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Sample records for adenine thymine cytosine

  1. Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Spectra of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine, and Uracil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using picosecond excitation at 1064 nm, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the nucleobases adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil with two different types of silver nanoparticles were obtained. Comparing the SEHRS spectra with SERS data from the identical samples excited at 532 nm and with known infrared spectra, the major bands in the spectra are assigned. Due to the different selection rules for the one- and two-photon excited Raman scattering, we observe strong variation in relative signal strengths of many molecular vibrations obtained in SEHRS and SERS spectra. The two-photon excited spectra of the nucleobases are found to be very sensitive with respect to molecule–nanoparticle interactions. Using both the SEHRS and SERS data, a comprehensive vibrational characterization of the interaction of nucleobases with silver nanostructures can be achieved. PMID:28077982

  2. Vacuum-Ultraviolet photoionization studies of the microhydrationof DNA bases (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine)

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, L.; Wilson, K.R.; Leone, S.R.; Musahid, Ahmed

    2007-01-22

    In this work, we report on a photoionization study of the microhydration of the four DNA bases. Gas-phase clusters of water with DNA bases [guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T)] are generated via thermal vaporization of the bases and expansion of the resultant vapor in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single-photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for the DNA bases and the following water (W) clusters: G, GW{sub n} (n = 1-3); C, CW{sub n} (n = 1-3); A, AW{sub n} (n = 1,2); and T, TW{sub n} (n = 1-3). Appearance energies (AE) are derived from the onset of these PIE curves (all energies in eV): G (8.1 {+-} 0.1), GW (8.0 {+-} 0.1), GW{sub 2} (8.0 {+-} 0.1), and GW{sub 3} (8.0); C (8.65 {+-} 0.05), CW (8.45 {+-} 0.05), CW{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.1), and CW{sub 3} (8.3 {+-} 0.1); A (8.30 {+-} 0.05), AW (8.20 {+-} 0.05), and AW{sub 2} (8.1 {+-} 0.1); T (8.90 {+-} 0.05); and TW (8.75 {+-} 0.05), TW{sub 2} (8.6 {+-} 0.1), and TW{sub 3} (8.6 {+-} 0.1). The AEs of the DNA bases decrease slightly with the addition of water molecules (up to three) but do not converge to values found for photoinduced electron removal from DNA bases in solution.

  3. IR Vibrational spectra of H-bonded complexes of adenine, 2-aminopurine and 2-aminopurine+ with cytosine and thymine: Quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', O. O.; Hovorun, D. M.

    2011-11-01

    Using theoretical study on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, we have compared vibrational spectra of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protonated at N1 atom species) with adenine and H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopurine (as neutral or protoned at N1 atom species) · cytosine or 2-aminopurine · thymine with adenine · cytosine and adenine · thymine base pairs. The nature of the base pairing between adenine, 2-aminopurine, 2-aminopurine+ and cytosine or thymine have been investigated by means of quantum-mechanical calculations. We have investigated the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the vibrational spectra of the investigated base pairs. The main differences in the vibrational spectra as for bases so for base pairs have been observed in the high-frequency region.

  4. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  5. Excess-electron injection and transfer in terthiophene-modified DNA: terthiophene as a photosensitizing electron donor for thymine, cytosine, and adenine.

    PubMed

    Park, Man Jae; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-02-13

    Excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has attracted wide attention owing to its close relation to DNA repair and nanowires. To clarify the dynamics of EET in DNA, a photosensitizing electron donor that can donate an excess electron to a variety of DNA sequences has to be developed. Herein, a terthiophene (3T) derivative was used as the photosensitizing electron donor. From the dyad systems in which 3T was connected to a single nucleobase, it was revealed that (1) 3T* donates an excess electron efficiently to thymine, cytosine, and adenine, despite adenine being a well-known hole conductor. The free-energy dependence of the electron-transfer rate was explained on the basis of the Marcus theory. From the DNA hairpins, it became clear that (1) 3T* can donate an excess electron not only to the adjacent nucleobase but also to the neighbor one nucleobase further along and so on. From the charge-injection rate, the possibilities of smaller β value and/or charge delocalization were discussed. In addition, EET through consecutive cytosine nucleobases was suggested.

  6. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-09-03

    We report the first low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are models for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and a knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for characterizing their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra, consistent with complexes where the Pt(CN)4(2-) moiety is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four dianion-nucleobase complexes and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine]* and [Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the delayed electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine but not for Pt(CN)4(2-)·uracil and Pt(CN)4(2-)·cytosine to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion in the clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase displays a long-lived excited state.

  7. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine and Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-08-05

    We report the first low-temperature photodetachment photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are model systems for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for understanding their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra consistent with the complexes where the Pt(CN)42- moiety is largely intact. The adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be between 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)42- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photodetachment spectra of the four nucleobase-dianion complexes, and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)42-∙thymine and Pt(CN)42-∙adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)42-∙T]* and [Pt(CN)42-∙A]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the resonant electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)42-∙T and Pt(CN)42-∙A but not for Pt(CN)42-∙U and Pt(CN)42-∙C to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)42- dianion in the Pt(CN)42-∙M clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase disaplys a long-lived excited state.

  8. On the deactivation mechanisms of adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, João Paulo; Saurí, Vicenta; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2012-04-05

    In this contribution, the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory method based on a complete active space reference wave function (CASSCF/CASPT2) is applied to study all possible single and double proton/hydrogen transfers between the nucleobases in the adenine-thymine (AT) base pair, analyzing the role of excited states with different nature [localized (LE) and charge transfer (CT)], and considering concerted as well as step-wise mechanisms. According to the findings, once the lowest excited states, localized in adenine, are populated during UV irradiation of the Watson-Crick base pair, the proton transfer in the N-O bridge does not require high energy in order to populate a CT state. The latter state will immediately relax toward a crossing with the ground state, which will funnel the system to either the canonical structure or the imino-enol tautomer. The base pair is also capable of repairing itself easily since the imino-enol species is unstable to thermal conversion.

  9. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-07

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1.

  10. Synthesis of rigid homo- and heteroditopic nucleobase-terminated molecules incorporating adenine and/or thymine.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Mikkel F; Andersen, Casper S; Knudsen, Martin M; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2007-07-19

    A series of homo- and heteroditopic thymine- and/or adenine-terminated molecules incorporating rigid aryl or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) linkers has been efficiently synthesized. The key steps involved in the synthesis are the construction of the N-arylated nucleobases using the Chan-Lam-Evans-modified Ullman coupling and their further elaboration using the Sonogashira coupling. Furthermore, the synthesis of a rigid tripodal thymine derivative is reported.

  11. Strand-biased cytosine deamination at the replication fork causes cytosine to thymine mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Ashok S; Hao, Weilong; Townes, Jesse P; Lee, Heewook; Tang, Haixu; Foster, Patricia L

    2016-02-23

    The rate of cytosine deamination is much higher in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) than in double-stranded DNA, and copying the resulting uracils causes C to T mutations. To study this phenomenon, the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G (A3G-CTD), an ssDNA-specific cytosine deaminase, was expressed in an Escherichia coli strain defective in uracil repair (ung mutant), and the mutations that accumulated over thousands of generations were determined by whole-genome sequencing. C:G to T:A transitions dominated, with significantly more cytosines mutated to thymine in the lagging-strand template (LGST) than in the leading-strand template (LDST). This strand bias was present in both repair-defective and repair-proficient cells and was strongest and highly significant in cells expressing A3G-CTD. These results show that the LGST is accessible to cellular cytosine deaminating agents, explains the well-known GC skew in microbial genomes, and suggests the APOBEC3 family of mutators may target the LGST in the human genome.

  12. Benchmark Thermochemistry for Biologically Relevant Adenine and Cytosine. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Shoifet, Evgeni; Meurer, Florian; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph; Held, Christoph

    2015-09-17

    The thermochemical properties available in the literature for adenine and cytosine are in disarray. A new condensed phase standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was measured by using combustion calorimetry. New molar enthalpies of sublimation were derived from the temperature dependence of vapor pressure measured by transpiration and by the quarz-crystal microbalance technique. The heat capacities of crystalline adenine and cytosine were measured by temperature-modulated DSC. Thermodynamic data on adenine and cytosine available in the literature were collected, evaluated, and combined with our experimental results. Thus, the evaluated collection of data together with the new experimental results reported here has helped to resolve contradictions in the available enthalpies of formation. A set of reliable thermochemical data is recommended for adenine and cytosine for further thermochemical calculations. Quantum-chemical calculations of the gas phase molar enthalpies of formation of adenine and cytosine have been performed by using the G4 method and results were in excellent agreement with the recommended experimental data. The standard molar entropies of formation and the standard molar Gibbs functions of formation in crystal and gas state have been calculated. Experimental vapor-pressure data measured in this work were used to estimate pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. This allowed modeling solubility of adenine and cytosine in water over the temperature interval 278-310 K.

  13. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-24

    DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1, Vishak Venkatraman1, James G. Grote2 & Andrew J. Steckl1...45433-7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs are small molecules that are the basic...polymer has been a frequent natural material integrated in electronic devices. DNA has been used in organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7–14

  14. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João P T; Nabeshima, Henrique S; da Costa, Marcello F; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2014-05-21

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr(2+) promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4=C5 and C6=O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310cm(-1) was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  15. An experimental and theoretical vibrational study of interaction of adenine and thymine with artificial seawaters: A prebiotic chemistry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João P. T.; Nabeshima, Henrique S.; da Costa, Marcello F.; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    Nucleic acid bases play important roles in living beings. Thus, their interaction with salts the prebiotic Earth could be an important issue for the understanding of origin of life. In this study, the effect of pH and artificial seawaters on the structure of adenine and thymine was studied via parallel determinations using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Thymine and adenine lyophilized in solutions at basic and acidic conditions showed characteristic bands of the enol-imino tautomer due to the deprotonation and the hydrochloride form due to protonation, respectively. The interaction of thymine and adenine with different seawaters representative of different geological periods on Earth was also studied. In the case of thymine a strong interaction with Sr2+ promoted changes in the Raman and infrared spectra. For adenine changes in infrared and Raman spectra were observed in the presence of salts from all seawaters tested. The experimental results were compared to theoretical calculations, which showed structural changes due to the presence of ions Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+ of artificial seawaters. For thymine the bands arising from C4dbnd C5 and C6dbnd O stretching were shifted to lower values, and for adenine, a new band at 1310 cm-1 was observed. The reactivity of adenine and thymine was studied by comparing changes in nucleophilicity and energy of the HOMO orbital.

  16. Comparative study of spontaneous deamination of adenine and cytosine in unbuffered aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; Hu, Anguang

    2016-06-01

    Adenine in unbuffered nanopure water at a concentration of 2 mM is completely deaminated (>99%) to hypoxanthine at room temperature in ca. 10 weeks, with an estimated half-life (t1/2) less than 10 days, about six orders of magnitude faster than previously reported. Cytosine is not deaminated under the same condition, even after 3 years. This is in contrast to previous observations that cytosine deaminates 20-40 times faster than adenine free base, in nucleoside, in nucleotide and in single-stranded DNA in buffered neutral aqueous solutions.

  17. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  18. External electric field promotes proton transfer in the radical cation of adenine-thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiqing; Xie, Shijie

    2016-07-01

    According to pKa measurements, it has been predicted that proton transfer would not occur in the radical cation of adenine-thymine (A:T). However, recent theoretical calculations indicate that proton transfer takes place in the base pair in water below the room temperature. We have performed simulations of proton transfer in the cation of B-DNA stack composed of 10 A:T base pairs in water from 20 K to 300 K. Proton transfer occurs below the room temperature, meanwhile it could also be observed at the room temperature under the external electric field. Another case that interests us is that proton transfer bounces back after ˜300 fs from the appearance of proton transfer at low temperatures.

  19. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen transfer mechanism in the adenine thymine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2005-09-01

    We have studied the quantum dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the adenine-thymine base pair. Due to the position of hydrogen atoms, different tautomers are possible: the stable Watson-Crick A-T, the imino-enol A*-T* and the zwitterionic (the form with charge separation) A +-T - and A --T + structures. The common idea in the literature is that only A-T exists either because the difference of energy among this tautomer and the others is large or because the other structures are transformed quickly in A-T. Here, we show a detailed theoretical study that suggests the following conclusion: A-T is the stablest tautomer, a partially charged system is important and a small amount of the imino-enol A*-T* tautomer is present at any time. The mechanism of passage from A-T tautomer to the others has also been investigated.

  20. Vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism reveals DNA duplex formation between short strands of adenine and thymine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2012-11-21

    Absorbance spectroscopy is used extensively to tell when two DNA single strands come together and form a double strand. Here we show that circular dichroism in the vacuum ultraviolet region provides an even stronger indication for duplex formation in the case of short strands of adenine and thymine (4 to 16 bases in each strand). Indeed, our results show that a strong positive CD band appears at 179 nm when double strands are formed. Melting experiments were done in aqueous solution with and without added Na(+) counter ions. With additional salt present a huge increase in the 179 nm CD band was observed when lowering the temperature. A 179 nm CD marker band for duplex formation can be used to measure the kinetics for the association of two single strands. Such experiments rely on large changes at one particular wavelength since it is too time-consuming to record a full-wavelength spectrum.

  1. Intriguing radical-radical interactions among double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Su, Xiyu; Su, Hanlei; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pair as well as its deprotonated Watson-Crick derivatives. Double-electron oxidation can destabilize the AT unit, leading to a barrier-hindered metastable A+T+ state with a dissociation channel featuring negative dissociation energy. This unusual energetic phenomenon originates from the competition of electrostatic repulsion and attractively hydrogen-bonding interaction co-existing between Arad + and Trad +. The associated double-proton-transfer process is also explored, suggesting a possible two-step mechanism. Magnetic coupling interactions of various diradical structures are controlled by both intra- and inter-molecular interactions.

  2. Energy level alignment at the interfaces between typical electrodes and nucleobases: Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide and Al/thymine/indium-tin-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Younjoo; Lee, Hyunbok; Park, Soohyung; Yi, Yeonjin

    2012-12-03

    We investigated the interfacial electronic structures of Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and Al/thymine/ITO using in situ ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Adenine shows both an interface dipole and level bending, whereas thymine shows only an interface dipole in contact with ITO. In addition, thymine possesses a larger ionization energy than adenine. These are understood with delocalized {pi} states confirmed with theoretical calculations. For the interface between nucleobases and Al, both nucleobases show a prominent reduction of the electron injection barrier from Al to each base in accordance with a downward level shift.

  3. Theoretical study of the pre- and post-translational effects of adenine and thymine tautomers and methyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Noel; Magers, David; Hill, Glake

    2013-09-01

    The study of pre-translational effects (ionization, tautomerization) and post-translational effects (methylation) of adenine and thymine has only recently been the focus of some studies. These effects can potentially help regulate gene expression as well as potentially disrupt normal gene function. Because of this wide array of roles, greater insight into these effects in deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) are paramount. There has been considerable research of each phenomenon (tautomerization, methylation and ionization) individually. In this work, we attempt to shed light upon the pre-translational effects and post translational effects of adenine and thymine by investigating the electron affinities (EAs) and ionization potentials (IPs) of the major and minor tautomers and their methyl derivatives. We performed all calculations using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP functional accompanied with 6-311G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(df,pd) basis sets. Our results reveal that the thymine tautomer has a higher EA and IP than the adenine tautomers. The higher EA suggests that an electron that attaches to the AT base pair would predominately attach to the thymine instead of adenine. The higher IP would suggest that an electron that is removed from the AT base pair would be predominately removed from the adenine within the base pair. Understanding how tautomerization, ionization and methylation differences change effects, discourages, or promotes one another is lacking. In this work, we begin the steps of integrating these effects with one another, to gain a greater understanding of molecular changes in DNA bases.

  4. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  5. Ultrafast deactivation processes in the 2-aminopyridine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Ai Yuejie; Zhang Feng; Cui Ganglong; Fang Weihai; Luo Yi

    2010-08-14

    2-aminopyridine dimer has frequently been used as a model system for studying photochemistry of DNA base pairs. We examine here the relevance of 2-aminopyridine dimer for a Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair by studying UV-light induced photodynamics along two main hydrogen bridges after the excitation to the localized {sup 1}{pi}{pi}* excited-state. The respective two-dimensional potential-energy surfaces have been determined by time-dependent density functional theory with Coulomb-attenuated hybrid exchange-correlation functional (CAM-B3LYP). Different mechanistic aspects of the deactivation pathway have been analyzed and compared in detail for both systems, while the related reaction rates have also be obtained from Monte Carlo kinetic simulations. The limitations of the 2-aminopyridine dimer as a model system for the adenine-thymine base pair are discussed.

  6. Ultrafast deactivation processes in the 2-aminopyridine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair: Similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yue-Jie; Zhang, Feng; Cui, Gang-Long; Luo, Yi; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2010-08-01

    2-aminopyridine dimer has frequently been used as a model system for studying photochemistry of DNA base pairs. We examine here the relevance of 2-aminopyridine dimer for a Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair by studying UV-light induced photodynamics along two main hydrogen bridges after the excitation to the localized π1π∗ excited-state. The respective two-dimensional potential-energy surfaces have been determined by time-dependent density functional theory with Coulomb-attenuated hybrid exchange-correlation functional (CAM-B3LYP). Different mechanistic aspects of the deactivation pathway have been analyzed and compared in detail for both systems, while the related reaction rates have also be obtained from Monte Carlo kinetic simulations. The limitations of the 2-aminopyridine dimer as a model system for the adenine-thymine base pair are discussed.

  7. Adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites: FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry and SEM studies.

    PubMed

    Baú, João Paulo T; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Souza Junior, Ivan G; de Souza, Cláudio M D; da Costa, Antonio C S; di Mauro, Eduardo; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Coronas, Joaquin; Casado, Clara; de Santana, Henrique; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2012-02-01

    The interactions of adenine and thymine with and adsorption on zeolites were studied using different techniques. There were two main findings. First, as shown by X-ray diffractometry, thymine increased the decomposition of the zeolites (Y, ZSM-5) while adenine prevented it. Second, zeolite Y adsorbed almost the same amount of adenine and thymine, thus both nucleic acid bases could be protected from hydrolysis and UV radiation and could be available for molecular evolution. The X-ray diffractometry and SEM showed that artificial seawater almost dissolved zeolite A. The adsorption of adenine on ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of thymine (Student-Newman-Keuls test-SNK p<0.05). Adenine was also more greatly adsorbed on ZSM-5 zeolite, when compared to other zeolites (SNK p<0.05). However the adsorption of thymine on different zeolites was not statistically different (SNK p>0.05). The adsorption of adenine and thymine on zeolites did not depend on pore size or Si/Al ratio and it was not explained only by electrostatic forces; rather van der Waals interactions should also be considered.

  8. Design of laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H bond of adenine and adenine-thymine base pair using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sitansh; Sharma, Purshotam; Singh, Harjinder; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    Time dependent quantum dynamics and optimal control theory are used for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H (amino N-H) bond in free adenine and in the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair. For the N6-H bond in free adenine we have used a one dimensional model while for the hydrogen bond, N6-H(A)...O4(T), present in the A-T base pair, a two mathematical dimensional model is employed. The conjugate gradient method is used for the optimization of the field dependent cost functional. Optimal laser fields are obtained for selective population transfer in both the model systems, which give virtually 100% excitation probability to preselected vibrational levels. The effect of the optimized laser field on the other hydrogen bond, N1(A)...H-N3(T), present in A-T base pair is also investigated.

  9. Vibrational signatures of Watson-Crick base pairing in adenine-thymine mimics.

    PubMed

    Nosenko, Yevgeniy; Kunitski, Maksim; Stark, Tina; Göbel, Michael; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Brutschy, Bernhard

    2013-07-21

    The vibrational fingerprints of hydrogen-bonding associated with the adenine-thymine (A-T) Watson-Crick (WC) base pair have been identified in an infrared study of the A-T mimics 4-aminopyrimidine-1-methylthymine (4APM-1MT) and 4-aminopyrimidine-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinone (4APM-M4PMN) in the gas-phase. The IR vibrational spectra were measured via a double resonance scheme utilizing femtosecond multiphoton ionization. The changes in the molecular structure, anharmonic vibrational parameters, and the assignment of the observed vibrational spectra in the NH/CH stretch region were investigated by carrying out high-level theoretical calculations of the anharmonic spectra. The experimental observations and theoretical calculations indicate that the hydrogen bonds associated with WC base-pairing are relatively stronger than those associated with reverse WC (rWC) base pairing. This is manifested in a more pronounced red-shift of the H-bonded vibrational modes associated with the WC as compared with the rWC base-pairing. An analysis of the factors contributing to the anharmonicity of the vibrational modes associated with H-bonding reveals that the magnitude of the off-diagonal anharmonic coupling of the H-bonded -NH2 stretch and the -NH2 bend is much smaller in WC base-pairing than in the corresponding rWC base-pairing. The chemical and biological implications of these results, especially in the context of using vibrational spectroscopy as a tool for identifying the signatures of nucleotide base vibrations is addressed.

  10. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 2: Application to the interaction of Na(+), Na(+)(aq.), Mg(+)-2(aq.) with adenine and thymine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Macelroy, R.; Chang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel, which includes explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions, is applied to the study of the energetics of Na(+),Mg(+), Na(+) (aqueous), and Mg(+2) (aqueous) ions approaching various possible binding sites on adenine and thymine. Results for the adenine + ion and thymine + ion are in good qualitative agreement with ab initio work on analogous systems. Energy differences between competing sites are in excellent agreement. Hydration appears to be a critical factor in determining favorable binding sites. That the adenine Nl and N3 sites cannot displace a water molecule from the hydrated cation indicates that they are not favorable binding sites in aqueous media. Of those sites investigated, 04 was the most favorable binding site on the thymine for the bare Na(+). However, the 02 site was the most favorable binding site for either hydrated cation.

  11. Electron correlated and density functional studies on hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in adenine thymine base pair of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Naoto; Kawano, Satoyuki; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2005-02-01

    The potential energy surface along the hydrogen-bonded proton transfer between the Watson-Crick (WC) adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and its tautomeric structures is calculated with 6-31G(d,p) basis set in Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory with Becke's three-parameter hybrid Lee-Yang-Parr exchange-correlation functional (B3LYP), second order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) levels. The tautomeric structure, where both two hydrogen-bonded protons in the A-T base pair have transferred each other, is found at all level of calculations. Though the optimized structure in which only one hydrogen-bonded proton in adenine has migrated to thymine is found at HF level, we could not obtain such optimized structure at both MP2 and B3LYP levels. Including electron correlations, the energy differences between the canonical A-T and the two hydrogen-bonded protons transferred tautomeric structure become smaller. Aside from this, potential energy surface from the WC A-T to the Hoogsteen type A-T gives almost the same among each level of calculation.

  12. Investigating the Co-Adsorption Behavior of Nucleic-Acid Base (Thymine and Cytosine) and Melamine at Liquid/Solid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huiling; Li, Yinli; Chen, Dong; Liu, Bo

    2016-12-01

    The co-adsorption behavior of nucleic-acid base (thymine; cytosine) and melamine was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique at liquid/solid (1-octanol/graphite) interface. STM characterization results indicate that phase separation happened after dropping the mixed solution of thymine-melamine onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, while the hetero-component cluster-like structure was observed when cytosine-melamine binary assembly system is used. From the viewpoints of non-covalent interactions calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) method, the formation mechanisms of these assembled structures were explored in detail. This work will supply a methodology to design the supramolecular assembled structures and the hetero-component materials composed by biological and chemical compound.

  13. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  14. The effects of tautomerization and protonation on the adenine-cytosine mismatches: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Hamid Reza; Bagheri, Sotoodeh; Abareghi, Mahsa

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the results of a theoretical study concerned with the question how tautomerization and protonation of adenine affect the various properties of adenine-cytosine mismatches. The calculations, in gas phase and in water, are performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In gas phase, it is observed that any tautomeric form of investigated mismatches is more stabilized when adenine is protonated. As for the neutral mismatches, the mismatches containing amino form of cytosine and imino form of protonated adenine are more stable. The role of aromaticity on the stability of tautomeric forms of mismatches is investigated by NICS(1)ZZ index. The stability of mispairs decreases by going from gas phase to water. It can be explained using dipole moment parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonds on the stability of mismatches is examined by atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. In addition to geometrical parameters and binding energies, the study of the topological properties of electron charge density aids in better understanding of these mispairs.

  15. Localization of a hole on an adenine-thymine radical cation in B-form DNA in water.

    PubMed

    Kravec, S M; Kinz-Thompson, C D; Conwell, E M

    2011-05-19

    A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out using CP2K for a hole introduced into a B-form DNA molecule consisting of 10 adenine-thymine (A/T) pairs in water. At the beginning of the simulation, the hole wave function is extended over several adenines. Within 20-25 fs, the hole wave function contracts so that it is localized on a single A. At 300 K, it stays on this A for the length of the simulation, several hundred fs, with the wave function little changed. In a range of temperatures below 300 K, proton transfer from A to T is seen to take place within the A/T occupied by the hole; it is completed by ∼40 fs after the contraction. We show that the contraction is due to polarization of the water by the hole. This polarization also plays a role in the proton transfer. Implications for transport are considered.

  16. Following Ultrafast Radiationless Relaxation Dynamics With Strong Field Dissociative Ionization: A Comparison Between Adenine, Uracil, and Cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2011-03-22

    We present the application of ultrafast time- and mass-resolved ion yield laser spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations to track molecular excited-state dynamics. We discuss how molecular fragment ions can be associated with conformations the molecule assumes during its relaxation, and how various features of the pump-probe signal for those fragments can be used to infer details of the excited state dynamics. We present results for radiationless relaxation in DNA and RNA bases adenine, cytosine, and uracil in the gas phase, pumped near a one-photon resonance transition to an excited state, and probed via strong-field near-IR dissociative ionization.

  17. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-10-25

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides.

  18. N-Sulfomethylation of guanine, adenine and cytosine with formaldehyde-bisulfite. A selective modification of guanine in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, H; Yamashita, Y; Yui, S; Yamagata, Y; Tomita, K; Negishi, K

    1982-01-01

    When guanine-, adenine- and cytosine-nucleosides and nucleotides were treated with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite, stable N-sulfomethyl compounds were formed. N2-Sulfomethylguanine, N6-sulfomethyladenine, N4-sulfomthylcytosine and N6-sulfomethyl-9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine were isolated as crystals and characterized. A guanine-specific sulfomethylation was brought about by treatment and denatured single-stranded DNA with formaldehyde and then with bisulfite at pH 7 and 4 degrees C. Since native double-stranded DNA was not modified by this treatment, this new method of modification is expected to be useful as a conformational probe for polynucleotides. PMID:7177848

  19. DNA duplex stability of the thio-iso-guanine•methyl-iso-Cytosine base pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkye; Switzer, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, incorporation into oligonucleotides, and base-pairing properties of the 2-thio-variant of iso-guanine. Iso-guanine is the purine component of a nonstandard base pair with 5-methyl-iso-cytosine. The 2-thio-iso-guanine • 5-methyl-iso-cytosine base pair is found to have similar stability to an adeninethymine pair.

  20. Acidity and complex formation studies of 3-(adenine-9-yl)-propionic and 3-(thymine-1-yl)-propionic acids in ethanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; El Shazly, Shawky; Sonji, Ghassan; Sonji, Nada; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2015-05-01

    The ligands 3-(adenine-9-yl)propionic acid (AA) and 3-(thymine-1-yl)propionic acid (TA) were prepared by N9-alkylation of adenine and N1-alkylation of thymine with ethylacrylate in presence of a base catalyst, followed by acid hydrolysis of the formed ethyl esters to give the corresponding propionic acid derivatives. The products were characterized by spectral methods (FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), which confirm their structures. The dissociation constants of ligands, were potentiometrically determined in 0.3 M KCl at 20-50 °C temperature range. The work was extended to study complexation behavior of AA and TA with various biologically important divalent metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+) in 50% v/v water-ethanol medium at four different temperatures, keeping ionic strength constant (0.3 M KCl). The order of the stability constants of the formed complexes decreases in the sequence Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ for both ligands. The effect of temperature was also studied and the corresponding thermodynamic functions (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were derived and discussed. The formation of metal complexes has been found to be spontaneous, and the stability constants were dependant markedly on the basicity of the ligands.

  1. Can an Excess Electron Localise on a Purine Moiety in the Adenine-thymine Watson-Crick Base Pair? A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Rak, Janusz

    2007-04-17

    The electron affinity and the propensity to electron-induced proton transfer (PT) of hydrogen-bonded complexes between the Watson–Crick adenine–thymine pair (AT) and simple organic acid (HX), attached to adenine in the Hoogsteen-type configuration, were studied at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level. Although the carboxyl group is deprotonated at physiological pH, its neutral form, COOH, resembles the peptide bond or the amide fragment in the side chain of asparagine (Asn) or glutamine (Gln). Thus, these complexes mimic the interaction between the DNA environment (e.g., proteins) and nucleobase pairs incorporated in the biopolymer. Electron attachment is thermodynamically feasible and adiabatic electron affinities range from 0.41 to 1.28 eV, while the vertical detachment energies of the resulting anions span the range of 0.39 –2.88 eV. Low-energy activation barriers separate the anionic minima: aHX(AT) from the more stable single-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-SPT, and aHX(AT)-SPT from the double-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-DPT. Interaction between the adenine of the Watson–Crick AT base pair with an acidic proton donor probably counterbalances the larger EA of isolated thymine, as SOMO is almost evenly delocalized over both types of nucleic bases in the aHX(AT) anions. Moreover, as a result of PT the excess electron localizes entirely on adenine. Thus, in DNA interacting with its physiological environment, damage induced by low-energy electrons could begin, contrary to the current view, with the formation of purine anions, which are not formed in isolated DNA because of the greater stability of anionic pyrimidines.

  2. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Baocheng; Xiong, Yong; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2010-11-22

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3{prime} end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5{prime}-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5{prime}-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3{prime} hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  3. How the CCA-Adding Enzyme Selects Adenine over Cytosine at Position 76 of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    B Pan; Y Xiong; T Steitz

    2011-12-31

    CCA-adding enzymes [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferases] add CCA onto the 3' end of transfer RNA (tRNA) precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Although the mechanism by which cytosine (C) is selected at position 75 of tRNA has been established, the mechanism by which adenine (A) is selected at position 76 remains elusive. Here, we report five cocrystal structures of the enzyme complexed with both a tRNA mimic and nucleoside triphosphates under catalytically active conditions. These structures suggest that adenosine 5'-monophosphate is incorporated onto the A76 position of the tRNA via a carboxylate-assisted, one-metal-ion mechanism with aspartate 110 functioning as a general base. The discrimination against incorporation of cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) at position 76 arises from improper placement of the {alpha} phosphate of the incoming CTP, which results from the interaction of C with arginine 224 and prevents the nucleophilic attack by the 3' hydroxyl group of cytidine75.

  4. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-14

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  5. Hydration properties of natural and synthetic DNA sequences with methylated adenine or cytosine bases in the R.DpnI target and BDNF promoter studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanak, Siba; Helms, Volkhard

    2014-12-01

    Adenine and cytosine methylation are two important epigenetic modifications of DNA sequences at the levels of the genome and transcriptome. To characterize the differential roles of methylating adenine or cytosine with respect to their hydration properties, we performed conventional MD simulations and free energy perturbation calculations for two particular DNA sequences, namely the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter and the R.DpnI-bound DNA that are known to undergo methylation of C5-methyl cytosine and N6-methyl adenine, respectively. We found that a single methylated cytosine has a clearly favorable hydration free energy over cytosine since the attached methyl group has a slightly polar character. In contrast, capping the strongly polar N6 of adenine with a methyl group gives a slightly unfavorable contribution to its free energy of solvation. Performing the same demethylation in the context of a DNA double-strand gave quite similar results for the more solvent-accessible cytosine but much more unfavorable results for the rather buried adenine. Interestingly, the same demethylation reactions are far more unfavorable when performed in the context of the opposite (BDNF or R.DpnI target) sequence. This suggests a natural preference for methylation in a specific sequence context. In addition, free energy calculations for demethylating adenine or cytosine in the context of B-DNA vs. Z-DNA suggest that the conformational B-Z transition of DNA transition is rather a property of cytosine methylated sequences but is not preferable for the adenine-methylated sequences investigated here.

  6. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  7. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-24

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  8. Red-Shifted Hydrogen Bonds and Blue-Shifted van der Waals Contact in the Standard Watson-Crick Adenine-Thymine Base Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pan-Pan; Qiu, Wen-Yuan

    2009-08-01

    Standard Watson-Crick adenine-thymine (AT) base pair has been investigated by using the B3LYP functional with 6-31G(d, p) basis set, at which level of theory the geometrical characteristics of the AT base pair are the best in agreement with the experiment. It exhibits simultaneously red-shifted N-H···O and N-H···N hydrogen bonds as well as a blue-shifted C-H···O contact. AIM analysis suggests that the blue-shifted C-H···O contact exists as van der Waals interaction, and the electron density ρ that reflects the strength of a bond has been used to explain the red- and blue-shifted. By means of NBO analysis, we report a method to estimate the effect of hyperconjugation quantitatively, which combines the electron density in the X-H (X = N, C) σ bonding orbital with that in the σ* antibonding orbital. The effect of structural reorganization on the origins of the red- and blue-shifted has been considered by the partial optimization, its behavior on the X-H (X = N, C) bond is quite different. Rehybridization and repolarization models are employed, and they act as bond-shortening effects. The competition between the electrostatic attractions and Pauli/nucleus repulsions is present in the two typical red-shifted N-H···O and N-H···N hydrogen bonds as well as in the blue-shifted C-H···O van der Waals contact. Electrostatic attraction between H and Y atoms (Y = O, N) is an important reason for the red shift, while the nucleus-nucleus repulsion between H and O atoms may be a factor leading to the C-H bond contraction and its blue shift. The electric field effect induced by the acceptor O atom on the C-H bond is also discussed.

  9. Cloning and characterization of two tandemly arranged DNA methyltransferase genes of Neisseria lactamica: an adenine-specific M.NlaIII and a cytosine-type methylase.

    PubMed

    Labbé, D; Höltke, H J; Lau, P C

    1990-10-01

    The gene encoding the Neisseria lactamica III DNA methyltransferase (M.NlaIII) which recognizes the sequence CATG has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequencing of a 3.125 kb EcoRI-PstI fragment localizes the M. NlaIII gene to a 334 codon open reading frame (ORF) and identifies, 468 bp downstream, a second ORF of 313 amino acids, which is referred to as M.NlaX. Both proteins are detectable in the E. coli coupled in vitro transcription-translation system; they are apparently expressed from separate N. lactamica promoters. The N-terminal half of the previously characterized M.FokI, which methylates adenine in one of the DNA strands with its asymmetric recognition sequence (GGATG), is found to have 41% sequence identity and a further 11.7% sequence similarity with M.NlaIII. Among the conserved amino acids is the wellknown DPPY sequence motif. With one exception, analysis of the nucleotides coding for the DP dipeptide in all known DPPY sequences shows the presence of an inherent DNA adenine methylation (dam) recognition site of GATC. A low level of expression of M.NlaX in E. coli prevents the elucidation of its sequence recognition specificity. Sequence analysis of M.NlaX shows that it is closely related to the group of monospecific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoRII, Dcm, M.HpaII and M.HhaI) which all have a modified cytosine at the second position of the recognition sequences. Both M.EcoRII and Dcm amino acid sequences are about 50% identical with M.NlaX; a considerable degree of sequence identity is found in the so-called variable region which is believed to be responsible for sequence recognition specificity. M.NlaX is probably the counterpart to the E. coli Dcm in N. lactamica.

  10. APOBEC3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both sequence context and single-stranded DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Colleen M; Sadler, Holly A; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-07-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3G (i.e., APOBEC3G or A3G) is an evolutionarily conserved cytosine deaminase that potently restricts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), retrotransposons and other viruses. A3G has a nucleotide target site specificity for cytosine dinucleotides, though only certain cytosine dinucleotides are 'hotspots' for cytosine deamination, and others experience little or no editing by A3G. The factors that define these critical A3G hotspots are not fully understood. To investigate how A3G hotspots are defined, we used an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based oligonucleotide assay to probe the site specificity of A3G. Our findings strongly suggest that the target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) secondary structure as well as the bases directly 3' and 5' of the cytosine dinucleotide are critically important A3G recognition. For instance, A3G cannot readily deaminate a cytosine dinucleotide in ssDNA stem structures or in nucleotide base loops composed of three bases. Single-stranded nucleotide loops up to seven bases in length were poor targets for A3G activity unless cytosine residues flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Furthermore, we observed that A3G favors adenines, cytosines and thymines flanking the cytosine dinucleotide target in unstructured regions of ssDNA. Low cytosine deaminase activity was detected when guanines flanked the cytosine dinucleotide. Taken together, our findings provide the first demonstration that A3G cytosine deamination hotspots are defined by both the sequence context of the cytosine dinucleotide target as well as the ssDNA secondary structure. This knowledge can be used to better trace the origins of mutations to A3G activity, and illuminate its impact on processes such as HIV-1 genetic variation.

  11. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  12. Thymine and other prebiotic molecules produced from the ultraviolet photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in simple astrophysical ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Materese, Christopher K; Nuevo, Michel; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Sandford, Scott A

    2013-10-01

    The informational subunits of RNA or DNA consist of substituted N-heterocyclic compounds that fall into two groups: those based on purine (C₅H₄N₄) (adenine and guanine) and those based on pyrimidine (C₄H₄N₂) (uracil, cytosine, and thymine). Although not yet detected in the interstellar medium, N-heterocycles, including the nucleobase uracil, have been reported in carbonaceous chondrites. Recent laboratory experiments and ab initio calculations have shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in ices containing H₂O, NH₃, or both leads to the abiotic production of substituted pyrimidines, including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine. In this work, we studied the methylation and oxidation of pyrimidine in CH₃OH:pyrimidine, H₂O:CH₃OH:pyrimidine, CH₄:pyrimidine, and H₂O:CH₄:pyrimidine ices irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. The nucleobase thymine was detected in the residues from some of the mixtures. Our results suggest that the abundance of abiotic thymine produced by ice photolysis and delivered to the early Earth may have been significantly lower than that of uracil. Insofar as the delivery of extraterrestrial molecules was important for early biological chemistry on early Earth, these results suggest that there was more uracil than thymine available for emergent life, a scenario consistent with the RNA world hypothesis.

  13. Photophysical properties of pyrrolocytosine, a cytosine fluorescent base analogue†

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh L.; Spata, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    The photophysical behavior of pyrrolocytosine (PC), a fluorescent base analogue of cytosine, has been investigated using theoretical approaches. The similarities between the PC and cytosine structures allow PC to maintain the pseudo-Watson–Crick base-pairing arrangement with guanine. Cytosine, similar to the other natural nucleobases, is practically non-fluorescent, because of ultrafast radiationless decay occurring through conical intersections. PC displays a much higher fluorescence quantum yield than cytosine, making it an effective fluorescent marker to study the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA/RNA complexes. Similar to 2-aminopurine, a constitutional isomer of adenine that base-pairs with thymine, PC's fluorescence is quenched when it is incorporated into a dinucleotide or a trinucleotide. In this work we examine the photophysical properties of isolated PC, microhydrated PC, as well as, complexes where PC is either base-stacked or hydrogen-bonded with guanine. Our results indicate that hydration affects the radiationless decay pathways in PC by destabilizing conical intersections. The calculations of dimers and trimers show that the radiative decay is affected by π stacking, while the presence of charge transfer states between PC and guanine may contribute to radiationless decay. PMID:27251599

  14. Crystal structure of an intermolecular 2:1 complex between adenine and thymine. Evidence for both Hoogsteen and 'quasi-Watson-Crick' interactions.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Naik, Tangali R Ravikumar; Nayak, Susanta K; Row, Tayur N Guru

    2010-06-15

    The titled complex, obtained by co-crystallization (EtOH/25 degrees C), is apparently the only known complex of the free bases. Its crystal structure, as determined by X-ray diffraction at both 90 K and 313 K, showed that one A-T pair involves a Hoogsteen interaction, and the other a Watson-Crick interaction but only with respect to the adenine unit. The absence of a clear-cut Watson-Crick base pair raises intriguing questions about the basis of the DNA double helix.

  15. Supramolecular polymeric chemosensor for biomedical applications: design and synthesis of a luminescent zinc metallopolymer as a chemosensor for adenine detection.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2012-11-01

    Adenine is an important bio-molecule that plays many crucial roles in food safety and biomedical diagnostics. Differentiating adenine from a mixture of adenosine and other nucleic bases (guanine, thymine, cytosine, and uracil) is particularly important for both biological and clinical applications. A neutral Zn(II) metallosupramolecular polymer based on acyl hydrazone derived coordination centres (P1) were generated through self-assembly polymerization. It is a linear coordination polymer that behaves like self-standing film. The synthesis, (1)H-NMR characterization, and spectroscopic properties of this supramolecular material are reported. P1 was found to be a chemosensor specific to adenine, with a luminescent enhancement. The binding properties of P1 with common nucleic bases and nucleosides reveal that this supramolecular polymer is very selective to adenine molecules (~20 to 420 times more selectivity than other nucleic bases). The formation constant (K) of P1 to adenine was found to be log K = 4.10 ± 0.02. This polymeric chemosensor produces a specific response to adenine down to 90 ppb. Spectrofluorimetric and (1)H-NMR titration studies showed that the P1 polymer allows each Zn(II) coordination centre to bind to two adenine molecules through hydrogen bonding with their imine and hydrazone protons.

  16. Energetics of the lattice: packing elements in crystals of four-stranded intercalated cytosine-rich DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, I.; Cai, L.; Chen, L.; Rich, A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation of single molecules from solution into crystals represents a transition between distinct energetic states. In solution, the atomic interactions within the molecule dominate. In the crystalline state, however, a set of additional interactions are formed between molecules in close contact in the lattice--these are the packing interactions. The crystal structures of d(CCCT), d(TAACCC), d(CCCAAT), and d(AACCCC) have in common a four-stranded intercalated cytosine segment, built by stacked layers of cytosine.cytosine+ (C.C+) base pairs coming from two parallel duplexes that intercalate into each other with opposite polarity. The intercalated cytosine segments in these structures are similar in their geometry, even though the sequences crystallized in different space groups. In the crystals, adenine and thymine residues of the sequences are used to build the three-dimensional crystal lattice by elaborately interacting with symmetry-related molecules. The packing elements observed provide novel insight about the copious ways in which nucleic acid molecules can interact with each other--for example, when folded in more complicated higher order structures, such as mRNA and chromatin.

  17. Local piezoresponse and polarization switching in nucleobase thymine microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bdikin, Igor; Heredia, Alejandro; Neumayer, Sabine M.; Bystrov, Vladimir S.; Gracio, José; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2015-08-01

    Thymine (2-oxy-4-oxy-5 methyl pyrimidine) is one of the four nucleobases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In the DNA molecule, thymine binds to adenine via two hydrogen bonds, thus stabilizing the nucleic acid structure and is involved in pairing and replication. Here, we show that synthetic thymine microcrystals grown from the solution exhibit local piezoelectricity and apparent ferroelectricity, as evidenced by nanoscale electromechanical measurements via Piezoresponse Force Microscopy. Our experimental results demonstrate significant electromechanical activity and polarization switchability of thymine, thus opening a pathway for piezoelectric and ferroelectric-based applications of thymine and, perhaps, of other DNA nucleobase materials. The results are supported by molecular modeling of polarization switching under an external electric field.

  18. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  19. Communication: Electronic UV-Vis transient spectra of the ∙OH reaction products of uracil, thymine, cytosine, and 5,6-dihydrouracil by using the complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory.

    PubMed

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2013-08-21

    Addition of ∙OH radicals to pyrimidine nucleobases is a common reaction in DNA/RNA damage by reactive oxygen species. Among several experimental techniques, transient absorption spectroscopy has been during the last decades used to characterize such compounds. Discrepancies have however appeared in the assignment of the adduct or adducts responsible for the reported transient absorption UV-Vis spectra. In order to get an accurate assignment of the transient spectra and a unified description of the absorption properties of the ∙OH reaction products of pyrimidines, a systematic complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory study has been carried out on the uracil, thymine, and cytosine ∙OH addition adducts, as well as on the 5,6-dihydrouracil hydrogen abstraction products. With the obtained findings, the C5OH contributions to the lowest-energy band can be finally discarded. Instead, a bright (2)(π2) state of the C6OH adducts is determined to be the main responsible in all compounds for the absorption band in the Vis range.

  20. Geometrical Characterization of Adenine And Guanine on Cu(110) By NEXAFS, XPS, And DFT Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Katano, S.; Kawai, M.; Ogasawara, H.; Nilsson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stockholm U.

    2009-04-30

    Adsorption of purine DNA bases (guanine and adenine) on Cu(1 1 0) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and density-functional theory (DFT) calculation. At coverages near 0.2 monolayers, Angular-resolved NEXAFS analysis revealed that adenine adsorbates lie almost flat and that guanine adsorbates are tilted up on the surface with the purine ring parallel to the atom rows of Cu(1 1 0). Referring to the previous studies on pyrimidine DNA bases [M. Furukawa, H. Fujisawa, S. Katano, H. Ogasawara, Y. Kim, T. Komeda, A. Nilsson, M. Kawai, Surf. Sci. 532-535 (2003) 261], the isomerization of DNA bases on Cu(1 1 0) was found to play an important role in the adsorption geometry. Guanine, thymine and cytosine adsorption have an amine-type nitrogen next to a carbonyl group, which is dehydrogenated into imine nitrogen on Cu(1 1 0). These bases are bonded by the inherent portion of - NH-CO - altered by conversion into enolic form and dehydrogenation. Adenine contains no CO group and is bonded to Cu(1 1 0) by participation of the inherent amine parts, resulting in nearly flatly-lying position.

  1. Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Couve, Sophie; Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Matkarimov, Bakhyt; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2014-01-01

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA→CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes. PMID:24692658

  2. Novel fluorescent CdTe quantum dot-thymine conjugate—synthesis, properties and possible application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodzik, Łucja; Lewandowska-Łańcucka, Joanna; Szuwarzyński, Michał; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Novel, highly fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots conjugated with thymine and stabilized with thioglycolic acid were obtained and characterized. Successful formation of the conjugate was confirmed by elemental analysis, and UV-vis, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies. Crystal structure and composition of the conjugates were characterized with xray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The size of the conjugates was 4-6 nm as demonstrated using atomic force microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The plasmon resonance fluorescence band at 540 nm on excitation at 351 nm was observed for these nanoparticles. The intensity of this band increased with the increase in the amount of conjugated thymine with no shift in its position. Based on the fluorescence measurements it was found that the CdTe-thymine conjugate interacted efficiently and selectively not only with adenine, a nucleobase complementary to thymine, but also with adenine-containing modified nucleosides, i.e., 5‧-deoxy-5‧-(methylthio)adenosine and 2‧-O-methyladenosine, the urinary tumor markers which allow monitoring of the disease progression. To the best of our knowledge, as yet, there have been no studies presented in literature on that type of the interaction with CdTe-thymine conjugates. Therefore, the system presented can be considered as a working component of a selective adenine/adenosine biosensor with potential application in cancer diagnosis.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  4. Human repair endonuclease incises DNA at cytosine photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Weiss, R.B.; Brent, T.P.; Duker, N.J.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of DNA damage by uvB and uvC irradiation was investigated using a defined sequence of human DNA. A UV-irradiated, 3'-end-labeled, 92 base pair sequence from the human alphoid segment was incubated with a purified human lymphoblast endonuclease that incises DNA at non-dimer photoproducts. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified all sites of endonucleolytic incision as cytosines. These were found in regions of the DNA sequence lacking adjacent pyrimidines and therefore are neither cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers nor 6-4'-pyrimidines. Incision at cytosine photoproducts was not detected at loci corresponding to alkali-labile sites in either control or irradiated substrates. This demonstrates that the bands detected after the enzymic reactions were not the result of DNA strand breaks, base loss sites or ring-opened cytosines. The optimal wavelengths for formation of cytosine photoproducts are 270-295 nm, similar to those associated with maximal tumor yields in animal ultraviolet carcinogenesis studies. Irradiation by monochromatic 254 nm light resulted in reduced cytosine photoproduct formation. This human UV endonuclease has an apparently identical substrate specificity to E. coli endonuclease III. Both the human and bacterial enzymes incise cytosine moieties in UV irradiated DNA and modified thymines in oxidized DNA.

