarantee the processive movement of dimeric KIFs. Here, we report the first crystal structure of KIF4 complexed with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog, AMPPNP (adenylyl imidodiphosphate), at 1.7Å resolution. By combining our structure with previously solved KIF1A structures complexed with two ATP analogs, molecular snapshots during ATP binding reveal that the closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket during ATP binding is achieved by closure of the backdoor. Closure of the backdoor stabilizes two mobile regions, switch I and switch II, to generate the phosphate tube from which hydrolyzed phosphate is released. Through the stabilization of switch II, the local conformational change at the catalytic center is further relayed to the neck-linker element that fully docks to the catalytic core to produce the power stroke. Because the neck linker is a sole element that connects the partner heads in dimeric KIFs, this tight structural coordination between the catalytic center and neck linker enables inter-domain communication between the partner heads. This study also revealed the putative microtubule-binding site of KIF4, thus providing structural insights that describe the specific binding of KIF4 to the microtubule. PMID:23500491

  9. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  10. Approach for determination of ATP:ADP molar ratio in mixed solution by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Yin, Hong Jun; Lv, Ming Yang; Xu, Hai Jun; Zhao, Yong Mei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Zheng Long; Liu, Luo; Tan, Tian Wei

    2015-07-15

    The ATP:ADP molar ratio is an important physiological factor. However, in previous literatures, ATP and ADP could not be distinguished by Raman spectroscopy due to the high similarity of molecular structure. To challenge this problem, also considering that the γ phosphate group may interact with adenine group and cause a different variation of the Raman spectrum than that of ADP, a highly sensitive, low-cost, environment protecting, flexible and super-hydrophobic Au nanoparticles/cicada wing (Au/CW) substrate with three-dimension structure was fabricated and employed as an active surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the ATP:ADP molar ratios. The concentration as low as 10(-8)M for ATP and ADP was analyzed to determine the limit of detection. This SERS study on various ATP:ADP molar ratios demonstrates that ATP:ADP could be distinguished and the quantitative determination of ATP content was achieved. Moreover, a principle was speculated based on the molecular structures of ATP and ADP of the Raman peaks centered at ~685 and ~731cm(-1) to explain the linear relationship between the area ratio and the molar ratio. A new method has been developed for quantitative determination of ATP:ADP molar ratio based on Au/CW substrate by the SERS method. PMID:25703730

  11. Regulation of the gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator C1 channels by phosphorylation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, T C; Nagel, G; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-01-01

    Opening of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channels requires their phosphorylation by protein kinase A followed by exposure to ATP. We examined the interaction between nucleotides and phosphorylated CFTR channels by recording currents in intact cardiac myocytes and in excised patches. We found that, although the hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue 5'-adenosine(beta,gamma- imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) cannot open phosphorylated CFTR channels, it can cause channels opened by ATP to remain open for many minutes. This suggests that ATP action at one site on CFTR is a prerequisite for AMP-PNP action at a second site. However, this action of AMP-PNP is restricted to highly phosphorylated CFTR channels, which, in the presence of ATP, display a relatively high open probability, but is not seen in partially phosphorylated CFTR channels, which have a low open probability in the presence of ATP. Our findings argue that incremental phosphorylation differentially regulates the interactions between nucleotides and the two nucleotide binding domains of CFTR. The nature of those interactions suggests that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide binding domain controls channel opening and ATP hydrolysis at the other regulates channel closing. Images PMID:7515176

  12. Regulation of the gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator C1 channels by phosphorylation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T C; Nagel, G; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-05-24

    Opening of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channels requires their phosphorylation by protein kinase A followed by exposure to ATP. We examined the interaction between nucleotides and phosphorylated CFTR channels by recording currents in intact cardiac myocytes and in excised patches. We found that, although the hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue 5'-adenosine(beta,gamma- imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) cannot open phosphorylated CFTR channels, it can cause channels opened by ATP to remain open for many minutes. This suggests that ATP action at one site on CFTR is a prerequisite for AMP-PNP action at a second site. However, this action of AMP-PNP is restricted to highly phosphorylated CFTR channels, which, in the presence of ATP, display a relatively high open probability, but is not seen in partially phosphorylated CFTR channels, which have a low open probability in the presence of ATP. Our findings argue that incremental phosphorylation differentially regulates the interactions between nucleotides and the two nucleotide binding domains of CFTR. The nature of those interactions suggests that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide binding domain controls channel opening and ATP hydrolysis at the other regulates channel closing. PMID:7515176

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis Transports NAD via the Npt1 ATP/ADP Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Derek J.; Fernández, Reinaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria comprising the order Chlamydiales lack the ability to synthesize nucleotides de novo and must acquire these essential compounds from the cytosol of the host cell. The environmental protozoan endosymbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25 encodes five nucleotide transporters with specificities for different nucleotide substrates, including ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, and NAD. In contrast, the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis encodes only two nucleotide transporters, the ATP/ADP translocase C. trachomatis Npt1 (Npt1Ct) and the nucleotide uniporter Npt2Ct, which transports GTP, UTP, CTP, and ATP. The notable absence of a NAD transporter, coupled with the lack of alternative nucleotide transporters on the basis of bioinformatic analysis of multiple C. trachomatis genomes, led us to re-evaluate the previously characterized transport properties of Npt1Ct. Using [adenylate-32P]NAD, we demonstrate that Npt1Ct expressed in Escherichia coli enables the transport of NAD with an apparent Km and Vmax of 1.7 μM and 5.8 nM mg−1 h−1, respectively. The Km for NAD transport is comparable to the Km for ATP transport of 2.2 μM, as evaluated in this study. Efflux and substrate competition assays demonstrate that NAD is a preferred substrate of Npt1Ct compared to ATP. These results suggest that during reductive evolution, the pathogenic chlamydiae lost individual nucleotide transporters, in contrast to their environmental endosymbiont relatives, without compromising their ability to obtain nucleotides from the host cytosol through relaxation of transport specificity. The novel properties of Npt1Ct and its conservation in chlamydiae make it a potential target for the development of antimicrobial compounds and a model for studying the evolution of transport specificity. PMID:23708130

  14. Modeling regulation of cardiac KATP and L-type Ca2+ currents by ATP, ADP, and Mg2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michailova, Anushka; Saucerman, Jeffrey; Belik, Mary Ellen; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic free Mg(2+) and adenosine nucleotide phosphates affect cardiac excitability and contractility. To investigate how modulation by Mg(2+), ATP, and ADP of K(ATP) and L-type Ca(2+) channels influences excitation-contraction coupling, we incorporated equations for intracellular ATP and MgADP regulation of the K(ATP) current and MgATP regulation of the L-type Ca(2+) current in an ionic-metabolic model of the canine ventricular myocyte. The new model: 1), quantitatively reproduces a dose-response relationship for the effects of changes in ATP on K(ATP) current, 2), simulates effects of ADP in modulating ATP sensitivity of K(ATP) channel, 3), predicts activation of Ca(2+) current during rapid increase in MgATP, and 4), demonstrates that decreased ATP/ADP ratio with normal total Mg(2+) or increased free Mg(2+) with normal ATP and ADP activate K(ATP) current, shorten action potential, and alter ionic currents and intracellular Ca(2+) signals. The model predictions are in agreement with experimental data measured under normal and a variety of pathological conditions.

  15. Modeling regulation of cardiac KATP and L-type Ca2+ currents by ATP, ADP, and Mg2+.

    PubMed

    Michailova, Anushka; Saucerman, Jeffrey; Belik, Mary Ellen; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2005-03-01

    Changes in cytosolic free Mg(2+) and adenosine nucleotide phosphates affect cardiac excitability and contractility. To investigate how modulation by Mg(2+), ATP, and ADP of K(ATP) and L-type Ca(2+) channels influences excitation-contraction coupling, we incorporated equations for intracellular ATP and MgADP regulation of the K(ATP) current and MgATP regulation of the L-type Ca(2+) current in an ionic-metabolic model of the canine ventricular myocyte. The new model: 1), quantitatively reproduces a dose-response relationship for the effects of changes in ATP on K(ATP) current, 2), simulates effects of ADP in modulating ATP sensitivity of K(ATP) channel, 3), predicts activation of Ca(2+) current during rapid increase in MgATP, and 4), demonstrates that decreased ATP/ADP ratio with normal total Mg(2+) or increased free Mg(2+) with normal ATP and ADP activate K(ATP) current, shorten action potential, and alter ionic currents and intracellular Ca(2+) signals. The model predictions are in agreement with experimental data measured under normal and a variety of pathological conditions. PMID:15738467

  16. Conformational changes of P-glycoprotein by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Pincheira, R; Zhang, M; Zhang, J T

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a membrane protein that transports chemotherapeutic drugs, causing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells. Pgp is a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily and functions as a transport ATPase. It has been suggested that the conformation of Pgp changes in the catalytic cycle. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using limited proteolysis as a tool to detect different conformational states trapped by binding of nucleotide ligands and inhibitors. Pgp has high basal ATPase activity; that is, ATP hydrolysis by Pgp is not rigidly associated with drug transport. This activity provides a convenient method for studying the conformational change of Pgp induced by nucleotide ligands, in the absence of drug substrates which may generate complications due to their own binding. Inside-out membrane vesicles containing human Pgp were isolated from multidrug-resistant SKOV/VLB cells and treated with trypsin in the absence or presence of MgATP, Mg-adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate (Mg-p[NH]ppA) and MgADP. Changes in the proteolysis profile of Pgp owing to binding of nucleotides were used to indicate the conformational changes in Pgp. We found that generation of tryptic fragments, including the loop linking transmembrane (TM) regions TM8 and TM9 of Pgp, were stimulated by the binding of Mg-p[NH]ppA, MgATP and MgADP, indicating that the Pgp conformation was changed by the binding of these nucleotides. The effects of nucleotides on Pgp conformation are directly associated with the binding and/or hydrolysis of these ligands. Four conformational states of Pgp were stabilized under different conditions with various ligands and inhibitors. We propose that cycling through these four states couples the Pgp-mediated MgATP hydrolysis to drug transport. PMID:9396736

  17. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  18. Structural Characterization of Two Metastable ATP-Bound States of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Megan L.; Mark, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters couple the binding and hydrolysis of ATP to the transport of substrate molecules across the membrane. The mechanism by which ATP binding and/or hydrolysis drives the conformational changes associated with substrate transport has not yet been characterized fully. Here, changes in the conformation of the ABC export protein P-glycoprotein on ATP binding are examined in a series of molecular dynamics simulations. When one molecule of ATP is placed at the ATP binding site associated with each of the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), the membrane-embedded P-glycoprotein crystal structure adopts two distinct metastable conformations. In one, each ATP molecule interacts primarily with the Walker A motif of the corresponding NBD. In the other, the ATP molecules interacts with both Walker A motif of one NBD and the Signature motif of the opposite NBD inducing the partial dimerization of the NBDs. This interaction is more extensive in one of the two ATP binding site, leading to an asymmetric structure. The overall conformation of the transmembrane domains is not altered in either of these metastable states, indicating that the conformational changes associated with ATP binding observed in the simulations in the absence of substrate do not lead to the outward-facing conformation and thus would be insufficient in themselves to drive transport. Nevertheless, the metastable intermediate ATP-bound conformations observed are compatible with a wide range of experimental cross-linking data demonstrating the simulations do capture physiologically important conformations. Analysis of the interaction between ATP and its cofactor Mg2+ with each NBD indicates that the coordination of ATP and Mg2+ differs between the two NBDs. The role structural asymmetry may play in ATP binding and hydrolysis is discussed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our results are not heavily influenced by the crystal structure chosen for initiation of the simulations

  19. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  20. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W.; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  1. Molecular mechanism of sulphonylurea block of K(ATP) channels carrying mutations that impair ATP inhibition and cause neonatal diabetes.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; de Wet, Heidi; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2013-11-01

    Sulphonylurea drugs are the therapy of choice for treating neonatal diabetes (ND) caused by mutations in the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP channel). We investigated the interactions between MgATP, MgADP, and the sulphonylurea gliclazide with KATP channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In the absence of MgATP, gliclazide block was similar for wild-type channels and those carrying the Kir6.2 ND mutations R210C, G334D, I296L, and V59M. Gliclazide abolished the stimulatory effect of MgATP on all channels. Conversely, high MgATP concentrations reduced the gliclazide concentration, producing a half-maximal block of G334D and R201C channels and suggesting a mutual antagonism between nucleotide and gliclazide binding. The maximal extent of high-affinity gliclazide block of wild-type channels was increased by MgATP, but this effect was smaller for ND channels; channels that were least sensitive to ATP inhibition showed the smallest increase in sulphonylurea block. Consequently, G334D and I296L channels were not fully blocked, even at physiological MgATP concentrations (1 mmol/L). Glibenclamide block was also reduced in β-cells expressing Kir6.2-V59M channels. These data help to explain why patients with some mutations (e.g., G334D, I296L) are insensitive to sulphonylurea therapy, why higher drug concentrations are needed to treat ND than type 2 diabetes, and why patients with severe ND mutations are less prone to drug-induced hypoglycemia. PMID:23835339

  2. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  3. PolyAdenine cryogels for fast and effective RNA purification.

    PubMed

    Köse, Kazım; Erol, Kadir; Özgür, Erdoğan; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Cryogels are used effectively for many diverse applications in a variety of fields. The isolation or purification of RNA, one of the potential utilizations for cryogels, is crucial due to their vital roles such as encoding, decoding, transcription and translation, and gene expression. RNA principally exists within every living thing, but their tendency to denaturation easily is still the most challenging issue. Herein, we aimed to develop adenine incorporated polymeric cryogels as an alternative sorbent for cost-friendly and fast RNA purification with high capacity. For this goal, we synthesized the polymerizable derivative of adenine called as adenine methacrylate (AdeM) through the substitution reaction between adenine and methacryloyl chloride. Then, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based cryogels were prepared in a partially frozen aqueous medium by copolymerization of monomers, AdeM, and HEMA. The cryogels were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and swelling tests. RNA adsorption experiments were performed via batch system while varying different conditions including pH, initial RNA concentration, temperature, and interaction time. We achieved high RNA adsorption capacity of cryogels, with the swelling ratio around 510%, as 11.86mg/g. The cryogels might be reused at least five times without significant decrease in adsorption capacity. PMID:27434154

  4. Selective inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinases by dinucleoside disulfide mimics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Sham, Yuk Yin; Chen, Liqiang; Felczak, Krzysztof; Bennett, Eric; Wilson, Daniel; Aldrich, Courtney; Yu, Jose S; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Magni, Giulio; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2009-08-01

    Diadenosine disulfide (5) was reported to inhibit NAD kinase from Listeria monocytogenes and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex has been solved. We have synthesized tiazofurin adenosine disulfide (4) and the disulfide 5, and found that these compounds were moderate inhibitors of human NAD kinase (IC(50)=110 microM and IC(50)=87 microM, respectively) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD kinase (IC(50)=80 microM and IC(50)=45 microM, respectively). We also found that NAD mimics with a short disulfide (-S-S-) moiety were able to bind in the folded (compact) conformation but not in the common extended conformation, which requires the presence of a longer pyrophosphate (-O-P-O-P-O-) linkage. Since majority of NAD-dependent enzymes bind NAD in the extended conformation, selective inhibition of NAD kinases by disulfide analogues has been observed. Introduction of bromine at the C8 of the adenine ring restricted the adenosine moiety of diadenosine disulfides to the syn conformation making it even more compact. The 8-bromoadenosine adenosine disulfide (14) and its di(8-bromoadenosine) analogue (15) were found to be the most potent inhibitors of human (IC(50)=6 microM) and mycobacterium NAD kinase (IC(50)=14-19 microM reported so far. None of the disulfide analogues showed inhibition of lactate-, and inosine monophosphate-dehydrogenase (IMPDH), enzymes that bind NAD in the extended conformation. PMID:19596199

  5. The Role of Gene Duplication in the Evolution of Purine Nucleotide Salvage Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    Purine nucleotides are formed de novo by a widespread biochemical route that may be of monophyletic origin, or are synthesized from preformed purine bases and nucleosides through different salvage pathways. Three monophyletic sets of purine salvage enzymes, each of which catalyzes mechanistically similar reactions, can be identified: (a) adenine-, xanthine-, hypoxanthine- and guanine-phosphoribosyltransferases, which are all homologous among themselves, as well as to nucleoside phosphorylases; (b) adenine deaminase, adenosine deaminase, and adenosine monophophate deaminase; and (c) guanine reductase and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. These homologies support the idea that substrate specificity is the outcome of gene duplication, and that the purine nucleotide salvage pathways were assembled by a patchwork process that probably took place before the divergence of the three cell domains (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya). Based on the ability of adenine PRTase to catalyze the condensation of PRPP with 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide (AICA), a simpler scheme of purine nucleotide biosynthesis is presented. This hypothetical route requires the prior evolution of PRPP biosynthesis. Since it has been argued that PRPP, nucleosides, and nucleotides are susceptible to hydrolysis, they are very unlikely prebiotic compounds. If this is the case, it implies that many purine salvage pathways appeared only after the evolution of phosphorylated sugar biosynthetic pathways made ribosides available.

  6. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  7. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  8. Effect of Adenine on Clozapine-induced Neutropenia in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Kishi, Taro; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the utility of adenine for preventing clozapine-induced neutropenia. Methods This retrospective study examined the effect of adenine on clozapine-induced neutropenia in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and was conducted at Okehazama Hospital in Japan from July 2010 to June 2013. Adenine was available for use from June 2011 onwards. Twenty-one patients started receiving clozapine treatment from July 2010 to April 2011 (the pre-adenine adoption group), and 47 patients started receiving it from May 2011 to June 2013 (the post-adenine adoption group). The effects of adenine were assessed based on changes in the patients’ leukocyte counts and the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Results Sixty-eight patients were treated with clozapine from July 2010 to June 2013. Of the 21 patients in the pre-adenine adoption group, 4 discontinued treatment due to clozapine-induced neutropenia, whereas only 2 of the 47 patients in the post-adenine adoption group discontinued treatment. The frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia was significantly lower in post-adenine adoption group than in the pre-adenine adoption group (p=0.047). Conclusion Adenine decreased the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to clozapine-induced neutropenia. Our data suggest that combined treatment with clozapine and adenine is a safe and effective strategy against treatment-resistant schizophrenia. PMID:26243842

  9. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  10. Fluorescence characteristic study of the ternary complex of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and cobalt (II) with ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqing; Zhang, Wujuan; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide; Hooper, Martin; Hooper, Beveley; Zhao, Zhengfeng

    2001-05-01

    The results from the measurement of the fluorescence spectra of fluoroquinolone antibiotics including ofloxacin (OF), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) complexed with cobalt (II) and ATP give information concerning the antibiotics-nucleotide interactions. From the fluorescence spectral data, it appears that the fluoroquinolone antibiotic cannot directly complex with ATP but indirectly complex with cobalt (II), which is playing an intermediary role. The interaction of fluoroquinolone antibiotic with the nucleotide occurs mainly through the phosphate group. The conclusion offers a more complete mechanism, which is important for understanding the interaction of these drugs with DNA.

