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Sample records for adenocarcinoma epithelial cell

  1. Paracrine influence of human perivascular cells on the proliferation of adenocarcinoma alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunbi; Na, Sunghun; An, Borim; Yang, Se-Ran; Kim, Woo Jin; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Ji Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the crosstalk mechanisms between perivascular cells (PVCs) and cancer cells might be beneficial in preventing cancer development and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the paracrine influence of PVCs derived from human umbilical cords on the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and erythroleukemia cells (TF-1α and K562) in vitro using Transwell® co-culture systems. PVCs promoted the proliferation of A549 cells without inducing morphological changes, but had no effect on the proliferation of TF-1α and K562 cells. To identify the factors secreted from PVCs, conditioned media harvested from PVC cultures were analyzed by antibody arrays. We identified a set of cytokines, including persephin (PSPN), a neurotrophic factor, and a key regulator of oral squamous cell carcinoma progression. Supplementation with PSPN significantly increased the proliferation of A549 cells. These results suggested that PVCs produced a differential effect on the proliferation of cancer cells in a cell-type dependent manner. Further, secretome analyses of PVCs and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms could facilitate the discovery of therapeutic target(s) for lung cancer. PMID:28280409

  2. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to an epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma: distinctive reactivity with xenografts of the original tumor and a cultured cell line.

    PubMed

    Baumal, R; Law, J; Buick, R N; Kahn, H; Yeger, H; Sheldon, K; Colgan, T; Marks, A

    1986-08-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (8C, 10B, M2A, and M2D) were produced against the human epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line, HEY. The affinity constants of binding of the mAb to cultured HEY cells were 8 X 10(8) M-1 (M2D) and 10(9) M-1 (8C and 10B). mAb 8C reacted with a major glycoprotein of Mr 90,000 on the surface of HEY cells. The four mAb differed from previously reported mAb to epithelial ovarian adenocarcinomas on the basis of their reactivity with cultured ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines using a cell-binding radioimmunoassay, and their staining of cryostat sections of various human normal and tumor tissues using an immunoperoxidase reaction. All four mAb reacted with s.c. tumors derived by injecting cultured HEY cells into thymectomized CBA/CJ mice. However, only two of the four mAb (8C and 10B) also reacted with s.c. tumors of the original HEY xenograft from which the cultured cell line was derived. In addition, mAb 8C and 10B reacted by immunoperoxidase staining with 2 and 4 different cases, respectively, of 11 epithelial ovarian adenocarcinomas examined. Cultured HEY cells were adapted to grow i.p. in BALB/c-nu/nu mice and the i.p. tumors retained their reactivity with the monoclonal antibodies. These tumor-bearing mice offer a useful model system for studying the potential of mAb, especially 8C and 10B, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peritoneal extension of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinomas.

  4. Apoptotic effect of sodium acetate on a human gastric adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Zhang, X L; Jin, F; Wang, Q X; Xiao, R; Hao, Z H; Gui, Q D; Sun, J

    2016-10-05

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium acetate on the viability of the human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) epithelial cell line. AGS cells were exposed to a range of concentrations of sodium acetate for different periods of time, and the sodium acetate-induced cytotoxic effects, including cell viability, DNA fragmentation, apoptotic gene expression, and caspase activity, were assessed. The changes in these phenotypes were quantified by performing a lactate dehydrogenase cell viability assay, annexin V staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and several caspase activity assays. In vitro studies demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of sodium acetate on the AGS cell line were dose- and time-dependent manners. No differences were found between the negative control and sodium acetate-treated cells stained with annexin V and subjected to the TUNEL assay. However, caspase-3 activity was increased in AGS cells exposed to sodium acetate. Overall, it was concluded that sodium acetate exerted an apoptotic effect in AGS cells via a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  5. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate. The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:25242904

  6. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae Woong; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate . The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles.

  7. Monitoring of TGF-β 1-Induced Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation Process by Measuring Cell Adhesion Force with a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Gao, AnXiu; Yu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process in which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion, and gain migratory and invasive properties. It is believed that EMT is associated with initiation and completion of the invasion-metastasis cascade. In this study, an economic approach was developed to fabricate a microfluidic device with less instrumentation requirement for the investigation of EMT by quantifying cell adhesion force. Fluid shear force was precisely controlled by a homemade microfluidic perfusion apparatus and interface. The adhesion capability of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 on different types of extracellular matrix protein was studied. In addition, effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on EMT in A549 cells were investigated by characterizing the adhesion force changes and on-chip fluorescent staining. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic device is a potential tool to characterize the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process by measuring cell adhesion force.

  8. Two-dimensional culture of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells results in an irreversible transition from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Ran; Suzuki, Rei; Li, Shao-qiang; Roife, David; Truty, Mark J; Chatterjee, Deyali; Thomas, Ryan M; Cardwell, James; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huamin; Katz, Matthew H; Fleming, Jason B

    2015-02-01

    Many commercially available cell lines have been in culture for ages, acquiring phenotypes that differ from the original cancers from which these cell lines were derived. Therefore, research on new cell lines could improve the success rates of translational research in cancer. We have developed methods for the isolation and culture of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells from murine xenografts of human PDAC. We hypothesize that phenotypes of PDAC cells are modified by in vitro culture conditions over time and by in vivo implantation. Patient-derived xenografts were created in immunodeficient mice using surgically resected tumor specimens. These murine xenografts were then used to establish human PDAC cell lines in culture. Earlier (<5) passage and later (>20) passage cell lines were evaluated separately regarding proliferation, cell cycle, genetic mutations, invasiveness, chemosensitivity, tumorigenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) status, and proteomics. Later passage cells accelerated their doubling time and colony formation, and were more concentrated in the G0/G1 phase and less in the G2/M checkpoint phase. Later passage cells were more sensitive to gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil than earlier passage cells, but all four new cell lines were more chemo-resistant compared with commercial ATCC cell lines. EMT induction was observed when establishing and passaging cell lines in vitro and furthermore by growing them as subcutaneous tumors in vivo. This study demonstrates a novel approach to the establishment of PDAC cell lines and observes a process by which newly established cell lines undergo phenotypic changes during in vitro culture and in vivo tumorigenesis. This may help explain differences of treatment effects often observed between experiments conducted in vitro, in vivo, and in human clinical trials.

  9. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characterization in a 3D-cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Celesti, Giuseppe; Tacchini, Lorenza; Pluchino, Stefano; Sforza, Chiarella; Rasile, Marco; Valerio, Vincenza; Laghi, Luigi; Conte, Vincenzo; Procacci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of three-dimensional (3D)-arrangement on the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. METHODS: HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 PDAC cells were cultured in either 2D-monolayers or 3D-spheroids. Ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, N-cadherin, collagen type I (COL-I), vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and podoplanin was assayed by confocal microscopy in cells cultured on 12-mm diameter round coverslips and in 3D-spheroids. Gene expression for E-cadherin, Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb1, and Zeb2 was quantified by real-time PCR. E-cadherin protein level and its electrophoretic pattern were studied by Western blot in cell lysates obtained from cells grown in 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. RESULTS: The E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was expressed in a similar way in plasma membrane cell boundaries in both 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. E-cadherin increased in lysates obtained from 3D-spheroids, while cleavage fragments were more evident in 2D-monolayers. N-cadherin expression was observed in very few PDAC cells grown in 2D-monolayers, but was more evident in 3D-spheroids. Some cells expressing COL-I were observed in 3D-spheroids. Podoplanin, expressed in collectively migrating cells, and αSMA were similarly expressed in both experimental conditions. The concomitant maintenance of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex at cell boundaries supports the hypothesis of a collective migration for these cells, which is consistent with podoplanin expression. CONCLUSION: We show that a 3D-cell culture model could provide deeper insight into understanding the biology of PDAC and allow for the detection of marked differences in the phenotype of PDAC cells grown in 3D-spheroids. PMID:27182158

  10. Gli promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Joy Q.; Woodard, Gavitt A.; Tolani, Bhairavi; Luh, Thomas M.; Giroux-Leprieur, Etienne; Mo, Minli; Chen, Zhao; Che, Juanjuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lei; Hao, Xishan; Jablons, David; Wang, Changli; He, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for tumor invasion/metastasis and the components that control this process are potential therapeutic targets. This study we examined the role of Gli in lung adenocarcinoma and whether its activation regulates metastasis through EMT in lung adenocarcinoma. We found that tumors with high Gli expression had significantly lower E-Cadherin expression in two independent cohorts of patients with lung adenocarcinoma that we studied. In vitro up-regulation of SHh resulted in increased cell migration while small molecule inhibitors of Smo or Gli significantly reduced cell mobility both in a wound healing assay and in a 3D cell invasion assay. Inhibition of Gli in vivo decreased tumor growth and induced an increase in E-Cadherin expression. Our results indicate that Gli may be critical for lung adenocarcinoma metastasis and that a novel Gli inhibitor shows promise as a therapeutic agent by preventing cell migration and invasion in vitro and significantly reducing tumor growth and increasing E-Cadherin expression in vivo. PMID:27533453

  11. Effect of RhoC on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process induced by TGF-β1 in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxiao; Guo, Honglan; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Jian; Zou, Yong; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    According to recent research, Ras homolog gene family member C (RhoC) is confirmed to have a powerful regulatory effect on cell motility mediated by the cytoskeleton, and this process is closely associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In addition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process which causes cytoskeleton rearrangement, also plays a pivotal role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Consequently, in the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether RhoC has an effect on the EMT process induced by TGF-β1 in lung adenocarcinoma cells and whether RhoC promotes tumor invasion by mediating the occurrence of EMT. Based on the findings, we demonstrated that RhoC was an essential mediator of the EMT process in lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 which was evaluated by observing the morphological characteristics of the cells and by assessing the expression levels of two EMT marker proteins: E-cadherin and vimentin. During the process of EMT in the A549 cells induced by TGF-β1 (5 ng/ml), upregulated RhoC protein and RhoC activity were detected, which was associated with the enhanced invasive capability of the cells in vitro. Conversely, downregulation of the expression of RhoC by shRNA markedly impeded EMT progression as well as the invasion of A549 cells. Our results may provide a novel target towards the prevention of metastasis in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27748883

  12. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis by subpopulations of epithelial cells from a mammary adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Angello, J.C.; Danielson, K.G.; Anderson, L.W.; Hosick, H.L.

    1982-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycan synthesis by two subpopulations of a mouse mammary tumor cell line was compared. The two sublines express distinctly different growth characteristics in vitro and in vivo which indicate differences in growth regulation. Newly made glycosaminoglycans were recovered from the culture media, the cell surfaces, and residual cellular material. The cell population which grows more aggressively in vivo (+SA subline, a subline that grows in soft agarose) incorporated about 8 times more (/sup 14/C)glucosamine per cell into total glycosaminoglycans than did the slower-growing population (-SA subline, which does not grow in soft agarose). Appropriate control experiments indicated that the apparent difference in rates of synthesis was not due to discrepancies in glucosamine uptake. The main residual cellular molecule labeled was heparan sulfate, but the predominant molecule at the cell surface and in the culture fluid was hyaluronic acid. Overall, +SA cells synthesized more hyaluronic acid and -SA cells synthesized more heparan sulfate; in both cell populations, these two molecules accounted for about 90% of total glycosaminoglycans produced.

  13. Oncostatin m modulates the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of lung adenocarcinoma cells by a mesenchymal stem cell-mediated paracrine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mong-Lien; Pan, Chih-Ming; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Hsin; Chang, Hsiang-Yi; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Hsu, Han-Sui; Wu, Cheng-Wen

    2012-11-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are strongly associated with tumor progression and have been used as novel cell-based agents to deliver anticancer drugs to tumors. However, controversies about the direct involvement of MSCs in tumor progression suggest that MSCs mediate tumor progression in a cancer type-dependent manner. In this report, we analyzed the functional interactions between human MSCs and lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) cells to determine the therapeutic potential of MSCs in lung cancer. We showed that MSCs effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and cell-cycle progression of several LAC cell lines. MSCs also enhanced the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) pathway, as evidenced by the reduction of several epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers in LAC cells cocultured with MSCs or in MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM). By cytokine array analysis, we determined that Oncostatin M (OSM), a differentiation-promoting cytokine, was elevated in the MSC-CM derived from primary MSC cultures. Furthermore, OSM treatment had the same effects as MSC-CM on LAC, whereas neutralizing antibodies to OSM reversed them. Notably, short hairpin RNAs against STAT1, an important downstream target of OSM, hindered the OSM-dependent induction of MET. In vivo xenograft tumor studies indicated that OSM inhibited tumor formation and metastasis of LAC cells, whereas neutralizing OSM in the MSC-CM hampered its inhibitory effects. In conclusion, this study showed that OSM is a paracrine mediator of MSC-dependent inhibition of tumorigenicity and activation of MET in LAC cells. These effects of OSM may serve as a basis for the development of new drugs and therapeutic interventions targeting cancer cells.

  14. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  15. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells.

  16. Fibroblast-led cancer cell invasion is activated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition through platelet-derived growth factor BB secretion of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neri, Shinya; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Hiroko; Suda, Yoshitaka; Ishibashi, Masayuki; Kii, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hirotada; Kuwata, Takeshi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Menju, Toshi; Sonobe, Makoto; Date, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF)-dependent local invasion is the process by which cancer cells invade the extracellular matrix using tracks that have been physically remodeled by CAFs. In the present study, we investigated the process by which the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells affect CAF-dependent local invasion. Using an in vitro collagen invasion assay, we showed cancer cells undergoing EMT to promote the matrix-remodeling ability of CAFs and thereby enhance CAF-dependent local cancer cell invasion. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB secretion was significantly elevated in cancer cells undergoing EMT, and this induced an increase in the invasion ability of both CAFs and cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of PDGF-B expression in cancer cells undergoing EMT, or treatment with a PDGF-receptor inhibitor, decreased the invasion ability of both CAFs and cancer cells. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of 442 patients with lung adenocarcinomas, we established that high expression of PDGF-B and presentation of mesenchymal-like tumors were significantly associated with a high rate of disease recurrence and poor patient prognosis. Thus, cancer cells undergoing EMT may accelerate their own ability to invade local tissues via PDGF-BB secretion to promote CAF matrix remodeling. Therefore, targeting PDGF signaling between cancer cells undergoing EMT and CAFs is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit cancer progression and improve patient prognosis.

  17. Reduction in membranous immunohistochemical staining for the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule correlates with poor patient outcome in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Ramjeesingh, R.; Chen, C.H.; Hurlbut, D.; Hammad, N.; Mulligan, L.M.; Nicol, C.; Feilotter, H.E.; Davey, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (epcam) is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on both normal epithelium and epithelial neoplasms such as gastric, breast, and renal carcinomas. Recent studies have proposed that the proteolytic cleavage of the intracellular domain of epcam (epcam-icd) can trigger signalling cascades leading to aggressive tumour behavior. The expression profile of epcam-icd has not been elucidated for primary colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we examined epcam-icd immunohistochemical staining in a large cohort of patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and assessed its performance as a potential prognostic marker. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for epcam-icd was assessed on tissue microarrays consisting of 137 primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples. Intensity of staining for each core was scored by 3 independent pathologists. The membranous epcam-icd staining score was calculated as a weighted average from 3 core samples per tumour. Univariate analysis of the average scores and clinical outcome measures was performed. Results The level of membranous epcam-icd staining was positively associated with well-differentiated tumours (p = 0.01); low preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.001); and several measures of survival, including 2-year (p = 0.02) and 5-year survival (p = 0.05), and length of time post-diagnosis (p = 0.03). A number of other variables—including stage, grade, and lymph node status—showed correlations with epcam staining and markers of poor outcome, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Low membranous epcam-icd staining might be a useful marker to identify tumours with aggressive clinical behavior and potential poor prognosis and might help to select candidates who could potentially benefit from treatment targeting epcam. PMID:27330354

  18. miR-367 promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells by targeting the Smad7-TGF-β signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Xu, Y; Zhao, J; Liu, Q; Feng, W; Fan, J; Wang, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aberrant Smad7 expression contributes to the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. However, the potential mechanism underlying aberrant Smad7 expression in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains largely unknown. Methods: Bioinformatic prediction programmes and luciferase reporter assay were used to identify microRNAs regulating Smad7. The association between miR-367 expression and the overall survival of PDAC patients was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier analysis. The effects of miR-367 and Smad7 on the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results: We found that miR-367 downregulated Smad7 expression by directly targeting its 3′-UTR in human pancreatic cancer cells. High level of miR-367 expression correlated with poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Functional studies showed that miR-367 promoted pancreatic cancer invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo through downregulating Smad7. In addition, we showed that miR-367 promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by increasing transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced transcriptional activity. Conclusions: The present study identified and characterised a signalling pathway, the miR-367/Smad7-TGF-β pathway, which is involved in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results suggest that miR-367 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer. PMID:25867271

  19. Proteomics indicates modulation of tubulin polymerization by L-menthol inhibiting human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Uzma; Sisodia, Brijesh S; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shukla, Rakesh K; Darokar, Mahendra P; Dwivedi, Upendra N; Shasany, Ajit K

    2011-05-01

    Menthol is a naturally occurring cyclic monoterpene used in oral hygiene products, confectionary, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, pesticides, and as a flavoring agent. In the present study, we analyzed the differentially expressing proteome in L-menthol-treated Caco-2 cell line as it was found to inhibit cell proliferation. Interestingly, free tubulin proteins were observed to be limited after menthol treatment. Semiquantitative RT-PCR with α-tubulin primers showed no change in the level of RNA expression in menthol-treated cell line. However, tubulin polymerization assay with menthol indicated a trend similar to taxol in promoting microtubule assembly. Further, physical counting of apoptotic nuclei and active caspase-3 assays confirmed onset of apoptosis though the rate was slower as compared with that of taxol treatment. This study is the first report of a monoterpene L-menthol modulating tubulin polymerization and apoptosis to inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

  20. Evidence for embryonic stem-like signature and epithelial-mesenchymal transition features in the spheroid cells derived from lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roudi, Raheleh; Madjd, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Najafi, Ali; Korourian, Alireza; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Identification of the cellular and molecular aspects of lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that are suggested to be the main culprit of tumor initiation, maintenance, drug resistance, and relapse is a prerequisite for targeted therapy of lung cancer. In the current study, LCSCs subpopulation of A549 cells was enriched, and after characterization of the spheroid cells, complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray analysis was applied to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the spheroid and parental cells. Microarray results were validated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and western blotting. Our results showed that spheroid cells had higher clonogenic potential, up-regulation of stemness gene Sox2, loss of CD44 expression, and gain of CD24 expression compared to parental cells. Among a total of 160 genes that were differentially expressed between the spheroid cells and the parental cells, 104 genes were up-regulated and 56 genes were down-regulated. Analysis of cDNA microarray revealed an embryonic stem cell-like signature and over-expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes in the spheroid cells. cDNA microarray results were validated at the gene expression level using qRT-PCR, and further validation was performed at the protein level by flow cytometry and western blotting. The embryonic stem cell-like signature in the spheroid cells supports two important notions: maintenance of CSCs phenotype by dedifferentiating mechanisms activated through oncogenic pathways and the origination of CSCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PI3/AKT3, as the most common up-regulated pathway, and other pathways related to aggressive tumor behavior and EMT process can confer to the spheroid cells' high potential for metastasis and distant seeding.

  1. MiR-134/487b/655 cluster regulates TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and drug resistance to gefitinib by targeting MAGI2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kazuhiro; Seike, Masahiro; Okano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Kuniko; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Mizutani, Hideaki; Noro, Rintaro; Minegishi, Yuji; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has recently been recognized as a key element of cell invasion, migration, metastasis, and drug resistance in several types of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our aim was to clarify microRNA (miRNA)-related mechanisms underlying EMT followed by acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) in NSCLC. miRNA expression profiles were examined before and after transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) exposure in four human adenocarcinoma cell lines with or without EMT. Correlation between expressions of EMT-related miRNAs and resistance to EGFR-TKI gefitinib was evaluated. miRNA array and real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that TGF-β1 significantly induced overexpression of miR-134, miR-487b, and miR-655, which belong to the same cluster located on chromosome 14q32, in lung adenocarcinoma cells with EMT. MAGI2 (membrane-associated guanylate kinase, WW, and PDZ domain-containing protein 2), a predicted target of these miRNAs and a scaffold protein required for PTEN, was diminished in A549 cells with EMT after the TGF-β1 stimulation. Overexpression of miR-134 and miR-487b promoted the EMT phenomenon and affected the drug resistance to gefitinib, whereas knockdown of these miRNAs inhibited the EMT process and reversed TGF-β1-induced resistance to gefitinib. Our study demonstrated that the miR-134/487b/655 cluster contributed to the TGF-β1-induced EMT phenomenon and affected the resistance to gefitinib by directly targeting MAGI2, in which suppression subsequently caused loss of PTEN stability in lung cancer cells. The miR-134/miR-487b/miR-655 cluster may be a new therapeutic target in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, depending on the EMT phenomenon.

  2. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  3. CCR7 regulates Twist to induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexin; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Guangying; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As reported, the CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) trigger a series of signaling cascades in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of some malignancies. Meanwhile, Twist promotes EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression. Here, effects of Twist on CCR7-induced EMT in the PDAC were investigated in detail. The immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Twist, and then, in vitro assays were applied. The expression rate of Twist was 72.0 % in PDAC samples and closely correlated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and invasion. When PDAC cell line PANC1 was subjected to CCL19 stimulation, the expression of p-ERK, p-AKT, Twist, N-cadherin, MMP9, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was induced, while the GSK1120212, BEZ235, and MK2206 prohibited the increase of Twist and EMT biomarkers. For another thing, the si-Twist treatment attenuated CCL19-stimulated EMT occurrence, migration, and invasion phenotypes of PANC1 cells. In conclusion, CCR7 pathway up-regulates Twist expression via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling to manage the EMT of PDAC. Our work allows for clinical gene or protein-targeted regimen of PDAC patients in the near future.

  4. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  5. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity.

  6. K-ras activation occurs frequently in mucinous adenocarcinomas and rarely in other common epithelial tumors of the human ovary.

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, T.; Weghorst, C. M.; Inoue, M.; Tanizawa, O.; Rice, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    To explore the role of mutational activation of members of the ras family of cellular protooncogenes in the development of human ovarian neoplasms, a series of 37 ovarian tumors from Japanese patients was studied. These included 30 common epithelial tumors (1 mucinous tumor of borderline malignancy, 7 mucinous adenocarcinomas, and 22 nonmucinous carcinomas: 10 serous, 3 clear cell, 8 endometrioid, and 1 undifferentiated), 5 tumors of germ cell origin, and 2 sex cord/stromal cell tumors. Polymerase chain reaction was performed from selected areas of deparaffinized sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and the presence of activating point mutations in codons 12, 13, and 61 of the H-, N-, and K-ras genes was probed by dot-blot hybridization analysis with mutation specific oligonucleotides. Mutations in K-ras were also looked for by direct genomic sequencing. The overall frequency of ras gene mutations was 10/37 (27%). Mutations were detected only in K-ras, and were found in most of the mucinous tumors, including the one such tumor of borderline malignancy (6/8; 75%). In one mucinous adenocarcinoma, two mutations were detected in paraffin-embedded material that had not previously been found in high molecular weight DNA isolated from frozen tissue from the same case. K-ras mutations occurred significantly more frequently in mucinous tumors (6/8, 75%) than in serous carcinomas (2/10, 20%; P = 0.031) or in all nonmucinous types of epithelial ovarian tumors combined (3/22, 14%; P = 0.0031). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1656759

  7. Mucin-positive epithelial mesotheliomas: a histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural comparison with mucin-producing pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hammar, S P; Bockus, D E; Remington, F L; Rohrbach, K A

    1996-01-01

    Pathologists routinely use histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy to differentiate epithelial mesotheliomas from pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Epithelial mesotheliomas are usually mucicarmine-, PAS-diastase, and carcinoembryonic antigen-negative, whereas about 60-75% of pulmonary adenocarcinomas are mucicarmine- and PAS-diastase-positive, and about 90% express polyclonal carcinoembryonic antigen. During a pathologic evaluation of pleural neoplasms between 1975 and 1990, 10 epithelial mesotheliomas were identified that were mucicarmine- and in some instances PAS-diastase-positive (diagnosis of mesothelioma confirmed by ultrastructural examination), with four mesotheliomas focally expressing carcinoembryonic antigen. The mucicarmine, PAS-diastase, and carcinoembryonic antigen staining were usually eradicated or reduced in intensity by pretreatment of the tissue sections with hyaluronidase, suggesting that hyaluronic acid was responsible for the positive mucin reactions. In three cases the epithelial mesotheliomas showed focal regions of mucicarmine, PAS-d-, and Alcian blue-hyaluronidase-resistant staining. In contrast, 10 mucicarmine-, PAS-diastase-, Alcian blue-, and carcinoembryonic antigen-positive pulmonary adenocarcinomas were not affected by hyaluronidase pretreatment of the tissue. Besides the usual ultrastructural features of well- to moderately well-differentiated epithelial mesotheliomas, the mucin-positive epithelial mesotheliomas often showed medium-electron-dense secretory material covering the microvilli, aggregates of medium electron-dense material in association with the microvilli, producing an ultrastructural morphology that has been observed only in epithelial mesotheliomas.

  8. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica L.; Streuli, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell–matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical–basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘ERM proteins at a glance’ by Andrea McClatchey (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3199–3204). ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). PMID:24994933

  9. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  10. [Gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinoma: A distinct entity].