  5. The electrochemical reduction of the purines guanine and adenine at platinum electrodes in several room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Rogers, Emma I; Hardacre, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2010-02-05

    The reduction of guanine was studied by microelectrode voltammetry in the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-hexyltriethylammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [N(6,2,2,2)][N(Tf)(2)], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorosphosphate [C(4)mim][PF(6)], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C(4)mpyrr][N(Tf)(2)], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C(4)mim][N(Tf)(2)], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium dicyanamide [C(4)mpyrr][N(NC)(2)] and tris(P-hexyl)-tetradecylphosphonium trifluorotris(pentafluoroethyl)phosphate [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP] on a platinum microelectrode. In [N(6,2,2,2)][NTf(2)] and [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP], but not in the other ionic liquids studied, guanine reduction involves a one-electron, diffusion-controlled process at very negative potential to produce an unstable radical anion, which is thought to undergo a dimerization reaction, probably after proton abstraction from the cation of the ionic liquid. The rate of this subsequent reaction depends on the nature of the ionic liquid, and it is faster in the ionic liquid [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP], in which the formation of the resulting dimer can be voltammetrically monitored at less negative potentials than required for the reduction of the parent molecule. Adenine showed similar behaviour to guanine but the pyrimidines thymine and cytosine did not; thymine was not reduced at potentials less negative than required for solvent (RTIL) decomposition while only a poorly defined wave was seen for cytosine. The possibility for proton abstraction from the cation in [N(6,2,2,2)][NTf(2)] and [P(14,6,6,6)][FAP] is noted and this is thought to aid the electrochemical dimerization process. The resulting rapid reaction is thought to shift the reduction potentials for guanine and adenine to lower values than observed in RTILs where the scope for proton abstraction is not present. Such shifts are characteristic of so-called EC processes where reversible electron transfer

  6. Profiling cytosine oxidation in DNA by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Samson-Thibault, Francois; Madugundu, Guru S; Gao, Shanshan; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2012-09-17

    Spontaneous and oxidant-induced damage to cytosine is probably the main cause of CG to TA transition mutations in mammalian genomes. The reaction of hydroxyl radical (·OH) and one-electron oxidants with cytosine derivatives produces numerous oxidation products, which have been identified in large part by model studies with monomers and short oligonucleotides. Here, we developed an analytical method based on LC-MS/MS to detect 10 oxidized bases in DNA, including 5 oxidation products of cytosine. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the measurement of base damage in isolated calf thymus DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in aerated aqueous solutions (0-200 Gy) and to well-known Fenton-like reactions (Fe(2+) or Cu(+) with H(2)O(2) and ascorbate). The following cytosine modifications were quantified as modified 2'-deoxyribonucleosides upon exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation in aqueous aerated solution: 5-hydroxyhydantoin (Hyd-Ura) > 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra) > 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt) > 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (Ura-Gly) > 1-carbamoyl-4,5-dihydroxy-2-oxoimidazolidine (Imid-Cyt). The total yield of cytosine oxidation products was comparable to that of thymine oxidation products (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (Thy-Gly), 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantotin (Hyd-Thy), 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HmUra), and 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra)) as well as the yield of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). The major oxidation product of cytosine in DNA was Hyd-Ura. In contrast, the formation of Imid-Cyt was a minor pathway of DNA damage, although it is the major product arising from irradiation of the monomers, cytosine, and 2'-deoxycytidine. The reaction of Fenton-like reagents with DNA gave a different distribution of cytosine derived products compared to ionizing radiation, which likely reflects the reaction of metal ions with intermediate peroxyl radicals or hydroperoxides. The analysis of the main cytosine oxidation products will help elucidate the complex

  7. Hole wave functions and transport with deazaadenines replacing adenines in DNA.

    PubMed

    Breindel, Alexander J; Stuart, Rachel E; Bock, William J; Stelter, David N; Kravec, Shane M; Conwell, Esther M

    2013-03-21

    Transport of a hole along the base stack of DNA is relatively facile for a series of adenines (As) paired with thymines (Ts) or for a series of guanines (Gs) paired with cytosines (Cs). However, the speed at which a hole was found to travel was much too small to make useful semiconductor-type devices. Quite recently it was found that replacing one of the electronegative nitrogens (N3 or N7) with a carbon and a hydrogen, thus turning A into deazaadenine, increased the hole speed in what was A/T by a factor 30. To study the effect of the substitution we have carried out simulations for the wave function of a hole on an A/T oligomer with As modified by replacing N3 or N7, or both, with C-H's. The simulations were carried out using QM/MM and the code CP2K. We find, for either N, or both, replaced, the wave function of the hole behaves similarly to that of a hole on A/T in being delocalized immediately after hole insertion for up to ∼20 fs, and then becoming localized on one of the modified As. The time for localization could be decreased by placing additional water within ∼1.8 Å of N3 or N7, encouraging the formation of hydrogen bonds with these nitrogens. Because of their positive charge the hydrogen bonds tend to repel holes. However, these bonds were found to decay on a femtosecond time scale, thus unlikely to affect the hole hopping, which occurs on approximately a nanosecond scale in A/T. Replacement with a C-H of one or both of the electronegative Ns, along with the structural changes that result, is expected to decrease the activation energy and thus account for the larger hole hopping rate in the deaza-modified DNA.

  8. Mechanisms for the formation of thymine under astrophysical conditions and implications for the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    Nucleobases are the carriers of the genetic information in ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for all life on Earth. Their presence in meteorites clearly indicates that compounds of biological importance can form via non-biological processes in extraterrestrial environments. Recent experimental studies have shown that the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil and cytosine can be easily formed from the ultraviolet irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ice mixtures that simulate astrophysical processes. In contrast, thymine, which is found only in DNA, is more difficult to form under the same experimental conditions, as its formation usually requires a higher photon dose. Earlier quantum chemical studies confirmed that the reaction pathways were favorable provided that several H2O molecules surrounded the reactants. However, the present quantum chemical study shows that the formation of thymine is limited because of the inefficiency of the methylation of pyrimidine and its oxidized derivatives in an H2O ice, as supported by the laboratory studies. Our results constrain the formation of thymine in astrophysical environments and thus the inventory of organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and have implications for the role of thymine and DNA in the origin of life.

  9. Mechanisms for the formation of thymine under astrophysical conditions and implications for the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Bera, Partha P; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K; Sandford, Scott A; Lee, Timothy J

    2016-04-14

    Nucleobases are the carriers of the genetic information in ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for all life on Earth. Their presence in meteorites clearly indicates that compounds of biological importance can form via non-biological processes in extraterrestrial environments. Recent experimental studies have shown that the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil and cytosine can be easily formed from the ultraviolet irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ice mixtures that simulate astrophysical processes. In contrast, thymine, which is found only in DNA, is more difficult to form under the same experimental conditions, as its formation usually requires a higher photon dose. Earlier quantum chemical studies confirmed that the reaction pathways were favorable provided that several H2O molecules surrounded the reactants. However, the present quantum chemical study shows that the formation of thymine is limited because of the inefficiency of the methylation of pyrimidine and its oxidized derivatives in an H2O ice, as supported by the laboratory studies. Our results constrain the formation of thymine in astrophysical environments and thus the inventory of organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and have implications for the role of thymine and DNA in the origin of life.

  10. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  11. The Cytosine Water Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, A. M.; Mata, S.; Bermudez, C.; Berdakin, M.; Pena, I.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    A multi FID system has been adapted into the operation sequence of the LA-MB-FTMW spectrometer. Thanks to the reached sensitivity, one monohydrate of cytosine (A= 3725.61 (26) MHz, B=980.385 (76) MHz, C=777.231 (46) MHz) has been detected in the supersonic expansion. J. --U. Grabow, W. Stahl, H. Dreizler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1996, 67, 4072 -- 4084. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2009, 11, 617 -- 627.

  12. Search for interstellar adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2015-05-01

    It is long debated if pre-biotic molecules are indeed present in the interstellar medium. Despite substantial works pointing to their existence, pre-biotic molecules are yet to be discovered with a complete confidence. In this paper, our main aim is to study the chemical evolution of interstellar adenine under various circumstances. We prepare a large gas-grain chemical network by considering various pathways for the formation of adenine. Majumdar et al. (New Astron. 20:15, 2013) proposed that in the absence of adenine detection, one could try to trace two precursors of adenine, namely, HCCN and NH2CN. Recently Merz et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 118:3637-3644, 2014), proposed another route for the formation of adenine in interstellar condition. They proposed two more precursor molecules. But it was not verified by any accurate gas-grain chemical model. Neither was it known if the production rate would be high or low. Our paper fills this important gap. We include this new pathways to find that the contribution through this pathways for the formation of Adenine is the most dominant one in the context of interstellar medium. We propose that observers may look for the two precursors (C3NH and HNCNH) in the interstellar media which are equally important for predicting abundances of adenine. We perform quantum chemical calculations to find out spectral properties of adenine and its two new precursor molecules in infrared, ultraviolet and sub-millimeter region. Our present study would be useful for predicting abundance of adenine.

  13. Copper(II)-Thymine Coordination Polymer Nanoribbons as Potential Oligonucleotide Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Verónica G; Lorca, Romina; Latorre, Ana; Hassanein, Khaled; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Castillo, Oscar; Somoza, Álvaro; Zamora, Félix; Amo-Ochoa, Pilar

    2017-01-19

    The direct reaction between copper nitrate, thymine-1-acetic acid, and 4,4'-bipyridine in water leads to the formation of a blue colloid comprising uniform crystalline nanoribbons (length >1 μm; width ca. 150-185 nm; diameter ca. 15-60 nm) of a coordination polymer. The polymer displays a thymine-based structure freely available for supramolecular interactions. These nanostructures show significant selective interaction with single-stranded oligonucleotides based on adenine. Remarkably, they present low cell toxicity in three cell lines-despite the copper(II) content-and can be used as nanocarriers of oligonucleotides. These results suggest the potential of these types of nanostructures in several biological applications.

  14. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  15. Thymine DNA Glycosylase Is Essential for Active DNA Demethylation by Linked Deamination-Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cortellino, Salvatore; Xu, Jinfei; Sannai, Mara; Moore, Robert; Caretti, Elena; Cigliano, Antonio; Le Coz, Madeleine; Devarajan, Karthik; Wessels, Andy; Soprano, Dianne; Abramowitz, Lara K.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Rambow, Florian; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Bruno, Tiziana; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Renner, Catherine; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kobi, Dominique; Davidson, Irwin; Alberti, Christophe; Larue, Lionel; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism for gene silencing. While methyltransferases mediate cytosine methylation, it is less clear how unmethylated regions in mammalian genomes are protected from de novo methylation and whether an active demethylating activity is involved. Here we show that either knockout or catalytic inactivation of the DNA repair enzyme Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) leads to embryonic lethality in mice. TDG is necessary for recruiting p300 to retinoic acid (RA)-regulated promoters, protection of CpG islands from hypermethylation, and active demethylation of tissue-specific, developmentally- and hormonally-regulated promoters and enhancers. TDG interacts with the deaminase AID and the damage-response protein GADD45a. These findings highlight a dual role for TDG in promoting proper epigenetic states during development and suggest a two-step mechanism for DNA demethylation in mammals, whereby 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine are first deaminated by AID to thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil, respectively, followed by TDG-mediated thymine and 5-hydroxymethyluracil excision repair. PMID:21722948

  16. Adenine formation without HCN.

    PubMed

    Merz, Kenneth M; Aguiar, Eduardo C; da Silva, Joao Bosco P

    2014-05-22

    From a historic point of view adenine was always presumed to be the product of HCN pentamerization. In this work a new mechanism for adenine synthesis in the gas phase without HCN is proposed. The concept of retrosynthetic analysis was employed to create a tautomer of adenine, which can be reached from previously observed interstellar molecules C3NH and HNCNH and its isomer H2NCN. MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations were performed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of the minimum and the transition state (TS) structures involved in the six step mechanism. This new mechanism requires a smaller number of steps, the reaction energy is twice as exergonic, and the rate determining TS is lower in energy than the corresponding ones proposed elsewhere in the literature.

  17. Mechanisms for the Formations of the Thymine Under Astrophysical Conditions and Implications for the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleobases are the carriers of the genetic information in ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for all life on Earth. Their presence in meteorites clearly indicates that compounds of biological importance can form via non-biological processes in extraterrestrial environments. Recent experimental studies have shown that the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil and cytosine can be easily formed from the ultraviolet irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ice mixtures that simulate astrophysical processes. In contrast, thymine, which is found only in DNA, is more difficult to form under the same experimental conditions, as its formation usually requires a higher photon dose. Earlier quantum chemical studies confirmed that the reaction pathways were favorable provided that several H2O molecules surrounded the reactants. However, the present quantum chemical study shows that the formation of thymine is limited because of the inefficiency of the methylation of pyrimidine and its oxidized derivatives in an H2O ice, as supported by the laboratory studies. Our results constrain the formation of thymine in astrophysical environments and thus the inventory of organic molecules delivered to the early Earth and have implications for the role of thymine and DNA in the origin of life.

  18. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  19. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  20. The effect of microhydration on ionization energies of thymine

    SciTech Connect

    Khistyev, Kirill; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2011-01-03

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the effect of microhydration on ionization energies (IEs) of thymine is presented. The experimental IEs are derived from photoionization efficiency curves recorded using tunable synchrotron VUV radiation. The onsets of the PIE curves are 8.85+-0.05, 8.60+-0.05, 8.55+-0.05, and 8.40+-0.05 eV for thymine, thymine mono-, di-, and tri-hydrates, respectively. The computed (EOM-IP-CCSD/cc-pVTZ) AIEs are 8.90, 8.51, 8.52, and 8.35 eV for thymine and the lowest isomers of thymine mono-, di-, and tri-hydrates. Due to large structural relaxation, the Franck-Condon factors for the 0<-- 0 transitions are very small shifting the apparent PIE onsets to higher energies. Microsolvation strongly affects IEs of thymine -- addition of each water molecule reduces the first vertical IE by 0.10-0.15 eV. The adiabatic IE decreases even more (up to 0.4 eV). The magnitude of the effect varies for different ionized states and for different isomers. For the ionized states that are localized on thymine the dominant contribution to the IE reduction is the electrostatic interaction between the delocalized positive charge on thymine and the dipole moment of the water molecule.

  1. Photosensitization of bioinspired thymine-containing polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Debora M; Reyna, Dalila; Estenoz, Diana A; Trakhtenberg, Sofia; Warner, John C

    2008-05-29

    Here, we report a sensitization study on a family of water-soluble photopolymers based on thymine. The goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of sensitizer molecules would promote photocrosslinking/immobilization of the polymers using low-energy irradiation (520 nm) as compared to the UV irradiation (approximately 280 nm) necessary for the standard photoinduced process to take place. With the aid of Eosin Y Spirit Soluble (EY) as a sensitizer, water-soluble polystyrene copolymers of vinylbenzylthymine-vinylbenzyltriethylammonium chloride (VBT-VBA) were immobilized after exposure to visible irradiation. By exciting the sensitizer molecule in the presence of VBT copolymers at a wavelength where absorption by the latter does not occur, the triplet state of the sensitizer is generated in high yields, and consequently, polymer photocross-linking takes place. UV-vis spectroscopy has been used to study the effect of irradiation dose, copolymer composition, and sensitizer concentration on the photoreactivity of VBT polymers. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Eosin Y as a sensitizer to achieve the thymine photodimer formation, resulting in immobilization of VBT-VBA-EY films on PET substrate. This provides complementary information on photoinduced immobilization of VBT-VBA films that are crucial for developing new classes of environmentally benign materials and new energy-saving methods.

  2. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures.

  3. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... AHK-see-rye-bow-noo-klee-ik) acid (DNA). DNA contains four chemicals (adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine — ... in your body contains about 6 feet of DNA thread, for a total of about 3 billion ...

  4. Protein modification by adenine propenal.

    PubMed

    Shuck, Sarah C; Wauchope, Orrette R; Rose, Kristie L; Kingsley, Philip J; Rouzer, Carol A; Shell, Steven M; Sugitani, Norie; Chazin, Walter J; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A; Galligan, James J; Beavers, William N; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2014-10-20

    Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. N(ε)-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine-lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is N(ε)-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA's ability to bind to a DNA substrate.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei adenine-phosphoribosyltransferases mediate adenine salvage and aminopurinol susceptibility but not adenine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Alexandra; Lamprea-Burgunder, Estelle; Graf, Fabrice E; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    African trypanosomes, like all obligate parasitic protozoa, cannot synthesize purines de novo and import purines from their hosts to build nucleic acids. The purine salvage pathways of Trypanosoma brucei being redundant, none of the involved enzymes is likely to be essential. Nevertheless they can be of pharmacological interest due to their role in activation of purine nucleobase or nucleoside analogues, which only become toxic when converted to nucleotides. Aminopurine antimetabolites, in particular, are potent trypanocides and even adenine itself is toxic to trypanosomes at elevated concentrations. Here we report on the T. brucei adenine phosphoribosyltransferases TbAPRT1 and TbAPRT2, encoded by the two genes Tb927.7.1780 and Tb927.7.1790, located in tandem on chromosome seven. The duplication is syntenic in all available Trypanosoma genomes but not in Leishmania. While TbAPRT1 is cytosolic, TbAPRT2 possesses a glycosomal targeting signal and co-localizes with the glycosomal marker aldolase. Interestingly, the distribution of glycosomal targeting signals among trypanosomatid adenine phosphoribosyltransferases is not consistent with their phylogeny, indicating that the acquisition of adenine salvage to the glycosome happened after the radiation of Trypanosoma. Double null mutant T. brucei Δtbaprt1,2 exhibited no growth phenotype but no longer incorporated exogenous adenine into the nucleotide pool. This, however, did not reduce their sensitivity to adenine. The Δtbaprt1,2 trypanosomes were resistant to the adenine isomer aminopurinol, indicating that it is activated by phosphoribosyl transfer. Aminopurinol was about 1000-fold more toxic to bloodstream-form T. brucei than the corresponding hypoxanthine isomer allopurinol. Aminopurinol uptake was not dependent on the aminopurine permease P2 that has been implicated in drug resistance.

  6. DNA methylation on N6-adenine in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Eric Lieberman; Blanco, Mario Andres; Gu, Lei; Sendinc, Erdem; Liu, Jianzhao; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Aravind, L.; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In mammalian cells, DNA methylation on the 5th position of cytosine (5mC) plays an important role as an epigenetic mark. However, DNA methylation was considered to be absent in C. elegans because of the lack of detectable 5mC as well as homologs of the cytosine DNA methyltransferases. Here, using multiple approaches, we demonstrate the presence of adenine N6-methylation (6mA) in C. elegans DNA. We further demonstrate that this modification increases trans-generationally in a paradigm of epigenetic inheritance. Importantly, we identify a DNA demethylase, NMAD-1, and a potential DNA methyltransferase, DAMT-1, which regulate 6mA levels and crosstalk between methylation of histone H3K4me2 and 6mA, and control the epigenetic inheritance of phenotypes associated with the loss of the H3K4me2 demethylase spr-5. Together, these data identify a DNA modification in C. elegans and raise the exciting possibility that 6mA may be a carrier of heritable epigenetic information in eukaryotes. PMID:25936839

  7. Structural basis for targeted DNA cytosine deamination and mutagenesis by APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A; Banerjee, Surajit; Shaban, Nadine M; Kurahashi, Kayo; Salamango, Daniel J; McCann, Jennifer L; Starrett, Gabriel J; Duffy, Justin V; Demir, Özlem; Amaro, Rommie E; Harki, Daniel A; Harris, Reuben S; Aihara, Hideki

    2017-02-01

    APOBEC-catalyzed cytosine-to-uracil deamination of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has beneficial functions in immunity and detrimental effects in cancer. APOBEC enzymes have intrinsic dinucleotide specificities that impart hallmark mutation signatures. Although numerous structures have been solved, mechanisms for global ssDNA recognition and local target-sequence selection remain unclear. Here we report crystal structures of human APOBEC3A and a chimera of human APOBEC3B and APOBEC3A bound to ssDNA at 3.1-Å and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a U-shaped DNA conformation, with the specificity-conferring -1 thymine flipped out and the target cytosine inserted deep into the zinc-coordinating active site pocket. The -1 thymine base fits into a groove between flexible loops and makes direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, accounting for the strong 5'-TC preference. These findings explain both conserved and unique properties among APOBEC family members, and they provide a basis for the rational design of inhibitors to impede the evolvability of viruses and tumors.

  8. Was adenine the first purine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Bakker, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Oligomerization of HCN (1 molar) in the presence of added formaldehyde (0.5 molar) produced an order of magnitude more 8-hydroxymethyladenine than adenine or any other biologically significant purine. This result suggests that on the prebiotic earth, nucleoside analogs may have been synthesized directly in more complex mixtures of HCN with other aldehydes.

  9. Onset of chiral adenine surface growth.

    PubMed

    Capitán, María Jose; Álvarez, Jesús; Wang, Yang; Otero, Roberto; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2013-10-07

    The structure and stability of adenine crystals and thin layers has been studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations. We have found that adenine crystals can be grown in two phases that are energetically quasi-degenerate, the structure of which can be described as a pile-up of 2D adenine planes. In each plane, the structure can be described as an aggregation of adenine dimers. Under certain conditions, kinetic effects can favor the growth of the less stable phase. These results have been used to understand the growth of adenine thin films on gold under ultra-high vacuum conditions. We have found that the grown phase corresponds to the α-phase, which is composed of stacked prochiral planes. In this way, the adenine nanocrystals exhibit a surface that is enantiopure. These results could open new insight into the applications of adenine in biological, medical, and enantioselective or pharmaceutical fields.

  10. Electron accommodation dynamics in the DNA base thymine

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sarah B.; Yandell, Margaret A.; Kunin, Alice; Stephansen, Anne B.; Yokoi, Yuki; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-07-14

    The dynamics of electron attachment to the DNA base thymine are investigated using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the gas phase iodide-thymine (I{sup −}T) complex. An ultraviolet pump pulse ejects an electron from the iodide and prepares an iodine-thymine temporary negative ion that is photodetached with a near-IR probe pulse. The resulting photoelectrons are analyzed with velocity-map imaging. At excitation energies ranging from −120 meV to +90 meV with respect to the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 4.05 eV for I{sup −}T, both the dipole-bound and valence-bound negative ions of thymine are observed. A slightly longer rise time for the valence-bound state than the dipole-bound state suggests that some of the dipole-bound anions convert to valence-bound species. No evidence is seen for a dipole-bound anion of thymine at higher excitation energies, in the range of 0.6 eV above the I{sup −}T VDE, which suggests that if the dipole-bound anion acts as a “doorway” to the valence-bound anion, it only does so at excitation energies near the VDE of the complex.

  11. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  12. Photoinduced formation of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine derivatives at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozinova, T. A.; Lobanov, A. V.; Lander, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The amount of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions of adenine (A), adenosine (Ado), cytidine (Cyt), and thymine (T) containing 0.1 M NaCl and irradiated with near-UV light at 77 K is determined. It is established by comparing the results to data obtained earlier that the amount of H2O2 detected in the defrosted samples following identical irradiation falls in the order Ado > adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) > A >> Cyt. The formation of H2O2 was not detected for T. The formation of H2O2 in solutions of adenine derivatives was observed when the samples were irradiated with light having wavelengths in the ranges λ = 240-400 nm and 290-450 nm. The latter covers only the long wave absorption range of these compounds. It is shown that the change in the intensity of irradiation that strongly affected the intensity of EPR signals of irradiated samples prior to defrosting affected the amount of detected H2O2 only slightly, and the effect was not unidirectional. The results from determining H2O2 in the samples of adenine derivatives are compared to estimates of the content of free peroxyl radicals, obtained by analyzing EPR spectra. Plausible mechanisms of the processes are discussed.

  13. Specific mercury(II) adsorption by thymine-based sorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangjun; Qi, Cui; Bing, Tao; Cheng, Xiaohong; Shangguan, Dihua

    2009-04-15

    A new kind of polymer sorbent based on the specific interaction of Hg(II) with nucleic acid base, thymine, is described for the selective adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Two types of sorbents immobilized with thymine were prepared by one-step swelling and polymerization and graft polymerization, respectively. The maximum static adsorption capacity of the new polymer sorbents for Hg(II) is proportional to the density of thymine on their surface, up to 200mg/g. Moreover, the new kind polymer sorbent shows excellent selectivity for Hg(II) over other interfering ions, such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Ca(II) and Mg(II), exhibits very fast kinetics for Hg(II) adsorption from aqueous solution, and can be easily regenerated by 1.0M HCl. It also has been successfully used for the selective adsorption of spiked Hg(II) from real tap water samples. This new thymine polymer sorbent holds a great promise in laboratory and industrial applications such as separation, on-line enrichment, solid-phase extraction, and removal of Hg(II) from pharmaceutical, food and environmental samples.

  14. Adenine and adenosine salvage in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Boitz, Jan M; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-08-01

    6-aminopurine metabolism in Leishmania is unique among trypanosomatid pathogens since this genus expresses two distinct routes for adenine salvage: adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) and adenine deaminase (AAH). To evaluate the relative contributions of APRT and AAH, adenine salvage was evaluated in Δaprt, Δaah, and Δaprt/Δaah null mutants of L. donovani. The data confirm that AAH plays the dominant role in adenine metabolism in L. donovani, although either enzyme alone is sufficient for salvage. Adenosine salvage was also evaluated in a cohort of null mutants. Adenosine is also primarily converted to hypoxanthine, either intracellularly or extracellularly, but can also be phosphorylated to the nucleotide level by adenosine kinase when the predominant pathways are genetically or pharmacologically blocked. These data provide genetic verification for the relative contributions of 6-aminopurine metabolizing pathways in L. donovani and demonstrate that all of the pathways can function under appropriate conditions of genetic or pharmacologic perturbation.

  15. Cytosine modifications in neurodevelopment and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bing; Jin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation has been studied comprehensively and linked to both normal neurodevelopment and neurological diseases. The recent identification of several new DNA modifications, including 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), has given us a new perspective on the previously observed plasticity in 5mC-dependent regulatory processes. Here we review the latest research into these cytosine modifications, focusing mainly on their roles in neurodevelopment and diseases. PMID:23912899

  16. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  17. Towards a test to predict 5-fluorouracil toxicity: Pharmacokinetic data for thymine and two sequential metabolites following oral thymine administration to healthy adult males.

    PubMed

    Duley, John A; Ni, Ming; Shannon, Catherine; Norris, Ross L; Sheffield, Lesley; Harris, Marion; van Kuilenburg, Andre B P; Mead, Scott; Cameron, Andrew; Helsby, Nuala; George, Rani; Charles, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    The fluoropyrimidine drugs 5-fluorouracil and its oral prodrug capecitabine remain first line therapy for solid tumours of the neck, breast and colon. However, significant and unpredictable toxicity affects about 10-25% of patients depending upon the mode of 5-fluorouracil delivery. The pharmacokinetics of thymine (5-methyluracil) may provide an approach for screening for 5-fluorouracil toxicity, based on the rationale that thymine is a close structural analogue of 5-fluorouracil and is catabolized by the same enzymatic pathway. Oral thymine loading tests were performed on 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject was given a single oral dose of 250mg thymine in capsule form. Blood, urine and saliva samples were collected pre-dose and up to 5h post-dose. Concentrations of thymine, and its catabolites dihydrothymine and ß-ureidoisobutyrate were analysed by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry in plasma, urine and saliva. The pharmacokinetic data of healthy volunteers were analysed assuming a non-compartmental model. Thymine peaked quickly (30-45min) in plasma to a maximum concentration of 170±185μg/L (mean±SD). Clearance was high (mean 57.9L/h/kg) exceeding normal human liver blood flow, suggesting low systemic bioavailability; urinary recovery of the thymine dose was low (<1%). Apparent formation rate-limited kinetics were observed for dihydrothymine, and the plasma concentration of dihydrothymine was consistently 10-fold higher than that of thymine. Plasma ß-ureidoisobutyrate concentrations, on the other hand, were similar to that of thymine. Genotyping confirmed that pathological mutations of the DPYD gene were absent. The urinary excretion ratio of thymine/dihydrothymine was informative of the maximum concentration. Saliva thymine was highly variable. These data are potentially useful as a basis for developing of a screening procedure to prospectively identify patients who are at risk of toxicity from fluoropyrimidine drugs.

  18. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  19. Adenine Aminohydrolase from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Strasser, Rona; Hartman, Charles U.; Jardim, Armando; Ullman, Buddy

    2012-01-01

    Adenine aminohydrolase (AAH) is an enzyme that is not present in mammalian cells and is found exclusively in Leishmania among the protozoan parasites that infect humans. AAH plays a paramount role in purine metabolism in this genus by steering 6-aminopurines into 6-oxypurines. Leishmania donovani AAH is 38 and 23% identical to Saccharomyces cerevisiae AAH and human adenosine deaminase enzymes, respectively, catalyzes adenine deamination to hypoxanthine with an apparent Km of 15.4 μm, and does not recognize adenosine as a substrate. Western blot analysis established that AAH is expressed in both life cycle stages of L. donovani, whereas subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies confirmed that AAH is localized to the parasite cytosol. Deletion of the AAH locus in intact parasites established that AAH is not an essential gene and that Δaah cells are capable of salvaging the same range of purine nucleobases and nucleosides as wild type L. donovani. The Δaah null mutant was able to infect murine macrophages in vitro and in mice, although the parasite loads in both model systems were modestly reduced compared with wild type infections. The Δaah lesion was also introduced into a conditionally lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant in which viability was dependent on pharmacologic ablation of AAH by 2′-deoxycoformycin. The Δaah/Δhgprt/Δxprt triple knock-out no longer required 2′-deoxycoformycin for growth and was avirulent in mice with no persistence after a 4-week infection. These genetic studies underscore the paramount importance of AAH to purine salvage by L. donovani. PMID:22238346

  20. On the puzzling deactivation mechanism of thymine after light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Leticia; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus; Samoylova, Elena; Schultz, Thomas

    2008-12-08

    The possible deactivation mechanisms of thymine after UV light irradiation are reviewed in the light of theoretical calculations. Recent experiments reveal that three transient species with lifetimes in the fs, ps, and ns regime are present in thymine. The possibility of ground or excited state tautomerization is explored and discarded. The role of {pi}{sigma}* states, as well as of the proposed minimum of the {pi}{pi}* excited state surface are assessed. In view of the obtained calculations and results available from the literature, the measured time scales can be tentatively attributed to a model involving different conical intersections between the {pi}{pi}*, n{pi}*, and the electronic ground state, as well as deactivation via the triplet states. Time-resolved photoelectron experiments supported by theoretical calculations are proposed to appraise the validity of this model.

  1. Self-assembling of cytosine nucleoside into triply-bound dimers in acid media. A comprehensive evaluation of proton-bound pyrimidine nucleosides by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, X-rays diffractometry, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Di Donna, Leonardo; Sindona, Giovanni; Giorgi, Gianluca; Salvini, Laura; Napoli, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is used to evaluate the assembling of cytosine and thymine nucleosides in the gas phase, through the formation of hydrogen bonded supermolecules. Mixtures of cytidine analogues and homologues deliver in the gas phase proton-bound heterodimers stabilized by multiple interactions, as proven by the kinetics of their dissociation into the corresponding protonated monomers. Theoretical calculations, performed on initial structures of methylcytosine homodimers available in the literature, converged to a minimized structure whereby the two pyrimidine rings interact through the formation of three hydrogen bonds of similar energy. The crystallographic data here reported show the equivalency of the two interacting pyrimidines which is attributable to the presence of an inversion center. Thymine and uracil pyrimidyl nucleosides form, by ESI, gaseous proton-bound dimers. The kinetic of their dissociation into the related protonated monomers shows that the nucleobases are weekly interacting through a single hydrogen bond. The minimized structure of the protonated heterodimer formed by thymine and N-1-methylthymine confirmed the existence of mainly one hydrogen bond which links the two nucleobases through the O4 oxygens. No crystallographic data exists on thymine proton-bound species, nor have we been able to obtain these aggregates in the solid phase. The gaseous phase, under high vacuum conditions, seems therefore a suitable environment where vanishing structures produced by ESI can be studied with a good degree of approximation.

  2. Structural analysis of 5-fluorouracil and thymine solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frederick G.; Vena, Joseph A.; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Strohmeier, Mark; Barnett, Maria E.

    2009-08-01

    Solid-state analysis with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), solid-state NMR (SSNMR), and other spectroscopic and physical methods can provide detailed structural information about organic and pharmaceutical cocrystals. In this study, a range of solid-state analysis methods are used to characterize co-crystallized solid solutions of 5-fluorouracil and thymine. 1H, 13C and 19F SSNMR and PXRD methods are used to study the structure and disorder present in a solid solution previously prepared by solution evaporation methods; here the solid solution is prepared over a wider stoichiometric range by solvent-drop grinding techniques. Long-range perturbations of key chemical shifts are detectable by SSNMR, indicating that the solid solution is not random. Cross-polarization and heteronuclear correlation SSNMR experiments between 1H, 13C, and 19F nuclei offer insight into the structure of this solid solution, and density functional theory (DFT) methods are applied to calculate lattice energies and NMR properties in order to understand the population of the two primary disordered sites in the crystal structure. In addition, a second solid solution of 5-fluorouracil and thymine is reported and analyzed. This solid solution, which was produced by solvent-drop grinding experiments and characterized by SSNMR and powder X-ray diffraction methods, is determined to be an isostructural phase to that of anhydrous thymine with the inclusion of 5-fluorouracil defects. A similar effect does not occur under excess 5-fluorouracil conditions; instead, phase-separated Form 1 of 5-fluorouracil and anhydrous thymine are obtained. DFT calculations are applied to offer a possible explanation for this disparity.

  3. Double proton transfer mechanism in the adenine-uracil base pair and spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Perpète, Eric A.; Michaux, Catherine; Jacquemin, Denis

    2009-12-01

    We study the mechanism of double proton transfer (DPT) in the adenine-uracil (AU) base pair, both in gas phase and under the influence of surrounding water molecules. According to our ab initio calculations, no stable proton transfer product exists in gas phase, while in solution, the DPT process may occur only through the catalysis of water molecules. Nevertheless, a thermodynamic analysis confirms that AU does not contribute to spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex, and thus guanine-cytosine (GC) would be the only base pair contributing to spontaneous mutation.

  4. Density Functional Theory Study on Interaction between Catechin and Thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wan-fei; Zheng, Yan; Li, Lai-cai; Tian, An-min

    2012-12-01

    The interacting patterns and mechanism of the catechin and thymine have been investigated with the density functional theory Becke's three-parameter nonlocal exchange functional and the Lee, Yang, and Parr nonlocal correlation functional (B3LYP) method by 6-31+G* basis set. Thirteen stable structures for the catechin-thymine complexes have been found which form two hydrogen bonds at least. The vibrational frequencies are also studied at the same level to analyze these complexes. The results indicated that catechin interacted with thymine by three different hydrogen bonds as N—H···O, C—H···O, O—H···O and the complexes are mainly stabilized by the hydrogen bonding interactions. Theories of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital have been adopted to investigate the hydrogen bonds involved in all systems. The interaction energies of all complexes have been corrected for basis set superposition error, which are from -18.15 kJ/mol to -32.99 kJ/mol. The results showed that the hydrogen bonding contribute to the interaction energies dominantly. The corresponding bonds stretching motions in all complexes are red-shifted relative to that of the monomer, which is in agreement with experimental results.

  5. Anti-mycobacterial activity of thymine derivatives bearing boron clusters.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Anna; Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Ruszczynska, Anna; Studzińska, Mirosława; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Paradowska, Edyta; Bulska, Ewa; Munier-Lehmann, Hélene; Dziadek, Jarosław; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B

    2016-10-04

    A series of novel thymine derivatives bearing lipophilic, electron-neutral 1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane, 1,12-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane or hydrophilic 7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate anions were synthesized. Synthesis was performed via copper(I)-catalysed Huisgen-Meldal-Sharpless 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of N(1)-propargylthymine or N(1),N(3)-bispropargylthymine to 1-(3-azidopropyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane. The obtained compounds were tested in vitro against Mycobacterium tuberculosis thymidylate kinase (TMPKmt) and as inhibitors of mycobacteria growth in culture using both saprophytic Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) strains. The most potent TMPKmt inhibitor in the series contained two negatively charged 7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate modifications at positions 1 and 3 of thymine (9) and exhibited a Ki value of 1.5 μM. The most potent inhibitors of mycobacteria growth was compound 5 with one electron-neutral 1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane modification at position 1 of thymine, and compound 8 with two modifications, at position 1 and 3. Both compounds completely inhibited M. smegmatis proliferation at a concentration of 100 μg/mL (0.25 mM and 0.15 mM, respectively).

  6. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  7. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair.

  8. Photosensitized [2 + 2] cycloaddition of N-acetylated cytosine affords stereoselective formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junpei; Nishiguchi, Kosuke; Manabe, Koichiro; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Photocycloaddition between two adjacent bases in DNA produces a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which is one of the major UV-induced DNA lesions, with either the cis-syn or trans-syn structure. In this study, we investigated the photosensitized intramolecular cycloaddition of partially-protected thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-N4-acetyl-2′-deoxy-5-methylcytidine, to clarify the effect of the base modification on the cycloaddition reaction. The reaction resulted in the stereoselective formation of the trans-syn CPD, followed by hydrolysis of the acetylamino group. The same result was obtained for the photocycloaddition of thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-N4-acetyl-2′-deoxycytidine, whereas both the cis-syn and trans-syn CPDs were formed from thymidylyl-(3′→5′)-thymidine. Kinetic analyses revealed that the activation energy of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is comparable to that reported for the thymine-cytosine CPD. These findings provided a new strategy for the synthesis of oligonucleotides containing the trans-syn CPD. Using the synthesized oligonucleotide, translesion synthesis by human DNA polymerase η was analyzed. PMID:20880992

  9. Laser flash photolysis and magnetic-field-effect studies on interaction of thymine and thymidine with menadione: role of sugar in controlling reaction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Adity; Dey, Debarati; Basu, Samita

    2008-04-01

    The magnetic field effect (MFE) in conjunction with laser flash photolysis has been used for the study of the interaction of one of the small drug like quinone molecules, 2-methyl, 1,4-naphthoquinone, commonly known as menadione (MQ), with one of the DNA bases, thymine (THN), and its corresponding nucleoside, thymidine (THDN), in acetonitrile (ACN) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. It has been observed that THN undergoes electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen (H) abstraction with MQ, while THDN undergoes only H abstraction in both the media. However, our earlier studies showed that a purine base, adenine (ADN), and its nucleoside, 2'-deoxyadenosine (ADS), undergo ET in ACN and H abstraction in SDS. Here we have attempted to explain the differences in the reactions of these DNA bases with MQ. We also reveal the crucial role of a sugar unit in altering the behavior of purine and pyrimidine bases with respect to ET and H abstraction.

  10. Inhibitory and Restorative Effects of Adenine Nucleotides on Rickettsial Adsorption and Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Herbert H.

    1974-01-01

    The adenine nucleotides, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, (ATP), and the methylene-bridge analogues are inhibitors of rickettsial adsorption to and the hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes. Other nucleotides, adenosine monophosphate, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cytosine triphosphate, and guanosine triphosphate, are without effect. Adsorption and hemolysis require the generation of energy by the rickettsiae which is usually derived from glutamate. When the generation of energy from the metabolism of glutamate is inhibited by arsenite or cyanide, the addition of ATP can supply the energy to restore hemolysis. However, in the presence of the uncouplers, ATP can not restore hemolysis. Even when functioning in a restorative role, ATP still has its inhibitory properties. These results suggest that a high-energy intermediate (X ∼ I), rather than ATP itself, is the energy source. The interactions of inhibitory nucleotides suggest that these compounds share a common transport system. PMID:4357933

  11. Synthesis of carbohydrate-scaffolded thymine glycoconjugates to organize multivalency

    PubMed Central

    Ciuk, Anna K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multivalency effects are essential in carbohydrate recognition processes as occurring on the cell surface. Thus many synthetic multivalent glycoconjugates have been developed as important tools for glycobiological research. We are expanding this collection of molecules by the introduction of carbohydrate-scaffolded divalent glycothymine derivatives that can be intramolecularily dimerized by [2 + 2] photocycloaddition. Thus, thymine functions as a control element that allows to restrict the conformational flexibility of the scaffolded sugar ligands and thus to “organize” multivalency. With this work we add a parameter to multivalency studies additional to valency. PMID:26124869

  12. Photophysical deactivation pathways in adenine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Spata, Vincent A; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2015-12-14

    In this work we study deactivation processes in adenine oligomers after absorption of UV radiation using Quantum Mechanics combined with Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM). Correlated electronic structure methods appropriate for describing the excited states are used to describe a π-stacked dimer of adenine bases incorporated into (dA)20(dT)20. The results of these calculations reveal three different types of excited state minima which play a role in deactivation processes. Within this set of minima there are minima where the excited state is localized on one adenine (monomer-like) as well as minima where the excited state is delocalized on two adenines, forming different types of excimers and bonded excimers of varying but inter-related character. The proximity of their energies reveals that the minima can decay into one another along a flat potential energy surface dependent on the interbase separation. Additionally, analysis of the emissive energies and other physical properties, including theoretical anisotropy calculations, and comparison with fluorescence experiments, provides evidence that excimers play an important role in long-lived signals in adenine oligonucleotides while the subpicosecond decay is attributed to monomer-like minima. The necessity for a close approach of the nucleobases reveals that the deactivation mechanism is tied to macro-molecular motion.

  13. Canonical Watson-Crick base pair interactions in π* type triplet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, M.; Blancafort, L.; Sodupe, M.; Bertran, J.

    2006-03-01

    Ground state and triplet π → π* states of canonical Watson-Crick base pairs have been studied at the B3LYP level of theory. Excited states were found to be localized at either of the monomers forming the base pair (guanine, cytosine, adenine and thymine), geometry relaxation of the excited base pair being similar to that occurring in the isolated nucleobase. For thymine and cytosine, triplet π → π* excitation produces a significant elongation of the C5-C6 bond whereas for guanine and adenine there is a significant increase of the N3-C2 bond and pyramidalization of the NH2 group. Adenine-thymine energy pairing remains almost unaffected by triplet excitation. However, for guanine-cytosine, with excitation localized at the guanine moiety, base pairing energy decreases about 5 kcal/mol due to pyramidalization of the amino group of guanine.

  14. Optoelectronic studies on heterocyclic bases of deoxyribonucleic acid for DNA photonics.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Fouad; Abdel-Wahab, Fathy

    2015-10-01

    The optoelectronics study of large molecules, particularly π-stacking molecules, such as DNA is really an extremely difficult task. We perform first electronic structure calculations on the heterocyclic bases of 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid based on Lorentz-Fresnel dispersion theory. In the UV-VIS range of spectrum, many of the optoelectronic parameters for DNA four bases namely adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine are calculated and discussed. The results demonstrate that adenine has the highest hyperpolarizability, whereas thymine has the lowest hyperpolarizability. Cytosine has the lower average oscillator energy and the higher lattice energy. Thymine infers the most stable nucleic base with the lower phonon energy. Thymine also has the highest average oscillator energy and the lower lattice energy. Moreover, the four nucleic acid bases have large band gap energies less than 5 eV with a semiconducting behavior. Guanine shows the smallest band gap and the highest Fermi level energy, whereas adenine elucidates the highest band gap energy.

  15. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background (“noise”) induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer’s principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do

  16. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background ("noise") induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1) the adherence to Landauer's principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2) whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic rules as do current

  17. Direct detection of the mercury-nitrogen bond in the thymine-Hg(II)-thymine base-pair with (199)Hg NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dairaku, Takenori; Furuita, Kyoko; Sato, Hajime; Šebera, Jakub; Yamanaka, Daichi; Otaki, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Shoko; Kondo, Yoshinori; Katahira, Ritsuko; Matthias Bickelhaupt, F; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Ono, Akira; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Kojima, Chojiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-18

    We have observed the 1-bond (199)Hg-(15)N J-coupling ((1)J((199)Hg,(15)N) = 1050 Hz) within the Hg(II)-mediated thymine-thymine base pair (T-Hg(II)-T). This strikingly large (1)J((199)Hg,(15)N) is the first one for canonical sp(2)-nitrogen atoms, which can be a sensitive structure-probe of N-mercurated compounds and a direct evidence for N-mercuration.

  18. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation and energy transfer in guanine-cytosine DNA double helices.

    PubMed

    Miannay, François-Alexandre; Bányász, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2007-11-28

    The DNA double helix poly(dGdC).poly(dGdC) is studied by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with femtosecond resolution. It is shown that the excited-state relaxation of the duplex is faster than that of the monomeric components dGMP and dCMP. This contrasts with the behavior of duplexes composed exclusively of adenine-thymine base pairs, for which an overall lengthening of the fluorescence lifetimes with respect to that of an equimolar mixture of dAMP and TMP was reported previously. Despite the difference in the excited-state deactivation rate between the two types of duplexes, the signature of ultrafast energy transfer is present in both of them. It is attested by the decrease of fluorescence anisotropy decay of the duplexes on the subpicosecond time scale, where molecular motions are inhibited, and is corroborated by the fact that their steady-state fluorescence spectra do not change with the excitation wavelength. Energy transfer involves excited states delocalized over at least two bases, whose existence is revealed by the UV absorption spectrum of the duplex, clearly different from that of an equimolar spectrum of dGMP and dCMP.

  19. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-03

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  20. Application of Markov chain to the pattern of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    This research explains how Markov chain used to model the pattern of deoxyribonucleic acid mutations in mitochondrial (mitochondrial DNA). First, sign test was used to see a pattern of nucleotide bases that will appear at one position after the position of mutated nucleotide base. Results obtained from the sign test showed that for most cases, there exist a pattern of mutation except in the mutation cases of adenine to cytosine, adenine to thymine, and cytosine to guanine. Markov chain analysis results on data of mutations that occur in mitochondrial DNA indicate that one and two positions after the position of mutated nucleotide bases tend to be occupied by particular nucleotide bases. From this analysis, it can be said that the adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine will mutate if the nucelotide base at one and/or two positions after them is cytosine.

  1. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  2. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  3. Mechanism of the Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Mismatched Thymine in Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Revealed by Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Natalia; Crehuet, Ramon; Imhof, Petra

    2015-09-24

    Base excision of mismatched or damaged nucleotides catalyzed by glycosylase enzymes is the first step of the base excision repair system, a machinery preserving the integrity of DNA. Thymine DNA glycosylase recognizes and removes mismatched thymine by cleaving the C1'-N1 bond between the base and the sugar ring. Our quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of this reaction in human thymine DNA glycosylase reveal a requirement for a positive charge in the active site to facilitate C1'-N1 bond scission: protonation of His151 significantly lowers the free energy barrier for C1'-N1 bond dissociation compared to the situation with neutral His151. Shuttling a proton from His151 to the thymine base further reduces the activation free energy for glycosidic bond cleavage. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the H151A mutant suggest that the mutation to the smaller, neutral, residue increases the water accessibility of the thymine base, rendering direct proton transfer from the bulk feasible. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of the glycosidic bond cleavage reaction in the H151A mutant show that the activation free energy is slightly lower than in the wild-type enzyme, explaining the experimentally observed higher reaction rates in this mutant.

  4. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  5. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  6. The interaction of melanin with ionizing and UVC radiations: Characterization of thymine damage

    SciTech Connect

    Huselton, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether melanin could protect DNA against the harmful effects of ionizing or UVC radiations. A simple, in vitro, model system was developed to evaluate eumelanin (Sigma melanin) as a radioprotector of solutions of 0.1 mM thymine or thymidine exposed to 570Gy of ionizing radiation. Sigma melanin was compared to several amino acids, other biomolecules or to other forms of melanin. To investigate the role of melanin as a passive screen of UVC radiation, melanotic (I{sub 3}), amelanotic (AMEL) cells (both derived from a Cloudman S91 melanoma) and non-melanotic (EMT6) cells were labelled with radioactive dTHd and exposed to 0, 1, 5 or 10KJ/m{sup 2} of UVC. The DNA was extracted; the bases hydrolyzed with concentrated HCl. Thymine bases were separated by reverse phase HPLC. No difference in dimer content was observed between I{sub 3} and AMEL cells, but EMT6 cells had nearly twice the amount of dimer. Overall thymine degradation was more pronounced in I{sub 3} cells than in the other two cell lines, due to the production of non-dimer thymine damage. This damage was identified as thymine glycol by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Melanin, upon exposure to UVC, appears to enhance thymine damage by producing oxidative damage.

  7. Mechanism of mutation by thymine starvation in Escherichia coli: clues from mutagenic specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, B A; Glickman, B W

    1985-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms of mutagenesis induced by thymine starvation, we examined the mutational specificity of this treatment in strains of Escherichia coli that are wild type (Ung+) or deficient in uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung-). An analysis of Ung+ his-4 (ochre) revertants revealed that the majority of induced DNA base substitution events were A:T----G:C transitions. However, characterization of lacI nonsense mutations induced by thymine starvation demonstrated that G:C----A:T transitions and all four possible transversions also occurred. In addition, thymineless episodes led to reversion of the trpE9777 frameshift allele. Although the defect in uracil-DNA-glycosylase did not appear to affect the frequency of total mutations induced in lacI by thymine deprivation, the frequency of nonsense mutations was reduced by 30%, and the spectrum of nonsense mutations was altered. Furthermore, the reversion of trpE9777 was decreased by 90% in the Ung- strain. These findings demonstrate that in E. coli, thymine starvation can induce frameshift mutations and all types of base substitutions. The analysis of mutational specificity indicates that more than a single mechanism is involved in the induction of mutation by thymine depletion. We suggest that deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pool imbalances, the removal of uracil incorporated into DNA during thymine starvation, and the induction of recA-dependent DNA repair functions all may play a role in thymineless mutagenesis. PMID:3888966

  8. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  9. Radiation-induced thymine base damage in replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Childers, T.J.