  11. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  12. Aptamer fluorescence anisotropy sensors for adenosine triphosphate by comprehensive screening tetramethylrhodamine labeled nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Lv, Qin; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for small molecules using tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) labeled aptamer. It relies on target-binding induced change of intramolecular interaction between TMR and guanine (G) base. TMR-labeling sites are crucial for this approach. Only terminal ends and thymine (T) bases could be tested for TMR labeling in our previous work, possibly causing limitation in analysis of different targets with this FA strategy. Here, taking the analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an example, we demonstrated a success of conjugating TMR on other bases of aptamer adenine (A) or cytosine (C) bases and an achievement of full mapping various labeling sites of aptamers. We successfully constructed aptamer fluorescence anisotropy (FA) sensors for adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We conjugated single TMR on adenine (A), cytosine (C), or thymine (T) bases or terminals of a 25-mer aptamer against ATP and tested FA responses of 14 TMR-labeled aptamer to ATP. The aptamers having TMR labeled on the 16th base C or 23rd base A were screened out and exhibited significant FA-decreasing or FA-increasing responses upon ATP, respectively. These two favorable TMR-labeled aptamers enabled direct FA sensing ATP with a detection limit of 1 µM and the analysis of ATP in diluted serum. The comprehensive screening various TMR labeling sites of aptamers facilitates the successful construction of FA sensors using TMR-labeled aptamers. It will expand application of TMR-G interaction based aptamer FA strategy to a variety of targets. PMID:25814408

  13. Copper-Adenine Complex Catalyst for O2 Production from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jacques; Bruston, F.; Calvayrac, R.; Grajcar, L.; Baron, M.-H.; Maurel, M.-C.

    The advent of oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is one of the central event in the development of life on earth. The early atmosphere has been midly reducing or neutral in overall redox balance and water photolysis by UV light can produce hydrogen peroxide. Before oxidation of water, intermediate stages are proposed in which H_2^O_2 was oxidized. The oxidation of H_2^O_2 to oxygen can be carried out by a modestly oxidizing species in which a metal-catalase like enzyme could extract electrons from H_2^O_2 producing the first oxygen-evolving complex. After what, modern photosynthesis with chlorophyll, to help transform H_2^O in O_2 was ready to come to light. In preliminary UV studies we were able to show that [Cu(adenine)2] system, containing copper coordinated to nitrogen activates H_2^O_2 disappearance. This was confirmed with the help of Raman and polarographic studies. Raman spectroscopy shows the formation of [Cu(adenine)2] complex in solution, quantifies H_2^O_2 consumption, polarography quantifies O_2 production. In both cases CuCl_2 addition entails H_2^O_2 disappearance. Without adenine, Cu_2^+ has only a weak catalytic effect. The molar activity of the [Cu(adenine)2] complex is much larger and concentration dependent. We emphasize that Cu(adenine)2 may have mimicked enzyme properties in the first stage of life evolution, in order to split H_2^O_2 into O_2 and H_2^O. Moreover, diluted copper and adenine, in small ephemeral prebiotic ponds , could have preserved biologically active entities from H_2^O_2 damage via dual properties: catalyzing H_2^O_2 disproportionation and also directly acting as a reductant complex. Finally, the present Mars surface is considered to be both reactive and embedded with oxydants. As it has been shown that the depth of diffusion for H_2^O_2 is less than 3 meters, it is important to study all the ways of H_2^O_2 consumption.

  14. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  15. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  16. ATP Is an Allosteric Inhibitor of Coxsackievirus B3 Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Karr, Jonathan P; Peersen, Olve B

    2016-07-19

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from positive-strand RNA viruses, such as picornaviruses and flaviviruses, close their active sites for catalysis via a unique NTP-induced conformational change in the palm domain. Combined with a fully prepositioned templating nucleotide, this mechanism is error-prone and results in a distribution of random mutations in the viral progeny often described as a quasi-species. Here we examine the extent to which noncognate NTPs competitively inhibit single-cycle elongation by coxsackievirus B3 3D(pol), a polymerase that generates three to four mutations per 10 kb of RNA synthesized during viral infection. Using an RNA with a templating guanosine combined with 2-aminopurine fluorescence as a reporter for elongation, we find that the cognate CTP has a Km of 24 μM and the three noncognate nucleotides competitively inhibit the reaction with Kic values of 500 μM for GTP, 1300 μM for ATP, and 3000 μM for UTP. Unexpectedly, ATP also acted as an uncompetitive inhibitor with a Kiu of 1800 μM, resulting in allosteric modulation of 3D(pol) that slowed the polymerase elongation rate ≈4-fold. ATP uncompetitive inhibition required the β- and γ-phosphates, and its extent was significantly diminished in two previously characterized low-fidelity polymerases. This led to further mutational analysis and the identification of a putative allosteric binding site below the NTP entry channel at the interface of conserved motifs A and D, although cocrystallization failed to reveal any density for bound ATP in this pocket. The potential role of an ATP allosteric effect during the virus life cycle is discussed. PMID:27319576

  17. Potentiation of disease-associated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutants by hydrolyzable ATP analogs.

    PubMed

    Miki, Haruna; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G

    2010-06-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. CFTR is gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which dimerize in the presence of ATP to form two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2). Mutations reducing the activity of CFTR result in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Two of the most common mutations causing a severe phenotype are G551D and DeltaF508. Previously we found that the ATP analog N(6)-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) potentiates the activity of G551D by approximately 7-fold. Here we show that 2'-deoxy-ATP (dATP), but not 3'-deoxy-ATP, increases the activity of G551D-CFTR by approximately 8-fold. We custom synthesized N(6)-(2-phenylethyl)-2'-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), an analog combining the chemical modifications in dATP and P-ATP. This new analog enhances G551D current by 36.2 +/- 5.4-fold suggesting an independent but energetically additive action of these two different chemical modifications. We show that P-dATP binds to ABP1 to potentiate the activity of G551D, and mutations in both sides of ABP1 (W401G and S1347G) decrease its potentiation effect, suggesting that the action of P-dATP takes place at the interface of both NBDs. Interestingly, P-dATP completely rectified the gating abnormality of DeltaF508-CFTR by increasing its activity by 19.5 +/- 3.8-fold through binding to both ABPs. This result highlights the severity of the gating defect associated with DeltaF508, the most prevalent disease-associated mutation. The new analog P-dATP can be not only an invaluable tool to study CFTR gating, but it can also serve as a proof-of-principle that, by combining elements that potentiate the channel activity independently, the increase in chloride transport necessary to reach a therapeutic target is attainable. PMID:20406820

  18. Potentiation of Disease-associated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutants by Hydrolyzable ATP Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Haruna; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G.

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. CFTR is gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which dimerize in the presence of ATP to form two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2). Mutations reducing the activity of CFTR result in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Two of the most common mutations causing a severe phenotype are G551D and ΔF508. Previously we found that the ATP analog N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP) potentiates the activity of G551D by ∼7-fold. Here we show that 2′-deoxy-ATP (dATP), but not 3′-deoxy-ATP, increases the activity of G551D-CFTR by ∼8-fold. We custom synthesized N6-(2-phenylethyl)-2′-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), an analog combining the chemical modifications in dATP and P-ATP. This new analog enhances G551D current by 36.2 ± 5.4-fold suggesting an independent but energetically additive action of these two different chemical modifications. We show that P-dATP binds to ABP1 to potentiate the activity of G551D, and mutations in both sides of ABP1 (W401G and S1347G) decrease its potentiation effect, suggesting that the action of P-dATP takes place at the interface of both NBDs. Interestingly, P-dATP completely rectified the gating abnormality of ΔF508-CFTR by increasing its activity by 19.5 ± 3.8-fold through binding to both ABPs. This result highlights the severity of the gating defect associated with ΔF508, the most prevalent disease-associated mutation. The new analog P-dATP can be not only an invaluable tool to study CFTR gating, but it can also serve as a proof-of-principle that, by combining elements that potentiate the channel activity independently, the increase in chloride transport necessary to reach a therapeutic target is attainable. PMID:20406820

  19. Methemoglobinemia and eccentrocytosis in equine erythrocyte flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J W; Stockham, S L; Scott, M A; Johnson, P J; Donald, J J; Chandler, C J

    2003-11-01

    This report describes erythrocyte biochemical findings in an adult Spanish mustang mare that exhibited persistent methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis that were not related to the consumption or administration of an exogenous oxidant. The methemoglobinemia was attributed to a deficiency in cytochrome-b5 reductase (Cb5R) activity, and the eccentrocytes and pyknocytes were attributed to a marked deficiency in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity that resulted in decreased reduced glutathione concentration within erythrocytes. The GR activity increased to a near-normal value after addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the enzyme assay, indicating a deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes. The methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis were attributed to deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes because the GR and Cb5R enzymes use FAD as a cofactor. This deficiency in FAD results from a defect in erythrocyte riboflavin metabolism, which has not been documented previously in animals. PMID:14608016

  20. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). PMID:27163876

  1. Nucleotide receptor signaling in murine macrophages is linked to reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Zachary A; Guerra, Alma N; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Prabhu, Usha; Aga, Mini; Hall, David J; Bertics, Paul J

    2007-05-15

    Macrophage activation is critical in the innate immune response and can be regulated by the nucleotide receptor P2X7. In this regard, P2X7 signaling is not well understood but has been implicated in controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by various leukocytes. Although ROS can contribute to microbial killing, the role of ROS in nucleotide-mediated cell signaling is unclear. In this study, we report that the P2X7 agonists ATP and 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoic ATP (BzATP) stimulate ROS production by RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. These effects are potentiated in lipopolysaccharide-primed cells, demonstrating an important interaction between extracellular nucleotides and microbial products in ROS generation. In terms of nucleotide receptor specificity, RAW 264.7 macrophages that are deficient in P2X7 are greatly reduced in their capacity to generate ROS in response to BzATP treatment (both with and without LPS priming), thus supporting a role for P2X7 in this process. Because MAP kinase activation is key for nucleotide regulation of macrophage function, we also tested the hypothesis that P2X7-mediated MAP kinase activation is dependent on ROS production. We observed that BzATP stimulates MAP kinase (ERK1/ERK2, p38, and JNK1/JNK2) phosphorylation and that the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid strongly attenuate BzATP-mediated JNK1/JNK2 and p38 phosphorylation but only slightly reduce BzATP-induced ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation. These studies reveal that P2X7 can contribute to macrophage ROS production, that this effect is potentiated upon lipopolysaccharide exposure, and that ROS are important participants in the extracellular nucleotide-mediated activation of several MAP kinase systems. PMID:17448897

  2. Dynamics and reactivity in Thermus aquaticus N6-adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Zinovjev, Kirill; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-11-19

    M.TaqI is a DNA methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N6 position of an adenine, a process described only in prokaryotes. We have used full atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the protein-SAM-DNA ternary complex where the target adenine is flipped out into the active site. Key protein-DNA interactions established by the target adenine in the active site are described in detail. The relaxed structure was used for a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics exploration of the reaction mechanism using the string method. According to our free energy calculations the reaction takes place through a stepwise mechanism where the methyl transfer precedes the abstraction of the proton from the exocyclic amino group. The methyl transfer is the rate-determining step, and the obtained free energy barrier is in good agreement with the value derived from the experimental rate constant. Two possible candidates to extract the leftover proton have been explored: a water molecule found in the active site and Asn105, a residue activated by the hydrogen bonds formed through the amide hydrogens. The barrier for the proton abstraction is smaller when Asn105 acts as a base. The reaction mechanisms can be different in other N6-DNA-methyltransferases, as determined from the exploration of the reaction mechanism in the Asn105Asp M.TaqI mutant. PMID:25347783

  3. Energy-dependent dissociation of ATP from high affinity catalytic sites of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1985-11-05

    Incubation of (gamma-TSP)ATP with a molar excess of the membrane-bound form of mitochondrial ATPase (F1) results in binding of the bulk of the radioactive nucleotide in high affinity catalytic sites (Ka = 10(12) M-1). Subsequent initiation of respiration by addition of succinate or NADH is accompanied by a profound decrease in the affinity for ATP. About one-third of the bound radioactive ATP appears to dissociate, that is, the (gamma-TSP)ATP becomes accessible to hexokinase. The NADH-stimulated dissociation of (gamma-TSP)ATP is energy-dependent since the stimulation is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and is prevented by respiratory chain inhibitors. The rate of the energy-dependent dissociation of ATP that occurs in the presence of NADH, ADP, and Pi is commensurate with the measured initial rate of ATP synthesis in NADH-supported oxidative phosphorylation catalyzed by the same submitochondrial particles. Thus, the rate of dissociation of ATP from the high affinity catalytic site of submitochondrial particles meets the criterion of kinetic competency under the conditions of oxidative phosphorylation. These experiments provide evidence in support of the argument that energy conserved during the oxidation of substrates by the respiratory chain can be utilized to reduce the very tight binding of product ATP in high affinity catalytic sites and to promote dissociation of the nucleotide.

  4. OmpF, a nucleotide-sensing nanoprobe, computational evaluation of single channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, R. H.; Mobasheri, H.; Nikouee, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of highthroughput practical single channel experiments should be formulated and validated by signal analysis approaches to increase the recognition precision of translocating molecules. For this purpose, the activities of the single nano-pore forming protein, OmpF, in the presence of nucleotides were recorded in real time by the voltage clamp technique and used as a means for nucleotide recognition. The results were analyzed based on the permutation entropy of current Time Series (TS), fractality, autocorrelation, structure function, spectral density, and peak fraction to recognize each nucleotide, based on its signature effect on the conductance, gating frequency and voltage sensitivity of channel at different concentrations and membrane potentials. The amplitude and frequency of ion current fluctuation increased in the presence of Adenine more than Cytosine and Thymine in milli-molar (0.5 mM) concentrations. The variance of the current TS at various applied voltages showed a non-monotonic trend whose initial increasing slope in the presence of Thymine changed to a decreasing one in the second phase and was different from that of Adenine and Cytosine; e.g., by increasing the voltage from 40 to 140 mV in the 0.5 mM concentration of Adenine or Cytosine, the variance decreased by one third while for the case of Thymine it was doubled. Moreover, according to the structure function of TS, the fractality of current TS differed as a function of varying membrane potentials (pd) and nucleotide concentrations. Accordingly, the calculated permutation entropy of the TS, validated the biophysical approach defined for the recognition of different nucleotides at various concentrations, pd's and polarities. Thus, the promising outcomes of the combined experimental and theoretical methodologies presented here can be implemented as a complementary means in pore-based nucleotide recognition approaches.

  5. Studies on the activation by ATP of the 26 S proteasome complex from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, B; Kuehn, L; Reinauer, H

    1995-01-01

    The 26 S proteasome complex is thought to catalyse the breakdown of ubiquitinated proteins within eukaryotic cells. In addition it has been found that the complex also degrades short-lived proteins such as ornithine decarboxylase in a ubiquitin-independent manner. Both proteolytic processes are paralleled by the hydrolysis of ATP. Here we show that ATP also affects the hydrolytic activity towards fluorigenic peptide substrates by the 26 S proteasome complex from rat skeletal muscle tissue. Low concentrations of ATP (about 25 microM) optimally activate the so-called chymotryptic and tryptic activity by increasing the rate of peptide hydrolysis but not peptidylglutamylpeptide hydrolysis. Activation of the enzyme by ATP is transient but this effect can be enhanced and prolonged by including in the assay an ATP-regenerating system, indicating that ATP is hydrolysed by the 26 S proteasome complex. Although ATP cannot be substituted for by adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate or AMP, hydrolysis of the phosphoanhydride bond of ATP seems not to be necessary for the activation process of the proteasome complex, a conclusion drawn from the findings that ATP analogues such as adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate, adenosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, adenosine 5'-O-[beta-thio]-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-[alpha,beta-methylene]triphosphate give the same effect as ATP, and vanadate does not prevent ATP activation. These effects are independent of the presence of Mg2+. Thus, ATP and other nucleotides may act as allosteric activators of peptide-hydrolysing activities of the 26 S proteasome complex as has also been found with the lon protease from Escherichia coli. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7619056

  6. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  7. Drosophila Sirt2/mammalian SIRT3 deacetylates ATP synthase β and regulates complex V activity

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Motiur; Nirala, Niraj K.; Singh, Alka; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Taguchi, Kaori; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lambright, David G.; Acharya, Jairaj K.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase β, the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial complex V, synthesizes ATP. We show that ATP synthase β is deacetylated by a human nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)–dependent protein deacetylase, sirtuin 3, and its Drosophila melanogaster homologue, dSirt2. dsirt2 mutant flies displayed increased acetylation of specific Lys residues in ATP synthase β and decreased complex V activity. Overexpression of dSirt2 increased complex V activity. Substitution of Lys 259 and Lys 480 with Arg in human ATP synthase β, mimicking deacetylation, increased complex V activity, whereas substitution with Gln, mimicking acetylation, decreased activity. Mass spectrometry and proteomic experiments from wild-type and dsirt2 mitochondria identified the Drosophila mitochondrial acetylome and revealed dSirt2 as an important regulator of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Additionally, we unravel a ceramide–NAD+–sirtuin axis wherein increased ceramide, a sphingolipid known to induce stress responses, resulted in depletion of NAD+ and consequent decrease in sirtuin activity. These results provide insight into sirtuin-mediated regulation of complex V and reveal a novel link between ceramide and Drosophila acetylome. PMID:25023514

  8. Severe MgADP Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase Is Not Due to the Absence of Nucleotide Binding to the Noncatalytic Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1) is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation. PMID:25244289

  9. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  10. Nucleotide Phosphohydrolase in Purified Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Munyon, William; Paoletti, Enzo; Ospina, Julio; Grace, James T.

    1968-01-01

    Purified infectious vaccinia virus has been shown to contain an enzyme or enzymes that remove the terminal phosphate group from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), uridine triphosphate (UTP), and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). The Km for ATP of this enzyme is 5.5 × 10−4m, and the relative rates of the reaction with ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP are 1.00, 0.34, 0.15, and 0.29, respectively. The virus enzyme does not react with any of the diphosphates. The rate of the reaction is proportional to the amount of virus added and is linear for 130 min. The virus nucleotide phosphohydrolase activity is greatly stimulated by Mg++ and very slightly stimulated by Ca++. The small residual activity observed in the absence of divalent cations is completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Neither Na+ nor K+ ions, nor any mixture of these, was found to stimulate the reaction significantly, and ouabain, at 10−4m, inhibited the reaction by only 27%. The response of the vaccinia enzyme to mono- and divalent cations and to ouabain indicates that the vaccinia enzyme has different properties from those associated with microsomes and mitochondria. PMID:4986904

  11. Comparison of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Xudong; Mou, Zhonglin

    2016-06-01

    The pyridine nucleotide nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a universal coenzyme in anabolic reactions and also functions in intracellular signaling by serving as a substrate for production of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). It has recently been shown that, in mammalian cells, cellular NADP can be released into the extracellular compartment (ECC) upon environmental stresses by active exocytosis or diffusion through transmembrane transporters in living cells or passive leakage across the membrane in dying cells. In the ECC, NADP can either serve as a substrate for production of NAADP or act directly on purinoceptors to activate transmembrane signaling. In the last several years, extracellular NADP has also been suggested to function in plant immune responses. Here, we compared exogenous NADP-induced immune responses against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia and found that NADP addition induces salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling but not jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated defense responses. These results suggest the specificity of exogenous NADP-activated signaling in plants. PMID:27031653

  12. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites. PMID:27296627

  13. Molecular structure of the Menkes disease gene (ATP7A)

    SciTech Connect

    Dierick, H.A.; Glover, T.W.; Ambrosini, L.