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Rouquette, Alexandre; Brezault, Catherine; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-04-01

    Gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (GSRC) is a distinct entity. Their incidence is increasing. The pathologist plays a central role in the identification of this entity. Diagnosis is based on an adenocarcinoma containing a majority of signet ring cells (above 50 %). The prognosis of GSRC is the same as gastric adenocarcinoma while GSRC appeared more aggressive. Signet ring cells present a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. This review aimed to discuss the histological, the prognostic and the therapeutic aspect of this entity.

  11. Prognostic significance of stem cell-related marker expression and its correlation with histologic subtypes in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunhyang; Park, Soo Young; Sun, Ping-Li; Jin, Yan; Kim, Ji Eun; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwhanmien; Lee, Choon Taek

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of tumor cells that exhibit stem cell-like properties and contribute in treatment failure. To clarify the expression and prognostic significance of several CSC markers in non-small cell lung cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 368 patients with adenocarcinoma (n = 226) or squamous cell carcinoma (n = 142). We correlated the expression of six CSC markers – CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), octamer binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), and Nanog – with clinicopathologic and molecular variables and survival outcomes. In adenocarcinoma, CD133, ALDH1 and CD44 expression was associated with low pathologic stage and absence of lymphovascular invasion, while Nanog expression correlated with high histologic grade, lymphatic invasion and increased expression of Snail-1, a transcription factor associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. CSC marker expression was also associated with histologic subtypes in adenocarcinoma. Multivariate analysis showed that high Nanog expression was an independent factor associated with a poor prognosis in adenocarcinoma. CSC markers had no prognostic value in squamous cell carcinoma. These results suggest that Nanog is an independent negative prognostic factor that may be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27285762

  12. FGF4 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition by inducing store-operated calcium entry in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lisha; Song, Wangzhao; Li, Lingmei; Cao, Lu; Yu, Yue; Song, Chunmin; Wang, Yalei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Yang; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Several fibroblast growth factor (FGF) isoforms act to stimulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. FGF4 and FGF7 are two ligands of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2). Using two lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) cell lines, A549 and H1299, we showed that FGF4, but not FGF7, altered cell morphology, promoted EMT-associated protein expression, and enhanced cell proliferation, migration/invasion and colony initiation. In addition, FGF4 increased store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and expression of the calcium signal-associated protein Orai1. The SOCE inhibitor 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) or Orai1 knockdown reversed all of the EMT-promoting effects of FGF4. BHQ also inhibited FGF4-induced EMT in a mouse xenograft model. Finally, 60 human lung ADC samples and 21 sets of matched specimens (primary and metastatic foci in lymph nodes from one patient) were used to confirm the clinicopathologic significance of FGF4 and its correlation with E-cadherin, Vimentin and Orai1 expression. Our study thus shows that FGF4 induces EMT by elevating SOCE in lung ADC. PMID:27677589

  13. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  14. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  15. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  16. Eosinophils promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Atsushi; Hosoki, Koa; Toda, Masaaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Matsushima, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Nagao, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Hiraguchi, Yukiko; Tokuda, Reiko; Naito, Masahiro; Takagi, Takehiro; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Suga, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Fujisawa, Takao; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling of the airways including subepithelial fibrosis and myofibroblast hyperplasia are characteristic pathological findings of bronchial asthma. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in airway remodelling. In this study, we hypothesized that infiltrating eosinophils promote airway remodelling in bronchial asthma. To demonstrate this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of eosinophils on EMT by in vitro and in vivo studies. EMT was assessed in mice that received intra-tracheal instillation of mouse bone marrow derived eosinophils and in human bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with eosinophils freshly purified from healthy individuals or with eosinophilic leukemia cell lines. Intra-tracheal instillation of eosinophils was associated with enhanced bronchial inflammation and fibrosis and increased lung concentration of growth factors. Mice instilled with eosinophils pre-treated with transforming growth factor(TGF)-β1 siRNA had decreased bronchial wall fibrosis compared to controls. EMT was induced in bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with human eosinophils and it was associated with increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 phosphorylation in the bronchial epithelial cells. Treatment with anti-TGF-β1 antibody blocked EMT in bronchial epithelial cells. Eosinophils induced EMT in bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting their contribution to the pathogenesis of airway remodelling.

  17. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in a fistula-associated anal adenocarcinoma in a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Frei, Pascal; Frei, Sandra M; Biedermann, Luc; Weber, Achim; Rogler, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Anal adenocarcinomas arising from perianal fistulae represent a rare complication in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We have previously demonstrated the involvement of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the pathogenesis of CD-associated fistulae. Although EMT has also been implicated in the development of colorectal and anal carcinoma, the molecular link from fistula to carcinoma is unclear. We present a case of a 48-year-old White woman who developed a mucinous anal adenocarcinoma originating from a perianal, CD-associated fistula 24 years after being diagnosed with CD. To characterize the expression of EMT-associated molecules in fistula and carcinoma tissue, immunohistochemical analysis for Snail1, Slug, β-catenin and E-cadherin was performed. A mucinous anal adenocarcinoma developed on a perianal fistula in a patient with long-standing CD. After neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, the fistula-associated tumour was resected and the patient is presently in remission. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we detected a remarkable staining of the Slug transcription factor in transitional cells lining the fistula tract. This observation is unique to this 'carcinoma'-fistula: we had previously shown Slug expression in cells surrounding the fistula tract but not in transitional cells. Expression of Snail1, β-catenin and E-cadherin in this case was comparable with our previous findings. We describe a rare case of a CD fistula-associated adenocarcinoma within an area of squamous epithelium of the perianal area and an unusual expression pattern of EMT markers in this fistula. This case seems to underline the relevance of our previous findings demonstrating that EMT plays an important role for fistula pathogenesis and likely carcinogenesis in CD patients.

  18. Glypican-5 suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of the lung adenocarcinoma by competitively binding to Wnt3a

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Youtao; Mao, Qixing; Wang, Jie; Dong, Gaochao; Xu, Lin; Yang, Xin; Yin, Rong

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Glypican-5 (GPC5), one of the members of heparan sulfate proteoglycan, was a novel tumor metastasis suppressor in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, it remains unclear how GPC5 suppresses lung cancer metastasis. Here, we found over-expression GPC5 induced significant Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) process of A549 cells in vitro. Bioinformatic analysis of RNA sequencing data indicated that GPC5 was co-expressed with EMT related markers, E-cadherin and Vimentin. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was also significantly enriched after overexpressing GPC5. Further in vitro experiments demonstrated that overexpressing GPC5 could block the translocation of β-catenin from cytoplasm to nucleus and therefore inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by competitively binding to Wnt3a. Subsequent rescue experiments demonstrated that GPC5-induced metastatic phenotype and EMT process suppression were significantly reversed when cells cultured in Wnt3a conditioned media. By establishing the metastatic model in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice, we also demonstrated that overexpressing GPC5 suppressed LAC migration and accordingly alerted EMT related markers, which including up-regulated E-cadherin and down-regulated Vimentin in both lung and liver metastasis. Finally, clinical samples of LAC further validated that GPC5 expression was positively correlated with E-cadherin, and negatively correlated with both Twist1 and MMP2. Taken together, these data suggested that GPC5 is able to suppress the LAC metastasis by competitively binding to Wnt3a and inactivating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings expanded the role and the molecular mechanism of GPC5 on malignant bionomics of LAC. PMID:27806326

  19. Signet cell adenocarcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Charles, Norman C; Ng, Diana D; Zoumalan, Christopher I

    2012-01-01

    A 24-year-old man developed abdominal carcinomatosis from signet cell carcinoma of the rectum. His only distal metastasis involved the superior orbit. Orbital pathology showed signet cells with a characteristic immunopathologic pattern. No hereditary syndrome was found. The authors identified only 5 cases in the literature describing colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the orbit, with 2 showing histopathology. The authors believe that this rare case represents the first illustrating bona fide signet cell colorectal cancer involving the orbit.

  20. MiR-205 functions as a tumor suppressor in adenocarcinoma and an oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus.

    PubMed

    Hezova, Renata; Kovarikova, Alena; Srovnal, Josef; Zemanova, Milada; Harustiak, Tomas; Ehrmann, Jiri; Hajduch, Marian; Sachlova, Milana; Svoboda, Marek; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a malignant disease with poor prognosis, increasing incidence, and ineffective treatment options. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression involved in many biological processes including carcinogenesis. We determined miR-205 expression levels in tumor/non-tumor tissues of 45 esophageal cancer patients using qPCR and found that decreased level of miR-205 in tumor tissue correlates with poor overall survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma patients. Further, we observed significantly higher levels of miR-205 in tumor tissue of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Ectopic overexpression of miR-205 in adenocarcinoma cell line SK-GT-4 led to decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest in G1, and decreased migration ability. Conversely, in squamous cell line KYSE-150, same effects like inhibition of proliferation, migration, and colony-forming potential and cell cycle arrest in G2 were observed after silencing of miR-205. We performed global gene expression profiling and revealed that suppressive functioning of miR-205 in adenocarcinoma could be realized through regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), whereas oncogenic in squamous cell carcinoma by regulation of metalloproteinase 10. Our results suggest that miR-205 could serve as biomarker in esophageal cancer and acts as a tumor suppressor in esophageal adenocarcinoma and oncogene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  1. Adhesion and invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to primary and secondary respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Sara; Shagan, Marilous; Blau, Karin; Lifshitz, Sarit; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Grossman, Nili; Bodner, Lipa; Dagan, Ron; Nebenzahl, Yaffa Mizrachi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) and the mucosal epithelial cells of its host is a prerequisite for pneumococcal disease development, yet the specificity of this interaction between different respiratory cells is not fully understood. In the present study, three areas were examined: i) The capability of the encapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 strain (WU2) to adhere to and invade primary nasal-derived epithelial cells in comparison to primary oral-derived epithelial cells, A549 adenocarcinoma cells and BEAS-2B viral transformed bronchial cells; ii) the capability of the unencapsulated 3.8DW strain (a WU2 derivative) to adhere to and invade the same cells over time; and iii) the ability of various genetically-unrelated encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains to adhere to and invade A549 lung epithelial cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the encapsulated WU2 strain adhesion to and invasion of primary nasal epithelial cells was greatest, followed by BEAS-2B, A549 and primary oral epithelial cells. By contrast, the unencapsulated 3.8-DW strain invaded oral epithelial cells significantly more efficiently when compared to the nasal epithelial cells. In addition, unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains adhered to and invaded the A459 cells significantly more efficiently than the encapsulated strains; this is consistent with previously published data. In conclusion, the findings presented in the current study indicated that the adhesion and invasion of the WU2 strain to primary nasal epithelial cells was more efficient compared with the other cultured respiratory epithelial cells tested, which corresponds to the natural course of S. pneumoniae infection and disease development. The target cell preference of unencapsulated strains was different from that of the encapsulated strains, which may be due to the exposure of cell wall proteins. PMID:27922699

  2. Pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Peng-Tao; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Yan; Chen, Yu-Ze; Liu, Fang; Ma, Si-Ping

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical step in the acquisition of metastatic and invasive power for tumor cells. Colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) is a common cancer where metastasis is directly linked to patient survival. Recent studies show that pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 (PLAGL2) could induce tumor EMT and is an independent predictive factor associated with poor prognosis in cancer. In the present study, we confirmed the role of PLAGL2 in the prognosis of CRC patients and provide molecular evidence of PLAGL2 promoted EMT in CRC cell line SW480. We found that PLAGL2 expression was upregulated in the paraffin-embedded CRC tissues compared to borderline or benign tissues. Experimental EMT induced by PLAGL2 plasmid transfection proved PLAGL2 protein overexpression could enhance the cell scratch wound-healing and transwell ability and significantly upregulated mesenchymal marker proteins, N-cadherin and vimentin and concurrently downregulated epithelial marker of E-cadherin. Subsequently, through western blot assay, we found that PLAGL2 could activate the wnt-signaling component β-catenin in the nuclei. More CRC cell metastasis to the lungs was observed when the PLAGL2 overexpressing SW480 cells were injected into the tail vein of rats, compared with the cell control and PLAGL2 silence group. Our findings indicated that PLAGL2 might be a very upstream key molecule regulating EMT involved in Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  4. Patterning Bacterial Communities on Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Leung, Brendan M.; Yaguchi, Toshiyuki; Takayama, Shuichi; Mitchell, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Micropatterning of bacteria using aqueous two phase system (ATPS) enables the localized culture and formation of physically separated bacterial communities on human epithelial cell sheets. This method was used to compare the effects of Escherichia coli strain MG1655 and an isogenic invasive counterpart that expresses the invasin (inv) gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis on the underlying epithelial cell layer. Large portions of the cell layer beneath the invasive strain were killed or detached while the non-invasive E. coli had no apparent effect on the epithelial cell layer over a 24 h observation period. In addition, simultaneous testing of the localized effects of three different bacterial species; E. coli MG1655, Shigella boydii KACC 10792 and Pseudomonas sp DSM 50906 on an epithelial cell layer is also demonstrated. The paper further shows the ability to use a bacterial predator, Bdellovibriobacteriovorus HD 100, to selectively remove the E. coli, S. boydii and P. sp communities from this bacteria-patterned epithelial cell layer. Importantly, predation and removal of the P. Sp was critical for maintaining viability of the underlying epithelial cells. Although this paper focuses on a few specific cell types, the technique should be broadly applicable to understand a variety of bacteria-epithelial cell interactions. PMID:23785519

  5. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  7. Bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Diane S

    2008-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived cells can take on the phenotype of epithelial cells and express epithelial-specific genes in multiple organs. Here, we focus on recent data on the appearance of marrow-derived epithelial cells in the adult lung. These findings have garnered significant skepticism because in most cases marrow-derived epithelial cells are very rare, the marrow cell of origin is not known, the techniques for detection have needed improvement, and there seem to be multiple mechanisms by which this occurs. Recent studies have focused on these concerns. Once these important concerns are addressed, further studies on the function(s) of these cells will need to be performed to determine whether this engraftment has any clinical significance-either beneficial or detrimental.

  8. Isolation, cultivation and identification of human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DE-GENG; JIANG, AI-GUI; LU, HUI-YU; ZHANG, LI-XIN; GAO, XIAO-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that lung cancer is a stem cell disease. However, ideal cell surface markers for isolating stem cells in lung cancer are yet to be identified. In the present study, a cell population with a cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ phenotype was successfully isolated from a single cell suspension of lung adenocarcinoma tissue using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and enriched in a serum-free culture. In comparison to CD133− cells, the CD133+ cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and a greater potential for in vivo tumor formation, in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Tumors could be induced in NOD/SCID mice by the transplantation of 102 stem-like cells per mouse. The results of the present study demonstrated that CD133 may serve as a specific cell surface marker for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, and that MACS combined with serum-free culture is an effective method for isolating and enriching lung cancer stem cells. PMID:25435932

  9. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Markers β-catenin, Snail, and E-Cadherin do not Predict Disease Free Survival in Prostate Adenocarcinoma: a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ipekci, Tumay; Ozden, Ferhat; Unal, Betul; Saygin, Caner; Uzunaslan, Didem; Ates, Erhan

    2015-09-01

    Current methods for diagnosis and staging of prostate adenocarcinoma are not sensitive enough to distinguish between patients with indolent disease and those that should receive radical treatment. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-characterized process involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to analyze the expression of β-catenin, Snail, and E-cadherin in prostate cancer patients with prospective evaluation of their value in predicting disease-free survival (DFS). One-hundred-and-three consecutive prostate carcinoma patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and 35 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were enrolled. Age, initial PSA level, tumor size and clinical stage were documented for adenocarcinoma patients and they were enrolled in active surveillance with serum PSA levels. Recurrence was defined as PSA level of ≥ 0.2 ng/ml on at least 2 occasions over a 2-month period. Immunohistochemical staining intensity was scored as negative, weakly positive, moderately positive, and strongly positive. For Snail and β-catenin immunoreaction, the tumors were considered nuclear positive when more than 5 % of the nuclei of tumor cells were positively stained. Patients with prostate cancer had weaker β-catenin (p < 0.0001), Snail (p = 0.006), and E-cadherin (p = 0.02) staining when compared to BPH patients and the frequency of nuclear positivity for β-catenin and Snail were higher in adenocarcinoma group (p < 0.0001). Increased expression and nuclear positivity of β-catenin were associated with advanced stage (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003) and higher tumor volume (p = 0.013 and p = 0.002). Additionally, patients with increased Snail expression had higher Gleason scores and tumor volume at presentation (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004). However, there were no significant DFS differences in adenocarcinoma patients who did and did not have β-catenin, Snail, and E-cadherin expression as assessed with log-rank test. Expressions

  10. Molecular Analysis of Motility in Metastatic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Culture MTLn3 cells were clonally derived from a lung metastasis of the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma ( Neri et al., 1982) (kindly provided by Dr...MTLn3 cells were plated on collagen I coated MATTEK tissue culture dishes for 24 hours. Cells were plated at a density of 5000 cells/sq cm and...mM KOH; 4 mM MgC12 ; 10 mM EGTA pH 6.5 with 20 mM KOH; 5 1M phallacidin; 0.025 % saponin) was added to the culture well. After 15 seconds of extraction

  11. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  12. Let-7c governs the acquisition of chemo- or radioresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shi-Yun; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Tian; Song, Hai-Zhu; Feng, Bing; Huang, Gui-Chun; Wang, Rui; Chen, Long-Bang; De, Wei

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression and functions have been reported to contribute to phenotypic features of tumor cells. Although targets and functional roles for many miRNAs have been described in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD), their pathophysiologic roles in phenotypes of chemoresistant LAD cells are still largely unclear. Previously, docetaxel (DTX)-resistant LAD cell lines (SPC-A1/DTX and H1299/DTX) were established by our laboratory and displayed chemo- or radioresistance and mesenchymal features with enhanced invasiveness and motility. Unbiased miRNA profiling indicated that let-7c (MIRLET7C) was significantly downregulated in SPC-A1/DTX cells. Ectopic let-7c expression increased the in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitivity of DTX-resistant LAD cells through enhanced apoptosis, reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal phenotypes, and inhibition of in vivo metastatic potential via inactivation of Akt phosphorylation, whereas a let-7c inhibitor decreased the chemo- or radiosensitivity of parental cells. Further investigation suggested that let-7c significantly reduced the luciferase activity of a Bcl-xL 3'-UTR-based reporter, concordant with reduced Bcl-xL protein levels. Additionally, siRNA-mediated Bcl-xL knockdown mimicked the same effects of let-7c precursor, and enforced Bcl-xL expression partially rescued the effects of let-7c precursor in DTX-resistant LAD cells. Furthermore, we found that Bcl-xL was significantly upregulated in DTX-nonresponding LAD tissues, and its expression was inversely correlated with let-7c expression. This study suggests an important role for let-7c in the molecular etiology of chemoresistant lung adenocarcinoma.

  13. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-08

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes.

  14. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed.

  15. Control of lens epithelial cell survival

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the survival requirements of developing lens epithelial cells to test the hypothesis that most cells are programmed to kill themselves unless they are continuously signaled by other cells not to do so. The lens cells survived for weeks in both explant cultures and high-density dissociated cell cultures in the absence of other cells or added serum or protein, suggesting that they do not require signals from other cell types to survive. When cultured at low density, however, they died by apoptosis, suggesting that they depend on other lens epithelial cells for their survival. Lens epithelial cells cultured at high density in agarose gels also survived for weeks, even though they were not in direct contact with one another, suggesting that they can promote one another's survival in the absence of cell- cell contact. Conditioned medium from high density cultures promoted the survival of cells cultured at low density, suggesting that lens epithelial cells support one another's survival by secreting survival factors. We show for the first time that normal cell death occurs within the anterior epithelium in the mature lens, but this death is strictly confined to the region of the anterior suture. PMID:8491781

  16. Growth requirements of human mammary epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Shearer, M; Stoker, M G

    1977-12-15

    Colony-forming epithelial cells can be separated from the non-dividing "foam cells" in human milk by differential adhesion to glass and freezing. The growth of such partially purified mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by co-culture with non-dividing feeder cells. Foam cells, mitomycin-treated mouse fibroblast lines and human mammary fibroblasts and calf lens epithelial cells are all effective in promoting mammary epithelial cell growth. Contact between epithelial cells and feeders is not required for the growth-promoting effect. The mitogenic effect of epidermal growth factor on mammary epithelial cells also requires feeder cell activity.

  17. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell Phenotype Predicts Recurrence and Survival in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.; Valero, Vicente; Saunders, Tyler; Blackford, Amanda L.; Griffin, James F.; Poling, Justin; Hruban, Ralph H.; Anders, Robert A.; Herman, Joseph; Zheng, Lei; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Ahuja, Nita; Weiss, Matthew J.; Cameron, John L.; Goggins, Michael; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Wood, Laura D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes as a potential prognostic biomarker for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Background PDAC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is an urgent need to develop biomarkers that predict patient prognosis and allow for better treatment stratification. Methods Peripheral and portal blood samples were obtained from 50 patients with PDAC before surgical resection and filtered using the Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor cells method. CTCs were identified by immunofluorescence using commercially available antibodies to cytokeratin, vimentin, and CD45. Results Thirty-nine patients (78%) had epithelial CTCs that expressed cytokeratin but not CD45. Twenty-six (67%) of the 39 patients had CTCs which also expressed vimentin, a mesenchymal marker. No patients had cytokeratin-negative and vimentin-positive CTCs. The presence of cytokeratin-positive CTCs (P < 0.01), but not mesenchymal-like CTCs (P = 0.39), was associated with poorer survival. The presence of cytokeratin-positive CTCs remained a significant independent predictor of survival by multi-variable analysis after accounting for other prognostic factors (P < 0.01). The detection of CTCs expressing both vimentin and cytokeratin was predictive of recurrence (P = 0.01). Among patients with cancer recurrence, those with vimentin-positive and cytokeratin-expressing CTCs had decreased median time to recurrence compared with patients without CTCs (P = 0.02). Conclusions CTCs are an exciting potential strategy for understanding the biology of metastases, and provide prognostic utility for PDAC patients. CTCs exist as heterogeneous populations, and assessment should include phenotypic identification tailored to characterize cells based on epithelial and mesenchymal markers. PMID:26756760

  19. Evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in adult liver cells.

    PubMed

    Sicklick, Jason K; Choi, Steve S; Bustamante, Marcia; McCall, Shannon J; Pérez, Elizabeth Hernández; Huang, Jiawen; Li, Yin-Xiong; Rojkind, Marcos; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2006-10-01

    Both myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and hepatic epithelial progenitors accumulate in damaged livers. In some injured organs, the ability to distinguish between fibroblastic and epithelial cells is sometimes difficult because cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). During EMT, cells coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal cell markers. To determine whether EMT occurs in adult liver cells, we analyzed the expression profile of primary HSC, two HSC lines, and hepatic epithelial progenitors. As expected, all HSC expressed HSC markers. Surprisingly, these markers were also expressed by epithelial progenitors. In addition, one HSC line expressed typical epithelial progenitor mRNAs, and these epithelial markers were inducible in the second HSC line. In normal and damaged livers, small ductular-type cells stained positive for an HSC marker. In conclusion, HSC and hepatic epithelial progenitors both coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal markers, providing evidence that EMT occurs in adult liver cells.

  20. Epithelial stem cells and intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nick

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian intestine is comprised of an epithelial layer that serves multiple functions in order to maintain digestive activity as well as intestinal homeostasis. This epithelial layer contains highly proliferative stem cells which facilitate its characteristic rapid regeneration. How these stem cells contribute to tissue repair and normal homeostasis are actively studied, and while we have a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cellular locations that underlie stem cell regulation in this tissue, much still remains undiscovered. This review describes epithelial stem cells in both intestinal and non-intestinal tissues, as well as the strategies that have been used to further characterize the cells. Through a discussion of the current understanding of intestinal self-renewal and tissue regeneration in response to injury, we focus on how dysregulation of critical signaling pathways results in potentially oncogenic aberrations, and highlight issues that should be addressed in order for effective intestinal cancer therapies to be devised.

  1. Epithelial cell extrusion: Pathways and pathologies.

    PubMed

    Gudipaty, Swapna Aravind; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2016-05-19

    To remove dying or unwanted cells from an epithelium while preserving the barrier function of the layer, epithelia use a unique process called cell extrusion. To extrude, the cell fated to die emits the lipid Sphingosine 1 Phosphate (S1P), which binds the G-protein-coupled receptor Sphingosine 1 Phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) in the neighboring cells that activates Rho-mediated contraction of an actomyosin ring circumferentially and basally. This contraction acts to squeeze the cell out apically while drawing together neighboring cells and preventing any gaps to the epithelial barrier. Epithelia can extrude out cells targeted to die by apoptotic stimuli to repair the barrier in the face of death or extrude live cells to promote cell death when epithelial cells become too crowded. Indeed, because epithelial cells naturally turn over by cell death and division at some of the highest rates in the body, epithelia depend on crowding-induced live cell extrusion to preserve constant cell numbers. If extrusion is defective, epithelial cells rapidly lose contact inhibition and form masses. Additionally, because epithelia act as the first line of defense in innate immunity, preservation of this barrier is critical for preventing pathogens from invading the body. Given its role in controlling constant cell numbers and maintaining barrier function, a number of different pathologies can result when extrusion is disrupted. Here, we review mechanisms and signaling pathways that control epithelial extrusion and discuss how defects in these mechanisms can lead to multiple diseases. We also discuss tactics pathogens have devised to hijack the extrusion process to infect and colonize epithelia.