    1982-06-01

    The efficiency of radiation-induced production of 5',6'-dihydroxydihydrothymine (t/sup ..gamma../)-type damage was determined in nascent and mature chromatin DNA for the dose range of 50 to 150 krad. These large doses affected neither the total fraction of nuclear DNA in chromatin subunits nor the nucleosome subunit repeat length. The DNA in nascent chromatin, however, was found to be 3.3 times more sensitive than mature chromatin DNA to ..gamma..-ray (/sup 137/Cs)-induced t/sup ..gamma../-type damage, while thymine damage of this type was uniformly distributed in the nucleosomal DNA of mature chromatin (i.e., in the nucleosome core and spacer DNA). The half-time for the transition of nascent DNA sensitivity to mature chromatin DNA sensitivity levels was the same as the half-time at 37/sup 0/C for the maturation of nascent into mature chromatin structure. The rate at which nascent chromatin matured was unaffected by radiation doses as large as 150 krad. The most logical explanation for the greater sensitivity of nascent DNA to radiation is the decreased concentration of histone chromosomal proteins in nascent chromatin.

  10. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Structures of protonated thymine and uracil and their monohydrated gas-phase ions from ultraviolet action spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Byskov, Camilla Skinnerup; Turecek, Frantisek; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2014-06-19

    The strong UV chromophores thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) have identical heteroaromatic rings that only differ by one methyl substituent. While their photophysics has been elucidated in detail, the effect on the excited states of base protonation and single water molecules is less explored. Here we report gas-phase absorption spectra of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) and monohydrated ions and demonstrate that the substituent is not only responsible for spectral shifts but also influences the tautomer distribution, being different for bare and monohydrated ions. Spectra interpretation is aided by calculations of geometrical structures and transition energies. The lowest free-energy tautomer (denoted 178, enol-enol form) accounts for 230-280 nm (ThyH(+)) and 225-270 nm (UraH(+)) bands. ThyH(+) hardly absorbs above 300 nm, whereas a discernible band is measured for UraH(+) (275-320 nm), ascribed to the second lowest free-energy tautomer (138, enol-keto form) comprising a few percent of the UraH(+) population at room temperature. Band widths are similar to those measured of cold ions in support of very short excited-state lifetimes. Attachment of a single water increases the abundance of 138 relative to 178, 138 now clearly present for ThyH(+). 138 resembles more the tautomer present in aqueous solution than 178 does, and 138 may indeed be a relevant transition structure. The band of ThyH(+)(178) is unchanged, that of UraH(+)(178) is nearly unchanged, and that of UraH(+)(138) blue-shifts by about 10 nm. In stark contrast to protonated adenine, more than one solvating water molecule is required to re-establish the absorption of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) in aqueous solution.

  12. Exploration of Excited State Deactivation Pathways of Adenine Monohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri; Sapunar, Marin; Ponzi, Aurora; Decleva, Piero; Došlić, Nađa

    2015-10-29

    Binding of a single water molecule has a dramatic effect on the excited state lifetime of adenine. Here we report a joint nonadiabatic dynamics and reaction paths study aimed at understanding the sub-100 fs lifetime of adenine in the monohydrates. Our nonadiabatic dynamics simulations, performed using the ADC(2) electronic structure method, show a shortening of the excited state lifetime in the monohydrates with respect to bare adenine. However, the computed lifetimes were found to be significantly longer that the observed one. By comparing the reaction pathways of several excited state deactivation processes in adenine and adenine monohydrates, we show that electron-driven proton transfer from water to nitrogen atom N3 of the adenine ring may be the process responsible for the observed ultrafast decay. The inaccessibility of the electron-driven proton transfer pathway to trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics simulation is discussed.

  13. Novel thymine-functionalized MIL-101 prepared by post-synthesis and enhanced removal of Hg(2+) from water.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xubiao; Shen, Tingting; Ding, Lin; Zhong, Weiping; Luo, Jianfeng; Luo, Shenglian

    2016-04-05

    A novel thymine-functionalized MIL-101 (MIL-101-Thymine) material was synthesized using a post-synthesis method to remove mercury at a high efficiency. MIL-101-Thymine was successfully prepared in this work and was confirmed by several characterization methods, such as (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. The Hg(2+) adsorption agreed well with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 51.27mg/g. The adsorption rate fit with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, MIL-101-Thymine exhibited excellent selectivity towards Hg(2+) over other cations, and the maximum value of the selective coefficient reached 947.34; this result is very likely due to the highly selective interactions of T-Hg(2+)-T in MIL-101-Thymine. The result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also showed that Hg(2+) was coordinated with the N of thymine in MIL-101-Thymine. Moreover, the results of the thermogravimetric analysis and adsorption experiments showed that the Hg atom was two-coordinated with the thymine group. MIL-101-Thymine was used to remove trace Hg(2+) in real water samples, and satisfactory recoveries were obtained.

  14. Assemblies of cytosine within H-bonded network of adipic acid and citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-08-01

    Adipic acid binds to cytosine to form H-bonded discrete cytosine-cytosinium assemblies embedded in 1D infinite chain of adipic acid, whereas citric acid stabilizes trimeric cytosine-cytosinium assemblies having length of 19.44 Å stabilized between layered structures of citric acid molecules.

  15. High-Resolution Analysis of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cropley, Jennifer E.; Cooper, Alan; Suter, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes to gene expression can result in heritable phenotypic characteristics that are not encoded in the DNA itself, but rather by biochemical modifications to the DNA or associated chromatin proteins. Interposed between genes and environment, these epigenetic modifications can be influenced by environmental factors to affect phenotype for multiple generations. This raises the possibility that epigenetic states provide a substrate for natural selection, with the potential to participate in the rapid adaptation of species to changes in environment. Any direct test of this hypothesis would require the ability to measure epigenetic states over evolutionary timescales. Here we describe the first single-base resolution of cytosine methylation patterns in an ancient mammalian genome, by bisulphite allelic sequencing of loci from late Pleistocene Bison priscus remains. Retrotransposons and the differentially methylated regions of imprinted loci displayed methylation patterns identical to those derived from fresh bovine tissue, indicating that methylation patterns are preserved in the ancient DNA. Our findings establish the biochemical stability of methylated cytosines over extensive time frames, and provide the first direct evidence that cytosine methylation patterns are retained in DNA from ancient specimens. The ability to resolve cytosine methylation in ancient DNA provides a powerful means to study the role of epigenetics in evolution. PMID:22276161

  16. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  17. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  18. Addition of cysteamine to thymine and thymidine monophosphate, initiated by. gamma. -irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, S.A.; Kropachev, E.V.; Litvyakova, G.I.

    1986-04-20

    On radiolysis of deaerated solutions containing thymine and cysteamine, or thymidine monophosphate and cysteamine, coupling products of these compounds are formed resulting from the addition of cysteamine to the double bond of the base. The radiochemical yields of the coupling products are dependent on the ratio of the concentration thymine (T) to that of cysteamine (RSH), or of thymidine monophosphate (TMP) to cysteamine in the irradiated solutions, and are at a maximum when (T)/(RSH) = 5-10, and (TMP)/(RSH) = 15-20. The mode of formation of coupling products involves reaction of H-, OH-, and e/sub aq//sup -/-adducts of thymine or thymidine monophosphate with cysteamine thiyl radicals.

  19. Kinetics of cyclobutane thymine dimer splitting by DNA photolyase directly monitored in the UV.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Byrdin, Martin; Eker, André P M; Müller, Pavel; Brettel, Klaus

    2011-06-07

    CPD photolyase uses light to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formed between adjacent pyrimidines in UV-irradiated DNA. The enzyme harbors an FAD cofactor in fully reduced state (FADH(-)). The CPD repair mechanism involves electron transfer from photoexcited FADH(-) to the CPD, splitting of its intradimer bonds, and electron return to restore catalytically active FADH(-). The two electron transfer processes occur on time scales of 10(-10) and 10(-9) s, respectively. Until now, CPD splitting itself has only been poorly characterized by experiments. Using a previously unreported transient absorption setup, we succeeded in monitoring cyclobutane thymine dimer repair in the main UV absorption band of intact thymine at 266 nm. Flavin transitions that overlay DNA-based absorption changes at 266 nm were monitored independently in the visible and subtracted to obtain the true repair kinetics. Restoration of intact thymine showed a short lag and a biexponential rise with time constants of 0.2 and 1.5 ns. We assign these two time constants to splitting of the intradimer bonds (creating one intact thymine and one thymine anion radical T(∘-)) and electron return from T(∘-) to the FAD cofactor with recovery of the second thymine, respectively. Previous model studies and computer simulations yielded various CPD splitting times between < 1 ps and < 100 ns. Our experimental results should serve as a benchmark for future efforts to model enzymatic photorepair. The technique and methods developed here may be applied to monitor other photoreactions involving DNA.

  20. Ferrocene-bis(thymine/uracil) conjugates: base pairing directed, spacer dependent self-assembly and supramolecular packing.

    PubMed

    Patwa, Amit N; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Kumar, Vaijayanti A; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2010-12-17

    X-ray crystallographic studies of methylene linked Ferrocene-bis(thymine/uracil) conjugates Fc(T:T)(M) and Fc(U:U)(M) reveal base dependent 2-D supramolecular assemblies generated via wobble self-pairing for bis-thymine and reverse wobble self-pairing for bis-uracil conjugates, differing in architecture from the corresponding butylene spacer linked conjugates.

  1. Excess electron trapping in duplex DNA: long range transfer via stacked adenines.

    PubMed

    Black, Paul J; Bernhard, William A

    2012-11-08

    An understanding of charge transfer (CT) in DNA lies at the root of assessing the risks and benefits of exposure to ionizing radiation. Energy deposition by high-energy photons and fast-charged particles creates holes and excess electrons (EEs) in DNA, and the subsequent reactions determine the complexity of DNA damage and ultimately the risk of disease. Further interest in CT comes from the possibility that hole transfer, excess electron transfer (EET), or both in DNA might be used to develop nanoscale circuits. To study EET in DNA, EPR spectroscopy was used to determine the distribution of EE trapping by oligodeoxynucleotides irradiated and observed at 4 K. Our results indicate that stretches of consecutive adenine bases on the same strand serve as an ideal conduit for intrastrand EET in duplex DNA at 4 K. Specifically, we show that A is an efficient trap for EE at 4 K if, and only if, the A strand of the duplex does not contain one of the other three bases. If there is a T, C, or G on the A strand, then trapping occurs at T or C instead of A. This holds true for stretches up to 32 A's. Whereas T competes effectively against A for the EE, it does not compete effectively against C. Long stretches of T pass the majority of EE to C. Our results show that AT stretches channel EE to cytosine, an end point with significance to both radiation damage and the photochemical repair of pyrimidine dimers.

  2. Radiation and thermal stabilities of adenine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Demidov, V V; Potaman, V N; Solyanina, I P; Trofimov, V I

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated in detail radiation and thermal stabilities and transformations of adenosine mono- and triphosphates in liquid and frozen solid aqueous solutions within a wide range of absorbed radiation dose (up to 75 kGy) and temperature (up to 160 degrees C). Dephosphorylation is the main pathway of high temperature hydrolysis of adenine nucleotides. Basic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of this process have been determined. Radiolysis of investigated compounds at room temperature results in scission of N-glycosidic bond with a radiation yield about of 1 mol/100 eV. Solution freezing significantly enhances radiation stability of nucleotides as well as other biomolecules. This circumstance is essential in the discussion of panspermia concepts.

  3. Adenine oxidation by pyrite-generated hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Corey A; Fisher, Shawn C; Brownawell, Bruce J; Schoonen, Martin Aa

    2010-04-26

    Cellular exposure to particulate matter with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidization of biomolecules may lead to negative health outcomes. Evaluating the particle-induced formation of ROS and the oxidation products from reaction of ROS with biomolecules is useful for gaining a mechanistic understanding of particle-induced oxidative stress. Aqueous suspensions of pyrite particles have been shown to form hydroxyl radicals and degrade nucleic acids. Reactions between pyrite-induced hydroxyl radicals and nucleic acid bases, however, remain to be determined. Here, we compared the oxidation of adenine by Fenton-generated (i.e., ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide) hydroxyl radicals to adenine oxidation by hydroxyl radicals generated in pyrite aqueous suspensions. Results show that adenine oxidizes in the presence of pyrite (without the addition of hydrogen peroxide) and that the rate of oxidation is dependent on the pyrite loading. Adenine oxidation was prevented by addition of either catalase or ethanol to the pyrite/adenine suspensions, which implies that hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are causing the adenine oxidation. The adenine oxidation products, 8-oxoadenine and 2-hydroxyadenine, were the same whether hydroxyl radicals were generated by Fenton or pyrite-initiated reactions. Although nucleic acid bases are unlikely to be directly exposed to pyrite particles, the formation of ROS in the vicinity of cells may lead to oxidative stress.

  4. Three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-07

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K(i) of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pK(a) of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pK(a) of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  5. An efficient prebiotic synthesis of cytosine and uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. P.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the purines, the routes that have been proposed for the prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidines from simple precursors give only low yields. Cytosine can be synthesized from cyanoacetylene and cyanate; the former precursor is produced from a spark discharge in a CH4/N2 mixture and is an abundant interstellar molecule. But this reaction requires relatively high concentrations of cyanate (> 0.1 M), which are unlikely to occur in aqueous media as cyanate is hydrolysed rapidly to CO2 and NH3. An alternative route that has been explored is the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde (formed by hydrolysis of cyanoacetylene) with urea. But at low concentrations of urea, this reaction produces no detectable quantities of cytosine. Here we show that in concentrated urea solution--such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon or in pools on drying beaches on the early Earth--cyanoacetaldehyde reacts to form cytosine in yields of 30-50%, from which uracil can be formed by hydrolysis. These reactions provide a plausible route to the pyrimidine bases required in the RNA world.

  6. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  7. Detection of Modified Forms of Cytosine Using Sensitive Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Abakir, Abdulkadir; Wheldon, Lee; Johnson, Andrew D.; Laurent, Patrick; Ruzov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine bases (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) occurring in vertebrate genomes is usually associated with transcriptional silencing. 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) are the recently discovered modified cytosine bases produced by enzymatic oxidation of 5mC, whose biological functions remain relatively obscure. A number of approaches ranging from biochemical to antibody based techniques have been employed to study the genomic distribution and global content of these modifications in various biological systems. Although some of these approaches can be useful for quantitative assessment of these modified forms of 5mC, most of these methods do not provide any spatial information regarding the distribution of these DNA modifications in different cell types, required for correct understanding of their functional roles. Here we present a highly sensitive method for immunochemical detection of the modified forms of cytosine. This method permits co-detection of these epigenetic marks with protein lineage markers and can be employed to study their nuclear localization, thus, contributing to deciphering their potential biological roles in different experimental contexts. PMID:27585398

  8. Preliminary studies on unusual polymorphs of thymine: Structural comparison with other nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennuru, Ramanaiah; Muthudoss, Prakash; Ramakrishnan, Srividya; Mohammad, Amjad Basha; Ravi Chandra Babu, R.; Mahapatra, Sudarshan; Nayak, Susanta K.

    2016-09-01

    Two polymorphs Form-R2 and Form-R4 of anhydrous thymine, one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of DNA were obtained via sublimation crystallization and desolvation technique respectively. Form-R2 crystallizes in monoclinic C 2/c with a = 25.107(7) Å, b = 6.846(2) Å, c = 6.715(2) Å, β = 90.529(6)⁰ and V = 1154.1(5) Å3. The supramolecular assembly in Form-R2 is a sheet of hydrogen bonded network similar to that found in the crystal structures of other reported anhydrous form of thymine (Form-R1). Interestingly the thermal behavior is similar for these two forms with a minor difference in powder X-ray diffraction pattern. Further thymine Form-R2 closely matches with one of the predicted form of thymine using Polymorph module of Accelrys. Form-R4 is obtained by the dehydration of the mono hydrated form (Form-R3) and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopic techniques and thermal analysis.

  9. Monitoring ultraviolet-B-induced DNA damage in individual diatom cells by immunofluorescent thymine dimer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Buma, A.G.J.; Van Hannen, E.J.; Roza, L.

    1995-04-01

    We developed a method to investigate the effect of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR) on the formation of thymine dimers in microalgal DNA that can be used for both laboratory and in situ research. Antibody labeling of dimers was followed by a secondary antibody (fluorescein isothiocyanate) staining to allow visualization of DNA damage with flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy. Thymine dimer-specific fluorescence in nuclear DNA of the marine diatom Cyclotella sp. was linearly related to the UVBR dose. Simultaneous measurements of cellular DNA content showed that the vulnerability of G2 cells to DNA damage did not differ significantly from the vulnerability of G1 cells. The formation and removal of thymine dimers in Cyclotella sp. cells was monitored for 3 consecutive days at two realistic UVBR irradiance levels. Thymine dimers were removed within 24 h when exposed to a saturating photosynthetically active radiation intensity following the UVBR treatment. This new method allows the study of UVBR-induced DNA damage on a cell-to-cell basis. It is also feasible for field studies because cells remain intact and can be recognized readily after antibody treatment. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  10. A deoxyribozyme that harnesses light to repair thymine dimers in DNA.

    PubMed

    Chinnapen, Daniel J-F; Sen, Dipankar

    2004-01-06

    In vitro selection was used to investigate whether nucleic acid enzymes are capable of catalyzing photochemical reactions. The reaction chosen was photoreactivation of thymine cyclobutane dimers in DNA by using serotonin as cofactor and light of wavelengths longer than the absorption spectrum of DNA. Curiously, the dominant single-stranded DNA sequence selected, UV1A, was found to repair its internal thymine dimer substrate efficiently even in the absence of serotonin or any other cofactor. UV1C, a 42-nucleotide fragment of UV1A, repaired the thymine dimer substrate in trans (k(cat)/k(uncat) = 2.5 x 10(4)), showing optimal activity with 305 nm light and thus resembling naturally occurring photolyase enzymes. Mechanistic investigation of UV1C indicated that its catalytic role likely exceeded the mere positioning of the substrate in a conformation favorable for photoreactivation. A higher-order structure, likely a quadruplex, formed by specific guanine bases within the deoxyribozyme, was implicated as serving as a light-harvesting antenna, with photoreactivation of the thymine dimer proceeding possibly via electron donation from an excited guanine base. In a primordial "RNA world," self-replicating nucleic acid populations may have been vulnerable to deactivation via UV light-mediated pyrimidine dimer formation. Photolyase nucleic acid enzymes such as the one described here could thus have played a role in preserving the integrity of such an RNA world.

  11. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  12. Control of the Synthesis of Macromolecules During Amino Acid and Thymine Starvation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Anraku, Naoyo; Landman, Otto E.

    1968-01-01

    Studies of Maaløe, Lark, and others with amino acid- and thymine-starved cultures revealed successive steps in the biosynthesis of Escherichia coli chromosomes. In this study, the corresponding mechanisms in Bacillus subtilis 168 were examined. Using a strain requiring both thymine and tryptophan, we found that, 3 hr after the start of amino acid starvation, when the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content of the culture had increased 40 to 50%, DNA synthesis ceased. After 4 to 5 hr, 100% of the cells were immune to thymineless death; their chromosomes had presumably been completed. Immune cultures slowly incorporated 3H-thymine. Thymine incorporation increased 20-fold 30 min after readdition of amino acids, indicating reinitiation of chromosome synthesis. Simultaneous presence of amino acids and thymine was required for reinitiation. If 5-bromouracil (5-BU) was added instead of thymine, newly replicated DNA segments could be separated by centrifugation in CsCl. Analysis of the CsCl fractions by a transformation assay showed that the order in which the markers were synthesized was ade-16, thr-5, leu-8, metB5. Less than half the chromosomes started resynthesis synchronously in 5-BU. Nevertheless, chromosome alignment in the amino acid-starved culture is probably very good: marker frequency analysis of its DNA gives the same normalized frequencies as DNA from “perfectly” aligned spores. Full viability is maintained in the chromosome-arrested culture for 10 hr in thymine-free medium in the absence or presence of amino acids. In the latter condition, protein synthesis proceeds, and the cells filament and become more lysozyme-sensitive. Such cells must be incubated and plated on hypertonic or on slow-growth media; otherwise, they undergo “quasiosmotic” thymineless death. This death is thus apparently not directly attributable to any damage of chromosomal DNA. Further, weakening of the teichoic acid portion of the cell wall is not involved, since 32P incorporation

  13. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR.

  14. Butyrate influences intracellular levels of adenine and adenine derivatives in the fungus Penicillium restrictum.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Chiang, Yi Ming; Faehnrich, Bettina; Bacher, Markus; Hellinger, Roland; Kluger, Bernhard; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Butyrate, a small fatty acid, has an important role in the colon of ruminants and mammalians including the inhibition of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation. There is also growing evidence that butyrate is influencing the histone structure in mammalian cells by inhibition of histone deacetylation. Butyrate shows furthermore an antimicrobial activity against fungi, yeast and bacteria, which is linked to its toxicity at a high concentration. In fungi there are indications that butyrate induces the production of secondary metabolites potentially via inhibition of histone deacetylases. However, information about the influence of butyrate on growth, primary metabolite production and metabolism, besides lipid catabolism, in fungi is scarce. We have identified the filamentous fungus Penicillium (P.) restrictum as a susceptible target for butyrate treatment in an antimicrobial activity screen. The antimicrobial activity was detected only in the mycelium of the butyrate treated culture. We investigated the effect of butyrate ranging from low (0.001mM) to high (30mM), potentially toxic, concentrations on biomass and antimicrobial activity. Butyrate at high concentrations (3 and 30mM) significantly reduced the fungal biomass. In contrast P. restrictum treated with 0.03mM of butyrate showed the highest antimicrobial activity. We isolated three antimicrobial active compounds, active against Staphylococcus aureus, from P. restrictum cellular extracts treated with butyrate: adenine, its derivate hypoxanthine and the nucleoside derivate adenosine. Production of all three compounds was increased at low butyrate concentrations. Furthermore we found that butyrate influences the intracellular level of the adenine nucleoside derivate cAMP, an important signalling molecule in fungi and various organisms. In conclusion butyrate treatment increases the intracellular levels of adenine and its respective derivatives.

  15. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  16. Adenine adlayers on Cu(111): XPS and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Ševčíková, Klára; Matolín, Vladimír; Acres, Robert G.; Prince, Kevin C.

    2015-11-07

    The adsorption of adenine on Cu(111) was studied by photoelectron and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Disordered molecular films were deposited by means of physical vapor deposition on the substrate at room temperature. Adenine chemisorbs on the Cu(111) surface with strong rehybridization of the molecular orbitals and the Cu 3d states. Annealing at 150 °C caused the desorption of weakly bonded molecules accompanied by formation of a short-range ordered molecular adlayer. The interface is characterized by the formation of new states in the valence band at 1.5, 7, and 9 eV. The present work complements and refines existing knowledge of adenine interaction with this surface. The coverage is not the main parameter that defines the adenine geometry and adsorption properties on Cu(111). Excess thermal energy can further rearrange the molecular adlayer and, independent of the initial coverage, the flat lying stable molecular adlayer is formed.

  17. Intermolecular band dispersion in quasi-one-dimensional adenine assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Fleurence, Antoine; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko; Friedlein, Rainer

    2011-12-07

    Highly-ordered, hydrated adenine multilayer films grown on the surface of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite, HOPG(0001), display extended electronic states, affording anisotropic band-like charge transport along the π-π stacking direction.

  18. "Action-at-a distance" of a new DNA oxidative damage product 6-furfuryl-adenine (kinetin) on template properties of modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Wyszko, Eliza; Barciszewska, Mirosława Z; Markiewicz, Maria; Szymański, Maciej; Markiewicz, Wojciech T; Clark, Brian F C; Barciszewski, Jan

    2003-02-20

    N(6)-furfuryladenine (kinetin, K) was shown to have cytokinin activity and antiageing effects. It also appears to protect DNA against oxidative damage mediated by the Fenton reaction. Kinetin was identified as a natural component of DNA in plant extract, calf thymus DNA, fresh DNA preparations from human cell culture, as well as in human urine. A proposed mechanism of kinetin synthesis includes furfural, the oxidative damage product of a 2-deoxyribose moiety of DNA, which reacts with an adenine residue to form N(6)-furfuryladenine at DNA level. The identification of kinetin in plant cell extracts, as well as human urine, suggests its excision from DNA by repair mechanisms. Since such a bulky modification as kinetin induces conformational changes of DNA, this could lead to mutations. Therefore, it was interesting to analyze an effect of kinetin on coding properties of DNA. Chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotide (20-mer) containing kinetin AAAACTGCCGTCCTGAKGAT was used as a primer. It was elongated in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a template plasmid pEW1 harboring a 210-bp fragment of DNA derived from the 5' end of HIV mRNA. The PCR product of that length containing kinetin in position 17 from the 5' end was isolated and sequenced. Interestingly, DNA polymerase correctly incorporates thymine opposite of kinetin (an adenine derivative) on the complementary strand, but the misincorporations occur in a vicinity of the modified base.

  19. A three-state model for the photophysics of adenine.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2006-08-25

    An ab initio theoretical study at the CASPT2 level is reported on minimum energy reaction paths, state minima, transition states, reaction barriers, and conical intersections on the potential energy hypersurfaces of two tautomers of adenine: 9H- and 7H-adenine. The obtained results led to a complete interpretation of the photophysics of adenine and derivatives, both under jet-cooled conditions and in solution, within a three-state model. The ultrafast subpicosecond fluorescence decay measured in adenine is attributed to the low-lying conical intersection (gs/pipi* La)(CI), reached from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) state along a path which is found to be barrierless only in 9H-adenine, while for the 7H tautomer the presence of an intermediate plateau corresponding to an NH2-twisted conformation may explain the absence of ultrafast decay in 7-substituted compounds. A secondary picosecond decay is assigned to a path involving switches towards two other states, 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*), ultimately leading to another conical intersection with the ground state, (gs/npi*), with a perpendicular disposition of the amino group. The topology of the hypersurfaces and the state properties explain the absence of secondary decay in 9-substituted adenines in water in terms of the higher position of the 1(npi*) state and also that the 1(pipi* Lb) state of 7H-adenine is responsible for the observed fluorescence in water. A detailed discussion comparing recent experimental and theoretical findings is given. As for other nucleobases, the predominant role of a pipi*-type state in the ultrafast deactivation of adenine is confirmed.

  20. Density Functional Study of the Influence of C5 Cytosine Substitution in Base Pairs with Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Adam; Guza, Rebecca; Tretyakova, Natalia; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study employs density-functional electronic structure methods to investigate the effect of chemical modification at the C5 position of cytosine. A series of experimentally motivated chemical modifications are considered, including alkyl, halogen, aromatic, fused ring, and strong σ and π withdrawing functional groups. The effect of these modifications on cytosine geometry, electronic structure, proton affinities, gas phase basicities, cytosine-guanine base-pair hydrogen bond network and corresponding nucleophilicity at guanine are examined. Ultimately, these results play a part in dissecting the effect of endogenous cytosine methylation on the reactivity of neighboring guanine toward carcinogens and DNA alkylating agents. PMID:19890472

  1. Ground state intermolecular proton transfer in the supersystems thymine-(H2O)n and thymine-(CH3OH)n, n = 1,2: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Delchev, Vassil B; Shterev, Ivan G

    2009-04-01

    Twelve binary and eight ternary supersystems between thymine and methanol, and water were investigated in the ground state at the B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory using B3LYP/6-311 + + G(d,p) basis functions. The thermodynamics of complex formations and the mechanisms of intermolecular proton transfers were clarified in order to find out the most stable H-boned system. It was established that the energy barriers of the water/methanol-assisted proton transfers are several times lower than those of the intramolecular proton transfers in the DNA/RNA bases. The X-ray powder spectra of thymine, and this precrystallized from water and methanol showed that water molecules are incorporated in the crystal lattice of thymine forming H-bridges between thymine molecules.

  2. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  3. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João Paulo T; Gomes, Frederico P; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S; Carneiro, Cristine E A; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  4. Thymine dimer formation as a probe of the path of DNA in and between nucleosomes in intact chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Pehrson, J.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Photo-induced thymine dimer formation was used to probe nucleosome structure in nuclei. The distribution of thymine dimers in the nucleosome and recent studies of the structure of thymine dimer-containing DNA suggest that the rate of thymine dimer formation is affected by the direction and degree of DNA bending. This premise was used to construct a model of the path of DNA in the nucleosome, which has the following features. (i) There are four regions of sharp bending, two which have been seen previously by x-ray crystallography of the core particle. (ii) The DNA in H1-containing nucleosomes deviates from its superhelical path near the midpoint; this is not seen with H1-stripped chromatin. (iii) The internucleosomal (linker) DNA appears to be relatively straight.

  5. Thymine auxotrophy is associated with increased UV sensitivity in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Lojo, M M

    1995-06-01

    Thymine auxotrophy was shown to be associated with an increase in UV sensitivity both in Bacillus subtilis and in Escherichia coli. This UV sensitization became clearly evident in polA5 mutants of Bacillus subtilis: at UV doses of 16 J/m2, a reduction of more than 10-fold in the survivor population is observed in thymine requiring spontaneous mutants (polA5 thyA thyB) compared to the parental strains (polA5). Reversion of either thyA or thyB mutation led to a partial recovery in the UV resistance. This result suggests that DNA repair polymerization might be improved by the biosynthesis of thymidylate or some effect associated with such activity.

  6. Temperature dependence of the cross section for the fragmentation of thymine via dissociative electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyra, Janina; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan

    2015-05-07

    Providing experimental values for absolute Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) cross sections for nucleobases at realistic biological conditions is a considerable challenge. In this work, we provide the temperature dependence of the cross section, σ, of the dehydrogenated thymine anion (T − H){sup −} produced via DEA. Within the 393-443 K temperature range, it is observed that σ varies by one order of magnitude. By extrapolating to a temperature of 313 K, the relative DEA cross section for the production of the dehydrogenated thymine anion at an incident energy of 1 eV decreases by 2 orders of magnitude and the absolute value reaches approximately 6 × 10{sup −19} cm{sup 2}. These quantitative measurements provide a benchmark for theoretical prediction and also a contribution to a more accurate description of the effects of ionizing radiation on molecular medium.

  7. Practical and regenerable electrochemical aptasensor based on nanoporous gold and thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine base pairs for Hg(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Chen; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Tang, Lin; Zhou, Yaoyu; Xu, Piao; Wang, Hou; Qin, Lei; Cheng, Min

    2017-04-15

    A simple, practical and reusable electrochemical aptasensor, based on thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and nanoporous gold (NPG) for signal amplification, was designed for sensitive and selective detection of mercury ions (Hg(2+)). The thiol modified T-rich hairpin capture probe was self-assembled onto the surface of the NPG modified electrode for hybridizing with ferrocene-labeled T-rich probe in the presence of Hg(2+) via T-Hg(2+)-T coordination chemistry. As a result, the hairpin capture probe was opened, and the ferrocene tags were close to the NPG modified electrode. Taking advantage of the amplification effect of NPG electrode for increasing the reaction sites of thiol modified capture probe, the proposed electrochemical aptasensor could detect Hg(2+) quantitatively in the range of 0.01-5000nM, with a detection limit as low as 0.0036nM which is much lower than the maximum contamination level for Hg(2+) in drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Moreover, the proposed electrochemical aptasensor can be regenerated by adding cysteine and Mg(2+). The aptasensor was also used to detect Hg(2+) from real water samples, and the results showed excellent agreement with the values determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometer. This aptasensor showed a promising potential for on-site detecting Hg(2+) in drinking water.

  8. Functionalized gold nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of mercury ions based on thymine-mercury-thymine structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Lin, Meng; Dai, Hongxiu; Ma, Houyi

    2016-05-15

    A sensitive, selective and reusable electrochemical biosensor for the determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) has been developed based on thymine (T) modified gold nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO) nanocomposites. Graphene oxide (GO) was electrochemically reduced on a glassy carbon substrate. Subsequently, AuNPs were deposited onto the surface of rGO by cyclic voltammetry. For functionalization of the electrode, the carboxylic group of the thymine-1-acetic acid was covalently coupled with the amine group of the cysteamine which self-assembled onto AuNPs. The structural features of the T bases functionalized AuNPs/rGO electrode were confirmed by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) spectroscopy. Each step of the modification process was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedence spectroscopy (EIS). The T bases modified AuNPs/rGO electrode was applied to detect various trace metal ions by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The proposed biosensor was found to be highly sensitive to Hg(2+) in the range of 10 ng/L-1.0 µg/L. The biosensor afforded excellent selectivity for Hg(2+) against other heavy metal ions such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+). Furthermore, the developed sensor exhibited a high reusability through a simple washing. In addition, the prepared biosensor was successfully applied to assay Hg(2+) in real environmental samples.

  9. Low temperature FTIR spectroscopy and hydrogen bonding in cytosine polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenberg, M.; Shoham, G.; Reva, I.; Fausto, R.

    2004-01-01

    The FTIR spectra of both the pure NH and isotopically substituted ND (<10% and >90% D) polycrystalline cytosine were recorded in the range 400-4000 cm -1 as a function of temperature (10-300 K). For the first time, uncoupled NH(D) stretching mode bands of amine and imine groups were observed in the spectra of isotopically diluted cytosine at low temperatures. These bands correspond to the three distinct H-bonds that are present in the crystal, in agreement with the available data obtained by structural methods. At least nine bands were observed below 1000 cm -1 and, in consonance with their temperature and isotopic exchange behavior, were assigned to the NH proton out-of-the-plane bending modes. Six of these bands were found to correspond to additional "disordered" H-bonds, which could not be observed by structural methods. Empirical correlations of spectral and thermodynamic parameters enabled to estimate the contribution of the H-bonds to the sublimation enthalpy of the crystal, in agreement with independent experimental data.

  10. Communication: UV photoionization of cytosine catalyzed by Ag{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Taccone, Martín I.; Berdakin, Matías; Pino, Gustavo A.; Féraud, Geraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-07-28

    The photo-induced damages of DNA in interaction with metal cations, which are found in various environments, still remain to be characterized. In this paper, we show how the complexation of a DNA base (cytosine (Cyt)) with a metal cation (Ag{sup +}) changes its electronic properties. By means of UV photofragment spectroscopy of cold ions, it was found that the photoexcitation of the CytAg{sup +} complex at low energy (315-282) nm efficiently leads to ionized cytosine (Cyt{sup +}) as the single product. This occurs through a charge transfer state in which an electron from the p orbital of Cyt is promoted to Ag{sup +}, as confirmed by ab initio calculations at the TD-DFT/B3LYP and RI-ADC(2) theory level using the SV(P) basis set. The low ionization energy of Cyt in the presence of Ag{sup +} could have important implications as point mutation of DNA upon sunlight exposition.

  11. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Sch. Agustsdottir, Inger M.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Edvardsson, Vidar O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. Study Design An observational cohort study. Setting & Participants All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Outcomes Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD and kidney failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in eGFR. Measurements Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Results Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were female and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6–67.9) years. The median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0–31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 patients (55%) and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3–5, including 11 patients (21%) with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 patients (62%) had had kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stage 3–5. Of the 14 (26%) patients with CKD stage 5, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 patients (55%). The median eGFR slope was −0.38 (range, −21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in patients receiving treatment with xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and −5.74 (range, −75.8 to −0.10) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (p=0.001). Limitations Use of observational registry data. Conclusions Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, while nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. PMID:26724837

  12. Pulsed-field ionization photoelectron and IR-UV resonant photoionization spectroscopy of Al-thymine.

    PubMed

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Lei, Yuxiu; Lee, Jung Sup; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2008-09-28

    Al-thymine (Al-C(4)H(3)N(2)O(2)CH(3)) is produced by laser vaporization of a rod made of Al and thymine powders in a molecular beam and studied by single-photon pulsed-field ionization-zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron and IR-UV resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The ZEKE experiment determines the adiabatic ionization energy of the neutral complex and 22 vibrational modes for the corresponding ion with frequencies below 2000 cm(-1). The IR-UV photoionization experiment measures two N-H and three C-H stretches for the neutral species. The theoretical calculations predict a number of low-energy isomers with Al binding to single oxygen or adjacent oxygen and nitrogen atoms of thymine. Among these isomers, the structure with Al binding to the O4 atom of the diketo tautomer is predicted to be the most stable one by the theory and is probed by both ZEKE and IR-UV measurements. This work presents the first application of the IR-UV resonant ionization to metal-organic molecule systems. Like ZEKE spectroscopy, the IR-UV photoionization technique is sensitive for identifying isomeric structures of metal association complexes.

  13. Formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers photosensitized by pyridopsoralens: Quantitative and qualitative distribution within DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moysan, A.; Viari, A.; Vigny, P. ); Voituriez, L.; Cadet J. ); Moustacchi, E.; Sage, E. )

    1991-07-23

    As after irradiation with 254-nm UV light, exposure of thymidine and three isomeric pyridopsoralen derivatives to UVA radiation, in the dry state, leads to the formation of the six diastereomers of cyclobutadithymidine as the predominant reaction. This unexpected photosensitized reaction, which also gives rise to both 5R* and 5S* diastereomers of 5,6-dihydro-5-({alpha}-thymidylyl)thymidine (or spore photoproduct), is selective since (2+2) dimerization of 2{prime}-deoxycytidine was not detected under the same experimental conditions. The cis-syn isomer of cyclobutadithymine was also found to be produced within isolated DNA following UVA irradiation in aqueous solutions containing 7-methylpyrido (3,4-c)psoralen. Quantitatively, this photoproduct represents about one-fifth of the overall yield of the furan-side pyridopsoralen (2+2) photocycloadducts the thymine. DNA sequencing methodology was used to demonstrate that pyridopsoralen-photosensitized DNA is a substrate for T4 endonuclease V and Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, two enzymes acting specifically on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers concomitant to that of thymine-furocoumarin photoadducts and their eventual implication in the photobiological effects of the pyridopsoralens are discussed.

  14. Death of Bacillus subtilis Auxotrophs Due to Deprivation of Thymine, Tryptophan, or Uracil

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, William B.; Romig, W. R.

    1966-01-01

    Pritikin, William B. (University of California, Los Angeles), and W. R. Romig. Death of Bacillus subtilis auxotrophs due to deprivation of thymine, tryptophan, or uracil, J. Bacteriol. 92:291–296. 1966.—Auxotrophic mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168 that require either tryptophan, uracil, or thymine died rapidly when deprived of any of these compounds. Phage PBS1 was produced by infected B. subtilis 168 (thy try-2) deprived of thymine. Phage PBS1 was not produced by infected B. subtilis 168 (try-2) deprived of tryptophan or infected B. subtilis 168-15 (try-2 ura) deprived of uracil. B. subtilis 168 thy try-2 and 168-15 could be transduced by phage PBS1 after prolonged deprivation of tryptophan or uracil, respectively. When B. subtilis 168-15 was transduced to uracil independence by phage PBS1, the uracil-independent transductants became immune to uracil-less death within 10 min of exposure to phage, and began to multiply within 2 hr after exposure to phage at an incubation temperature of 46 C. PMID:16562109

  15. Death of Bacillus subtilis Auxotrophs Due to Deprivation of Thymine, Tryptophan, or Uracil.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, W B; Romig, W R

    1966-08-01

    Pritikin, William B. (University of California, Los Angeles), and W. R. Romig. Death of Bacillus subtilis auxotrophs due to deprivation of thymine, tryptophan, or uracil, J. Bacteriol. 92:291-296. 1966.-Auxotrophic mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168 that require either tryptophan, uracil, or thymine died rapidly when deprived of any of these compounds. Phage PBS1 was produced by infected B. subtilis 168 (thy try-2) deprived of thymine. Phage PBS1 was not produced by infected B. subtilis 168 (try-2) deprived of tryptophan or infected B. subtilis 168-15 (try-2 ura) deprived of uracil. B. subtilis 168 thy try-2 and 168-15 could be transduced by phage PBS1 after prolonged deprivation of tryptophan or uracil, respectively. When B. subtilis 168-15 was transduced to uracil independence by phage PBS1, the uracil-independent transductants became immune to uracil-less death within 10 min of exposure to phage, and began to multiply within 2 hr after exposure to phage at an incubation temperature of 46 C.

  16. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy of the cyclobutane thymine dimer repair mechanism: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hideo; Fingerhut, Benjamin P; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Biggs, Jason D; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-10-22

    Cyclobutane thymine dimer, one of the major lesions in DNA formed by exposure to UV sunlight, is repaired in a photoreactivation process, which is essential to maintain life. The molecular mechanism of the central step, i.e., intradimer C-C bond splitting, still remains an open question. In a simulation study, we demonstrate how the time evolution of characteristic marker bands (C═O and C═C/C-C stretch vibrations) of cyclobutane thymine dimer and thymine dinucleotide radical anion, thymidylyl(3'→5')thymidine, can be directly probed with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). We construct a DFT(M05-2X) potential energy surface with two minor barriers for the intradimer C₅-C₅' splitting and a main barrier for the C₆-C₆' splitting, and identify the appearance of two C₅═C₆ stretch vibrations due to the C₆-C₆' splitting as a spectroscopic signature of the underlying bond splitting mechanism. The sequential mechanism shows only absorptive features in the simulated FSRS signals, whereas the fast concerted mechanism shows characteristic dispersive line shapes.

  17. [Study of some pharmacological properties of a new adenine derivative].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov; Ozerov, A A; Motin, V G; Iasnetsov, Vik V; Karsanova, S K; Ivanov, Iu V; Chel'naia, N A

    2014-01-01

    It is established that the new compound, 9-[2-(4-isopropylphenoxy)ethyl]adenine (9-IPE-adenine) in a dose of 10 mg/kg per day produces neuroprotective effect in rats with brain ischemia model. 9-IPE-adenine decreased the neurologic deficiency 1.2 times more effectively (p < 0.05) than the reference drug mexidol in analogous dose, and had equal effect with this drug at 25 mg/kg per day on the neurologic deficiency and survival of animals. Electrophysiological studies in hippocampal slices in rats showed that 9-IPE-adenine depressed orthodromic population spikes in CA1 area by 42 ± 4%. Non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor complex MK-801, in contrast to D-AP5 (competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) and CNQX (competitive AMPA receptor antagonist), enhanced the depressive effect of the new drug more than two times. These ese results are indicative of the ability of 9-IPE-adenine to modulate the ion channel of NMDA receptor complex.

  18. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-03

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  19. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound homodimers determined by guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry: application to cytosine and 5-substituted cytosines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2013-11-19

    Base-pairing interactions in proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)·C) are the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Permethylation of cytosine in extended (CCG)·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats has been shown to cause fragile-X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. Oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo- or 5-fluorocytosine can bind to proteins that selectively bind methylated DNA, suggesting that halogenated cytosine damage products can potentially mimic methylation signals. However, the influence of methylation or halogenation on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of proton-bound dimers of cytosine and their impact on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations is presently unknown. To address this, proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and 5-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo-, and 5-iodocytosine are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The BPEs of proton-bound homodimers of cytosine and the modified cytosines are measured by threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. 5-Methylation of cytosine is found to increase the BPE and would therefore tend to stabilize DNA i-motif conformations. In contrast, 5-halogenation lowers the BPE. However, the BPEs of the proton-bound 5-halocytosine homodimers examined here still significantly exceed that of Watson-Crick G·C base pairs, such that DNA i-motif conformations should be preserved in the presence of these modifications. Excellent agreement between TCID measured and B3LYP calculated BPEs is found, suggesting that B3LYP calculations can be used to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  20. Synthon preference in a hydrated β-resorcylic acid structure and its cocrystal with thymine.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian

    2015-12-01

    Multicomponent crystals or cocrystals play a significant role in crystal engineering, the main objective of which is to understand the role of intermolecular interactions and to utilize such understanding in the design of novel crystal structures. Molecules possessing carboxylic acid and amide functional groups are good candidates for forming cocrystals. β-Resorcylic acid monohydrate, C7H6O4·H2O, (I), crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with one β-resorcylic acid molecule and one water molecule in the asymmetric unit. The cocrystal thymine-β-resorcylic acid-water (1/1/1), C5H6N2O2·C7H6O4·H2O, (II), crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pca21, with one molecule each of thymine, β-resorcylic acid and water in the asymmetric unit. All available donor and acceptor atoms in (I) and (II) are utilized for hydrogen bonding. The acid and amide functional groups are well known for the formation of self-complementary acid-acid and amide-amide homosynthons. In (I), an acid-acid homosynthon is observed, while in (II), an amide-acid heterosynthon is present. In (I), the β-resorcylic acid molecule exhibits the expected intramolecular S(6) motif between the hydroxy and carbonyl O atoms, and an intermolecular R2(2)(8) dimer motif between the carboxylic acid groups; only the former motif is observed in (II). The water solvent molecule in (I) propagates the discrete dimers into two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded sheets. In (II), thymine and β-resorcylic acid molecules do not form self-complementary amide-amide and acid-acid homosynthons; instead, a thymine-β-resorcylic acid heterosynthon is observed. With the help of the water molecule, this heterosynthon is aggregated into a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network. The absence of thymine base pairing in (II) might be linked to the availability of additional functional groups and the preference of the donor and acceptor hydrogen-bond combinations.

  1. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  2. Detection of Cytosine Methylation in Ancient DNA from Five Native American Populations Using Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rick W. A.; Monroe, Cara; Bolnick, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While cytosine methylation has been widely studied in extant populations, relatively few studies have analyzed methylation in ancient DNA. Most existing studies of epigenetic marks in ancient DNA have inferred patterns of methylation in highly degraded samples using post-mortem damage to cytosines as a proxy for cytosine methylation levels. However, this approach limits the inference of methylation compared with direct bisulfite sequencing, the current gold standard for analyzing cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution. In this study, we used direct bisulfite sequencing to assess cytosine methylation in ancient DNA from the skeletal remains of 30 Native Americans ranging in age from approximately 230 to 4500 years before present. Unmethylated cytosines were converted to uracils by treatment with sodium bisulfite, bisulfite products of a CpG-rich retrotransposon were pyrosequenced, and C-to-T ratios were quantified for a single CpG position. We found that cytosine methylation is readily recoverable from most samples, given adequate preservation of endogenous nuclear DNA. In addition, our results indicate that the precision of cytosine methylation estimates is inversely correlated with aDNA preservation, such that samples of low DNA concentration show higher variability in measures of percent methylation than samples of high DNA concentration. In particular, samples in this study with a DNA concentration above 0.015 ng/μL generated the most consistent measures of cytosine methylation. This study presents evidence of cytosine methylation in a large collection of ancient human remains, and indicates that it is possible to analyze epigenetic patterns in ancient populations using direct bisulfite sequencing approaches. PMID:26016479

  3. Adenine and 2-aminopurine: paradigms of modern theoretical photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela; Borin, Antonio C

    2006-06-06

    Distinct photophysical behavior of nucleobase adenine and its constitutional isomer, 2-aminopurine, has been studied by using quantum chemical methods, in particular an accurate ab initio multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory. After light irradiation, the efficient, ultrafast energy dissipation observed for nonfluorescent 9H-adenine is explained here by the nonradiative internal conversion process taking place along a barrierless reaction path from the initially populated 1(pipi* La) excited state toward a low-lying conical intersection (CI) connected with the ground state. In contrast, the strong fluorescence recorded for 2-aminopurine at 4.0 eV with large decay lifetime is interpreted by the presence of a minimum in the 1(pipi* La) hypersurface lying below the lowest CI and the subsequent potential energy barrier required to reach the funnel to the ground state. Secondary deactivation channels were found in the two systems related to additional CIs involving the 1(pipi* Lb) and 1(npi*) states. Although in 9H-adenine a population switch between both states is proposed, in 7H-adenine this may be perturbed by a relatively larger barrier to access the 1(npi*) state, and, therefore, the 1(pipi* Lb) state becomes responsible for the weak fluorescence measured in aqueous adenine at approximately 4.5 eV. In contrast to previous models that explained fluorescence quenching in adenine, unlike in 2-aminopurine, on the basis of the vibronic coupling of the nearby 1(pipi*) and 1(npi*) states, the present results indicate that the 1(npi*) state does not contribute to the leading photophysical event and establish the prevalence of a model based on the CI concept in modern photochemistry.

  4. Negative ion formation in potassium-adenine collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; García, G.; Limáo Vieira, P.

    2016-09-01

    We have devoted experimental studies to time-of-flight negative ion formation in electron transfer experiments from neutral potassium atoms with neutral adenine molecules1. Total partial cross sections have been obtained as a function of the collision energy, together with branching ratios for the most relevant fragment anions. Additional set of measurements in adenine derivatives have been performed in order to probe the role of negative ions as well as to probe whether site- and bond-selective excision is also a prevalent mechanism within electron transfer in atom-molecule collision experiments.

  5. Photodynamic therapy-driven induction of suicide cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Bil, Jacek; Wlodarski, Pawel; Winiarska, Magdalena; Kurzaj, Zuzanna; Issat, Tadeusz; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Wegiel, Barbara; Dulak, Jozef; Golab, Jakub

    2010-04-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors is associated with induction of hypoxia that results in activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Several observations indicate that increased HIFs transcriptional activity in tumor cells is associated with cytoprotective responses that limit cytotoxic effectiveness of PDT. Therefore, we decided to examine whether this cytoprotective mechanism could be intentionally used for designing more efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity. To this end we transfected tumor cells with a plasmid vector carrying a suicide cytosine deaminase gene driven by a promoter containing hypoxia response elements (HRE). The presence of such a genetic molecular beacon rendered tumor cells sensitive to cytotoxic effects of a non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The results of this study provides a proof of concept that inducible cytoprotective mechanisms can be exploited to render tumor cells more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of prodrugs activated by products of suicide genes.