    1995-08-10

    We report a detailed molecular analysis of the genomic structure of the Menkes disease gene (MNK; ATP7A). There are 23 exons in ATP7A covering a genomic region of approximately 140 kb. The size of the individual coding exons varies between 77 and 726 bp, and introns vary in size between 196 bp and approximately 60 kb. All of the splice sites obey the consensus GT-AG rule except the splice donor of intron 9, which is GC instead of GT. The exon following this rare splice donor variant is alternatively spliced. A PGAM pseudogene and two highly polymorphic CA repeats map to introns within the gene. The structure is very similar to that of the closely related Wilson disease gene (WND; ATP7B). From exon 5 (exon 3 in ATP7B) to the end, all of the splice sites occur at exactly the same nucleotide positions as in the WND gene, except for the boundary between exons 17 and 18 (exons 15 and 16 in ATP7B) and a single codon difference at the boundary between exons 4 and 5 of the MNK gene (exons 2 and 3 in ATP7B). In contrast to the WND gene, in which the first four of six metal binding domains are contained in 1 exon, metal binding domains 1 to 4 are divided over 3 exons. The striking similarity of the MNK and WND genes at the genomic level is consistent with their relatively recent divergence from a common ancestral gene. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Influence of dietary nucleotide restriction on bacterial sepsis and phagocytic cell function in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A D; Fanslow, W C; Drath, D B; Rudolph, F B; Van Buren, C T

    1986-02-01

    Although enzyme defects in purine metabolism have revealed the importance of these substrates to maintenance of a normal immune response, the role of exogenous nucleotides on the cells that mediate the host defense system has remained largely unexplored. Recent investigations have revealed that dietary nucleotides are vital to the maintenance of cell-mediated responses to antigen stimulation. To test the influence of dietary nucleotide deprivation on resistance to infection, Balb/c mice were maintained on chow, a nucleotide-free (NF) diet, or an NF diet repleted with adenine, uracil, or RNA. Mice on the NF diet suffered 100% mortality following intravenous challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, while chow-fed and RNA- or uracil-repleted mice demonstrated significantly greater resistance to this bacterial challenge. Macrophages from mice on the NF diet had decreased phagocytic activity as measured by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria compared with mice maintained on the NF diet supplemented with adenine, uracil, or RNA. No change in S aureus antibody response was noted on the various diets. Although the mechanism of this suppression of nonspecific immunity remains unclear, provision of nucleotides to defined diets appears vital to maintain host resistance to bacterial challenge. PMID:3947217

  15. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  16. Basal nucleotide levels, release, and metabolism in normal and cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, S. H.; Lazarowski, E. R.; Picher, M.; Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Boucher, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a syndrome caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CF, the link between CFTR gene mutations and the pathogenesis of CF lung disease remains poorly defined. CFTR has been assigned a number of putative functions that may contribute to innate airway defense, including the regulation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) release into the extracellular environment. Because extracellular ATP and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) may regulate airway mucociliary clearance via interaction with luminal P2Y2 receptors, the loss of CFTR-mediated nucleotide release could explain the defect in CF airway defense. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the physiologic importance of CFTR-mediated nucleotide release in vivo by directly measuring levels of ATP and UTP in nasal airway surface liquid from normal and CF subjects. Because these basal nucleotide levels reflect the net activities of nucleotide release and metabolic pathways, we also measured constitutive rates of nucleotide release and metabolism on well-differentiated normal and CF airway cultures in vitro. The measurement of ATP release rates were paralleled by in vivo studies employing continuous nasal perfusion in normal and CF subjects. Finally, the regulation of ATP release by isoproterenol and methacholine-stimulated submucosal gland secretion was tested. RESULTS: These studies revealed that steady-state ATP and UTP levels were similar in normal (470 +/- 131 nM and 37 +/- 7 nM, respectively) and CF (911 +/- 199 nM and 33 +/- 12 nM, respectively) subjects. The rates of both ATP release and metabolism were also similar in normal and CF airway epithelia both in vitro and in vivo. Airway submucosal glands did not secrete nucleotides, but rather, secreted a soluble nucleotidase in response to cholinergic stimuli. CONCLUSION: The concentration of ATP in airway surface liquid is in a range

  17. Ligation-triggered fluorescent silver nanoclusters system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijuan; Wang, Pei; Qiu, Xue; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a novel silver nanocluster-based fluorescent system for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an important biological small molecule involved in a wide range of biological processes. A single-stranded dumbbell DNA probe was designed and used for the assay, which contained a nick in the stem, a poly-cytosine nucleotide loop close to 5' end as the template for the formation of highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) and another loop close to 3' end. Only in the presence of NAD(+), the probe was linked at 5' and 3' ends by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, which blocked the DNA polymerase-based extension reaction, ensuring the formation of fluorescent Ag NCs. This technique provided a logarithmic linear relationship in the range of 1 pM-500 nM with a detection limit of as low as 1 pM NAD(+), and exhibited high selectivity against its analogues, and was then successfully used for the detection of NAD(+) level in four kinds of cell homogenates. In addition, this new approach was conducted in an isothermal and homogeneous condition without the need of any thermal cycling, washing, and separation steps, making it very simple. Overall, this label-free protocol offers a promising alternative for the detection of NAD(+), taking advantage of specificity, sensitivity, cost-efficiency, and simplicity. PMID:24442015

  18. Uncoupling protein and ATP/ADP carrier increase mitochondrial proton conductance after cold adaptation of king penguins

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Darren A; Duchamp, Claude; Rey, Benjamin; Hanuise, Nicolas; Rouanet, Jean Louis; Sibille, Brigitte; Brand, Martin D

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile king penguins develop adaptive thermogenesis after repeated immersion in cold water. However, the mechanisms of such metabolic adaptation in birds are unknown, as they lack brown adipose tissue and uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which mediate adaptive non-shivering thermogenesis in mammals. We used three different groups of juvenile king penguins to investigate the mitochondrial basis of avian adaptive thermogenesis in vitro. Skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from penguins that had never been immersed in cold water showed no superoxide-stimulated proton conductance, indicating no functional avian UCP. Skeletal muscle mitochondria from penguins that had been either experimentally immersed or naturally adapted to cold water did possess functional avian UCP, demonstrated by a superoxide-stimulated, GDP-inhibitable proton conductance across their inner membrane. This was associated with a markedly greater abundance of avian UCP mRNA. In the presence (but not the absence) of fatty acids, these mitochondria also showed a greater adenine nucleotide translocase-catalysed proton conductance than those from never-immersed penguins. This was due to an increase in the amount of adenine nucleotide translocase. Therefore, adaptive thermogenesis in juvenile king penguins is linked to two separate mechanisms of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle mitochondria: increased proton transport activity of avian UCP (dependent on superoxide and inhibited by GDP) and increased proton transport activity of the adenine nucleotide translocase (dependent on fatty acids and inhibited by carboxyatractylate). PMID:15146050

  19. Intracellular ATP Decrease Mediates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation upon Nigericin and Crystal Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; So, Alexander; Tamura, Mizuho; Busso, Nathalie

    2015-12-15

    Activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome initiates an inflammatory response, which is associated with host defense against pathogens and the progression of chronic inflammatory diseases such as gout and atherosclerosis. The NLRP3 inflammasome mediates caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β processing in response to various stimuli, including extracellular ATP, although the roles of intracellular ATP (iATP) in NLRP3 activation remain unclear. In this study, we found that in activated macrophages artificial reduction of iATP by 2-deoxyglucose, a glycolysis inhibitor, caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization, leading to IL-1β secretion via NLRP3 and caspase-1 activation. Additionally, the NLRP3 activators nigericin and monosodium urate crystals lowered iATP through K(+)- and Ca(2+)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a feedback loop between iATP loss and lowering of mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrate the fundamental roles of iATP in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and regulation of IL-1β secretion, and they suggest that maintenance of the intracellular ATP pools could be a strategy for countering NLRP3-mediated inflammation. PMID:26546608

  20. Structure and Mechanism of Soybean ATP Sulfurylase and the Committed Step in Plant Sulfur Assimilation*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; McKinney, Samuel E.; Westfall, Corey S.; Lee, Soon Goo; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Giovannetti, Marco; Kopriva, Stanislav; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes of the sulfur assimilation pathway are potential targets for improving nutrient content and environmental stress responses in plants. The committed step in this pathway is catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase, which synthesizes adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) from sulfate and ATP. To better understand the molecular basis of this energetically unfavorable reaction, the x-ray crystal structure of ATP sulfurylase isoform 1 from soybean (Glycine max ATP sulfurylase) in complex with APS was determined. This structure revealed several highly conserved substrate-binding motifs in the active site and a distinct dimerization interface compared with other ATP sulfurylases but was similar to mammalian 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate synthetase. Steady-state kinetic analysis of 20 G. max ATP sulfurylase point mutants suggests a reaction mechanism in which nucleophilic attack by sulfate on the α-phosphate of ATP involves transition state stabilization by Arg-248, Asn-249, His-255, and Arg-349. The structure and kinetic analysis suggest that ATP sulfurylase overcomes the energetic barrier of APS synthesis by distorting nucleotide structure and identifies critical residues for catalysis. Mutations that alter sulfate assimilation in Arabidopsis were mapped to the structure, which provides a molecular basis for understanding their effects on the sulfur assimilation pathway. PMID:24584934

  1. Regulation of calreticulin–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I interactions by ATP

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva Joseph; Gagnon, Jessica K.; Arora, Karunesh; Brooks, Charles L.; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class I peptide loading complex (PLC) facilitates the assembly of MHC class I molecules with peptides, but factors that regulate the stability and dynamics of the assembly complex are largely uncharacterized. Based on initial findings that ATP, in addition to MHC class I-specific peptide, is able to induce MHC class I dissociation from the PLC, we investigated the interaction of ATP with the chaperone calreticulin, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal, calcium-binding component of the PLC that is known to bind ATP. We combined computational and experimental measurements to identify residues within the globular domain of calreticulin, in proximity to the high-affinity calcium-binding site, that are important for high-affinity ATP binding and for ATPase activity. High-affinity calcium binding by calreticulin is required for optimal nucleotide binding, but both ATP and ADP destabilize enthalpy-driven high-affinity calcium binding to calreticulin. ATP also selectively destabilizes the interaction of calreticulin with cellular substrates, including MHC class I molecules. Calreticulin mutants that affect ATP or high-affinity calcium binding display prolonged associations with monoglucosylated forms of cellular MHC class I, delaying MHC class I dissociation from the PLC and their transit through the secretory pathway. These studies reveal central roles for ATP and calcium binding as regulators of calreticulin–substrate interactions and as key determinants of PLC dynamics. PMID:26420867

  2. Specific requirement for ATP at an early step of in vitro transcription of human mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, N.; Attardi, G.

    1987-06-01

    The ATP concentrations allowing transcription of heavy- and light-strand of human mtDNA in a HeLa cell mitochrondrial lysate were found to cover a broad range, with a maximum around 2.5 mM, and with reproducible differences in the ATP response curves for the two transcription events. Direct measurements showed that nonspecific ATP degradation during the assay did not account for the high ATP requirement. 5'-Adenylyl imidodiphosphate (p(NH)ppA), an ATP analog with a nonhydrolyzable ..beta..-..gamma.. bond, was unable to substitute for ATP in supporting mtDNA transcription but greatly stimulated this transcription in the presence of a low concentration of exogenous APT, measured with (/sup 32/P)-labeled nucleotides. Evidence was obtained indicating that p(NH)ppA did not support an early event in mtDNA transcription (formation of preinitiation complex or initiation), whereas this analog could substitute effectively for ATP in the subsequent elongation steps. These results pointed to a specific requirement for ATP at an early step of the transcription process.

  3. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Andreas; Verghese, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1, and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell. PMID:26913285

  4. Regulation of arylsulfate sulfotransferase from a human intestinal bacterium by nucleotides and magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Konishi-Imamura, L; Kim, D H; Koizumi, M; Kobashi, K

    1995-01-01

    Arylsulfate sulfotransferase (ASST) from a human intestinal bacterium stoichiometrically catalyzed the transfer of a sulfate group from phenylsulfate esters to phenolic compounds. Pentachlorophenol, one of the selective inhibitors of phenol sulfoconjugation in mammalian tissues, inhibited both phenol and tyramine sulfation by ASST. Nucleotide triphosphates such as ATP, GTP, UTP and CTP, and pyrophosphate inhibited the ASST activity, whereas Mg2+ and Mn2+ activated the enzyme and prevented its inhibition by ATP and pyrophosphate. Equimolar binding of [alpha-] and [gamma-32P]ATP to the enzyme showed that the enzyme protein was not phosphorylated, but bound ATP. These results suggest that nucleotide triphosphates and divalent cations are important modulators in the control of ASST activity. PMID:7542320

  5. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  6. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  7. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules. PMID:27394096

  8. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  9. Orthophosphite-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Malacinski, George M.; Konetzka, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Information was obtained on the general properties and specificity of orthophosphite-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase. The enzyme was extracted from Pseudomonas fluorescens 195 grown in medium containing orthophosphite as the sole source of phosphorus. An enzyme preparation suitable for characterization was obtained from crude extracts by use of high-speed centrifugation, protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex gel filtration. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.0, and was inactivated within 6 min at 37 C. Arsenite, hypophosphite, nitrite, selenite, and tellurite were not oxidized by the enzyme. Sulfite inhibited the enzymatic oxidation of orthophosphite in an apparent competitive manner. PMID:4381632

  10. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  11. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-11-13

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a "steric-gate" to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2'-exo, North) conformation near a C3'-endo pucker, and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3'-exo, South) conformation near a C2'-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3'-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  12. Multiple conformations of the nucleotide site of Kinesin family motors in the triphosphate state.

    PubMed

    Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam; Rice, Sarah; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2011-05-13

    Identifying conformational changes in kinesin family motors associated with nucleotide and microtubule (MT) binding is essential to determining an atomic-level model for force production and motion by the motors. Using the mobility of nucleotide analog spin probes bound at the active sites of kinesin family motors to monitor conformational changes, we previously demonstrated that, in the ADP state, the open nucleotide site closes upon MT binding [Naber, N., Minehardt, T. J., Rice, S., Chen, X., Grammer, J., Matuska, M., et al. (2003). Closing of the nucleotide pocket of kinesin family motors upon binding to microtubules. Science, 300, 798-801]. We now extend these studies to kinesin-1 (K) and ncd (nonclaret disjunctional protein) motors in ATP and ATP-analog states. Our results reveal structural differences between several triphosphate and transition-state analogs bound to both kinesin and ncd in solution. The spectra of kinesin/ncd in the presence of SLADP•AlFx/BeFx and kinesin, with the mutation E236A (K-E236A; does not hydrolyze ATP) bound to ATP, show an open conformation of the nucleotide pocket similar to that seen in the kinesin/ncd•ADP states. In contrast, the triphosphate analogs K•SLAMPPNP and K-E236A•SLAMPPNP induce a more immobilized component of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum, implying closing of the nucleotide site. The MT-bound states of all of the triphosphate analogs reveal two novel spectral components. The equilibrium between these two components is only weakly dependent on temperature. Both components have more restricted mobility than observed in MT-bound diphosphate states. Thus, the closing of the nucleotide pocket when the diphosphate state binds to MTs is amplified in the triphosphate state, perhaps promoting accelerated ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, molecular dynamics simulations show a good correlation between our spectroscopic data, X-ray crystallography, and the electron microscopy of MT

  13. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  14. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2′(3′)-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5′ triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s−1, whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s−1. These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement.

  15. Kinetics of nucleotide transport in rat heart mitochondria studied by a rapid filtration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Brandolin, G.; Marty, I.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1990-10-01

    A rapid filtration technique has been used to measure at room temperature the kinetics of ADP and ATP transport in rat heart mitochondria in the millisecond time range. Transport was stopped by cessation of the nucleotide supply, without the use of a transport inhibitor, thus avoiding any quenching delay. The kinetics of ({sup 14}C)ADP transport in energized mitochondria were apparently monophasic. The rate of transport of ({sup 14}C)ATP in energized mitochondria was 5-10 times lower than that of ({sup 14}C)ADP. Upon uncoupling, the rate of ({sup 14}C)ATP uptake was enhanced, and that of ({sup 14}C)ADP uptake was decreased. However, the two rates did not equalize, indicating that transport was not exclusively electrogenic. Transport of ({sup 14}C)ADP and ({sup 14}C)ATP by resting mitochondria followed biphasic kinetics. Depletion of nucleotides in resting mitochondria resulted in a greater decrease in the extent of the slow phase than of the rapid one. In addition, about half of the nucleotides taken up at the end of the rapid phase were not discharged into the medium upon addition of carboxyatractyloside. This suggested that matricial nucleotides are compartmentalized in two pools which are exchangeable at different rates with external nucleotides.