  2. 5-Fluorouracil-radiation interactions in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, D.J.; Lepek, K.J.; Rich, T.A.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of cellular proliferation and cell cycle stage on the ability of postirradiation 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to radiosensitize cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Clone A cells. Cell survival curves were generated for irradiated: (a) log- and plateau-phase Clone A cells; and (b) Clone A cells separated by centrifugal elutriation into the various phases of the cell cycle; with and without postirradiation treatment with 100 {mu}g/ml 5-FU. Postirradiation treatment with 5-FU sensitized proliferating cells to a greater degree than it sensitized cells growing in plateau phase. The {beta} component of cell kill in log-phase cells was increased by a factor of 1.5 with a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.21 at the 0.01 survival level. Plateau-phase cells showed less radiosensitization (sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.13 at the 0.01 survival level); however, there was a mild increase in both {alpha} and {beta} kill in plateau-phase cells. Elutriated G{sub 1} cells were the most radiosensitive, independent of treatment with 5-FU. The phase of the cell cycle had little effect on the ability of fluorouracil to radiosensitize Clone A cells. Proliferating cells are more susceptible to radiosensitization with 5-FU than plateau-phase cells are, but this effect appears to be independent of the phase of the cell cycle. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. In vitro biomechanical properties, fluorescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and photothermal therapy evaluation of luminescent functionalized CaMoO4:Eu@Au hybrid nanorods on human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qifei; Parchur, Abdul K.; Zhou, Anhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Highly dispersible Eu3+-doped CaMoO4@Au-nanorod hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) exhibit optical properties, such as plasmon resonances in the near-infrared region at 790 nm and luminescence at 615 nm, offering multimodal capabilities: fluorescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection and photothermal therapy (PTT). HNPs were conjugated with a Raman reporter (4-mercaptobenzoic acid), showing a desired SERS signal (enhancement factor 5.0 × 105). The HNPs have a heat conversion efficiency of 25.6%, and a hyperthermia temperature of 42°C could be achieved by adjusting either concentration of HNPs, or laser power, or irradiation time. HNPs were modified with antibody specific to cancer biomarker epidermal growth factor receptor, then applied to human lung cancer (A549) and mouse hepatocyte cells (AML12), and in vitro PTT effect was studied. In addition, the biomechanical properties of A549 cells were quantified using atomic force microscopy. This study shows the potential applications of these HNPs in fluorescence imaging, SERS detection, and PTT with good photostability and biocompatibility. PMID:27877887

  4. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β expression in clear cell adenocarcinomas of the bladder and urethra: diagnostic utility and implications for histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brimo, Fadi; Herawi, Mehsati; Sharma, Rajni; Netto, Georges J; Epstein, Jonathan I; Illei, Peter B

    2011-11-01

    The histogenesis of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder/urethra is uncertain. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β is a homeodomain protein that has been reported to be frequently overexpressed in ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma in comparison with rare or no expression in other types of epithelial ovarian tumors. We assessed the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β in a series of 18 clear cell adenocarcinomas of the bladder and urethra and compared it with that of invasive high-grade transitional/urothelial carcinoma (n = 35); adenocarcinomas of the bladder, urethra, and paraurethral glands (n = 21); as well as nephrogenic adenomas of the bladder (n = 8). Staining intensity and extent were evaluated using a 4-tiered grading system (0-3). A case was considered positive for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β if 10% or more of tumor cells showed at least weak nuclear staining or if any moderate or strong nuclear staining was observed. All 18 clear cell adenocarcinomas exhibited nuclear staining in at least 50% of tumor cells (16 strong, 1 moderate, and 1 weak with focal strong nuclear staining) in comparison with positive nuclear staining (moderate) in 1 of 21 bladder adenocarcinoma, 1 of 35 invasive high-grade transitional/urothelial carcinoma (weak to moderate staining), and 2 of 8 nephrogenic adenomas (1 weak and 1 moderate to strong staining). We concluded that hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β is a useful marker in differentiating clear cell adenocarcinomas of the bladder/urethra from invasive high-grade transitional/urothelial carcinoma and other types of bladder adenocarcinomas and to a lesser extent from nephrogenic adenomas. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β is of no diagnostic utility in discriminating primary bladder/urethral clear cell adenocarcinomas from metastatic clear cell adenocarcinomas of the female genital tract to the bladder/urethra. From a histogenesis standpoint, although the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β in both gynecologic and

  5. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  6. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  7. Enhanced autophagy is required for survival in EGFR-independent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Yuji; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Koizume, Shiro; Sekiguchi, Hironobu; Saito, Haruhiro; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Kameda, Yoichi; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Oguni, Sachiko; Niki, Toshiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancers harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations depend on constitutive activation of the kinase for survival. Although most EGFR-mutant lung cancers are sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and shrink in response to treatment, acquired resistance to TKI therapy is common. We demonstrate here that two EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and HCC4006, contain a subpopulation of cells that have undergone epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and survive independent of activated EGFR. These EGFR-independent cancer cells, herein termed gefitinib-resistant (GR) cells, demonstrate higher levels of basal autophagy than their parental cells and thrive under hypoxic, reduced-serum conditions in vitro; this somewhat simulates the hypoxic environment common to cancerous tissues. We show that depletion of the essential autophagy gene, ATG5, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, markedly reduces GR cell viability under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, we show a significant elevation in caspase activity in GR cells following knockdown of ATG5. These results suggest that GR cells can evade apoptosis and survive in hostile, hypoxic environments with constant autophagic flux. We also show the presence of autophagosomes in some cancer cells from patient samples, even in untreated EGFR-mutant lung cancer tissue samples. Together, our results indicate that autophagy inhibitors alone or in combination with EGFR TKIs may be an effective approach for the treatment of EGFR-mutant lung cancers, where basal autophagy of some cancer cells is upregulated.

  8. Epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cells in airway epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coraux, Christelle; Roux, Jacqueline; Jolly, Thomas; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-08-15

    In healthy subjects, the respiratory epithelium forms a continuous lining to the airways and to the environment, and plays a unique role as a barrier against external deleterious agents to protect the airways from the insults. In respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, or asthma, the airway epithelium is frequently remodeled and injured, leading to the impairment of its defense functions. The rapid restoration of the epithelial barrier is crucial for these patients. The complete regeneration of the airway epithelium is a complex phenomenon, including not only the epithelial wound repair but also the epithelial differentiation to reconstitute a fully well differentiated and functional epithelium. The regeneration implies two partners: the epithelial stem/progenitor cells and factors able to regulate this process. Among these factors, epithelial cells-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a crucial role. The secretion of a provisional ECM, the cell-ECM relationships through epithelial receptors, and the remodeling of the ECM by proteases (mainly matrix metalloproteinases) contribute not only to airway epithelial repair by modulating epithelial cell migration and proliferation, but also to the differentiation of repairing cells leading to the complete restoration of the wounded epithelium. A better characterization of resident stem cells and of effectors of the regeneration process is an essential prerequisite to propose new regenerative therapeutics to patients suffering from infectious/inflammatory respiratory diseases.

  9. Long noncoding RNA CCAT1 acts as an oncogene and promotes chemoresistance in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Chu, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Longbang

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance remains one of the major obstacles in clinical treatment of lung adenocarcinoma (LAD). Indeed, docetaxel-resistant LAD cells present chemoresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to promote tumorigenesis in many cancer types. Here, we showed that the lncRNA colon cancer-associated transcript-1 (CCAT1) was upregulated in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. Furthermore, downregulation of CCAT1 decreased chemoresistance, inhibited proliferation, enhanced apoptosis and reversed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype of docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. We also found that the oncogenic function of CCAT1 in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells depended on the sponging of let-7c. In turn, the sponging of let-7c by CCAT1 released Bcl-xl (a let-7c target), thereby promoting the acquisition of chemoresistance and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotypes in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. Our data reveal a novel pathway underlying chemoresistance and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. PMID:27566568

  10. CCN1 is critical for acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Modak, Cristina; Mouazzen, Wasim; Narvaez, Reinier; Reavis, Kevin M; Chai, Jianyuan

    2010-02-19

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein involved in both wound healing and cancer cell invasion. Increased CCN1 expression has been associated with the development of Barrett's esophagus and the increased risk of progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, acid reflux is a major contributor. Low pH has been shown to induce CCN1 gene expression in esophageal epithelial cells. Here we demonstrated that both CCN1 and low pH could cause esophageal epithelial cell transformation, including loss of E-cadherin, disruption of cell-cell junctions, and expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, knockdown of CCN1 through RNA interference sufficiently attenuated acid-driven cell phenotypic changes, while over-expression of CCN1 exacerbated these effects, indicating a critical role of CCN1 in acid-induced esophageal epithelial cell transformation. Given the pivotal role of low pH in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its progression towards esophageal adenocarcinoma, our study identified CCN1 as a key molecule mediating this process.

  11. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  12. microRNA-214 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma by targeting the suppressor-of-fused protein (Sufu)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junying; Xiang, Tong; Li, Qijing; Diao, Xinwei; Zhu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related deaths in patients with lung adenocarcinoma (LAD). Emerging evidence reveals that miRNA is critical for tumor metastasis. miR-214 expression has been associated with LAD progression. However, whether and how miR-214 is involved in the development and metastasis of LAD remain unaddressed. Here, we found that the expression of miR-214 was elevated in LAD and correlated positively with LAD metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, we found that miR-214 enhanced the molecular program controlling the EMT of LAD cells and promoted LAD cell metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. This study thus provides the first evidence to show that the miR-214 expression by LAD cells contributes to the EMT and metastasis of LAD. Mechanistically, Sufu was identified as an important miR-214 functional target for the EMT and metastasis of LAD, ectopic expression of Sufu alleviated miR-214 promoted EMT and metastasis. Importantly, the expression of Sufu inversely correlated with the expression of miR-214 and vimentin and positively associated with the expression of E-cadherin in the tumor cells from human LAD patients. Collectively, this study uncovers a previously unappreciated miR-214-Sufu pathway in controlling EMT and metastasis of LAD and suggests that interfering with miR-214 and Sufu could be a viable approach to treat late stage metastatic LAD patients. PMID:26462018

  13. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  14. Adamantinoma-like Ewing sarcoma mimicking basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Cecilia; Clarke, Martha R; Zhang, Lei; Antonescu, Cristina R; Seethala, Raja R

    2015-06-01

    Adamantinoma-like Ewing sarcoma (AES) is a rare variant of the Ewing family of tumors that resembles classic adamantinoma of bone. AES shows epithelial differentiation and a more complex immunohistochemical expression profile with keratin and basal marker immunoreactivity and can resemble a variety of carcinomas. We report an unusual case of an AES of the parotid gland that mimicked a basal cell adenocarcinoma. Like basal cell adenocarcinoma, this AES showed a nested basaloid proliferation with peripheral palisading in tumor nests with 'basaloid' epithelial differentiation as highlighted by cytokeratin AE1/3 and p40 positivity. However, unlike most basal cell adenocarcinomas, this tumor demonstrated high grade morphology, showed no true ductal or myoepithelial component, and also showed a tendency towards neuroectodermal phenotype with focal rosette formation, CD99 and weak synaptophysin immunoreactivity. EWSR1 and FLI1 fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of a translocation supporting the diagnosis of AES. This is the first case of AES presenting as a primary parotid mass highlighting the potential to be mistaken for primary salivary gland carcinomas, which in addition to basal cell adenocarcinoma include other basaloid tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma.

  15. Synergistic association of Notch and NFκB signaling and role of Notch signaling in modulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Sivasithamparam, Niranjali Devaraj; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2014-12-01

    Notch1 signaling plays a key role in normal developmental processes and in cancer. The association between Notch activation and development of cancer has been well documented. Notch activation and outcome of the disease depend upon the crosstalk with other regulatory pathways including Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. In this study, we have investigated the interaction of Notch intracellular domain (NICD) with NFκBp65 in colorectal cancer which resulted in the upregulation of Bcl-xL resulting in the inhibition of apoptosis. Mesenchymal marker Slug expression and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial phenotypic marker were demonstrated in colon cancer tissues. The study was also illustrated by using the gamma secretase inhibitor, N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) in HT29 cells. Immunohistochemistry (NICD, NFκBp65, and Slug) and double immunofluorescence analysis (NICD, NFκBp65) revealed that NICD and NFκBp65 were highly expressed in HT29 cells and in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. Slug and Bcl-xL protein expressions were significantly reduced in DAPT treated HT 29 cells. Immunoprecipitation and dual staining emphasized the strong interaction of NICD with NFκBp65 in adenocarcinoma than in normal tissue. It appeared that Notch1 and NFκB could independently contribute to tumor progression. However, their interaction and synergism might be the determinants that would affect the outcome of the disease and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Sulphamoylated 2-Methoxyestradiol Analogues Induce Apoptosis in Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Michelle; Theron, Anne; Mqoco, Thandi; Vieira, Warren; Prudent, Renaud; Martinez, Anne; Lafanechère, Laurence; Joubert, Annie

    2013-01-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is a naturally occurring estradiol metabolite which possesses antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and antitumor properties. However, due to its limited biological accessibility, synthetic analogues have been synthesized and tested in attempt to develop drugs with improved oral bioavailability and efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of three novel in silico-designed sulphamoylated 2ME2 analogues on the HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cell line and estrogen receptor-negative breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. A dose-dependent study (0.1–25 μM) was conducted with an exposure time of 24 hours. Results obtained from crystal violet staining indicated that 0.5 μM of all 3 compounds reduced the number of cells to 50%. Lactate dehydrogenase assay was used to assess cytotoxicity, while the mitotracker mitochondrial assay and caspase-6 and -8 activity assays were used to investigate the possible occurrence of apoptosis. Tubulin polymerization assays were conducted to evaluate the influence of these sulphamoylated 2ME2 analogues on tubulin dynamics. Double immunofluorescence microscopy using labeled antibodies specific to tyrosinate and detyrosinated tubulin was conducted to assess the effect of the 2ME2 analogues on tubulin dynamics. An insignificant increase in the level of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed in the compounds-treated cells. These sulphamoylated compounds caused a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation indicating apoptosis induction by means of the intrinsic pathway in HeLa and MDA-MB-231 cells. Microtubule depolymerization was observed after exposure to these three sulphamoylated analogues. PMID:24039728

  17. Establishment and characterization of a singaporean chinese lung adenocarcinoma cell line with four copies of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Choong, Meng Ling; Yong, Jacklyn; Wang, Yu; Lee, May Ann

    2014-08-01

    We have established a lung adenocarcinoma cell line, ETCC016, from lung pleural effusion of a male Singaporean Chinese with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. The subject smoked 20 cigarettes per day for more than 30 years. The cell line arose from spontaneous transformation of cells grown in a collagen-coated culture dish. Transformed characteristics of the cell line include the ability to reach high confluency in a culture dish, low cell doubling time, ability to form colonies in soft agar, and ability to form solid tumor in immune-compromised SCID mice. Immunostaining showed that the cells originated from lung epithelial cells. Genomic analysis revealed a large amount of chromosomal aberrations (gain and loss of genetic materials, and loss of heterozygosity [LOH]), indicative of a long history of smoking. The cells have four copies of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and three copies of MYC, but have lost one copy of the RB1 gene. LOH was detected in TP53 and BRAF genes. There is no anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement. The ETCC016 lung adenocarcinoma cell line has demonstrated susceptibility towards inhibitors specific for EGFR/HER2 and ALK targets, but resistance to MYC-specific inhibitor. This cell line will be a useful model for further understanding of lung adenocarcinoma.

  18. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maggie Y.; Lee, Tammy L.; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease. PMID:27764770

  19. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maggie Y; Lee, Tammy L; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease.

  20. Stem cells as the root of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Balic, Anamaria; Dorado, Jorge; Alonso-Gomez, Mercedes; Heeschen, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells play a crucial role not only in the generation and maintenance of different tissues, but also in the development and progression of malignancies. For the many solid cancers, it has now been shown that they harbor a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells that bear stem cell features and therefore, these cells are termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-propagating cells. CSC are exclusively tumorigenic and essential drivers for tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma does not only contain one homogeneous population of CSC rather than diverse subpopulations that may have evolved during tumor progression. One of these populations is called migrating CSC and can be characterized by CXCR4 co-expression. Only these cells are capable of evading the primary tumor and traveling to distant sites such as the liver as the preferred site of metastatic spread. Clinically even more important, however, is the observation that CSC are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy resulting in their relative enrichment during treatment and rapid relapse of disease. Many laboratories are now working on the further in-depth characterization of these cells, which may eventually allow for the identification of their Achilles heal and lead to novel treatment modalities for fighting this deadly disease.

  1. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  2. CCN1 induces a reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jianyuan; Norng, Manith; Modak, Cristina; Reavis, Kevin M; Mouazzen, Wasim; Pham, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein that activates many genes related to wound healing and tissue remodeling in fibroblasts, but its effect on epithelial cells remains unclear. This study examined the role of CCN1 in epithelial wound healing using rat gastric epithelial cells and rat stomach ulcer as in vitro and in vivo models, respectively. We found that CCN1 expression is highly upregulated in the epithelial cells adjacent to a wound and remains high until the wound is healed. Upregulation of CCN1 activates a transient epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the epithelial cells at the migrating front and drives wound closure. Once the wound is healed, these epithelial cells and their progeny can resume their original epithelial phenotype. We also found that CCN1-induced E-cadherin loss is not due to transcriptional regulation but rather protein degradation due to the collapse of adherens junctions, which is contributed by beta-catenin translocation. CCN1-activated integrin-linked kinase mediates this process. Finally, our in vivo study showed that locally neutralizing CCN1 drastically impairs wound closure, whereas local injection of recombinant CCN1 protein induces expression of vimentin and smooth muscle alpha-actin in normal gastric mucosal epithelial cells and accelerates re-epithelialization during ulcer healing. In conclusion, our study indicates that CCN1 can induce reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and this feature may have great value for clinical wound healing.

  3. Adherence of skin bacteria to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Steiner, S; Witek, T; Balish, E

    1990-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria isolated from human axillae were tested for their capacity to adhere to buccal epithelial cells, immortalized human epithelial (HEp-2) cells, and undifferentiated and differentiated human epithelial cells. In general, both aerobic and anaerobic diphtheroids adhered better to differentiated human epithelial cells than to HEp-2 and undifferentiated human epithelial cells (P less than 0.05). Mannose, galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and fibronectin were also assayed for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of diphtheroids to human epithelial cells. A great deal of variability was observed in the capacity of the latter compounds to inhibit the attachment of aerobic diphtheroids to undifferentiated and differentiated epithelial cells. Overall, mannose appeared to be best at inhibiting the adherence of the aerobic diphtheroids to undifferentiated human epithelial cells. Galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and fibronectin showed a greater capacity to inhibit attachment of aerobic diphtheroids to differentiated than to undifferentiated human epithelial cells. The inhibition of adherence to differentiated human epithelial cells varied with the microorganism and the compound tested; however, the highest and most consistent inhibition of adherence (76.1 to 88.6%) was observed with a 5% solution of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The in vitro adherence and adherence inhibition assays presented here demonstrate that a number of adhesins and receptors are involved in the adherence of skin bacteria to human epithelial cells and receptors on human epithelial cells are apparently altered during differentiation. PMID:2298877

  4. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  5. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Kai; Jin, Faguang

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  6. Proton Pump Inhibitors Display Antitumor Effects in Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Eduardo; Apostolova, Nadezda; Esplugues, Juan V.; García-González, María A.; Lanas, Ángel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can exert antineoplastic effects through the disruption of pH homeostasis by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase (H+-VATPase), a proton pump overexpressed in several tumor cells, but this aspect has not been deeply investigated in EAC yet. In the present study, the expression of H+-VATPase was assessed through the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the antineoplastic effects of PPIs and cellular mechanisms involved were evaluated in vitro. H+-VATPase expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffined-embedded samples or by immunofluorescence in cultured BE and EAC cell lines. Cells were treated with different concentrations of PPIs and parameters of citotoxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy were evaluated. H+-VATPase expression was found in all biopsies and cell lines evaluated, showing differences in the location of the pump between the cell lines. Esomeprazole inhibited proliferation and cell invasion and induced apoptosis of EAC cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seemed to be involved in the cytotoxic effects observed since the addition of N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced esomeprazole-induced apoptosis in EAC cells. Esomeprazole also reduced intracellular pH of tumor cells, whereas only disturbed the mitochondrial membrane potential in OE33 cells. Esomeprazole induced autophagy in both EAC cells, but also triggered a blockade in autophagic flux in the metastatic cell line. These data provide in vitro evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC and also shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger PPIs cytotoxic effects, which differ upon the cell line evaluated. PMID:27932981

  7. Invasive mouse gastric adenocarcinomas arising from Lgr5+ stem cells are dependent on crosstalk between the Hedgehog/GLI2 and mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Li-Jyun; Zhao, Xinyi; Zhang, Yaqing; Grachtchouk, Marina; Demitrack, Elise; Ermilov, Alexandre; Wilbert, Dawn M.; Zheng, Xinlei; Kaatz, Ashley; Greenson, Joel K.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Merchant, Juanita L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Samuelson, Linda C.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Here we report a novel, highly-penetrant mouse model of invasive gastric cancer arising from deregulated Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling targeted to Lgr5-expressing stem cells in adult stomach. Tumor development progressed rapidly: three weeks after inducing the Hh pathway oncogene GLI2A, 65% of mice harbored in situ gastric cancer, and an additional 23% of mice had locally invasive tumors. Advanced mouse gastric tumors had multiple features in common with human gastric adenocarcinomas, including characteristic histological changes, expression of RNA and protein markers, and the presence of major inflammatory and stromal cell populations. A subset of tumor cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely mediated by focal activation of canonical Wnt signaling and Snail1 induction. Strikingly, mTOR pathway activation, based on pS6 expression, was robustly activated in mouse gastric adenocarcinomas from the earliest stages of tumor development, and treatment with rapamycin impaired tumor growth. GLI2A-expressing epithelial cells were detected transiently in intestine, which also contains Lgr5+ stem cells, but they did not give rise to epithelial tumors in this organ. These findings establish that deregulated activation of Hedgehog/Gli2 signaling in Lgr5-expressing stem cells is sufficient to drive gastric adenocarcinoma development in mice, identify a critical requirement for mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of these tumors, and underscore the importance of tissue context in defining stem cell responsiveness to oncogenic stimuli. PMID:26859571

  8. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  9. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K(+) channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K(+) channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa 3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa 1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv 7.1), KCNH2 (Kv 11.1), KCNH5 (Kv 10.2), KCNT1 (KCa 4.1), KCNT2 (KCa 4.2), and KCNK5 (K 2P 5.1). We will give an overview of K(+) channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K(+) channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K(+) channels may be of importance.

  10. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  11. MDA-9/Syntenin-Slug transcriptional complex promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasion/metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Kai; Pan, Szu-Hua; Chang, Yih-Leong; Hung, Pei-Fang; Kao, Shih-Han; Wang, Wen-Lung; Lin, Ching-Wen; Yang, Shuenn-Chen; Liang, Chen-Hsien; Wu, Chen-Tu; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-9 (MDA-9)/Syntenin is a novel therapeutic target because it plays critical roles in cancer progression and exosome biogenesis. Here we show that Slug, a key epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) regulator, is a MDA-9/Syntenin downstream target. Mitogen EGF stimulation increases Slug expression and MDA-9/Syntenin nuclear translocation. MDA-9/Syntenin uses its PDZ1 domain to bind with Slug, and this interaction further leads to HDAC1 recruitment, up-regulation of Slug transcriptional repressor activity, enhanced Slug-mediated EMT, and promotion of cancer invasion and metastasis. The PDZ domains and nuclear localization of MDA-9/Syntenin are both required for promoting Slug-mediated cancer invasion. Clinically, patients with high MDA-9/Syntenin and high Slug expressions were associated with poor overall survival compared to those with low expression in lung adenocarcinomas. Our findings provide evidence that MDA-9/Syntenin acts as a pivotal adaptor of Slug and it transcriptionally enhances Slug-mediated EMT to promote cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:26561205

  12. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44 nm (NP44) and 100 nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors.

  13. Cytotoxicity of selected magnetic fluids on human adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, Ingrid; Frühauf, Sylvia; Linß, Werner; Hiergeist, Robert; Andrä, Wilfried; Hergt, Rudolf; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2003-04-01

    Based on the knowledge that the magnetite particles seem to be well tolerated by the human body, the cytotoxic potential of coated particles was investigated, which had been selected for potential applications regarding the minimal-invasive elimination of breast tumors by magnetic thermoablation. Human adenocarcinoma cells (BT-20) were exposed (24, 48 and 72 h) to different magnetite particles with diverging total size (8, 10 and 220 nm) and coating (cationic and anionic). One sample contained only non-coated magnetite particles. The magnetite concentration ranged between 0.2 and 20 ng/cell. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring the succinate dehydrogenase activity. The morphologic features resulting from the interaction of magnetic fluids with BT-20 cells was determined by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to the non-coated magnetic particles, cationic particles induced the strongest decrease in cell survival rates depending on time and concentration. Morphologically, the cationic particle samples exerted a strong binding to cellular membranes. Changes in the subcellular structure were found in relation to the coated magnetic particles. In conclusion, our results show that the coated prototype magnetic particles, particularly those with a cationic surfactant, are cytotoxic to BT-20 cells. The cytotoxicity is attributed to electrostatic bindings with cellular membranes, influences of chemical components or non-physiologic pH. Considering the in vivo applications, adverse systemic effects are conceivable and more biocompatible coatings for the selected magnetic particles should be elaborated.