  6. Base-pairing energies of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines: implications for the stability of DNA i-motif conformations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-01-08

    The DNA i-motif conformation was discovered in (CCG)•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats, which are associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The DNA i-motif is a four-stranded structure whose strands are held together by proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C(+)•C). The stronger base-pairing interactions in C(+)•C proton-bound dimers as compared to Watson-Crick G•C base pairs are the major forces responsible for stabilization of i-motif conformations. Methylation of cytosine results in silencing of the FMR1 gene and causes fragile X syndrome. However, the influence of methylation or other modifications such as halogenation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) in the i-motif remains elusive. To address this, proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine, 5-fluorocytosine, 5-bromocytosine, and 5-iodocytosine are probed in detail. Experimentally, the BPEs of proton-bound heterodimers of cytosine and modified cytosines are determined using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. All modifications at the 5-position of cytosine are found to lower the BPE and therefore would tend to destabilize DNA i-motif conformations. However, the BPEs in these proton-bound heterodimers still significantly exceed those of the Watson-Crick G•C and neutral C•C base pairs, suggesting that C(+)•C mismatches are still energetically favored such that i-motif conformations are preserved. Excellent agreement between TCID measured BPEs and B3LYP calculated values is found with the def2-TZVPPD and 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis sets, suggesting that calculations at these levels of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetic predictions for related systems.

  7. Watson-Crick and sugar-edge base pairing of cytosine in the gas phase: UV and infrared spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-23

    While keto-amino cytosine is the dominant species in aqueous solution, spectroscopic studies in molecular beams and in noble gas matrices show that other cytosine tautomers prevail in apolar environments. Each of these offers two or three H-bonding sites (Watson-Crick, wobble, sugar-edge). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 ← S0 vibronic spectra of cytosine·2-pyridone (Cyt·2PY) and 1-methylcytosine·2PY are measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV/UV depletion, and IR depletion spectroscopy. The UV spectra of the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge isomers of Cyt·2PY are separated using UV/UV spectral hole-burning. Five different isomers of Cyt·2PY are observed in a supersonic beam. We show that the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge dimers of keto-amino cytosine with 2PY are the most abundant in the beam, although keto-amino-cytosine is only the third most abundant tautomer in the gas phase. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) methylation of the cytosine N1-H group prevents formation of both the sugar-edge and wobble isomers and gives the Watson-Crick isomer exclusively. (2) The calculated ground state binding and dissociation energies, relative gas-phase abundances, excitation and the ionization energies are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant Cyt·2PY isomers to the Watson-Crick and sugar-edge complexes of keto-amino cytosine. (3) The comparison of calculated ground state vibrational frequencies to the experimental IR spectra in the carbonyl stretch and NH/OH/CH stretch ranges strengthen this identification.

  8. Invertase-labeling gold-dendrimer for in situ amplified detection mercury(II) with glucometer readout and thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Jin, Guixiao; Xu, Mingdi; Wei, Qiaohua; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-15

    A simple, low-cost transducer with glucometer readout was designed for sensitive detection of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)), coupling with thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and invertase-functionalized gold-dendrimer nanospheres for the signal amplification. Initially, nanogold-encapsulated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (Au DENs) were synthesized by in-situ reduction of gold(III). Thereafter, the as-prepared Au DENs were utilized for the labeling of invertase and T-rich signal DNA probe. In the presence of target Hg(2+), the functionalized Au DENs were conjugated to capture DNA probe-modified electrode via T-Hg(2+)-T coordination chemistry. Accompanying the Au DENs, the labeled invertase could hydrolyze sucrose into glucose, which could be quantitatively monitored by an external personal glucometer (PGM). The PGM signal increased with the increasing target Hg(2+) in the sample. Under the optimal conditions, our designed sensing platform exhibited good PGM responses toward target Hg(2+), and allowed the detection of Hg(2+) at a concentration as low as 4.2 pM. This sensing system also displayed remarkable specificity relative to target Hg(2+) against other competing ions, and could be applied for reliable monitoring of spiked Hg(2+) into the environmental water samples with satisfactory results. With the advantages of cost-effectiveness, simplicity, portability, and convenience, our strategy provides a tremendous potential to be a promising candidate for point-of-use monitoring of non-glucose targets by the public.

  9. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  10. Surface study of gallium- and aluminum- doped graphenes upon adsorption of cytosine: DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali; Zareyee, Daryoush; Peyravi, Majid; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of cytosine molecule on Al- and Ga- doped graphenes is studied using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The energetically most stable geometries of cytosine on both Al- and Ga- doped graphenes are determined and the adsorption energies are calculated. The net charge of transfer as well as local charge of doped atoms upon adsorption of cytosine are studied by natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. Orbital hybridizing of complexes was searched by frontier molecular orbital theory (FMO), and density of states (DOS). Depending on the side of cytosine, there are four possible sites for its adsorption on doped graphene; denoted as P1, P2, P3, and P4, respectively. The order of binding energy in the case of Al-doped graphene is found as P1 ˃ P4 ˃ P3 ˃ P2. Interestingly, the order in the case of Ga-doped graphene changes to: P4 ∼ P1˃ P3˃ P2. Both surfaces show superior adsorbent property, resulting chemisorption of cytosine, especially at P1 and P4 position configurations. The NBO charge analysis reveals that the charge transfers from Al- and Ga- doped graphene sheets to cytosine. The electronic properties of both surfaces undertake important changes after cytosine adsorption, which indicates notable change in its electrical conductivity.

  11. Detection of electronically equivalent tautomers of adenine base: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shamoon Ahmad; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rasheed, Tabish; Al-Assiri, M.S.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT calculations have been performed on adenine and its rare tautomer Cu{sup 2+} complexes. • Interaction of A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied briefly. • It is found that AlN modified C{sub 60} could be used as a nanoscale sensor to detect these two A-Cu{sup 2+} and rA-Cu{sup 2+} complexes. - Abstract: In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structures and stabilities of adenine and its rare tautomer along with their Cu{sup 2+} complexes. Density Functional Theory (B3LYP method) was used in all calculations. The two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine have almost similar energies and electronic structures; hence, their chemical differentiation is very difficult. For this purpose, interactions of these complexes with AlN modified fullerene (C{sub 60}) have been studied. Theoretical investigations reveal that AlN-doped C{sub 60} may serve as a potentially viable nanoscale sensor for detection of the two Cu{sup 2+} complexes of adenine.

  12. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  13. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  14. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  15. Hydrogen bonding in proton-transfer complexes of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Reji; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2008-02-01

    Protons-transfer complexes (1:1) of cytosine with trimesic and pyromellitic acids have been crystallized and single crystal structures have been solved by X-ray crystallography. Both cocrystals exhibit layered structures, each layer containing a plethora of N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the proton-transfer duplets. The cytosine-trimesic acid complex exhibits a bilayered structure (2.87 Å) in contrast to the commonly observed layered structure seen in the cytosine-pyromellitic acid complex (3.98 Å). Another layered system, an adduct of pyromellitic acid and 1,4-dihydroxy benzene, has also been studied.

  16. A highly sensitive and stable glucose biosensor using thymine-based polycations into laponite hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Paz Zanini, Veronica I; Gavilán, Maximiliano; López de Mishima, Beatriz A; Martino, Débora M; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2016-04-01

    A series of glucose bioelectrodes were prepared by glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization into laponite hydrogel films containing DNA bioinspired polycations made of vinylbenzyl thymine (VBT) and vinylbenzyl triethylammonium chloride (VBA) with general formulae (VBT)m(VBA)n](n+)≈25 with m=0, 1 and n=2, 4, 8, deposited onto glassy carbon electrode. The bioelectrodes were characterized by chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results indicated that the electrochemical properties of the laponite hydrogel films were largely improved by the incorporation of thymine-based polycations, being proportional to the positive charge density of the polycation molecule. After incorporation of glucose oxidase, the sensitivity of the bioelectrode to glucose increased with the positive charge density of the polycation. Additionally, the presence of the vinylbenzyl thymine moiety played a role in the long-term stability and reproducibility of the bioelectrode signal. As a consequence, the [(VBT)(VBA)8](8+)≈25 was the most appropriate polycation for bioelectrode preparation and glucose sensing, with a specific sensitivity of se=176 mA mmol(-1)Lcm(-2)U(-1), almost two-order of magnitude larger than other laponite immobilized GOx bioelectrodes reported elsewhere. These features were confirmed by testing the bioelectrode for a selective determination of glucose in powder milk and blood serum samples without interference of either ascorbic or uric acids under the experimental conditions. The present study demonstrates the suitability of DNA bioinspired water-soluble polycations [(VBT)m(VBA)n](n+)≈25 for enzyme immobilization like GOx into laponite hydrogels, and the preparation of highly sensitive and stable bioelectrodes on glassy carbon surface.

  17. In vitro adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zietara, Marek S; Słomińska, Ewa; Rurangwa, Eugene; Ollevier, Frans; Swierczyński, Julian; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2004-08-01

    It has been shown recently that African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) spermatozoa possess relatively low ATP content and low adenylate energy charge (AEC). One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the spermatozoa actively catabolize adenine nucleotides. A relatively high rate of such catabolism could then contribute to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in the spermatozoa in vitro. To check this hypothesis, we investigated ATP content and adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa stored at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine as an energetic substrate. Our results indicate that the storage of African catfish sperm at 4 degrees C in the presence of glycine causes time-dependent ATP depletion. In contrast to ATP, the AMP content increases significantly during the same period of sperm storage, while the ADP increases only slightly. Moreover, a significant increase of inosine and hypoxanthine content was also found. Hypoxanthine was accumulated in the storage medium, but xanthine was found neither in spermatozoa nor in the storage medium. It indicates that hypoxanthine is not converted to xanthine, probably due to lack of xanthine oxidase activity in catfish spermatozoa. Present results suggest that adenine nucleotides may be converted to hypoxanthine according to the following pathway: ATP-->ADP-->AMP (adenosine/IMP)-->inosine-->hypoxanthine. Moreover, hypoxanthine seems to be the end product of adenine nucleotide catabolism in African catfish spermatozoa. In conclusion, our results suggest that a relatively high rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism contributes to the low ATP concentration and low adenylate energy charge observed in African catfish spermatozoa in vitro.

  18. Fast repair of thymine-hydroxyl radical adduct by phenylpropanoid glycosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenyan, Li; Zhihua, Zou; Rongliang, Zheng; Changzeng, Wang; Zhongjian, Jia; Side, Yao; Nianyun, Lin

    1997-04-01

    The repair effect on thymine-hydroxyl adduct by phenylpropanoid glycosides (PPG): verbascoside, and pedicularioside A, isolated from Pedicularis, were studied using pulse radiolysis technique. From the analysis of transient absorption spectra, the rapid electron transfer from PPG to T-OH - was observed. Phenoxyl radical of PPG were generated via one-electron-transfer reaction. This result showed that two PPG exhibited repair activities on oxidizing T-OH -. The reaction rate constants of electron transfer from PPGs were 1.27 × 10 9 and 1.29 × 10 9 dm 3·mol -1s -1 respectively.

  19. Differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans serotypes A and D using creatinine dextrose bromothymol blue thymine medium.

    PubMed

    Irokanulo, E A; Akueshi, C O; Makinde, A A

    1994-06-01

    A serotype differentiation of the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is described using creatinine dextrose bromothymol blue thymine (CDBT) medium. On CDBT medium C. neoformans serotype D grew as bright red colonies, turning the medium a bright orange after five days incubation at 28 degrees C. C. neoformans serotype A grew as pale colonies with no apparent colour effect on the medium. Serotypes B and C caused a slight greening of the medium. The reaction of the four serotypes of C. neoformans on CDBT medium is considered useful in the differentiation of the closely related serotype A and D.

  20. Study on the oxidation form of adenine in phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zhi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Feng-Xia; Ye, Yong; Xie, Ji-Min

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of adenine in phosphate buffer solution is investigated using square-wave voltammetry and in situ UV spectroelectrochemistry. The geometry of adenine and the derivatives optimized at DFTB3LYP-6-31G (d, p)-PCM level is in agreement with the crystal structure, and the imitated UV spectra of adenine and the product at electrode are consistent with the in situ UV spectra. The relationship between the electrochemical property and the molecular structure is also discussed. The experimental and theoretical results show that the adenine oxidation origins from the neutral adenine.

  1. Binding of the human nucleotide excision repair proteins XPA and XPC/HR23B to the 5R-thymine glycol lesion and structure of the cis-(5R,6S) thymine glycol epimer in the 5'-GTgG-3' sequence: destabilization of two base pairs at the lesion site.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyle L; Roginskaya, Marina; Zou, Yue; Altamirano, Alvin; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    The 5R thymine glycol (5R-Tg) DNA lesion exists as a mixture of cis-(5R,6S) and trans-(5R,6R) epimers; these modulate base excision repair. We examine the 7:3 cis-(5R,6S):trans-(5R,6R) mixture of epimers paired opposite adenine in the 5'-GTgG-3' sequence with regard to nucleotide excision repair. Human XPA recognizes the lesion comparably to the C8-dG acetylaminoflourene (AAF) adduct, whereas XPC/HR23B recognition of Tg is superior. 5R-Tg is processed by the Escherichia coli UvrA and UvrABC proteins less efficiently than the C8-dG AAF adduct. For the cis-(5R, 6S) epimer Tg and A are inserted into the helix, remaining in the Watson-Crick alignment. The Tg N3H imine and A N(6) amine protons undergo increased solvent exchange. Stacking between Tg and the 3'-neighbor G*C base pair is disrupted. The solvent accessible surface and T(2) relaxation of Tg increases. Molecular dynamics calculations predict that the axial conformation of the Tg CH(3) group is favored; propeller twisting of the Tg*A pair and hydrogen bonding between Tg OH6 and the N7 atom of the 3'-neighbor guanine alleviate steric clash with the 5'-neighbor base pair. Tg also destabilizes the 5'-neighbor G*C base pair. This may facilitate flipping both base pairs from the helix, enabling XPC/HR23B recognition prior to recruitment of XPA.

  2. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  3. Cytosine-to-uracil deamination by SssI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stier, Ildikó; Kiss, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase M.SssI shares the specificity of eukaryotic DNA methyltransferases (CG) and is an important model and experimental tool in the study of eukaryotic DNA methylation. Previously, M.SssI was shown to be able to catalyze deamination of the target cytosine to uracil if the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) was missing from the reaction. To test whether this side-activity of the enzyme can be used to distinguish between unmethylated and C5-methylated cytosines in CG dinucleotides, we re-investigated, using a sensitive genetic reversion assay, the cytosine deaminase activity of M.SssI. Confirming previous results we showed that M.SssI can deaminate cytosine to uracil in a slow reaction in the absence of SAM and that the rate of this reaction can be increased by the SAM analogue 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine. We could not detect M.SssI-catalyzed deamination of C5-methylcytosine ((m5)C). We found conditions where the rate of M.SssI mediated C-to-U deamination was at least 100-fold higher than the rate of (m5)C-to-T conversion. Although this difference in reactivities suggests that the enzyme could be used to identify C5-methylated cytosines in the epigenetically important CG dinucleotides, the rate of M.SssI mediated cytosine deamination is too low to become an enzymatic alternative to the bisulfite reaction. Amino acid replacements in the presumed SAM binding pocket of M.SssI (F17S and G19D) resulted in greatly reduced methyltransferase activity. The G19D variant showed cytosine deaminase activity in E. coli, at physiological SAM concentrations. Interestingly, the C-to-U deaminase activity was also detectable in an E. coli ung (+) host proficient in uracil excision repair.

  4. Roles, and establishment, maintenance and erasing of the epigenetic cytosine methylation marks in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumari, Renu; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay

    2013-12-01

    Heritable information in plants consists of genomic information in DNA sequence and epigenetic information superimposed on DNA sequence. The latter is in the form of cytosine methylation at CG, CHG and CHH elements (where H = A, T orC) and a variety of histone modifications in nucleosomes. The epialleles arising from cytosine methylation marks on the nuclear genomic loci have better heritability than the epiallelic variation due to chromatin marks. Phenotypic variation is increased manifold by epiallele comprised methylomes. Plants (angiosperms) have highly conserved genetic mechanisms to establish, maintain or erase cytosine methylation from epialleles. The methylation marks in plants fluctuate according to the cell/tissue/organ in the vegetative and reproductive phases of plant life cycle. They also change according to environment. Epialleles arise by gain or loss of cytosine methylation marks on genes. The changes occur due to the imperfection of the processes that establish and maintain the marks and on account of spontaneous and stress imposed removal of marks. Cytosine methylation pattern acquired in response to abiotic or biotic stress is often inherited over one to several subsequent generations.Cytosine methylation marks affect physiological functions of plants via their effect(s) on gene expression levels. They also repress transposable elements that are abundantly present in plant genomes. The density of their distribution along chromosome lengths affects meiotic recombination rate, while their removal increases mutation rate. Transposon activation due to loss of methylation causes rearrangements such that new gene regulatory networks arise and genes for microRNAs may originate. Cytosine methylation dynamics contribute to evolutionary changes. This review presents and discusses the available evidence on origin, removal and roles of cytosine methylation and on related processes, such as RNA directed DNA methylation, imprinting, paramutation and

  5. Highly thymine-dependent formation of fluorescent copper nanoparticles templated by ss-DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guiying; Shao, Yong; Peng, Jian; Dai, Wei; Liu, Lingling; Xu, Shujuan; Wu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua

    2013-08-01

    Double-stranded DNAs (ds-DNAs) have been identified as efficient templates favoring the formation of fluorescent copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs). Herein, we have tried to synthesize fluorescent Cu NPs using single-stranded DNAs (ss-DNAs) as templates and to identify the critical DNA sequences. By comparing the results using homopolymer DNAs, hairpin DNAs, and pristine ss-DNAs as templates, we found that DNA thymine base plays a dominant role in producing red-emissive fluorescent Cu NPs on ss-DNA templates. The thymine-dependent growth of the fluorescent Cu NPs is confirmed by Hg2+ mediated T-T base pair in comparison with the other non-specific metal ions, which could be developed into a practical sensor for turn-on fluorescence detection of Hg2+ with a high selectivity. The mechanism is briefly discussed according the DNA sequence-dependent formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. This work demonstrates the sequence role in producing fluorescent Cu NPs that could serve as promising fluorescent nanoprobes in biosensing and DNA-hosted Cu nanomaterials.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering enhancement of thymine adsorbed on graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of carbon nanostructures, namely, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, graphene nanoplatelets, graphene oxide, and multiwall carbon nanotubes as well CARS spectra of thymine (Thy) molecules adsorbed on graphene oxide were studied. The spectra of the samples were compared with spontaneous Raman scattering (RS) spectra. The CARS spectra of Thy adsorbed on graphene oxide are characterized by shifts of the main bands in comparison with RS. The CARS spectra of the initial nanocarbons are definitely different: for all investigated materials, there is a redistribution of D- and G-mode intensities, significant shift of their frequencies (more than 20 cm-1), and appearance of new modes about 1,400 and 1,500 cm-1. The D band in CARS spectra is less changed than the G band; there is an absence of 2D-mode at 2,600 cm-1 for graphene and appearance of intensive modes of the second order between 2,400 and 3,000 cm-1. Multiphonon processes in graphene under many photon excitations seem to be responsible for the features of the CARS spectra. We found an enhancement of the CARS signal from thymine adsorbed on graphene oxide with maximum enhancement factor about 105. The probable mechanism of CARS enhancement is discussed. PMID:24948887

  7. The DNA nucleobase thymine in motion - Intersystem crossing simulated with surface hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Sebastian; Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2017-01-01

    We report ab initio excited-state dynamics simulations on isolated thymine to investigate the mechanism of intersystem crossing, based on CASSCF potential energy surfaces and the SHARC surface hopping method. We show that even though S2 →S1 internal conversion is not described accurately with CASSCF, intersystem crossing can be correctly simulated. Intersystem crossing in thymine occurs from the S1 (1 nπ∗) minimum, via a nearby crossing with T2 (3 ππ∗). The system further relaxes via ultrafast internal conversion in the triplet manifold to the T1 (3 ππ∗) state. The simulations reveal that, once the system is trapped in the 1 nπ∗ minimum, intersystem crossing might proceed with a time constant of 1 ps. Furthermore, the change of the system's electronic state is accompanied respectively by elongation/shortening of specific bonds, which could thus be used as indicators to identify which state is populated in the dynamics.

  8. Orbital interactions and charge redistribution in weak hydrogen bonds: The Watson-Crick AT mimic adenine-2,4-difluorotoluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2003-08-01

    The discovery by Kool and co-workers that 2,4-difluorotoluene (F) mimics thymine (T) in DNA replication has led to a controversy about the question if this mimic has the capability of forming hydrogen bonds with adenine (A). In the present study, we address not only the question about the strengths of the hydrogen bonds in AF as compared to those in AT but we focus in particular on the nature of these interactions. Thus, we have analyzed AF and AT at the BP86/TZ2P level of density functional theory (DFT). In line with previous experience, this approach is shown to achieve close agreement with the available data from ab initio computations and experiment: the complexation energy of AF (-3.2 kcal/mol) is confirmed to be much weaker indeed than that of AT (-13.0 kcal/mol). Interestingly, the weak hydrogen bonds in AF still possess a significant orbital interaction component that resembles the situation for the more strongly bound AT, as follows from (1) an analysis of the orbital electronic structure of AF and AT, (2) a quantitative decomposition of the A-F and A-T bond energies, as well as (3) a quantitative decomposition of the charge redistribution associated with the A-F and A-T interactions based on the Voronoi deformation density (VDD) method. The VDD method has been further developed such that the charge redistribution ΔQ per atom can be decomposed into a component associated with the Pauli repulsive orbital interactions and a component associated with the bonding orbital interactions: ΔQ=ΔQPauli+ΔQoi. Implications of our findings for the mechanism of DNA replication are discussed.

  9. The CHH motif in sugar beet satellite DNA: a modulator for cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schubert, Veit; Viehoever, Prisca; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Methylation of DNA is important for the epigenetic silencing of repetitive DNA in plant genomes. Knowledge about the cytosine methylation status of satellite DNAs, a major class of repetitive DNA, is scarce. One reason for this is that arrays of tandemly arranged sequences are usually collapsed in next-generation sequencing assemblies. We applied strategies to overcome this limitation and quantified the level of cytosine methylation and its pattern in three satellite families of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) which differ in their abundance, chromosomal localization and monomer size. We visualized methylation levels along pachytene chromosomes with respect to small satellite loci at maximum resolution using chromosome-wide fluorescent in situ hybridization complemented with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. Only reduced methylation of many satellite arrays was obtained. To investigate methylation at the nucleotide level we performed bisulfite sequencing of 1569 satellite sequences. We found that the level of methylation of cytosine strongly depends on the sequence context: cytosines in the CHH motif show lower methylation (44-52%), while CG and CHG motifs are more strongly methylated. This affects the overall methylation of satellite sequences because CHH occurs frequently while CG and CHG are rare or even absent in the satellite arrays investigated. Evidently, CHH is the major target for modulation of the cytosine methylation level of adjacent monomers within individual arrays and contributes to their epigenetic function. This strongly indicates that asymmetric cytosine methylation plays a role in the epigenetic modification of satellite repeats in plant genomes.

  10. Electron attachment to the cytosine-centered DNA single strands: does base stacking matter?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-02-02

    Electron attachment to the trimer of nucleotide, dGpdCpdG, has been investigated by a quantum mechanical approach at a reliable level of theory. The study of the electron attached dGpdCpdG species demonstrates that cytosine contained DNA single strands have a strong tendency to capture low-energy electrons and to form electronically stable cytosine-centered radical anions. The comparative study of the model molecules pdCpdG and dGpdCp reveals that base stacking has little contribution to the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of cytosine in DNA single strands. Additionally, the base-base stacking does not affect the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the cytosine-centered radicals. Intrastrand H-bonding is found to be critical in increasing the values of the AEA and VDE. However, base-base stacking is revealed to be important in enlarging the vertical electron affinity (VEA) of cytosine. The electron attachment to the cytosine moiety intensifies the intrastrand H-bonding between the neighboring G and C bases. This process disrupts the base-base stacking interaction in the radical anion of dGpdCpdG.

  11. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  12. TET proteins: on the frenetic hunt for new cytosine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic genome marking and chromatin regulation are central to establishing tissue-specific gene expression programs, and hence to several biological processes. Until recently, the only known epigenetic mark on DNA in mammals was 5-methylcytosine, established and propagated by DNA methyltransferases and generally associated with gene repression. All of a sudden, a host of new actors—novel cytosine modifications and the ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes—has appeared on the scene, sparking great interest. The challenge is now to uncover the roles they play and how they relate to DNA demethylation. Knowledge is accumulating at a frantic pace, linking these new players to essential biological processes (e.g. cell pluripotency and development) and also to cancerogenesis. Here, we review the recent progress in this exciting field, highlighting the TET enzymes as epigenetic DNA modifiers, their physiological roles, and their functions in health and disease. We also discuss the need to find relevant TET interactants and the newly discovered TET–O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) pathway. PMID:23625996

  13. Excited State Pathways Leading to Formation of Adenine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Martinez-Fernandez, Lara; Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Esposito, Luciana; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    The reaction intermediate in the path leading to UV-induced formation of adenine dimers A═A and AA* is identified for the first time quantum mechanically, using PCM/TD-DFT calculations on (dA)2 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine). In parallel, its fingerprint is detected in the absorption spectra recorded on the millisecond time-scale for the single strand (dA)20 (dA: 2'deoxyadenosine).

  14. The nucleobase adenine as a signalling molecule in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Thimm, D; Schiedel, A C; Peti-Peterdi, J; Kishore, B K; Müller, C E

    2015-04-01

    In 2002, the first receptor activated by the nucleobase adenine was discovered in rats. In the past years, two adenine receptors (AdeRs) in mice and one in Chinese hamsters, all of which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), were cloned and pharmacologically characterized. Based on the nomenclature for other purinergic receptor families (P1 for adenosine receptors and P2 for nucleotide, e.g. ATP, receptors), AdeRs were designated P0 receptors. Pharmacological data indicate the existence of G protein-coupled AdeRs in pigs and humans as well; however, those have not been cloned so far. Current data suggest a role for adenine and AdeRs in renal proximal tubules. Furthermore, AdeRs are suggested to be functional counterplayers of vasopressin in the collecting duct system, thus exerting diuretic effects. We are only at the beginning of understanding the significance of this new class of purinergic receptors, which might become future drug targets.

  15. Regulation of the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide- and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two distinct l-glutamate dehydrogenases. These enzymes are affected in a reciprocal fashion by growth on ammonia or dicarboxylic amino acids as the nitrogen source. The specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) (anabolic) enzyme is highest in ammonia-grown cells and is reduced in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate. Conversely, the specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) (catabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase is highest in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate and is much lower in cells grown on ammonia. The specific activity of both enzymes is very low in nitrogen-starved yeast. Addition of the ammonia analogue methylamine to the growth medium reduces the specific activity of the NAD-dependent enzyme and increases the specific activity of the NADP-dependent enzyme. PMID:4147647

  16. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  17. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  18. Electronic structure of uracil-like nucleobases adsorbed on Si(001): uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Elena; Onida, Giovanni; Cappellini, Giancarlo

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic properties of the Si(001):Uracil, Si(001):Thymine, and Si(001):5-Fluorouracil systems, focusing on the Si dimer-bridging configuration with adsorption governed by carbonyl groups. While the overall structural and electronic properties are similar, with small differences due to chemical substitutions, much larger effects on the surface band dispersion and bandgap show up as a function of the molecular orientation with respect to the surface. An off-normal orientation of the molecular planes is favored, showing larger bandgap and lower total energy than the upright position. We also analyze the localization of gap-edge occupied and unoccupied surface states. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70011-1

  19. Ferrocene-linked thymine/uracil conjugates: base pairing directed self-assembly and supramolecular packing.

    PubMed

    Patwa, Amit N; Gupta, Susmita; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Kumar, Vaijayanti A; Bhadbhade, Mohan M; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2008-02-15

    Ferrocene-linked bis(nucleobase) (1a-c) and chimeric nucleobase (1d) conjugates have been synthesized from mono- and bis(hydroxybutyl)ferrocene 6 via Mitsunobu reaction as the key step. X-ray crystallographic studies of ferrocene bis(nucleobase) conjugates reveal two-dimensional supramolecular organizations of backbones through self-assembled Watson-Crick and reverse Watson-Crick type pairs. Ferrocene-bis(thymine) conjugate self-assembles by reverse Watson-Crick pairing, while the corresponding bis(uracil) conjugate self-assembles by alternating WC and reverse WC type pairing. Such continuous assemblies are not seen in monosubstituted ferrocene nucleobase conjugates which form only planar sheets. The results are interesting from the point of understanding and engineering supramolecular assemblies through rational design of base pairing patterns.

  20. Structural basis of damage recognition by thymine DNA glycosylase: Key roles for N-terminal residues

    PubMed Central

    Coey, Christopher T.; Malik, Shuja S.; Pidugu, Lakshmi S.; Varney, Kristen M.; Pozharski, Edwin; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme functioning in DNA repair and epigenetic regulation. TDG removes thymine from mutagenic G·T mispairs arising from deamination of 5-methylcytosine (mC), and it processes other deamination-derived lesions including uracil (U). Essential for DNA demethylation, TDG excises 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine, derivatives of mC generated by Tet (ten-eleven translocation) enzymes. Here, we report structural and functional studies of TDG82-308, a new construct containing 29 more N-terminal residues than TDG111-308, the construct used for previous structures of DNA-bound TDG. Crystal structures and NMR experiments demonstrate that most of these N-terminal residues are disordered, for substrate- or product-bound TDG82-308. Nevertheless, G·T substrate affinity and glycosylase activity of TDG82-308 greatly exceeds that of TDG111-308 and is equivalent to full-length TDG. We report the first high-resolution structures of TDG in an enzyme-substrate complex, for G·U bound to TDG82-308 (1.54 Å) and TDG111-308 (1.71 Å), revealing new enzyme-substrate contacts, direct and water-mediated. We also report a structure of the TDG82-308 product complex (1.70 Å). TDG82-308 forms unique enzyme–DNA interactions, supporting its value for structure-function studies. The results advance understanding of how TDG recognizes and removes modified bases from DNA, particularly those resulting from deamination. PMID:27580719

  1. Selective excision of 5-carboxylcytosine by a thymine DNA glycosylase mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) excises the mismatched base, uracil, thymine, or 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU), as well as removes 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) when paired with a guanine. In the previously solved structure of TDG in complex with DNA containing 5caC, the side chain of asparagine 157 (N157) contacts the 5-carboxyl moiety of 5caC via a weak hydrogen bond. We examined the role of N157 in recognition of 5caC by mutagenesis. The asparagine-to-alanine (N157A) mutant has no detectable base excision activity for a G:T mismatch, and its excision activity is reduced for other substrates including G:5caC. Unexpectedly, the asparagine-to-aspartate (N157D) mutant has a comparable base excision rate for G:5caC substrate to that of wild type, but it only has residual activity for G:U and no detectable activity for other substrates. We further show that the N157D mutant has higher activity for 5caC at a lower pH (6.0), suggesting that increased protonation of the carboxylate of 5caC and the aspartate facilitates base excision. The N157D mutant remains highly specific for 5caC even in the presence of large excess of genomic DNA, a property that can potentially be used for mapping the very low amount of 5caC in genomes. PMID:23337108

  2. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  3. B3LYP, BLYP and PBE DFT band structures of the nucleotide base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekeres, Zs; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    DFT crystal orbital (band structure) calculations have been performed for the nucleotide base stacks of cytosine, thymine, adenine, and guanine arranged in DNA B geometry. The band structures obtained with PBE, BLYP, and B3LYP functionals are presented and compared to other related experimental and theoretical results. The influence of the quality of the basis set on the fundamental gap values was also investigated using Clementi's double ζ, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets.

  4. Modeling of Bacillus spores: Inactivation and Outgrowth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    bases: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T). In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick correctly proposed that the DNA molecule consist... DNA double helix can be readily, faithfully repaired, but completely cleaving the DNA double helix in multiple locations may not be faithfully... helix begins to dissociate into its component single strands. This is because the hydroxide ions can react with bases in DNA base pairs to remove

  5. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia.

  6. Cytosine deaminase MX cassettes as positive/negative selectable markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartzog, Phillip E; Nicholson, Bradly P; McCusker, John H

    2005-07-30

    We describe positive/negative selectable cytosine deaminase MX cassettes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of positive selection for cytosine deaminase (Fcy1) activity is that (a) fcy1 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as a sole nitrogen source and (b) fcy1 ura3 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as the sole pyrimidine source. Conversely, as 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) is toxic to cytosine deaminase-producing cells, fcy1 strains are resistant to 5FC. FCY1MX and FCA1MX cassettes, containing open reading frames (ORFs) of S. cerevisiae FCY1 and Candida albicans FCA1, respectively, were constructed and used to disrupt targeted genes in S. cerevisiae fcy1 strains. In addition, new direct repeat cassettes, kanPR, FCA1PR, FCY1PR and CaURA3PR, were developed to allow efficient deletion of target genes in cells containing MX3 repeats. Finally, the FCY1- and FCA1MX3 or PR direct repeat cassettes can be readily recycled after 5FC counter-selection on both synthetic and rich media.

  7. Effects of spinally administered adenine on dorsal horn neuronal responses in a rat model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2004-02-19

    A novel G-protein-coupled receptor with adenine identified as the endogenous ligand has recently been described. In vivo electrophysiological techniques in the rat were used to record the response of dorsal horn neurones in response to transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the hindpaw receptive field. Spinal adenine (1-1000 microg) exerted facilitatory effects on the electrically-evoked neuronal responses, in a mildly dose-related manner. After establishment of carrageenan-induced inflammation to the hindpaw this excitatory effect of adenine was still apparent, yet reduced. C-fibre-evoked responses and other nociceptive related measures were most susceptible to the effects of adenine, whereas non-nociceptive Abeta-fibre evoked activity remained unaffected. Thus, activation of the adenine receptor site, via spinally applied adenine, suggests a pronociceptive role in nociceptive sensory transmission.

  8. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the geometry of the adenine fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Joanna Maria; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of two adenine derivatives, N(6),9-dimethyl-8-butyladenine (I) and its hydrate (1 : 1) (II), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometrical features of both structures are discussed. The influence of protonation, substitution and hydrogen bond formation on the geometry of the adenine fragment was studied, based on data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database. Total correlation analysis showed mutual correlation between the structural parameters in the adenine ring system; partial correlation calculations for the adenine nucleoside fragments suggest intercorrelation between the parameters of the hydrogen bonding involved in base pairing and the N(adenine)-C(sugar) bond through the adenine fragment; few such correlations were found for fragments without the sugar substituent.

  9. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  10. HYDROGEN-BONDED DIMERS OF ADENINE AND URACIL DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    HAMLIN, R M; LORD, R C; RICH, A

    1965-06-25

    In concentrated solutions of either 9-ethyladenine or 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform, absorption bands in the infrared spectrum demonstrate hydrogen bonding of the adenine and uracil derivatives with themselves. In dilute solutions, there is very little hydrogen bonding. However, when dilute solutions of 9-ethyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil are mixed, a series of bands appear which show that these molecules are hydrogen-bonding with each other much more strongly than with themselves. A study of the stoichiometry of this association indicates formation of 1:1 hydrogen-bonded pairs in solution.

  11. Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Michal J

    2010-08-01

    The Purines 2010: Adenine Nucleosides and Nucleotides in Biomedicine meeting, held in Tarragona, Spain, included topics covering new findings in the field of purinergic signaling and the development of purine-based drugs. This conference report highlights selected presentations on developments in purinerigic signaling, medicinal chemistry, the therapeutic potential of purine-based drugs, and the role of purines and adenosine receptors in neurodegenerative disorders, sickle cell disease, bone homeostasis, pulmonary fibrosis and pain. Investigational drugs discussed include CF-101 (Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd/NIH/Kwang Dong Pharmaceutical Co Ltd/Seikagaku Corp) and denufosol tetrasodium (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Inc/Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  12. Investigation of coordination properties of isolated adenine to copper metal: a systematic spectroscopic and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2013-08-01

    The coordination properties of copper with adenine have been studied by the analyzing the changes in Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectra of adenine and adenine-copper complex. The geometry of adenine and adenine copper complex were optimized and theoretical Infra-red and Raman spectra of the optimized structures were calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT). During synthesis of adenine-copper complex specific procedure was adopted to attach the Cu atom with particular N-atom of adenine (N9). The results of Raman and DFT confirmed the attachment. The Raman bands at 625, 330 and 230 cm(-1) of adenine-copper complex contain significant contribution of the vibrational motions of Cu metal coordinated to N9 and Cl atoms. The DFT calculations give additional vibrational modes containing the Cu, N9 and N9* atoms, which are not observed in FTIR and Raman spectra. The Raman, IR and DFT study confirm that Cu metal has good binding affinity to the isolated adenine base.

  13. AID enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the size of cytosine C5 orbital cloud.

    PubMed

    Rangam, Gopinath; Schmitz, Kerstin-Maike; Cobb, Alexander J A; Petersen-Mahrt, Svend K

    2012-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil, which is required for a functional humoral immune system. Previous work demonstrated, that AID also deaminates 5-methylcytosine (5 mC). Recently, a novel vertebrate modification (5-hydroxymethylcytosine - 5 hmC) has been implicated in functioning in epigenetic reprogramming, yet no molecular pathway explaining the removal of 5 hmC has been identified. AID has been suggested to deaminate 5 hmC, with the 5 hmU product being repaired by base excision repair pathways back to cytosine. Here we demonstrate that AID's enzymatic activity is inversely proportional to the electron cloud size of C5-cytosine - H > F > methyl > hydroxymethyl. This makes AID an unlikely candidate to be part of 5 hmC removal.

  14. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles A.; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5′-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH‡) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years. PMID:27382162

  15. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  16. Cytosine deamination and the precipitous decline of spontaneous mutation during Earth's history.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charles A; Crayle, Jesse; Zhou, Shuntai; Swanstrom, Ronald; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-07-19

    The hydrolytic deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA appears to contribute significantly to the appearance of spontaneous mutations in microorganisms and in human disease. In the present work, we examined the mechanism of cytosine deamination and the response of the uncatalyzed reaction to changing temperature. The positively charged 1,3-dimethylcytosinium ion was hydrolyzed at a rate similar to the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-methylcytosine, for which it furnishes a satisfactory kinetic model and a probable mechanism. In agreement with earlier reports, uncatalyzed deamination was found to proceed at very similar rates for cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, cytidine, and cytidine 5'-phosphate, and also for cytosine residues in single-stranded DNA generated from a phagemid, in which we sequenced an insert representing the gene of the HIV-1 protease. Arrhenius plots for the uncatalyzed deamination of cytosine were linear over the temperature range from 90 °C to 200 °C and indicated a heat of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 23.4 ± 0.5 kcal/mol at pH 7. Recent evidence indicates that the surface of the earth has been cool enough to support life for more than 4 billion years and that life has been present for almost as long. If the temperature at Earth's surface is assumed to have followed Newton's law of cooling, declining exponentially from 100 °C to 25 °C during that period, then half of the cytosine-deaminating events per unit biomass would have taken place during the first 0.2 billion years, and <99.4% would have occurred during the first 2 billion years.

  17. Ultrafast internal conversion of excited cytosine via the lowest pipi electronic singlet state.

    PubMed

    Merchán, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2003-07-09

    Computational evidence at the CASPT2 level supports that the lowest excited state pipi* contributes to the S1/S0 crossing responsible for the ultrafast decay of singlet excited cytosine. The computed radiative lifetime, 33 ns, is consistent with the experimentally derived value, 40 ns. The nOpi* state does not play a direct role in the rapid repopulation of the ground state; it is involved in a S2/S1 crossing. Alternative mechanisms through excited states pisigma* or nNpi* are not competitive in cytosine.

  18. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  19. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  20. A9145, a New Adenine-Containing Antifungal Antibiotic: Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, L. D.; Clem, G. M.; Wilson, M. M.; Westhead, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co2+, PO43−, and CaCO3, were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O2 level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−2 μmole of O2/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels. PMID:4208279

  1. A9145, a new adenine-containing antifungal antibiotic: fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boeck, L D; Clem, G M; Wilson, M M; Westhead, J E

    1973-01-01

    A9145 is a basic, water-soluble, antifungal antibiotic which is produced in a complex organic medium by Streptomyces griseolus. The metabolite has a molecular weight of 510, and contains adenine as well as sugar hydroxyl and amino groups. Although glucose, fructose, glucose polymers, and some long-chain fatty acid methyl esters supported biosynthesis, oils were superior, with cottonseed oil being preferred. Several ions and salts, especially Co(2+), PO(4) (3-), and CaCO(3), were stimulatory. Adenine, nucleosides, and some amino acids increased the accumulation of A9145 in shaken-flask fermentors. Enrichment of the culture medium with tyrosine afforded maximal enhancement of antibiotic production in both flask and tank fermentors. Control of the dissolved O(2) level was also critical, the optimal concentration being 3 x 10(-2) to 4.5 x 10(-2) mumole of O(2)/ml. Optimization of various fermentation parameters increased antibiotic titers approximately 135-fold in shaken flask fermentors and 225-fold in stirred vessels.

  2. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  3. Global DNA cytosine methylation as an evolving trait: phylogenetic signal and correlated evolution with genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Conchita; Pérez, Ricardo; Bazaga, Pilar; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is a widespread epigenetic mechanism in eukaryotes, and plant genomes commonly are densely methylated. Genomic methylation can be associated with functional consequences such as mutational events, genomic instability or altered gene expression, but little is known on interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation in plants. In this paper, we compare global cytosine methylation estimates obtained by HPLC and use a phylogenetically-informed analytical approach to test for significance of evolutionary signatures of this trait across 54 angiosperm species in 25 families. We evaluate whether interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation is statistically related to phylogenetic distance and also whether it is evolutionarily correlated with genome size (C-value). Global cytosine methylation varied widely between species, ranging between 5.3% (Arabidopsis) and 39.2% (Narcissus). Differences between species were related to their evolutionary trajectories, as denoted by the strong phylogenetic signal underlying interspecific variation. Global cytosine methylation and genome size were evolutionarily correlated, as revealed by the significant relationship between the corresponding phylogenetically independent contrasts. On average, a ten-fold increase in genome size entailed an increase of about 10% in global cytosine methylation. Results show that global cytosine methylation is an evolving trait in angiosperms whose evolutionary trajectory is significantly linked to changes in genome size, and suggest that the evolutionary implications of epigenetic mechanisms are likely to vary between plant lineages. PMID:25688257

  4. Methylation of thymine and uracil with free methyl cations formed due to beta-decay of tritiated methane: possible implication in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Korsakov, M V; Bystrova, M O; Mironiuk, T A; Sinotova, E N; Ivin, B A; Nefedov, V D; Likhachev, A J

    1989-05-01

    Exposure of solid thymine and uracil at room temperature to free methyl cations, produced due to beta-decay of tritiated methane, resulted in formation of their 1-, O2-, 3-, O4-, and 6-methyl derivatives. In addition, uracil formed a 5-methyl derivative (thymine); tritium-containing thymine and uracil were also detected. Both thymine and uracil formed predominantly unidentified products which resulted presumably from their oligomerization. Incubation at -195 degrees C did not markedly change the pattern of reaction products. Aqueous-ammonia solutions of these pyrimidines formed methylated derivatives and considerable amounts of methanol and tritiated water. The possible implication of these reactions in mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of tritium-substituted hydrocarbons is discussed.

  5. Mass Spectrometry and Theoretical Studies on N-C Bond Cleavages in the N-Sulfonylamidino Thymine Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetić, Renata; Kazazić, Snježana; Kovačević, Borislav; Glasovac, Zoran; Krstulović, Luka; Bajić, Miroslav; Žinić, Biserka

    2015-05-01

    The reactivity of new biologically active thymine derivatives substituted with 2-(arylsulfonamidino)ethyl group at N1 and N3 position was investigated in the gas phase using CID experiments (ESI-MS/MS) and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Both derivatives show similar chemistry in the negative mode with a retro-Michael addition (Path A-) being the most abundant reaction channel, which correlate well with the fluoride induced retro-Michael addition observed in solution. The difference in the fragmentation of N-3 substituted thymine 5 and N-1 substituted thymine 1 in the positive mode relates to the preferred cleavage of the sulfonyl group ( m/z 155, Path B) in N-3 isomer and the formation of the acryl sulfonamidine 3 ( m/z 309) via Path A in N-1 isomer. Mechanistic studies of the cleavage reaction conducted by DFT calculations give the trend of the calculated activation energies that agree well with the experimental observations. A mechanism of the retro-Michael reaction was interpreted as a McLafferty type of fragmentation, which includes Hβ proton shift to one of the neighboring oxygen atoms in a 1,5-fashion inducing N1(N3)-Cα bond scission. This mechanism was found to be kinetically favorable over other tested mechanisms. Significant difference in the observed fragmentation pattern of N-1 and N-3 isomers proves the ESI-MS/MS technique as an excellent method for tracking the fate of similar sulfonamidine drugs. Also, the observed N-1 and/or N-3 thymine alkylation with in situ formed reactive acryl sulfonamidine 3 as a Michael acceptor may open interesting possibilities for the preparation of other N-3 substituted pyrimidines.

  6. Epidermal p53 response and repair of thymine dimers in human skin after a single dose of ultraviolet radiation: effects of photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Ling, G; Chadwick, C A; Berne, B; Potten, C S; Pontén, J; Pontén, F

    2001-05-01

    A cellular p53 response, DNA repair enzymes and melanin pigmentation are important strategies utilized by skin keratinocytes against impairment caused by ultraviolet radiation (UVR). In this study a double-immunofluorescence technique was used to investigate UVR-induced thymine dimers and p53 protein simultaneously. Four healthy volunteers were irradiated on both sides of their buttock skin with a single dose of solar-simulating UVR. One side was pretreated with a topical sunscreen. Biopsies from different time-points were immunostained for visualization of thymine dimers, p53 and proliferation. One single physiological dose of UVR generated widespread formation of thymine dimers throughout the epidermis 4h after irradiation. The level of thymine dimers decreased over time and was followed by a p53 response in the same cells. A late proliferative response was also found. The formation of thymine dimers, the p53 response and the late proliferative response were partially blocked by topical sunscreen. Large inter-individual differences in the kinetics of thymine dimer formation and repair as well as in the p53 response were evident in both sunscreen-protected and unprotected skin.

  7. Adenine attenuates the Ca(2+) contraction-signaling pathway via adenine receptor-mediated signaling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Takahiro; Kono, Miki; Hyoguchi, Mai; Tajiri, Satoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that adenine (6-amino-6H-purine) relaxed contracted rat aorta rings in an endothelial-independent manner. Although adenine receptors (AdeRs) are expressed in diverse tissues, aortic AdeR expression has not been ascertained. Thus, the aims of this study were to clarify the expression of AdeR in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the adenine-induced vasorelaxation mechanism(s). VSMCs were isolated from 8-week-old male Wistar-Kyoto rats and used in this study. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC) was measured by western blot. AdeR mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured by using Fura-2/AM. Vasorelaxant adenine (10-100 μM) significantly reduced p-MLC by angiotensin II (Ang II, 10 μM) in VSMCs (P < 0.05). We confirmed the expression of aortic AdeR mRNA and the activation of PKA in VSMCs through stimulation of AdeR by adenine by ELISA. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurement demonstrated that adenine inhibits Ang II- and m-3M3FBS (PLC agonist)-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation. In AdeR-knockdown VSMCs, PKA activation and p-MLC reduction by adenine were completely abolished. These results firstly demonstrated that vasorelaxant adenine can suppress Ca(2+) contraction signaling pathways via aortic AdeR/PKA activation in VSMCs.

  8. Renoprotective effects of aliskiren on adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy: possible underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Malek, Hala Abdel; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible renoprotective effect of direct renin inhibitor (aliskiren) on renal dysfunctions, as well as its underlying mechanisms in rat model of adenine-induced tubulointerstitial nephropathy. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups; normal group, aliskiren group (normal rats received 10 mg/kg aliskiren), adenine group (animals received high-adenine diet for 4 weeks and saline for 12 weeks), and adenine + aliskiren group (animals received adenine for 4 weeks and aliskiren 10 mg/kg for 12 weeks). It was found that adenine caused significant decrease in body mass, Hb, HR, serum Ca(2+), eNOS and nrf2 expression, GSH, and catalase in kidney tissues with significant increase in arterial blood pressure (ABP), serum creatinine, BUN, plasma renin activity (PRA), K(+) and P, urinary albumin excretion (UAE), caspase-3, and MDA (lipid peroxidation marker) in kidney tissues compared to normal group (p < 0.05). Administration of aliskiren caused significant improvement in all studied parameters compared to adenine group (p < 0.05). We concluded that aliskiren has renoprotective effect against adenine-induced nephropathy. This might be due to inhibition of PRA, attenuation of oxidative stress, activation of Nrf2 and eNOS genes, and suppression of caspase-3.