  16. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  17. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  18. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  19. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  20. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  1. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    PubMed

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  2. ATP-independent CFTR channel gating and allosteric modulation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Bernard, Karen; Li, Ge; Wang, Guangyu; Bevensee, Mark O.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. CFTR gating is linked to ATP binding and dimerization of its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Channel activation also requires phosphorylation of the R domain by poorly understood mechanisms. Unlike conventional ligand-gated channels, CFTR is an ATPase for which ligand (ATP) release typically involves nucleotide hydrolysis. The extent to which CFTR gating conforms to classic allosteric schemes of ligand activation is unclear. Here, we describe point mutations in the CFTR cytosolic loops that markedly increase ATP-independent (constitutive) channel activity. This finding is consistent with an allosteric gating mechanism in which ligand shifts the equilibrium between inactive and active states but is not essential for channel opening. Constitutive mutations mapped to the putative symmetry axis of CFTR based on the crystal structures of related ABC transporters, a common theme for activating mutations in ligand-gated channels. Furthermore, the ATP sensitivity of channel activation was strongly enhanced by these constitutive mutations, as predicted for an allosteric mechanism (reciprocity between protein activation and ligand occupancy). Introducing constitutive mutations into CFTR channels that cannot open in response to ATP (i.e., the G551D CF mutant and an NBD2-deletion mutant) substantially rescued their activities. Importantly, constitutive mutants that opened without ATP or NBD2 still required R domain phosphorylation for optimal activity. Our results confirm that (i) CFTR gating exhibits features of protein allostery that are shared with conventional ligand-gated channels and (ii) the R domain modulates CFTR activity independent of ATP-induced NBD dimerization. PMID:20133716

  3. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as a cellular network throughout the mineralised matrix of bone and are considered the primary mechanosensors of this tissue. They sense mechanical stimulation such as fluid flow and are able to regulate osteoblast and osteoclast functions on the bone surface. Previously, we found that ATP is released load-dependently from osteocytes from the onset of mechanical stimulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and how ATP release can be evoked in osteocytes via purinergic receptor activation. ATP release was quantified by real-time determination using the luciferin-luciferase assay and the release pathway was investigated using pharmacological inhibition. The P2Y receptor profile was analysed using gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while functional testing was performed using measurements of intracellular calcium responses to P2 receptor agonists. These investigations demonstrated that MLO-Y4 osteocytes express functional P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors in addition to the previously reported P2X receptors. Further, we found that osteocytes respond to nucleotides such as ATP, UTP and ADP by increasing the intracellular calcium concentration and that they release ATP dose-dependently upon stimulation with 1-10 μM UTP. In addition to this, osteocytes release large amounts of ATP upon cell rupture, which might also be a source for other nucleotides, such as UTP. These findings indicate that mechanically induced ATP signals may be propagated by P2 receptor activation and further ATP release in the osteocyte network and implicate purinergic signalling as a central signalling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24374572

  4. High-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken from MT-COI and ATP-6 perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Wu, Nan; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Gu, Ting; Li, Diyan

    2016-09-01

    The problem of hypoxia adaptation in high altitudes is an unsolved brainteaser in the field of life sciences. As one of the best chicken breeds with adaptability to highland environment, the Tibetan chicken, is genetically different from lowland chicken breeds. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxic adaptability in high altitude, in the present study, we focused on the MT-COI together with ATP-6 gene to explore the regulatory mechanisms for hypoxia adaptability in Tibet chicken. Here, we sequenced MT-COI of 29 Tibetan chickens and 30 Chinese domestic chickens and ATP-6 gene of 28 Tibetan chickens and 29 Chinese domestic chickens. In MT-COI gene, 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected though none of these was a missense mutation, confirming the fact that MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence. In ATP-6 gene, 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected and we found a missense mutation (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene of Tibetan chicken resulting in an amino acid substitution. Due to the critical role of ATP-6 gene in the proton translocation and energy metabolism, we speculated the possibility of this mutation playing an important role in easier energy conversion and metabolism in Tibetan chickens than Chinese domestic chickens so as to better adapt to the harsh environment of the high-altitude areas. The Median-joining profile also suggested that haplotype Ha2 has the ancestral position to the other haplotypes and has significant relationship with high-altitude adaptation in ATP-6 gene. Therefore, we considered that the polymorphism (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene may affect the specific functions of ATP-6 enzyme relating to high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken and MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence. PMID:25693693

  5. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide–protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson–Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson–Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues. PMID:21737431

  6. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  7. The purine nucleotide cycle. A pathway for ammonia production in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bogusky, R T; Lowenstein, L M; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-01-01

    Particle-free extracts prepared from kidney cortex of rat catalyze the formation of ammonia via the purine nucleotide cycle. The cycle generates ammonia and fumarate from aspartate, using catalytic amounts of inosine monophosphate, adenylosuccinate, and adenosine monophosphate. The specific activities of the enzymes of the cycle are 1.27+/-0.27 nmol/mg protein per min (SE) for adenoylosuccinate synthetase, 1.38+/-0.16 for adenylosuccinase, and 44.0+/-3.3 for AMP deaminase. Compared with controls, extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed ammonium chloride for 2 days show a 60% increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity, and a greater and more rapid synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate. Extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed a potassium-deficient diet show a twofold increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity. In such extracts the rate of synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate is also increased. These results show that the reactions of the purine nucleotide cycle are present and can operate in extracts of kidney cortex. The operational capacity of the cycle is accelerated by ammonium chloride feeding and potassium depletion, conditions known to increase renal ammonia excretion. Extracts of kidney cortex convert inosine monophosphate to uric acid. This is prevented by addition of allopurinol of 1-pyrophosphoryl ribose 5-phosphate to the reaction mixture. PMID:821968

  8. The low-affinity ATP binding site of the Escherichia coli SecA dimer is localized at the subunit interface.

    PubMed

    van der Wolk, J P; Boorsma, A; Knoche, M; Schäfer, H J; Driessen, A J

    1997-12-01

    The homodimeric SecA protein is the ATP-dependent force generator in the Escherichia coli precursor protein translocation cascade. SecA contains two essential nucleotide binding sites (NBSs), i.e., NBS1 and NBS2 that bind ATP with high and low affinity, respectively. The photoactivatable bifunctional cross-linking agent 3'-arylazido-8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (diN3ATP) was used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the nucleotide binding sites of SecA. DiN3ATP is an authentic ATP analogue as it supports SecA-dependent precursor protein translocation and translocation ATPase. UV-induced photo-cross-linking of the diN3ATP-bound SecA results in the formation of stable dimeric species of SecA. D209N SecA, a mutant unable to bind nucleotides at NBS1, was also photo-cross-linked by diN3ATP, whereas no cross-linking occurred with the NBS2 mutant R509K SecA. We concluded that the low-affinity NBS2, which is located in the carboxyl-terminal half of SecA, is the site of crosslinking and that NBS2 binds nucleotides at or near the subunit interface of the SecA dimer. PMID:9398216

  9. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR’s opening–closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in real time with a ligand exchange protocol, we demonstrated that during many of these gating cycles, NBD1 is constantly occupied by a stably bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP molecule for tens of seconds. We provided evidence that this tightly bound ATP or 8-N3-ATP also interacts with residues in the signature sequence of NBD2, a telltale sign for an event occurring at the NBD1–NBD2 interface. The open state of CFTR has been shown to represent a two-ATP–bound NBD dimer. Our results indicate that upon ATP hydrolysis in NBD2, the channel closes into a “partial NBD dimer” state where the NBD interface remains partially closed, preventing ATP dissociation from NBD1 but allowing the release of hydrolytic products and binding of the next ATP to occur in NBD2. Opening and closing of CFTR can then be coupled to the formation and “partial” separation of the NBD dimer. The tightly bound ATP molecule in NBD1 can occasionally dissociate from the partial dimer state, resulting in a nucleotide-free monomeric state of NBDs. Our data, together with other structural/functional studies of CFTR’s NBDs, suggest that this process is poorly reversible, implying that the channel in the partial dimer state or monomeric state enters the open state through different pathways. We therefore proposed a gating model for CFTR with two distinct cycles. The structural and functional significance of our results to other ABC proteins is discussed. PMID:20421370

  10. Selective Migration of Subpopulations of Bone Marrow Cells along an SDF-1α and ATP Gradient.

    PubMed

    Laupheimer, Michael; Skorska, Anna; Große, Jana; Tiedemann, Gudrun; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert; Lux, Cornelia A

    2014-01-01

    Both stem cell chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) are increased in ischemic myocardium. Since ATP has been reported to influence cell migration, we analysed the migratory response of bone marrow cells towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. Total nucleated cells (BM-TNCs) were isolated from bone marrow of cardiac surgery patients. Migration assays were performed in vitro. Subsequently, migrated cells were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of CD133, CD34, CD117, CD184, CD309, and CD14 expression. BM-TNCs migrated significantly towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. The proportions of CD34+ cells as well as subpopulations coexpressing multiple stem cell markers were selectively enhanced after migration towards SDF-1 or SDF-1 + ATP. After spontaneous migration, significantly fewer stem cells and CD184+ cells were detected. Direct incubation with SDF-1 led to a reduction of CD184+ but not stem cell marker-positive cells, while incubation with ATP significantly increased CD14+ percentage. In summary, we found that while a combination of SDF-1 and ATP elicited strong migration of BM-TNCs in vitro, only SDF-1 was responsible for selective attraction of hematopoietic stem cells. Meanwhile, spontaneous migration of stem cells was lower compared to BM-TNCs or monocytes. PMID:25610653

  11. Impairment of vesicular ATP release affects glucose metabolism and increases insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shohei; Miyaji, Takaaki; Hiasa, Miki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uematsu, Akira; Iwatsuki, Ken; Shibata, Atsushi; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine cells store ATP in secretory granules and release it along with hormones that may trigger a variety of cellular responses in a process called purinergic chemical transmission. Although the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) has been shown to be involved in vesicular storage and release of ATP, its physiological relevance in vivo is far less well understood. In Vnut knockout (Vnut−/−) mice, we found that the loss of functional VNUT in adrenal chromaffin granules and insulin granules in the islets of Langerhans led to several significant effects. Vesicular ATP accumulation and depolarization-dependent ATP release were absent in the chromaffin granules of Vnut−/− mice. Glucose-responsive ATP release was also absent in pancreatic β-cells in Vnut−/− mice, while glucose-responsive insulin secretion was enhanced to a greater extent than that in wild-type tissue. Vnut−/− mice exhibited improved glucose tolerance and low blood glucose upon fasting due to increased insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrated an essential role of VNUT in vesicular storage and release of ATP in neuroendocrine cells in vivo and suggest that vesicular ATP and/or its degradation products act as feedback regulators in catecholamine and insulin secretion, thereby regulating blood glucose homeostasis. PMID:25331291

  12. Selective Migration of Subpopulations of Bone Marrow Cells along an SDF-1α and ATP Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Laupheimer, Michael; Skorska, Anna; Große, Jana; Tiedemann, Gudrun; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert; Lux, Cornelia A.

    2014-01-01

    Both stem cell chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) are increased in ischemic myocardium. Since ATP has been reported to influence cell migration, we analysed the migratory response of bone marrow cells towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. Total nucleated cells (BM-TNCs) were isolated from bone marrow of cardiac surgery patients. Migration assays were performed in vitro. Subsequently, migrated cells were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of CD133, CD34, CD117, CD184, CD309, and CD14 expression. BM-TNCs migrated significantly towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. The proportions of CD34+ cells as well as subpopulations coexpressing multiple stem cell markers were selectively enhanced after migration towards SDF-1 or SDF-1 + ATP. After spontaneous migration, significantly fewer stem cells and CD184+ cells were detected. Direct incubation with SDF-1 led to a reduction of CD184+ but not stem cell marker-positive cells, while incubation with ATP significantly increased CD14+ percentage. In summary, we found that while a combination of SDF-1 and ATP elicited strong migration of BM-TNCs in vitro, only SDF-1 was responsible for selective attraction of hematopoietic stem cells. Meanwhile, spontaneous migration of stem cells was lower compared to BM-TNCs or monocytes. PMID:25610653

  13. L-ATP is recognized by some cellular and viral enzymes: does chance drive enzymic enantioselectivity?

    PubMed Central

    Verri, A; Montecucco, A; Gosselin, G; Boudou, V; Imbach, J L; Spadari, S; Focher, F

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that l-ATP is recognized by some enzymes that are involved in the synthesis of nucleotides and nucleic acids. l-ATP, as well as its natural d-enantiomer, acts as a phosphate donor in the reaction catalysed by human deoxycytidine kinase, whereas it is not recognized by either enantioselective human thymidine kinase or non-enantioselective herpes virus thymidine kinase. l-ATP strongly inhibits (Ki 80 microM) the synthesis of RNA primers catalysed by DNA primase associated with human DNA polymerase alpha, whereas RNA synthesis catalysed by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is completely unaffected. Moreover, l-ATP competitively inhibits ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase (Ki 25 microM), suggesting that it interacts with the ATP-binding site of the enzyme. Kinetic studies demonstrated that l-ATP cannot be used as a cofactor in the ligase-catalysed joining reaction. On the other hand, l-AMP is used by T4 DNA ligase to catalyse the reverse reaction, even though a high level of intermediate circular nicked DNA molecules accumulates. Our results suggest that a lack of enantioselectivity of enzymes is more common than was believed a few years ago, and, given the absence of selective constraints against l-nucleosides in Nature, this may depend on chance more than on evolutionary strategy. PMID:9895305

  14. Fine-tuned ATP signals are acute mediators in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Ellegaard, Maria; Syberg, Susanne; Andersen, Christina K B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Vang, Ole; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2015-12-01

    Osteocytes are considered the primary mechanosensors of bone, but the signaling pathways they apply in mechanotransduction are still incompletely investigated and characterized. A growing body of data strongly indicates that P2 receptor signaling among osteoblasts and osteoclasts has regulatory effects on bone remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesized that ATP signaling is also applied by osteocytes in mechanotransduction. We applied a short fluid pulse on MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells during real-time detection of ATP and demonstrated that mechanical stimulation activates the acute release of ATP and that these acute ATP signals are fine-tuned according to the magnitude of loading. ATP release was then challenged by pharmacological inhibitors, which indicated a vesicular release pathway for acute ATP signals. Finally, we showed that osteocytes express functional P2X2 and P2X7 receptors and respond to even low concentrations of nucleotides by increasing intracellular calcium concentration. These results indicate that in osteocytes, vesicular ATP release is an acute mediator of mechanical signals and the magnitude of loading. These and previous results, therefore, implicate purinergic signaling as an early signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:26327582

  15. Impairment of vesicular ATP release affects glucose metabolism and increases insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shohei; Miyaji, Takaaki; Hiasa, Miki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uematsu, Akira; Iwatsuki, Ken; Shibata, Atsushi; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine cells store ATP in secretory granules and release it along with hormones that may trigger a variety of cellular responses in a process called purinergic chemical transmission. Although the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) has been shown to be involved in vesicular storage and release of ATP, its physiological relevance in vivo is far less well understood. In Vnut knockout (Vnut(-/-)) mice, we found that the loss of functional VNUT in adrenal chromaffin granules and insulin granules in the islets of Langerhans led to several significant effects. Vesicular ATP accumulation and depolarization-dependent ATP release were absent in the chromaffin granules of Vnut(-/-) mice. Glucose-responsive ATP release was also absent in pancreatic β-cells in Vnut(-/-) mice, while glucose-responsive insulin secretion was enhanced to a greater extent than that in wild-type tissue. Vnut(-/-) mice exhibited improved glucose tolerance and low blood glucose upon fasting due to increased insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrated an essential role of VNUT in vesicular storage and release of ATP in neuroendocrine cells in vivo and suggest that vesicular ATP and/or its degradation products act as feedback regulators in catecholamine and insulin secretion, thereby regulating blood glucose homeostasis. PMID:25331291

  16. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  17. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs. PMID:27318925

  18. Nucleotide diversity in gorillas.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ning; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of the levels of nucleotide diversity in humans and apes may provide valuable information for inferring the demographic history of these species, the effect of social structure on genetic diversity, patterns of past migration, and signatures of past selection events. Previous DNA sequence data from both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genomes suggested a much higher level of nucleotide diversity in the African apes than in humans. Noting that the nuclear DNA data from the apes were very limited, we previously conducted a DNA polymorphism study in humans and another in chimpanzees and bonobos, using 50 DNA segments randomly chosen from the noncoding, nonrepetitive parts of the human genome. The data revealed that the nucleotide diversity (pi) in bonobos (0.077%) is actually lower than that in humans (0.087%) and that pi in chimpanzees (0.134%) is only 50% higher than that in humans. In the present study we sequenced the same 50 segments in 15 western lowland gorillas and estimated pi to be 0.158%. This is the highest value among the African apes but is only about two times higher than that in humans. Interestingly, available mtDNA sequence data also suggest a twofold higher nucleotide diversity in gorillas than in humans, but suggest a threefold higher nucleotide diversity in chimpanzees than in humans. The higher mtDNA diversity in chimpanzees might be due to the unique pattern in the evolution of chimpanzee mtDNA. From the nuclear DNA pi values, we estimated that the long-term effective population sizes of humans, bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas are, respectively, 10,400, 12,300, 21,300, and 25,200. PMID:15082556

  19. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  20. Adenine, a hairpin ribozyme cofactor--high-pressure and competition studies.

    PubMed

    Ztouti, Myriam; Kaddour, Hussein; Miralles, Francisco; Simian, Christophe; Vergne, Jacques; Hervé, Guy; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    The RNA world hypothesis assumes that life arose from ancestral RNA molecules, which stored genetic information and catalyzed chemical reactions. Although RNA catalysis was believed to be restricted to phosphate chemistry, it is now established that the RNA has much wider catalytic capacities. In this respect, we devised, in a previous study, two hairpin ribozymes (adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1 and adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 2) that require adenine as cofactor for their reversible self-cleavage. We have now used high hydrostatic pressure to investigate the role of adenine in the catalytic activity of adenine-dependent hairpin ribozyme 1. High-pressure studies are of interest because they make it possible to determine the volume changes associated with the reactions, which in turn reflect the conformational modifications and changes in hydration involved in the catalytic mechanism. They are also relevant in the context of piezophilic organisms, as well as in relation to the extreme conditions that prevailed at the origin of life. Our results indicate that the catalytic process involves a transition state whose formation is accompanied by a positive activation volume and release of water molecules. In addition, competition experiments with adenine analogs strongly suggest that exogenous adenine replaces the adenine present at the catalytic site of the wild-type hairpin ribozyme. PMID:19476496

  1. Characterization of photophysical and base-mimicking properties of a novel fluorescent adenine analogue in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dierckx, Anke; Dinér, Peter; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Kumar, Joshi Dhruval; Brown, Tom; Grøtli, Morten; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2011-01-01

    To increase the diversity of fluorescent base analogues with improved properties, we here present the straightforward click-chemistry-based synthesis of a novel fluorescent adenine-analogue triazole adenine (AT) and its photophysical characterization inside DNA. AT shows promising properties compared to the widely used adenine analogue 2-aminopurine. Quantum yields reach >20% and >5% in single- and double-stranded DNA, respectively, and show dependence on neighbouring bases. Moreover, AT shows only a minor destabilization of DNA duplexes, comparable to 2-aminopurine, and circular dichroism investigations suggest that AT only causes minimal structural perturbations to normal B-DNA. Furthermore, we find that AT shows favourable base-pairing properties with thymine and more surprisingly also with normal adenine. In conclusion, AT shows strong potential as a new fluorescent adenine analogue for monitoring changes within its microenvironment in DNA. PMID:21278417

  2. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules. PMID:25754395

  3. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  4. Mechanism of action of ATP on canine pulmonary vagal C fibre nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Pelleg, A; Hurt, C M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on pulmonary vagal afferent fibres (n = 46) was studied in a canine model in vivo (n = 38). 2. ATP (3-6 mumol kg-1), administered as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a transient burst of action potentials in cervical vagal fibres, which was not affected by either blockade of ganglionic transmission (hexamethonium) or a drop in arterial blood pressure (nitroglycerine). 3. The fibres with ATP-sensitive terminals were otherwise quiescent with no activity related to either cardiac or respiratory cycles and their conduction velocity was 0.85 +/- 0.13 m s-1 (n = 7). 4. Inflation of the lungs to 2-3 times the tidal volume triggered brief bursts of action potentials in these fibres. 5. Capsaicin (10 micrograms kg-1), given as a rapid bolus into the right atrium, elicited a burst of action potentials in these ATP-sensitive fibres. 6. Smaller amounts of ATP and capsaicin (0.5-3 mumol kg-1 and 1-5 micrograms kg-1, respectively) had similar effects when the two compounds were given into the right pulmonary artery. 7. Adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, or adenosine 5'-diphosphate did not excite these fibres (n = 30). 8. The non-degradable analogue of ATP alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-mATP) was tenfold more potent than ATP while beta,gamma-methylene ATP (beta,gamma-mATP) was in active. 9. The selective P2x-purinoceptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid markedly attenuated the effect of ATP but not of capsaicin. The P2Y-purinoceptor antagonist Reactive Blue 2 was without effect. 10. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not affect this action of ATP. 11. In the canine lungs ATP activates vagal C fibre nerve terminals. This action is mediated by P2X-purinoceptors and is independent of a PTX-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein). PMID:8745294