  14. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  15. Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vona, Giovanna; Sabile, Abdelmajid; Louha, Malek; Sitruk, Veronique; Romana, Serge; Schütze, Karin; Capron, Frédérique; Franco, Dominique; Pazzagli, Mario; Vekemans, Michel; Lacour, Bernard; Bréchot, Christian; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new assay, ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells), which allows the counting and the immunomorphological and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in patients with carcinoma, using peripheral blood sample volumes as small as 1 ml. Using this assay, epithelial tumor cells can be isolated individually by filtration because of their larger size when compared to peripheral blood leukocytes. ISET parameters were defined using peripheral blood spiked with tumor cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, MCF-7, HeLa, and LNCaP). ISET can detect a single, micropipetted tumor cell, added to 1 ml of blood. We also demonstrate that fluorescence in situ hybridization can be used to perform chromosomal analyses on tumor cells collected using ISET. Polymerase chain reaction-based genetic analyses can be applied to ISET-isolated cells, and, as an example, we demonstrate homozygous p53 deletion in single Hep3B cells after filtration and laser microdissection. Finally, we provide evidence for the in vivo feasibility of ISET in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing tumor resection. ISET, but not reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, allowed analysis of cell morphology, counting of tumor cells, and demonstration of tumor microemboli spread into peripheral blood during surgery. Overall, ISET constitutes a novel approach that should open new perpectives in molecular medicine. PMID:10623654

  16. Force mapping in epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    du Roure, Olivia; Saez, Alexandre; Buguin, Axel; Austin, Robert H.; Chavrier, Philippe; Siberzan, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 μm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior. PMID:15695588

  17. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  19. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Lishan; Xian, Guozhe; Lv, Yinping; Lin, Yanliang; Wang, Yibing

    2017-03-18

    25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase in various organs and is involved in many processes, including lipid metabolism, inflammation and the immune response. However, the role of 25-HC in the migration and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that 0.1 μM 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion without affecting cell proliferation, especially after coculture with THP1-derived macrophages. Further investigation showed that 0.1 μM 25-HC significantly stimulated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in a coculture system and increased the expression of LXR and Snail. IL-1β also mimicked the effect of 25-HC. LXR knockdown notably blocked the 25-HC-induced Snail expression, migration and invasion in both the monoculture system and the coculture system, but it did not impact the effect of IL-1β, which suggested that IL-1β functioned in an LXR-independent manner. These results suggested that 25-HC promoted ADC cell migration and invasion in an LXR-dependent manner in the monoculture system but that in the coculture system, the 25-HC-induced IL-1β secretion enhanced the effect of 25-HC in an LXR-independent manner.

  20. Authentication and characterisation of a new oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell line: MFD-1.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Edwin; Hayden, Annette; Birts, Charles; Britton, Edward; Cowie, Andrew; Pickard, Karen; Mellone, Massimiliano; Choh, Clarisa; Derouet, Mathieu; Duriez, Patrick; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J; Primrose, John N; Strefford, Jonathan C; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Thomas, Gareth J; Ang, Yeng; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Underwood, Timothy J

    2016-09-07

    New biological tools are required to understand the functional significance of genetic events revealed by whole genome sequencing (WGS) studies in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The MFD-1 cell line was isolated from a 55-year-old male with OAC without recombinant-DNA transformation. Somatic genetic variations from MFD-1, tumour, normal oesophagus, and leucocytes were analysed with SNP6. WGS was performed in tumour and leucocytes. RNAseq was performed in MFD-1, and two classic OAC cell lines FLO1 and OE33. Transposase-accessible chromatin sequencing (ATAC-seq) was performed in MFD-1, OE33, and non-neoplastic HET1A cells. Functional studies were performed. MFD-1 had a high SNP genotype concordance with matched germline/tumour. Parental tumour and MFD-1 carried four somatically acquired mutations in three recurrent mutated genes in OAC: TP53, ABCB1 and SEMA5A, not present in FLO-1 or OE33. MFD-1 displayed high expression of epithelial and glandular markers and a unique fingerprint of open chromatin. MFD-1 was tumorigenic in SCID mouse and proliferative and invasive in 3D cultures. The clinical utility of whole genome sequencing projects will be delivered using accurate model systems to develop molecular-phenotype therapeutics. We have described the first such system to arise from the oesophageal International Cancer Genome Consortium project.

  1. Authentication and characterisation of a new oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell line: MFD-1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Edwin; Hayden, Annette; Birts, Charles; Britton, Edward; Cowie, Andrew; Pickard, Karen; Mellone, Massimiliano; Choh, Clarisa; Derouet, Mathieu; Duriez, Patrick; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J.; Primrose, John N.; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew; Thomas, Gareth J.; Ang, Yeng; Sharrocks, Andrew D.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Underwood, Timothy J.; MacRae, Shona; Grehan, Nicola; Abdullahi, Zarah; de la Rue, Rachel; Noorani, Ayesha; Elliott, Rachael Fels; de Silva, Nadeera; Bornschein, Jan; O’Donovan, Maria; Contino, Gianmarco; Yang, Tsun-Po; Chettouh, Hamza; Crawte, Jason; Nutzinger, Barbara; Edwards, Paul A. W.; Smith, Laura; Miremadi, Ahmad; Malhotra, Shalini; Cluroe, Alison; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Ford, Hugo; Gilligan, David; Safranek, Peter; Hindmarsh, Andy; Sujendran, Vijayendran; Carroll, Nick; Turkington, Richard; Hayes, Stephen J.; Ang, Yeng; Preston, Shaun R.; Oakes, Sarah; Bagwan, Izhar; Save, Vicki; Skipworth, Richard J. E.; Hupp, Ted R.; O’Neill, J. Robert; Tucker, Olga; Taniere, Philippe; Owsley, Jack; Crichton, Charles; Schusterreiter, Christian; Barr, Hugh; Shepherd, Neil; Old, Oliver; Lagergren, Jesper; Gossage, James; Davies, Andrew; Chang, Fuju; Zylstra, Janine; Sanders, Grant; Berrisford, Richard; Harden, Catherine; Bunting, David; Lewis, Mike; Cheong, Ed; Kumar, Bhaskar; Parsons, Simon L.; Soomro, Irshad; Kaye, Philip; Saunders, John; Lovat, Laurence; Haidry, Rehan; Eneh, Victor; Igali, Laszlo; Welch, Ian; Scott, Michael; Sothi, Shamila; Suortamo, Sari; Lishman, Suzy; Beardsmore, Duncan; Anderson, Charlotte; Smith, Mike L.; Secrier, Maria; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Bower, Lawrence; Achilleos, Achilleas; Lynch, Andy G.; Tavare, Simon

    2016-01-01

    New biological tools are required to understand the functional significance of genetic events revealed by whole genome sequencing (WGS) studies in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The MFD-1 cell line was isolated from a 55-year-old male with OAC without recombinant-DNA transformation. Somatic genetic variations from MFD-1, tumour, normal oesophagus, and leucocytes were analysed with SNP6. WGS was performed in tumour and leucocytes. RNAseq was performed in MFD-1, and two classic OAC cell lines FLO1 and OE33. Transposase-accessible chromatin sequencing (ATAC-seq) was performed in MFD-1, OE33, and non-neoplastic HET1A cells. Functional studies were performed. MFD-1 had a high SNP genotype concordance with matched germline/tumour. Parental tumour and MFD-1 carried four somatically acquired mutations in three recurrent mutated genes in OAC: TP53, ABCB1 and SEMA5A, not present in FLO-1 or OE33. MFD-1 displayed high expression of epithelial and glandular markers and a unique fingerprint of open chromatin. MFD-1 was tumorigenic in SCID mouse and proliferative and invasive in 3D cultures. The clinical utility of whole genome sequencing projects will be delivered using accurate model systems to develop molecular-phenotype therapeutics. We have described the first such system to arise from the oesophageal International Cancer Genome Consortium project. PMID:27600491

  2. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  3. Can Villin be Used to Identify Malignant and Undifferentiated Normal Digestive Epithelial Cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robine, S.; Huet, C.; Moll, R.; Sahuquillo-Merino, C.; Coudrier, E.; Zweibaum, A.; Louvard, D.

    1985-12-01

    We have investigated the presence of villin (a Ca2+-regulated actin binding protein) in various tissues (normal or malignant) and in established cell lines by using sensitive immunochemical techniques on cell extracts and immunofluorescence analysis on frozen sections. Our results show that villin is a marker that can be used to distinguish normal differentiated epithelial cells from the simple epithelia lining the gastrointestinal tract and renal tubules. Villin is found in the absorptive cells of the small and large intestines, in the duct cells of pancreas and biliary system, and in the cells of kidney proximal tubules. Furthermore, undifferentiated normal and tumoral cells of intestinal origin in vivo and in cell culture express villin. Therefore, expression of villin is seen in cells that do not necessarily display the morphological features characteristic of their terminally differentiated state, such as the microvilli-lined brush border. We suggest the possible clinical implications of using villin as a marker in the diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas.

  4. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  5. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  6. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  7. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    breast is highly expressed by luminal epithelial cells and is less expressed by basal cells19,20. In contrast, CD49f (a6 integrin) has an inverse pattern...mouse stretched on its back. The hose and nose cone from the anesthetic vaporizer are securely attached to one side of the plate, and a heated pad is...the mouse by a nose cone. Check that the mouse has reached surgical anesthesia by loss of pedal withdrawal reflex . ! cautIon Institutional review

  8. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  9. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans.

  10. Hypoxia induced CCL28 promotes angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma by targeting CCR3 on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guichun; Tao, Leilei; Shen, Sunan; Chen, Longbang

    2016-06-02

    Tumor hypoxia is one of the important features of lung adenocarcinoma. Chemokines might mediate the effects caused by tumor hypoxia. As confirmed in tumor tissue and serum of patients, CC chemokine 28 (CCL28) was the only hypoxia induced chemokine in lung adenocarcinoma cells. CCL28 could promote tube formation, migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. In addition, angiogenesis was promoted by CCL28 in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and matrigel implanted in dorsal back of athymic nude mice (CByJ.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J). Tumors formed by lung adenocarcinoma cells with high expression of CCL28 grew faster and had a higher vascular density, whereas tumor formation rate of lung adenocarcinoma cells with CCL28 expression knockdown was quite low and had a lower vascular density. CCR3, receptor of CCL28, was highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells in lung adenocarcinoma when examining by immunohistochemistry. Further signaling pathways in endothelial cells, modulated by CCL28, were analyzed by Phosphorylation Antibody Array. CCL28/CCR3 signaling pathway could bypass that of VEGF/VEGFR on the levels of PI3K-Akt, p38 MAPK and PLC gamma. The effects could be neutralized by antibody against CCR3. In conclusion, CCL28, as a chemokine induced by tumor hypoxia, could promote angiogenesis in lung adenocarcinoma through targeting CCR3 on microvascular endothelial cells.

  11. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Stark, Valerie E; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L

    2016-04-05

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC.

  12. Differential transformation of mammary epithelial cells by Wnt genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G T; Gavin, B J; McMahon, A P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Wnt family includes at least 10 genes that encode structurally related secreted glycoproteins. Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 were originally identified as oncogenes activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus in virus-induced mammary adenocarcinomas, although they are not expressed in the normal mammary gland. However, five other Wnt genes are differentially expressed during development of adult mammary tissue, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in various phases of mammary gland growth and development. Induction of transformation by Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 may be due to interference with these normal regulatory events; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. We have tested Wnt family members for the ability to induce transformation of cultured mammary cells. The results demonstrate that the Wnt gene family can be divided into three groups depending on their ability to induce morphological transformation and altered growth characteristics of the C57MG mammary epithelial cell line. Wnt-1, Wnt-3A, and Wnt-7A were highly transforming and induced colonies which formed and shed balls of cells. Wnt-2, Wnt-5B, and Wnt-7B also induced transformation but with a lower frequency and an apparent decrease in saturation density. In contrast, Wnt-6 and two other family members which are normally expressed in C57MG cells, Wnt-4 and Wnt-5A, failed to induce transformation. These data demonstrate that the Wnt genes have distinct effects on cell growth and should not be regarded as functionally equivalent. Images PMID:8065359

  13. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in four colonic adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Broitman, S A

    1995-12-01

    Colon tumor cells, unlike normal human fibroblasts, exhibited an uncoupling of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol from cellular growth, when endogenous cholesterol synthesis was inhibited by mevinolin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) competitive inhibitor [Fabricant, M., and Broitman, S.A. (1990) Cancer Res. 50, 632-636]. Further evaluation of cholesterol metabolism was conducted in two undifferentiated (SW480, SW1417) and two differentiated (HT29, CACO2) colonic adenocarcinoma (adeno-CA) cell lines and an untransformed human fibroblast, AG1519A. Cells grown in monolayer culture to near subconfluency were used to assess endogenous cholesterol synthesis by 14C-acetate incorporation, in response to the following treatments in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS)-supplemented minimum essential medium (MEM): LPDS alone, LDL, mevinolin, mevinolin with LDL, and 25-hydroxy-cholesterol (25-OH-CH). Complete fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented MEM was used as control. All colon tumor lines exhibited similarly high endogenous cholesterol synthesis in both FBS and LPDS relative to the fibroblasts which demonstrated low basal levels in FBS and maximal synthesis in LPDS. LDL treatment did not inhibit cholesterol synthesis in colon tumor cells, but suppressed that in the fibroblast by 70%. Sterol repression of cholesterol synthesis mediated by 25-OH-CH occurred in all cells. Mevinolin caused a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the colonic cancer cell lines, which was not further decreased by concurrent addition of LDL. In contrast, in mevinolin-treated fibroblasts, LDL further inhibited cholesterol synthesis. When the effect of cell density on cholesterol synthesis regulation was evaluated under conditions of sparse density in SW480 and SW147, results indicated that (i) basal rates of cholesterol synthesis were higher, (ii) LDL inhibited cholesterol synthesis more effectively, and (iii) mevinolin or 25-OH-CH had a more pronounced effect than in

  14. Circulating Tumor Cells in the Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are elements of indisputable significance as they seem to be responsible for the onset of metastasis. Despite this, research into CTCs and their clinical application have been hindered by their rarity and heterogeneity at the molecular and cellular level, and also by a lack of technical standardization. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Its incidence has increased so much in recent years that new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed. Preliminary findings suggest that CTCs could represent an effective, non-invasive, real-time assessable biomarker in all stages of EAC. This review provides an overview of EAC and CTC characteristics and reports the main research results obtained on CTCs in this setting. The need to carry out further basic and translational research in this area to confirm the clinical usefulness of CTCs and to provide oncologists with a tool to improve therapeutic strategies for EAC patients was herein highlighted. PMID:27527155

  15. A case of signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with spontaneous urinary extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Sanish S.; Thachil, Joseph V.; Raja, T. `; Mani, Rama

    2011-01-01

    Primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (PSRCC) of the bladder is a relatively rare variant of adenocarcinoma of the bladder with poor prognosis. Also PSRCC of the bladder presenting with spontaneous urinary extravasation is very rare. We present the case of a 48-year male who presented with spontaneous urinary extravasation and was diagnosed to have PSRCC of the urinary bladder on evaluation. He was treated with radical cystectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. This report emphasizes the need to rule out other primary sites of adenocarcinoma in the body, which may metastasize to the urinary bladder. PMID:22022068

  16. Cellular Preoxygenation Partially Attenuates the Antitumoral Effect of Cisplatin despite Highly Protective Effects on Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulian, Bahram; Rezaei, Maryam; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies demonstrated that oxygen pretreatment significantly protects human embryonic renal tubular cell against acute cisplatin- (CP-) induced cytotoxicity. The present study was designed to investigate whether this protective effect is associated with decreasing therapeutic effects of cisplatin on malignant cells. For this purpose, cultured human embryonic kidney epithelial-like (AD293), cervical carcinoma epithelial-like (Hela), and ovarian adenocarcinoma epithelial-like (OVCAR-3) cells were subjected to either 2-hour pretreatment with oxygen (≥90%) or normal air and then to a previously determined 50% lethal dose of cisplatin for 24 hours. Cellular viability was evaluated via MTT and Neutral Red assays. Also, activated caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, as the biochemical markers of cell apoptosis, were determined using immunoblotting. The hyperoxic preexposure protocol significantly protects renal AD293 cells against cisplatin-induced toxicity. Oxygen pretreatment also partially attenuated the cisplatin-induced cytotoxic effects on Hela and OVCAR-3 cells. However, it did not completely protect these cells against the therapeutic cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. In summary, the protective methods for reducing cisplatin nephrotoxic side effects like oxygen pretreatment might be associated with concurrent reduction of the therapeutic cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on malignant cells like cervical carcinoma (Hela) and ovarian adenocarcinoma (OVCAR-3) cells. PMID:28298953

  17. Cellular Preoxygenation Partially Attenuates the Antitumoral Effect of Cisplatin despite Highly Protective Effects on Renal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rasoulian, Bahram; Kaeidi, Ayat; Rezaei, Maryam; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies demonstrated that oxygen pretreatment significantly protects human embryonic renal tubular cell against acute cisplatin- (CP-) induced cytotoxicity. The present study was designed to investigate whether this protective effect is associated with decreasing therapeutic effects of cisplatin on malignant cells. For this purpose, cultured human embryonic kidney epithelial-like (AD293), cervical carcinoma epithelial-like (Hela), and ovarian adenocarcinoma epithelial-like (OVCAR-3) cells were subjected to either 2-hour pretreatment with oxygen (≥90%) or normal air and then to a previously determined 50% lethal dose of cisplatin for 24 hours. Cellular viability was evaluated via MTT and Neutral Red assays. Also, activated caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, as the biochemical markers of cell apoptosis, were determined using immunoblotting. The hyperoxic preexposure protocol significantly protects renal AD293 cells against cisplatin-induced toxicity. Oxygen pretreatment also partially attenuated the cisplatin-induced cytotoxic effects on Hela and OVCAR-3 cells. However, it did not completely protect these cells against the therapeutic cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. In summary, the protective methods for reducing cisplatin nephrotoxic side effects like oxygen pretreatment might be associated with concurrent reduction of the therapeutic cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on malignant cells like cervical carcinoma (Hela) and ovarian adenocarcinoma (OVCAR-3) cells.

  18. Phenotypic plasticity in normal breast derived epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Normal, healthy human breast tissue from a variety of volunteer donors has become available for research thanks to the establishment of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure® Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB). Multiple epithelial (K-HME) and stromal cells (K-HMS) were established from the donated tissue. Explant culture was utilized to isolate the cells from pieces of breast tissue. Selective media and trypsinization were employed to select either epithelial cells or stromal cells. The primary, non-transformed epithelial cells, the focus of this study, were characterized by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and in vitro cell culture. Results All of the primary, non-transformed epithelial cells tested have the ability to differentiate in vitro into a variety of cell types when plated in or on biologic matrices. Cells identified include stratified squamous epithelial, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, neural progenitors/neurons, immature muscle and melanocytes. The cells also express markers of embryonic stem cells. Conclusions The cell culture conditions employed select an epithelial cell that is pluri/multipotent. The plasticity of the epithelial cells developed mimics that seen in metaplastic carcinoma of the breast (MCB), a subtype of triple negative breast cancer; and may provide clues to the origin of this particularly aggressive type of breast cancer. The KTB is a unique biorepository, and the normal breast epithelial cells isolated from donated tissue have significant potential as new research tools. PMID:24915897

  19. Scrib is required for epithelial cell identity and prevents epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yamben, Idella F; Rachel, Rivka A; Shatadal, Shalini; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A; Warming, Soren; Griep, Anne E

    2013-12-01

    The integrity and function of epithelial tissues depend on the establishment and maintenance of defining characteristics of epithelial cells, cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity. Disruption of these characteristics can lead to the loss of epithelial identity through a process called epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which can contribute to pathological conditions such as tissue fibrosis and invasive cancer. In invertebrates, the epithelial polarity gene scrib plays a critical role in establishing and maintaining cell adhesion and polarity. In this study we asked if the mouse homolog, Scrib, is required for establishment and/or maintenance of epithelial identity in vivo. To do so, we conditionally deleted Scrib in the head ectoderm tissue that gives rise to both the ocular lens and the corneal epithelium. Deletion of Scrib in the lens resulted in a change in epithelial cell shape from cuboidal to flattened and elongated. Early in the process, the cell adhesion protein, E-cadherin, and apical polarity protein, ZO-1, were downregulated and the myofibroblast protein, αSMA, was upregulated, suggesting EMT was occurring in the Scrib deficient lenses. Correlating temporally with the upregulation of αSMA, Smad3 and Smad4, TGFβ signaling intermediates, accumulated in the nucleus and Snail, a TGFβ target and transcriptional repressor of the gene encoding E-cadherin, was upregulated. Pax6, a lens epithelial transcription factor required to maintain lens epithelial cell identity also was downregulated. Loss of Scrib in the corneal epithelium also led to molecular changes consistent with EMT, suggesting that the effect of Scrib deficiency was not unique to the lens. Together, these data indicate that mammalian Scrib is required to maintain epithelial identity and that loss of Scrib can culminate in EMT, mediated, at least in part, through TGFβ signaling.

  20. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  1. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 11 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A method for... Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human mammary epithelial stem cells with in vivo regenerative ability...Abstracts Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turshvili, Sam Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves, “Identification of Human Mammary

  2. Functional expression of nicotine influx transporter in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tega, Yuma; Yuzurihara, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is a potent addictive alkaloid, and is rapidly absorbed through the alveoli of the lung. However, the transport mechanism of nicotine at the human alveolar epithelial barrier has not been investigated in great detail. In the present study, the transport mechanism of nicotine across alveolar epithelium was investigated in vitro using A549 cells, a human adenocarcinoma-derived cell line with an alveolar epithelial cell like phenotype. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells exhibited time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependence with a Km of 50.4 μM. These results suggest that a carrier-mediated transport process is involved in nicotine transport in human alveolar epithelial cells. Nicotine uptake by A549 cells was insensitive to change in extracellular pH. Moreover, nicotine uptake by A549 cells could be inhibited by organic cations such as verapamil and pyrilamine, but not typical substrates of organic cation transporters and β2-agonist. These results suggest that a novel, not yet molecularly identified, organic cation transporter plays a role in nicotine transport which is unlikely to interact with β2-agonist transport. This nicotine influx transporter in human alveolar epithelium might have implications for the rapid absorption of nicotine into the systemic circulation.

  3. Quercetin Blocks Airway Epithelial Cell Chemokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanua, Suparna; Zick, Suzanna M.; Andrade, Juan E.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Burgess, John R.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that quercetin blocks airway epithelial cell chemokine expression via PI 3-kinase–dependent mechanisms. Pretreatment with quercetin and the PI 3–kinase inhibitor LY294002 each reduced TNF-α–induced IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (also called CCL2) expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Quercetin also inhibited TNF-α–induced PI 3-kinase activity, Akt phosphorylation, intracellular H2O2 production, NF-κB transactivation, IL-8 promoter activity, and steady-state mRNA levels, consistent with the notion that quercetin inhibits chemokine expression by attenuating NF-κB transactivation via a PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway. Quercetin also reduced TNF-α–induced chemokine secretion in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, while inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)-2α, suggesting that quercetin attenuates chemokine expression by post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional mechanisms. Finally, we tested the effects of quercetin in cockroach antigen–sensitized and –challenged mice. These mice show MCP-1–dependent airways hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Quercetin significantly reduced lung MCP-1 and methacholine responsiveness. We conclude that quercetin blocks airway cell chemokine expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. PMID:16794257

  4. Urokinase plasminogen activator released by alveolar epithelial cells modulates alveolar epithelial repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, Coretta; Stutz, Monika; Haeberli, André; Geiser, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Intra-alveolar fibrin is formed following lung injury and inflammation and may contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrin turnover is altered in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, resulting in intra-alveolar fibrin accumulation, mainly due to decreased fibrinolysis. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC) repair the injured alveolar epithelium by migrating over the provisional fibrin matrix. We hypothesized that repairing alveolar epithelial cells modulate the underlying fibrin matrix by release of fibrinolytic activity, and that the degree of fibrinolysis modulates alveolar epithelial repair on fibrin. To test this hypothesis we studied alveolar epithelial wound repair in vitro using a modified epithelial wound repair model with human A549 alveolar epithelial cells cultured on a fibrin matrix. In presence of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta, wounds increase by 800% in 24 hours mainly due to detachment of the cells, whereas in serum-free medium wound areas decreases by 22.4 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.01). Increased levels of D-dimer, FDP and uPA in the cell supernatant of IL-1beta-stimulated A549 epithelial cells indicate activation of fibrinolysis by activation of the plasmin system. In presence of low concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, including specific blocking anti-uPA antibodies, alveolar epithelial repair in vitro was improved, whereas in presence of high concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, a decrease was observed mainly due to decreased spreading and migration of cells. These findings suggest the existence of a fibrinolytic optimum at which alveolar epithelial repair in vitro is most efficient. In conclusion, uPA released by AEC alters alveolar epithelial repair in vitro by modulating the underlying fibrin matrix.