  9. Electronic excited states responsible for dimer formation upon UV absorption directly by thymine strands: joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Improta, Roberto; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Vayá, Ignacio; Perron, Marion; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2012-09-12

    The study addresses interconnected issues related to two major types of cycloadditions between adjacent thymines in DNA leading to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts. Experimental results are obtained for the single strand (dT)(20) by steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy, as well as by HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Calculations are carried out for the dinucleoside monophosphate in water using the TD-M052X method and including the polarizable continuum model; the reliability of TD-M052X is checked against CASPT2 calculations regarding the behavior of two stacked thymines in the gas phase. It is shown that irradiation at the main absorption band leads to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts via different electronic excited states. T<>Ts are formed via (1)ππ* excitons; [2 + 2] dimerization proceeds along a barrierless path, in line with the constant quantum yield (0.05) with the irradiation wavelength, the contribution of the (3)ππ* state to this reaction being less than 10%. The formation of oxetane, the reaction intermediate leading to (6-4) adducts, occurs via charge transfer excited states involving two stacked thymines, whose fingerprint is detected in the fluorescence spectra; it involves an energy barrier explaining the important decrease in the quantum yield of (6-4) adducts with the irradiation wavelength.

  10. Major and minor groove conformations of DNA trimers modified on guanine or adenine by 4-aminobiphenyl: Adenine adducts favor the minor groove

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.; Ellis, S.; Hingerty, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the conformational effects of 4-aminobiphenyl modification at C-8 of guanine or adenine on double-stranded DNA trimers. We used sequences with the modified purine at the central base pair and all 16 possible neighboring sequences at the outer pairs. Minimized potential energy calculations were carried out using the molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to survey the conformation space of these adducts, using a total of 1280 starting structures both in the modified guanine series and in the modified adenine series. Conformer families in which the bound 4-aminobiphenyl was located in the DNA major groove, and in the minor groove, were located for both adenine and guanine modification. In the modified guanine series, the major and minor groove families were roughly comparable in energy, and the sequence context determined which was more stable in a particular case. In the modified adenine series, however, the minor groove structure was more that 10 kcal/mol more stable than the major groove for all sequences. As a result, minor groove adducts provided most of the global minima in the adenine-modified series. This result may be relevant to a previous mutagenesis study [Lasko et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15429-15435] in which the hot spot of most frequent occurrence was located at an adenine, in the sequence GAT. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of the ligand release path in yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2007-04-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase, a zinc metalloenzyme, catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to uracil. Experimental and computational evidence indicates that the rate-limiting step is product release, instead of the chemical reaction step. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to suggest ligand exit paths. Simulation at 300 K shows that the active site is well protected by the C-terminal helix (residues 150-158) and F-114 loop (residues 111-117) and that on the molecular dynamics timescale water does not flow in or out of the active site. In contrast, simulation at 320 K shows a significant increase in flexibility of the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop. The motions of these two regions at 320 K open the active site and permit water molecules to diffuse into and out of the active site through two paths with one much more favored than the other. Cytosine is pushed out of the active site by a restraint method in two directions specified by these two paths. In path 1 the required motion of the protein is local-involving only the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop-and two residues, F-114 and I-156, are identified that have to be moved away to let cytosine out; whereas in path 2, the protein has to rearrange itself much more extensively, and the changes are also much larger compared to the path 1 simulation.

  12. A molecular dynamics exploration of the catalytic mechanism of yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Sklenak, Stepan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-04-21

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD), a zinc metalloenzyme of significant biomedical interest, is investigated by a series of molecular dynamics simulations in its free form and complexed with its reactant (cytosine), product (uracil), several reaction intermediates, and an intermediate analogue. Quantum chemical calculations, used to construct a model for the catalytic Zn ion with its ligands (two cysteines, a histidine, and one water) show, by comparison with crystal structure data, that the cysteines are deprotonated and the histidine is monoprotonated. The simulations suggest that Glu64 plays a critical role in the catalysis by yCD. The rotation of the Glu64 side-chain carboxyl group that can be protonated or deprotonated permits it to act as a proton shuttle between the Zn-bound water and cytosine and subsequent reaction intermediates. Free energy methods are used to obtain the barriers for these rotations, and they are sufficiently small to permit rotation on a nanosecond time scale. In the course of the reaction, cytosine reorients to a geometry to favor nucleophilic attack by a Zn-bound hydroxide. A stable position for a reaction product, ammonia, was located in the active site, and the free energy of exchange with a water molecule was evaluated. The simulations also reveal small motions of the C-terminus and the loop that contains Phe114 that may be important for reactant binding and product release.

  13. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendiran, N.; Thulasidhasan, J.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer modified electrode developed for monitoring of adenine.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Filiz; Erdem, Arzum; Abacı, Serdar; Ozyörük, Haluk

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemical characterization of redox polymer for monitoring of adenine was described in this study using poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF(+)) modified platinum (Pt) electrode. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used for the surface characterization. The electrochemical behaviors of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In order to obtain more sensitive and improved electrochemical signals, analytical parameters such as the effects of polymeric film thickness, immobilization time of adenine, pH and adenine concentration were examined on the response of the polymer modified electrode. Alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy was used for the characterization of polymer modified and adenine immobilized polymer modified electrodes. The effect of possible interferents on the response of the electrode was examined.

  15. Interaction of sulfanilamide and sulfamethoxazole with bovine serum albumin and adenine: spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, N; Thulasidhasan, J

    2015-06-05

    Interaction between sulfanilamide (SAM) and sulfamethoxazole (SMO) with BSA and DNA base (adenine) was investigated by UV-visible, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking studies. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constant (Ka) suggests SMO is more quenched with BSA/adenine than that of SAM. The distance r between donor (BSA/adenine) and acceptor (SAM and SMO) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results showed that hydrophobic forces, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds played vital roles in the SAM and SMO with BSA/adenine binding interaction. During the interaction, sulfa drugs could insert into the hydrophobic pocket, where the non-radioactive energy transfer from BSA/adenine to sulfa drugs occurred with high possibility. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that when the drug concentration is increased, the anodic electrode potential deceased. The docking method indicates aniline group is interacted with the BSA molecules.

  16. Interactions of Some Divalent Metal Ions with Thymine and Uracil Thiosemicarbazide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hammud, Hassan H; El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H; Sonji, Nada; Sonji, Ghassan; Bouhadir, Kamal H

    2016-05-03

    The study of interactions between metal ions and nucleobases, nucleosides, nucleotides, or nucleic acids has become an active research area in chemical, biological, and therapeutic fields. In this respect, the coordination behavior of nucleobase derivatives to transition metals was studied in order to get a better understanding about DNA-metal interactions in in vitro and in vivo systems. Two nucleobase derivatives, 3-benzoyl-1-[3-(thymine-1-yl)propamido]thiourea and 3-benzoyl-1-[3-(uracil-1-yl)propamido]thiourea, were synthesized and their dissociation constants were determined at different temperatures and 0.3 ionic strength. Potentiometric studies were carried out on the interaction of the derivatives towards some divalent metals in 50% v/v ethanol-water containing 0.3 mol.dm(-3) KCl, at five different temperatures. The formation constants of the metal complexes for both ligands follow the order: Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Co(2+) > Zn(2+) > Pb(2+) > Cd(2+) > Mn(2+). The thermodynamic parameters were estimated; the complexation process has been found to be spontaneous, exothermic, and entropically favorable.

  17. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of the lowest triplet state of thymine and thymidine

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Patrick M.; Middleton, Chris T.; Mertel, Kristin I.

    2008-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of the lowest energy triplet states of thymine and its 2’-deoxyribonucleoside, thymidine, are reported for the first time. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) difference spectra were recorded over seven decades of time from 300 fs – 3 µs using femtosecond and nanosecond pump-probe techniques. The carbonyl stretch bands in the triplet state are seen at 1603 and ~1700 cm−1 in room-temperature acetonitrile-d3 solution. These bands and additional ones observed between 1300 and 1450 cm−1 are quenched by dissolved oxygen on a nanosecond time scale. Density-functional calculations accurately predict the difference spectrum between triplet and singlet IR absorption cross sections, confirming the peak assignments and elucidating the nature of the vibrational modes. In the triplet state, the C4=O carbonyl exhibits substantial single-bond character, explaining the large (~70 cm−1) red shift in this vibration, relative to the singlet ground state. Femtosecond TRIR measurements unambiguously demonstrate that the triplet state is fully formed within the first 10 ps after excitation, ruling out a relaxed 1nπ* state as the triplet precursor. PMID:19936322

  18. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of the lowest triplet state of thymine and thymidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Patrick M.; Middleton, Chris T.; Mertel, Kristin I.; Herbert, John M.; Kohler, Bern

    2008-05-01

    Vibrational spectra of the lowest energy triplet states of thymine and its 2'-deoxyribonucleoside, thymidine, are reported for the first time. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) difference spectra were recorded over seven decades of time from 300 fs to 3 μs using femtosecond and nanosecond pump-probe techniques. The carbonyl stretch bands in the triplet state are seen at 1603 and ˜1700 cm -1 in room-temperature acetonitrile- d3 solution. These bands and additional ones observed between 1300 and 1450 cm -1 are quenched by dissolved oxygen on a nanosecond time scale. Density-functional calculations accurately predict the difference spectrum between triplet and singlet IR absorption cross sections, confirming the peak assignments and elucidating the nature of the vibrational modes. In the triplet state, the C4 dbnd O carbonyl exhibits substantial single-bond character, explaining the large (˜70 cm -1) red shift in this vibration, relative to the singlet ground state. Femtosecond TRIR measurements unambiguously demonstrate that the triplet state is fully formed within the first 10 ps after excitation, ruling out a relaxed 1nπ ∗ state as the triplet precursor.

  19. Distribution of ions around thymine dimer containing DNA: A possible recognition element for endonuclease V

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, R.; Luo, N.; Miaskiewicz, K.; Miller, J.

    1995-10-01

    The molecular link between sunlight exposure and skin cancer can be traced to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers together with (6-4) photoadducts of pyrimidines in DNA upon exposure to UV radiation. The mutagenicity of these lesions is frequently explained by miscoding during DNA replication due to perturbations of base-pairing interactions. However the mutagenicity of UV photoproducts depends of their sequence context, suggesting that more global structural changes in DNA contribute to mutation induction. One of the most effective protections against the deleterious effects of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is the wide range of repair of this lesion by different enzymatic pathways. This paper presents the results of a 200 ps molecular dynamics simulation on the dodecarner d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} containing a cis, syn-cyclobutane thymine dimer, explicit water and counterions. The averaged structure calculated from the simulation shows good agreement with the available NMR data. The distribution of counterions around the damaged DNA is different from that around a non damaged DNA and suggests a possible mechanism of damage recognition by the enzyme.

  20. beta-Aminoisobutyric acid as a marker of thymine catabolism in malignancy.

    PubMed

    van Gennip, A H; van Bree-Blom, E J; Abeling, N G; van Erven, A J; Voûte, P A

    1987-06-15

    Urine from untreated patients with various tumours and controls has been examined for the excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid and uric acid. The patients were classified into four groups: I, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and uric acid both normal; II, beta-aminoisobutyric acid normal, uric acid elevated; III, beta-aminoisobutyric acid elevated, uric acid normal; IV, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and uric acid both elevated. Uric acid was used as an indicator for tissue-breakdown. Pseudouridine being a specific parameter for t-RNA degradation was estimated for comparison. Increased urinary concentrations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid were frequently found in tumour patients, especially in patients with leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Tissue breakdown being the cause of the beta-aminoisobutyric aciduria could only be considered in part of the patients. Moreover, strongly elevated ratios of beta-aminoisobutyric acid to uric acid were found. Urinary patterns of pyrimidines and purines were determined in order to exclude other abnormalities. The results are discussed in relation to thymine metabolism and renal function.

  1. Study of the thymine molecule: equilibrium structure from joint analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction and microwave data and assignment of vibrational spectra using results of ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Natalja; Khaikin, Leonid S; Grikina, Olga E; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vogt, Jürgen

    2008-08-21

    Thymine is one of the nucleobases which forms the nucleic acid (NA) base pair with adenine in DNA. The study of molecular structure and dynamics of nucleobases can help to understand and explain some processes in biological systems and therefore it is of interest. Because the scattered intensities on the C, N, and O atoms as well as some bond lengths in thymine are close to each other the structural problem cannot been solved by the gas phase electron diffraction (GED) method alone. Therefore the rotational constants from microvawe (MW) studies and differences in the groups of N-C, C=O, N-H, and C-H bond lengths from MP2 (full)/cc-pVQZ calculations were used as supplementary data. The analysis of GED data was based on the C(s) molecular symmetry according to results of the structure optimizations at the MP2 (full) level using 6-311G (d,p), cc-pVTZ, and cc-pVQZ basis sets confirmed by vibrational frequency calculations with 6-311G (d,p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. Mean-square amplitudes as well as harmonic and anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (r(e)-r(a)) and to the rotational constants (B(e)(k)-B(0)(k), where k = A, B, C) were calculated from the quadratic (MP2 (full)/cc-pVTZ) and cubic (MP2 (full)/6-311G (d,p)) force constants (the latter were used only for anharmonic corrections). The harmonic force field was scaled using published IR and Raman spectra of the parent and N1,N3-dideuterated species, which were for the first time completely assigned in the present work. The main equilibrium structural parameters of the thymine molecule determined from GED data supplemented by MW rotational constants and results of MP2 calculations are the following (bond lengths in Angstroms and bond angles in degrees with 3sigma in parentheses): r(e) (C5=C6) = 1.344 (16), r(e) (C5-C9) = 1.487 (8), r(e) (N1-C6) = 1.372 (3), r(e) (N1-C2) = 1.377 (3), r(e) (C2-N3) = 1.378 (3), r(e) (N3-C4) = 1.395 (3), r(e) (C2=O7) = 1.210 (1), r(e) (C4=O8) = 1.215 (1

  2. Gender differences in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications in rats.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Small, David; Kauter, Kate; Gobe, Glenda C; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Gender contributes to differences in incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease. To induce kidney damage in male and female Wistar rats (n = 12/group), a 0.25% adenine diet for 16 wk was used. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, proteinuria) and structure (glomerular damage, tubulointerstitial atrophy, fibrosis, inflammation); cardiovascular function (blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, vascular responses, echocardiography) and structure (cardiac fibrosis); plasma testosterone and estrogen concentrations; and protein expression for oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1, inflammation (TNF-α), fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β), ERK1/2, and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α)] were compared in males and females. Adenine-fed females had less decline in kidney function than adenine-fed males, although kidney atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis were similar. Plasma estrogen concentrations increased and plasma testosterone concentrations decreased in adenine-fed males, with smaller changes in females. CKD-associated molecular changes in kidneys were more pronounced in males than females except for expression of ER-α in the kidney, which was completely suppressed in adenine-fed males but unchanged in adenine-fed females. Both genders showed increased blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, and cardiac fibrosis with the adenine diet. Cardiovascular changes with adenine were similar in males and females, except males developed concentric, and females eccentric cardiac hypertrophy. In hearts from adenine-fed male and female rats, expression of ER-α and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway were increased, in part explaining changes in cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, adenine-induced kidney damage may be increased in males due to the suppression of ER-α.

  3. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  4. Ultraviolet absorption and luminescence of matrix-isolated adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.; Zinger, D.; Trunk, J.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission and the fluorescence lifetimes of adenine in low-temperature argon and nitrogen matrices at 15 K. Compared to other environments the absorption spectrum shows higher intensity at the shortest wavelengths, and a weak apparent absorption peak is observed at 280 nm. The resolved fluorescence excitation spectrum has five peaks at positions corresponding to those observed in the absorption spectrum. The position of the fluorescence maximum depends on the excitation wavelength. Excitation below 220 nm displays a fluorescence maximum at 305 nm, while for excitations at higher wavelengths the maximum occurs at 335 nm. The results suggest that multiple-emission excited electronic states are populated in low-temperature gas matrices. Excitation at 265 nm produces a phosphorescence spectrum with a well-resolved vibrational structure and a maximum at 415 nm. The fluorescence decays corresponding to excitation at increasing energy of each resolved band could be fit with a double exponential, with the shorter and longer lifetimes ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 ns and from 12 to 23 ns, respectively. Only for the excitation at 180 nm one exponential is required, with the calculated lifetimes of 3.3 ns. The presented results provide an experimental evidence of the existence of multiple site-selected excited electronic states, and may help elucidate the possible deexcitation pathways of adenine. The additional application of synchrotron radiation proved to result in a significant enhancement of the resolution and spectral range of the phenomena under investigation.

  5. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a “stack” to a “close” conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the “solvation” effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  6. Palladium(II) and platinum(II) organometallic complexes with the model nucleobase anions of thymine, uracil, and cytosine: antitumor activity and interactions with DNA of the platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, José; Lorenzo, Julia; Sanglas, Laura; Cutillas, Natalia; Vicente, Consuelo; Villa, María Dolores; Avilés, Francesc X; López, Gregorio; Moreno, Virtudes; Pérez, José; Bautista, Delia

    2006-08-07

    Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with the anions of the model nucleobases 1-methylthymine (1-MethyH), 1-methyluracil (1-MeuraH), and 1-methylcytosine (1-MecytH) of the types [Pd(dmba)(mu-L)]2 [dmba = N,C-chelating 2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl; L = 1-Methy, 1-Meura or 1-Mecyt] and [M(dmba)(L)(L')] [L = 1-Methy or 1-Meura; L' = PPh(3) (M = Pd or Pt), DMSO (M = Pt)] have been obtained. Palladium complexes of the types [Pd(C6F5)(N-N)(L)] [L = 1-Methy or 1-Meura; N-N = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmeda), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), or 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy)] and [NBu4][Pd(C6F5)(1-Methy)2(H2O)] have also been prepared. The crystal structures of [Pd(dmba)(mu-1-Methy)]2, [Pd(dmba)(mu-1-Mecyt)]2.2CHCl3, [Pd(dmba)(1-Methy)(PPh3)].3CHCl3, [Pt(dmba)(1-Methy)(PPh3)], [Pd(tmeda)(C6F5)(1-Methy)], and [NBu4][Pd(C6F5)(1-Methy)2(H2O)].H2O have been established by X-ray diffraction. The DNA adduct formation of the new platinum complexes synthesized was followed by circular dichroism and electrophoretic mobility. Atomic force microscopy images of the modifications caused by the platinum complexes on plasmid DNA pBR322 were also obtained. Values of IC50 were also calculated for the new platinum complexes against the tumor cell line HL-60. All the new platinum complexes were more active than cisplatin (up to 20-fold in some cases).

  7. Hydroxyl ion addition to one-electron oxidized thymine: Unimolecular interconversion of C5 to C6 OH-adducts

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Heizer, Alicia N.; Palmer, Brian J.; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, addition of OH− to one-electron oxidized thymidine (dThd) and thymine nucleotides in basic aqueous glasses is investigated. At pHs ca. 9–10 where the thymine base is largely deprotonated at N3, one-electron oxidation of the thymine base by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K results in formation of a neutral thyminyl radical, T(−H)•. Assignment to T(−H)• is confirmed by employing 15N substituted 5'-TMP. At pH ≥ ca. 11.5, formation of the 5-hydroxythymin-6-yl radical, T(5OH)•, is identified as a metastable intermediate produced by OH− addition to T(−H)• at C5 at ca. 155 K. Upon further annealing to ca. 170 K, T(5OH)• readily converts to the 6-hydroxythymin-5-yl radical, T(6OH)•. One-electron oxidation of N3-methyl-thymidine (N3-Me-dThd) by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K produces the cation radical (N3-Me-dThd•+) for which we find a pH dependent competition between deprotonation from the methyl group at C5 and addition of OH− to C5. At pH 7 the 5-methyl deprotonated species is found; however, at pH ca. 9, N3-Me-dThd•+ produces T(5OH)• that on annealing up to 180 K forms T(6OH)•. Through use of deuterium substitution at C5' and on the thymine base, i.e., specifically employing [5',5”-D,D]-5'-dThd, [5',5”-D,D]-5'-TMP, [CD3]-dThd and [CD3,6D]-dThd, we find unequivocal evidence for T(5OH)• formation and its conversion to T(6OH)•. The addition of OH− to the C5 position in T(−H)• and N3-Me-dThd•+ is governed by spin and charge localization. DFT calculations predict that the conversion of the “reducing” T(5OH)• to the “oxidizing” T(6OH)• occurs by a unimolecular OH group transfer from C5 to C6 in the thymine base. The T(5OH)• to T(6OH)• conversion is found to occur more readily for deprotonated dThd and its nucleotides than for N3-Me-dThd. In agreement, calculations predict that the deprotonated thymine base has a lower energy barrier (ca. 6 kcal/mol) for OH transfer than its corresponding N3-protonated thymine

  8. Ability of melanins to protect against the radiolysis of thymine and thymidine.

    PubMed

    Hill, H Z; Huselton, C; Pilas, B; Hill, G J

    1987-01-01

    Individuals with black skin rarely get skin cancer, and melanomas, tumors arising from pigmented cells, are generally resistant to radiation therapy. The role of melanin in these two phenomena has not been defined, but oxygen-radical species have been implicated in both effects. These studies were undertaken to determine the ability of various melanins to compete for ionizing radiation-produced radicals which destroy nucleic acid bases. The ability of Sigma eumelanin (S-eumelanin) to protect against the radiolysis of thymidine in buffered solutions was compared to the protective ability of seven amino acids, including melanin precursors; bovine serum albumin, as a model protein; ficoll, as a model polysaccharide; and DNA. Both proteins and polysaccharides are known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals in cells. The concentration of thymidine after exposure to gamma radiation was determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis after removal of insoluble melanin by acid precipitation. S-eumelanin was more effective at competing with thymidine for free radicals than bovine serum albumin, Ficoll, or DNA, but less effective than certain of the small molecules. Several of the above compounds were also examined for ability to protect against thymine radiolysis. In addition, melanins from other sources were compared to S-eumelanin. Of these, enzymatically synthesized phaeomelanin was the most effective. The results indicate that melanins can compete for base- and nucleoside-damaging free radicals more effectively than other cellular macromolecules. Of the small molecules, the phenolic compounds had the greatest scavenging ability. In vivo, melanins are found in melanosomes bound to protein. Therefore, the relevance of these findings to the photo- and radiobiology of melanins in vivo has yet to be determined.

  9. Thymine adsorption on two-dimensional boron nitride structures: first-principles studies.

    PubMed

    Castro-Medina, J; García-Toral, D; López-Fuentes, M; Sánchez-Castillo, A; Torres-Morales, S; de la Garza, L Morales; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H

    2017-04-01

    First-principles total-energy calculations were performed to investigate the structural and electronic properties of thymine (T) adsorption on pristine and Al-doped two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D-hBN) surfaces. Periodic density functional theory, as developed in the PWscf code of the quantum espresso package, was applied. The pseudopotential theory was used to deal with electron-ion interactions. The generalized gradient approximation was applied to treat the exchange-correlation energies. Van der Waals interactions were incorporated in the calculations. Considering T as an elongated molecule and the interactions through one oxygen atom of the molecule ring, two geometries were explored in pristine and Al-doped systems: in (1) the ring side O interacts with B, and (2) the O at the molecule end interacting with the B. The pristine case yields (4 × 4-a), (5 × 5-b) and (6 × 6-b) as the ground states, , while the doped system shows (4 × 4-a), (5 × 5-a) and (6 × 6-a) as the ground states. Calculations of the adsorption energies indicate chemisorption. Doping enhances the surface reactivity, inducing larger binding energies. The total density of states (DOS) was calculated and interpreted with the aid of the projected DOS. Below the Fermi energy, the DOS graphs indicate that p orbitals make the largest contributions. Above the Fermi level, the DOS is formed mainly by -s and H-s orbitals. The DOS graphs indicate that the structures have non-semiconductor behavior.

  10. Impact of cytosine 5-halogens on the interaction of DNA with restriction endonucleases and methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Wu, Winnie; Liu, Pingfang; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicates that pyrimidine 5-methyl groups can have profound biological consequences that are mediated by the affinity of DNA-protein interactions. The presence of the 5-methyl group could potentially create a steric block preventing the binding of some proteins whereas the affinity of many other proteins is substantially increased by pyrimidine methylation. In this paper, we have constructed a series of oligonucleotides containing cytosine and a series of 5-substituted cytosine analogues including all halogens. This set of oligonucleotides has been used to probe the relationship between the size of the substituent and its capacity to modulate cleavage by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases MspI and HpaII. Additionally, we have examined the impact of the halogen substitution on the corresponding bacterial methyltransferase (M.HpaII). We observed that MspI cleavage is only subtly affected by substituted cytosine analogues at the inner position of the CCGG recognition site. In contrast, HpaII cleaves cytosine-containing oligonucleotides completely whereas 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotides are cleaved at a reduced rate. The presence of the larger halogens Cl, Br, or I as well as a methyl group completely prevents cleavage by HpaII. These data suggest that the steric wall is encountered by HpaII slightly beyond the fluorine substituent, at about 2.65 A from the pyrimidine C5-position. It is known that 5-fluorocytosine in an oligonucleotide can form a covalent irreversible suicide complex with either prokaryotic or eukaryotic methyltransferases. Kinetic data reported here suggest that the 5-fluorocytosine-containing oligonucleotide can also inhibit M.HpaII by formation of a reversible, noncovalent complex. Our results indicate that although a 5-Cl substituent has electronic properties similar to 5-F, 5-chlorocytosine duplexes neither form a complex with M.HpaII nor inhibit enzymatic

  11. Slow deactivation channels in UV-photoexcited adenine DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai; Wang, Haobin

    2014-03-07

    The molecular mechanism for removing the excess energy in DNA bases is responsible for the high photostability of DNA and is thus the subject of intense theoretical/computational investigation. To understand why the excited state decay of the stacked bases is significantly longer than that of the monomers, we carried out electronic structure calculations on an adenine monomer and an aqueous (dA)5 oligonucleotide employing the CASPT2//CASSCF and CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER levels of theory. The newly-found bright excited state pair Sstack1((1)ππ*) and Sstack2((1)ππ*) of d(A)5, originated from base stacking, is of intra-base charge transfer nature and occurs in different stacked bases with charge transfer along opposite directions. Two slow deactivation channels of d(A)5 were proposed as a result of the sizable barriers along the relaxation paths starting from the FC point of the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state. The SN1P((1)nπ*) state of d(A)5 serves as an intermediate state in one relaxation channel, to which a nonadiabatic decay from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state occurs in an energy degeneracy region. A relatively high barrier in this state is found and attributed to the steric hindrance of the DNA environment due to the large NH2 group twisting, which gives a weak and red-shifted fluorescence. Another direct relaxation channel, induced by the C2-H2 bond twisting motion, is found to go through a conical intersection between the Sstack1((1)ππ*) and the ground state. The barrier found here enables fluorescence from the Sstack1((1)ππ*) state and may explain the bright state emission observed in the fluorescence upconversion measurements. The inter-molecular SCT((1)ππ*) state may be involved in the slow relaxation process of the photoexcited adenine oligomers through efficient internal conversion to the intra-base Sstack1((1)ππ*) state.

  12. Defective thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin and its characteristic catalysis by cell-free extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Y.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1983-11-01

    Specific excision of thymine dimers from isolated normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP complementation groups A, C, D and G) chromatin was investigated under cell-free conditions. Crude extracts derived from unirradiated XP groups A, C and G cells were unable to excise dimers from their own nuclear sonicates, native chromatin and whole-cell sonicates prepared after exposure to 100 J/m2 of u.v. radiation at 254 nm, while normal-cell extracts were able to do so from all substrates including purified DNA. However, the extracts of XP groups A, C and G cells became capable of excising thymine dimers from chromatin preparations depleted of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl and from purified DNA. Extracts of XP group D cells catalyzed normal levels of excision from nuclear sonicates, native chromatin and 0.35 M NaCl-treated chromatin. These results suggest that none of the XP groups examined is deficient in a dimer-specific u.v. endonuclease. XP groups A, C and G cells are apparently defective in 'XP factors' present in the non-histone protein fraction, which are required for the excision of thymine dimers from chromatin. The XP group D factor appears to be different from the others. Extracts from XP groups A, C and G cells were able to complement each other with respect to dimer excision from chromatin. Novobiocin (200 micrograms/ml) completely inhibited dimer excision effected by extracts of normal cells or by complementing extracts of XP cells.

  13. Reaction mechanism of zinc-dependent cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli: a quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Manta, Bianca; Raushel, Frank M; Himo, Fahmi

    2014-05-29

    The reaction mechanism of cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli is studied using density functional theory. This zinc-dependent enzyme catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to form uracil and ammonia. The calculations give a detailed description of the catalytic mechanism and establish the role of important active-site residues. It is shown that Glu217 is essential for the initial deprotonation of the metal-bound water nucleophile and the subsequent protonation of the substrate. It is also demonstrated that His246 is unlikely to function as a proton shuttle in the nucleophile activation step, as previously proposed. The steps that follow are nucleophilic attack by the metal-bound hydroxide, protonation of the leaving group assisted by Asp313, and C-N bond cleavage. The calculated overall barrier is in good agreement with the experimental findings. Finally, the calculations reproduce the experimentally determined inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect, which further corroborates the suggested reaction mechanism.

  14. Stabilization of Aspergillus parasiticus cytosine deaminase by immobilization on calcium alginate beads improved enzyme operational stability.

    PubMed

    Zanna, H; Nok, A J; Ibrahim, S; Inuwa, H M

    2013-12-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) from Aspergillus parasiticus, which has half-life of 1.10 h at 37°C, was stabilized by immobilization on calcium alginate beads. The immobilized CD had pH and temperature optimum of 5 and 50°C respectively. The immobilized enzyme also stoichiometrically deaminated Cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) with the apparent K(M) values of 0.60 mM and 0.65 mM respectively, displaying activation energy of 10.72 KJ/mol. The immobilization of native CD on calcium alginate beads gave the highest yield of apparent enzymatic activity of 51.60% of the original activity and the enzymatic activity was lost exponentially at 37°C over 12 h with a half-life of 5.80 h. Hence, the operational stability of native CD can be improved by immobilization on calcium alginate beads.

  15. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  16. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  17. Molecular energetics of cytosine revisited: a joint computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José R B; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria D M C; Freitas, Vera L S; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A V

    2007-08-02

    A static bomb calorimeter has been used to measure the standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, of a commercial sample of cytosine. From this energy, the standard (p degrees = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state was derived as -(221.9 +/- 1.7) kJ.mol(-1). This value confirms one experimental value already published in the literature but differs from another literature value by 13.5 kJ.mol(-1). Using the present standard molar enthalpy of formation in the condensed phase and the enthalpy of sublimation due to Burkinshaw and Mortimer [J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans. 1984, 75], (155.0 +/- 3.0) kJ.mol(-1), results in a value for the gas-phase standard molar enthalpy of formation for cytosine of -66.9 kJ.mol(-1). A similar value, -65.1 kJ.mol(-1), has been estimated after G3MP2B3 calculations combined with the reaction of atomization on three different tautomers of cytosine. In agreement with experimental evidence, the hydroxy-amino tautomer is the most stable form of cytosine in the gas phase. The enthalpies of formation of the other two tautomers were also estimated as -60.7 kJ.mol(-1) and -57.2 kJ.mol(-1) for the oxo-amino and oxo-imino tautomers, respectively. The same composite approach was also used to compute other thermochemical data, which is difficult to be measured experimentally, such as C-H, N-H, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities, and ionization enthalpies.

  18. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing Anantram, M. P.; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  19. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  20. Solvent effects on the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Sarkar, Nilmoni; Bányász, Akos; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We report a comparison of the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of three representative uracil derivatives (uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil) in alcoholic solutions. The present results are compared with those from our previous experimental and computational studies of the same compounds in water and acetonitrile. The effects of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the spectra are discussed in the light of theoretical predictions. This comparative analysis provides a more complete picture of the solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence properties of pyrimidine nucleobases, with special emphasis on the mechanism of the excited state deactivation.

  1. Radiolysis of aqueous adenine (vitamin B4) and 8-hydroxyadenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.; Quint, R. M.; Getoff, N.

    2007-05-01

    The radiolysis of adenine (vitamin B4) was studied in aqueous solution (pH˜7.4) saturated either with argon (operating radicals: 44% e -aq, 46% OH, 10% H) or with air (46% OH, 54% O 2rad - ) and with N 2O (90% OH, 10% H), respectively. The obtained initial Gi-values are: 0.88, 1.16 and 1.45. As main radiolytic product was determined 8-hydroxyadenine (8-HOA), whose yield depends on the OH concentration in the reacting media. Hence, under the same experimental conditions the Gi-values are in media saturated with argon: 0.1, in air: 0.15 and in N 2O: 0.29. In aerated solution also a mixture of aldehydes as well as of carboxylic acids were formed, but they were not identified. 8-HOA is of some biological interest; therefore, its radiolysis was also investigated under the same conditions. The determined Gi(-8HOA)-values were in airfree solution negligible, in aerated solutions: 3.1 and in the presence of N 2O: 4.0. For explanation of the product formation some probable reaction mechanisms were given.

  2. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  3. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  5. Spontaneous tunneling and near-infrared-induced interconversion between the amino-hydroxy conformers of cytosine

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J.; Lapinski, Leszek

    2012-02-14

    Spontaneous and near-infrared/infrared (NIR/IR)-induced interconversions between two amino-hydroxy conformers of monomeric cytosine have been investigated for the compound isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix. Combined use of a laser source (which provides narrowband NIR radiation) and a broadband NIR/IR source of excitation light allowed a detailed investigation of mutual conversions of the two conformers in question. The experiments carried out within the current work demonstrated that upon broadband NIR/IR irradiation (with the IR source of FTIR spectrometer) the population ratio of the two amino-hydroxy conformers changes towards a ratio corresponding to a photostationary state. Evolution of the conformer population ratio towards the photostationary ratio occurred independent of the initial ratio of conformers, which could be prepared by a population shift (in favor of one of the forms) induced by narrowband NIR excitation. Moreover, spontaneous tunneling conversion of the higher-energy conformer into a lower-energy form was observed for cytosine isolated in a low-temperature argon matrix kept in the dark. This process is slow and occurs on a time scale of days. The tunneling process, studied for matrix-isolated cytosine, clearly follows a dispersive type of kinetics rather than the classical monoexponential kinetics.

  6. The Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard S.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a Ki of 52 nM. The zinc and iron containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0 and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on kcat and kcat/Km, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed. PMID:21545144

  7. Isolation and identification by sequence homology of a putative cytosine methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, E J; Dennis, E S

    1993-01-01

    A plant cytosine methyltransferase cDNA was isolated using degenerate oligonucleotides, based on homology between prokaryote and mouse methyltransferases, and PCR to amplify a short fragment of a methyltransferase gene. A fragment of the predicted size was amplified from genomic DNA from Arabidopsis thaliana. Overlapping cDNA clones, some with homology to the PCR amplified fragment, were identified and sequenced. The assembled nucleic acid sequence is 4720 bp and encodes a protein of 1534 amino acids which has significant homology to prokaryote and mammalian cytosine methyltransferases. Like mammalian methylases, this enzyme has a C terminal methyltransferase domain linked to a second larger domain. The Arabidopsis methylase has eight of the ten conserved sequence motifs found in prokaryote cytosine-5 methyltransferases and shows 50% homology to the murine enzyme in the methyltransferase domain. The amino terminal domain is only 24% homologous to the murine enzyme and lacks the zinc binding region that has been found in methyltransferases from both mouse and man. In contrast to mouse where a single methyltransferase gene has been identified, a small multigene family with homology to the region amplified in PCR has been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Images PMID:8389441

  8. Solution structures of oligonucleotides containing either a guanine or a cytosine in front of a gap of one nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulard, Y.; Faibis, V.; Fazakerley, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    We report NMR and molecular modelling studies on two DNA duplexes containing a gap of one nucleotides. The difference between the two oligonucleotides lies in the central base face to the gap, a guanine or a cytosine. For the gapG, we observed in solution a B-form conformation where the guanine stacks in the helix. For the gapC, we reveal the existence of two species, one majority where the cytosine is inside the helix and a second for which the cytosine is extrahelical. Nous présentons une étude par RMN et modélisation moléculaire sur deux duplexes d'ADN contenant une lacune de un nucléotide. La différence entre les deux oligonucléotides réside dans la base centrale en face de la lacune, une guanine ou une cytosine. Pour le duplex appelé gapG, nous observons en solution une hélice de type B dans laquelle la guanine est empilée à l'intérieur de l'hélice. Dans le cas du duplex gapC, nous montrons l'existence de deux formes, l'une où la cytosine est à l'intérieur de l'hélice; la seconde où la cytosine est extra hélicale.

  9. Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism during platelet storage at 22 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Murphy, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism of platelet concentrates (PCs) was studied during storage for transfusion at 22 +/- 2 degrees C over a 7-day period using high-pressure liquid chromatography. There was a steady decrease in platelet adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which was balanced quantitatively by an increase in plasma hypoxanthine. As expected, ammonia accumulated along with hypoxanthine but at a far greater rate. A fall in platelet guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) paralleled the fall in ATP + ADP. When adenine was present in the primary anticoagulant, it was carried over into the PC and metabolized. ATP, GTP, total adenine nucleotides, and total guanine nucleotides declined more slowly in the presence of adenine than in its absence. With adenine, the increase in hypoxanthine concentration was more rapid and quantitatively balanced the decrease in adenine and platelet ATP + ADP. Plasma xanthine rose during storage but at a rate that exceeded the decline in GTP + GDP. When platelet ATP + ADP was labeled with 14C-adenine at the initiation of storage, half of the radioactivity was transferred to hypoxanthine (45%) and GTP + GDP + xanthine (5%) by the time storage was completed. The isotopic data were consistent with the presence of a radioactive (metabolic) and a nonradioactive (storage) pool of ATP + ADP at the initiation of storage with each pool contributing approximately equally to the decline in ATP + ADP during storage. The results suggested a continuing synthesis of GTP + GDP from ATP + ADP, explaining the slower rate of fall of GTP + GDP relative to the rate of rise of plasma xanthine. Throughout storage, platelets were able to incorporate 14C-hypoxanthine into both adenine and guanine nucleotides but at a rate that was only one fourth the rate of hypoxanthine accumulation.

  10. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in a triphasic rat model of adenine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amnon; Brod, Vera; Awad, Hoda; Heyman, Samuel N; Abassi, Zaid; Frajewicki, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether NGAL, given its advantages over traditional biomarkers, can be used to describe the dynamic characteristics of the renal tubulointerstitial insult caused by adenine. Subsequently, it will be possible to assess NGAL as a biomarker of any acute kidney injury, on top of chronic interstitial disease, if NGAL levels are stable through the chronic phase of our adenine model. Study group rats were fed an adenine diet, and control group rats were fed a regular diet only. Blood and urine samples for urea, creatinine and NGAL were drawn from each rat at the beginning of the study and after 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 weeks. Kidney slices from these rats were stained with Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and β-actin stainings. Serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio in the study group were higher than baseline and than in the control group; these differences were statistically significant in some of the intervals. Tubulointerstitial changes and adenine crystals were evident in the study group rats. In the rats fed adenine, serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio followed a triphasic pattern of kidney injury: an acute phase while on the adenine diet, a partial recovery phase after switching to the regular diet and a chronic kidney disease phase after stabilization of renal function. NGAL can serve a biomarker for acute kidney injury and possibly for chronic kidney disease in the tubulointerstitial rat model.

  11. Improved growth and stress tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 mutant triggered by altered adenine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sukrong, Suchada; Yun, Kil-Young; Stadler, Patrizia; Kumar, Charan; Facciuolo, Tony; Moffatt, Barbara A; Falcone, Deane L

    2012-11-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses. A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1, a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions. Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1), an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), indicating a link between purine metabolism, whole-plant growth responses, and stress acclimation. The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity. Correspondingly, oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine. Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1. The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge. Finally, it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth, leading to increases in plant biomass. The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  12. Thiaminylated adenine nucleotides. Chemical synthesis, structural characterization and natural occurrence.

    PubMed

    Frédérich, Michel; Delvaux, David; Gigliobianco, Tiziana; Gangolf, Marjorie; Dive, Georges; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Elias, Benjamin; De Pauw, Edwin; Angenot, Luc; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2009-06-01

    Thiamine and its three phosphorylated derivatives (mono-, di- and triphosphate) occur naturally in most cells. Recently, we reported the presence of a fourth thiamine derivative, adenosine thiamine triphosphate, produced in Escherichia coli in response to carbon starvation. Here, we show that the chemical synthesis of adenosine thiamine triphosphate leads to another new compound, adenosine thiamine diphosphate, as a side product. The structure of both compounds was confirmed by MS analysis and 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR, and some of their chemical properties were determined. Our results show an upfield shifting of the C-2 proton of the thiazolium ring in adenosine thiamine derivatives compared with conventional thiamine phosphate derivatives. This modification of the electronic environment of the C-2 proton might be explained by a through-space interaction with the adenosine moiety, suggesting U-shaped folding of adenosine thiamine derivatives. Such a structure in which the C-2 proton is embedded in a closed conformation can be located using molecular modeling as an energy minimum. In E. coli, adenosine thiamine triphosphate may account for 15% of the total thiamine under energy stress. It is less abundant in eukaryotic organisms, but is consistently found in mammalian tissues and some cell lines. Using HPLC, we show for the first time that adenosine thiamine diphosphate may also occur in small amounts in E. coli and in vertebrate liver. The discovery of two natural thiamine adenine compounds further highlights the complexity and diversity of thiamine biochemistry, which is not restricted to the cofactor role of thiamine diphosphate.

  13. Labeling of mitochondrial adenine nucleotides of bovine sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheetham, J.; Lardy, H.A.

    1986-05-01

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into the adenine nucleotide pool of intact bovine spermatozoa utilizing endogenous substrates results in a specific activity (S.A.) ratio ATP/ADP of 0.3 to 0.5, suggesting compartmentation of nucleotide pools or a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP in addition to the myokinase reaction. Incubation of filipin-permeabilized cells with pyruvate, acetylcarnitine, or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate (..cap alpha..KG) resulted in ATP-ADP S.A. ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.6, respectively, for mitochondrial nucleotides. However, when malate was included with pyruvate or acetylcarnitine, the ATP/ADP S.A. ratio increased by 400% to 2.0 for pyruvate/malate and by 290% to 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate, while the ATP/ADP ratio increased by less than 100% in both cases. These results may indicate that under conditions of limited flux through the citric acid cycle a pathway for phosphorylation of AMP from a precursor other than ATP exists or that ATP is compartmented within the mitochondrion. In the presence of uncoupler and oligomycin with ..cap alpha..KG, pyruvate/malate, or acetylcarnitine/malate, /sup 32/P/sub i/ is incorporated primarily into ATP, resulting in an ATP/ADP S.A. ratio of 4.0 for ..cap alpha..KG, 2.7 for pyruvate/malate, and 2.8 for acetylcarnitine/malate. These data are consistent with phosphorylation of ADP during substrate level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle.

  14. Phenotype and Genotype Characterization of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Dollinger, Cécile; Boutaud, Lucile; Guillemot, Delphine; Bensman, Albert; Harambat, Jérôme; Deteix, Patrice; Daudon, Michel; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones and renal failure secondary to intratubular crystalline precipitation. Little is known regarding the clinical presentation of APRT deficiency, especially in the white population. We retrospectively reviewed all 53 cases of APRT deficiency (from 43 families) identified at a single institution between 1978 and 2009. The median age at diagnosis was 36.3 years (range 0.5 to 78.0 years). In many patients, a several-year delay separated the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Of the 40 patients from 33 families with full clinical data available, 14 (35%) had decreased renal function at diagnosis. Diagnosis occurred in six (15%) patients after reaching ESRD, with five diagnoses made at the time of disease recurrence in a renal allograft. Eight (20%) patients reached ESRD during a median follow-up of 74 months. Thirty-one families underwent APRT sequencing, which identified 54 (87%) mutant alleles on the 62 chromosomes analyzed. We identified 18 distinct mutations. A single T insertion in a splice donor site in intron 4 (IVS4 + 2insT), which produces a truncated protein, accounted for 40.3% of the mutations. We detected the IVS4 + 2insT mutation in two (0.98%) of 204 chromosomes of healthy newborns. This report, which is the largest published series of APRT deficiency to date, highlights the underdiagnosis and potential severity of this disease. Early diagnosis is crucial for initiation of effective treatment with allopurinol and for prevention of renal complications. PMID:20150536

  15. Cytosine hypomethylation at CHG and CHH sites in the pleiotropic mutants of Mendelian inheritance in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Renu; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sharma, Vishakha; Sharma, Vinay; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-12-01

    The 5S and 18S rDNA sequences of Catharanthus roseus cv 'Nirmal' (wild type) and its leafless inflorescence (lli), evergreen dwarf (egd) and irregular leaf lamina (ill) single mutants and lli egd, lli ill and egd ill double mutants were characterized. The lli, egd and ill mutants of Mendelian inheritance bore the names after their most conspicuous morphological feature(s). They had been chemically induced and isolated for their salt tolerance. The double mutants were isolated as morphological segregants from crosses between single mutants. The morphological features of the two parents accompanied salt tolerance in the double mutants. All the six mutants were hypomethylated at repeat sequences, upregulated and downregulated for many genes and carried pleiotropic alterations for several traits. Here the 5S and 18S rDNAs of C. roseus were found to be relatively low in cytosine content. Cytosines were preponderantly in CG context (53%) and almost all of them were methylated (97%). The cytosines in CHH and CHG (where H = A, T or C) contexts were largely demethylated (92%) in mutants. The demethylation was attributable to reduced expression of RDR2 and DRM2 led RNA dependant DNA methylation and CMT3 led maintenance methylation pathways. Mutants had gained some cytosines by substitution of C at T sites. These perhaps arose on account of errors in DNA replication, mediated by widespread cytosine demethylation at CHG and CHH sites. It was concluded that the regulation of cytosine ethylation mechanisms was disturbed in the mutants. ILL, EGD and LLI genes were identified as the positive regulators of other genes mediating the RdDM and CMT3 pathways, for establishment and maintenance of cytosine methylation in C. roseus.

  16. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  17. Dissection of the PHO pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine.

    PubMed

    Estill, Molly; Kerwin-Iosue, Christine L; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, intracellular phosphate levels are maintained by the PHO pathway, activation of which is assayed by increased phosphatase activity. The PHO pathway of Schizosaccharomyces pombe upregulates phosphatase activity (encoded by pho1 (+)) during low extracellular phosphate levels, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We utilized an alternate repressor of pho1 (+) expression (adenine supplementation) along with epistasis analysis to develop a model of how S. pombe PHO pathway components interact. Analyzing Pho1 activity in S. pombe PHO pathway deletion mutants during adenine starvation, we observed most mutants with a phosphatase defect in phosphate starvation also had a defect in adenine starvation. Pho7, a transcription factor in the PHO pathway, is necessary for an adenine starvation-mediated increase in Pho1 activity. Comparing adenine starvation to phosphate starvation, there are differences in the degree to which individual mutants regulate the two responses. Through epistasis studies, we identified two positive regulatory arms and one repressive arm of the PHO pathway. PKA activation is a positive regulator of Pho1 activity under both environmental conditions and is critical for transducing adenine concentrations in the cell. The synthesis of IP7 also appears critical for the induction of Pho1 activity during adenine starvation, but IP7 is not critical during phosphate starvation, which differs from S. cerevisiae. Finally, Csk1 is critical for repression of pho1 (+) expression during phosphate starvation. We believe all of these regulatory arms converge to increase transcription of pho1 (+) and some of the regulation acts through pho7 (+).

  18. Label free sub-picomole level DNA detection with Ag nanoparticle decorated Au nanotip arrays as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy platform.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hung-Chun; Hsiung, Hsin-I; Chattopadhyay, Surojit; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Fu; Leu, Jih Perng; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2011-01-15

    Label free optical sensing of adenine and thymine oligonucleotides has been achieved at the sub-picomole level using self assembled silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) decorated gold nanotip (AuNT) arrays. The platform consisting of the AuNTs not only aids in efficient bio-immobilization, but also packs AgNPs in a three dimensional high surface area workspace, assisting in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of sub-10 nm AgNPs with optimum inter-particle distance ensures amplification of the chemically specific Raman signals of the adsorbed adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine molecules in SERS experiments. High temporal stability of the Raman signals ensured reliable and repeatable DNA detection even after three weeks of ambient desk-top conservation. This facile architecture, being three dimensional and non-lithographic, differs from conventional SERS platforms.

  19. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all p<0.05). Glibenclamide decreased infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys.