  5. Multiple Conformations of the Nucleotide Site of Kinesin-Family Motors in the Triphosphate State

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam; Rice, Sarah; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Identifying conformational changes in kinesin-family motors associated with nucleotide and microtubule binding is essential to determining an atomic-level model for force production and motion by the motors. Using the mobility of nucleotide-analog spin probes bound at the active sites of kinesin-family motors to monitor conformational changes, we previously demonstrated that in the ADP state the open nucleotide site closes upon microtubule (MT) binding1. We now extend these studies to kinesin-1 (K) and ncd motors in ATP and ATP-analog states. Our results reveal structural differences between several triphosphate and transition-state analogs bound to both kinesin and ncd in solution. The spectra of kinesin/ncd in the presence of SLADP•AlFx/BeFx and kinesin with the mutation E236A (K-E236A, does not hydrolyze ATP) bound to ATP show an open conformation of the nucleotide pocket similar to that seen in the kinesin/ncd•ADP states. In contrast, the triphosphate/analogs K•SLAMPPNP and K-E236A•SLAMPPNP induce a more immobilized component of the EPR spectrum, implying a closing of the nucleotide site. The MT-bound states of all of the triphosphate-analogs reveal two novel spectral components. The equilibrium between these two components is only weakly dependent on temperature. Both components have lower mobility than those observed in MT-bound diphosphate states. Thus the closing of the nucleotide pocket when the diphosphate state binds to MTs is amplified in the triphosphate state, perhaps promoting accelerated ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, molecular dynamics simulations show a good correlation between our spectroscopic data, X-ray crystallography, and electron microscopy of MT-bound triphosphate analog states. PMID:21277856

  6. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments. PMID:26844692

  7. Nucleotide-binding mechanisms in pseudokinases

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases are classified by the lack of one or several of the highly conserved motifs involved in nucleotide (nt) binding or catalytic activity of protein kinases (PKs). Pseudokinases represent ∼10% of the human kinome and they are found in all evolutionary classes of kinases. It has become evident that pseudokinases, which were initially considered somewhat peculiar dead kinases, are important components in several signalling cascades. Furthermore, several pseudokinases have been linked to human diseases, particularly cancer, which is raising interest for therapeutic approaches towards these proteins. The ATP-binding pocket is a well-established drug target and elucidation of the mechanism and properties of nt binding in pseudokinases is of significant interest and importance. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the pseudokinase family are very diverse in structure as well as in their ability and mechanism to bind nts or perform phosphoryl transfer reactions. This diversity also precludes prediction of pseudokinase function, or the importance of nt binding for said function, based on primary sequence alone. Currently available data indicate that ∼40% of pseudokinases are able to bind nts, whereas only few are able to catalyse occasional phosphoryl transfer. Pseudokinases employ diverse mechanisms to bind nts, which usually occurs at low, but physiological, affinity. ATP binding serves often a structural role but in most cases the functional roles are not precisely known. In the present review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pseudokinases employ for nt binding and how this often low-affinity binding can be accurately analysed. PMID:26589967

  8. Role of key residues at the flavin mononucleotide (FMN):adenylyltransferase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) Synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    In mammals and in yeast the conversion of Riboflavin (RF) into flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is catalysed by the sequential action of two enzymes: an ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) and an ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT). However, most prokaryotes depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, FAD synthetase (FADS), which folds into two modules: the C-terminal associated with RFK activity and the N-terminal associated with FMNAT activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that the 28-HxGH-31, 123-Gx(D/N)-125 and 161-xxSSTxxR-168 motifs from FADS must be involved in ATP stabilisation for the adenylylation of FMN, as well as in FAD stabilisation for FAD phyrophosphorolysis. Mutants were produced at these motifs in the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS). Their effects on the kinetic parameters of CaFADS activities (RFK, FMNAT and FAD pyrophosphorilase), and on substrates and product binding properties indicate that H28, H31, N125 and S164 contribute to the geometry of the catalytically competent complexes at the FMNAT-module of CaFADS. PMID:23203077

  9. Dual contractile effects of ATP released by field stimulation revealed by effects of alpha,beta-methylene ATP and suramin in rat tail artery.

    PubMed Central

    Bao, J. X.; Stjärne, L.

    1993-01-01

    1. The field stimulation-induced release of endogenous ATP and noradrenaline (NA) and contractile response in rat isolated tail artery were examined. The release of ATP was studied by extracellular electrophysiological recording and that of NA by a novel voltammetrical technique. The effects of the P2-purinceptor antagonist, suramin, on these parameters were compared with those of alpha,beta-methylene ATP, a P2X-purinoceptor desensitizing agent. 2. Neither alpha,beta-methylene ATP (10 microM) nor suramin (100-500 microM) had significant effects on the extracellularly recorded nerve terminal action potential but both abolished the ATP-induced excitatory junction current caused by stimulation at 0.1 Hz. Neither agent affected significantly the voltammetrically measured release of NA induced by 10 or 100 pulses at 20 Hz. 3. Combined blockade of both postjunctional alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors by prazosin and yohimbine (both 0.1 microM) profoundly depressed the contractile response to 10 pulses at 20 Hz. The small and fast residual contraction in the presence of these agents was abolished by alpha,beta-methylene ATP (10 microM) and inhibited by suramin in a concentration-dependent manner (10-500 microM; IC50 75 microM) and was hence probably caused by ATP or a related nucleotide. 4. When added first, alpha,beta-methylene ATP (10 microM) or suramin (100-500 microM) delayed the onset and enhanced the amplitude of the neurogenic contraction. This enhanced response was abolished by further addition of prazosin and yohimbine (both 0.1 microM). 5. The K+ channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (10 mM), dramatically enhanced the contractile response to 100 pulses at 1 Hz and caused it to become diphasic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8306081

  10. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  11. Sirtuins and Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Maha

    2012-01-01

    The silencer information regulator (Sir) family of proteins has attracted much attention during the past decade due to their prominent role in metabolic homeostasis in mammals. The Sir1-4 proteins were first discovered in yeast as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, which through a gene silencing effect promoted longevity. The subsequent discovery of a homologous sirtuin (Sirt) family of proteins in the mammalian systems soon led to the realization that these molecules have beneficial effects in metabolism- and aging-related diseases. Through their concerted functions in the central nervous system, liver, pancreas, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, they regulate the body’s metabolism. Sirt1, -6, and -7 exert their functions, predominantly, through a direct effect on nuclear transcription of genes involved in metabolism, whereas Sirt3-5 reside in the mitochondrial matrix and regulate various enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles, oxidative phosphorylation, as well as reactive oxygen species production. An interesting aspect of sirtuin’s functionality involves their regulation by the circadian rhythm, which impacts their function via cyclically regulating systemic NAD+ availability, further establishing the link of these proteins to metabolism. In this review we will discuss the relation of sirtuins to NAD+ metabolism, their mechanism of function, and their role in metabolism and mitochondrial functions. In addition, we will describe their effects in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:22904043

  12. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]adenine.

    PubMed

    Serafinowska, H T; Ashton, R J; Bailey, S; Harnden, M R; Jackson, S M; Sutton, D

    1995-04-14

    A number of esters and amides of the anti-HIV nucleotide analogue 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)-ethoxy]adenine (1) have been synthesized as potential prodrugs and evaluated for oral bioavailability in mice. Dialkyl esters 17-20 were prepared via a Mitsunobu coupling of alcohols 8-11 with 9-hydroxypurine 12 whereas (acyloxy)alkyl esters 25-33 and bis-[(alkoxycarbonyl)methyl] and bis(amidomethyl) esters 34-39 were obtained by reaction of 1 with a suitable alkylating agent. Phosphonodichloridate chemistry was employed for the preparation of dialkyl and diaryl esters 42-65, and bis(phosphonoamidates) 66 and 67. Following oral administration to mice, most of the dialkyl esters 17-20 were well-absorbed and then converted to the corresponding monoesters, but minimal further metabolism to 1 occurred. Bis[(pivaloyloxy)methyl] ester 25 displayed an oral bioavailability of 30% that was 15-fold higher than the bioavailability observed after dosing of 1. Methyl substitution at the alpha carbon of the bis[(pivaloyloxy)methyl] ester 25 (33) increased the oral bioavailability of 1 to 74%. Some of the diaryl esters also showed improved absorption properties in comparison with that of 1. In particular, the crystalline hydrochloride salt of diphenyl ester 55 was well-absorbed and efficiently converted to the parent compound with an oral bioavailability of 50%. On the basis of these results as well as the physicochemical properties of the prodrugs and their stability in mouse duodenal contents, the hydrochloride salt of diphenyl ester 55 was identified as the preferred prodrug of 1. PMID:7731022

  13. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine decreases intestinal permeability and protects against experimental sepsis: a prospective, randomised laboratory investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Nalan; Funke, Benjamin; Conzelmann, Lars Oliver; Winkler, Harald; Hofer, Stefan; Steppan, Jochen; Schmidt, Heinfried; Bardenheuer, Hubert; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Weigand, Markus A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of septic conditions in critically ill patients is still one of medicine's major challenges. Cyclic nucleotides, adenosine and its receptors play a pivotal role in the regulation of inflammatory responses and in limiting inflammatory tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that adenosine deaminase-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate-stimulated phosphodiesterase inhibition by erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine could be beneficial in experimental endotoxicosis/sepsis. Method We used two established animal models for endotoxicosis and sepsis. Twenty-four male Wistar rats that had been given intravenous endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide) were treated with either erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine infusion or 0.9% saline during a study length of 120 minutes. Sepsis in 84 female C57BL/6 mice was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Animals were treated with repeated erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine injections after 0, 12 and 24 hours or 4, 12 and 24 hours for delayed treatment. Results In endotoxaemic rats, intestinal production of hypoxanthine increased from 9.8 +/- 90.2 μmol/l at baseline to 411.4 +/- 124.6 μmol/l and uric acid formation increased from 1.5 +/- 2.3 mmol/l to 13.1 +/- 2.7 mmol/l after 120 minutes. In endotoxaemic animals treated with erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine, we found no elevation of adenosine metabolites. The lactulose/L-rhamnose ratio (14.3 versus 4.2 in control animals; p = 2.5 × 10-7) reflects a highly permeable small intestine and through the application of erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine, intestinal permeability could be re-established. The lipopolysaccharide animals had decreased L-rhamnose/3-O-methyl-D-glucose urine excretion ratios. Erythro-9-[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl]-adenine reduced this effect. The mucosa damage score of the septic animals was higher compared with control and therapy animals (p < 0.05). Septic shock induction by caecal

  14. Stimulation by extracellular ATP and UTP of the stress-activated protein kinase cascade in rat renal mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; van Rossum, Gerda; Wartmann, Markus; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) have been shown to activate a nucleotide receptor (P2U receptor) in rat mesangial cells that mediates phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipases C and D, respectively. This is followed by an increased activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and cell proliferation. Here we show that ATP and UTP potently stimulate the stress-activated protein kinase pathway and phosphorylation of the transcription factor c-Jun.Both nucleotides stimulated a rapid (within 5 min) and concentration-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinases as measured by the phosphorylation of c-Jun in a solid phase kinase assay.When added at 100 μM the rank order of potency of a series of nucleotide analogues for stimulation of c-Jun phosphorylation was UTP>ATP=UDP=ATPγS>2-methylthio-ATP>βγ-imido-ATP= ADP>AMP=UMP=adenosine=uridine. Activation of stress-activated protein kinase activity by ATP and UTP was dose-dependently attenuated by suramin.Down-regulation of protein kinase C-α, -δ and -ε isoenzymes by 24 h treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not inhibit ATP- and UTP-induced activation of c-Jun phosphorylation. Furthermore, the specific protein kinase C inhibitors, CGP 41251 and Ro 31-8220, did not inhibit nucleotide-stimulated c-Jun phosphorylation, suggesting that protein kinase C is not involved in ATP- and UTP-triggered stress-activated protein kinase activation.Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, strongly attenuated ATP- and UTP-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. Furthermore, N-acetyl-cysteine completely blocked the activation of stress-activated protein kinase in response to extracellular nucleotide stimulation.In summary, these results suggest that ATP and UTP trigger the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase module in mesangial cells by a

  15. Cytochrome b nucleotide sequence variation among the Atlantic Alcidae.

    PubMed

    Friesen, V L; Montevecchi, W A; Davidson, W S

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cytochrome b nucleotide sequences of the six extant species of Atlantic alcids and a gull revealed an excess of adenines and cytosines and a deficit of guanines at silent sites on the coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the sequences of the common (Uria aalge) and Brünnich's (U. lomvia) guillemots, followed by the razorbill (Alca torda) and little auk (Alle alle). The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) sequence formed a sister taxon, and the puffin (Fratercula arctica) fell outside the other alcids. Phylogenetic comparisons of substitutions indicated that mutabilities of bases did not differ, but that C was much more likely to be incorporated than was G. Imbalances in base composition appear to result from a strand bias in replication errors, which may result from selection on secondary RNA structure and/or the energetics of codon-anticodon interactions. PMID:7916741

  16. Critical roles of interdomain interactions for modulatory ATP binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-10-17

    ATP has dual roles in the reaction cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Upon binding to the Ca2E1 state, ATP phosphorylates the enzyme, and by binding to other conformational states in a non-phosphorylating modulatory mode ATP stimulates the dephosphorylation and other partial reaction steps of the cycle, thereby ensuring a high rate of Ca(2+) transport under physiological conditions. The present study elucidates the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect on dephosphorylation. In the intermediate states of dephosphorylation the A-domain residues Ser(186) and Asp(203) interact with Glu(439) (N-domain) and Arg(678) (P-domain), respectively. Single mutations to these residues abolish the stimulation of dephosphorylation by ATP. The double mutation swapping Asp(203) and Arg(678) rescues ATP stimulation, whereas this is not the case for the double mutation swapping Ser(186) and Glu(439). By taking advantage of the ability of wild type and mutant Ca(2+)-ATPases to form stable complexes with aluminum fluoride (E2·AlF) and beryllium fluoride (E2·BeF) as analogs of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state and E2P ground state, respectively, of the dephosphorylation reaction, the mutational effects on ATP binding to these intermediates are demonstrated. In the wild type Ca(2+)-ATPase, the ATP affinity of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state is higher than that of the E2P ground state, thus explaining the stimulation of dephosphorylation by nucleotide-induced transition state stabilization. We find that the Asp(203)-Arg(678) and Ser(186)-Glu(439) interdomain bonds are critical, because they tighten the interaction with ATP in the E2·P phosphoryl transition state. Moreover, ATP binding and the Ser(186)-Glu(439) bond are mutually exclusive in the E2P ground state. PMID:25193668

  17. Critical Roles of Interdomain Interactions for Modulatory ATP Binding to Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Johannes D.; Holdensen, Anne Nyholm; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-01

    ATP has dual roles in the reaction cycle of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. Upon binding to the Ca2E1 state, ATP phosphorylates the enzyme, and by binding to other conformational states in a non-phosphorylating modulatory mode ATP stimulates the dephosphorylation and other partial reaction steps of the cycle, thereby ensuring a high rate of Ca2+ transport under physiological conditions. The present study elucidates the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect on dephosphorylation. In the intermediate states of dephosphorylation the A-domain residues Ser186 and Asp203 interact with Glu439 (N-domain) and Arg678 (P-domain), respectively. Single mutations to these residues abolish the stimulation of dephosphorylation by ATP. The double mutation swapping Asp203 and Arg678 rescues ATP stimulation, whereas this is not the case for the double mutation swapping Ser186 and Glu439. By taking advantage of the ability of wild type and mutant Ca2+-ATPases to form stable complexes with aluminum fluoride (E2·AlF) and beryllium fluoride (E2·BeF) as analogs of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state and E2P ground state, respectively, of the dephosphorylation reaction, the mutational effects on ATP binding to these intermediates are demonstrated. In the wild type Ca2+-ATPase, the ATP affinity of the E2·P phosphoryl transition state is higher than that of the E2P ground state, thus explaining the stimulation of dephosphorylation by nucleotide-induced transition state stabilization. We find that the Asp203-Arg678 and Ser186-Glu439 interdomain bonds are critical, because they tighten the interaction with ATP in the E2·P phosphoryl transition state. Moreover, ATP binding and the Ser186-Glu439 bond are mutually exclusive in the E2P ground state. PMID:25193668

  18. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  19. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  20. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  1. Standard role for a conserved aspartate or more direct involvement in deglycosylation? An ONIOM and MD investigation of adenine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kellie, Jennifer L; Wilson, Katie A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2013-12-01

    8-Oxoguanine (OG) is one of the most frequently occurring forms of DNA damage and is particularly deleterious since it forms a stable Hoogsteen base pair with adenine (A). The repair of an OG:A mispair is initiated by adenine-DNA glycosylase (MutY), which hydrolyzes the sugar-nucleobase bond of the adenine residue before the lesion is processed by other proteins. MutY has been proposed to use a two-part chemical step involving protonation of the adenine nucleobase, followed by SN1 hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. However, differences between a recent (fluorine recognition complex, denoted as the FLRC) crystal structure and the structure on which most mechanistic conclusions have been based to date (namely, the lesion recognition complex or LRC) raise questions regarding the mechanism used by MutY and the discrete role of various active-site residues. The present work uses both molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (ONIOM) models to compare the active-site conformational dynamics in the two crystal structures, which suggests that only the understudied FLRC leads to a catalytically competent reactant. Indeed, all previous computational studies on MutY have been initiated from the LRC structure. Subsequently, for the first time, various mechanisms are examined with detailed ONIOM(M06-2X:PM6) reaction potential energy surfaces (PES) based on the FLRC structure, which significantly extends the mechanistic picture. Specifically, our work reveals that the reaction proceeds through a different route than the commonly accepted mechanism and the catalytic function of various active-site residues (Geobacillus stearothermophilus numbering). Specifically, contrary to proposals based on the LRC, E43 is determined to solely be involved in the initial adenine protonation step and not the deglycosylation reaction as the general base. Additionally, a novel catalytic role is proposed for Y126, whereby this residue plays a significant role in stabilizing the highly charged