  5. Modulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis in murine mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shalinsky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    In efforts to exploit the differential oxygen levels within the subcompartments of solid neoplasms, this project has focused on modulating prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cells (Line 4526), either intact or sonicated, were incubated with either 2.0 uM {sup 14}C-arachidonic acid (AA) or 20.0 uM {sup 14}C-PGH{sub 2}, respectively. Following metabolism, products were extracted, separated by thin layer chromatography and analyzed by radiochromatographic scan. PGE{sub 2} was predominantly formed with minimal amounts of PGF{sub 2a} or PGD{sub 2}. Indomethacin and ibuprofen inhibited the PGE{sub 2} formation from AA with an IC{sub 50} value of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and 9.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}M, respectively. Suspended cells in glass vials were made hypoxic by flushing with N{sub 2} for varying time intervals to study AA metabolism. A time-dependent inhibition of PG biosynthesis was observed under hypoxia, and by 30 min, the PGE{sub 2} synthesis was reduced by 50% which was further inhibited by indomethacin. Misonidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole analogue, partially reversed the inhibition of PGE{sub 2} synthesis under hypoxia by 49% at 100 uM. However, misonidazole did not affect PG biosynthesis under aerobic conditions. The stimulation of PGE{sub 2} biosynthesis by misonidazole under hypoxia was blocked by indomethacin, suggesting that misonidazole can not act independently of the cyclooxygenase.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pujolsa, Laura; Mullol, Joaquim; Picado, Cèsar

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled and intranasal glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most common and effective drugs for controlling symptoms and airway inflammation in respiratory diseases such as allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with/without nasal polyps, and asthma, and the respiratory epithelium is a primary target of GC anti-inflammatory actions. GC effects are mediated through the GC receptor (GR). In humans, one single GR gene gives rise to two main GR products, namely GRalpha and GRbeta, which are subject to translational and posttranslational modifications. GRalpha is expressed in virtually all human cells and tissues, including respiratory epithelial cells, and - at least in vitro - is downregulated by GC. GRalpha mediates the anti-inflammatory actions of GC by activating transcription of anti-inflammatory genes through binding of GRalpha to glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) located in the promoter region of target genes, repressing transcription of proinflammatory genes through direct interaction between GRalpha and proinflammatory transcription factors, such as AP-1 and NF-kappaB (transrepression), and also by destabilizing the mRNA of proinflammatory mediators. GRbeta acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of GRalpha-mediated transactivation and transrepression in certain in vitro studies with transfected cells. The GRbeta message is expressed at low levels in numerous tissues and its protein is mainly expressed in inflammatory cells, although it has also been detected in airway epithelial cells. Increased GRbeta expression has been reported in bronchial asthma and nasal polyposis, and after incubation of cells with certain proinflammatory stimuli. However, the role of GRbeta in modulating GC sensitivity in vivo has been highly debated and is as yet unclear.

  7. Henipavirus pathogenesis in human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection.

  8. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  9. Circulating tumor cells from patients with advanced prostate and breast cancer display both epithelial and mesenchymal markers.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; Marengo, Matthew S; Oltean, Sebastian; Kemeny, Gabor; Bitting, Rhonda L; Turnbull, James D; Herold, Christina I; Marcom, Paul K; George, Daniel J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2011-08-01

    During cancer progression, malignant cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (MET) as part of a broad invasion and metastasis program. We previously observed MET events among lung metastases in a preclinical model of prostate adenocarcinoma that suggested a relationship between epithelial plasticity and metastatic spread. We thus sought to translate these findings into clinical evidence by examining the existence of EMT in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with progressive metastatic solid tumors, with a focus on men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and women with metastatic breast cancer. We showed that the majority (> 80%) of these CTCs in patients with metastatic CRPC coexpress epithelial proteins such as epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), cytokeratins (CK), and E-cadherin, with mesenchymal proteins including vimentin, N-cadherin and O-cadherin, and the stem cell marker CD133. Equally, we found that more than 75% of CTCs from women with metastatic breast cancer coexpress CK, vimentin, and N-cadherin. The existence and high frequency of these CTCs coexpressing epithelial, mesenchymal, and stem cell markers in patients with progressive metastases has important implications for the application and interpretation of approved methods to detect CTCs.

  10. Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Cancer; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Carcinoma Breast Stage IV; Hormone-refractory Prostate Cancer; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Head and Neck Cancers- Squamous Cell; Renal Cell Cancer; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme

  11. Epithelial Cell Innate Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, J.R.; Moyes, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of treatments and diseases such as AIDS resulting in increasing numbers of patients with suppressed immune systems, fungal diseases are an escalating problem. Candida albicans is the most common of these fungal pathogens, causing infections in many of these patients. It is therefore important to understand how immunity to this fungus is regulated and how it might be manipulated. Although work has been done to identify the receptors, fungal moieties, and responses involved in anti-Candida immunity, most studies have investigated interactions with myeloid or lymphoid cells. Given that the first site of contact of C. albicans with its host is the mucosal epithelial surface, recent studies have begun to focus on interactions of C. albicans with this site. The results are startling yet in retrospect obvious, indicating that epithelial cells play an important role in these interactions, initiating responses and even providing a level of protection. These findings have obvious implications, not just for fungal pathogens, but also for identifying how host organisms can distinguish between commensal and pathogenic microbes. This review highlights some of these recent findings and discusses their importance in the wider context of infection and immunity. PMID:21441481

  12. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  13. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  14. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Bar, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs) and target genes (TGs). The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA). Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE), mid-early (ME), mid-late (ML) and very late (VL). Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  15. Culture and differentiation of mouse tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    You, Yingjian; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell biology has been greatly advanced by studies of genetically defined and modified mice; however it is often difficult to isolate, manipulate, and assay epithelial cell-specific responses in vivo. In vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells are made possible by a high-fidelity system for primary culture of mouse tracheal epithelial cells described in this chapter. Using this method, epithelial cells purified from mouse tracheas proliferate in growth factor-enriched medium. Subsequent culture in defined medium and the use of the air-liquid interface condition result in the development of well-differentiated epithelia composed of ciliated and non-ciliated cells with characteristics of native airways. Methods are also provided for manipulation of differentiation and analysis of differentiation and gene expression. These approaches allow the assessment of global responses and those of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium.

  16. A Distinct Slow-Cycling Cancer Stem-like Subpopulation of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells is maintained in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Krauss, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst prognosis of any major malignancy, with <5% of patients surviving five years. This can be contributed to the often late diagnosis, lack of sufficient treatment and metastatic spread. Heterogeneity within tumors is increasingly becoming a focus in cancer research, as novel therapies are required to target the most aggressive subpopulations of cells that are frequently termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the current study, we describe the identification of a slow-cycling cancer stem-like population of cells in vivo in BxPC-3 and Panc03.27 xenografts. A distinct slow-cycling label-retaining population of cells (DiI+/SCC) was found both at the edge of tumors, and in small circumscribed areas within the tumors. DiI+/SCC in these areas display an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) fingerprint, including an upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N-cadherin and a loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. DiI+/SCC also displayed a critical re-localization of beta-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus. Additionally, the DiI+/SCC population was found to express the developmental signaling molecule sonic hedgehog. This study represents a novel step in defining the biological activities of a tumorigenic subpopulation within the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment in vivo. Understanding the interactions and functions of a CSC population within the context of the tumor microenvironment is critical to design targeted therapeutics. PMID:24281215

  17. In vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin in the Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Huang, Kai-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori causes extensive gastric epithelial cell inflammation which may progress to atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and even gastric adenocarcinoma. Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and is a well-known antiinflammatory supplement with low cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in H. pylori-infected MKN45 cells, for which IκBα, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6, IL-1β, and mucin-2 (MUC-2) expressions were examined. Apigenin treatments (9.3-74 μM) significantly increased the IκBα expression, and thus inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, and the inflammatory factor (COX-2, ICAM-1, ROS, IL-6, and IL-8) expressions decreased. The ROS levels decreased partially based on the intrinsic scavenging property of apigenin. In summary, apigenin treatments effectively inhibited NF-κB activation and the related inflammatory factor expressions, as well as increased MUC-2 expression in the H. pylori-infected MKN45 cells. The compound shows great potential as a candidate agent for the inhibition of H. pylori-induced extensive gastric epithelial cell inflammation.

  18. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  19. Release of HIV-1 sequestered in the vesicles of oral and genital mucosal epithelial cells by epithelial-lymphocyte interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yasen, Aizezi; Herrera, Rossana; Rosbe, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucosal epithelia of fetuses/neonates/infants and the genital epithelia of adults play a critical role in HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission of virus, respectively. To study the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through mucosal epithelium, we established polarized tonsil, cervical and foreskin epithelial cells. Analysis of HIV-1 transmission through epithelial cells showed that approximately 0.05% of initially inoculated virions transmigrated via epithelium. More than 90% of internalized virions were sequestered in the endosomes of epithelial cells, including multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and vacuoles. Intraepithelial HIV-1 remained infectious for 9 days without viral release. Release of sequestered intraepithelial HIV-1 was induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin and by cytochalasin D, which increase intracellular calcium and disrupt the cortical actin of epithelial cells, respectively. Cocultivation of epithelial cells containing HIV-1 with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes led to the disruption of epithelial cortical actin and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Treatment of epithelial cells with proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon gamma also induced reorganization of cortical actin and release of virus. Inhibition of MVB formation by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of its critical protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) expression reduced viral sequestration in epithelial cells and its transmission from epithelial cells to lymphocytes by ~60–70%. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuole formation of epithelial cells by siRNA-inactivated rabankyrin-5 expression also significantly reduced HIV-1 sequestration in epithelial cells and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Interaction of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of epithelial cells with the function-associated antigen-1

  20. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Results Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0.001). Similarly, the OS of patients with single cell invasion and large cell invasion was reduced (single cell invasion, HR: 3.553, P<0.001; large cell invasion, HR: 2.466, P<0.001). Following multivariate analysis, tumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (P<0.05). According to the Lauren classification, patients with intestinal-type adenocarcinoma had better outcomes than those with diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (HR: 2.563, P<0.001). Conclusion Tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:28255247

  1. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae Is Able to Trigger Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Process in Cultured Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Laura; Mazzetta, Francesca; Martinelli, Daniela; Valente, Sabatino; Alimandi, Maurizio; Raffa, Salvatore; Santino, Iolanda

    2016-01-01

    The ability of some bacterial pathogens to activate Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition normally is a consequence of the persistence of a local chronic inflammatory response or depends on a direct interaction of the pathogens with the host epithelial cells. In this study we monitored the abilities of the K. pneumoniae to activate the expression of genes related to EMT-like processes and the occurrence of phenotypic changes in airway epithelial cells during the early steps of cell infection. We describe changes in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and increased HIF-1α mRNA expression in cells exposed to K. pneumoniae infection. We also describe the upregulation of a set of transcription factors implicated in the EMT processes, such as Twist, Snail and ZEB, indicating that the morphological changes of epithelial cells already appreciable after few hours from the K. pneumoniae infection are tightly regulated by the activation of transcriptional pathways, driving epithelial cells to EMT. These effects appear to be effectively counteracted by resveratrol, an antioxidant that is able to exert a sustained scavenging of the intracellular ROS. This is the first report indicating that strains of K. pneumoniae may promote EMT-like programs through direct interaction with epithelial cells without the involvement of inflammatory cells. PMID:26812644

  3. Airway epithelial IL-15 transforms monocytes into dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Regamey, Nicolas; Obregon, Carolina; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; van Leer, Coretta; Chanson, Marc; Nicod, Laurent P; Geiser, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    IL-15 has recently been shown to induce the differentiation of functional dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes. Since DCs lay in close proximity to epithelial cells in the airway mucosa, we investigated whether airway epithelial cells release IL-15 in response to inflammatory stimuli and thereby induce differentiation and maturation of DCs. Alveolar (A549) and bronchial (BEAS-2B) epithelial cells produced IL-15 spontaneously and in a time- and dose-dependent manner after stimulation with IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. Airway epithelial cell supernatants induced an increase of IL-15Ralpha gene expression in ex vivo monocytes, and stimulated DCs enhanced their IL-15Ralpha gene expression up to 300-fold. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media induced the differentiation of ex vivo monocytes into partially mature DCs (HLA-DR+, DC-SIGN+, CD14+, CD80-, CD83+, CD86+, CCR3+, CCR6(+), CCR7-). Based on their phenotypic (CD123+, BDCA2+, BDCA4+, BDCA1(-), CD1a-) and functional properties (limited maturation upon stimulation with LPS and limited capacity to induce T cell proliferation), these DCs resembled plasmacytoid DCs. The effects of airway epithelial cell supernatants were largely blocked by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to IL-15. Thus, our results demonstrate that airway epithelial cell-conditioned media have the capacity to differentiate monocytes into functional DCs, a process substantially mediated by epithelial-derived IL-15.

  4. Mechanical stretch triggers rapid epithelial cell division through Piezo1.

    PubMed

    Gudipaty, S A; Lindblom, J; Loftus, P D; Redd, M J; Edes, K; Davey, C F; Krishnegowda, V; Rosenblatt, J

    2017-03-02

    Despite acting as a barrier for the organs they encase, epithelial cells turn over at some of the fastest rates in the body. However, epithelial cell division must be tightly linked to cell death to preserve barrier function and prevent tumour formation. How does the number of dying cells match those dividing to maintain constant numbers? When epithelial cells become too crowded, they activate the stretch-activated channel Piezo1 to trigger extrusion of cells that later die. However, it is unclear how epithelial cell division is controlled to balance cell death at the steady state. Here we show that mammalian epithelial cell division occurs in regions of low cell density where cells are stretched. By experimentally stretching epithelia, we find that mechanical stretch itself rapidly stimulates cell division through activation of the Piezo1 channel. To stimulate cell division, stretch triggers cells that are paused in early G2 phase to activate calcium-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, thereby activating the cyclin B transcription that is necessary to drive cells into mitosis. Although both epithelial cell division and cell extrusion require Piezo1 at the steady state, the type of mechanical force controls the outcome: stretch induces cell division, whereas crowding induces extrusion. How Piezo1-dependent calcium transients activate two opposing processes may depend on where and how Piezo1 is activated, as it accumulates in different subcellular sites with increasing cell density. In sparse epithelial regions in which cells divide, Piezo1 localizes to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, whereas in dense regions in which cells extrude, it forms large cytoplasmic aggregates. Because Piezo1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a homeostatic sensor to control epithelial cell numbers, triggering extrusion and apoptosis in crowded regions and cell division in sparse regions.

  5. Migration and invasion of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells are dependent on mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Keon; Shin, Youngmi; Kim, Hee Yeon; Song, Bomin; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Jong Kwang; You, Hye Jin; Cheong, Heesun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo Youl; Jang, Hyonchol

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of cancer cells have stem-cell-like properties, are resistant to standard therapy and are associated with a poor prognosis. The metabolism of such drug-resistant cells differs from that of nearby non-resistant cells. In this study, the metabolism of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The expression of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial membrane was negatively correlated with the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Because the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reflects the functional status of mitochondria and metastasis is the principal cause of death due to cancer, the relationship between MMP and metastasis was evaluated. Cells with a higher MMP exhibited greater migration and invasion than those with a lower MMP. Cells that survived treatment with cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug for lung adenocarcinoma, exhibited increased MMP and enhanced migration and invasion compared with parental cells. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of mitochondrial activity significantly impeded the migration and invasion of cisplatin-resistant cells. RNA-sequencing analysis indicated that the expression of mitochondrial complex genes was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. These results suggested that drug-resistant cells have a greater MMP and that inhibition of mitochondrial activity could be used to prevent metastasis of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27932791

  6. Cancer cell chemokines direct chemotaxis of activated stellate cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ishan; Boyle, Kathleen A; Vonderhaar, Emily P; Zimmerman, Noah P; Gorse, Egal; Mackinnon, A Craig; Hwang, Rosa F; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Cukierman, Edna; Tsai, Susan; Evans, Douglas B; Dwinell, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms by which the extreme desmoplasia observed in pancreatic tumors develops remain unknown and its role in pancreatic cancer progression is unsettled. Chemokines have a key role in the recruitment of a wide variety of cell types in health and disease. Transcript and protein profile analyses of human and murine cell lines and human tissue specimens revealed a consistent elevation in the receptors CCR10 and CXCR6, as well as their respective ligands CCL28 and CXCL16. Elevated ligand expression was restricted to tumor cells, whereas receptors were in both epithelial and stromal cells. Consistent with its regulation by inflammatory cytokines, CCL28 and CCR10, but not CXCL16 or CXCR6, were upregulated in human pancreatitis tissues. Cytokine stimulation of pancreatic cancer cells increased CCL28 secretion in epithelial tumor cells but not an immortalized activated human pancreatic stellate cell line (HPSC). Stellate cells exhibited dose- and receptor-dependent chemotaxis in response to CCL28. This functional response was not linked to changes in activation status as CCL28 had little impact on alpha smooth muscle actin levels or extracellular matrix deposition or alignment. Co-culture assays revealed CCL28-dependent chemotaxis of HPSC toward cancer but not normal pancreatic epithelial cells, consistent with stromal cells being a functional target for the epithelial-derived chemokine. These data together implicate the chemokine CCL28 in the inflammation-mediated recruitment of cancer-associated stellate cells into the pancreatic cancer parenchyma.

  7. Expression of neuroendocrine factor VGF in lung cancer cells confers resistance to EGFR kinase inhibitors and triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hwang; Chiu, Yu-Fan; Kuo, Ming-Han; Lee, Kuan-Lin; Lee, An-Chun; Yu, Chia-Cherng; Chang, Junn-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chien; Hsiao, Shih-Hsin; Lin, Sey-En; Chou, Yu-Ting

    2017-04-05

    Mutations in EGFR drive tumor growth but render tumor cells sensitive to treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Phenotypic alteration in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been linked to the TKI resistance in lung adenocarcinoma. However, the mechanism underlying this resistance remains unclear. Here we report that high expression of a neuroendocrine factor termed VGF induces the transcription factor TWIST1 to facilitate TKI resistance, EMT, and cancer dissemination in a subset of lung adenocarcinoma cells. VGF silencing resensitized EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma cells to TKI. Conversely, overexpression of VGF in sensitive cells conferred resistance to TKIs and induced EMT, increasing migratory and invasive behaviors. Correlation analysis revealed a significant association of VGF expression with advanced tumor grade and poor survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. In a mouse xenograft model of lung adenocarcinoma, suppressing VGF expression was sufficient to attenuate tumor growth. Overall, our findings show how VGF can confer TKI resistance and trigger EMT, suggesting its potential utility as a biomarker and therapeutic target in lung adenocarcinoma.

  8. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  9. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  10. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus.

  11. Multi-functionality and plasticity characterize epithelial cells in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Buzgariu, W; Al Haddad, S; Tomczyk, S; Wenger, Y; Galliot, B

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets, a synapomorphy of all metazoans but porifers, are present as 2 layers in cnidarians, ectoderm and endoderm, joined at their basal side by an extra-cellular matrix named mesoglea. In the Hydra polyp, epithelial cells of the body column are unipotent stem cells that continuously self-renew and concomitantly express their epitheliomuscular features. These multifunctional contractile cells maintain homeostasis by providing a protective physical barrier, by digesting nutrients, by selecting a stable microbiota, and by rapidly closing wounds. In addition, epithelial cells are highly plastic, supporting the adaptation of Hydra to physiological and environmental changes, such as long starvation periods where survival relies on a highly dynamic autophagy flux. Epithelial cells also play key roles in developmental processes as evidenced by the organizer activity they develop to promote budding and regeneration. We propose here an integrative view of the homeostatic and developmental aspects of epithelial plasticity in Hydra. PMID:26716072

  12. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis: an extremely rare neoplasm of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, K-W; Lin, V C-H; Chang, I-W

    2013-12-01

    Clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCA) in the urinary tract is a rare neoplasm morphologically identical to the Müllerian counterpart. Clear cell adenocarcinoma is extremely rare in the upper urinary tract. We present a case with CCA of the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor exhibited exophytic growth with predominantly tubulocystic structures, as well as solid and papillary patterns. The neoplastic cells were cuboidal with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm and abundant intracellular and extracellular eosinophilic hyaline globules. By immunohistochemically, the tumor was labeled by cytokeratins and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β. The patient was still alive without evidence of recurrence in the follow-up period of nineteen months after diagnosis.

  13. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow.

  14. Deoxycholic acid impairs glycosylation and fucosylation processes in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Sharma, Ruchika; Duggan, Gina; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2012-05-01

    It is generally accepted that esophageal adenocarcinoma arises from a Barrett's metaplastic lesion. Altered glycoprotein expression has been demonstrated in tissue from patients with Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer but the mechanisms regarding such changes are unknown. The bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) alters many cell signaling pathways and is implicated in esophageal cancer progression. We have demonstrated that DCA disrupts Golgi structure and affects protein secretion and glycosylation processes in cell lines derived from normal squamous epithelium (HET-1A) and Barrett's metaplastic epithelium (QH). Cell surface expression of glycans was identified using carbohydrate-specific probes (wheat germ agglutinate, conconavalin A, peanut agglutinin, lithocholic acid and Ulex europaeus agglutinin) that monitored N-glycosylation, O-glycosylation and core fucosylation in resting and DCA-treated cells. DCA altered intracellular localization and reduced cell surface expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, α-methyl-mannopyranoside (Man/Glc) and fucose in both cell lines. Furthermore, DCA reduced the expression of epithelial growth factor receptor and E-cadherin in a manner analogous to treatment of cells with the N-glycan biosynthesis inhibitor tunicamycin. This is the first study to identify an altered Golgi structure and glycomic profile in response to DCA in esophageal epithelial cells, a process which could potentially contribute to metaplasia, dysplasia and cancer of the esophagus.

  15. Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yueling; Gu, Zhaohui; Hao, Lina; Du, Juan; Yang, Qian; Li, Suping; Wang, Liying; Gong, Shilei

    2014-07-15

    Although cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 is important for neurological function, its neuroprotective properties remain unclear. We speculated that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative injury. In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells were treated with peroxynitrite to induce oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite triggered apoptosis in these cells, and increased the expression of Fas-associated death domain, Bax, caspa-se-8 and Bcl-2. These changes were suppressed by treatment with cholecystokinin octapeptide-8. These results suggest that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against apoptosis induced by peroxynitrite.

  16. Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yueling; Gu, Zhaohui; Hao, Lina; Du, Juan; Yang, Qian; Li, Suping; Wang, Liying; Gong, Shilei

    2014-01-01

    Although cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 is important for neurological function, its neuroprotective properties remain unclear. We speculated that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative injury. In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells were treated with peroxynitrite to induce oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite triggered apoptosis in these cells, and increased the expression of Fas-associated death domain, Bax, caspa-se-8 and Bcl-2. These changes were suppressed by treatment with cholecystokinin octapeptide-8. These results suggest that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against apoptosis induced by peroxynitrite. PMID:25221599

  17. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  18. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  19. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  20. Doublecortin-Like Kinase 1 Is Elevated Serologically in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma and Widely Expressed on Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weygant, Nathaniel; May, Randal; Aiello, Nicole; Rhim, Andrew; Zhao, Lichao; Zheng, Wei; Lightfoot, Stanley; Pant, Shubham; Irvan, Jeremy; Postier, Russell; Hocker, James; Hanas, Jay S.; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M.; An, Guangyu; Schlosser, Michael J.; Stanger, Ben; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is a putative pancreatic stem cell marker and is upregulated in pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, and many other solid tumors. It marks tumor stem cells in mouse models of intestinal neoplasia. Here we sought to determine whether DCLK1 protein can be detected in the bloodstream and if its levels in archived serum samples could be quantitatively assessed in pancreatic cancer patients. DCLK1 specific ELISA, western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine expression levels in the serum and staining intensity in archived tumor tissues of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and in pancreatic cancer mouse models. DCLK1 levels in the serum were elevated in early stages of PDAC (stages I and II) compared to healthy volunteers (normal controls). No differences were observed between stages III/IV and normal controls. In resected surgical tissues, DCLK1 expression intensity in the stromal cells was significantly higher than that observed in tumor epithelial cells. Circulating tumor cells were isolated from KPCY mice and approximately 52% of these cells were positive for Dclk1 staining. Dclk1 levels in the serum of KPC mice were also elevated. We have previously demonstrated that DCLK1 plays a potential role in regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Given the increasingly recognized role of EMT derived stem cells in cancer progression and metastasis, we hypothesize that DCLK1 may contribute to the metastatic process. Taken together, our results suggest that DCLK1 serum levels and DCLK1 positive circulating tumor cells should be further assessed for their potential diagnostic and prognostic significance. PMID:25723399

  1. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 is elevated serologically in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and widely expressed on circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Dongfeng; Johnson, Jeremy; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; May, Randal; Aiello, Nicole; Rhim, Andrew; Zhao, Lichao; Zheng, Wei; Lightfoot, Stanley; Pant, Shubham; Irvan, Jeremy; Postier, Russell; Hocker, James; Hanas, Jay S; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M; An, Guangyu; Schlosser, Michael J; Stanger, Ben; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is a putative pancreatic stem cell marker and is upregulated in pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, and many other solid tumors. It marks tumor stem cells in mouse models of intestinal neoplasia. Here we sought to determine whether DCLK1 protein can be detected in the bloodstream and if its levels in archived serum samples could be quantitatively assessed in pancreatic cancer patients. DCLK1 specific ELISA, western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine expression levels in the serum and staining intensity in archived tumor tissues of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and in pancreatic cancer mouse models. DCLK1 levels in the serum were elevated in early stages of PDAC (stages I and II) compared to healthy volunteers (normal controls). No differences were observed between stages III/IV and normal controls. In resected surgical tissues, DCLK1 expression intensity in the stromal cells was significantly higher than that observed in tumor epithelial cells. Circulating tumor cells were isolated from KPCY mice and approximately 52% of these cells were positive for Dclk1 staining. Dclk1 levels in the serum of KPC mice were also elevated. We have previously demonstrated that DCLK1 plays a potential role in regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Given the increasingly recognized role of EMT derived stem cells in cancer progression and metastasis, we hypothesize that DCLK1 may contribute to the metastatic process. Taken together, our results suggest that DCLK1 serum levels and DCLK1 positive circulating tumor cells should be further assessed for their potential diagnostic and prognostic significance.