  20. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  1. O⁶-carboxymethylguanine in DNA forms a sequence context-dependent wobble base-pair structure with thymine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Tsunoda, Masaru; Kikuchi, Yuji; Wilkinson, Oliver; Millington, Christopher L; Margison, Geoffrey P; Williams, David M; Takénaka, Akio

    2014-06-01

    N-Nitrosation of glycine and its derivatives generates potent alkylating agents that can lead to the formation of O(6)-carboxymethylguanine (O(6)-CMG) in DNA. O(6)-CMG has been identified in DNA derived from human colon tissue and its occurrence has been linked to diets high in red and processed meats, implying an association with the induction of colorectal cancer. By analogy to O(6)-methylguanine, O(6)-CMG is expected to be mutagenic, inducing G-to-A mutations that may be the molecular basis of increased cancer risk. Previously, the crystal structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGCG[O(6)-CMG]ATTCGCG) has been reported, in which O(6)-CMG forms a Watson-Crick-type pair with thymine similar to the canonical A:T pair. In order to further investigate the versatility of O(6)-CMG in base-pair formation, the structure of the DNA dodecamer d(CGC[O(6)-CMG]AATTTGCG) containing O(6)-CMG at a different position has been determined by X-ray crystallography using four crystal forms obtained under conditions containing different solvent ions (Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) or Na(+)) with and without Hoechst 33258. The most striking finding is that the pairing modes of O(6)-CMG with T are quite different from those previously reported. In the present dodecamer, the T bases are displaced (wobbled) into the major groove to form a hydrogen bond between the thymine N(3) N-H and the carboxyl group of O(6)-CMG. In addition, a water molecule is bridged through two hydrogen bonds between the thymine O(2) atom and the 2-amino group of O(6)-CMG to stabilize the pairing. These interaction modes commonly occur in the four crystal forms, regardless of the differences in crystallization conditions. The previous and the present results show that O(6)-CMG can form a base pair with T in two alternative modes: the Watson-Crick type and a high-wobble type, the nature of which may depend on the DNA-sequence context.

  2. Specific and modular binding code for cytosine recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-07-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  3. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  4. One-pot synthesis of fluorescent polysaccharides: adenine grafted agarose and carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Oza, Mihir D; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, A K

    2012-08-01

    New fluorescent polysaccharides were synthesized by grafting the nucleobase adenine on to the backbones of agarose and κ-carrageenan, which were characterized by FT-IR, (13)C NMR, TGA, XRD, UV, and fluorescence properties. The synthesis involved a rapid water based potassium persulfate (KPS) initiated method under microwave irradiation. The emission spectra of adenine grafted agarose and κ-carrageenan were recorded in aqueous (5×10(-5) M) solution, exhibiting λ(em,max) 347 nm by excitation at 261 nm, affording ca. 30% and 40% enhanced emission intensities, respectively compared to that of pure adenine solution in the same concentration. Similar emission intensity was recorded in the pure adenine solution at its molar equivalent concentrations present in the 5×10(-5) M solution of the agarose and carrageenan grafted products, that is, 3.28×10(-5) M and 4.5×10(-5) M respectively. These fluorescent adenine grafted products may have potential utility in various sensor applications.

  5. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  6. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0 μmol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046 μmol L-1, indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-15

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Determination of adenine based on the fluorescence recovery of the L-Tryptophan-Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruilin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Li, Yuanfang; Yuan, Yusheng; Hu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-05

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of adenine was developed based on fluorescence quenching and recovery of L-Tryptophan (L-Trp). The fluorescence of L-Trp could efficiently quenched by copper ion compared with other common metal ions. Upon addition of adenine (Ade) in L-Trp-Cu(II) system, the fluorescence was reoccurred. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery fluorescence intensity was linearly correlated with the concentration of adenine in the range from 0.34 to 25.0μmolL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9994. The detection limit (3σ/k) was 0.046μmolL(-1), indicating that this method could applied to detect trace adenine. In this study, amino acids including L-Trp, D-Trp, L-Tyr, D-Tyr, L-Phe, D-Phe were investigated and only L-Trp could well chelated copper ion. Additionally, the mechanism of quench and recovery also were discussed and the method was successfully applied to detect the adenine in DNA with satisfactory results.

  9. Binding of adenine to Stx2, the protein toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Marie E.; Cherney, Maia M.; Marcato, Paola; Mulvey, George L.; Armstrong, Glen D.; James, Michael N. G.

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of Stx2 were grown in the presence of adenosine and adenine. In both cases, the resulting electron density showed only adenine bound at the active site of the A subunit, proving that the holotoxin is an active N-glycosidase. Stx2 is a protein toxin whose catalytic subunit acts as an N-glycosidase to depurinate a specific adenine base from 28S rRNA. In the holotoxin, the catalytic portion, A1, is linked to the rest of the A subunit, A2, and A2 interacts with the pentameric ring formed by the five B subunits. In order to test whether the holotoxin is active as an N-glycosidase, Stx2 was crystallized in the presence of adenosine and adenine. The crystals diffracted to ∼1.8 Å and showed clear electron density for adenine in the active site. Adenosine had been cleaved, proving that Stx2 is an active N-glycosidase. While the holotoxin is active against small substrates, it would be expected that the B subunits would interfere with the binding of the 28S rRNA.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Electrochemical studies on the oxidation of guanine and adenine at cyclodextrin modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Noori, Abolhassan

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemical sensor for guanine and adenine using cyclodextrin-modified poly(N-acetylaniline) (PNAANI) on a carbon paste electrode has been developed. The oxidation mechanism of guanine and adenine on the surface of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrode processes are irreversible, pH dependent, and involve several reaction products. The electron transfer process occurs in consecutive steps with the formation of a strongly adsorbed intermediate on the electrode surface. Also, a new method for estimating the apparent formation constants of guanine and adenine with the immobilized cyclodextrins, through the change of surface coverage of studied analytes has been reported. Both guanine and adenine showed linear concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 microM by using differential pulse voltammetry, with an experimental limit of detection down to 0.05 microM. Linear concentration ranges of 2-150 microM for guanine and 6-104 microM for adenine have been found when cyclic voltammetry was used for determination of both analytes.

  12. Alkylation by propylene oxide of deoxyribonucleic acid, adenine, guanosine and deoxyguanylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P. D.; Jarman, M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Propylene oxide reacts with DNA in aqueous buffer solution at about neutral pH to yield two principal products, identified as 7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)adenine, which hydrolyse out of the alkylated DNA at neutral pH values at 37°C. 2. These products were obtained in quantity by reactions between propylene oxide and guanosine or adenine respectively. 3. The reactions between propylene oxide and adenine in acetic acid were parallel to those between dimethyl sulphate and adenine in neutral aqueous solution; the alkylated positions in adenine in order of decreasing reactivity were N-3, N-1 and N-9. A method for separating these alkyladenines is described. 4. Deoxyguanylic acid sodium salt was alkylated at N-7 by propylene oxide in neutral aqueous solution. 5. The nature of the side chain in the principal alkylation products was established by mass spectrometry, and the nature of the products is consistent with their formation by the bimolecular reaction mechanism. PMID:5073240

  13. Annexin V-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy using cytosine deaminase in combination with 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Van Rite, Brent D; Harrison, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    A fusion protein, consisting of cytosine deaminase (CD) linked to human annexin V, was created for use in an enzyme prodrug therapy targeted to the tumor vasculature and associated cancer cells in the primary tumor and distant metastases. The major finding of this study is that the CD-annexin V fusion protein in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine has significant cytotoxic activity against endothelial cells and two breast cancer cells lines in vitro that expose phosphatidylserine on their surface. The cytotoxicity experiments verified this novel enzyme prodrug system has the ability to produce therapeutic levels of 5-fluorouracil and thus appears promising.

  14. Solvent effect on the anharmonic vibrational frequencies in guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, A.; Muntean, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    We present an ab initio study of the vibrational properties of cytosine and guanine in the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pair configurations. The results are obtained by considering the DFT method together with the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) using PBE and B3PW91 exchange-correlation functionals and triple-ζ valence basis set. We investigate the importance of anharmonic corrections for the vibrational modes taking into account the solvent effect of the water environment. In particular, the unusual anharmonic effect of the H+ vibration in the case of the Hoogsteen base pair configuration is discussed.

  15. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  16. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Maps and Nonadiabatic Simulations for a Photochemical Reaction in DNA: Cyclobutane Thymine Dimer.

    PubMed

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Trabada, Daniel G; Mendieta, Jesús; Lewis, James P; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José

    2016-11-03

    The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by DNA may result in harmful genetic lesions that affect DNA replication and transcription, ultimately causing mutations, cancer, and/or cell death. We analyze the most abundant photochemical reaction in DNA, the cyclobutane thymine dimer, using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques and QM/MM nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. We find that, due to its double helix structure, DNA presents a free energy barrier between nonreactive and reactive conformations leading to the photolesion. Moreover, our nonadiabatic simulations show that most of the photoexcited reactive conformations return to standard B-DNA conformations after an ultrafast nonradiative decay to the ground state. This work highlights the importance of dynamical effects (free energy, excited-state dynamics) for the study of photochemical reactions in biological systems.

  17. "False" thymine-1H-Enol guanine base pair. low misinsertion rate by DNA polymerase explained by computational chemistry consideration.

    PubMed

    Seclaman, E; Kurunczi, L; Simon, Z

    2007-03-01

    Formation of correct TA and GC and "false" thymine-1H-enol guanine (TGenol) base pairs is here considered to control nucleotide insertion into DNA via low substrate concentration Michaelis-Menten controlled kinetics. Contributions of base pairing to formation of Gibbs free energies in water solution, DeltaDeltaG, are calculated for the correct and false base pairs with the semi-empiric MNDO/PM3 method for base pairing energies in vacuum and the BEM method for hydration effects. The results for DeltaDeltaG indicate equal insertion rates for correct base pairing and a 10(-3)-10(-4) error probability for false insertion controlled by the TGenol false pair.

  18. Excited-state lifetime of adenine near the first electronic band origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyuk; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-10-01

    The excited-state lifetime of supersonically cooled adenine was measured in the gas phase by femtosecond pump-probe transient ionization as a function of excitation energy between 36 100 and 37 500 cm-1. The excited-state lifetime of adenine is ˜2 ps around the 0-0 band of the L1b ππ ∗ state (36 105 cm-1). The lifetime drops to ˜1 ps when adenine is excited to the L1a ππ ∗ state with the pump energy at 36 800 cm-1 and above. The excited-state lifetimes of L1a and L1b ππ∗ states are differentiated in accordance with previous frequency-resolved and computational studies.

  19. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease.

  20. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors.

  1. The basal proton conductance of mitochondria depends on adenine nucleotide translocase content

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The basal proton conductance of mitochondria causes mild uncoupling and may be an important contributor to metabolic rate. The molecular nature of the proton-conductance pathway is unknown. We show that the proton conductance of muscle mitochondria from mice in which isoform 1 of the adenine nucleotide translocase has been ablated is half that of wild-type controls. Overexpression of the adenine nucleotide translocase encoded by the stress-sensitive B gene in Drosophila mitochondria increases proton conductance, and underexpression decreases it, even when the carrier is fully inhibited using carboxyatractylate. We conclude that half to two-thirds of the basal proton conductance of mitochondria is catalysed by the adenine nucleotide carrier, independently of its ATP/ADP exchange or fatty-acid-dependent proton-leak functions. PMID:16076285

  2. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  3. Base flip in DNA studied by molecular dynamics simulationsof differently-oxidized forms of methyl-Cytosine.

    PubMed

    Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Kanaan, Natalia; Imhof, Petra

    2014-07-03

    Distortions in the DNA sequence, such as damage or mispairs, are specifically recognized and processed by DNA repair enzymes. Many repair proteins and, in particular, glycosylases flip the target base out of the DNA helix into the enzyme's active site. Our molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with intact and damaged (oxidized) methyl-cytosine show that the probability of being flipped is similar for damaged and intact methyl-cytosine. However, the accessibility of the different 5-methyl groups allows direct discrimination of the oxidized forms. Hydrogen-bonded patterns that vary between methyl-cytosine forms carrying a carbonyl oxygen atom are likely to be detected by the repair enzymes and may thus help target site recognition.

  4. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the (1-14C)glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis.

  5. Efficacy of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Kuffer, M; Balzarini, J; Naesens, L; Goldberg, M; Erfle, V; Goebel, F D; De Clercq, E; Jindrich, J; Holy, A; Bischofberger, N; Kraft, W

    1998-02-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S)-9-(3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (FPMPA) and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (PMEA) were evaluated for their efficacy and side effects in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial using naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. This natural retrovirus animal model is considered highly relevant for the pathogenesis and chemotherapy of HIV in humans. Both PMEA and FPMPA proved effective in ameliorating the clinical symptoms of FIV-infected cats, as measured by several clinical parameters including the incidence and severity of stomatitis, Karnofsky's score, immunologic parameters such as relative and absolute CD4+ lymphocyte counts, and virologic parameters including proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of drug-treated animals. In contrast with PMEA, FPMPA showed no hematologic side effects at a dose that was 2.5-fold higher than PMEA.

  6. The Role of Hydrogen Bonds in the Stabilization of Silver-Mediated Cytosine Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Leal, Leonardo Andrés; Karpenko, Alexander; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G; Rojas-Cervellera, Victor; Rovira, Carme; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    2015-10-15

    DNA oligomers can form silver-mediated duplexes, stable in gas phase and solution, with potential for novel biomedical and technological applications. The nucleobase-metal bond primarily drives duplex formation, but hydrogen (H-) bonds may also be important for structure selection and stability. To elucidate the role of H-bonding, we conducted theoretical and experimental studies of a duplex formed by silver-mediated cytosine homopobase DNA strands, two bases long. This silver-mediated cytosine tetramer is small enough to permit accurate, realistic modeling by DFT-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods. In gas phase, our calculations found two energetically favorable configurations distinguished by H-bonding, one with a novel interplane H-bond, and the other with planar H-bonding of silver-bridged bases. Adding solvent favored silver-mediated tetramers with interplane H-bonding. Overall agreement of electronic circular dichroism spectra for the final calculated structure and experiment validates these findings. Our results can guide use of these stabilization mechanisms for devising novel metal-mediated DNA structures.

  7. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  8. Yeast cytosine deaminase mutants with increased thermostability impart sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S; Korkegian, Aaron M; Willmon, Candice L; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2008-03-28

    Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of CD-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of CD are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study, we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast CD (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated T(m) values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in stability, as well as a more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models.

  9. Stability and isomerization of complexes formed by metal ions and cytosine isomers in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongqi; Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Kwaichow

    2013-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the stability of the formation of complexes produced by four metal ions (M(+/2+)) and 14 cytosine isomers (Cn). This work predicts theoretically that predominant product complexes are associated with higher-energy C4M(+/2+) and C5M(+/2+) rather than the most stable C1M(+/2+). The prediction resolves successfully several experimental facts puzzling two research groups. Meanwhile, in-depth studies further reveal that direct isomerization of C1↔C4 is almost impossible, and also that the isomerization induced by either metalation or hydration, or by a combination of the two unfavorable. It is the single water molecule locating between the H1(-N1) and O2 of the cytosine that plays the dual roles of being a bridge and an activator that consequently improves the isomerization greatly. Moreover, the cooperation of divalent metal ion and such a monohydration actually leads to an energy-free C1←C4 isomerization in the gas phase. Henceforth, we are able to propose schemes inhibiting the free C1←C4 isomerization, based purely on extended hydration at the divalent metal ion.

  10. Inheritance of cytosine methylation patterns in purebred versus hybrid chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Sun, D X; Li, J L; Liu, R; Wang, Y C; Zhang, Y

    2013-07-30

    We used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism to examine DNA methylation levels and CCGG patterns in parents and offsprings of 3 groups of adult chickens, purebred White Leghorn (AA), White Plymouth Rock (EE), and crossbred individuals (EA) using 10 primer combinations. We found that about 66% of the cytosines at CCGG sites were not methylated. Fully methylated sites were less frequent than hemi-methylated sites in the chicken genome; these frequencies were different from those of plants. We observed that the probability that the offspring would inherit the methylation pattern for any given site from the parents was 88%; consequently, unexpected methylation patterns in offspring occurred at a rate of about 12%. The methylation degree in offspring was lower than in parents, and there were more sites with altered methylation patterns in EA crossbreds compared with AA and EE purebreds. Seven differentially methylated fragments between parental lines and their offspring were isolated, sequenced, and characterized, 4 of which were located in the coding regions. We conclude that most of the methylation status is transferred from parents to offspring in chickens, and that there are differences in the inheritance of methylation status in purebred versus crossbred offspring. We also concluded that methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism is highly efficient for large-scale detection of cytosine methylation in the chicken genome.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for sub-micromolar detection of DNA/RNA mononucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bell, Steven E J; Sirimuthu, Narayana M S

    2006-12-13

    Surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra of all the DNA/RNA mononucleotides have been obtained with high sensitivity using citrate-reduced silver colloids aggregated with MgSO4, rather than the more usual halide ions, which were found to prevent enhancement of these compounds. The SERS spectra of adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine, and uracil were recorded along with their corresponding nucleosides and 5'-deoxynucleotides. For the cytosine series, all three spectra had similar relative band intensities but the spectra of adenine were different from those of adenosine and dAMP, probably due to differences in orientation on the surface. No enhanced bands from the phosphate or sugar groups were observed. There were general similarities between the SERS spectra of the purine mononucleotides and the pyrimidine mononucleotides, but the spectra were sufficiently different to allow each of them to be distinguished. This method can therefore be used for high sensitivity, label-free identification of mononucleotides.

  12. Ricin Activity Assay by Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry Detection of Adenine Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry. The release of adenine from the inhomo- geneous substrate herring sperm DNA by ricin was determined to...chain catalyzes cleavage at adenosine 4324 (in rat RNA) of 28S rRNA to release adenine.10 This action inhibits protein synthesis, leading to cell...death. In addition to RNA, herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) is a substrate for ricin.11 We chose to employ hsDNA for this assay because it is relatively stable

  13. Affinity of a galactose-specific legume lectin from Dolichos lablab to adenine revealed by X-ray cystallography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kartika N; Latha, Vakada Lavanya; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-07-01

    Crystal structure analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from a leguminous food crop Dolichos lablab (Indian lablab beans) has been carried out to obtain insights into its quaternary association and lectin-carbohydrate interactions. The analysis led to the identification of adenine binding sites at the dimeric interfaces of the heterotetrameric lectin. Structural details of similar adenine binding were reported in only one legume lectin, Dolichos biflorus, before this study. Here, we present the structure of the galactose-binding D. lablab lectin at different pH values in the native form and in complex with galactose and adenine. This first structure report on this lectin also provides a high resolution atomic view of legume lectin-adenine interactions. The tetramer has two canonical and two DB58-like interfaces. The binding of adenine, a non-carbohydrate ligand, is found to occur at four hydrophobic sites at the core of the tetramer at the DB58-like dimeric interfaces and does not interfere with the carbohydrate-binding site. To support the crystallographic observations, the adenine binding was further quantified by carrying out isothermal calorimetric titration. By this method, we not only estimated the affinity of the lectin to adenine but also showed that adenine binds with negative cooperativity in solution.

  14. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9 L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

  15. Synthesis, cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine and its hydrochloride salt.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, Kamal H; Abramian, Lara; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Usher, Karyn; Vladimirov, Nikolay

    2012-11-08

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl) adenine. We evaluated two different synthetic routes starting with adenine where the optimal route was achieved through coupling of 9-(2-chloroethyl)adenine with diallylamine. The cyclopolymerization and cyclo-copolymerization of 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine hydrochloride salt resulted in low molecular weight oligomers in low yields. In contrast, 9-(2-diallylaminoethyl)adenine failed to cyclopolymerize, however, it formed a copolymer with SO₂ in relatively good yields. The molecular weights of the cyclopolymers were around 1,700-6,000 g/mol, as estimated by SEC. The cyclo-copolymer was stable up to 226 °C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a free-radical cyclo-copolymerization of a neutral alkyldiallylamine derivative with SO₂. These polymers represent a novel class of carbocyclic polynucleotides.

  16. Caffeine biosynthesis and adenine metabolism in transgenic Coffea canephora plants with reduced expression of N-methyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Katahira, Riko; Morimoto, Masayuki; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sano, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    In anti-sense and RNA interference transgenic plants of Coffea canephora in which the expression of CaMXMT1 was suppressed, caffeine biosynthesis from [8-(14)C]adenine was investigated, together with the overall metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine. Compared with wild type control plants, total purine alkaloid biosynthesis from adenine and conversion of theobromine to caffeine were both reduced in the transgenic plants. As found previously, [8-(14)C]adenine was metabolised to salvage products (nucleotides and RNA), to degradation products (ureides and CO(2)) and to purine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine). In the transgenic plants, metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine shifted from purine alkaloid synthesis to purine catabolism or salvage for nucleotides. HPLC analysis revealed a significantly reduced caffeine content in the transgenic plants. A small quantity (less than 20 nmol g(-1) fresh weight) of xanthosine had accumulated in at least one of the transgenic plants.

  17. The UV absorption of nucleobases: semi-classical ab initio spectra simulations.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Aquino, Adelia J A; Lischka, Hans

    2010-05-21

    Semi-classical simulations of the UV-photoabsorption cross sections of adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil in gas phase were performed at the resolution-of-identity coupled cluster to the second-order (RI-CC2) level. With the exception of cytosine, the spectra of the other four nucleobases show a two band pattern separated by a low intensity region. The spectrum of cytosine is shaped by a sequence of three bands of increasing intensity. The first band of guanine is composed by two pipi* transitions of similar intensities. The analysis of individual contributions to the spectra allows a detailed assignment of bands. It is shown that the semi-classical simulations are able to predict general features of the experimental spectra, including their absolute intensities.

  18. Gas-Phase Hydration Thermochemistry of Sodiated and Potassiated Nucleic Acid Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH o n , ΔS o n , and ΔG o n , for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  19. Gas-phase hydration thermochemistry of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH(o)(n), ΔS(o)(n), and ΔG(o)(n), for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  20. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  1. Diminution in adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by platelets and serum from rats submitted to Walker 256 tumour.

    PubMed

    Buffon, Andréia; Ribeiro, Vanessa B; Schanoski, Alessandra S; Sarkis, João J F

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in the circulation is mediated by the action of an NTPDase (CD39, apyrase) and of a 5'-nucleotidase (CD73), presenting as a final product, adenosine. Among other properties described for adenine nucleotides, an anti-cancer activity is suggested, since ATP is considered a cytotoxic molecule in several tumour cell systems. Conversely, some studies demonstrate that adenosine presents a tumour-promoting activity. In this study, we evaluated the pattern of adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by serum and platelets from rats submitted to the Walker 256 tumour model. Extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by blood serum and platelets obtained from rats at, 6, 10 and 15 days after the subcutaneous Walker 256 tumour inoculation, was evaluated. Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum at 6, 10 and 15 days after tumour induction. In platelets, a significant reduction in ATP and AMP hydrolysis was observed at 10 and 15 days after tumour induction, while an inhibition of ADP hydrolysis was observed at all times studied. Based on these results, it is possible to suggest a physiologic protection mechanism against the tumoral process in circulation. The inhibition in nucleotide hydrolysis observed probably maintains ATP levels elevated (cytotoxic compound) and, at the same time, reduces the adenosine production (tumour-promoting molecule) in the circulation.

  2. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  3. Ameliorative effect of chrysin on adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Adham, Sirin A; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine - induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered.

  4. Effect of atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Liu, C; Zhou, Q; Xie, Y C; Qiu, X M; Feng, X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the therapeutic effects of Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided in to 5 groups (n=10 rats per group): The normal control group, the chronic renal failure pathological control group, the dexamethasone treatment group and two Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide treatment groups, treated with two different concentrations of the polysaccharide, the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group. All the rats, except those in the normal control group were fed adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 3 weeks. After being fed with adenine, the dexamethasone treatment group, Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group rats were administered the drug orally for 2 weeks. On day 35, the kidney coefficient of the rats and the serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein and hemalbumin were determined. Subsequent to experimentation on a model of chronic renal failure in rats, the preparation was proven to be able to reduce serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and hemalbumin levels (P<0.05) and improve renal function. Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide had reversed the majority of the indices of chronic renal failure in rats.

  5. The Effect of Adenine Repeats on G-quadruplex/hemin Peroxidase Mimicking DNAzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jielin; Guo, Yuehua; Zhou, Jun; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-03-23

    The catalytic activity of G-quadruplex/hemin is much lower than that of proteinous enzymes, so it is very important to increase its activity. Very recently, flanking sequences, which can be regarded as an external part of G-quadruplexes, were found to enhance the activity of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme. However, little is known about the effect of internal parts, such as loop sequences and linkers, on the activity. In the present study, adenine repeats were incorporated into several designed G-quadruplex structures either in the loops, bulges, or linkers, and the constructed G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme exhibit about fivefold improvement in peroxidase-mimicking activity in some cases. The enhancement effect may result from the formation of compound I, protoporphyrin⋅Fe(IV) =O(.+) , accelerated by dA repeats, which was demonstrated by H2 O2 decay kinetics and pH dependency analysis. The novel enhancement methods described here may help in the development of high-activity DNAzymes, illustrated by a dimer G-quadruplex with flanking adenine at one end, a relatively long adenine run in one loop, and another adenine run in the linker.

  6. Macrophage Trafficking as Key Mediator of Adenine-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; da Silva, João Santana; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a special role in the onset of several diseases, including acute and chronic kidney injuries. In this sense, tubule interstitial nephritis (TIN) represents an underestimated insult, which can be triggered by different stimuli and, in the absence of a proper regulation, can lead to fibrosis deposition. Based on this perception, we evaluated the participation of macrophage recruitment in the development of TIN. Initially, we provided adenine-enriched food to WT and searched for macrophage presence and action in the kidney. Also, a group of animals were depleted of macrophages with the clodronate liposome while receiving adenine-enriched diet. We collected blood and renal tissue from these animals and renal function, inflammation, and fibrosis were evaluated. We observed higher expression of chemokines in the kidneys of adenine-fed mice and a substantial protection when macrophages were depleted. Then, we specifically investigated the role of some key chemokines, CCR5 and CCL3, in this TIN experimental model. Interestingly, CCR5 KO and CCL3 KO animals showed less renal dysfunction and a decreased proinflammatory profile. Furthermore, in those animals, there was less profibrotic signaling. In conclusion, we can suggest that macrophage infiltration is important for the onset of renal injury in the adenine-induced TIN. PMID:25132730

  7. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  8. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  9. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  10. Cytosine-cytosinium dimer behavior in a cocrystal with a decavanadate anion as a function of the temperature.

    PubMed

    Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-de Biré, Anne

    2010-10-07

    We have performed X-ray diffraction measurements on single crystals of Na(3)[V(10)O(28)](C(4)N(3)OH(5))(3)(C(4)N(3)OH(6))(3)·10H(2)O as a function of the temperature. When the sample is cooled, from room temperature to 100 K, we have observed additional peaks well indexed in P1, while the phase at room temperature crystallizes in P1. The molecular structure at 210 K indicates that the center of inversion is located between two cytosinium molecules, formally described with a charge of +0.5. When this crystal is heated to room temperature and the structure in P1 reindexed, some peaks remained unindexed. A protonation-deprotonation process gives rise to additional diffraction peaks at temperatures lower than 210 K. The triply bridged hydrogen bonded cytosine-cytosinum dimer is discussed according to the results of the charge density analysis and topological analysis at 210 K. The structure at 100 K has been completely solved based on a comparative study with other compounds containing cytosine-cytosinium dimer. This description could be considered as a reference for such dimer. It could help for discrimination between cytosine and cytosinium molecules, for any new structure containing a cytosine-cytosinium pair, and for which the quality does not allow a precise determination of the hydrogen localization.

  11. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selection marker for gene disruption and replacement in the genus Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, Marie-Pierre; Ghinet, Mariana Gabriela; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Clermont, Nancy; Beaulieu, Carole; Brzezinski, Ryszard

    2009-02-01

    We developed a novel negative selection system for actinobacteria based on cytosine deaminase (CodA). We constructed vectors that include a synthetic gene encoding the CodA protein from Escherichia coli optimized for expression in Streptomyces species. Gene disruption and the introduction of an unmarked in-frame deletion were successfully achieved with these vectors.

  12. Electron transport through 5-substituted pyrimidines in DNA: electron affinities of uracil and cytosine derivatives differently affect the apparent efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Utsumi, Nihiro; Hamaguchi, Yuta; Tanabe, Kazuhito; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2013-11-11

    We investigated excess electron transport (EET) in DNA containing cytosine derivatives. By arranging the derivatives according to their electron affinities, the apparent EET efficiency was successfully regulated. Unexpectedly, however, providing gradients of electron affinity by inserting 5-fluorocytosine did not always enhance EET.

  13. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of DNA-(N4-cytosine)-methyltransferase from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Roca, Maite; López-Canut, Violeta; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the reaction mechanism for methylation of cytosine at the exocyclic N4 position catalyzed by M.PvuII has been explored by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. A reaction model was prepared by placing a single cytosine base in the active site of the enzyme. In this model the exocyclic amino group of the base establishes hydrogen bond interactions with the hydroxyl oxygen atom of Ser53 and the carbonyl oxygen atom of Pro54. The reaction mechanism involves a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the N4 atom and a proton transfer from this atom to Ser53, which in turn transfers a proton to Asp96. Different timings for the proton transfers and methylation steps have been explored at the AM1/MM and B3LYP/MM levels including localization and characterization of stationary structures. At our best estimate the reaction proceeds by means of a simultaneous but asynchronous proton transfer from Ser53 to Asp96 and from N4 of cytosine to Ser53 followed by a direct methyl transfer from AdoMet to the exocyclic N4 of cytosine.

  14. Metal Ion Induced Pairing of Cytosine Bases: Formation of I-Motif Structures Identified by IR Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    While the Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or presence of cations. Pairing of two cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H^+-C) gives rise to the so-called i-motif, occurring particularly in the telomeric region of DNA, and particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently suggested to form cytosine dimers in a C-Ag^+-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated cytosine dimer, which was later confirmed by IR spectroscopy.^1 Here we investigate whether Ag^+ is unique in this behavior. Using infrared action spectroscopy employing the free-electron laser FELIX and a tandem mass spectrometer in combination with quantum-chemical computations, we investigate a series of C-M^+-C complexes, where M is Cu, Li and Na. The complexes are formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from a solution of cytosine and the metal chloride salt in acetonitrile/water. The complexes of interest are mass-isolated in the cell of a FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, where they are irradiated with the tunable IR radiation from FELIX in the 600 - 1800 wn range. Spectra in the H-stretching range are obtained with a LaserVision OPO. Both experimental spectra as well as theoretical calculations indicate that while Cu behaves as Ag, the alkali metal ions induce a clearly different dimer structure, in which the two cytosine units are parallelly displaced. In addition to coordination to the ring nitrogen atom, the alkali metal ions coordinate to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of both cytosine bases, indicating that the alkali metal ion coordination favorably competes with hydrogen bonding between the two cytosine sub-units of the i-motif like structure. 1. Berdakin, Steinmetz, Maitre, Pino, J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 3804

  15. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Pacheco e Silva Filho, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-06-18

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration.

  16. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  17. Administration of α-Galactosylceramide Improves Adenine-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Naffah-de-Souza, Cristiane; Castoldi, Angela; Corrêa-Costa, Matheus; Braga, Tárcio T; Naka, Érika L; Amano, Mariane T; Abate, Débora T R S; Hiyane, Meire I; Cenedeze, Marcos A; Filho, Alvaro Pacheco e Silva; Câmara, Niels O S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that reacts to glycolipids presented by CD1d. Invariant NKT cells (iNKT) correspond to >90% of the total population of NKTs and reacts to α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). αGalCer promotes a complex mixture of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, as interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4. NKT cells and IFN-γ are known to participate in some models of renal diseases, but further studies are still necessary to elucidate their mechanisms. The aim of our study was to analyze the participation of iNKT cells in an experimental model of tubule-interstitial nephritis. We used 8-wk-old C57BL/6j, Jα18KO and IFN-γKO mice. They were fed a 0.25% adenine diet for 10 d. Both adenine-fed wild-type (WT) and Jα18KO mice exhibited renal dysfunction, but adenine-fed Jα18KO mice presented higher expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and type I collagen. To analyze the role of activated iNKT cells in our model, we administered αGalCer in WT mice during adenine ingestion. After αGalCer injection, we observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine, proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis. However, this improvement in renal function was not observed in IFN-γKO mice after αGalCer treatment and adenine feeding, illustrating that this cytokine plays a role in our model. Our findings may suggest that IFN-γ production is one of the factors contributing to improved renal function after αGalCer administration. PMID:26101952

  18. Hydration of nucleic acid bases: a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Isayev, Olexandr; Shishkin, Oleg V; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-04-14

    Comprehensive study on interactions between nucleic acid bases (NABs) and bulk water environment has been performed with use of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. Detailed analysis of average number, lifetimes and mobility of water molecules, orientation and 3D organization of hydrogen bond network in the first hydration shell of adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine has been carried out. Effect of hydration by bulk water environment has been compared with the data from polyhydrated complexes of NABs. During bulk water hydration the presence of mixed Hw...N/Hw...pi type of bonding is detected for imino nitrogen atoms. The formation of three hydrogen bonds to carbonyl groups reflects the significance of polarizing effects of aqueous environments. Hydration of hydrophobic sites revealed the presence of extremely weak bonding. Hydration of C6-H6 site of thymine is standing significantly apart from the hydration of other hydrophobic sites. An average coordination numbers of adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in bulk water environment are 6.87, 8.52, 6.12 and 6.42 water molecules, correspondingly. The lifetime of water molecules in the first hydration shell varies from 1 to 3 ps. Some differences in hydration studied by CPMD (bulk water) and quantum chemical (less than 20 water molecules) methods indicate a significant effect of the second hydration shell on structure and properties of the first hydration shell for the considered compounds.

  19. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-04-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures.

  20. Cytosine chemoreceptor McpC in Pseudomonas putida F1 also detects nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Hughes, Jonathan G; Luu, Rita A; Ditty, Jayna L

    2014-12-01

    Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in Pseudomonas genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of Pseudomonas chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in Pseudomonas putida F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

  1. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  2. Markerless Gene Deletion with Cytosine Deaminase in Thermus thermophilus Strain HB27.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hoffmann, Jana; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2015-12-11

    We developed a counterselectable deletion system for Thermus thermophilus HB27 based on cytosine deaminase (encoded by codA) from Thermaerobacter marianensis DSM 12885 and the sensitivity of T. thermophilus HB27 to the antimetabolite 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The deletion vector comprises the pUC18 origin of replication, a thermostable kanamycin resistance marker functional in T. thermophilus HB27, and codA under the control of a constitutive putative trehalose promoter from T. thermophilus HB27. The functionality of the system was demonstrated by deletion of the bglT gene, encoding a β-glycosidase, and three carotenoid biosynthesis genes, CYP175A1, crtY, and crtI, from the genome of T. thermophilus HB27.

  3. Genetic immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by endothelial progenitor cells armed with cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Yu-Jia, Zhen; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) serve as cellular vehicles for targeting cancer cells and are a powerful tool for delivery of therapeutic genes. Cytosine deaminase (CD), a kind of frequent suicide gene which can kill carcinoma cells by converting a non-poisonous pro-drug 5-flucytosine (5-FC) into a poisonous cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We combined super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled EPCs with CD gene to treat grafted liver carcinomas and tracked them with 7.0 T Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that the therapeutic EPCs loaded with CD plus 5-Fc provided stronger carcinoma growth suppression compared with treatment using CD alone. The CD/5-Fc significantly inhibited the growth of endothelial cells and induced carcinoma cells apoptosis. These results indicate that EPCs transfected with anti-carcinoma genes can be used in carcinoma therapy as a novel therapeutic modality.

  4. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  5. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures. PMID:22888295

  6. Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of microRNA by target-assisted isothermal exponential amplification coupled with poly (thymine)-templated fluorescent copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwan Woo; Batule, Bhagwan S.; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2016-10-01

    We devised a novel method for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of target microRNA (miRNA) by employing target-assisted isothermal exponential amplification (TAIEA) combined with poly (thymine)-templated fluorescent copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) as signaling probes. The target miRNA hybridizes to the unimolecular template DNA and works as a primer for the extension reaction to form double-stranded product, which consequently generates two nicking endonuclease recognition sites. By simultaneous nicking and displacement reactions, exponential amplification generates many poly (thymine) strands as final products, which are employed for the synthesis of fluorescent CuNPs. Based on the fluorescent signal from CuNPs, target miRNA is detected as low as 0.27 fM around 1 h of total analysis time. The diagnostic capability of this system has been successfully demonstrated by reliably detecting target miRNA from different cell lysates, showing its great potential towards real clinical applications.

  7. Comment on ‘To stack or not to stack: Performance of a new density functional for the uracil and thymine dimers’ [Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2009-04-01

    A Letter by Gu et al. [J. Gu, J. Wang, J. Leszczynski, Y. Xie, H.F. Schaefer III, Chem. Phys. Lett. 459 (2008) 164] presented MP2/6-31+G(d) and MP2/TZVPP stacking energies for the uracil and thymine dimers, with the aim to assess the performance of the new M06-2X density functional. However, the stacking energies were not corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE). Here we show that correction for this error dramatically changes the results. BSSE correction severely reduces the stacking energy of the thymine dimer, whereas the stacked uracil dimer structure considered by Gu et al. is not even a minimum on the MP2/6-31+G(d) potential energy surface.

  8. Mutation Processes in 293-Based Clones Overexpressing the DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3B

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Jelmar S.; Temiz, Nuri A.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Harris, Reuben S.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and clinical studies have combined to demonstrate a contribution from the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) to the overall mutation load in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, ovarian, and other cancer types. However, the complete landscape of mutations attributable to this enzyme has yet to be determined in a controlled human cell system. We report a conditional and isogenic system for A3B induction, genomic DNA deamination, and mutagenesis. Human 293-derived cells were engineered to express doxycycline-inducible A3B-eGFP or eGFP constructs. Cells were subjected to 10 rounds of A3B-eGFP exposure that each caused 80–90% cell death. Control pools were subjected to parallel rounds of non-toxic eGFP exposure, and dilutions were done each round to mimic A3B-eGFP induced population fluctuations. Targeted sequencing of portions of TP53 and MYC demonstrated greater mutation accumulation in the A3B-eGFP exposed pools. Clones were generated and microarray analyses were used to identify those with the greatest number of SNP alterations for whole genome sequencing. A3B-eGFP exposed clones showed global increases in C-to-T transition mutations, enrichments for cytosine mutations within A3B-preferred trinucleotide motifs, and more copy number aberrations. Surprisingly, both control and A3B-eGFP clones also elicited strong mutator phenotypes characteristic of defective mismatch repair. Despite this additional mutational process, the 293-based system characterized here still yielded a genome-wide view of A3B-catalyzed mutagenesis in human cells and a system for additional studies on the compounded effects of simultaneous mutation mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27163364

  9. Mutation of Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase significantly enhances molecular chemotherapy of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, S A; Market, J M; Gillespie, G Y; Krendelchtchikova, V; Della Manna, D; Sellers, J C; Kaliberova, L N; Black, M E; Buchsbaum, D J

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment using adenoviral (Ad)-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful method of cancer therapy. We have developed an Ad vector encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene (AdbCD-D314A), which has a higher affinity for cytosine than wild-type bCD (bCDwt). The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of the combination of AdbCD-D314A with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ionizing radiation against human glioma. The present study demonstrates that AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated cell killing, compared with AdbCDwt. Furthermore, a significant increase in cytotoxicity following AdbCD-D314A and radiation treatment of glioma cells in vitro was demonstrated as compared to AdbCDwt. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of subcutaneous or intracranial tumor growth of D54MG glioma xenografts by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with ionizing radiation as compared with either agent alone, and with AdbCDwt/5-FC plus radiation. The results suggest that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation produces markedly increased cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that combined treatment with this novel mutant enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiotherapy provides a promising approach for cancer therapy.

  10. Targeted endostatin-cytosine deaminase fusion gene therapy plus 5-fluorocytosine suppresses ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sher, Y-P; Chang, C-M; Juo, C-G; Chen, C-T; Hsu, J L; Lin, C-Y; Han, Z; Shiah, S-G; Hung, M-C

    2013-02-28

    There are currently no effective therapies for cancer patients with advanced ovarian cancer, therefore developing an efficient and safe strategy is urgent. To ensure cancer-specific targeting, efficient delivery, and efficacy, we developed an ovarian cancer-specific construct (Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD) composed of the cancer specific promoter survivin in a transgene amplification vector (VISA; VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier) to express a secreted human endostatin-yeast cytosine deaminase fusion protein (hEndoyCD) for advanced ovarian cancer treatment. hEndoyCD contains an endostatin domain that has tumor-targeting ability for anti-angiogenesis and a cytosine deaminase domain that converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD was found to be highly specific, selectively express secreted hEndoyCD from ovarian cancer cells, and induce cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo in the presence of 5-FC without affecting normal cells. In addition, Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD plus 5-FC showed strong synergistic effects in combination with cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell lines. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment with Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD coupled with liposome attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice bearing advanced ovarian tumors. Importantly, there was virtually no severe toxicity when hEndoyCD is expressed by Survivin-VISA plus 5-FC compared with CMV plus 5-FC. Thus, the current study demonstrates an effective cancer-targeted gene therapy that is worthy of development in clinical trials for treating advanced ovarian cancer.

  11. Reactions of an osmium-hexahydride complex with cytosine, deoxycytidine, and cytidine: the importance of the minor tautomers.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; García-Raboso, Jorge; Oliván, Montserrat

    2012-09-03

    Complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) deprotonates cytosine to give molecular hydrogen and the d(4)-trihydride derivative OsH(3)(cytosinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2), which in solution exists as a mixture of isomers containing κ(2)-N1,O (2a) and κ(2)-N3,O (2b) amino-oxo and κ(2)-N3,N4 (2c) imino-oxo tautomers. The major isomer 2b associates with the minor one 2c through N-H···N and N-H···O hydrogen bonds to form [2b·2c](2) dimers, which crystallize from saturated pentane solutions of 2. Complex 1 is also able to perform the double deprotonation of cytosine (cytosinate') to afford the dinuclear derivative (P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(3)Os(cytosinate')OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3), where the anion is coordinated κ(2)-N1,O and κ(2)-N3,N4 to two different OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) metal fragments. The deprotonation of deoxycytidine and cytidine leads to OsH(3)(deoxycytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (4) and OsH(3)(cytidinate)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (5), respectively, containing the anion κ(2)-N3,N4 coordinated. Dimer [2b·2c](2) and dinuclear complex 3 have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  12. Probing the Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Deprotonated Thymine Radical by Photodetachment and State-Selective Autodetachment Photoelectron Spectroscopy via Dipole-Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonated thymine can exist in two different forms, depending on which of its two N sites is deprotonated: N1[T-H]^- or N3[T-H]^-. Here we report a photodetachment study of the N1[T-H]^- isomer cooled in a cryogenic ion trap and the observation of an excited dipole-bound state. Eighteen vibrational levels of the dipole-bound state are observed, and its vibrational ground state is found to be 238 ± 5 wn below the detachment threshold of N1[T-H]^-. The electron affinity of the deprotonated thymine radical (N1[T-H]^.) is measured accruately to be 26 322 ± 5 wn (3.2635 ± 0.0006 eV). By tuning the detachment laser to the sixteen vibrational levels of the dipole-bound state that are above the detachment threshold, highly non-Franck-Condon resonant-enhanced photoelectron spectra are obtained due to state- and mode-selective vibrational autodetachment. Much richer vibrational information is obtained for the deprotonated thymine radical from the photodetachment and resonant-enhanced photoelectron spectroscopy. Eleven fundamental vibrational frequencies in the low-frequency regime are obtained for the N1[T-H]^. radical, including the two lowest-frequency internal rotational modes of the methyl group at 70 ± 8 wn and 92 ± 5 wn. D. L. Huang, H. T. Liu, C. G. Ning, G. Z. Zhu and L. S. Wang, Chem. Sci., 6, 3129-3138 (2015)

  13. E.s.r. study of the post-radiolysis growth of spin-trapped radicals in gamma-irradiated aqueous solutions of thymine.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Moss, H; Riesz, P

    1978-08-01

    The post-irradiation growth of the spin-adduct nitroxide radical produced by the addition of the thymine--OD radical to t-nitrosobutane (tNB) in gamma-irradiated, de-aerated D2O solutions was investigated by e.s.r. The thymine--OD radical was formed by the addition of an OD radical to the C(5) position of thymine. Growth reached a greater maximum value and was more rapid with increasing dose. At a fixed dose, growth was also greater and more rapid if oxygen was present after gamma-radiolysis. The addition of a second radical to the spin-adduct nitroxide during radiolysis to give a diamagnetic intermediate, which can regenerate the spin-adduct radical during storage in air-free and in air-saturated solutions at room temperature, was inferred to be responsible for post-irradiation growth. U.V. photolysis at 260-280 nm of a solution containing the diamagnetic intermediate rapidly regenerates the spin-adduct nitroxide. The longer lifetime of the diamagnetic intermediate in oxygen-free solutions may be relevant to an understanding of the anoxic sensitization by nitroxides in cellular systems.

  14. Solvent effects on the ultrafast nonradiative deactivation mechanisms of thymine in aqueous solution: Excited-state QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Akira Arai, Gaku; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2013-12-07

    On-the-fly excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations of thymine in aqueous solution are performed to investigate the role of solvent water molecules on the nonradiative deactivation process. The complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) method is employed for a thymine molecule as the QM part in order to provide a reliable description of the excited-state potential energies. It is found that, in addition to the previously reported deactivation pathway involving the twisting of the C-C double bond in the pyrimidine ring, another efficient deactivation pathway leading to conical intersections that accompanies the out-of-plane displacement of the carbonyl group is observed in aqueous solution. Decay through this pathway is not observed in the gas phase simulations, and our analysis indicates that the hydrogen bonds with solvent water molecules play a key role in stabilizing the potential energies of thymine in this additional decay pathway.

  15. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleobases are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They consist of Nheterocycles that belong to either the pyrimidine-base group (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) or the purinebase group (adenine and guanine). Several nucleobases, mostly purine bases, have been detected in meteorites [1-3], with isotopic signatures consistent with an extraterrestrial origin [4]. Uracil is the only pyrimidine-base compound formally reported in meteorites [2], though the presence of cytosine cannot be ruled out [5,6]. However, the actual process by which the uracil was made and the reasons for the non-detection of thymine in meteorites have yet to be fully explained. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM [7,8], the positions of the 6.2-µm interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present [9]. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including the three nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices consisting of several combinations of H(sub2)O, NH(sub3), CH(sub3)OH, and CH(sub4) at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium, in the protosolar nebula, and on icy bodies of the Solar System.

  16. Differences in Electrostatic Potential Around DNA Fragments Containing Adenine and 8-oxo-Adenine. An Analysis Based on Regular Cylindrical Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Miller, John H; Gutowski, Maciej S

    2007-07-01

    Changes of electrostatic potential (EP) around the DNA molecule resulting from chemical modifications of nucleotides may play a role in enzymatic recognition of damaged sites. Effects of chemical modifications of nucleotides on the structure of DNA have been characterized through large scale density functional theory computations. Quantum mechanical structural optimizations of DNA fragments with three pairs of nucleotides and accompanying counteractions were performed with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and 6-31G** basis sets. The “intact” DNA fragment contained adenine in the middle layer, while the “damaged” fragment had the adenine replaced with 8-oxo-adenine. The electrostatic potential around these DNA fragments was projected on a cylindrical surface around the double helix. The two-dimensional maps of EP of the intact and damaged DNA fragments were analyzed to identify these modifications of EP that result from the occurrence of 8-oxo-adenine (8oA). It was found that distortions of a phosphate group neighboring 8oA and displacements of the accompanying countercation are clearly reflected in the EP maps. Helpful discussions Michel Dupuis are gratefully acknowledged. Authors wish to thank Marcel Swart for directing us to a compilation of van der Waals radii. This work was supported by the: (i) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G. and M.H.), (ii) the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG03-02ER63470 (JHM), (iii) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grant DS/8221-4-0140-6 (MG), (iv) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk (TASK) and at the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national

  17. Characterization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-nucleobase supramolecular complexes featuring bio-multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Lee, Ai-Wei; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2014-11-07

    In this study we employed poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a matrix that we hybridized with five different nucleobase units (adenine, thymine, uracil, guanine, cytosine) to generate PNIPAAm-nucleobase supramolecular complexes (PNSCs) stabilized through bio-multiple hydrogen bonds (BMHBs). These nucleobase units interacted with PNIPAAm through BMHBs of various strengths, leading to competition between the BMHBs and the intramolecular hydrogen bonds (HBs) of PNIPAAm. The changes in morphology, crystalline structure, and thermoresponsive behavior of PNIPAAm were related to the strength of its BMHBs with the nucleobases. The strengths of the BMHBs followed the order guanine > adenine > thymine > cytosine > uracil, as verified through analyses of Fourier transform infrared spectra, lower critical solution temperatures, and inter-association equilibrium constants. The PNSCs also exhibited remarkable improvements in conductivity upon the formation of BMHBs, which facilitated proton transport. The neat PNIPAAm film was an insulator, but it transformed into a semiconductor after hybridizing with the nucleobases. In particular, the resistivity of the PNIPAAm-guanine supramolecular complex decreased to 1.35 × 10(5) ohm cm. The resistivity of the PNIPAAm-cytosine supramolecular complex increased significantly from 5.83 × 10(6) to 3 × 10(8) ohm cm upon increasing the temperature from 40 to 50 °C, suggesting that this material might have applicability in thermo-sensing. The ability to significantly improve the conductivity of hydrogels through such a simple approach involving BMHBs might facilitate their use as novel materials in bioelectronics.