  2. CFTR gating II: Effects of nucleotide binding on the stability of open states.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Cho, Jeong Han; Wang, Xiaohui; Zou, Xiaoqin; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that ADP inhibits cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) opening by competing with ATP for a binding site presumably in the COOH-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD2). We also found that the open time of the channel is shortened in the presence of ADP. To further study this effect of ADP on the open state, we have used two CFTR mutants (D1370N and E1371S); both have longer open times because of impaired ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. Single-channel kinetic analysis of DeltaR/D1370N-CFTR shows unequivocally that the open time of this mutant channel is decreased by ADP. DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR channels can be locked open by millimolar ATP with a time constant of approximately 100 s, estimated from current relaxation upon nucleotide removal. ADP induces a shorter locked-open state, suggesting that binding of ADP at a second site decreases the locked-open time. To test the functional consequence of the occupancy of this second nucleotide binding site, we changed the [ATP] and performed similar relaxation analysis for E1371S-CFTR channels. Two locked-open time constants can be discerned and the relative distribution of each component is altered by changing [ATP] so that increasing [ATP] shifts the relative distribution to the longer locked-open state. Single-channel kinetic analysis for DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR confirms an [ATP]-dependent shift of the distribution of two locked-open time constants. These results support the idea that occupancy of a second ATP binding site stabilizes the locked-open state. This binding site likely resides in the NH2-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) because introducing the K464A mutation, which decreases ATP binding affinity at NBD1, into E1371S-CFTR shortens the relaxation time constant. These results suggest that the binding energy of nucleotide at NBD1 contributes to the overall energetics of the open channel conformation. PMID:15767296

  3. Novel electrochemical sensor based on functionalized graphene for simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Sun, Jun-Yong; Han, Cong-Hui; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yan-Li; Xiong, Xiao-Qin

    2011-02-01

    A nano-material carboxylic acid functionalized graphene (graphene-COOH) was prepared and used to construct a novel biosensor for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. The direct electrooxidation behaviors of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode (graphene-COOH/GCE) were carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicated that both adenine and guanine showed the increase of the oxidation peak currents with the negative shift of the oxidation peak potentials in contrast to that on the bare glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical parameters of adenine and guanine on the graphene-COOH/GCE were calculated and a simple and reliable electroanalytical method was developed for the detection of adenine and guanine, respectively. The modified electrode exhibited good behaviors in the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine with the peak separation as 0.334V. The detection limit for individual determination of guanine and adenine was 5.0×10(-8)M and 2.5×10(-8)M (S/N=3), respectively. Furthermore, the measurements of thermally denatured single-stranded DNA were carried out and the value of (G+C)/(A+T) of single-stranded DNA was calculated as 0.80. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:21050729

  4. Polyphosphate/ATP-dependent NAD kinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum: biochemical properties and impact of ppnK overexpression on lysine production.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Niederholtmeyer, Henrike; Schmitz, Katja; Schoberth, Siegfried M; Wendisch, Volker F

    2010-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is synthesized by phosphorylation of either oxidized or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD/NADH). Here, the cg1601/ppnK gene product from Corynebacterium glutamicum genome was purified from recombinant Escherichia coli and enzymatic characterization revealed its activity as a polyphosphate (PolyP)/ATP-dependent NAD kinase (PPNK). PPNK from C. glutamicum was shown to be active as homotetramer accepting PolyP, ATP, and even ADP for phosphorylation of NAD. The catalytic efficiency with ATP as phosphate donor for phosphorylation of NAD was higher than with PolyP. With respect to the chain length of PolyP, PPNK was active with short-chain PolyPs. PPNK activity was independent of bivalent cations when using ATP, but was enhanced by manganese and in particular by magnesium ions. When using PolyP, PPNK required bivalent cations, preferably manganese ions, for activity. PPNK was inhibited by NADP and NADH at concentrations below millimolar. Overexpression of ppnK in C. glutamicum wild type slightly reduced growth and ppnK overexpression in the lysine producing strain DM1729 resulted in a lysine product yield on glucose of 0.136 +/- 0.006 mol lysine (mol glucose)(-1), which was 12% higher than that of the empty vector control strain. PMID:20180116

  5. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  6. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotide receptors in the apical membranes of equine cultured epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ko, W H; Wilson, S M; Wong, P Y D

    1997-01-01

    The short circuit current (ISC) technique was used to quantify electrolyte transport by equine cultured sweat gland epithelia. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and certain related compounds, caused transient increases in ISC when added to the apical solution. The order of potency was uridine triphosphate (UTP)>ATP>ADP>>AMP=adenosine.The responses to apical nucleotides were due to chloride and bicarbonate secretion and were reduced in pertussis toxin-treated cells. P2-receptors sensitive to uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP), that interact with inhibitory G proteins, therefore appear to be present in the apical membrane.Responses to ATP and UTP were reduced in cells loaded with BAPTA, a calcium chelator. BAPTA attenuated the response to ATP more than the response to UTP suggesting that these nucleotides may not act via a common pathway.Cross-desensitization experiments indicated that two populations of UTP-sensitive receptor were present. One was sensitive to UTP and ATP, whereas the second was sensitive only to UTP. Uridine diphosphate appeared to activate the ATP-insensitive receptor population selectively.These data suggest that apical pyrimidinoceptors may be expressed by these cells. The physiological role of these receptors is unknown but they may allow the autocrine regulation of epithelial function. PMID:9146899

  7. Modulation of the chloroplast ATPase by tight ADP binding. Effect of uncouplers and ATP.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zvi, D; Shavit, N

    1982-12-01

    Inactivation of the membrane-bound ATPase by tight ADP binding was studied under nonenergized conditions. The energy state of the system was controlled either by omitting MgCl2, preventing ATP hydrolysis, or by addition of an uncoupler which dissipates the delta mu H+. In the absence of Mg2+, ATP prevents the inactivation of the enzyme by ADP, in a competitive manner. This effect of ATP resembles that of GDP with Mg2+ present. In the presence of nigericin, Mg2+, and ATP, inactivation occurs after a 10-15-sec interval, during which the enzyme is able to hydrolyze ATP at a relatively rapid rate. The degree of inactivation is proportional to the level of bound ADP detected. This behavior is different from that of the coupled ATPase (no uncoupler added), where inactivation is attained only upon exhaustion of the ATP by its hydrolysis, despite the finding that ADP binds tightly to the active ATPase at all stages of the reaction. Higher levels of tightly bound ADP were detected in the presence of an uncoupler. We suggest that the interval during which the enzyme becomes inactive is that required for the enzyme to generate and bind ADP, and to change from the active to the inactive conformation. These results support the mechanism suggested previously for the modulation of the ATPase by tight nucleotide binding. PMID:6219104

  8. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  9. A diverse superfamily of enzymes with ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine/thiol ligase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Koonin, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    The recently developed PSI-BLAST method for sequence database search and methods for motif analysis were used to define and expand a superfamily of enzymes with an unusual nucleotide-binding fold, referred to as palmate, or ATP-grasp fold. In addition to D-alanine-D-alanine ligase, glutathione synthetase, biotin carboxylase, and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, the ATP-grasp domain is predicted in the ribosomal protein S6 modification enzyme (RimK), urea amidolyase, tubulin-tyrosine ligase, and three enzymes of purine biosynthesis. All these enzymes possess ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase activity, and their catalytic mechanisms are likely to include acylphosphate intermediates. The ATP-grasp superfamily also includes succinate-CoA ligase (both ADP-forming and GDP-forming variants), malate-CoA ligase, and ATP-citrate lyase, enzymes with a carboxylate-thiol ligase activity, and several uncharacterized proteins. These findings significantly extend the variety of the substrates of ATP-grasp enzymes and the range of biochemical pathways in which they are involved, and demonstrate the complementarity between structural comparison and powerful methods for sequence analysis. PMID:9416615

  10. The power stroke driven by ATP binding in CFTR as studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Furukawa-Hagiya, Tomoka; Furuta, Tadaomi; Chiba, Shuntaro; Sohma, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2013-01-10

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily. Currently, it remains unclear how ATP binding causes the opening of the channel gate at the molecular level. To clarify this mechanism, we first constructed an atomic model of the inward-facing CFTR using the X-ray structures of other ABC proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were then performed to explore the structure and dynamics of the inward-facing CFTR in a membrane environment. In the MgATP-bound state, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) formed a head-to-tail type of dimer, in which the ATP molecules were sandwiched between the Walker A and signature motifs. Alternatively, one of the final MD structures in the apo state was similar to that of a "closed-apo" conformation found in the X-ray analysis of ATP-free MsbA. Principal component analysis for the MD trajectory indicated that NBD dimerization causes significant structural and dynamical changes in the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which is likely indicative of the formation of a chloride ion access path. This study suggests that the free energy gain from ATP binding acts as a driving force not only for NBD dimerization but also for NBD-TMD concerted motions. PMID:23214920

  11. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in assembly of MacAB-TolC macrolide transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2012-12-01

    MacB is a founding member of the Macrolide Exporter family of transporters belonging to the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily. These proteins are broadly represented in genomes of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are implicated in virulence and protection against antibiotics and peptide toxins. MacB transporter functions together with MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, which stimulates MacB ATPase. In Gram-negative bacteria, MacA is believed to couple ATP hydrolysis to transport of substrates across the outer membrane through a TolC-like channel. In this study, we report a real-time analysis of concurrent ATP hydrolysis and assembly of MacAB-TolC complex. MacB binds nucleotides with a low millimolar affinity and fast on- and off-rates. In contrast, MacA-MacB complex is formed with a nanomolar affinity, which further increases in the presence of ATP. Our results strongly suggest that association between MacA and MacB is stimulated by ATP binding to MacB but remains unchanged during ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also found that the large periplasmic loop of MacB plays the major role in coupling reactions separated in two different membranes. This loop is required for MacA-dependent stimulation of MacB ATPase and at the same time, contributes to recruitment of TolC into a trans-envelope complex. PMID:23057817

  12. ATP binding and aspartate protonation enhance photoinduced electron transfer in plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Gallois, Michaël; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2014-09-17

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins encountered in most vegetal and animal species. They play a role of blue-light receptors in plants and in invertebrates. The putative resting state of the FAD cofactor in these proteins is its fully oxidized form, FADox. Upon blue-light excitation, the isoalloxazine ring (ISO) may undergo an ultrafast reduction by a nearby tryptophan residue W400. This primary reduction triggers a cascade of electron and proton transfers, ultimately leading to the formation of the FADH° radical. A recent experimental study has shown that the yield of FADH° formation in Arabidopsis cryptochrome can be strongly modulated by ATP binding and by pH, affecting the protonation state of D396 (proton donor to FAD°(-)). Here we provide a detailed molecular analysis of these effects by means of combined classical molecular dynamics simulations and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. When ATP is present and D396 protonated, FAD remains in close contact with W400, thereby enhancing electron transfer (ET) from W400 to ISO*. In contrast, deprotonation of D396 and absence of ATP introduce flexibility to the photoactive site prior to FAD excitation, with the consequence of increased ISO-W400 distance and diminished tunneling rate by almost two orders of magnitude. We show that under these conditions, ET from the adenine moiety of FAD becomes a competitive relaxation pathway. Overall, our data suggest that the observed effects of ATP and pH on the FAD photoreduction find their roots in the earliest stage of the photoreduction process; i.e., ATP binding and the protonation state of D396 determine the preferred pathway of ISO* relaxation. PMID:25157750

  13. Nucleotide triphosphate promiscuity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis dethiobiotin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Salaemae, Wanisa; Yap, Min Y; Wegener, Kate L; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) plays a crucial role in biotin biosynthesis in microorganisms, fungi, and plants. Due to its importance in bacterial pathogenesis, and the absence of a human homologue, DTBS is a promising target for the development of new antibacterials desperately needed to combat antibiotic resistance. Here we report the first X-ray structure of DTBS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDTBS) bound to a nucleotide triphosphate (CTP). The nucleoside base is stabilized in its pocket through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protein backbone, rather than amino acid side chains. This resulted in the unexpected finding that MtDTBS could utilise ATP, CTP, GTP, ITP, TTP, or UTP with similar Km and kcat values, although the enzyme had the highest affinity for CTP in competitive binding and surface plasmon resonance assays. This is in contrast to other DTBS homologues that preferentially bind ATP primarily through hydrogen-bonds between the purine base and the carboxamide side chain of a key asparagine. Mutational analysis performed alongside in silico experiments revealed a gate-keeper role for Asn175 in Escherichia coli DTBS that excludes binding of other nucleotide triphosphates. Here we provide evidence to show that MtDTBS has a broad nucleotide specificity due to the absence of the gate-keeper residue. PMID:25801336

  14. Nucleotide specificity of the human terminal nucleotidyltransferase Gld2 (TUT2).

    PubMed

    Chung, Christina Z; Jo, David Hyung Suk; Heinemann, Ilka U

    2016-08-01

    The nontemplated addition of single or multiple nucleotides to RNA transcripts is an efficient means to control RNA stability and processing. Cytoplasmic RNA adenylation and the less well-known uridylation are post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating RNA maturation, activity, and degradation. Gld2 is a member of the noncanonical poly(A) polymerases, which include enzymes with varying nucleotide specificity, ranging from strictly ATP to ambiguous to exclusive UTP adding enzymes. Human Gld2 has been associated with transcript stabilizing miRNA monoadenylation and cytoplasmic mRNA polyadenylation. Most recent data have uncovered an unexpected miRNA uridylation activity, which promotes miRNA maturation. These conflicting data raise the question of Gld2 nucleotide specificity. Here, we biochemically characterized human Gld2 and demonstrated that it is a bona fide adenylyltransferase with only weak activity toward other nucleotides. Despite its sequence similarity with uridylyltransferases (TUT4, TUT7), Gld2 displays an 83-fold preference of ATP over UTP. Gld2 is a promiscuous enzyme, with activity toward miRNA, pre-miRNA, and polyadenylated RNA substrates. Apo-Gld2 activity is restricted to adding single nucleotides and processivity likely relies on additional RNA-binding proteins. A phylogeny of the PAP/TUTase superfamily suggests that uridylyltransferases, which are derived from distinct adenylyltransferase ancestors, arose multiple times during evolution via insertion of an active site histidine. A corresponding histidine insertion into the Gld2 active site alters substrate specificity from ATP to UTP. PMID:27284165

  15. Mutations in the NB-ARC Domain of I-2 That Impair ATP Hydrolysis Cause Autoactivation1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Tameling, Wladimir I.L.; Vossen, Jack H.; Albrecht, Mario; Lengauer, Thomas; Berden, Jan A.; Haring, Michel A.; Cornelissen, Ben J.C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants confer specificity to the innate immune system. Most R proteins have a centrally located NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4) domain. For two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) R proteins, I-2 and Mi-1, we have previously shown that this domain acts as an ATPase module that can hydrolyze ATP in vitro. To investigate the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the function of I-2 in planta, specific mutations were introduced in conserved motifs of the NB-ARC domain. Two mutations resulted in autoactivating proteins that induce a pathogen-independent hypersensitive response upon expression in planta. These mutant forms of I-2 were found to be impaired in ATP hydrolysis, but not in ATP binding, suggesting that the ATP- rather than the ADP-bound state of I-2 is the active form that triggers defense signaling. In addition, upon ADP binding, the protein displayed an increased affinity for ADP suggestive of a change of conformation. Based on these data, we propose that the NB-ARC domain of I-2, and likely of related R proteins, functions as a molecular switch whose state (on/off) depends on the nucleotide bound (ATP/ADP). PMID:16489136

  16. Probing the nucleotide-binding site of Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M A; Fraser, M E; Brownie, E R; James, M N; Bridger, W A; Wolodko, W T

    1999-06-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) catalyzes the reversible interchange of purine nucleoside diphosphate, succinyl-CoA, and Pi with purine nucleoside triphosphate, succinate, and CoA via a phosphorylated histidine (H246alpha) intermediate. Two potential nucleotide-binding sites were predicted in the beta-subunit, and have been differentiated by photoaffinity labeling with 8-N3-ATP and by site-directed mutagenesis. It was demonstrated that 8-N3-ATP is a suitable analogue for probing the nucleotide-binding site of SCS. Two tryptic peptides from the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit were labeled with 8-N3-ATP. These corresponded to residues 107-119beta and 121-146beta, two regions lying along one side of an ATP-grasp fold. A mutant protein with changes on the opposite side of the fold (G53betaV/R54betaE) was unable to be phosphorylated using ATP or GTP, but could be phosphorylated by succinyl-CoA and Pi. A mutant protein designed to probe nucleotide specificity (P20betaQ) had a Km(app) for GTP that was more than 5 times lower than that of wild-type SCS, whereas parameters for the other substrates remained unchanged. Mutations of residues in the C-terminal domain of the beta-subunit designed to distrupt one loop of the Rossmann fold (I322betaA, and R324betaN/D326betaA) had the greatest effect on the binding of succinate and CoA. They did not disrupt the phosphorylation of SCS with nucleotides. It was concluded that the nucleotide-binding site is located in the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit. This implies that there are two active sites approximately 35 A apart, and that the H246alpha loop moves between them during catalysis. PMID:10353839

  17. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    B Pan; Y Xiong; T Steitz

    2011-12-31

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3' end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5'-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3' hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  18. Synergistic effect of ATP for RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Takuma; Han, Yong-Woon; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Yokota, Hiroaki; Nakao, Kimiko; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Ono, Teruo; Harada, Yoshie

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RuvB hexameric ring motor proteins, together with RuvAs, promote branch migration of Holliday junction DNA. Zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) constitute of nanosized holes and enable the visualization of a single fluorescent molecule under micromolar order of the molecules, which is applicable to characterize the formation of RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex. In this study, we used ZMWs and counted the number of RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex. Our data demonstrated that different nucleotide analogs increased the amount of Cy5-RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex in the following order: no nucleotide, ADP, ATPγS, and mixture of ADP and ATPγS. These results suggest that not only ATP binding to RuvB but also ATP hydrolysis by RuvB facilitates a stable RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation. PMID:26658024

  19. Secondary sup 18 O isotope effects for hexokinase-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer from ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.; Weiss, P.M.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-04-16

    Secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects in the {gamma}-position of ATP have been measured on phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by yeast hexokinase in an effort to deduce the structure of the transition state. The isotope effects were measured by the remote-label method with the exocyclic amino group of adenine as the remote label. With glucose as substrate, the secondary {sup 18}O isotope effect per {sup 18}O was 0.9987 at pH 8.2 and 0.9965 at pH 5.3, which is below the pK of 6.15 seen in the V/K profile for MgATP. With the slow substrate 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol, the value was 0.9976 at pH 8.2. While part of the inverse nature of the isotope effect may result from an isotope effect on binding, the more inverse values when catalysis is made more rate limiting by decreasing the pH or switching to a slower substrate suggest a dissociative transition state for phosphoryl transfer, in agreement with predictions from model chemistry. The {sup 18}O equilibrium isotope effect for deprotonation of HATP{sup 3{minus}} is 1.0156, while Mg{sup 2+} coordination to ATP{sup 4{minus}} does not appear to be accompanied by an {sup 18}O isotope effect larger than 1.001.