  2. Clinical implications of epithelial cell plasticity in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Luis A; Blanco, Moisés; Castosa, Raquel; Concha, Ángel; Valladares, Manuel; Calvo, Lourdes; Figueroa, Angélica

    2015-09-28

    In the last few years, the role of epithelial cell plasticity in cancer biology research has gained increasing attention. This concept refers to the ability of the epithelial cells to dynamically switch between different phenotypic cellular states. This programme is particularly relevant during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer progression. During colonization, epithelial cells first activate the EMT programme to disseminate from a primary tumour to reach a distant tissue site. During this process, cells are transported into the circulation and are able to escape the immune system of the host. Then, a reverse process called mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) occurs on cells that settle in the distant organs. Although epithelial cell plasticity has an important impact on tumour biology, the clinical relevance of this concept remains to be recapitulated. In this review, we will update the current state of epithelial cell plasticity in cancer progression and its clinical implications for the design of therapeutic strategies, the acquisition of multidrug resistance, and future perspectives for the management of cancer patients.

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  4. Mounting Pressure in the Microenvironment: Fluids, Solids, and Cells in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    DuFort, Christopher C; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2016-06-01

    The microenvironment influences the pathogenesis of solid tumors and plays an outsized role in some. Our understanding of the stromal response to cancers, particularly pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, has evolved from that of host defense to tumor offense. We know that most, although not all, of the factors and processes in the microenvironment support tumor epithelial cells. This reappraisal of the roles of stromal elements has also revealed potential vulnerabilities and therapeutic opportunities to exploit. The high concentration in the stroma of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, together with the large gel-fluid phase and pressures it generates, were recently identified as primary sources of treatment resistance in pancreas cancer. Whereas the relatively minor role of free interstitial fluid in the fluid mechanics and perfusion of tumors has been long appreciated, the less mobile, gel-fluid phase has been largely ignored for historical and technical reasons. The inability of classic methods of fluid pressure measurement to capture the gel-fluid phase, together with a dependence on xenograft and allograft systems that inaccurately model tumor vascular biology, has led to an undue emphasis on the role of free fluid in impeding perfusion and drug delivery and an almost complete oversight of the predominant role of the gel-fluid phase. We propose that a hyaluronan-rich, relatively immobile gel-fluid phase induces vascular collapse and hypoperfusion as a primary mechanism of treatment resistance in pancreas cancers. Similar properties may be operant in other solid tumors as well, so revisiting and characterizing fluid mechanics with modern techniques in other autochthonous cancers may be warranted.

  5. COX-2 inhibition affects growth rate of Chlamydia muridarum within epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dubinett, Steven; Patterson, Simie Lavern A; Kelly, Kathleen A

    2006-02-01

    Chlamydiae alter apoptosis of host target cells, which regulates their growth. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, modulates epithelial cell survival. We addressed whether endogenous PGE2 alters chlamydial growth or apoptosis of epithelial cells infected with Chlamydia muridarum. PGE2 is secreted by infected host cells in the genital tract (GT). Using immunohistochemical techniques, we found that COX-2 enzyme was localized to epithelial cells in the GT in vivo. Pellets of the COX-2 enzyme inhibitor, NS-398, and placebo were implanted in mice subcutaneously and released a constant amount of these chemicals throughout the infection. NS-398-treated mice were found to exhibit 10-fold lower bacterial load than the placebo group on day 3 post infection, suggesting disruption of the chlamydial developmental cycle. To prove this, the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was then infected with different MOIs of C. muridarum in the presence of multiple concentrations of NS-398 in vitro. There was no difference in inclusion forming units (IFUs) between NS-389-treated and untreated cells. We also found no alterations in C. muridarum IFUs in A549 cells transfected with a 2.0 kb cDNA fragment of human COX-2 cloned in the sense (S) or anti-sense (AS) orientation. However, the inclusion size was reduced and the number of EB was significantly diminished during reinfection in AS-transfected cells. In addition, the absence of COX-2 did not significantly modify apoptosis in infected cells. In total, COX-2 deficiency reduces the infectious burden in vivo and may modulate transmission of the organism.

  6. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling.

  7. Genetics and epithelial cell dysfunction in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, J.R.; Buchwald, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the advances being made in the study of the physiology, cell biology, and molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis. Emphasis is placed on various areas of research that involve epithelial cells (e.g., the CF-specific phenotypes exhibited by epithelial cells, abnormalities in epithelium ion transport, chloride channel regulation in CF epithelial.) Coverage is presented on the current status of CF, including data on the incidence of the disease, its mode of inheritance, chromosomal localization, genetic heterogeneity, and screening and management.

  8. Growth of corneal epithelial cells over in situ therapeutic contact lens after simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET).

    PubMed

    Bhalekar, Swapnil; Sangwan, Virender S; Basu, Sayan

    2013-06-27

    An 11-year-old boy underwent simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) from the healthy right eye to his left eye for total limbal stem cell deficiency. One month later, corneal surface epithelialised and whitish plaques overlying the transplants were seen inferiorly. Those plaques were adherent to the surface of the contact lens and underlying corneal surface had smooth elevations. Similar findings were noted in a 23-year man following cyanoacrylate glue application for corneal perforation. On histological and immunohistochemical analysis, cells lining the contact lenses were identified as corneal epithelial cells. These cases illustrate epithelial cell growth on the contact lens and epithelial hyperplasia on corresponding surface of the cornea. Exorbitant proliferation of the epithelial cells may be owing to young age; therefore, early contact lens removal after SLET in young age, can possibly avoid epithelial hyperplasia. This also reiterates the possibility of using contact lens as a scaffold to grow epithelial cells.

  9. Polarized fibronectin secretion induced by adenosine regulates bacterial–epithelial interaction in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in many biological processes including cell adhesion and migration, wound healing and inflammation. Cellular FNs are produced by a wide variety of cell types including epithelial cells, which secrete them and often organize them into extensive extracellular matrices at their basal surface. However, regulation of FN synthesis and the polarity of FN secretion by intestinal epithelial cells have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the role of adenosine, whose levels are up-regulated during inflammation, in modulating FN synthesis, the polarity of FN secretion and the downstream effects of the secreted FN. Polarized monolayers of T84 cells were used as an intestinal epithelial model. Adenosine added to either the apical or basolateral aspect of the cells led to a time- and dose-dependent accumulation of FN in the culture supernatants, polarized to the apical compartment and reached maximal levels 24 h after apical or basolateral addition of adenosine. Confocal microscopy confirmed that FN localized to the apical domain of model intestinal epithelial cells stimulated with apical or basolateral adenosine. The induction of FN was significantly down-regulated in response to the adenosine receptor antagonist alloxazine and was inhibited by cycloheximide. Moreover, adenosine increased FN promoter activity (3.5-fold compared with unstimulated controls) indicating that FN induction is, in part, transcriptionally regulated. Interestingly, we demonstrated that adenosine, as well as apical FN, significantly enhanced the adherence and invasion of Salmonella typhimurium into cultured epithelial cells. In summary, we have shown for the first time that FN, a classic extracellular matrix protein, is secreted into the apical compartment of epithelial cells in response to adenosine. FN may be a critical host factor that modulates adherence and invasion of bacteria, thus playing a key role

  10. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  12. NR4A2 Is Regulated by Gastrin and Influences Cellular Responses of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K.; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells. PMID:24086717

  13. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  14. Microfluidic approaches for epithelial cell layer culture and characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Thuenauer, Roland; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Römer, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, epithelial cell layers line most body cavities and form selective barriers that regulate the exchange of solutes between compartments. In order to fulfil these functions, the cells assume a polarised architecture and maintain two distinct plasma membrane domains, the apical domain facing the lumen and the basolateral domain facing other cells and the extracellular matrix. Microfluidic biochips offer the unique opportunity to establish novel in vitro models of epithelia in which the in vivo microenvironment of epithelial cells is precisely reconstituted. In addition, analytical tools to monitor biologically relevant parameters can be directly integrated on-chip. In this review we summarise recently developed biochip designs for culturing epithelial cell layers. Since endothelial cell layers, which line blood vessels, have similar barrier functions and polar organisation as epithelial cell layers, we also discuss biochips for culturing endothelial cell layers. Furthermore, we review approaches to integrate tools to analyse and manipulate epithelia and endothelia in microfluidic biochips, including methods to perform electrical impedance spectroscopy, methods to detect substances undergoing trans-epithelial transport via fluorescence, spectrophotometry, and mass spectrometry, techniques to mechanically stimulate cells via stretching and fluid flow-induced shear stress, and methods to carry out high-resolution imaging of vesicular trafficking with light microscopy. Taken together, this versatile microfluidic toolbox enables novel experimental approaches to characterise epithelial monolayers. PMID:24668405

  15. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pin; Chen, Fuchun; Pan, Qi; Zhao, Xianda; Zhao, Chen; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Chen, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis. PMID:28243118

  16. SWCNTs induced autophagic cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Zahari, Nur Elida M; Lee, Eun-Woo; Song, Jaewhan; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being actively introduced in electronics, computer science, aerospace, and other industries. Thus, the urgent need for toxicological studies on CNTs is mounting. In this study, we investigated the alterations in cellular response with morphological changes induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. At 24h after exposure, SWCNTs rapidly decreased ATP production and cell viability as well a slight increase in the number of cells in the subG1 and G1 phases. In addition, SWCNTs increased the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, but not SOD-2, and the number of cells generating ROS. The concentration of Cu and Zn ions also increased in a dose-dependent manner in cells exposed to SWCNTs. SWCNTs significantly enhanced the release of nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and up-regulated the expression of chemokine- and cytokine-related genes. Furthermore, the levels of autophagy-related genes, especially the DRAM1 gene, and the autophagosome formation-related proteins, were clearly up-regulated together with an increase of autophagosome-like vacuoles. Based on these results, we suggest that SWCNTs induce autophagic cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic damage in human bronchial epithelial cells.

  17. Immunohistochemical characterization of endometrial carcinomas: endometrioid, serous and clear cell adenocarcinomas in association with genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    Developments in immunohistochemistry, which are closely linked with the advances in the analyses of genetic abnormalities and their associated molecular disorders as early and late histogenetic events, have contributed greatly to the improvement of pathological diagnostic confirmation and validation. Immunohistochemistry has also generated great benefit to the innovation of therapeutic strategies for various kinds of cancers. In this article, the three representative histological types of corpus cancer, namely, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, serous adenocarcinoma and clear cell adenocarcinoma, will be histologically approached in association with their immunohistochemical profiles as well as genetic disorders. First, the focus will be on 'Conventional/prototypic features,' followed by 'Controversy over conventional histological subclassification,' and subsequently 'Tumorigenesis and re-subclassification'.

  18. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C.; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. Stochastic Terminal Dynamics in Epithelial Cell Intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eule, Stephan; Metzger, Jakob; Reichl, Lars; Kong, Deqing; Zhang, Yujun; Grosshans, Joerg; Wolf, Fred

    2015-03-01

    We found that the constriction of epithelial cell contacts during intercalation in germ band extension in Drosophila embryos follows intriguingly simple quantitative laws. The mean contact length < L > follows < L > (t) ~(T - t) α , where T is the finite collapse time; the time dependent variance of contact length is proportional to the square of the mean; finally the time dependent probability density of the contact lengths remains close to Gaussian during the entire process. These observations suggest that the dynamics of contact collapse can be captured by a stochastic differential equation analytically tractable in small noise approximation. Here, we present such a model, providing an effective description of the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of contact collapse. All model parameters are fixed by measurements of time dependent mean and variance of contact lengths. The model predicts the contact length covariance function that we obtain in closed form. The contact length covariance function closely matches experimental observations suggesting that the model well captures the dynamics of contact collapse.

  2. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen; Walls, Dermot; Egan, Jim J.; Doran, Peter P.

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  3. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  4. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Airway epithelial cell wound repair mediated by alpha-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Wojcik, K R; Gruenert, D; Sun, S; Dorscheid, D R

    2001-02-01

    Dystroglycans (DGs) bind laminin matrix proteins in skeletal and cardiac muscle and are expressed in other nonmuscle tissues. However, their expression in airway epithelial cells has not been demonstrated. We examined expression of DGs in the human airway epithelial cell line 1HAEo(-), and in human primary airway epithelial cells. Expression of the common gene for alpha- and beta-DG was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase/ polymerase chain reaction in 1HAEo(-) cells. Protein expression of beta-DG was demonstrated by both Western blot and flow cytometry in cultured cells. Localization of alpha-DG, using both a monoclonal antibody and the alpha-DG binding lectin wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA), was to the cell membrane and nucleus. We then examined the function of DGs in modulating wound repair over laminin matrix. Blocking alpha-DG binding to laminin in 1HAEo(-) monolayers using either glycosyaminoglycans or WGA attenuated cell migration and spreading after mechanical injury. alpha-DG was not expressed in epithelial cells at the wound edge immediately after wound creation, but localized to the cell membrane in these cells within 12 h of injury. These data demonstrate the presence of DGs in airway epithelium. alpha-DG is dynamically expressed and serves as a lectin to bind laminin during airway epithelial cell repair.

  7. Ion pump sorting in polarized renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M J

    2001-08-01

    The plasma membranes of renal epithelial cells are divided into distinct apical and basolateral domains, which contain different inventories of ion transport proteins. Without this polarity vectorial ion and fluid transport would not be possible. Little is known of the signals and mechanisms that renal epithelial cells use to establish and maintain polarized distributions of their ion transport proteins. Analysis of ion pump sorting reveals that multiple complex signals participate in determining and regulating these proteins' subcellular localizations.

  8. Secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Venembre, P; Boutten, A; Seta, N; Dehoux, M S; Crestani, B; Aubier, M; Durand, G

    1994-06-13

    We have investigated the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (human A549 cell line and rat type-II pneumocytes) to produce alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT). Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of an AAT-specific mRNA transcript in A549 cells. Unstimulated A549 cells secreted immunoreactive AAT at a rate of 0.51 +/- 0.04 ng/10(6) cells/h, with a modified glycosylation compared to serum AAT. AAT formed a complex with neutrophil elastase. Rat type-II pneumocytes secreted immunoreactive AAT. Our results suggest that alveolar epithelial cells could participate in antiprotease defense within the lung through local AAT production.

  9. Claudin-18 inhibits cell proliferation and motility mediated by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Shun; Taga, Saeko; Akizuki, Risa; Hichino, Asami; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Sugatani, Junko; Ikari, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal expression of claudin subtypes has been reported in various cancers. However, the pathological role of each claudin has not been clarified in detail. Claudin-18 was absent in human non-small cell and small cell lung cancers, although it is expressed in normal lung tissues. Here, we examined the effect of claudin-18 expression on the expression of junctional proteins, cell proliferation, and cell motility using human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting showed that exogenous expression of claudin-18 had no effect on the expression of junctional proteins including claudin-1, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin. Claudin-18 was mainly distributed in cell-cell contact areas concomitant with ZO-1. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased at 48 and 72h after seeding of claudin 18-expressing cells. Claudin-18 suppressed cell motility, whereas it increased cell death in anoikis. Claudin-18 decreased phosphorylated (p)-3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and p-Akt levels without affecting p-epidermal growth factor receptor and p-phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) levels. Furthermore, claudin-18 was bound with PDK1 and suppressed the nuclear localization of PDK1. We suggest that claudin-18 suppresses the abnormal proliferation and motility of lung epithelial cells mediated by inhibition of the PI3K/PDK1/Akt signaling pathway.

  10. Wnt family genes and their modulation in the ovary-independent and persistent vaginal epithelial cell proliferation and keratinization induced by neonatal diethylstilbestrol exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Hajime; Mizutani, Takeshi; Sato, Tomomi; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Takeuchi, Takashi; Iguchi, Taisen; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2012-06-14

    Proliferation and differentiation of cells in female reproductive organs, the oviduct, uterus and vagina, are regulated by endogenous estrogen. In utero exposure to a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), induces vaginal clear-cell adenocarcinoma in humans. In mice, perinatal exposure to DES results in abnormalities such as polyovular follicles, uterine circular muscle disorganization and persistent vaginal epithelial cell proliferation. We reported the persistent gene expression change such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) related genes, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its downstream signaling in the mouse vagina exposed neonatally to DES. In this study, we found persistent up-regulation of Wnt4 and persistent down-regulation of Wnt11 in the vagina of mice exposed neonatally to DES and estrogen receptor α specific ligand. Also Wnt4 expression in vagina is correlated to the stratification of epithelial cells with the superficial keratinization of vagina, but not epithelial cell stratification only.

  11. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  12. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  13. Inhibition of corneal epithelial cell migration by cadmium and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Ubels, J.L.; Osgood, T.B. Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee )

    1991-02-01

    In a previous comparative study of corneal healing in fish, the authors observed that corneal epithelial healing occurs very rapidly in vivo in the marine teleost Myoxocephalus octodecimspinosus (longhorn sculpin) with a 6-mm diameter wound on the mammalian cornea. This rapid healing which permits prompt restoration of the epithelial barrier is apparently an adaptation to the large ionic and osmotic gradients between the environment and the intraocular fluids of the fish. These observations suggested that epithelial healing in the sculpin cornea might be useful model in aquatic biomedical toxicology if an in vitro method for measurement of healing rates could be developed. In this report the authors demonstrate that sculpin eyes maintained in short-term organ culture have a rapid corneal epithelial healing response and that this model can be used to demonstrate the toxic effects of heavy metals on epithelial cell migration.

  14. Chlorpyrifos promotes colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth through the activation of EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Tachachartvanich, Phum; Visitnonthachai, Daranee; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-12-02

    Aside from the effects on neuronal cholinergic system, epidemiological studies suggest an association between chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure and cancer risk. This in vitro study examined the effects of CPF and its toxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-O), on the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma H508, colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29, normal colon epithelial CCD841, liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and normal liver hepatocyte THLE-3 cells. The results showed that CPF (5-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased viability of H508 and CCD841 cells in serum-free conditions. This increasing trend was not found in HT-29, HepG2 and THLE-3 cells. In contrast, CPF-O (50-100 μM) reduced the viability of all cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the induction of cells in the S phase, and EdU incorporation assay revealed the induction of DNA synthesis in CPF-treated H508 cells indicating that CPF promotes cell cycle progression. Despite the observation of acetylcholinesterase activity inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, atropine (a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and N-acetylcysteine (a potent antioxidant) failed to inhibit the growth-promoting effect of CPF. CPF increased the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream effector, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), in H508 cells. AG-1478 (a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and U0126 (a specific MEK inhibitor) completely mitigated the growth promoting effect of CPF. Altogether, these results suggest that EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway involves in CPF-induced colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth.

  15. Left-right asymmetric cell intercalation drives directional collective cell movement in epithelial morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Emi; Isomura, Ayako; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kuranaga, Erina

    2015-12-01

    Morphogenetic epithelial movement occurs during embryogenesis and drives complex tissue formation. However, how epithelial cells coordinate their unidirectional movement while maintaining epithelial integrity is unclear. Here we propose a novel mechanism for collective epithelial cell movement based on Drosophila genitalia rotation, in which epithelial tissue rotates clockwise around the genitalia. We found that this cell movement occurs autonomously and requires myosin II. The moving cells exhibit repeated left-right-biased junction remodelling, while maintaining adhesion with their neighbours, in association with a polarized myosin II distribution. Reducing myosinID, known to cause counter-clockwise epithelial-tissue movement, reverses the myosin II distribution. Numerical simulations revealed that a left-right asymmetry in cell intercalation is sufficient to induce unidirectional cellular movement. The cellular movement direction is also associated with planar cell-shape chirality. These findings support a model in which left-right asymmetric cell intercalation within an epithelial sheet drives collective cellular movement in the same direction.

  16. A gene expression programme induced by bovine colostrum whey promotes growth and wound-healing processes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blais, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S; Boutin, Y; Lessard, M

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its beneficial properties on health and development. It contains a wide variety of bioactive ingredients that are known to promote a number of cellular processes. Therefore the use of colostrum whey as a feed additive to promote intestinal health has been proposed, yet little is known about mechanisms implicated in its beneficial properties on intestinal epithelial cells. In the present paper, casein were removed from bovine colostrum and the remaining liquid, rich in bioactive compounds, was evaluated for its capacity to modulate cellular processes in porcine intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2/15. First, we verified the effect of colostrum whey and cheese whey on processes involved in intestinal wound healing, including cell proliferation, attachment, morphology and migration. Our results showed that colostrum whey promoted proliferation and migration, and decreased specifically the attachment of Caco-2/15 cells on the culture dish. On the other hand, cheese whey induced proliferation and morphological changes in IPEC-J2 cells, but failed to induce migration. The gene expression profile of IPEC-J2 cells following colostrum whey treatment was evaluated by microarray analysis. Results revealed that the expression of a significant number of genes involved in cell migration, adhesion and proliferation was indeed affected in colostrum whey-treated cells. In conclusion, colostrum specific bioactive content could be beneficial for intestinal epithelial cell homoeostasis by controlling biological processes implicated in wound healing through a precise gene expression programme.

  17. Subcellular localization of the human papillomavirus 16 E7 oncoprotein in CaSki cells and its detection in cervical adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Kerstin; Scheiden, René; Lener, Barbara; Ehehalt, Daniela; Pircher, Haymo; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Rostek, Ursula; Kaiser, Andreas; Fiedler, Marc; Ressler, Sigrun; Lechner, Stefan; Widschwendter, Andreas; Even, Jos; Capesius, Catherine; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Zwerschke, Werner

    2011-01-05

    E7 is the major oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) which causes cervical cancer. To date E7 oncoproteins have not been investigated in cervical adenocarcinoma. In this study we generated a rabbit monoclonal anti-HPV-16 E7 antibody, RabMab42-3, which recognizes a conformational epitope in the E7 carboxy-terminal zinc-finger resulting in a strong increase in the sensitivity for the detection of cell-associated HPV-16 E7 protein relative to conventional polyclonal anti-HPV-16 E7 antibodies. Using RabMab42-3, we show that the subcellular localization of endogenous HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein varies during the cell cycle in cervical cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein is abundantly expressed in cervical adenocarcinoma in situ and adenocarcinoma, suggesting an important role of HPV-16 E7 for the development of these tumors. Our findings suggest that the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein could be a useful marker for the detection of cervical adenocarcinoma and their precursors.

  18. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-11-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell-cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell-cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett's, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin-catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells.

  19. Characteristics and EGFP expression of goat mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y-M; He, X-Y; Zhang, Y

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to establish a goat mammary gland epithelial (GMGE) cell line, and (ii) to determine if these GMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of GMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating goat. The passage 16 GMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in GMGE cells was test by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was test for GMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that when grown at low density on a plastic substratum, the GMGE cells formed islands, and when grown to confluency, the cells formed a monolayer and aggregated with the characteristic cobble-stone morphology of epithelial cells. GMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the lumen-like structures formed among the cells. Several blister-like structures appeared in the appearance of the cells. The GMGE cells contained different cell types, majority of the cells were short shuttle-like or polygon which were beehive-like. A part of cells were round and flat, a small number of cells were elongated. Some of the GMGE cells contained milk drops. The cell nuclei were round which had 2-4 obvious cores. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells in GMGE cells by immunofluorescence. The GMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the GMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected GMGE (ET-GMGE) cell line and maintained it long-term in culture by continuous subculturing.

  20. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  1. DA-6034 Induces [Ca(2+)]i Increase in Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Park, Soonhong; Ji, Hyewon; Kim, Tae-Im; Kim, Eung Kweon; Kang, Kyung Koo; Shin, Dong Min

    2014-04-01

    DA-6034, a eupatilin derivative of flavonoid, has shown potent effects on the protection of gastric mucosa and induced the increases in fluid and glycoprotein secretion in human and rat corneal and conjunctival cells, suggesting that it might be considered as a drug for the treatment of dry eye. However, whether DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling and its underlying mechanism in epithelial cells are not known. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for actions of DA-6034 in Ca(2+) signaling pathways of the epithelial cells (conjunctival and corneal cells) from human donor eyes and mouse salivary gland epithelial cells. DA-6034 activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) and increased intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in primary cultured human conjunctival cells. DA-6034 also increased [Ca(2+)]i in mouse salivary gland cells and human corneal epithelial cells. [Ca(2+)]i increase of DA-6034 was dependent on the Ca(2+) entry from extracellular and Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores. Interestingly, these effects of DA-6034 were related to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) but not phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) pathway and lysosomal Ca(2+) stores. These results suggest that DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling via extracellular Ca(2+) entry and RyRs-sensitive Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores in epithelial cells.

  2. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  3. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chun-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Shelly; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  4. Identification of CCDC6-RET fusion in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, LC-2/ad.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Daisuke; Kanai, Yoshihiko; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Ohara, Shiori; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Sakatani, Takashi; Oguni, Sachiko; Tamura, Tomoko; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Endo, Shunsuke; Murakami, Yoshinori; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Niki, Toshiro

    2012-12-01

    Rearranged during transfection (RET) fusions have been newly identified in approximately 1% of patients with primary lung tumors. However, patient-derived lung cancer cell lines harboring RET fusions have not yet been established or identified, and therefore, the effectiveness of an RET inhibitor on lung tumors with endogenous RET fusion has not yet been studied. In this study, we report identification of CCDC6-RET fusion in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line LC-2/ad. LC-2/ad showed distinctive sensitivity to the RET inhibitor, vandetanib, among 39 non-small lung cancer cell lines. The xenograft tumor of LC-2/ad showed cribriform acinar structures, a morphologic feature of primary RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas. LC-2/ad cells could provide useful resources to analyze molecular functions of RET-fusion protein and its response to RET inhibitors.