  18. Anhydrous crystals of DNA bases are wide gap semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Maia, F F; Freire, V N; Caetano, E W S; Azevedo, D L; Sales, F A M; Albuquerque, E L

    2011-05-07

    We present the structural, electronic, and optical properties of anhydrous crystals of DNA nucleobases (guanine, adenine, cytosine, and thymine) found after DFT (Density Functional Theory) calculations within the local density approximation, as well as experimental measurements of optical absorption for powders of these crystals. Guanine and cytosine (adenine and thymine) anhydrous crystals are predicted from the DFT simulations to be direct (indirect) band gap semiconductors, with values 2.68 eV and 3.30 eV (2.83 eV and 3.22 eV), respectively, while the experimentally estimated band gaps we have measured are 3.83 eV and 3.84 eV (3.89 eV and 4.07 eV), in the same order. The electronic effective masses we have obtained at band extremes show that, at low temperatures, these crystals behave like wide gap semiconductors for electrons moving along the nucleobases stacking direction, while the hole transport are somewhat limited. Lastly, the calculated electronic dielectric functions of DNA nucleobases crystals in the parallel and perpendicular directions to the stacking planes exhibit a high degree of anisotropy (except cytosine), in agreement with published experimental results.

  19. OmpF, a nucleotide-sensing nanoprobe, computational evaluation of single channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, R. H.; Mobasheri, H.; Nikouee, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of highthroughput practical single channel experiments should be formulated and validated by signal analysis approaches to increase the recognition precision of translocating molecules. For this purpose, the activities of the single nano-pore forming protein, OmpF, in the presence of nucleotides were recorded in real time by the voltage clamp technique and used as a means for nucleotide recognition. The results were analyzed based on the permutation entropy of current Time Series (TS), fractality, autocorrelation, structure function, spectral density, and peak fraction to recognize each nucleotide, based on its signature effect on the conductance, gating frequency and voltage sensitivity of channel at different concentrations and membrane potentials. The amplitude and frequency of ion current fluctuation increased in the presence of Adenine more than Cytosine and Thymine in milli-molar (0.5 mM) concentrations. The variance of the current TS at various applied voltages showed a non-monotonic trend whose initial increasing slope in the presence of Thymine changed to a decreasing one in the second phase and was different from that of Adenine and Cytosine; e.g., by increasing the voltage from 40 to 140 mV in the 0.5 mM concentration of Adenine or Cytosine, the variance decreased by one third while for the case of Thymine it was doubled. Moreover, according to the structure function of TS, the fractality of current TS differed as a function of varying membrane potentials (pd) and nucleotide concentrations. Accordingly, the calculated permutation entropy of the TS, validated the biophysical approach defined for the recognition of different nucleotides at various concentrations, pd's and polarities. Thus, the promising outcomes of the combined experimental and theoretical methodologies presented here can be implemented as a complementary means in pore-based nucleotide recognition approaches.

  20. The interplay between ππ*/nπ* excited states in gas-phase thymine: a quantum dynamical study.

    PubMed

    Picconi, David; Barone, Vincenzo; Lami, Alessandro; Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto

    2011-07-11

    A quantum mechanical study of the interplay between the bright ππ*(S(π)) and the dark nπ*(S(n)) excited states of thymine in the gas phase is reported. TD-PBE0 calculations indicate that within a relevant region of the S(π) surface, connecting the Franck-Condon point with the planar and non-planar S(π) plateau, S(π) and S(n) are almost isoenergetic and that a S(π)→S(n) population transfer is therefore likely. This latter process has been studied by two complementary quantum dynamical approaches, a three-dimensional anharmonic (quartic) model, and a full-dimensional harmonic linear vibronic coupling model. Although providing slightly different quantitative indications, both approaches predict a very fast and effective S(π)→S(n) population transfer: already at 50 fs the S(n) state is significantly populated (20-40%) and this population persists or even increases on a longer time scale.

  1. The effect of Pot1 binding on the repair of thymine analogs in a telomeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Theruvathu, Jacob A; Darwanto, Agus; Hsu, Chia Wei; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2014-08-01

    Telomeric DNA can form duplex regions or single-stranded loops that bind multiple proteins, preventing it from being processed as a DNA repair intermediate. The bases within these regions are susceptible to damage; however, mechanisms for the repair of telomere damage are as yet poorly understood. We have examined the effect of three thymine (T) analogs including uracil (U), 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU) on DNA-protein interactions and DNA repair within the GGTTAC telomeric sequence. The replacement of T with U or 5FU interferes with Pot1 (Pot1pN protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe) binding. Surprisingly, 5hmU substitution only modestly diminishes Pot1 binding suggesting that hydrophobicity of the T-methyl group likely plays a minor role in protein binding. In the GGTTAC sequence, all three analogs can be cleaved by DNA glycosylases; however, glycosylase activity is blocked if Pot1 binds. An abasic site at the G or T positions is cleaved by the endonuclease APE1 when in a duplex but not when single-stranded. Abasic site formation thermally destabilizes the duplex that could push a damaged DNA segment into a single-stranded loop. The inability to enzymatically cleave abasic sites in single-stranded telomere regions would block completion of the base excision repair cycle potentially causing telomere attrition.

  2. Ab initio Study of the Structural, Tautomeric, Pairing and Electronic Properties of Seleno-Derivatives of Thymine

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Luque, Javier; Huertas, Oscar; Orozco, Modesto; Felice, Rosa; Brancolini, Giorgia; Migliore, Agostino

    2009-01-01

    The structural, tautomeric, hydrogen-bonding, stacking and electronic properties of a seleno-derivative of thymine (T), denoted here as 4SeT and created by replacing O4 in T with Se, are investigated by means of ab initio computational techniques. The structural properties of T and 4SeT are very similar and the geometrical differences are mainly limited to the adjacent environment of the C-Se bond. The canonical keto form is the most stable tautomer, in gas phase and in aqueous solution, for both T and 4SeT. It is argued that the competition between two opposite trends, i.e. a decrease in the base-pairing ability and an increase of the stacking interaction upon incorporation of 4SeT into a duplex, likely explains the similar experimental melting points of a seleno-derivative duplex (Se-DNA) and its native counterpart. Interestingly, the underlying electronic structure shows that replacement of O4 with Se promotes a reduction in the HOMO-LUMO gap and an increase in inter-plane coupling, which suggests that Se-DNA could be potentially useful for nanodevice applications. This finding is further supported by the fact that transfer integrals between 4SeT---A stacked base pairs are larger than those determined for similarly stacked natural T---A pairs.

  3. DPT tautomerisation of the wobble guanine·thymine DNA base mispair is not mutagenic: QM and QTAIM arguments.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    We have shown for the first time, connecting QM methods with QTAIM analysis and using the methodology of the sweeps of the energetical, electron-topological and geometrical parameters, that the tautomerisation of the wobble guanine·thymine (wG·T) DNA base mispair into the wG(*)·T(*) base mispair induced by the double proton transfer (DPT), which undergoes a concerted asynchronous pathway, is not mutagenic. The wG·T → wG(*)·T(*) DPT tautomerisation does not result in the transition of the G base into its mutagenic tautomeric form G(*) able to mispair with the T base within the Watson-Crick base pairing scheme. This observation is explained by the so-called quantum protection of the wG·T DNA base mispair from its mutagenic tautomerisation - the dynamical non-stability of the tautomerised wG(*)·T(*) base mispair and significantly negative value of the Gibbs free energy of activation for the reverse reaction of the wG·T → wG(*)·T(*) DPT tautomerisation.

  4. Biochemical Characterization of Nonamer Binding Domain of RAG1 Reveals its Thymine Preference with Respect to Length and Position

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Deepthi; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    RAG complex consisting of RAG1 and RAG2 is a site-specific endonuclease responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity. It cleaves recombination signal sequence (RSS), comprising of conserved heptamer and nonamer. Nonamer binding domain (NBD) of RAG1 plays a central role in the recognition of RSS. To investigate the DNA binding properties of the domain, NBD of murine RAG1 was cloned, expressed and purified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NBD binds with high affinity to nonamer in the context of 12/23 RSS or heteroduplex DNA. NBD binding was specific to thymines when single stranded DNA containing poly A, C, G or T were used. Biolayer interferometry studies showed that poly T binding to NBD was robust and comparable to that of 12RSS. More than 23 nt was essential for NBD binding at homothymidine stretches. On a double-stranded DNA, NBD could bind to A:T stretches, but not G:C or random sequences. Although NBD is indispensable for sequence specific activity of RAGs, external supplementation of purified nonamer binding domain to NBD deleted cRAG1/cRAG2 did not restore its activity, suggesting that the overall domain architecture of RAG1 is important. Therefore, we define the sequence requirements of NBD binding to DNA. PMID:26742581

  5. N-terminal and C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Tian, Yong-Jun; Ding, Hong-Hui; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Yan; Hao, You-Hua; Zhao, Xi-Ping; Lu, Meng-Ji; Gong, Fei-Li; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic-polypeptide 3G (APOBEC3G) and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain-mediated antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The mammalian hepatoma cells HepG2 and HuH7 were cotransfected with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vector and 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA as well as the linear monomeric HBV of genotype B and C. For in vivo study, an HBV vector-based mouse model was used in which APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vectors were co-delivered with 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA via high-volume tail vein injection. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the media of the transfected cells and in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA. The expression of hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) in the transfected cells was determined by Western blot analysis. Core-associated HBV DNA was examined by Southern blot analysis. Levels of HBV DNA in the sera of mice as well as HBV core-associated RNA in the liver of mice were determined by quantitative PCR and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Human APOBEC3G exerted an anti-HBV activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, and comparable suppressive effects were observed on genotype B and C as that of genotype A. Interestingly, the N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain alone could also inhibit HBV replication in HepG2 cells as well as Huh7 cells. Consistent with in vitro results, the levels of HBsAg in the sera of mice were dramatically decreased, with more than 50 times decrease in the levels of serum HBV DNA and core-associated RNA in the liver of mice treated with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain as compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide probably the

  6. Particular behavior of the adenine and guanine ring-breathing modes upon the DNA conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Taillandier, E

    1988-06-01

    Harmonic dynamics calculations performed on the deoxyguanosine (dG) and deoxyadenosine (dA) residues, based on a reliable force field, show that the breathing motions of both guanine and adenine residues are involved in two different vibration modes (750-500 cm-1 spectral region). The calculated results reveal a strong coupling of these modes with the sugar pucker motions. This effect has been verified for the dG residue by the Raman spectra of polyd(G-C). As far as the dA residue is concerned, the particular behavior of the adenine residue breathing mode predicted by these calculations, has been confirmed by Raman spectra of polyd(A-T) undergoing a B----Z conformational transition.

  7. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  8. BII stability and base step flexibility of N6-adenine methylated GATC motifs.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of N6-adenine methylation on the flexibility and shape of palindromic GATC sequences has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Variations in DNA backbone geometry were observed, which were dependent on the degree of methylation and the identity of the bases. While the effect was small, more frequent BI to BII conversions were observed in the GA step of hemimethylated DNA. The increased BII population of the hemimethylated system positively correlated with increased stacking interactions between methylated adenine and guanine, while stacking interactions decreased at the TC step for the fully methylated strand. The flexibility of the AT and TC steps was marginally affected by methylation, in a fashion that was correlated with stacking interactions. The facilitated BI to BII conversion in hemimethylated strands might be of importance for SeqA selectivity and binding.

  9. From formamide to adenine: a self-catalytic mechanism for an abiotic approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-11-14

    Mechanisms for abiotic reaction pathways from formamide (H2NCHO) to adenine are presented herein. Formamide is a simple C1 building block hypothesized to be a precursor to many protometabolic compounds. On the basis of a step-by-step mechanism of the reaction pathways, formamide is suggested to be more reactive in addition reactions than HCN. In addition to its simplicity, the formamide self-catalyzed mechanism is energetically (kinetically) more viable than either a water-catalyzed mechanism or noncatalyzed processes. Moreover, this self-catalyzed mechanism accounts for the yields of purine and adenine previously observed in experiments. This mechanism may elucidate processes that were vital for the emergence of life on the early earth.

  10. Critical appraisal of excited state nonadiabatic dynamics simulations of 9H-adenine.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Lan, Zhenggang; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Szymczak, Jaroslaw J; Lischka, Hans; Thiel, Walter

    2012-12-14

    In spite of the importance of nonadiabatic dynamics simulations for the understanding of ultrafast photo-induced phenomena, simulations based on different methodologies have often led to contradictory results. In this work, we proceed through a comprehensive investigation of on-the-fly surface-hopping simulations of 9H-adenine in the gas phase using different electronic structure theories (ab initio, semi-empirical, and density functional methods). Simulations that employ ab initio and semi-empirical multireference configuration interaction methods predict the experimentally observed ultrafast deactivation of 9H-adenine with similar time scales, however, through different internal conversion channels. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory with six different hybrid and range-corrected functionals fail to predict the ultrafast deactivation. The origin of these differences is analyzed by systematic calculations of the relevant reaction pathways, which show that these discrepancies can always be traced back to topographical features of the underlying potential energy surfaces.

  11. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  12. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Ding, Qing-Bao; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Yong-Li; Ou, Lin; Wang, Chang-Lu

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells of Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  13. Natural materials for nano bio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchen, Fahima; Yaney, Perry; Joyce, Donna; Williams, Adrienne; Gomez, Eliot; Subramanyam, Guru; Grote, James

    2014-09-01

    Many papers have been published on the properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and DNAhexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) and their applications in electronics and photonics. This paper is a review of some of the properties and their related applications for other types of naturally occurring materials, nucleic acid bases or nucleobases which make up the DNA molecules. Nucleobases under investigation included guanine, cytosine, adenine and thymine. Potential applications include electron blocking layers for organic light emitting diodes, gate dielectrics for organic thin film transistors and protective layers for polymer-based capacitors.

  14. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  15. Nucleotide capacitance calculation for DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun-Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2008-01-01

    Using a first-principles linear response theory, the capacitance of the DNA nucleotides, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, are calculated. The difference in the capacitance between the nucleotides is studied with respect to conformational distortion. The result suggests that although an alternate current capacitance measurement of a single-stranded DNA chain threaded through a nano-gap electrodes may not sufficient to be used as a stand alone method for rapid DNA sequencing, the capacitance of the nucleotides should be taken into consideration in any GHz-frequency electric measurements and may also serve as an additional criterion for identifying the DNA sequence.

  16. Adsorption of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Song, Wei; Wang, Lu; Lu, Jing; Luo, Guangfu; Zhou, Jing; Qin, Rui; Li, Hong; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lai, Lin; Li, Guangping; Mei, Wai Ning

    2009-11-01

    We study the adsorptions of nucleic acid bases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), and uracil (U) and four amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, alanine on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) by using density functional theory. We find that the aromatic content plays a critical role in the adsorption. The adsorptions of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on the (7, 7) SWBNNT are stronger than those on the (7, 7) SWCNT. Oxidative treatment of SWCNTs favors the adsorption of biomolecules on nanotubes.

  17. Estimation on the individual hydrogen-bond strength in molecules with multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hao; Hua, Weijie; Li, Shuhua

    2007-04-19

    A simple atom-replacement approach is proposed for estimating the individual contributions of each intermolecular hydrogen bond (HB) in multiple hydrogen-bonded systems. The approach is validated by calculations on the homodimer of formylformamide and then applied to nucleic acid base pairs (adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine) and some quadruply hydrogen-bonded dimers. With the help of this method, it is easy to distinguish the relative strength of each HB, and identify the main factors contributing to the total binding energies of multiple HBs.

  18. The DNA electronic specific heat at low temperature: The role of aperiodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Mendes, G. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Ujsághy, O.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic specific heat spectra at constant volume (CV) of a long-range correlated extended ladder model, mimicking a DNA molecule, is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of a double-stranded structure made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. The role of the aperiodicity on CV is discussed, considering two different nucleotide arrangements with increasing disorder, namely the Fibonacci and the Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic structures. Comparisons are made for different values of the band fillings, considering also a finite segment of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  19. Specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-11-01

    The specific heat spectra of long-range correlated DNA molecules is theoretically analyzed for a stacked array of single-stranded DNA made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T arranged in the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic sequences, with the aim to compare them with those related with a genomic DNA sequence. The energy spectra are calculated using the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a tight-binding approximation with the on-site energy exhibiting long-range disorder and nonrandom hopping amplitudes.

  20. Would Dissociative Recombination of DNA+ be a Possible Pathway of DNA Damage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H. C.; Chen, Z. P.; Strom, R. A.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-05-01

    It is known that dissociative recombination (DR) is one of the very efficient processes of destruction of molecular cations into neutral particles. During the past few years, the focus of DR has been expanded from small inorganic molecules to macromolecular cation. We are probing the possibility of the DR of DNA+ after ionization of DNA, for example due to ionizing radiation. Therefore we are investigating the existence of autoionization states within nucleotide bases (Guanine, Adenine, Cytosine, and Thymine). Our results from computational analysis using the modern electronic structure program ORCA will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate for their financial support.

  1. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  2. Adenine Nucleotides Control Proliferation In Vivo of Rat Retinal Progenitors by P2Y1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Pereira, Luana; Magalhães, Camila Feitosa; Repossi, Marinna Garcia; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza Prates; Sholl-Franco, Alfred; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne

    2016-08-24

    Previous studies demonstrated that exogenous ATP is able to regulate proliferation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro possibly via P2Y1 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we evaluated the function of adenine nucleotides in vivo during retinal development of newborn rats. Intravitreal injection of apyrase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleotides, reduced cell proliferation in retinas at postnatal day 2 (P2). This decrease was reversed when retinas were treated together with ATPγ-S or ADPβ-S, two hydrolysis-resistant analogs of ATP and ADP, respectively. During early postnatal days (P0 to P5), an increase in ectonucleotidase (E-NTPDase) activity was observed in the retina, suggesting a decrease in the availability of adenine nucleotides, coinciding with the end of proliferation. Interestingly, intravitreal injection of the E-NTPDase inhibitor ARL67156 increased proliferation by around 60 % at P5 rats. Furthermore, immunolabeling against P2Y1 receptor was observed overall in retina layers from P2 rats, including proliferating Ki-67-positive cells in the neuroblastic layer (NBL), suggesting that this receptor could be responsible for the action of adenine nucleotides upon proliferation of RPCs. Accordingly, intravitreal injection of MRS2179, a selective antagonist of P2Y1 receptors, reduced cell proliferation by approximately 20 % in P2 rats. Moreover, treatment with MRS 2179 caused an increase in p57(KIP2) and cyclin D1 expression, a reduction in cyclin E and Rb phosphorylated expression and in BrdU-positive cell number. These data suggest that the adenine nucleotides modulate the proliferation of rat RPCs via activation of P2Y1 receptors regulating transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle.

  3. Geometric consequences of electron delocalization for adenine tautomers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Makowski, Mariusz

    2014-06-01

    Geometric consequences of electron delocalization were studied for all possible adenine tautomers in aqueous solution by means of ab initio methods {PCM(water)//DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)} and compared to those in the gas phase {DFT(B3LYP)/6-311+G(d,p)}. To measure the consequences of any type of resonance conjugation (π-π, n-π, and σ-π), the geometry-based harmonic oscillator model of electron delocalization (HOMED) index, recently extended to the isolated (DFT) and hydrated (PCM//DFT) molecules, was applied to the molecular fragments (imidazole, pyrimidine, 4-aminopyrimidine, and purine) and also to the whole tautomeric system. For individual tautomers, the resonance conjugations and consequently the bond lengths strongly depend on the position of the labile protons. The HOMED indices are larger for tautomers (or their fragments) possessing the labile proton(s) at the N rather than C atom. Solvent interactions with adenine tautomers slightly increase the resonance conjugations. Consequently, they slightly shorten the single bonds and lengthen the double bonds. When going from the gas phase to water solution, the HOMED indices increase (by less than 0.15 units). There is a good relation between the HOMED indices estimated in water solution and those in the gas phase for the neutral and ionized forms of adenine. Subtle effects, being a consequence of intramolecular interactions between the neighboring groups, are so strongly reduced by solvent that the relation between the HOMED indices and the relative energies for the neutral adenine tautomers seems to be better in water solution than in the gas phase.

  4. Synthesis of metal-adeninate frameworks with high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Nan; Tan, Yan-Xi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    By introducing isophthalic acid or 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid to assemble with adenine and cadmium salt, two isostructural and anionic porous metal-organic frameworks (1 and 2) possessing the novel (4,8)-connected sqc topology are presented here. 1 shows permanent porosity with Langmuir surface area of 770.1 m2/g and exhibits high separation capacity on C2/C1 hydrocarbons.

  5. Dietary L-lysine prevents arterial calcification in adenine-induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-09-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC.

  6. Dietary l-Lysine Prevents Arterial Calcification in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC. PMID:24652795

  7. Structure-wise discrimination of adenine and guanine by proteins on the basis of their nonbonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the nonbonded interactions of the structurally similar moieties, adenine and guanine forming complexes with proteins. The results comprise (a) the amino acid-ligand atom preferences, (b) solvent accessibility of ligand atoms before and after complex formation with proteins, and (c) preferred amino acid residue atoms involved in the interactions. We have observed that the amino acid preferences involved in the hydrogen bonding interactions vary for adenine and guanine. The structural variation between the purine atoms is clearly reflected by their burial tendency in the solvent environment. Correlation of the mean amino acid preference values show the variation that exists between adenine and guanine preferences of all the amino acid residues. All our observations provide evidence for the discriminating nature of the proteins in recognizing adenine and guanine.

  8. Adenine nucleotides stimulate migration in wounded cultures of kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, S; Toback, F G

    1992-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides speed structural and functional recovery when administered after experimental renal injury in the rat and stimulate proliferation of kidney epithelial cells. As cell migration is a component of renal regeneration after acute tubular necrosis, we have used an in vitro model of wound healing to study this process. High density, quiescent monkey kidney epithelial cultures were wounded by mechanically scraping away defined regions of the monolayer to simulate the effect of cell loss after tubular necrosis and the number of cells that migrated into the denuded area was counted. Migration was independent of cell proliferation. Provision of adenosine, adenine nucleotides, or cyclic AMP increased the number of migrating cells and accelerated repair of the wound. Other purine and pyrimidine nucleotides were not effective. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine peptide, which blocks the binding of extracellular fibronectin to its cell surface receptor, completely inhibited migration in the presence or absence of ADP. Very low concentrations of epidermal growth factor (K0.5 approximately 0.3 ng/ml) stimulated migration, whereas transforming growth factor-beta 2 was inhibitory (Ki approximately 0.2 ng/ml). Thus, adenosine and/or adenine nucleotides released from injured or dying renal cells, or administered exogenously, may stimulate surviving cells in the wounded nephron to migrate along the basement membrane, thereby rapidly restoring tubular structure and function. Images PMID:1634617

  9. Mechanism of charge separation in DNA by hole transfer through consecutive adenines.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Osakada, Yasuko; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of charge separation in DNA with consecutive adenines adjacent to a photosensitizer (Sens), a series of naphthalimide (NI) and 5-bromouracil ((br)U)-modified DNAs were prepared, and the quantum yields of formation of the charge-separated states (Phi) upon photo-excitation of the Sens NI in DNA were measured. The Phi was modulated by the incorporation site of (br)U, which changes the oxidation potential of its complementary A through hydrogen bonding and the hole-transfer rates between adenines. The results were interpreted as charge separation by means of the initial charge transfer between NI in the singlet excited state and the second- and third-nearest adenine to the NI. In addition, the oxidation of the A nearest to NI leads to the rapid charge recombination within a contact ion pair. This suggests that the charge-separation process can be refined to maximize the Phi by putting a redox-inactive spacer base pair between a photosensitizer and an A-T stretch.

  10. Identification of a Campylobacter coli methyltransferase targeting adenines at GATC sites.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Vikrant; Altermann, Eric; Crespo, Maria D; Olson, Jonathan W; Siletzky, Robin M; Kathariou, Sophia

    2016-12-02

    Campylobacter coli can infect humans and colonize multiple other animals but its host-associated genes or adaptations are poorly understood. Adenine methylation at GATC sites, resulting in MboI resistance of genomic DNA, was earlier frequently detected among C. coli from swine but not among turkey-derived isolates. The underlying genetic basis has remained unknown. Comparative genome sequence analyses of C. coli 6461, a swine-derived strain with MboI-resistant DNA, revealed two chromosomal ORFs, 0059 and 0060, encoding a putative DNA methyltransferase and a conserved hypothetical protein, respectively, which were lacking from the genome of the turkey-derived C. coli strain 11601, which had MboI-susceptible DNA. To determine whether the ORF0059 mediated MboI resistance and hence encoded a putative N6-adenine DNA methyltransferase, the gene was cloned immediately upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance cassette (cat) and a PCR fragment harboring ORF0059-cat was transformed into C. coli 11601. The transformants had MboI-resistant DNA, suggesting a direct role of this gene in methylation of adenines at GATC sites. In-silico analyses suggested that the ORF0059-ORF0060 cassette was more frequent among C. coli from swine than certain other sources (e.g. cattle, humans). Potential impacts of ORF0059-mediated methylation on C. coli host preference and other adaptations remain to be elucidated.

  11. Absorption by DNA single strands of adenine isolated in vacuo: The role of multiple chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgaard; Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-02-01

    The degree of electronic coupling between DNA bases is a topic being up for much debate. Here we report on the intrinsic electronic properties of isolated DNA strands in vacuo free of solvent, which is a good starting point for high-level excited states calculations. Action spectra of DNA single strands of adenine reveal sign of exciton coupling between stacked bases from blueshifted absorption bands (˜3 nm) relative to that of the dAMP mononucleotide (one adenine base). The bands are blueshifted by about 10 nm compared to those of solvated strands, which is a shift similar to that for the adenine molecule and the dAMP mononucleotide. Desolvation has little effect on the bandwidth, which implies that inhomogenous broadening of the absorption bands in aqueous solution is of minor importance compared to, e.g., conformational disorder. Finally, at high photon energies, internal conversion competes with electron detachment since dissociation of the bare photoexcited ions on the microsecond time scale is measured.

  12. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  13. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-08

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  14. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process.

  15. White spot syndrome virus VP12 interacts with adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang-fang; Chou, Zhi-guang; Liu, Qing-hui; Guan, Guangkuo; Li, Chen; Huang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus VP12 contains cell attachment motif RGD which is considered to be critical for host cell binding. Until now, the function of this protein remains undefined. In this study, we explored the interaction of VP12 with host cells. A new shrimp protein (adenine nucleotide translocase of Litopenaeus vannamei, LvANT) is selected by far-western overlay assay. Tissue distribution of adenine nucleotide translocase mRNA showed that it was commonly spread in all the tissues detected. Cellular localization of LvANT in shrimp hemocytes showed that it was primarily located in the cytoplasm of hemocytes and colocalized with mitochondria. ELISA and far-western blot assay confirmed that VP12 interacted with LvANT. In vivo neutralization assay showed that anti-LvANT antibody can significantly reduce the mortality of shrimp challenged by WSSV at 48h post-treatment. Our results collectively showed that VP12 is involved in host cell binding via interaction with adenine nucleotide translocase.

  16. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  17. Adenine deaminase is encoded by Tad1 and participates in copper accumulation in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kehe; Fan, Lili; Yu, Chuangjing; Li, Yingying; Gao, Shigang; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-02-01

    We cloned a novel Tad1 gene and demonstrated that this gene is closely involved in copper bioaccumulation in Trichoderma reesei. Tad1 gene encodes a 510 amino acids protein of the amidohydrolase superfamily which belongs to COG0402. We found that adenine was the most efficient substrate of Tad1 protein among the substrates used in this study. Gene function was also investigated by overexpression and RNA interference. Results showed that copper accumulation increased in mutant cells when Tad1 was overexpressed; by contrast, copper accumulation significantly decreased when Tad1 was inhibited. To investigate the function of Tad1 in copper bioaccumulation, we determined adenine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine concentrations by reversed phase HPLC. Tad1 overexpression induced a substantial production of xanthine, which functions in binding numerous copper ions and reducing copper concentration. We further compared the gene expression profile of AT01 with that of a wild-type T. reesei strain grown in a medium containing 1.0mM Cu(2+) by performing DNA microarray. Several upregulated genes in the mutant were associated with adenine or copper metabolism.

  18. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    DOE PAGES

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; ...

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu7(μ2-OH2)6(μ3-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu2(μ2-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-clustermore » interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.« less

  19. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology.

    PubMed

    Anumukonda, Lakshmi N; Young, Avery; Lynn, David G; Buckley, Ragan; Warrayat, Amena; Graves, Christina L; Bean, Heather D; Hud, Nicholas V

    2011-12-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life's chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum.

  20. Adenine Synthesis in a Model Prebiotic Reaction: Connecting Origin of Life Chemistry with Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many high school laboratory experiments demonstrate concepts related to biological evolution, but few exist that allow students to investigate life’s chemical origins. This series of laboratory experiments has been developed to allow students to explore and appreciate the deep connection that exists between prebiotic chemistry, chemical evolution, and contemporary biological systems. In the first experiment of the series, students synthesize adenine, one of the purine nucleobases of DNA and RNA, from plausibly prebiotic precursor molecules. Students compare their product to authentic standards using thin-layer chromatography. The second and third experiments of the series allow students to extract DNA from a familiar organism, the strawberry, and hydrolyze it, releasing adenine, which they can then compare to the previously chemically-synthesized adenine. A fourth, optional experiment is included where the technique of thin-layer chromatography is introduced and chromatographic skills are developed for use in the other three experiments that comprise this series. Concepts relating to organic and analytical chemistry, as well as biochemistry and DNA structure, are incorporated throughout, allowing this series of laboratory experiments to be easily inserted into existing laboratory courses and to reinforce concepts already included in any high school chemistry or biology curriculum. PMID:22075932

  1. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  2. Heptacopper(II) and dicopper(II)-adenine complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Leite Ferreira, B. J. M.; Brandão, Paula; Dos Santos, A. M.; Gai, Z.; Cruz, C.; Reis, M. S.; Santos, T. M.; Félix, V.

    2015-07-13

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of two new copper(II) complexes with molecular formulas [Cu72-OH2)63-O)6(adenine)6(NO3)26H2O (1) and [Cu22-H2O)2(adenine)2(H2O)4](NO3)42H2O (2) are reported. We composed the heptanuclear compound of a central octahedral CuO6 core sharing edges with six adjacent copper octahedra. In 2, the copper octahedra shares one equatorial edge. In both compounds, these basic copper cluster units are further linked by water bridges and bridging adenine ligands through N3 and N9 donors. All copper(II) centers exhibit Jahn-Teller distorted octahedral coordination characteristic of a d9 center. Our study of the magnetic properties of the heptacopper complex revealed a dominant ferromagnetic intra-cluster interaction, while the dicopper complex exhibits antiferromagnetic intra-dimer interactions with weakly ferromagnetic inter-dimer interaction.

  3. Properties of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan-Fun; Ljungdahl, Lars; Wood, Harland G.

    1966-01-01

    Li, Lan-Fun (Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio), Lars Ljungdahl, and Harland G. Wood. Properties of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum. J. Bacteriol. 92: 405–412. 1966.—A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent formate dehydrogenase has been isolated from C. thermoaceticum. The enzyme is very sensitive to oxygen and requires sulfhydryl compounds for activity. The apparent Km at 50 C and pH 7.0 for NADP is 5.9 × 10−5m and for formate, 2.2 × 10−4m. The enzyme is most active at about 60 C and at pH values between 7.0 and 9.0. The enzyme catalyzes an exchange between C14O2 and formate, which requires NADP, but net synthesis of formate from CO2 and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate could not be demonstrated. The reaction does not involve ferredoxin. PMID:16562128

  4. Selective self-assembly of adenine-silver nanoparticles forms rings resembling the size of cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sungmoon; Park, Soonyoung; Yang, Seon-Ah; Jeong, Yujin; Yu, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly has played critical roles in the construction of functional nanomaterials. However, the structure of the macroscale multicomponent materials built by the self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks is hard to predict due to multiple intermolecular interactions of great complexity. Evaporation of solvents is usually an important approach to induce kinetically stable assemblies of building blocks with a large-scale specific arrangement. During such a deweting process, we tried to monitor the possible interactions between silver nanoparticles and nucleobases at a larger scale by epifluorescence microscopy, thanks to the doping of silver nanoparticles with luminescent silver nanodots. ssDNA oligomer-stabilized silver nanoparticles and adenine self-assemble to form ring-like compartments similar to the size of modern cells. However, the silver ions only dismantle the self-assembly of adenine. The rings are thermodynamically stable as the drying process only enrich the nanoparticles-nucleobase mixture to a concentration that activates the self-assembly. The permeable membrane-like edge of the ring is composed of adenine filaments glued together by silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, chemicals are partially confined and accumulated inside the ring, suggesting that this might be used as a microreactor to speed up chemical reactions during a dewetting process. PMID:26643504

  5. DNA dynamics in aqueous solution: opening the double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Ross, W. S.; Tinoco, I. Jr; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    The opening of a DNA base pair is a simple reaction that is a prerequisite for replication, transcription, and other vital biological functions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of biological reactions is crucial for predicting and, ultimately, controlling them. Realistic computer simulations of the reactions can provide the needed understanding. To model even the simplest reaction in aqueous solution requires hundreds of hours of supercomputing time. We have used molecular dynamics techniques to simulate fraying of the ends of a six base pair double strand of DNA, [TCGCGA]2, where the four bases of DNA are denoted by T (thymine), C (cytosine), G (guanine), and A (adenine), and to estimate the free energy barrier to this process. The calculations, in which the DNA was surrounded by 2,594 water molecules, required 50 hours of CRAY-2 CPU time for every simulated 100 picoseconds. A free energy barrier to fraying, which is mainly characterized by the movement of adenine away from thymine into aqueous environment, was estimated to be 4 kcal/mol. Another fraying pathway, which leads to stacking between terminal adenine and thymine, was also observed. These detailed pictures of the motions and energetics of DNA base pair opening in water are a first step toward understanding how DNA will interact with any molecule.

  6. Design and synthesis of novel adenine fluorescence probe based on Eu(III) complexes with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengyun; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Dou, Xuekai; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2017-02-24

    A novel adenine (Ad) fluorescence probe (Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine)) was designed and synthesized by improving experimental method based on the Eu(III) complex and dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. The dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand was first synthesized by the acylation action between dtpaa and guanine (Gu), and the corresponding Eu(III) complex was successfully prepared through heat-refluxing method with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. As a novel fluorescence probe, the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) complex can detect adenine (Ad) with characteristics of strong targeting, high specificity and high recognition ability. The detection mechanism of the adenine (Ad) using this probe in buffer solution was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy. When the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) was introduced to the adenine (Ad) solution, the fluorescence emission intensity was significantly enhanced. However, adding other bases such as guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) with similar composition and structure to that of adenine (Ad) to the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) solution, the fluorescence emission intensities are nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the interference of guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) on the detection of the adenine using Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) probe was also studied. It was found that presence of these bases does not affect the detection of adenine (Ad). A linear response of fluorescence emission intensities of Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) at 570nm as a function of adenine (Ad) concentration in the range of 0.00-5.00×10(-5)molL(-1) was observed. The detection limit is about 4.70×10(-7)molL(-1).

  7. Effect of gum arabic on oxidative stress and inflammation in adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Husseni, Isehaq; Beegam, Sumyia; Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schierling, Simone; Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease in humans, and in chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats. The aim of this work was to study the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in adenine-induced CRF and the effect thereon of the purported nephroprotective agent gum arabic (GA). Rats were divided into four groups and treated for 4 weeks as follows: control, adenine in feed (0.75%, w/w), GA in drinking water (15%, w/v) and adenine+GA, as before. Urine, blood and kidneys were collected from the rats at the end of the treatment for analysis of conventional renal function tests (plasma creatinine and urea concentration). In addition, the concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the oxidative stress markers glutathione and superoxide dismutase, renal apoptosis, superoxide formation and DNA double strand break frequency, detected by immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX, were measured. Adenine significantly increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine in plasma, significantly decreased the creatinine clearance and induced significant increases in the concentration of the measured inflammatory mediators. Further, it caused oxidative stress and DNA damage. Treatment with GA significantly ameliorated these actions. The mechanism of the reported salutary effect of GA in adenine-induced CRF is associated with mitigation of the adenine-induced inflammation and generation of free radicals.

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  9. Inhibition of transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vitro by the alc gene product of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Drivdahl, R H; Kutter, E M

    1990-01-01

    The alc gene product (gpalc) of bacteriophage T4 inhibits the transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vivo. We examined its effect on transcription in vitro by comparing RNA polymerase isolated from Escherichia coli infected with either wild-type T4D+ or alc mutants. A 50 to 60% decline in RNA polymerase activity, measured on phage T7 DNA, was observed by 1 min after infection with either T4D+ or alc mutants; this did not occur when the infecting phage lacked gpalt. In the case of the T4D+ strain but not alc mutants, this was followed by a further decrease. By 5 min after infection the activity of alc mutants was 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than that of the wild type on various cytosine-containing DNA templates, whereas there was little or no difference in activity on T4 HMdC-DNA, in agreement with the in vivo specificity. Effects on transcript initiation and elongation were distinguished by using a T7 phage DNA template. Rifampin challenge, end-labeling with [gamma-32P]ATP, and selective initiation with a dinucleotide all indicate that the decreased in vitro activity of the wild-type polymerase relative to that of the alc mutants was due to inhibition of elongation, not to any difference in initiation rates. Wild-type (but not mutated) gpalc copurified with RNA polymerase on heparin agarose but not in subsequent steps. Immunoprecipitation of modified RNA polymerase also indicated that gpalc was not tightly bound to RNA polymerase intracellularly. It thus appears likely that gpalc inhibits transcript elongation on cytosine-containing DNA by interacting with actively transcribing core polymerase as a complex with the enzyme and cytosine-rich stretches of the template. Images PMID:2185231

  10. Basis set dependence using DFT/B3LYP calculations to model the Raman spectrum of thymine.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Jakub; Lipiec, Ewelina

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy (including surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS)) is a highly promising experimental method for investigations of biomolecule damage induced by ionizing radiation. However, proper interpretation of changes in experimental spectra for complex systems is often difficult or impossible, thus Raman spectra calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) provide an invaluable tool as an additional layer of understanding of underlying processes. There are many works that address the problem of basis set dependence for energy and bond length consideration, nevertheless there is still lack of consistent research on basis set influence on Raman spectra intensities for biomolecules. This study fills this gap by investigating of the influence of basis set choice for the interpretation of Raman spectra of the thymine molecule calculated using the DFT/B3LYP framework and comparing these results with experimental spectra. Among 19 selected Pople's basis sets, the best agreement was achieved using 6-31[Formula: see text](d,p), 6-31[Formula: see text](d,p) and 6-11[Formula: see text]G(d,p) sets. Adding diffuse functions or polarized functions for small basis set or use of a medium or large basis set without diffuse or polarized functions is not sufficient to reproduce Raman intensities correctly. The introduction of the diffuse functions ([Formula: see text]) on hydrogen atoms is not necessary for gas phase calculations. This work serves as a benchmark for further research on the interaction of ionizing radiation with DNA molecules by means of ab initio calculations and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, this work provides a set of new scaling factors for Raman spectra calculation in the framework of DFT/B3LYP method.

  11. Effects of microinjected photoreactivating enzyme on thymine dimer removal and DNA repair synthesis in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roza, L.; Vermeulen, W.; Bergen Henegouwen, J.B.; Eker, A.P.; Jaspers, N.G.; Lohman, P.H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H. )

    1990-03-15

    UV-induced thymine dimers (10 J/m2 of UV-C) were assayed in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts with a monoclonal antibody against these dimers and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. In repair-proficient cells dimer-specific immunofluorescence gradually decreased with time, reaching about 25% of the initial fluorescence after 27 h. Rapid disappearance of dimers was observed in cells which had been microinjected with yeast photoreactivating enzyme prior to UV irradiation. This photoreactivation (PHR) was light dependent and (virtually) complete within 15 min of PHR illumination. In general, PHR of dimers strongly reduces UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). However, when PHR was applied immediately after UV irradiation, UDS remained unchanged initially; the decrease set in only after 30 min. When PHR was performed 2 h after UV exposure, UDS dropped without delay. An explanation for this difference is preferential removal of some type(s) of nondimer lesions, which is responsible for the PHR-resistant UDS immediately following UV irradiation. After the rapid removal of these photoproducts, the bulk of UDS is due to dimer repair. From the rapid effect of dimer removal by PHR on UDS it can be deduced that the excision of dimers up to the repair synthesis step takes considerably less than 30 min. Also in XP fibroblasts of various complementation groups the effect of PHR was investigated. The immunochemical dimer assay showed rapid PHR-dependent removal comparable to that in normal cells. However, the decrease of (residual) UDS due to PHR was absent (in XP-D) or much delayed (in XP-A and -E) compared to normal cells. This supports the idea that in these XP cells preferential repair of nondimer lesions does occur, but at a much lower rate.

  12. Tautomeric equilibrium of uracil and thymine in model protein-nucleic acid contacts. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Samijlenko, Svitlana P; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Stepanyugin, Andriy V; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2010-01-28

    This work deals with tautomeric transformations of uracil (Ura) and thymine (Thy) in their model complexes with the deprotonated carboxylic group. Essential changes in the UV spectra of the bases upon their interaction with NaAc, vanishing signals of both imino protons in (1)H NMR spectra, and a perceptible decrease in intensity of both IR bands, related to the stretching vibrations nu(C=O) of the carbonyl groups, imply involvement of enolic tautomers. Results of quantum chemical calculations of the double complexes of the Ura(Thy) tautomers with CH(3)COO(-) at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory proved to be incompatible with the spectral features: despite the fact that the complexes of the enolic tautomers are much closer in energy to the diketo ones as compared to isolated tautomers, the energy gap between them is such that in tautomeric equilibrium dominate diketo forms. Calculations of triple complexes of the type CH(3)COO(-):Ura(Thy) tautomer:Na(+), taking into account the effect of the Na(+) coordination with tautomers, show that three triple complexes formed by enolic tautomers appeared more stable than those formed by diketo ones. This makes the UV and (1)H NMR data understandable, but the high residual intensity of the nu(C=O) bands in the IR spectra remains unclear. At that ion, Na(+) itself was not able to disturb the tautomeric equilibrium in the coordination complexes of the type Ura(Thy) tautomer:Na(+). To evaluate the DMSO effect, the CPCM solvation model was applied to triple complexes of the Ura tautomers. It appeared that in the solution there is coexistence between the diketo and enolic tautomers in a ratio of 53%:47%. This makes possible reconciliation of our experimental data. The biological significance of high-energy tautomers of nucleotide bases is discussed.

  13. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  14. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine reveals conservation of its tissue distribution between amphibians and mammals.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rimple D; Sottile, Virginie; Loose, Matthew; De Sousa, Paul A; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2012-02-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) is a form of modified cytosine, which has recently attracted a considerable attention due to its potential role in transcriptional regulation. According to several reports 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine distribution is tissue-specific in mammals. Thus, 5-hmC is enriched in embryonic cell populations and in adult neuronal tissue. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-quantitative immunohistochemical detection of 5-hmC and utilize it to assess the levels of this modification in amphibian tissues. We show that, similar to mammalian embryos, 5-hmC is enriched in axolotl tadpoles compared with adult tissues. Our data demonstrate that 5-hmC distribution is tissue-specific in amphibians, and that strong 5-hmC enrichment in neuronal cells is conserved between amphibians and mammals. In addition, we identify 5-hmC-enriched cell populations that are distributed in amphibian skin and connective tissue in a mosaic manner. Our results illustrate that immunochemistry can be successfully used not only for spatial identification of cells enriched with 5-hmC, but also for the semi-quantitative assessment of the levels of this epigenetic modification in single cells of different tissues.

  15. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling.

  16. Epigenetic contribution to successful polyploidizations: variation in global cytosine methylation along an extensive ploidy series in Dianthus broteri (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Conchita; Balao, Francisco; Bazaga, Pilar; Pérez, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Polyploidization is a significant evolutionary force in plants which involves major genomic and genetic changes, frequently regulated by epigenetic factors. We explored whether natural polyploidization in Dianthus broteri complex resulted in substantial changes in global DNA cytosine methylation associated to ploidy. Global cytosine methylation was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 12 monocytotypic populations with different ploidies (2×, 4×, 6×, 12×) broadly distributed within D. broteri distribution range. The effects of ploidy level and local variation on methylation were assessed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). Dianthus broteri exhibited a higher methylation percent (˜33%) than expected by its monoploid genome size and a large variation among study populations (range: 29.3-35.3%). Global methylation tended to increase with ploidy but did not significantly differ across levels due to increased variation within the highest-order polyploidy categories. Methylation varied more among hexaploid and dodecaploid populations, despite such cytotypes showing more restricted geographic location and increased genetic relatedness than diploids and tetraploids. In this study, we demonstrate the usefulness of an HPLC method in providing precise and genome reference-free global measure of DNA cytosine methylation, suitable to advance current knowledge of the roles of this epigenetic mechanism in polyploidization processes.

  17. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  18. Studying Z-DNA and B- to Z-DNA transitions using a cytosine analogue FRET-pair

    PubMed Central

    Dumat, Blaise; Larsen, Anders Foller; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on the use of a tricyclic cytosine FRET pair, incorporated into DNA with different base pair separations, to study Z-DNA and B-Z DNA junctions. With its position inside the DNA structure, the FRET pair responds to a B- to Z-DNA transition with a distinct change in FRET efficiency for each donor/acceptor configuration allowing reliable structural probing. Moreover, we show how fluorescence spectroscopy and our cytosine analogues can be used to determine rate constants for the B- to Z-DNA transition mechanism. The modified cytosines have little influence on the transition and the FRET pair is thus an easily implemented and virtually non-perturbing fluorescence tool to study Z-DNA. This nucleobase analogue FRET pair represents a valuable addition to the limited number of fluorescence methods available to study Z-DNA and we suggest it will facilitate, for example, deciphering the B- to Z-DNA transition mechanism and investigating the interaction of DNA with Z-DNA binding proteins. PMID:26896804

  19. Methyl-Cytosine-Driven Structural Changes Enhance Adduction Kinetics of an Exon 7 fragment of the p53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Spundana; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Fu, You-Jun; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine (C) at C-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites enhances reactivity of DNA towards electrophiles. Mutations at CpG sites on the p53 tumor suppressor gene that can result from these adductions are in turn correlated with specific cancers. Here we describe the first restriction-enzyme-assisted LC-MS/MS sequencing study of the influence of methyl cytosines (MeC) on kinetics of p53 gene adduction by model metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), using methodology applicable to correlate gene damage sites for drug and pollutant metabolites with mutation sites. This method allows direct kinetic measurements by LC-MS/MS sequencing for oligonucleotides longer than 20 base pairs (bp). We used MeC and non-MeC (C) versions of a 32 bp exon 7 fragment of the p53 gene. Methylation of 19 cytosines increased the rate constant 3-fold for adduction on G at the major reactive CpG in codon 248 vs. the non-MeC fragment. Rate constants for non-CpG codons 244 and 243 were not influenced significantly by MeC. Conformational and hydrophobicity changes in the MeC-p53 exon 7 fragment revealed by CD spectra and molecular modeling increase the BPDE binding constant to G in codon 248 consistent with a pathway in which preceding reactant binding greatly facilitates the rate of covalent SN2 coupling. PMID:28102315

  20. A cytosine methyltransferase homologue is essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Michael; Williams, Rebecca L.; Kothe, Gregory O.; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    During sexual development, Neurospora crassa inactivates genes in duplicated DNA segments by a hypermutation process, repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP introduces C:G to T:A transition mutations and creates targets for subsequent DNA methylation in vegetative tissue. The mechanism of RIP and its relationship to DNA methylation are not fully understood. Mutations in DIM-2, a DNA methyltransferase (DMT) responsible for all known cytosine methylation in Neurospora, does not prevent RIP. We used RIP to disrupt a second putative DMT gene in the Neurospora genome and tested mutants for defects in DNA methylation and RIP. No effect on DNA methylation was detected in the tissues that could be assayed, but the mutants showed recessive defects in RIP. Duplications of the am and mtr genes were completely stable in crosses homozygous for the mutated potential DMT gene, which we call rid (RIP defective). The same duplications were inactivated normally in heterozygous crosses. Disruption of the rid gene did not noticeably affect fertility, growth, or development. In contrast, crosses homozygous for a mutation in a related gene in Ascobolus immersus, masc1, reportedly fail to develop and heterozygous crosses reduce methylation induced premeiotically [Malagnac, F., Wendel, B., Goyon, C., Faugeron, G., Zickler, D., et al. (1997) Cell 91, 281–290]. We isolated homologues of rid from Neurospora tetrasperma and Neurospora intermedia to identify conserved regions. Homologues possess all motifs characteristic of eukaryotic DMTs and have large distinctive C- and N-terminal domains. PMID:12072568

  1. Hydroxymethyl cytosine marks in the human mitochondrial genome are dynamic in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Apart from DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation has increasingly been studied as an important epigenetic mark. 5- hydroxymethylcytosines, though initially were thought to be an intermediary product of demethylation, recent studies suggest this to be a highly regulated process and modulated by the TET family of enzymes. Recent genome wide studies have shown that hydroxymethylcytosine marks are closely associated with the regulation of important biological processes like transcription and embryonic development. It is also known that aberrant hydroxymethylation marks have been associated with diseases like cancer. The presence of hydroxymethylcytosines in the mitochondrial genome has been earlier suggested, though the genome-scale map has not been laid out. In this present study, we have mapped and analyzed the hydroxymethylcytosine marks in the mitochondrial genome using 23 different publicly available datasets. We cross validated our data by checking for consistency across a subset of genomic regions previously annotated to hydroxymethylcytosines and show good consistency. We observe a dynamic distribution of hydroxymethylation marks in the mitochondrial genome. Unlike the methylcytosine marks, hydroxymethylcytosine marks are characterized by the lack of conservation across the samples considered, though similar cell types shared the pattern. We additionally observed that the hydroxymethylation marks are enriched in the upstream of GSS (gene start site) regions and in gene body as similar as nuclear genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-scale map of hydroxymethyl cytosines in the human mitochondrial genome.