  20. Mutations in Sensor 1 and Walker B in the Bovine Papillomavirus E1 Initiator Protein Mimic the Nucleotide-Bound State▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Stenlund, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Viral replication initiator proteins are multifunctional proteins that utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis by their AAA+ modules for multiple functions in the replication of their viral genomes. These proteins are therefore of particular interest for understanding how AAA+ proteins carry out multiple ATP driven functions. We have performed a comprehensive mutational analysis of the residues involved in ATP binding and hydrolysis in the papillomavirus E1 initiator protein based on the recent structural data. Ten of the eleven residues that were targeted were defective for ATP hydrolysis, and seven of these were also defective for ATP binding. The three mutants that could still bind nucleotide represent the Walker B motif (D478 and D479) and Sensor 1 (N523), three residues that are in close proximity to each other and generally are considered to be involved in ATP hydrolysis. Surprisingly, however, two of these mutants, D478A and N523A, mimicked the nucleotide bound state and were capable of binding DNA in the absence of nucleotide. However, these mutants could not form the E1 double trimer in the absence of nucleotide, demonstrating that there are two qualitatively different consequences of ATP binding by E1, one that can be mimicked by D478A and N523A and one which cannot. PMID:19939914

  1. Dual Effects of Adp and Adenylylimidodiphosphate on Cftr Channel Kinetics Show Binding to Two Different Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Frank; Riordan, John R.; Nagel, Georg

    1999-01-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  2. Dual effects of ADP and adenylylimidodiphosphate on CFTR channel kinetics show binding to two different nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, F; Riordan, J R; Nagel, G

    1999-07-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  3. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G; Khan, Sanjoy K; Liu, Andrew C; Herzog, Erik D; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology, and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high-level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP(3) signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP(3) signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  4. Circadian regulation of ATP release in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Swanstrom, Adrienne E.; Chung, Kevin; Simon, Tatiana; Haydon, Philip G.; Khan, Sanjoy K.; Liu, Andrew C.; Herzog, Erik D.; Beaulé, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks sustain daily oscillations in gene expression, physiology and behavior, relying on transcription-translation feedback loops of clock genes for rhythm generation. Cultured astrocytes display daily oscillations of extracellular ATP, suggesting that ATP release is a circadian output. We hypothesized that the circadian clock modulates ATP release via mechanisms that regulate acute ATP release from glia. To test the molecular basis for circadian ATP release, we developed methods to measure in real-time ATP release and Bmal1::dLuc circadian reporter expression in cortical astrocyte cultures from mice of different genotypes. Daily rhythms of gene expression required functional Clock and Bmal1, both Per1 and Per2, and both Cry1 and Cry2 genes. Similarly, high level, circadian ATP release also required a functional clock mechanism. Whereas blocking IP3 signaling significantly disrupted ATP rhythms with no effect on Bmal1::dLuc cycling, blocking vesicular release did not alter circadian ATP release or gene expression. We conclude that astrocytes depend on circadian clock genes and IP3 signaling to express daily rhythms in ATP release. PMID:21653839

  5. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  6. Intermolecular interactions of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Junaid Farooqi, M.; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^+/NADH) is a coenzyme involved in cellular respiration as an electron transporter. In aqueous solution, the molecule exhibits a folding transition characterized by the stacking of its aromatic moieties. A transition to an unfolded conformation is possible using chemical denaturants like methanol. Because the reduced NADH form is fluorescent, the folding transition can be monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy, e.g., via a blue-shift in the UV-excited emission peak upon methanol unfolding. Here we present evidence of interactions between NADH molecules in solution. We measure the excited-state emission from NADH at various concentrations (1-100 μM in MOPS buffer, pH 7.5; 337-nm wavelength excitation). Unlike for the folded form, the emission peak wavelength of the unfolded form is concentration dependent, exhibiting a red-shift with higher NADH concentration, suggesting the presence of intermolecular interactions. An understanding of NADH spectra in solution would assist in interpreting intercellular NADH measurements used for the in vivo monitoring cellular energy metabolism.

  7. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and Ca2+ mobilization.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Miklós; Bak, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological processes are controlled by a great diversity of Ca2+ signals that depend on Ca2+ entry into the cell and/or Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores is gated by a family of messengers including inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). There is increasing evidence for a novel intracellular Ca2+ release channel that may be targeted by NAADP and that displays properties distinctly different from the well-characterized InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. These channels appear to localize on a wider range of intracellular organelles, including the acidic Ca2+ stores. Activation of the NAADP-sensitive Ca2+ channels evokes complex changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels by means of channel chatter with other intracellular Ca2+ channels. The recent demonstration of changes in intracellular NAADP levels in response to physiologically relevant extracellular stimuli highlights the significance of NAADP as an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:18569524

  8. Extracellular ATP Selectively Upregulates Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase 2 and Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase by Rat Cortical Astrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Brisevac, Dusica; Adzic, Marija; Laketa, Danijela; Parabucki, Ana; Milosevic, Milena; Lavrnja, Irena; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Sévigny, Jean; Kipp, Markus; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern which induces reactive response of astrocytes after brain insult, including morphological remodeling of astrocytes, proliferation, chemotaxis, and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The responses induced by eATP are under control of ecto-nucleotidases, which catalyze sequential hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine. In the mammalian brain, ecto-nucleotidases comprise three enzyme families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases 1-3 (NTPDase1-3), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phospodiesterases 1-3 (NPP1-3), and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), which crucially determine ATP/adenosine ratio in the pericellular milieu. Altered expression of ecto-nucleotidases has been demonstrated in several experimental models of human brain dysfunctions. In the present study, we have explored the pattern of NTPDase1-3, NPP1-3, and eN expression by cultured cortical astrocytes challenged with 1 mmol/L ATP (eATP). At the transcriptional level, eATP upregulated expression of NTPDase1, NTPDase2, NPP2, and eN, while, at translational and functional levels, these were paralleled only by the induction of NTPDase2 and eN. Additionally, eATP altered membrane topology of eN, from clusters localized in membrane domains to continuous distribution along the cell membrane. Our results suggest that eATP, by upregulating NTPDase2 and eN and altering the enzyme membrane topology, affects local kinetics of ATP metabolism and signal transduction that may have important roles in the process related to inflammation and reactive gliosis. PMID:26080748

  9. Antagonism by nifedipine of contraction and Ca2(+)-influx evoked by ATP in guinea-pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Katsuragi, T.; Usune, S.; Furukawa, T.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of Ca2(+)-antagonists, especially nifedipine, on contraction and increase of intracellular Ca2+ (Fura-2/AM method) evoked by ATP were evaluated in a thin outer layer segment of guinea-pig urinary bladder. 2. The ATP-evoked contraction was markedly inhibited by dihydropyridine-type Ca2(+)-antagonists, such as nifedipine and nitrendipine, but not by D-600, omega-conotoxin and tetramethrin. 3. This antagonism by nifedipine of ATP-evoked contractions was competitive from the Schild plot analysis, the pA2 value being 8.23. The reduction of ATP-evoked contraction by nifedipine (0.1 microM) was fully reversed by administration of Bay K 8644 (0.1 microM). 4. ATP (100 microM) caused an increase of fluorescence brightness after loading Fura-2/AM, which was coupled with a contraction of the bladder. Both the contraction and the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ evoked evoked by the nucleotide were completely antagonized by nifedipine. by the nucleotide were completely antagonized by nifedipine. 5. These results suggest that ATP may activate the dihydropyridine-sensitive, voltage-dependent Ca2(+)-channels in a direct or indirect fashion and, thereby, elicit a contraction of the bladder. PMID:1696154

  10. Cardiac Na+ Current Regulation by Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Sanyal, Shamarendra; Gao, Ge; Gurung, Iman S.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Gaconnet, Georgia; Kerchner, Laurie J.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Huang, Christopher L-H.; Grace, Andrew; London, Barry; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1-L) protein reduce cardiac Na+ current (INa) and cause Brugada Syndrome (BrS). GPD1-L has >80% amino acid homology with glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent energy metabolism. Objective Therefore, we tested whether NAD(H) could regulate human cardiac sodium channels (Nav1.5). Methods and Results HEK293 cells stably expressing Nav1.5 and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were used. The influence of NADH/NAD+ on arrhythmic risk was evaluated in wild-type or SCN5A+/− mouse heart. A280V GPD1-L caused a 2.48 ± 0.17-fold increase in intracellular NADH level (P<0.001). NADH application or co-transfection with A280V GPD1-L resulted in decreased INa (0.48 ± 0.09 or 0.19 ±0.04 of control group, respectively; P<0.01), which was reversed by NAD+, chelerythrine, or superoxide dismutase (SOD). NAD+ antagonism of the Na+ channel downregulation by A280V GPD1-L or NADH was prevented by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, PKAI6–22. The effects of NADH and NAD+ were mimicked by a phorbol ester and forskolin, respectively. Increasing intracellular NADH was associated with an increased risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in wild-type mouse hearts. Extracellular application of NAD+ to SCN5A+/− mouse hearts ameliorated the risk of VT. Conclusions Our results show that Nav1.5 is regulated by pyridine nucleotides, suggesting a link between metabolism and INa. This effect required protein kinase C (PKC) activation and was mediated by oxidative stress. NAD+ could prevent this effect by activating PKA. Mutations of GPD1-L may downregulate Nav1.5 by altering the oxidized to reduced NAD(H) balance. PMID:19745168

  11. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  12. The Signaling Mechanism of Contraction Induced by ATP and UTP in Feline Esophageal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Jung, Hyunwoo; Cho, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    P2 receptors are membrane-bound receptors for extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and UTP. P2 receptors have been classified as ligand-gated ion channels or P2X receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Recently, purinergic signaling has begun to attract attention as a potential therapeutic target for a variety of diseases especially associated with gastroenterology. This study determined the ATP and UTP-induced receptor signaling mechanism in feline esophageal contraction. Contraction of dispersed feline esophageal smooth muscle cells was measured by scanning micrometry. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was determined by western blot analysis. ATP and UTP elicited maximum esophageal contraction at 30 s and 10 μM concentration. Contraction of dispersed cells treated with 10 μM ATP was inhibited by nifedipine. However, contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP, 0.1 μM UTP and 10 μM UTP was decreased by U73122, chelerythrine, ML-9, PTX and GDPβS. Contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP and UTP was inhibited by Gαi3 or Gαq antibodies and by PLCβ1 or PLCβ3 antibodies. Phosphorylated MLC20 was increased by ATP and UTP treatment. In conclusion, esophageal contraction induced by ATP and UTP was preferentially mediated by P2Y receptors coupled to Gαi3 and G q proteins, which activate PLCβ1 and PLCβ3. Subsequently, increased intracellular Ca2+ and activated PKC triggered stimulation of MLC kinase and inhibition of MLC phosphatase. Finally, increased pMLC20 generated esophageal contraction. PMID:26013385

  13. Circadian autodephosphorylation of cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC occurs via formation of ATP as intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-05-25

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ~24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using (32)P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from (32)P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [(32)P]ATP preceding the accumulation of (32)P(i). Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form P(i). We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  14. Circadian Autodephosphorylation of Cyanobacterial Clock Protein KaiC Occurs via Formation of ATP as Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ∼24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using 32P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from 32P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [32P]ATP preceding the accumulation of 32Pi. Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form Pi. We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  15. Study of sperm cell phosphorylating systems using nucleotide photoaffinity probes

    SciTech Connect

    Khatoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    The major thrust of the research presented in this thesis was to identify specific nucleotide binding proteins and phosphoproteins of rat caput and cauda sperm. Also, the differences in these proteins between caput and cauda sperm were investigated as well as determination of the membrane sidedness of the proteins and their location in either the head or tail/mid-piece region. In addition, the effects of small molecular weight modifers such as cGMP, cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ on the detection of binding proteins and phosphorylated proteins was studied. The technique used to identify and locate nucleotide binding proteins was photoaffinity labeling using the proven 8-azidopurine nucleotide analogs of cAMP, ATP and GTP in radioactive form. The first study presented involved the use of (/sup 32/P)8-N /sub 3/cAMP which showed that both caput and cauda sperm contained both type I and type II regulatory subunits (R/sub I/ and R/sub II/, respectively) of the cAMP dependent kinases and that the great majority of the regulatory subunits were located in the tail/mid-piece section and not in the sperm head. The second phase of this study involved the use of (..gamma../sup 32/P)8-azidoadensosine triphosphate ((..gamma../sup 32/P)8-N/sub 3/ATP) and (..gamma../sup 32/P)8-azidoguanosine triphosphate ((..gamma../sup 32/P)8-N/sub 3/GTP) to photolable specific ATP and GTP binding proteins and to phosphorylate specific phosphoproteins. Again, this was done on caput versus cauda sperm and the location of the majority of the photolabeled or phosphorylated proteins was shown to be in the tail/mid-piece fraction. In addition, considerable differences were found in both the phosphorylated and photolabeled proteins of caput versus cauda sperm.

  16. Dual modulation of chloride conductance by nucleotides in pancreatic and parotid zymogen granules.

    PubMed Central

    Thévenod, F; Gasser, K W; Hopfer, U

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of Cl- conductance by cytoplasmic nucleotides was investigated in pancreatic and parotid zymogen granules. Cl- conductance was assayed by measuring the rate of cation-ionophore-induced osmotic lysis of granules suspended in iso-osmotic salt solutions. Both inhibition and stimulation were observed, depending on the type and concentration of nucleotide. Under optimal conditions, the average inhibition measured in different preparations was 1.6-fold, whereas the average stimulation was 4.4-fold. ATP was inhibitory at 1-10 microM but stimulated Cl- conductance above 50 microM. Stimulation by ATP was more pronounced in granules with low endogenous Cl- conductance. The potency of nucleotides in terms of inhibition was ATP greater than adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (ATP[S]) greater than UTP much greater than or equal to CTP much greater than or equal to GTP much greater than or equal to guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) much greater than or equal to ITP. The potency with respect to stimulation had the following order: adenosine 5'-[beta gamma-methylene]triphosphate (App[CH2]p) greater than ATP greater than guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[S]). Adenosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (App[NH]p) was also stimulatory, and was more potent than ATP in the parotid granules, but less potent in the pancreatic granules. Aluminium fluoride stimulated Cl- conductance maximally at 15-30 microM-Al3+ and 10-15 mM-F. F was less effective at higher concentrations. Protein phosphorylation by kinases was apparently not involved, since the nucleotide effects (1) could be mimicked by non-hydrolysable analogues of ATP and GTP, (2) showed reversibility, and (3) were not abolished by the protein kinase inhibitors 1-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) or staurosporine. The data suggest the presence of at least two binding sites for nucleotides, whereby occupancy of one induces inhibition and occupancy of the other induces stimulation

  17. Binding of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotides to diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, L.; Sperti, Simonetta

    1967-01-01

    1. Changes in protein fluorescence have been utilized in determining the stoicheiometry and dissociation constants of the complexes of diphtheria toxin with NADH2, NAD, NADPH2 and NADP. 2. The binding stoicheiometry is 2moles of NADH2 and 1mole of NADPH2/mole of diphtheria toxin. The binding sites for NADH2 appear to be equivalent and independent. 3. The toxin shows a higher affinity for the reduced than for the oxidized forms of the nucleotides. 4. Dissociation constants at 0·01I, pH7 and 25° are 0·7×10−6m for NADH2 and 0·45×10−6m for NADPH2. Dissociation constants increase with increasing ionic strength, indicating that the binding is mainly electrostatic. 5. Bound NADH2 and NADPH2 may be activated to fluoresce by the transfer of energy from the excited aromatic amino acids of the toxin. Activation and emission spectra of bound and free nucleotides are compared. 6. Since NAD and NADH2 are cofactors specifically required for the inhibition of protein synthesis by diphtheria toxin, the possible role of toxin–nucleotide complexes is discussed in this regard. PMID:4384596

  18. Transient increase of ATP as a response to temperature up-shift in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soini, Jaakko; Falschlehner, Christina; Mayer, Christina; Böhm, Daniela; Weinel, Stefan; Panula, Johanna; Vasala, Antti; Neubauer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli induces the heat shock response to a temperature up-shift which is connected to the synthesis of a characteristic set of proteins, including ATP dependent chaperones and proteases. Therefore the balance of the nucleotide pool is important for the adaptation and continuous function of the cell. Whereas it has been observed in eukaryotic cells, that the ATP level immediately decreased after the temperature shift, no data are available for E. coli about the adenosine nucleotide levels during the narrow time range of minutes after a temperature up-shift. Results The current study shows that a temperature up-shift is followed by a very fast significant transient increase of the cellular ATP concentration within the first minutes. This increase is connected to a longer lasting elevation of the cellular respiration and glucose uptake. Also the mRNA level of typical heat shock genes increases within only one minute after the heat-shock. Conclusion The presented data prove the very fast response of E. coli to a heat-shock and that the initial response includes the increase of the ATP pool which is important to fulfil the need of the cell for new syntheses, as well as for the function of chaperones and proteases. PMID:15804347

  19. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  20. SLOW MYOSIN ATP TURNOVER IN THE SUPER-RELAXED STATE IN TARANTULA MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg-muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog, mantATP, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when mantATP is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multi-exponential process, with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant, ~30 minutes. This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated in mantADP and chased with ADP, the SRX is not seen, indicating that trinucleotide-relaxed myosins are responsible for the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain eliminates the fraction of myosin with the very long lifetime. The data imply that the very long-lived SRX in tarantula fibers is a highly novel adaptation for energy conservation in an animal that spends extremely long periods of time in a quiescent state employing a lie-in-wait hunting strategy. The presence of the SRX measured here correlates well with the binding of myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the “interacting-heads motif” observed previously by electron microscopy. Both the structural array and the long-lived SRX require relaxed filaments or relaxed fibers, both are lost upon myosin phosphorylation, and both appear to be more stable in tarantula than in vertebrate skeletal or vertebrate cardiac preparations. PMID:21763701

  1. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  2. Protonation mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malic enzyme reaction from isotope effects and pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1986-01-14

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and the primary deuterium isotope effects with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and also thionicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (thio-NAD) as the nucleotide substrates were determined in order to obtain information about the chemical mechanism and location of rate-determining steps for the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme reaction. The maximum velocity with thio-NAD as the nucleotide is pH-independent from pH 4.2 to 9.6, while with NAD, V decreases below a pK of 4.8. V/K for both nucleotides decreases below a pK of 5.6 and above a pK of 8.9. Both the tartronate pKi and V/Kmalate decrease below a pK of 4.8 and above a pK of 8.9. Oxalate is competitive vs. malate above pH 7 and noncompetitive below pH 7 with NAD as the nucleotide. The oxalate Kis increases from a constant value above a pK of 4.9 to another constant value above a pK of 6.7. The oxalate Kii also increases above a pK of 4.9, and this inhibition is enhanced by NADH. In the presence of thio-NAD the inhibition by oxalate is competitive vs. malate below pH 7. For thio-NAD, both DV and D(V/K) are pH-independent and equal to 1.7. With NAD as the nucleotide, DV decreases to 1.0 below a pK of 4.9, while D(V/KNAD) and D(V/Kmalate) are pH-independent. Above pH 7 the isotope effects on V and the V/K values for NAD and malate are equal to 1.45, the pH-independent value of DV above pH 7. Results indicate that substrates bind to only the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Two enzyme groups are necessary for binding of substrates and catalysis. Both NAD and malate are released from the Michaelis complex at equal rates which are equal to the rate of NADH release from E-NADH above pH 7. Below pH 7 NADH release becomes more rate-determining as the pH decreases until at pH 4.0 it completely limits the overall rate of the reaction.