  5. Epithelial cell guidance by self-generated EGF gradients†

    PubMed Central

    Scherber, Cally; Aranyosi, Alexander J.; Kulemann, Birte; Thayer, Sarah P.; Toner, Mehmet; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2012-01-01

    Cancer epithelial cells often migrate away from the primary tumor to invade into the surrounding tissues. Their migration is commonly assumed to be directed by pre-existent spatial gradients of chemokines and growth factors in the target tissues. Unexpectedly however, we found that the guided migration of epithelial cells is possible in vitro in the absence of pre-existent chemical gradients. We observed that both normal and cancer epithelial cells can migrate persistently and reach the exit along the shortest path from microscopic mazes filled with uniform concentrations of media. Using microscale engineering techniques and biophysical models, we uncovered a self-guidance strategy during which epithelial cells generate their own guiding cues under conditions of biochemical confinement. The self-guidance strategy depends on the balance between three interdependent processes: epidermal growth factor (EGF) uptake by the cells (U), the restricted transport of EGF through the structured microenvironment (T), and cell chemotaxis toward the resultant EGF gradients (C). The UTC self-guidance strategy can be perturbed by inhibition of signalling through EGF-receptors and appears to be independent from chemokine signalling. Better understanding of the UTC self-guidance strategy could eventually help devise new ways for modulating epithelial cell migration and delaying cancer cell invasion or accelerating wound healing. PMID:22314635

  6. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

    PubMed Central

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP), were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine. PMID:26828484

  7. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  8. Development of human epithelial cell systems for radiation risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.

    1994-10-01

    The most important health effect of space radiation for astronauts is cancer induction. For radiation risk assessment, an understanding of carcinogenic effect of heavy ions in human cells is most essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed a human mammary epithelial cell system for studying the neoplastic transformation in vitro. Growth variants were obtained from heavy ion irradiated immortal mammary cell line. These cloned growth variants can grow in regular tissue culture media and maintain anchorage dependent growth and density inhibition property. Upon further irradiation with high-LET radiation, transformed foci were found. Experimental results from these studies suggest that multiexposure of radiation is required to induce neoplastic transformation of human epithelial cells. This multihits requirement may be due to high genomic stability of human cells. These growth variants can be useful model systems for space flight experiments to determine the carcinogenic effect of space radiation in human epithelial cells.

  9. Development of human epithelial cell systems for radiation risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Craise, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    The most important health effect of space radiation for astronauts is cancer induction. For radiation risk assessment, an understanding of carcinogenic effect of heavy ions in human cells is most essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed a human mammary epithelial cell system for studying the neoplastic transformation in vitro. Growth variants were obtained from heavy ion irradiated immortal mammary cell line. These cloned growth variants can grow in regular tissue culture media and maintain anchorage dependent growth and density inhibition property. Upon further irradiation with high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation, transformed foci were found. Experimental results from these studies suggest that multiexposure of radiation is required to induce neoplastic tranformation of human epithelial cells. This multihits requirement may be due to high genomic stability of human cells. These growth variants can be useful model systems for space flight experiments to determine the carcinogenic effect of space radiation in human epithelial cells.

  10. Effects of ethanol on an intestinal epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nano, J.L.; Cefai, D.; Rampal, P. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of exposure of an intestinal epithelial cell line to various concentrations of ethanol (217 mM (1%) to 652 mM (3%)) during 24, 48, and 72 hr was investigated in vitro using a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IRD 98). Incubation of these cells in the presence of ethanol significantly decreased cell growth. This inhibition was accompanied by a strong increase in cellular protein. Stimulation of specific disaccharidases, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and aminopeptidase activities by ethanol was dose- and time-dependent. Ethanol induces a change in the relative proportions of the different lipid classes synthesized; triglycerides, fatty acids, and cholesterol esters were preferentially synthethysed. Our findings show that cell lines are good models for investigation of the effects of ethanol, and that alcohol considerably modifies the functions of intestinal epithelial cells.

  11. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations.

  12. Fabrication of transplantable corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets using a novel temperature-responsive closed culture device.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Kitano, Yuriko; Watanabe, Hiroya; Mizutani, Manabu; Nozaki, Takayuki; Senda, Naoko; Saitoh, Kazuo; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-05-01

    Temperature-responsive culture surfaces make it possible to harvest transplantable carrier-free cell sheets. Here, we applied temperature-responsive polymer for polycarbonate surfaces with previously developed closed culture devices for an automated culture system in order to fabricate transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and colony-forming assays revealed that corneal epithelial and oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets could be harvested with the temperature-responsive closed culture devices. The results were similar to those obtained using temperature-responsive culture inserts. These results indicate that the novel temperature-responsive closed culture device is useful for fabricating transplantable stratified epithelial cell sheets.

  13. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15034.001 PMID:27431614

  14. CD4+ T cells potently induce epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in premalignant and malignant pancreatic ductal epithelial cells–novel implications of CD4+ T cells in pancreatic cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Lisa; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Gorys, Artur; Helm, Ole; Genrich, Geeske; Lenk, Lennart; Wesch, Daniela; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Sipos, Bence; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Heiner; Sebens, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and characterized by a pronounced desmoplastic reaction with CD4+ T cells accounting for the majority of the stromal T cell infiltrate. Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) is a critical process for metastasis by which epithelial/carcinoma cells become enabled to disseminate probably prior to tumor formation. To investigate whether CD4+ T cells induce EMT in human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, premalignant H6c7 cells were mono- or co-cultured with human CD4+CD25+CD127−CD49d− regulatory T cells (T-regs) or CD4+CD25− T-effector cells (T-effs) being isolated by negative magnetic bead separation from blood of healthy donors. Particularly in the presence of activated T-effs, H6c7 cells acquired a spindle-shaped morphology, reduced E-cadherin expression, and elevated expression of the mesenchymal proteins vimentin, L1CAM, and ZEB-1. This was accompanied by an increased invasive behavior. Moreover, activated T-effs exerted similar effects in the PDAC cell line T3M4. Blocking of TNF-α and IL-6 being released at greater amounts into supernatants during co-cultures with activated T-effs attenuated the EMT-associated alterations in H6c7 cells. Supporting these findings, EMT-associated alterations (exemplified by reduced E-cadherin expression and enhanced expression of vimentin and L1CAM) were predominantly detected in ductal epithelium of CP tissues surrounded by a dense stroma enriched with CD4+ T cells. Overall this study points to a novel role of CD4+ T cells beyond their immune function in pancreatic tumorigenesis and underscores the view that EMT induction in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells represents an early event in PDAC development being essentially promoted by inflammatory processes. PMID:26137395

  15. Cytoskeletal changes induced by allosteric modulators of calcium-sensing receptor in esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen L; Rabon, Edd C; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Islam, Mohammed T; Schmieg, John J; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein-coupled receptor, plays a role in glandular and fluid secretion in the gastrointestinal tract, and regulates differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells. We examined the expression of CaSR in normal and pathological conditions of human esophagus and investigated the effect of a CaSR agonist, cinacalcet (CCT), and antagonist, calhex (CHX), on cell growth and cell–cell junctional proteins in primary cultures of porcine stratified squamous esophageal epithelium. We used immunohistochemistry and Western analysis to monitor expression of CaSR and cell–cell adhesion molecules, and MTT assay to monitor cell proliferation in cultured esophageal cells. CCT treatment significantly reduced proliferation, changed the cell shape from polygonal to spindle-like, and caused redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, it reduced expression of β-catenin by 35% (P < 0.02) and increased expression of a proteolysis cleavage fragment of E-cadherin, Ecad/CFT2, by 2.3 folds (P < 0.01). On the other hand, CHX treatment enhanced cell proliferation by 27% (P < 0.01), increased the expression of p120-catenin by 24% (P < 0.04), and of Rho, a GTPase involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, by 18% (P < 0.03). In conclusion, CaSR is expressed in normal esophagus as well as in Barrett’s, esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Long-term activation of CaSR with CCT disrupted the cadherin–catenin complex, induced cytoskeletal remodeling, actin fiber formation, and redistribution of CaSR to the nuclear area. These changes indicate a significant and complex role of CaSR in epithelial remodeling and barrier function of esophageal cells. PMID:26603452

  16. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  17. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    diverse transformed HMEC lines with defined genetic alterations may aid the identification of potential therapeutic treatments , including...human model systems to test potential therapeutics, could facilitate individualized treatment and possibly prevention. The main variables thought to...epithelial cells. Middle, corresponding cell culture models used in this study. Red, treatment or genetic manipulation used. Cell models are described in

  18. Cyto- and genotoxicity assessment of Gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Migliore, Lucia; Marsili, Paolo; Vergari, Chiara; Giammanco, Francesco; Giorgetti, Emilia

    2015-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous interest in biomedical applications, based on their unique optical properties. However, their toxicity on human tissues is still an open issue. Beyond the potential intrinsic toxicity of nanostructured gold, a non-negligible contribution of stabilizers or reaction by-products related to current wet chemical synthesis procedures can be expected. Aimed at isolating gold contribution from that of any other contaminant, we produced colloidal suspensions of Gold nanoparticles having average size <10 nm in deionized water or acetone by pulsed laser ablation, that permits preparation of uncoated and highly stable Gold nanoparticles in pure solvents. Subsequently, we investigated the role of surface chemistry, size, and dispersivity of synthesized Gold nanoparticles in exerting toxicity in a cell model system of deep respiratory tract, representing the main route of exposure to NPs, namely adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. Gold nanoparticles prepared in water showed no particular signs of cytotoxicity, cytostasis, and/or genotoxicity as assessed by MTT colorimetric viability test and Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay up to concentrations of the order of 5 μg/mL. In contrast, Gold nanoparticles produced in pure acetone and then transferred into deionized water showed impaired cell viability, apoptosis responses, micronuclei, and dicentric chromosomes induction as well as nuclear budding, as a function of the amount of surface contaminants like amorphous carbon and enolate ions.

  19. Mechanobiology in Lung Epithelial Cells: Measurements, Perturbations, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra; Navajas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the lung are located at the interface between the environment and the organism and serve many important functions including barrier protection, fluid balance, clearance of particulate, initiation of immune responses, mucus and surfactant production, and repair following injury. Because of the complex structure of the lung and its cyclic deformation during the respiratory cycle, epithelial cells are exposed to continuously varying levels of mechanical stresses. While normal lung function is maintained under these conditions, changes in mechanical stresses can have profound effects on the function of epithelial cells and therefore the function of the organ. In this review, we will describe the types of stresses and strains in the lungs, how these are transmitted, and how these may vary in human disease or animal models. Many approaches have been developed to better understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical stresses, and we will discuss these approaches and how they have been used to study lung epithelial cells in culture. Understanding how cells sense and respond to changes in mechanical stresses will contribute to our understanding of the role of lung epithelial cells during normal function and development and how their function may change in diseases such as acute lung injury, asthma, emphysema, and fibrosis. PMID:23728969

  20. Ozone exposed epithelial cells modify cocultured natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) causes significant adverse health effects worldwide. Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are among the first sites within the respiratory system to be exposed to inhaled air pollutants. They recruit, activate, and interact with immune cells via soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contacts. Based on our recent observation demonstrating the presence of natural killer (NK) cells in nasal lavages, the goal of this study was to establish a coculture model of NECs and NK cells and examine how exposure to O3 modifies this interaction. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess immunophenotypes of NK cells cocultured with either air- or O3-exposed NECs. Our data show that coculturing NK cells with O3-exposed NECs decreased intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enhanced, albeit not statistically significant, IL-4, and increased CD16 expression on NK cells compared with air controls. Additionally, the cytotoxicity potential of NK cells was reduced after coculturing with O3-exposed NECs. To determine whether soluble mediators released by O3-exposed NECs caused this shift, apical and basolateral supernatants of air- and O3-exposed NECs were used to stimulate NK cells. While the conditioned media of O3-exposed NECs alone did not reduce intracellular IFN-γ, O3 enhanced the expression of NK cell ligands ULBP3 and MICA/B on NECs. Blocking ULBP3 and MICA/B reversed the effects of O3-exposed NECs on IFN-γ production in NK cells. Taken together, these data showed that interactions between NECs and NK cells in the context of O3 exposure changes NK cell activity via direct cell-cell interactions and is dependent on ULBP3/MICA/B expressed on NECs. PMID:23241529

  1. Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system, largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only after the cancer has metastasized into the...Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system, largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only

  2. Epithelial cell division in the Xenopus laevis embryo during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Hatte, Guillaume; Tramier, Marc; Prigent, Claude; Tassan, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    How vertebrate epithelial cells divide in vivo and how the cellular environment influences cell division is currently poorly understood. A sine qua non condition to study cell division in situ is the ease of observation of cell division. This is fulfilled in the Xenopus embryo at the gastrula stage where polarized epithelial cells divide with a high frequency at the surface of the organism. Recently, using this model system, we have shown that epithelial cells divide by asymmetric furrowing and that the mode of cell division is regulated during development. Here, we further characterize epithelial cell division in situ. To this end, we used confocal microscopy to study epithelial cell division in the ectoderm of the Xenopus laevis gastrula. Cell division was followed either by indirect immunofluorescence in fixed embryos or by live imaging of embryos transiently expressing diverse fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that during cytokinesis, the plasma membranes of the two daughter cells are usually separated by a gap. For most divisions, daughter cells make contacts basally at a distance from the furrow tip which creates an inverted teardrop-like shaped volume tightly associated with the furrow. At the end of cytokinesis, the inverted teardrop is resorbed; thus it is a transient structure. Several proteins involved in cytokinesis are localized at the tip of the inverted teardrop suggesting that the formation of the gap could be an active process. We also show that intercalation of neighboring cells between daughter cells occasionally occurs during cytokinesis. Our results reveal an additional level of complexity in the relationship between dividing cells and also with their neighboring cells during cytokinesis in the Xenopus embryo epithelium.

  3. Cell death in cancer therapy of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zagryazhskaya, Anna; Gyuraszova, Katarina; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the main cause of all cancer-related deaths in the world, with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) being the most common subtype of this fatal disease. Lung ADC is often diagnosed at advanced stages involving disseminated metastatic tumors. This is particularly important for the successful development of new cancer therapy approaches. The high resistance of lung ADC to conventional radio- and chemotherapies represents a major challenge to treatment effectiveness. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of ADC's broad resistance to treatment and its possible therapeutic implications. A number of driving oncogenic alterations were identified in a subset of lung ADCs, making them suitable for targeted therapies directed towards specific cancer-associated molecular changes. In addition, we discuss the molecular aberrations common in lung ADC that are currently being exploited or are potentially important for targeted cancer therapy, as well as limitations of this type of therapy. Furthermore, we highlight possible treatment modalities that hold promise for overcoming resistance to targeted therapies as well as alternative treatment options such as immunotherapies that are potentially promising for improving the clinical outcome of lung ADC patients.

  4. Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions of bile duct epithelial cells in primary hepatolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijin; Yang, Rigao; Cheng, Long; Wang, Maijian; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Shuguang

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis of hepatolithiasis. Thirty-one patients with primary hepatolithiasis were enrolled in this study. Expressions of E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, alpha-SMA, vimentin, S100A4, TGF-beta1 and P-smad2/3 in hepatolithiasis bile duct epithelial cells were examined by immunohistochemistry staining. The results showed that the expressions of the epithelial markers E-cadherin and alpha-catenin were frequently lost in hepatolithiasis (32.3% and 25.9% of cases, respectively), while the mesenchymal markers vimentin, alpha-SMA and S100A4 were found to be present in hepatolithiasis (35.5%, 29.0%, and 32.3% of cases, respectively). The increased mesenchymal marker expression was correlated with decreased epithelial marker expression. The expressions of TGF-beta1 and P-smad2/3 in hepatolithiasis were correlated with the expression of S100A4. These data indicate that TGF-beta1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition might be involved in the formation of hepatolithiasis.

  5. Effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba Extract Against Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammation in Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hoon; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the characteristics of Helicobacter pylori and the effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extract on the expression of cytokines in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Cultured human adenocarcinoma gastric cells (AGS) were infected by H. pylori in RPMI 1640 media. Cell growth was measured by trypan blue assay. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate effect of extract containing Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on the expression of inflammatory factors and the inhibition on cell growth. Furthermore, we compared the inhibitory effects with various combinations of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole, and ECQ. The urease test with Christensen's Urea Agar was performed to identify the urease activity of H. pylori and the effect ECQ has on urease activity. When the cells were exposed to H. pylori, the trypan blue assay revealed a decrease in the rate of cell growth. Western blot analysis showed that H. pylori-infected cells had increased levels of degraded IκB-α and inflammatory factors. Pretreatment with ECQ inhibited interleukin expression induced by H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of ECQ and antibiotics inhibited cytokine expression more effectively than other treatments. H. pylori displayed significant urease activity. ECQ did not significantly inhibit urease activity. These data suggest that H. pylori infection has cytotoxic effects against AGS cells, and ECQ may inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines in H. pylori-infected AGS cells.

  6. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  7. Secretion of IL-13 by airway epithelial cells enhances epithelial repair via HB-EGF.

    PubMed

    Allahverdian, Sima; Harada, Norihiro; Singhera, Gurpreet K; Knight, Darryl A; Dorscheid, Delbert R

    2008-02-01

    Inappropriate repair after injury to the epithelium generates persistent activation, which may contribute to airway remodeling. In the present study we hypothesized that IL-13 is a normal mediator of airway epithelial repair. Mechanical injury of confluent airway epithelial cell (AEC) monolayers induced expression and release of IL-13 in a time-dependent manner coordinate with repair. Neutralizing of IL-13 secreted from injured epithelial cells by shIL-13Ralpha2.FC significantly reduced epithelial repair. Moreover, exogenous IL-13 enhanced epithelial repair and induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation. We examined secretion of two EGFR ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), after mechanical injury. Our data showed a sequential release of the EGF and HB-EGF by AEC after injury. Interestingly, we found that IL-13 induces HB-EGF, but not EGF, synthesis and release from AEC. IL-13-induced EGFR phosphorylation and the IL-13-reparative effect on AEC are mediated via HB-EGF. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by tyrphostin AG1478 increases IL-13 release after injury, suggesting negative feedback between EGFR and IL-13 during repair. Our data, for the first time, showed that IL-13 plays an important role in epithelial repair, and that its effect is mediated through the autocrine release of HB-EGF and activation of EGFR. Dysregulation of EGFR phosphorylation may contribute to a persistent repair phenotype and chronically increased IL-13 release, and in turn result in airway remodeling.

  8. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  9. Fibrin glue inhibits migration of ocular surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A M; Faraj, L A; McIntosh, O D; Dhillon, V K; Dua, H S

    2016-10-01

    PurposeFibrin glue has been used successfully in numerous ophthalmic surgical procedures. Recently, fibrin glue has been used in limbal stem cell transplantation to reduce both operative time and to negate the need for sutures. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of fibrin glue on epithelial cell migration in vitro.MethodsCorneoscleral rims were split to retain the epithelial layer, Bowman's layer, and anterior stroma. Rims were cut into eight equal-sized pieces and were placed directly on culture plates or affixed with fibrin glue. Rims were maintained in culture for 25 days and epithelial cell growth was monitored. Cells were photographed to measure area or growth and immunofluorescence staining of explants for fibrin was performed.ResultsExplants that were glued demonstrated significantly delayed epithelial cell growth and migration as compared with explants without glue. By day 16, all fibrin glue had dissolved and coincided with onset of cell growth from glued explants. Cell growth commenced between days 3 and 4 for control explants without glue and around days 14-16 for explants with fibrin glue.ConclusionsFibrin glue delays epithelial cell migration by acting as a physical barrier and can potentially interfere with explant-derived limbal epithelial cell migration on to the corneal surface. We propose that glue should be used to attach the conjunctival frill of the limbal explant but care should be taken to ensure that the glue does not wrap around the explant if used to secure the explant as well. Strategic use of glue, to attach the recessed conjunctiva, can be advantageous in delaying conjunctival cell migration and reducing the need for sequential sector conjunctival epitheliectomy.

  10. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  11. Assessment of cytotoxicity of Portulaca oleracea Linn. against human colon adenocarcinoma and vero cell line

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Prashant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portulaca oleracea Linn. (Portulacaceae) is commonly known as purslane in English. In traditional system it is used to cure diarrhea, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, asthma, and piles, reduce small tumors and inflammations. Aim: To assess cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-15) and normal (Vero) cell line. Materials and Methods: Characterization of chloroform extract of P. oleracea by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was performed. Cytotoxicity (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay was used for assessment of cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea. The concentrations of 1000–0.05 μg/ml were used in the experiment. Doxorubicin was considered as standard reference drug. Results: FTIR spectrum showed the peak at 1019.52 and 1396.21 center. The 50% cell growth inhibition (IC50) of chloroform extract of P. oleracea and doxorubicin was 1132.02 μg/ml and 460.13 μg/ml against human colon adenocarcinoma and 767.60 μg/ml and 2392.71 μg/ml against Vero cell line, respectively. Conclusion: Chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant was less efficient or does not have cytotoxic activity against human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. It was not safe to normal Vero cell line. But, there is a need to isolate, identify, and confirm the phytoconstituents present in extract by sophisticated analytical techniques. PMID:27833374

  12. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  13. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  14. A Rare Case of an Adult with Untreated Bladder Exstrophy Presenting with Signet-Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma of Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikash; Kasat, Gaurav; Sawant, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Untreated bladder exstrophy in an adult is rare, as the defect is obvious and primary reconstruction is usually done in infancy. There are less than 90 reported cases of primary adenocarcinoma in an untreated bladder exstrophy in literature and only two such case reports from India. Of these, only one case was of signet-ring cell type of mucinous adenocarcinoma. Here we report the second case of signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma in a 63 year old male with untreated bladder exstrophy (oldest patient in literature), to highlight the extreme rarity, yet distinct possibility and challenges faced in surgical management of such cases. PMID:28050437

  15. Wheatgrass extract inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nam Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in not only cancer development and metastasis but also non-cancerous conditions. Hypoxia is one of the proposed critical factors contributing to formation of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. Wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum) has antioxidant, anti-aging, and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we analyzed whether wheatgrass has an inhibitory effect on the EMT process in airway epithelial cells. MATERIALS/METHODS A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions (CO2 5%/O2 1%) for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of wheatgrass extract (50, 75, 100, and 150 µg/mL) and changes in expression of epithelial or mesenchymal markers were evaluated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Accordingly, associated EMT-related transcriptional factors, Snail and Smad, were also evaluated. RESULTS Hypoxia increased expression of N-cadherin and reduced expression of E-cadherin. Mechanistically, E-cadherin levels were recovered during hypoxia by silencing hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α or administering wheatgrass extract. Wheatgrass inhibited the hypoxia-mediated EMT by reducing the expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3) and Snail. It suppressed the hypoxia-mediated EMT processes of airway epithelial cells via HIF-1α and the pSmad3 signaling pathway. CONCLUSION These results suggest that wheatgrass has potential as a therapeutic or supplementary agent for HIF-1-related diseases. PMID:28386380

  16. Gastric carcinoma: monoclonal epithelial malignant cells expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent infection protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, S; Koizumi, S; Sugiura, M; Tokunaga, M; Uemura, Y; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, S; Sato, E; Osato, T

    1994-01-01

    In 1000 primary gastric carcinomas, 70 (7.0%) contained Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic sequences detected by PCR and Southern blots. The positive tumors comprised 8 of 9 (89%) undifferentiated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, 27 of 476 (5.7%) poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and 35 of 515 (6.8%) moderately to well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In situ EBV-encoded small RNA 1 hybridization and hematoxylin/eosin staining in adjacent sections showed that the EBV was present in every carcinoma cell but was not significantly present in lymphoid stroma and in normal mucosa. Two-color immunofluorescence and hematoxylin/eosin staining in parallel sections revealed that every keratin-positive epithelial malignant cell expressed EBV-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) but did not significantly express CD45+ infiltrating leukocytes. A single fused terminal fragment was detected in each of the EBNA1-expressing tumors, thereby suggesting that the EBV-carrying gastric carcinomas represent clonal proliferation of cells infected with EBV. The carcinoma cells had exclusively EBNA1 but not EBNA2, -3A, -3B, and -3C; leader protein; and latent membrane protein 1 because of methylation. The patients with EBV-carrying gastric carcinoma had elevated serum EBV-specific antibodies. The EBV-specific cellular immunity was not significantly reduced; however, the cytotoxic T-cell target antigens were not expressed. These findings strongly suggest a causal relation between a significant proportion of gastric carcinoma and EBV, and the virus-carrying carcinoma cells may evade immune surveillance. Images PMID:8090780

  17. Cell division cycle 20 overexpression predicts poor prognosis for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Sun, Qi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xin; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Wang, Anpeng; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The cell division cycle 20, a key component of spindle assembly checkpoint, is an essential activator of the anaphase-promoting complex. Aberrant expression of cell division cycle 20 has been detected in various human cancers. However, its clinical significance has never been deeply investigated in non-small-cell lung cancer. By analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas database and using some certain online databases, we validated overexpression of cell division cycle 20 in both messenger RNA and protein levels, explored its clinical significance, and evaluated the prognostic role of cell division cycle 20 in non-small-cell lung cancer. Cell division cycle 20 expression was significantly correlated with sex (p = 0.003), histological classification (p < 0.0001), and tumor size (p = 0.0116) in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. In lung adenocarcinoma patients, overexpression of cell division cycle 20 was significantly associated with bigger primary tumor size (p = 0.0023), higher MKI67 level (r = 0.7618, p < 0.0001), higher DNA ploidy level (p < 0.0001), and poor prognosis (hazard ratio = 2.39, confidence interval: 1.87-3.05, p < 0.0001). However, in lung squamous cell carcinoma patients, no significant association of cell division cycle 20 expression was observed with any clinical parameter or prognosis. Overexpression of cell division cycle 20 is associated with poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and its overexpression can also be used to identify high-risk groups. In conclusion, cell division cycle 20 might serve as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients.