  2. Regulation of expression and activity of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Shannon R Morey; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2011-01-01

    Three active DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases (DNMTs) have been identified in mammalian cells, Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b. DNMT1 is primarily a maintenance methyltransferase, as it prefers to methylate hemimethylated DNA during DNA replication and in vitro. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are de novo methyltransferases and show similar activity on unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA. DNMT3L, which lacks the catalytic domain, binds to DNMT3A and DNMT3B variants and facilitates their chromatin targeting, presumably for de novo methylation. There are several mechanisms by which mammalian cells regulate DNMT levels, including varied transcriptional activation of the respective genes and posttranslational modifications of the enzymes that can affect catalytic activity, targeting, and enzyme degradation. In addition, binding of miRNAs or RNA-binding proteins can also alter the expression of DNMTs. These regulatory processes can be disrupted in disease or by environmental factors, resulting in altered DNMT expression and aberrant DNA methylation patterns.

  3. RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity requires the cytosine methyltransferase Dnmt2.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Jafar; Grandjean, Valérie; Liebers, Reinhard; Tuorto, Francesca; Ghanbarian, Hossein; Lyko, Frank; Cuzin, François; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2013-05-01

    RNA-mediated transmission of phenotypes is an important way to explain non-Mendelian heredity. We have previously shown that small non-coding RNAs can induce hereditary epigenetic variations in mice and act as the transgenerational signalling molecules. Two prominent examples for these paramutations include the epigenetic modulation of the Kit gene, resulting in altered fur coloration, and the modulation of the Sox9 gene, resulting in an overgrowth phenotype. We now report that expression of the Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase is required for the establishment and hereditary maintenance of both paramutations. Our data show that the Kit paramutant phenotype was not transmitted to the progeny of Dnmt2(-/-) mice and that the Sox9 paramutation was also not established in Dnmt2(-/-) embryos. Similarly, RNA from Dnmt2-negative Kit heterozygotes did not induce the paramutant phenotype when microinjected into Dnmt2-deficient fertilized eggs and microinjection of the miR-124 microRNA failed to induce the characteristic giant phenotype. In agreement with an RNA-mediated mechanism of inheritance, no change was observed in the DNA methylation profiles of the Kit locus between the wild-type and paramutant mice. RNA bisulfite sequencing confirmed Dnmt2-dependent tRNA methylation in mouse sperm and also indicated Dnmt2-dependent cytosine methylation in Kit RNA in paramutant embryos. Together, these findings uncover a novel function of Dnmt2 in RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity.

  4. Morphologic and phenotypic changes of human neuroblastoma cells in culture induced by cytosine arabinoside

    SciTech Connect

    Ponzoni, M.; Lanciotti, M.; Melodia, A.; Casalaro, A.; Cornaglia-Ferraris, P. )

    1989-03-01

    The effects of cytosine-arabinoside (ARA-C) on the growth and phenotypic expression of a new human neuroblastoma (NB) cell line (GI-ME-N) have been extensively tested. Low doses of ARA-C allowing more than 90% cell viability induce morphological differentiation and growth inhibition. Differentiated cells were larger and flattened with elongated dendritic processes; such cells appeared within 48 hours after a dose of ARA-C as low as 0.1 {mu}g/ml. The new morphological aspect reached the maximum expression after 5-6 days of culture being independent from the addition of extra drug to the culture. A decrease in ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation was also observed within 24 hours and the cell growth was completely inhibited on the sixth day. Moreover, ARA-C strongly inhibited anchorage-independent growth in soft agar assay. Membrane immunofluorescence showed several dramatic changes in NB-specific antigen expression after 5 days of treatment with ARA-C. At the same time ARA-C also modulated cytoskeletal proteins and slightly increased catecholamine expression. These findings suggest that noncytotoxic doses of ARA-C do promote the differentiation of GI-ME-N neuroblastoma cells associated with reduced expression of the malignant phenotype.

  5. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas; Parker, Brian J; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J; Kelly, Theresa K; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A; Hoover, Cindi A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of transitions induced by cytosine analogue: comparative quantum-chemical study].

    PubMed

    Brovarets', O O; Govorun, D M

    2010-01-01

    Using the simplest molecular models at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of the theory it has been shown for the first time that in addition to traditional incorporational errors caused by facilitated (compared with the canonical DNA bases cytosine (Cyt)) tautomerization of 6-(2-deoxy-beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-3,4-dihydro-6H,8H-pyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (DCyt), this mutagen causes the replication errors, increasing one million times the population of mispair Gua.DCyt* (asterisk marked mutagenic tautomer) as compared with mispair Gua.Cyt*. It is also proved that DCyt in addition to traditional incorporational errors also induces similar errors by an additional mechanism - due to a facilitated tautomerization of the wobble base pair Ade.DCyt (compared to the same pair Ade.Cyt) to a mispair Ade.DCyt* which is quasirisomorphic Watson-Crick base pair. Moreover, the obtained results allowed interpreting non-inconsistently the existing experimental NMR data.

  7. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  8. Persistence of cytosine methylation of DNA following fertilisation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; O'Neill, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Normal development of the mammalian embryo requires epigenetic reprogramming of the genome. The level of cytosine methylation of CpG-rich (5meC) regions of the genome is a major epigenetic regulator and active global demethylation of 5meC throughout the genome is reported to occur within the first cell-cycle following fertilization. An enzyme or mechanism capable of catalysing such rapid global demethylation has not been identified. The mouse is a widely used model for studying developmental epigenetics. We have reassessed the evidence for this phenomenon of genome-wide demethylation following fertilisation in the mouse. We found when using conventional methods of immunolocalization that 5meC showed a progressive acid-resistant antigenic masking during zygotic maturation which gave the appearance of demethylation. Changing the unmasking strategy by also performing tryptic digestion revealed a persistence of a methylated state. Analysis of methyl binding domain 1 protein (MBD1) binding confirmed that the genome remained methylated following fertilisation. The maintenance of this methylated state over the first several cell-cycles required the actions of DNA methyltransferase activity. The study shows that any 5meC remodelling that occurs during early development is not explained by a global active loss of 5meC staining during the cleavage stage of development and global loss of methylation following fertilization is not a major component of epigenetic reprogramming in the mouse zygote.

  9. Retrovirus-mediated transduction of a cytosine deaminase gene preserves the stemness of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoi; Jung, Jin Hwa; Park, JoonSeong; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-02-22

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as attractive cellular vehicles to deliver therapeutic genes for ex-vivo therapy of diverse diseases; this is, in part, because they have the capability to migrate into tumor or lesion sites. Previously, we showed that MSCs could be utilized to deliver a bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene to brain tumors. Here we assessed whether transduction with a retroviral vector encoding CD gene altered the stem cell property of MSCs. MSCs were transduced at passage 1 and cultivated up to passage 11. We found that proliferation and differentiation potentials, chromosomal stability and surface antigenicity of MSCs were not altered by retroviral transduction. The results indicate that retroviral vectors can be safely utilized for delivery of suicide genes to MSCs for ex-vivo therapy. We also found that a single retroviral transduction was sufficient for sustainable expression up to passage 10. The persistent expression of the transduced gene indicates that transduced MSCs provide a tractable and manageable approach for potential use in allogeneic transplantation.

  10. Enhancing VSV oncolytic activity with an improved cytosine deaminase suicide gene strategy.

    PubMed

    Leveille, S; Samuel, S; Goulet, M-L; Hiscott, J

    2011-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, with recent studies emphasizing the combined use of chemotherapeutic compounds and prodrug suicide gene strategies to improve OV efficacy. In the present study, the synergistic activity of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-MΔ51 virus expressing the cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT) suicide gene and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) prodrug was investigated in triggering tumor cell oncolysis. In a panel of VSV-sensitive and -resistant cells-prostate PC3, breast MCF7 and TSA, B-lymphoma Karpas and melanoma B16-F10-the combination treatment increased killing of non-infected bystander cells in vitro via the release of 5FC toxic derivatives. In addition, we showed a synergistic effect on cancer cell killing with VSV-MΔ51 and the active form of the drug 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, by monitoring VSV replication at the tumor site and maximizing 5FC bioavailability, we optimized the treatment regimen and improved survival of animals bearing TSA mammary adenocarcinoma. Altogether, this study emphasizes the potency of the VSV-CD::UPRT and 5FC combination, and demonstrates the necessity of optimizing each step of a multicomponent therapy to design efficient treatment.

  11. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  12. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Combined with Cytosine Deaminase-Endostatin for Suppression of Liver Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Chen, Hua-Jun; Jia, ZhenYu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of gene transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provides a novel method for treatment of human tumors. To study treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma using cytosine deaminase (CD)- and endostatin (ES)-transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were cultured and transfected with Lenti6.3-CD-EGFP and Lenti6.3-ES-Monomer-DsRed labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. DiD (lipophilic fluorescent dye)-labeled EPCs were injected into normal mice and mice with liver carcinoma. The EPCs loaded with CD-ES were infused into the mice through caudal veins and tumor volumes were measured. The tumor volumes in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group were found to be smaller as a result and grew more slowly than those from the EPC + SPIO + LV (lentivirus, empty vector control) group. Survival times were also measured after infusion of the cells into the mice. The median survival time was found to be longer in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group than in the others. In conclusion, the EPCs transfected with CD-ES suppressed the liver carcinoma cells in vitro, migrated primarily to the carcinoma, inhibited tumor growth, and also extended the median survival time for the mice with liver carcinoma.

  13. Endogenous APOBEC3A DNA cytosine deaminase is cytoplasmic and nongenotoxic.

    PubMed

    Land, Allison M; Law, Emily K; Carpenter, Michael A; Lackey, Lela; Brown, William L; Harris, Reuben S

    2013-06-14

    APOBEC3A (A3A) is a myeloid lineage-specific DNA cytosine deaminase with a role in innate immunity to foreign DNA. Previous studies have shown that heterologously expressed A3A is genotoxic, suggesting that monocytes may have a mechanism to regulate this enzyme. Indeed, we observed no significant cytotoxicity when interferon was used to induce the expression of endogenous A3A in CD14(+)-enriched primary cells or the monocytic cell line THP-1. In contrast, doxycycline-induced A3A in HEK293 cells caused major cytotoxicity at protein levels lower than those observed when CD14(+) cells were stimulated with interferon. Immunofluorescent microscopy of interferon-stimulated CD14(+) and THP-1 cells revealed that endogenous A3A is cytoplasmic, in stark contrast to stably or transiently transfected A3A, which has a cell-wide localization. A3A constructs engineered to be cytoplasmic are also nontoxic in HEK293 cells. These data combine to suggest that monocytic cells use a cytoplasmic retention mechanism to control A3A and avert genotoxicity during innate immune responses.

  14. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  15. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen transfer mechanism in the guanine cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the quantum-dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the guanine-cytosine base pair. Due to the position of hydrogen atoms, different tautomers are possible: the stable Watson-Crick G-C, the imino-enol G*-C*, the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # and some zwitterionic structures. The common idea in the literature is that only the G-C and the G*-C* tautomers are stable with an estimate of G-C → G*-C* transition probability of 10 -6-10 -9 by the help of Boltzmann statistics. Here we show a detailed quantum theoretical study that suggests the following conclusion: G-C is the stablest tautomer, some partially charged systems (due to the movement of only one hydrogen atom) are important and a large amount of the imino-enol G*-C* (and less of the imino-enol-imino-enol G #-C # structure) tautomer is present at any time. The corresponding transition probabilities from different tautomers are not due to thermal passage, but they are a pure quantum phenomenon. These large probabilities definitively disprove the idea of these tautomers as mutation points. The mechanisms of passage from the G-C tautomer to the others have also been investigated.

  16. Analysis of DNA Cytosine Methylation Patterns Using Methylation-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP).

    PubMed

    Guevara, María Ángeles; de María, Nuria; Sáez-Laguna, Enrique; Vélez, María Dolores; Cervera, María Teresa; Cabezas, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Different molecular techniques have been developed to study either the global level of methylated cytosines or methylation at specific gene sequences. One of them is the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism technique (MSAP) which is a modification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). It has been used to study methylation of anonymous CCGG sequences in different fungi, plants, and animal species. The main variation of this technique resides on the use of isoschizomers with different methylation sensitivity (such as HpaII and MspI) as a frequent-cutter restriction enzyme. For each sample, MSAP analysis is performed using both EcoRI/HpaII- and EcoRI/MspI-digested samples. A comparative analysis between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI fragment patterns allows the identification of two types of polymorphisms: (1) methylation-insensitive polymorphisms that show common EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns but are detected as polymorphic amplified fragments among samples and (2) methylation-sensitive polymorphisms which are associated with the amplified fragments that differ in their presence or absence or in their intensity between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns. This chapter describes a detailed protocol of this technique and discusses the modifications that can be applied to adjust the technology to different species of interest.

  17. On the electron affinity of cytosine in bulk water and at hydrophobic aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Dörner, Ciro; Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    In the past one possible mechanism of DNA damage in bulk water has been attributed to the presence of hydrated electrons in water. Recently, one important property of hydrated electrons, namely their binding energy, was reported to be smaller at hydrophobic interfaces than in bulk aqueous solution. This possibly opens up new reaction possibilities with different solutes such as the DNA at hydrophobic, aqueous interfaces. Here, we use QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation to study how the molecular environment at the vacuum-water interface and in the bulk alters the electron affinity of cytosine being a characteristic part of the DNA. The electron affinity at the interface is closer to the corresponding binding energy of the partially hydrated electron. The increased energy resonance makes the electron capture process more probable and suggests that hydrated electrons at hydrophobic interfaces may be more reactive than the fully hydrated ones. Additionally, we found that the relaxation of the anionic form after electron attachment also induces a proton transfer from the surrounding solvent that was confirmed by comparison with the experimental reduction potential.

  18. Variation in cytosine methylation patterns during ploidy level conversions in Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Cervigni, Gerardo; Selva, Juan P; Echenique, Viviana C; Pessino, Silvina C

    2009-05-01

    In many species polyploidization involves rearrangements of the progenitor genomes, at both genetic and epigenetic levels. We analyzed the cytosine methylation status in a 'tetraploid-diploid-tetraploid' series of Eragrostis curvula with a common genetic background by using the MSAP (Methylation-sensitive Amplified Polymorphism) technique. Considerable levels of polymorphisms were detected during ploidy conversions. The total level of methylation observed was lower in the diploid genotype compared to the tetraploid ones. A significant proportion of the epigenetic modifications occurring during the tetraploid-diploid conversion reverted during the diploid-tetraploid one. Genetic and expression data from previous work were used to analyze correlation with methylation variation. All genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation data correlated significantly when compared by pairs in simple Mantel tests. Dendrograms reflecting genetic, epigenetic and expression distances as well as principal coordinate analysis suggested that plants of identical ploidy levels present similar sets of data. Twelve (12) different genomic fragments displaying different methylation behavior during the ploidy conversions were isolated, sequenced and characterized.

  19. Hydrogen-bonding patterns in 5-fluoro-cytosine-melamine co-crystal (4/1).

    PubMed

    Mohana, Marimuthu; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McMillen, Colin D

    2016-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 4C4H4FN3O·C3H6N6, comprises of two independent 5-fluoro-cytosine (5FC) mol-ecules (A and B) and one half-mol-ecule of melamine (M). The other half of the melamine mol-ecule is generated by a twofold axis. 5FC mol-ecules A and B are linked through two different homosynthons [R 2 (2)(8) ring motif]; one is formed via a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and the second via a pair of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds. In addition to this pairing, the O atoms of 5FC mol-ecules A and B inter-act with the N2 amino group on both sides of the melamine mol-ecule, forming a DDAA array of quadruple hydrogen bonds and generating a supra-molecular pattern. The 5FC (mol-ecules A and B) and two melamine mol-ecules inter-act via N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N and N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N, C-H⋯F hydrogen bonds forming R 6 (6)(24) and R 4 (4)(15) ring motifs. The crystal structure is further strengthened by C-H⋯F, C-F⋯π and π-π stacking inter-actions.

  20. Evolutionary breakpoints in the gibbon suggest association between cytosine methylation and karyotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R Alan; Vessere, Gery M; Mootnick, Alan R; Humphray, Sean; Rogers, Jane; Kim, Sung K; Wall, Jeffrey D; Martin, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; de Jong, Pieter J

    2009-06-01

    Gibbon species have accumulated an unusually high number of chromosomal changes since diverging from the common hominoid ancestor 15-18 million years ago. The cause of this increased rate of chromosomal rearrangements is not known, nor is it known if genome architecture has a role. To address this question, we analyzed sequences spanning 57 breaks of synteny between northern white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus l. leucogenys) and humans. We find that the breakpoint regions are enriched in segmental duplications and repeats, with Alu elements being the most abundant. Alus located near the gibbon breakpoints (<150 bp) have a higher CpG content than other Alus. Bisulphite allelic sequencing reveals that these gibbon Alus have a lower average density of methylated cytosine that their human orthologues. The finding of higher CpG content and lower average CpG methylation suggests that the gibbon Alu elements are epigenetically distinct from their human orthologues. The association between undermethylation and chromosomal rearrangement in gibbons suggests a correlation between epigenetic state and structural genome variation in evolution.

  1. Neuronal apoptosis and gray matter heterotopia in microcephaly produced by cytosine arabinoside in mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomoyuki; Akahori, Shie; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Masaki

    2006-05-17

    Primary microcephaly can be accompanied by numerous migration anomalies. This experiment was undertaken to examine the pathogenesis of gray matter heterotopia and microcephaly that is produced after administering cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) to mice. Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with Ara-C at 30 mg/kg body weight on days 13.5 and 14.5 of gestation, and then their offspring were examined. On embryonic day 15.5, in the ventricular zone of the cingulate cortex, the neuroepithelial cells lacked BrdU immunoreactivity. Nestin-immunoreactive radial glial fibers and calretinin-positive subplate fibers were disrupted. TUNEL reaction was remarkable throughout the cerebral hemisphere. Subcortical heterotopia in the cingulate cortex and subependymal nodular heterotopia in the dorsolateral part of the lateral ventricles became detectable by the first day after birth. Thirty-two days after birth, microcephaly was apparent; subcortical heterotopia was observed to have increased in size while it was still located in the frontal and cingulate cortices. This experiment demonstrated that Ara-C induces neuronal apoptosis throughout the cerebral hemisphere. The immunohistochemical characteristics in the gray matter heterotopia suggest that both the subcortical and the subependymal heterotopias were formed by neurons originally committed to the neocortex. We conclude that the gray matter heterotopia that accompanies the microcephaly was produced by a disturbance of radial, tangential, and interkinetic neuronal migrations due to the toxicity of Ara-C in the immature developing brain.

  2. A quantum chemical insight to intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between cytosine and nitrosamine: Structural and energetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Behzad

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions which are formed during complex formation between cytosine and nitrosamine have been fully investigated using B3LYP, B3PW91 and MP2 methods in conjunction with various basis sets including 6-311++G (d,p), 6-311++G (2d,2p), 6-311++G (df,pd) and AUG-cc-pVDZ. Three regions around the most stable conformer of cytosine in the gas phase with six possible double H-bonded interactions were considered. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds of type NC-N-HNA and O-H(N-H)C-ONA were found on the potential energy surface in a cyclic system with 8-member in CN1, CN3, CN5 and 7-member in CN2, CN4, CN6 systems. Results of binding energy calculation at all applied methods reveal that the CN1 structure is the most stable one which is formed by interaction of nitrosamine with cytosine in S1 region. The BSSE-corrected binding energy for six complex system is ranging from -23.8 to -43.6 kJ/mol at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level and the stability order is as CN1 > CN2 > CN3 > CN4 > CN5 > CN6 in all studied levels of theories. The NBO results reveal that the charge transfer occurred from cytosine to nitrosamine in CN1, CN3, CN5 and CN6 whereas this matter in the case of CN2 and CN4 was reversed. The relationship between BEs with red shift of H-bond involved bonds vibrational frequencies, charge transfer energies during complex formation and electron densities at H-bond BCPs were discussed. In addition activation energetic properties related to the proton transfer process between cytosine and nitrosamine have been calculated at MP2/6-311++G (df,pd) level. AIM results imply that H-bond interactions are electrostatic with partially covalent characteristic in nature.

  3. Recent and remote spatial memory in mice treated with cytosine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Fremouw, Thane; Fessler, Christy L; Ferguson, Robert J; Burguete, Yamil

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that chemotherapy is associated with long-term cognitive impairment in some patients. A number of underlying mechanisms have been proposed, however, the etiology of chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction remains relatively unknown. As part of a multifaceted approach, animal models of chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment are being developed. Thus far, the majority of animal studies have utilized a rat model, however, mice may prove particularly beneficial in studying genetic risk factors for developing chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. Various chemotherapy agents, including cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), have been found to impair remote spatial memory in rats in the Morris water maze. The present study evaluated the effects of Ara-C on remote (30 d) spatial memory in mice. In addition, the possibility that time relative to chemotherapy treatment may modulate the effect of chemotherapy on spatial learning and/or recent (1 d) memory was explored. Male C57BL/6J mice received either Ara-C (275 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days) or saline. Spatial learning and memory was assessed using the Morris water maze. Half the mice performed a remote (30 d) memory version of the task and the other half performed a recent (1 d) memory version of the task. The experiment was designed such that the probe trial for the recent memory version occurred on the same day relative to chemotherapy treatment as the remote memory version. Despite significant toxic effects as assessed by weight loss, Ara-C treated mice performed as well as control mice during acquisition, recent memory, and remote memory portions of the task. As are some humans, C57BL/6J mice may be resistant to at least some aspects of chemotherapy induced cognitive decline.

  4. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation.

  5. Influence of photoperiod on expression of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Giannetto, Alessia; Nagasawa, Kazue; Fasulo, Salvatore; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2013-05-01

    Photoperiod manipulation during early juvenile stages can influence growth in Atlantic cod. In the present study, one group of cod juveniles were reared under natural photoperiod conditions for Bodø (67° N, 14° E), whereas their counterparts were kept under continuous illumination. The mean weight of juvenile cod reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod after 120days of light treatment. The molecular basis of this phenotypic plasticity is currently unknown but it is likely that DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferases (dnmts) are involved, since these genes play a crucial role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis of Atlantic cod dnmt1, dnmt2 and dnmt3a revealed that within each group, the phylogeny follows the taxonomic relationship between the various species and comparative mapping of dnmt paralogues showed that these genes lie within regions of conserved synteny amongst teleosts. Of the three dnmt paralogues, dnmt3a had the highest expression in fast muscle of adult cod. In addition, dnmt1 and dnmt2 were differentially expressed between tissues but with prominent expression in gonads. Dnmt1 and dnmt3a transcript levels showed a significant increase in fast muscle of juvenile cod from the continuous light group at several time points. Remarkably, dnmt1 and dnmt3a transcript levels were 2-fold higher at 120days, by which point photoperiod conditions between the two light groups had become identical. Our data revealed that photoperiod can have an extended effect on expression of dnmt genes, which may be involved in the epigenetic regulation of muscle growth by photoperiod in Atlantic cod.

  6. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  7. Inhibition of tumor growth by polyarginine-fused mutant cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Zhang, Tong; Li, Deshan

    2015-02-01

    Gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy is a method whereby cancerous tumors are selectively eradicated with minimal impact to healthy tissue. Due to its thermostability, E. coli cytosine deaminase (bCD) is one of the most widely used enzyme-prodrug combinations. However, wild-type bCD (wtbCD) displays a relatively poor turnover of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and also has low permeability as a hexamer macromolecule (∼ 300 kDa), like many other therapeutic proteins. To improve these shortcomings, site-specific mutagenesis was performed by infusing the bCD with R9, a typical and highly effective cell-penetrating peptide. The results obtained by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the R9 efficiently delivered the enhanced green fluorescent proteins (EGFP) into the human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, and gathered at the nucleus, while EGFP alone did not have this ability. The penetrating efficiency of R9-EGPF was time and dose dependent. The results obtained by Western blot showed that R9-bCD, but not bCD proteins alone, could be uptaken into HepG2 cells. In vitro experiments showed that polyarginine enhanced the cytotoxicity of bCD, and R9-bCDmut had a stronger cytotoxicity than R9-bCD proteins. In vivo experiments also showed that R9-bCD and R9-bCDmut could prolong the survival time of tumor mice for 8-10 days. Future therapeutic applications of cell-permeable R9-bCDmut fusion proteins together with a systemic administration of 5-FC prodrug could result in profound anti-tumor activities.

  8. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kuroda, T; Fuchs, B C; He, X; Supko, J G; Schmitt, A; McGinn, C M; Lanuti, M; Tanabe, K K

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. In animal models, 12 days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing-schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng ml⁻¹) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses.

  9. Molecular chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer using novel mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Della Manna, Debbie L; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Black, Margaret E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2008-09-01

    The combination of molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful approach for treatment of pancreatic cancer. We have developed an adenoviral vector (AdbCD-D314A) encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene, which converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the active drug 5-fluorouracil. The aim of this study was to investigate AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo alone and in combination with radiation against human pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts. AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity alone and in combination with radiation was analyzed using crystal violet inclusion and clonogenic survival assays. CD enzyme activity was determined by measuring conversion of [3H]5-FC to [3H]5-fluorouracil after adenoviral infection of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and pancreatic tumor xenografts by TLC. S.c. pancreatic tumor xenografts were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy. AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated pancreatic cancer cell killing that correlated with significantly enhanced CD enzyme activity compared with AdbCDwt encoding wild-type of bCD. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of growth of human pancreatic tumors treated with AdbCD-D314A/5-FC in comparison with AdbCDwt/5-FC. Also, a significantly greater inhibition of growth of Panc2.03 and MIA PaCA-2 tumor xenografts was produced by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation compared with either agent alone. The results indicate that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and increased therapeutic efficacy against human pancreatic tumor xenografts.

  10. Epigenetic variation, inheritance, and parent-of-origin effects of cytosine methylation in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Piccinini, Sara; Pirona, Raul; Lund, Gertrud; Viotti, Angelo; Motto, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Pure epigenetic variation, or epigenetic variation that is independent of genetic context, may provide a mechanism for phenotypic variation in the absence of DNA mutations. To estimate the extent of pure epigenetic variation within and across generations and to identify the DNA regions targeted, a group of eight plants derived from a highly inbred line of maize (Zea mays) was analyzed by the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique. We found that cytosine methylation (mC) differences among individuals accounted for up to 7.4% of CCGG sites investigated by MSAP. Of the differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) identified in the S0 generation, ∼12% were meiotically inherited for at least six generations. We show that meiotically heritable mC variation was consistently generated for an average of 0.5% CCGG sites per generation and that it largely occurred somatically. We provide evidence that mC variation can be established and inherited in a parent-of-origin manner, given that the paternal lineage is more prone to both forward and reverse mC changes. The molecular characterization of selected DMFs revealed that the variation was largely determined by CG methylation changes that map within gene regions. The expression analysis of genes overlapping with DMFs did not reveal an obvious correlation between mC variation and transcription, reinforcing the idea that the primary function of gene-body methylation is not to control gene expression. Because this study focuses on epigenetic variation in field-grown plants, the data presented herein pertain to spontaneous epigenetic changes of the maize genome in a natural context.

  11. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  12. Dual targeting of tumor angiogenesis and chemotherapy by endostatin-cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Te; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Lee, Heng-Huan; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Yen, Chia-Jui; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Edward T H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-08-01

    Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) that were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for many cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer, can effectively reduce tumor growth. However, targeting the VEGF signaling pathway will probably influence the normal function of endothelial cells in maintaining homeostasis and can cause unwanted adverse effects. Indeed, emerging experimental evidence suggests that VEGF-targeting therapy induced less tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity, allowing residual cells to become more resistant and eventually develop a more malignant phenotype. We report an antitumor therapeutic EndoCD fusion protein developed by linking endostatin (Endo) to cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD). Specifically, Endo possesses tumor antiangiogenesis activity that targets tumor endothelial cells, followed by CD, which converts the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the cytotoxic antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the local tumor area. Moreover, selective targeting of tumor sites allows an increasing local intratumoral concentration of 5-FU, thus providing high levels of cytotoxic activity. We showed that treatment with EndoCD plus 5-FC, compared with bevacizumab plus 5-FU treatment, significantly increased the 5-FU concentration around tumor sites and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in human breast and colorectal orthotropic animal models. In addition, in contrast to treatment with bevacizumab/5-FU, EndoCD/5-FC did not induce cardiotoxicity leading to heart failure in mice after long-term treatment. Our results showed that, compared with currently used antiangiogenic drugs, EndoCD possesses potent anticancer activity with virtually no toxic effects and does not increase tumor invasion or metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that EndoCD/5-FC could become an alternative option for future antiangiogenesis therapy.

  13. Double proton transfer in the isolated and DNA-embedded guanine-cytosine base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoete, Vincent; Meuwly, Markus

    2004-09-01

    The energetics and dynamics of double proton transfer (DPT) is investigated theoretically for the Watson-Crick conformation of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair. Using semiempirical density functional theory the isolated and DNA-embedded GC pair is considered. Differences in the energetics and dynamics of DPT thus addresses the question of how relevant studies of isolated base pairs are for the understanding of processes occurring in DNA. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces involving the transferring hydrogen atoms and the proton donors and acceptors are presented for both systems. The DPT reaction is accompanied by a contraction of the distance between the two bases with virtually identical energetic barriers being 18.8 and 18.7 kcal/mol for the isolated and DNA-embedded system, respectively. However, the transition state for DPT in the DNA-embedded GC pair is offset by 0.1 Å to larger N-H separation compared to the isolated GC pair. Using activated ab initio molecular dynamics, DPT is readily observed for the isolated base pair with a minimal amount of 21.4 kcal/mol of initial average kinetic energy along the DPT normal mode vector. On a time scale of ≈100 fs DPT has occurred and the excess energy is redistributed. For the DNA-embedded GC pair considerably more kinetic energy is required (30.0 kcal/mol) for DPT and the process is completed within one hydrogen vibration. The relevance of studies of isolated base pairs and base pair analogs in regard of reactions or properties involving DNA is discussed.

  14. Mechanism of human methyl-directed DNA methyltransferase and the fidelity of cytosine methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S S; Kaplan, B E; Sowers, L C; Newman, E M

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the methyl-directed DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.37) suggest that it is the enzyme that maintains patterns of methylation in the human genome. Proposals for the enzyme's mechanism of action suggest that 5-methyldeoxycytidine is produced from deoxycytidine via a dihydrocytosine intermediate. We have used an oligodeoxynucleotide containing 5-fluorodeoxycytidine as a suicide substrate to capture the enzyme and the dihydrocytosine intermediate. Gel retardation experiments demonstrate the formation of the expected covalent complex between duplex DNA containing 5-fluorodeoxycytidine and the human enzyme. Formation of the complex was dependent upon the presence of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine, suggesting that it comprises an enzyme-linked 5-substituted dihydrocytosine moiety in DNA. Dihydrocytosine derivatives are extremely labile toward hydrolytic deamination in aqueous solution. Because C-to-T transition mutations are especially prevalent at CG sites in human DNA, we have used high-performance liquid chromatography to search for thymidine that might be generated by hydrolysis during the methyl transfer reaction. Despite the potential for deamination inherent in the formation of the intermediate, the methyltransferase did not produce detectable amounts of thymidine. The data suggest that the ability of the human methyltransferase to preserve genetic information when copying a methylation pattern (i.e., its fidelity) is comparable to the ability of a mammalian DNA polymerase to preserve genetic information when copying a DNA sequence. Thus the high frequency of C-to-T transitions at CG sites in human DNA does not appear to be due to the normal enzymatic maintenance of methylation patterns. Images PMID:1584813

  15. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  16. NF-κB activation mediates crystal translocation and interstitial inflammation in adenine overload nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Cristiene; Borges, Raquel Lerner; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Fanelli, Camilla; Barlette, Grasiela Pedreira; Machado, Flavia Gomes; Arias, Simone Costa Alarcon; Malheiros, Denise Maria Avancini Costa; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Zatz, Roberto; Fujihara, Clarice Kazue

    2013-07-15

    Adenine overload promotes intratubular crystal precipitation and interstitial nephritis. We showed recently that these abnormalities are strongly attenuated in mice knockout for Toll-like receptors-2, -4, MyD88, ASC, or caspase-1. We now investigated whether NF-κB activation also plays a pathogenic role in this model. Adult male Munich-Wistar rats were distributed among three groups: C (n = 17), receiving standard chow; ADE (n = 17), given adenine in the chow at 0.7% for 1 wk and 0.5% for 2 wk; and ADE + pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; n = 14), receiving adenine as above and the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (120 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹ in the drinking water). After 3 wk, widespread crystal deposition was seen in tubular lumina and in the renal interstitium, along with granuloma formation, collagen accumulation, intense tubulointerstitial proliferation, and increased interstitial expression of inflammatory mediators. Part of the crystals were segregated from tubular lumina by a newly formed cell layer and, at more advanced stages, appeared to be extruded to the interstitium. p65 nuclear translocation and IKK-α increased abundance indicated activation of the NF-κB system. PDTC treatment prevented p65 migration and normalized IKK-α, limited crystal shift to the interstitium, and strongly attenuated interstitial fibrosis/inflammation. These findings indicate that the complex inflammatory phenomena associated with this model depend, at least in part, on NF-κB activation, and suggest that the NF-κB system may become a therapeutic target in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  17. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  18. Brain Injury Alters Ectonucleotidase Activities and Adenine Nucleotide Levels in Rat Serum

    PubMed Central

    Laketa, Danijela; Savić, Jasmina; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Lavrnja, Irena; Vasić, Vesna; Stojiljković, Mirjana; Nedeljković, Nadežda

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cortical stab injury (CSI) induces changes in the activity, expression and cellular distribution of specific ectonucleotidases at the injury site. Also, several experimentally induced neuropathologies are associated with changes in soluble ectonucleotidase activities in the plasma and serum, whilst various insults to the brain alter purine compounds levels in cerebrospinal fluid, but also in serum, indicating that insults to the brain may induce alterations in nucleotides release and rate of their hydrolysis in the vascular system. Since adenine nucleotides and adenosine regulate diverse cellular functions in the vascular system, including vascular tone, platelet aggregation and inflammatory responses of lymphocytes and macrophages, alterations of ectonucleotidase activities in the vascular system may be relevant for the clinical outcome of the primary insult. Methods We explored ectonucleotidase activities using specific enzyme assays and determined adenine nucleotides concentrations by the UPLC method in the rat serum after cortical stab injury. Results At 4-h post-injury, ATP and AMP hydrolysis increased by about 60% and 40%, respectively, while phosphodiesterase activity remained unchanged. Also, at 4-h post-injury a marked decrease in ATP concentration and more than 2-fold increase in AMP concentration were recorded. Conclusions CSI induces rapid up-regulation of nucleotide catabolizing soluble ectonucleotidases in rat serum, which leads to the observed shift in serum nucleotide levels. The results obtained imply that ectonucleotidases and adenine nucleotides participate in the communication between the brain and the vascular system in physiological and pathological conditions and thereby may be involved in the development of various human neuropathologies.

  19. Conformational behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide: conserved stereochemistry in bound and free states.

    PubMed

    Kuppuraj, Gopi; Kruise, Dennis; Yura, Kei

    2014-11-26

    Metabolic enzymes utilize the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to catalyze essential biochemical reactions. Because these enzymes have been implicated in disease pathways, it will be necessary to target them via FAD-based structural analogues that can either activate/inhibit the enzymatic activity. To achieve this, it is important to explore the conformational space of FAD in the enzyme-bound and free states. Herein, we analyze X-ray crystallographic data of the enzyme-bound FAD conformations and sample conformations of the molecule in explicit water by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Enzyme-bound FAD conformations segregate into five distinct groups based on dihedral angle principal component analysis (PCA). A notable feature in the bound FADs is that the adenine base and isoalloxazine ring are oppositely oriented relative to the pyrophosphate axis characterized by near trans hypothetical dihedral angle "δV" values. Not surprisingly, MD simulations in water show final compact but not perfectly stacked ring structures in FAD. Simulation data did not reveal noticeable changes in overall conformational dynamics of the dinucleotide in reduced and oxidized forms and in the presence and/or absence of ions. During unfolding-folding dynamics, the riboflavin moiety is more flexible than the adenosine monophosphate group in the molecule. Conversely, the isoalloxazine ring is more stable than the variable adenine base. The pyrophosphate group depicts an unusually highly organized fluctuation illustrated by its dihedral angle distribution. Conformations sampled from enzymes and MD are quantified. The extent to which the protein shifts the distribution from the unbound state is discussed in terms of prevalent FAD shapes and dihedral angle population.

  20. Adenine Nucleotide Levels in the Cytosol, Chloroplasts, and Mitochondria of Wheat Leaf Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Mark; Lilley, Ross McC.; Heldt, Hans W.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, a new method has been described, in which membrane filtration is used to allow the levels of adenine nucleotides in the chloroplast stroma, the cytosol, and the mitochondrial matrix to be measured. This method is now used to investigate the effect of illumination, of respiratory inhibitors, and of uncouplers on the distribution of ATP, ADP, and AMP in wheat (Triticum aestivum var. `Timmo') leaf protoplasts. (a) The adenine nucleotides are apparently equilibrated by adenylate kinase in the stroma and the cytosol, but not in the mitochondrial matrix. (b) The ATP/ADP quotient in the cytosol is considerably higher than that in the mitochondrial matrix or the chloroplast stroma. (c) A large gradient exists between the ATP/ADP quotients in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix in the dark, with a very low ATP/ADP quotient in the mitochondria. This gradient is lowered by uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors showing that, as in animal tissues, it reflects the energization of the mitochondria. (d) In the dark, the stromal ATP/ADP is lower than in the light, and appears to be maintained, at least in part, by import from the cytosol. (e) The cytosolic ATP/ADP, however, actually decreases in the light. This contradicts the widespread assumption, that export of photosynthetically produced ATP from the chloroplast leads to an increase in the cytosolic ATP/ADP, which then inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. (f) The mitochondrial ATP/ADP increases in the light, and the gradient between the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix falls. This is also difficult to understand in terms of an inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation in the light due to a lack of ADP in the cytosol. (g) The significance of the measured variations in the adenine nucleotide pools are discussed with respect to the diurnal carbohydrate metabolism in a leaf, and to the metabolic function of the chloroplast, the cytosol and the mitochondria. PMID:16662653

  1. Probing the Watson-Crick, wobble, and sugar-edge hydrogen bond sites of uracil and thymine.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Frey, Jann A; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-06-16

    The nucleobases uracil (U) and thymine (T) offer three hydrogen-bonding sites for double H-bond formation via neighboring N-H and C=O groups, giving rise to the Watson-Crick, wobble and sugar-edge hydrogen bond isomers. We probe the hydrogen bond properties of all three sites by forming hydrogen bonded dimers of U, 1-methyluracil (1MU), 3-methyluracil (3MU), and T with 2-pyridone (2PY). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 <-- S0 vibronic spectra of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU, 2PY.1MU, and 2PY.T were measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). The spectra of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of 2PY.1MU were separated using UV-UV spectral hole-burning. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) Selective methylation of the uracil N3-H group, which allows formation of the sugar-edge isomer only, and methylation of the N1-H group, which leads to formation of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers. (2) The experimental S1 <-- S0 origins exhibit large spectral blue shifts relative to the 2PY monomer. Ab initio CIS calculations of the spectral shifts of the different hydrogen-bonded dimers show a linear correlation with experiment. This correlation allows us to identify the R2PI spectra of the weakly populated Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of both 2PY.U and 2PY.T. (3) PW91 density functional calculation of the ground-state binding and dissociation energies De and D0 are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant hydrogen bond isomers of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU and 2PY.T as the sugar-edge form. For 2PY.U, 2PY.T and 2PY.1MU the measured wobble:Watson-Crick:sugar-edge isomer ratios are in good agreement with the calculated ratios, based on the ab initio dissociation energies and gas-phase statistical mechanics. The Watson-Crick and wobble isomers are thereby determined to be several kcal/mol less strongly bound than the sugar-edge isomers. The 36 observed intermolecular frequencies of the nine different H-bonded isomers give

  2. Adenine arabinoside inhibition of adenovirus replication enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wigand, R

    1979-01-01

    The inhibition of adenovirus multiplication by adenine arabinoside was determined by yield reduction in one-step multiplication cycle. Inhibition was greatly enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (2-deoxycoformycin) in concentrations down to 10 ng/ml. Adenovirus types from four subgroups showed similar results. However, the enhancing effect of adenosine deaminase inhibitor was great in HeLa cells, moderate in human fibroblasts, and negligible in Vero cells. This difference could be explained by different concentrations of adenosine deaminase found in cell homogenates.

  3. Physical Separation of Streptococcal Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Glycohydrolase from Streptolysin O

    PubMed Central

    Shany, S.; Grushoff, Phyllis S.; Bernheimer, Alan W.

    1973-01-01

    Streptococcal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide glycohydrolase (NADase) with a molecular weight of about 55,000 and an isoelectric pH of 8.55 was isolated from crude streptolysin O (SLO) preparations. NADase differed from SLO in size, charge, and immunological behavior. Streptococcal NADase is considered to have no role in the hemolytic process because it has no hemolytic activity; conversely, partially purified SLO showed no NADase activity. The hemolytic activity of crude SLO was completely inhibited by anti-tetanolysin, whereas the NADase activity in the same reaction mixture was unaffected. Experiments involving double diffusion in agar also demonstrated immunological nonidentity of the two proteins. Images PMID:4357989

  4. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK.

  5. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  6. [Synthese of 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine and 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine, and their phosphates. Specificity of an mammalian (rat) ribonucleotide-reductase].

    PubMed

    David, S; de Sennyey, G

    1979-12-01

    Mild, acidic hydrolysis of 3-O-benzoyl-1,2,:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-allofuranose gave a diol that was selectively benzoylated at O-6 in high yield by intermediate conversion to the stannylene derivative. The 3,6-dibenzoate was converted to the 5-O-tosyl derivative and thence to a mixture of iodides, which were reduced with tributylstannane to 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-ribo-hexofuranose (6). Acetolysis gave an anomeric mixture of diacetates, which, when treated with N-acetylbis(trimethylsilyl)cytosine gave the protected nucleoside, which was deprotected to free "homocytidine", 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine (11), by alklaine methanolysis. This was N-acetylated and then treated with acetone to give a protected nucleoside, which was labelled by oxidation to the aldehyde, reduction with sodium borotritide, and deprotection. Acidic methanolysis of 6 gave a mixture of methyl 2,6- and 3,6-di-O-benzoylfuranosides, the hydroxyl groups of which were treated by the tetrachloromethane-triphenylphosphine reagent to give the 2-chloro-2-deoxy (21) and 3-chloro-3-deoxy derivatives. Reduction of 21 gave methyl 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-2,5-dideoxy-D-erythro-furanoside, further transformed in 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine mixed with the alpha anomer. Phosphates and diphosphates of the nucleosides were prepared by extensions of known methods. The phosphate and the diphosphate of 11 act neither as substrates nor as inhibitors of a ribonucleotide-reductase from rat asicites tumor.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent.

    PubMed

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-25

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]⋅SO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions.

  10. Photosensitization of thymine nucleobase by benzophenone derivatives as models for photoinduced DNA damage: Paterno-Büchi vs energy and electron transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Susana; Belmadoui, Noureddine; Climent, Maria J; Gil, Salvador; Miranda, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    Time-resolved and product studies have shown that there is a strong interaction between drugs containing the benzophenone chromophore and the free thymidine nucleoside. In quantitative terms, such an interaction is stronger for the lowest lying npi* triplet states (S-ketoprofen) than for mixed npi*-pipi* triplets (fenofibrate and fenofibric acid), as indicated by the quenching rate constants. This is consistent with a Paterno-Büchi photoreaction, where the initial step is the formation of a new bond between the excited carbonyl oxygen and one of the thymine olefinic carbons. Actually, oxetanes are obtained as photoproducts when benzophenone is irradiated in the presence of thymidine. Hence, triplet-triplet energy transfer resulting in formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, which would be thermodynamically disfavored, does not seem to play a major role. However, in DNA, the contribution of energy transfer could be higher, due to the lower energy of the thymine triplet in the biomacromolecule. These results are discussed in connection with the observed DNA damage upon photosensitization with ketoprofen, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid.

  11. The contribution of the methyl groups on thymine bases to binding specificity and affinity by alanine-rich mutants of the bZIP motif.

    PubMed

    Kise, K J; Shin, J A

    2001-09-01

    We have used fluorescence anisotropy to measure in situ the thermodynamics of binding of alanine-rich mutants of the GCN4 basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) to short DNA duplexes, in which thymines were replaced with uracils, in order to quantify the contributions of the C5 methyl group on thymines with alanine methyl side chains. We simplified the alpha-helical GCN4 bZIP by alanine substitution: 4A, 11A, and 18A contain four, 11, and 18 alanine mutations in their DNA-binding basic regions, respectively. Titration of fluorescein-labeled duplexes with increasing amounts of protein yielded dissociation constants in the low-to-mid nanomolar range for all bZIP mutants in complex with the AP-1 target site (5'-TGACTCA-3'); binding to the nonspecific control duplex was >1000-fold weaker. Small changes of <1 kcal/mol in binding free energies were observed for wild-type bZIP and 4A mutant to uracil-containing AP-1, whereas 11A and 18A bound almost equally well to native AP-1 and uracil-containing AP-1. These modest changes in binding affinities may reflect the multivalent nature of protein-DNA interactions, as our highly mutated proteins still exhibit native-like behavior. These protein mutations may compensate for changes in enthalpic and entropic contributions toward DNA-binding in order to maintain binding free energies similar to that of the native protein-DNA complex.

  12. Direct fluorescence detection of microRNA based on enzymatically engineered primer extension poly-thymine (EPEPT) reaction using copper nanoparticles as nano-dye.

    PubMed

    Chi, Bao-Zhu; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Yuan, Yan-Hong; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2017-01-15

    A new strategy based on enzymatically engineered primer extension poly-thymine (EPEPT) and nanomaterials in situ generation technology is reported for direct detection of microRNA (miRNA) in a fluorescence turn-on format using the sequential and complementary reactions catalyzed by Klenow Fragment exo(-) (KFexo(-)) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdTase). The short miRNA can be efficiently converted into long poly-thymine (polyT) sequences, which function as template for in situ formation of fluorescence copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) as nano-dye for detecting miRNA. The polyT-CuNPs can effectively form and emit intense red fluorescence under the 340nm excitation. For the proof of concept, microRNA-21 (miR-21) was selected as the model target to testify this strategy as a versatile assay platform. By directly using miR-21 as the primer, the simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection was successfully achieved with a good linearity between 1pM and 1nM and a detection limit of 100fM. Thus, the EPEPT strategy holds great potential in biochemical sensing research as an efficient and universal platform.

  13. Singlet excited-state behavior of uracil and thymine in aqueous solution: a combined experimental and computational study of 11 uracil derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Bányász, Akos; Lazzarotto, Elodie; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J; Barone, Vincenzo; Improta, Roberto

    2006-01-18

    The excited-state properties of uracil, thymine, and nine other derivatives of uracil have been studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. The excited-state lifetimes were measured using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion in the UV. The absorption and emission spectra of five representative compounds have been computed at the TD-DFT level, using the PBE0 exchange-correlation functional for ground- and excited-state geometry optimization and the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate the aqueous solution. The calculated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental ones. Experiments show that the excited-state lifetimes of all the compounds examined are dominated by an ultrafast (<100 fs) component. Only 5-substituted compounds show more complex behavior than uracil, exhibiting longer excited-state lifetimes and biexponential fluorescence decays. The S(0)/S(1) conical intersection, located at CASSCF (8/8) level, is indeed characterized by pyramidalization and out of plane motion of the substituents on the C5 atom. A thorough analysis of the excited-state Potential Energy Surfaces, performed at the PCM/TD-DFT(PBE