  3. Do ATP4- and Mg2+ bind stepwise to the F1-ATPase of Halobacterium saccharovorum?

    PubMed

    Schobert, B

    1998-06-01

    ATP4- adds first. The steric constraints evident in the diffraction structure of the ATP binding site in the bovine mitochondrial F-ATPase [Abrahams, J. P., Leslie, A. G. W., Lutter, R. & Walker, J. E. (1994) Nature 370, 621-628] tend to favor the ordered-binding model, but the final decision as to which kinetic model is valid has to be from further structural studies. If the ordered-binding model gains more experimental support, a revision of the current concepts of unisite catalysis and negative cooperativity of nucleotide binding will be necessary. PMID:9660192

  4. A conditional probability analysis of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gating indicates that ATP has multiple effects during the gating cycle.

    PubMed

    Hennager, D J; Ikuma, M; Hoshi, T; Welsh, M J

    2001-03-13

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters bind and hydrolyze ATP. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel, this interaction with ATP generates a gating cycle between a closed (C) and two open (O1 and O2) conformations. To understand better how ATP controls channel activity, we examined gating transitions from the C to the O1 and O2 states and from these open states to the C conformation. We made three main observations. First, we found that the channel can open into either the O1 or O2 state, that the frequency of transitions to both states was increased by ATP concentration, and that ATP increased the relative proportion of openings into O1 vs. O2. These results indicate that ATP can interact with the closed state to open the channel in at least two ways, which may involve binding to nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) NBD1 and NBD2. Second, ATP prolonged the burst duration and altered the way in which the channel closed. These data suggest that ATP also interacts with the open channel. Third, the channel showed runs of specific types of open-closed transitions. This finding suggests a mechanism with more than one cycle of gating transitions. These data suggest models to explain how ATP influences conformational transitions in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and perhaps other ABC transporters. PMID:11248123

  5. A conditional probability analysis of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gating indicates that ATP has multiple effects during the gating cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hennager, Daniel J.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Hoshi, Toshinori; Welsh, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters bind and hydrolyze ATP. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel, this interaction with ATP generates a gating cycle between a closed (C) and two open (O1 and O2) conformations. To understand better how ATP controls channel activity, we examined gating transitions from the C to the O1 and O2 states and from these open states to the C conformation. We made three main observations. First, we found that the channel can open into either the O1 or O2 state, that the frequency of transitions to both states was increased by ATP concentration, and that ATP increased the relative proportion of openings into O1 vs. O2. These results indicate that ATP can interact with the closed state to open the channel in at least two ways, which may involve binding to nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) NBD1 and NBD2. Second, ATP prolonged the burst duration and altered the way in which the channel closed. These data suggest that ATP also interacts with the open channel. Third, the channel showed runs of specific types of open–closed transitions. This finding suggests a mechanism with more than one cycle of gating transitions. These data suggest models to explain how ATP influences conformational transitions in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and perhaps other ABC transporters. PMID:11248123

  6. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K. PMID:26317826

  7. P2Y nucleotide receptors: Promise of therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP and UTP, have distinct signaling roles through a class of G protein-coupled receptors, termed P2Y. However, the receptor ligands are typically charged molecules of low bioavailability and stability in vivo. Recent progress in the development of selective agonists and antagonists for P2Y receptors and study of knockout mice have led to new drug concepts based on these receptors. The rapidly accelerating progress in this field has already resulted in drug candidates for cystic fibrosis, dry eye disease, and thrombosis. On the horizon are novel treatments of cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20594935

  8. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells. PMID:26780667

  9. The use of nucleotide analogs to evaluate the mechanism of the heterotropic response of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed Central

    Sakash, J. B.; Tsen, A.; Kantrowitz, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    As an alternative method to study the heterotropic mechanism of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase, a series of nucleotide analogs were used. These nucleotide analogs have the advantage over site-specific mutagenesis experiments in that interactions between the backbone of the protein and the nucleotide could be evaluated in terms of their importance for function. The ATP analogs purine 5'-triphosphate (PTP), 6-chloropurine 5'-triphosphate (Cl-PTP), 6-mercaptopurine 5'-triphosphate (SH-PTP), 6-methylpurine 5'-triphosphate (Me-PTP), and 1-methyladenosine 5'-triphosphate (Me-ATP) were partially synthesized from their corresponding nucleosides. Kinetic analysis was performed on the wild-type enzyme in the presence of these ATP analogs along with GTP, ITP, and XTP. PTP, Cl-PTP, and SH-PTP each activate the enzyme at subsaturating concentrations of L-aspartate and saturating concentrations of carbamoyl phosphate, but not to the same extent as does ATP. These experiments suggest that the interaction between N6-amino group of ATP and the backbone of the regulatory chain is important for orienting the nucleotide and inducing the displacements of the regulatory chain backbone necessary for initiation of the regulatory response. Me-PTP and Me-ATP also activate the enzyme, but in a more complex fashion, which suggests differential binding at the two sites within each regulatory dimer. The purine nucleotides GTP, ITP, and XTP each inhibit the enzyme but to a lesser extent than CTP. The influence of deoxy and dideoxynucleotides on the activity of the enzyme was also investigated. These experiments suggest that the 2' and 3' ribose hydroxyl groups are not of significant importance for binding and orientation of the nucleotide in the regulatory binding site. 2'-dCTP inhibits the enzyme to the same extent as CTP, indicating that the interactions of the enzyme to the O2-carbonyl of CTP are critical for CTP binding, inhibition, and the ability of the enzyme to discriminate

  10. Preservation of ATP in Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tuovila, Bruce J.; Dobbs, Fred C.; LaRock, Paul A.; Siegel, B. Z.

    1987-01-01

    High concentrations of particulate ATP were found in the anoxic brines of the Orca Basin and East Flower Garden, Gulf of Mexico. Other measurements indicative of growth and respiration suggested that the microbial community in the brines was inactive, but somehow the ATP associated with the cells persisted. Conceivably, when cells growing just above the interface sank into the brine, the increased osmotic stress could elicit an osmoregulatory response resulting in increased ATP. It was also possible that hydrolytic enzymes were inactivated, resulting in the preservation of ATP. Experiments in which a culture of marine bacteria was suspended in menstrua of different salinities comparable to those found across the Orca Basin interface revealed that as salinity increased, ATP increased three- to sixfold. Within 24 h the ATP fell to its initial level and remained at that concentration for 3 days, at which time the experiment was terminated. In contrast, the control suspensions, at a salinity of 28% (grams per liter) had 1/10th of the initial ATP concentration when the experiment was ended. Cells were also exposed to killing UV irradiation, enabling us to demonstrate with absolute certainty that cellular ATP could be preserved. At the end of the experiment, the viable component of the population was reduced by orders of magnitude by UV irradiation, but the ATP levels of the cells suspended in brine did not decrease. In certain environments it appears that the conventional analytical tools of the microbial ecologist must be interpreted with caution. PMID:16347491

  11. Preservation of ATP in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Tuovila, B J; Dobbs, F C; Larock, P A; Siegel, B Z

    1987-12-01

    High concentrations of particulate ATP were found in the anoxic brines of the Orca Basin and East Flower Garden, Gulf of Mexico. Other measurements indicative of growth and respiration suggested that the microbial community in the brines was inactive, but somehow the ATP associated with the cells persisted. Conceivably, when cells growing just above the interface sank into the brine, the increased osmotic stress could elicit an osmoregulatory response resulting in increased ATP. It was also possible that hydrolytic enzymes were inactivated, resulting in the preservation of ATP. Experiments in which a culture of marine bacteria was suspended in menstrua of different salinities comparable to those found across the Orca Basin interface revealed that as salinity increased, ATP increased three- to sixfold. Within 24 h the ATP fell to its initial level and remained at that concentration for 3 days, at which time the experiment was terminated. In contrast, the control suspensions, at a salinity of 28% (grams per liter) had 1/10th of the initial ATP concentration when the experiment was ended. Cells were also exposed to killing UV irradiation, enabling us to demonstrate with absolute certainty that cellular ATP could be preserved. At the end of the experiment, the viable component of the population was reduced by orders of magnitude by UV irradiation, but the ATP levels of the cells suspended in brine did not decrease. In certain environments it appears that the conventional analytical tools of the microbial ecologist must be interpreted with caution. PMID:16347491

  12. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L; Vercesi, A; Bababunmi, E A

    1978-04-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca(2+) and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca(2+) is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as beta-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca(2+). Successive cycles of Ca(2+) release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca(2+)-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca(2+), mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. PMID:25436

  13. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  14. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Oliver D K; Labuschagne, Christiaan F; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-21

    Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids. PMID:26774282

  15. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; Adams, Peter D.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids. PMID:26774282

  16. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  17. Ototoxic Model of Oxaliplatin and Protection from Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Dalian, Ding; Haiyan, Jiang; Yong, Fu; Yongqi, Li; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, an anticancer drug commonly used to treat colorectal cancer and other tumors, has a number of serious side effects, most notably neuropathy and ototoxicity. To gain insights into its ototoxic profile, oxaliplatin was applied to rat cochlear organ cultures. Consistent with it neurotoxic propensity, oxaliplatin selectively damaged nerve fibers at a very low dose 1 μM. In contrast, the dose required to damage hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons was 50 fold higher (50 μM). Oxailiplatin-induced cochlear lesions initially increased with dose, but unexpectedly decreased at very high doses. This non-linear dose response could be related to depressed oxaliplatin uptake via active transport mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that axonal degeneration involves biologically active processes which can be greatly attenuated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). To determine if NAD+ would protect spiral ganglion axons and the hair cells from oxaliplatin damage, cochlear cultures were treated with oxaliplatin alone at doses of 10 μM or 50 μM respectively as controls or combined with 20 mM NAD+. Treatment with 10 μM oxaliplatin for 48 hours resulted in minor damage to auditory nerve fibers, but spared cochlear hair cells. However, when cochlear cultures were treated with 10 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+, most auditory nerve fibers were intact. 50 μM oxaliplatin destroyed most of spiral ganglion neurons and cochlear hair cells with apoptotic characteristics of cell fragmentations. However, 50 μM oxaliplatin plus 20 mM NAD+ treatment greatly reduced neuronal degenerations and hair cell missing. The results suggested that NAD+ provides significant protection against oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, which may be due to its actions of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and energy supply. PMID:25419212

  18. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  19. Interplay of Mg2+, ADP, and ATP in the cytosol and mitochondria: Unravelling the role of Mg2+ in cell respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Elisabeth; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Douce, Roland; Bligny, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In animal and plant cells, the ATP/ADP ratio and/or energy charge are generally considered key parameters regulating metabolism and respiration. The major alternative issue of whether the cytosolic and mitochondrial concentrations of ADP and ATP directly mediate cell respiration remains unclear, however. In addition, because only free nucleotides are exchanged by the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, whereas MgADP is the substrate of ATP synthase (EC 3.6.3.14), the cytosolic and mitochondrial Mg2+ concentrations must be considered as well. Here we developed in vivo/in vitro techniques using 31P-NMR spectroscopy to simultaneously measure these key components in subcellular compartments. We show that heterotrophic sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells incubated in various nutrient media contain low, stable cytosolic ADP and Mg2+ concentrations, unlike ATP. ADP is mainly free in the cytosol, but complexed by Mg2+ in the mitochondrial matrix, where [Mg2+] is tenfold higher. In contrast, owing to a much higher affinity for Mg2+, ATP is mostly complexed by Mg2+ in both compartments. Mg2+ starvation used to alter cytosolic and mitochondrial [Mg2+] reversibly increases free nucleotide concentration in the cytosol and matrix, enhances ADP at the expense of ATP, decreases coupled respiration, and stops cell growth. We conclude that the cytosolic ADP concentration, and not ATP, ATP/ADP ratio, or energy charge, controls the respiration of plant cells. The Mg2+ concentration, remarkably constant and low in the cytosol and tenfold higher in the matrix, mediates ADP/ATP exchange between the cytosol and matrix, [MgADP]-dependent mitochondrial ATP synthase activity, and cytosolic free ADP homeostasis. PMID:25313036

  20. Characterization and molecular cloning of a novel enzyme, inorganic polyphosphate/ATP-glucomannokinase, of Arthrobacter sp. strain KM.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takako; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Matsukawa, Hirokazu; Matuo, Yuhsi; Murata, Kousaku

    2003-07-01

    A bacterium exhibiting activities of several inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)]- and ATP-dependent kinases, including glucokinase, NAD kinase, mannokinase, and fructokinase, was isolated, determined to belong to the genus Arthrobacter, and designated Arthrobacter sp. strain KM. Among the kinases, a novel enzyme responsible for the poly(P)- and ATP-dependent mannokinase activities was purified 2,200-fold to homogeneity from a cell extract of the bacterium. The purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 30 kDa. This enzyme phosphorylated glucose and mannose with a high affinity for glucose, utilizing poly(P) as well as ATP, and was designated poly(P)/ATP-glucomannokinase. The K(m) values of the enzyme for glucose, mannose, ATP, and hexametaphosphate were determined to be 0.50, 15, 0.20, and 0.02 mM, respectively. The catalytic sites for poly(P)-dependent phosphorylation and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme were found to be shared, and the poly(P)-utilizing mechanism of the enzyme was shown to be nonprocessive. The gene encoding the poly(P)/ATP-glucomannokinase was cloned from Arthrobacter sp. strain KM, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. This gene contained an open reading frame consisting of 804 bp coding for a putative polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 29,480 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide exhibited homology to the amino acid sequences of the poly(P)/ATP-glucokinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (level of homology, 45%), ATP-dependent glucokinases of Corynebacterium glutamicum (45%), Renibacterium salmoninarum (45%), and Bacillus subtilis (35%), and proteins of bacteria belonging to the order Actinomyces whose functions are not known. Alignment of these homologous proteins revealed seven conserved regions. The mannose and poly(P) binding sites of poly(P)/ATP-glucomannokinase are discussed. PMID:12839753

  1. How azide inhibits ATP hydrolysis by the F-ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2006-01-01

    In the structure of bovine F1-ATPase determined at 1.95-Å resolution with crystals grown in the presence of ADP, 5′-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, and azide, the azide anion interacts with the β-phosphate of ADP and with residues in the ADP-binding catalytic subunit, βDP. It occupies a position between the catalytically essential amino acids, β-Lys-162 in the P loop and the “arginine finger” residue, α-Arg-373, similar to the site occupied by the γ-phosphate in the ATP-binding subunit, βTP. Its presence in the βDP-subunit tightens the binding of the side chains to the nucleotide, enhancing its affinity and thereby stabilizing the state with bound ADP. This mechanism of inhibition appears to be common to many other ATPases, including ABC transporters, SecA, and DNA topoisomerase IIα. It also explains the stimulatory effect of azide on ATP-sensitive potassium channels by enhancing the binding of ADP. PMID:16728506

  2. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  3. Urothelial ATP exocytosis: regulation of bladder compliance in the urine storage phase.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Mochizuki, Tsutomu; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Ryohei; Imura, Yoshio; Morizawa, Yosuke; Hiasa, Miki; Miyaji, Takaaki; Kira, Satoru; Araki, Isao; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Iwatsuki, Ken; Nomura, Masatoshi; de Groat, William C; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2016-01-01

    The bladder urothelium is more than just a barrier. When the bladder is distended, the urothelium functions as a sensor to initiate the voiding reflex, during which it releases ATP via multiple mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying this ATP release in response to the various stretch stimuli caused by bladder filling remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate these mechanisms. By comparing vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-deficient and wild-type male mice, we showed that ATP has a crucial role in urine storage through exocytosis via a VNUT-dependent mechanism. VNUT was abundantly expressed in the bladder urothelium, and when the urothelium was weakly stimulated (i.e. in the early filling stages), it released ATP by exocytosis. VNUT-deficient mice showed reduced bladder compliance from the early storage phase and displayed frequent urination in inappropriate places without a change in voiding function. We conclude that urothelial, VNUT-dependent ATP exocytosis is involved in urine storage mechanisms that promote the relaxation of the bladder during the early stages of filling. PMID:27412485

  4. Urothelial ATP exocytosis: regulation of bladder compliance in the urine storage phase

    PubMed Central

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Mochizuki, Tsutomu; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Ryohei; Imura, Yoshio; Morizawa, Yosuke; Hiasa, Miki; Miyaji, Takaaki; Kira, Satoru; Araki, Isao; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Iwatsuki, Ken; Nomura, Masatoshi; de Groat, William C.; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2016-01-01

    The bladder urothelium is more than just a barrier. When the bladder is distended, the urothelium functions as a sensor to initiate the voiding reflex, during which it releases ATP via multiple mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying this ATP release in response to the various stretch stimuli caused by bladder filling remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate these mechanisms. By comparing vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-deficient and wild-type male mice, we showed that ATP has a crucial role in urine storage through exocytosis via a VNUT-dependent mechanism. VNUT was abundantly expressed in the bladder urothelium, and when the urothelium was weakly stimulated (i.e. in the early filling stages), it released ATP by exocytosis. VNUT-deficient mice showed reduced bladder compliance from the early storage phase and displayed frequent urination in inappropriate places without a change in voiding function. We conclude that urothelial, VNUT-dependent ATP exocytosis is involved in urine storage mechanisms that promote the relaxation of the bladder during the early stages of filling. PMID:27412485

  5. On the peripheral and central chemoreception and control of breathing: an emerging role of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Gourine, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral and central respiratory chemoreceptors are ultimately responsible for maintenance of constant levels of arterial PO2, PCO2 and [H+], protecting the brain from hypoxia and ensuring that the breathing is always appropriate for metabolism. The aim of this discussion is to shed some light on the potential mechanisms of chemosensory transduction– the process which links chemosensory mechanisms to the central nervous mechanisms controlling breathing. Recent experimental data suggest that the purine nucleotide ATP acts as a common mediator of peripheral and central chemosensory transduction (within the carotid body and the medulla oblongata, respectively). In response to a decrease in PO2 (hypoxia) oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body release ATP to activate chemoafferent fibres of the carotid sinus nerve which transmit this information to the brainstem respiratory centres. In response to an increase in PCO2/[H+] (hypercapnia) chemosensitive structures located on the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata rapidly release ATP, which acts locally within the medullary respiratory network. The functional role of ATP released at both sites is similar – to evoke adaptive enhancement in breathing. Understanding the mechanisms of ATP release in response to chemosensory stimulation may prove to be essential for further detailed analysis of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying respiratory chemosensitivity. PMID:16141266

  6. The ectoenzyme E-NPP3 negatively regulates ATP-dependent chronic allergic responses by basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih Han; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kusu, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Okumura, Ryu; Ikeda, Kayo; Shimada, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Obata-Ninomiya, Kazushige; Kurashima, Yosuke; Sato, Shintaro; Umemoto, Eiji; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Karasuyama, Hajime; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2015-02-17

    Crosslinking of the immunoglobulin receptor FcεRI activates basophils and mast cells to induce immediate and chronic allergic inflammation. However, it remains unclear how the chronic allergic inflammation is regulated. Here, we showed that ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase-phosphodiesterase 3 (E-NPP3), also known