  18. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  19. Montelukast suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells induced by eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Koa; Kainuma, Keigo; Toda, Masaaki; Harada, Etsuko; Chelakkot-Govindalayathila, Ayshwarya-Lakshmi; Roeen, Ziaurahman; Nagao, Mizuho; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Fujisawa, Takao; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2014-07-04

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a mechanism by which eosinophils can induce airway remodeling. Montelukast, an antagonist of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor, can suppress airway remodeling in asthma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether montelukast can ameliorate airway remodeling by blocking EMT induced by eosinophils. EMT induced was assessed using a co-culture system of human bronchial epithelial cells and human eosinophils or the eosinophilic leukemia cell lines, Eol-1. Montelukast inhibited co-culture associated morphological changes of BEAS-2b cells, decreased the expression of vimentin and collagen I, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. Montelukast mitigated the rise of TGF-β1 production and Smad3 phosphorylation. Co-culture of human eosinophils with BEAS-2B cells significantly enhanced the production of CysLTs compared with BEAS-2B cells or eosinophils alone. The increase of CysLTs was abolished by montelukast pre-treatment. Montelukast had similar effects when co-culture system of Eol-1 and BEAS-2B was used. This study showed that montelukast suppresses eosinophils-induced EMT of airway epithelial cells. This finding may explain the mechanism of montelukast-mediated amelioration of airway remodeling in bronchial asthma.

  20. Epithelial cell apoptosis facilitates Entamoeba histolytica infection in the gut.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen M; Cho, Kyou-Nam; Guo, Xiaoti; Fendig, Kirsten; Oosman, Mohammed N; Whitehead, Robert; Cohn, Steven M; Houpt, Eric R

    2010-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes amebic colitis. The parasite triggers apoptosis on contact with host cells; however, the biological significance of this event during intestinal infection is unclear. We examined the role of apoptosis in a mouse model of intestinal amebiasis. Histopathology revealed that abundant epithelial cell apoptosis occurred in the vicinity of amoeba in histological specimens. Epithelial cell apoptosis occurred rapidly on co-culture with amoeba in vitro as measured by annexin positivity, DNA degradation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of the pan caspase inhibitor ZVAD decreased the rate and severity of amebic infection in CBA mice by all measures (cecal culture positivity, parasite enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and histological scores). Similarly, caspase 3 knockout mice on the resistant C57BL/6 background exhibited even lower cecal parasite antigen burden and culture positive rates than wild type mice. The permissive effect of apoptosis on infection could be tracked to the epithelium, in that transgenic mice that overexpressed Bcl-2 in epithelial cells were more resistant to infection as measured by cecal parasite enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and histological scores. We concluded that epithelial cell apoptosis in the intestine facilitates amebic infection in this mouse model. The parasite's strategy for inducing apoptosis may point to key virulence factors, and therapeutic maneuvers to diminish epithelial apoptosis may be useful in amebic colitis.

  1. Anti-proliferative effect on a colon adenocarcinoma cell line exerted by a membrane disrupting antimicrobial peptide KL15

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Ye, Xin-Hong; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial and anticancer activities of an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) KL15 obtained through in silico modification on the sequences of 2 previously identified bacteriocins m2163 and m2386 from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 by us have been studied. While significant bactericidal effect on the pathogenic bacteria Listeria, Escherichia, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus is exerted by KL15, the AMP can also kill 2 human adenocarcinoma cells SW480 and Caco-2 with measured IC50 as 50 μg/ml or 26.3 μM. However, the IC50 determined for KL15 on killing the normal human mammary epithelial cell H184B5F5/M10 is 150 μg/ml. The conformation of KL15 dissolved in 50% 2,2,2-trifluroroethanol or in 2 large unilamellar vesicle systems determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy appears to be helical. Further, the cell membrane permeability of treated SW480 cells by KL15 appears to be significantly enhanced as studied by both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. As observed under a scanning electron microscope, the morphology of treated SW480 cells is also significantly changed as treating time by 80 μg/ml KL15 is increased. KL15 appears to be able to pierce the cell membrane of treated SW480 cells so that numerous porous structures are generated and observable. Therefore, KL15 is likely to kill the treated SW480 cells through the necrotic pathway similar to some recently identified AMPs by others. PMID:26147829

  2. Immunolocalization of epithelial and mesenchymal matrix constituents in association with inner enamel epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosshardt, D D; Nanci, A

    1998-02-01

    After crown formation, the enamel organ reorganizes into Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). Although it is generally accepted that HERS plays an inductive role during root formation, it also has been suggested that it may contribute enamel-related proteins to cementum matrix. By analogy to the enamel-free area (EFA) in rat molars, in which epithelial cells express not only enamel proteins but also "typical" mesenchymal matrix constituents, it has been proposed that HERS cells may also have the potential to produce cementum proteins. To test this hypothesis, we examined the nature of the first matrix layer deposited along the cervical portion of root dentin and the characteristics of the associated cells. Rat molars were processed for postembedding colloidal gold immunolabeling with antibodies to amelogenin (AMEL), ameloblastin (AMBN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteopontin (OPN). To minimize the possibility of false-negative results, several antibodies to AMEL were used. The labelings were compared with those obtained at the EFA. Initial cementum matrix was consistently observed at a time when epithelial cells from HERS covered most of the forming root surface. Cells with mesenchymal characteristics were rarely seen in proximity to the matrix. Both the EFA matrix and initial cementum exhibited collagen fibrils and were intensely immunoreactive for BSP and OPN. AMEL and AMBN were immunodetected at the EFA but not over the initial cementum proper. These two proteins were, however, present at the cervical-most portion of the root where enamel matrix extends for a short distance between dentin and cementum. These data suggest that epithelial cells along the root surface are likely responsible for the deposition of the initial cementum matrix and therefore, like the cells at the EFA, may be capable of producing mesenchymal proteins.

  3. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion...COVERED 1Aug2014 - 31Jul2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0223...histologies of lung cancer is made difficult in part because of the extensive genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in lung carcinogenesis, the

  5. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  6. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  7. Cooperative Interactions During Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Immortal Transformation of Cultured Human Mammary Epithelial Cells. Cellular Oncology, 26:248-251, 2004. Rodier , F., Kim, S-H., Nijjar, T., Yaswen, P...Promoter, Mol. Cell Biol.: 25:3923-3933, 2005. Goldstein, J, Rodier , F, Garbe, J, Stampfer, M, Campisi, J, Caspase-independent cytochrome c release is a

  8. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium1,2. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelia; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside of the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells appears to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelia layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions. PMID:26414404

  9. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  10. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites on Extracellular Corneal Epithelial Cell Maspin

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Malathi; Mirza, Shama P.; Twining, Sally S.

    2011-01-01

    Maspin, a 42-kDa non classical serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is expressed by epithelial cells of various tissues including the cornea. The protein localizes to the nucleus and cytosol, and is present in the extracellular space. While extracellular maspin regulates corneal stromal fibroblast adhesion and inhibits angiogenesis during wound healing in the cornea, the molecular mechanism of its extracellular functions is unclear. We hypothesized that identifying post-translational modifications of maspin, such as phosphorylation, may help decipher its mode of action. The focus of this study was on the identification of phosphorylation sites on extracellular maspin, since the extracellular form of the molecule is implicated in several functions. Multi-stage fragmentation mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of phosphorylation on extracellular corneal epithelial cell maspin. A total of eight serine and threonine phosphorylation sites (Thr50, Ser97, Thr118, Thr157, Ser240, Ser298, Thr310, Ser316) were identified on the extracellular forms of the molecule. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on extracellular maspin was not detected on extracellular maspin from corneal epithelial cell, in contrast to breast epithelial cells. This study provides the basis for further investigation into the functional role of phosphorylation of corneal epithelial maspin. PMID:21365746

  11. Isolation and biological analysis of tumor stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Wang, Chun-You; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Liu, Tao; Xiong, Jiang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the method of isolation and biological analysis of tumor stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1. METHODS: The PANC-1 cells were cultured in Dulbecco modified eagle medium F12 (1:1 volume) (DMEM-F12) supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Subpopulation cells with properties of tumor stem cells were isolated from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1 according to the cell surface markers CD44 and CD24 by flow cytometry. The proliferative capability of these cells in vitro were estimated by 3-[4,5-dimehyl-2-thiazolyl]-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. And the tumor growth of different subpopulation cells which were injected into the hypodermisof right and left armpit of nude mice was studied, and expression of CD44 and CD24 of the CD44+CD24+ cell-formed nodules and PANC-1 cells were detected by avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: The 5.1%-17.5% of sorted PANC-1 cells expressed the cell surface marker CD44, 57.8% -70.1% expressed CD24, only 2.1%-3.5% of cells were CD44+ CD24+. Compared with CD44-CD24- cells, CD44+CD24+ cells had a lower growth rate in vitro. Implantation of 104 CD44-CD24- cells in nude mice showed no evident tumor growth at wk 12. In contrast, large tumors were found in nude mice implanted with 103 CD44+CD24+ cells at wk 4 (2/8), a 20-fold increase in tumorigenic potential (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). There was no obvious histological difference between the cells of the CD44+CD24+ cell-formed nodules and PANC-1 cells. CONCLUSION: CD44 and CD24 may be used as the cell surface markers for isolation of pancreatic cancer stem cells from pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line PANC-1. Subpopulation cells CD44+CD24+ have properties of tumor stem cells. Because cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and its recurrence after an initial response to chemotherapy, it may be a very promising target for new drug development. PMID

  12. Evaluating alternative stem cell hypotheses for adult corneal epithelial maintenance

    PubMed Central

    West, John D; Dorà, Natalie J; Collinson, J Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this review we evaluate evidence for three different hypotheses that explain how the corneal epithelium is maintained. The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) hypothesis is most widely accepted. This proposes that stem cells in the basal layer of the limbal epithelium, at the periphery of the cornea, maintain themselves and also produce transient (or transit) amplifying cells (TACs). TACs then move centripetally to the centre of the cornea in the basal layer of the corneal epithelium and also replenish cells in the overlying suprabasal layers. The LESCs maintain the corneal epithelium during normal homeostasis and become more active to repair significant wounds. Second, the corneal epithelial stem cell (CESC) hypothesis postulates that, during normal homeostasis, stem cells distributed throughout the basal corneal epithelium, maintain the tissue. According to this hypothesis, LESCs are present in the limbus but are only active during wound healing. We also consider a third possibility, that the corneal epithelium is maintained during normal homeostasis by proliferation of basal corneal epithelial cells without any input from stem cells. After reviewing the published evidence, we conclude that the LESC and CESC hypotheses are consistent with more of the evidence than the third hypothesis, so we do not consider this further. The LESC and CESC hypotheses each have difficulty accounting for one main type of evidence so we evaluate the two key lines of evidence that discriminate between them. Finally, we discuss how lineage-tracing experiments have begun to resolve the debate in favour of the LESC hypothesis. Nevertheless, it also seems likely that some basal corneal epithelial cells can act as long-term progenitors if limbal stem cell function is compromised. Thus, this aspect of the CESC hypothesis may have a lasting impact on our understanding of corneal epithelial maintenance, even if it is eventually shown that stem cells are restricted to the limbus as proposed

  13. A clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Dianbin; Shi, Xuetao; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old male was referred to our department for a gallbladder mass. He denied any history of alcohol consumption or cholecystitis and smoking. Hepatitis B surface antigen test and antihepatitis C antibody test were found to be negative. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen were elevated (CA19-9 was 59.92 U/mL and carcinoembryonic antigen was 12.64 ng/mL), whereas alpha-fetoprotein was below the normal limit (2.46 ng/mL). Computed tomography scan revealed a solid mass with measurements of 4.6×5.6×7.1 cm, which nearly filled the whole gallbladder space. Radical cholecystectomy, including segments IV B and V of the liver and lymphadenectomy, was performed. The neoplasm in gallbladder was completely resected, and the patient obtained a negative margin. Histological and immunohistochemical profile suggested a clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation. After reviewing the literature, we reported that this case is the first identified case of cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with extensive hepatoid differentiation. However, clinical features of clear cell adenocarcinoma with hepatoid differentiation remain unclear due to the extremely rare incidence. There was no indication of adjuvant chemotherapy and no literature has been reported on the application of chemotherapy. This case showed a promising clinical outcome after curative resection, which indicated that surgical treatment could be potentially considered for suitable patients. PMID:27703378

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis genes isolated by screening for epithelial cell attachment.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Emory, S A; Almira, E C

    1996-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with chronic and severe periodontitis in adults. P. gingivalis and the other periodontal pathogens colonize and interact with gingival epithelial cells, but the genes and molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. To dissect the first steps in these interactions, a P. gingivalis expression library was screened for clones which bound human oral epithelial cells. Insert DNA from the recombinant clones did not contain homology to the P. gingivalis fimA gene, encoding fimbrillin, the subunit protein of fimbriae, but showed various degrees of homology to certain cysteine protease-hemagglutinin genes. The DNA sequence of one insert revealed three putative open reading frames which appeared to be in an operon. The relationship between P. gingivalis attachment to epithelial cells and the activities identified by the screen is discussed. PMID:8751909

  15. Coronavirus entry and release in polarized epithelial cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingying; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2014-09-01

    Most coronaviruses cause respiratory or intestinal infections in their animal or human host. Hence, their interaction with polarized epithelial cells plays a critical role in the onset and outcome of infection. In this paper, we review the knowledge regarding the entry and release of coronaviruses, with particular emphasis on the severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses. As these viruses approach the epithelial surfaces from the apical side, it is not surprising that coronavirus cell receptors are exposed primarily on the apical domain of polarized epithelial cells. With respect to release, all possibilities appear to occur. Thus, most coronaviruses exit through the apical surface, several through the basolateral one, although the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus appears to use both sides. These observations help us understand the local or systematic spread of the infection within its host as well as the spread of the virus within the host population.

  16. [Isolation, purification and identification of epithelial cells derived from fetal islet-like cell clusters].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hai; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Yun; Yang, Chun-Rong; Xiao, Mei; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this article is to provide methods for the isolation and identification of pancreatic stem cells and cell source for research and therapy of diabetes. ICCs were isolated by collagenase IV digesting and then cultured; epithelial cells were purified from monolayer cultured ICCs. The growth curve of the epithelial cells was measured by MTT. The expression of molecular markers in the cells was identified by immunohistochemical staining. The surface markers in the epithelial cells were analyzed by FACS. Epithelial cells were purified from isolated human fetal ICCs and passaged 40 times, and 10(6) - 10(8) cells were cryopreservated per passage. The growth curve demonstrated that the epithelial cells proliferated rapidly. The epithelial cells expressed PDX-1, PCNA, CK-7, CK-19, Nestin, Glut2, and Vimentin, but Insulin was undetected. The cells expressed CD29, CD44, and CD166, but did not express CD11a, CD14, CD34, CD45, CD90, CD105, and CD117. Taken together, these results indicate that self-renewable epithelial cells can be isolated and purified from human fetal pancreas. These also show that the epithelial cells originate from ducts and have the characteristics of pancreatic stem cells.

  17. Oxidized alginate hydrogels as niche environments for corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bernice; De Bank, Paul A; Luetchford, Kim A; Acosta, Fernando R; Connon, Che J

    2014-10-01

    Chemical and biochemical modification of hydrogels is one strategy to create physiological constructs that maintain cell function. The aim of this study was to apply oxidised alginate hydrogels as a basis for development of a biomimetic niche for limbal epithelial stem cells that may be applied to treating corneal dysfunction. The stem phenotype of bovine limbal epithelial cells (LEC) and the viability of corneal epithelial cells (CEC) were examined in oxidised alginate gels containing collagen IV over a 3-day culture period. Oxidation increased cell viability (P ≤ 0.05) and this improved further with addition of collagen IV (P ≤ 0.01). Oxidised gels presented larger internal pores (diameter: 0.2-0.8 µm) than unmodified gels (pore diameter: 0.05-0.1 µm) and were significantly less stiff (P ≤ 0.001), indicating that an increase in pore size and a decrease in stiffness contributed to improved cell viability. The diffusion of collagen IV from oxidised alginate gels was similar to that of unmodified gels suggesting that oxidation may not affect the retention of extracellular matrix proteins in alginate gels. These data demonstrate that oxidised alginate gels containing corneal extracellular matrix proteins can influence corneal epithelial cell function in a manner that may impact beneficially on corneal wound healing therapy.

  18. Intestinal epithelial cells and their role in innate mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Contreras, A L; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts are covered by a layer of epithelial cells that are responsible for sensing and promoting a host immune response in order to establish the limits not only for commensal microorganisms but also for foreign organisms or particles. This is a remarkable task as the human body represents a composite of about 10 trillion human-self cells plus non-self cells from autochthonous or indigenous microbes that outnumber human cells 10:1. Hence, the homeostasis of epithelial cells that line mucosal surfaces relies on a fine-tuned immune system that patrols the boundaries between human and microbial cells. In the case of the intestine, the epithelial layer is composed of at least six epithelial cell lineages that act as a physiological barrier in addition to aiding digestion and the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes. In this review, we highlight the immense role of the intestinal epithelium in coordinating the mucosal innate immune response.

  19. Oxidized alginate hydrogels as niche environments for corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bernice; De Bank, Paul A; Luetchford, Kim A; Acosta, Fernando R; Connon, Che J

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and biochemical modification of hydrogels is one strategy to create physiological constructs that maintain cell function. The aim of this study was to apply oxidised alginate hydrogels as a basis for development of a biomimetic niche for limbal epithelial stem cells that may be applied to treating corneal dysfunction. The stem phenotype of bovine limbal epithelial cells (LEC) and the viability of corneal epithelial cells (CEC) were examined in oxidised alginate gels containing collagen IV over a 3-day culture period. Oxidation increased cell viability (P ≤ 0.05) and this improved further with addition of collagen IV (P ≤ 0.01). Oxidised gels presented larger internal pores (diameter: 0.2–0.8 µm) than unmodified gels (pore diameter: 0.05–0.1 µm) and were significantly less stiff (P ≤ 0.001), indicating that an increase in pore size and a decrease in stiffness contributed to improved cell viability. The diffusion of collagen IV from oxidised alginate gels was similar to that of unmodified gels suggesting that oxidation may not affect the retention of extracellular matrix proteins in alginate gels. These data demonstrate that oxidised alginate gels containing corneal extracellular matrix proteins can influence corneal epithelial cell function in a manner that may impact beneficially on corneal wound healing therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published byWiley Periodicals, Inc. Part A: 102A: 3393–3400, 2014. PMID:24142706

  20. Fucan-coated silver nanoparticles synthesized by a green method induce human renal adenocarcinoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Rocha Amorim, Monica Oliveira; Lopes Gomes, Dayanne; Dantas, Larisse Araujo; Silva Viana, Rony Lucas; Chiquetti, Samanta Cristina; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Silva Costa, Leandro; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    Polysaccharides containing sulfated L-fucose are often called fucans. The seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi synthesizes three fucans, among which fucan A is the most abundant. This polymer is not cytotoxic against various normal cell lines and is non-toxic to rats when administered at high doses. In addition, it exhibits low toxicity against tumor cells. With the aim of increasing the toxicity of fucan A, silver nanoparticles containing this polysaccharide were synthesized using a green chemistry method. The mean size of these nanoparticles was 210nm. They exhibited a spherical shape and negative surface charge and were stable for 14 months. When incubated with cells, these nanoparticles did not show any toxic effects against various normal cell lines; however, they decreased the viability of various tumor cells, especially renal adenocarcinoma cells 786-0. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the nanoparticles induced cell death responses of 786-0 cells through necrosis. Assays performed with several renal cell lines (HEK, VERO, MDCK) showed that these nanoparticles only induce death of 786-0 cells. The data obtained herein leads to the conclusion that fucan A nanoparticles are promising agents against renal adenocarcinoma.

  1. Characterization of spheres derived from canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Michishita, Masaki; Akiyoshi, Rui; Yoshimura, Hisashi; Katsumoto, Takuo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sasaki, Nobuo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells in several solid tumors, and these cancer stem cells have a potential role in tumor initiation, aggression, and recurrence. The stem cell-like properties of spheres derived from canine mammary tumors remain largely elusive. We attempted to induce sphere formation using four cell lines of canine mammary adenocarcinoma, and characterized the spheres derived from a CHMp line in vitro and in vivo. The CHMp-derived spheres showed predominantly CD44+CD24- population, higher expression of stem cell-related genes, such as CD133, Notch3 and MDR, and higher resistance to doxorubicin compared with the CHMp-derived adherent cells. Xenograft transplantations in nude mice demonstrated that only 1 × 10(4)sphere cells were sufficient for tumor formation. Use of the sphere assay on these sphere-derived tumors showed that sphere-forming cells were present in the tumors, and were maintained in serial transplantation. We propose that spheres derived from canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines possess a potential characteristic of cancer stem cells. Spheres derived from canine mammary tumors could be a powerful tool with which to investigate novel therapeutic drugs and to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie tumorigenesis.

  2. EBV BMRF-2 facilitates cell-to-cell spread of virus within polarized oral epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiao; Palefsky, Joel M.; Herrera, Rossana; Berline, Jennifer; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BMRF-2 protein plays an important role in EBV infection of polarized oral epithelial cells by interacting with β1 and αv family integrins. Here we show that infection of polarized oral epithelial cells with B27-BMRF-2low recombinant virus, expressing a low level of BMRF-2, resulted in significantly smaller plaques compared with infection by parental B95-8 virus. BMRF-2 localized in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and basolateral sorting vesicles and was transported to the basolateral membranes of polarized epithelial cells. Mutation of the tyrosine- and dileucine-containing basolateral sorting signal, YLLV, in the cytoplasmic domain of BMRF-2 led to the failure of its accumulation in the TGN and its basolateral transport. These data show that BMRF-2 may play an important role in promoting the spread of EBV progeny virions through lateral membranes of oral epithelial cells. PMID:19394065

  3. Effect of silencing SATB1 on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Zhou, Hongli; Wang, Siwang; Lang, Xian Ping; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of special adenine-thymine-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1) in lung adenocarcinoma and its role in the proliferation, invasion, migration and apoptosis of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. The expression of SATB1 was first studied in tumor tissues of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non-tumor tissues. The siRNA green fluorescent protein expression vector of SATB1 was constructed and transfected into the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549, then a fluorescence microscope was used to study the transfection efficiency. Western blot analysis was adopted to measure the silencing efficiency. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), Transwell and scratch assays were used to study cell proliferation, invasion and migration activity, and the apoptosis rate was tested by flow cytometry. SATB1 expression was low in the adjacent non-tumor tissues but high in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, and it was reversely proportional to the differentiation degree. Following transfection with SATB1-siRNA, the expression of SATB1 in A549 cells was blocked (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation, invasion and migration abilities of cells decreased significantly while the apoptosis rate increased significantly (P<0.01). In conclusion SATB1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis and development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27895736

  4. TRPV channels as thermosensory receptors in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosang; Caterina, Michael J

    2005-10-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are critical contributors to normal pain and temperature sensation and therefore represent attractive targets for pain therapy. When these channels were first discovered, most attention was focused on their potential contributions to direct thermal activation of peripheral sensory neurons. However, recent anatomical, physiological, and behavioral studies have provided evidence that TRPV channels expressed in skin epithelial cells may also contribute to thermosensation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review these studies and speculate on possible communication mechanisms from cutaneous epithelial cells to sensory neurons.

  5. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells as a Biomarker of Response to Treatment in Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Torphy, Robert J.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Kamande, Joyce W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Herrera Loeza, Silvia G.; Soper, Steven A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from solid tumors into circulation and have been shown to be prognostic in the setting of metastatic disease. These cells are obtained through a routine blood draw and may serve as an easily accessible marker for monitoring treatment effectiveness. Because of the rapid progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), early insight into treatment effectiveness may allow for necessary and timely changes in treatment regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate CTC burden as a biomarker of response to treatment with a oral phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor, BKM120, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models of PDAC. PDX mice were randomized to receive vehicle or BKM120 treatment for 28 days and CTCs were enumerated from whole blood before and after treatment using a microfluidic chip that selected for EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) positive cells. This microfluidic device allowed for the release of captured CTCs and enumeration of these cells via their electrical impedance signatures. Median CTC counts significantly decreased in the BKM120 group from pre- to post-treatment (26.61 to 2.21 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.0207) while no significant change was observed in the vehicle group (23.26 to 11.89 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.8081). This reduction in CTC burden in the treatment group correlated with tumor growth inhibition indicating CTC burden is a promising biomarker of response to treatment in preclinical models. Mutant enriched sequencing of isolated CTCs confirmed that they harbored KRAS G12V mutations, identical to the matched tumors. In the long-term, PDX mice are a useful preclinical model for furthering our understanding of CTCs. Clinically, mutational analysis of CTCs and serial monitoring of CTC burden may be used as a minimally invasive approach to predict and monitor treatment response to guide therapeutic regimens. PMID:24586805

  7. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling.

  8. CXCR2 expression in tumor cells is a poor prognostic factor and promotes invasion and metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Pierre; Massarelli, Erminia; Lin, Steven; Chen, Yulong; Goswami, Sangeeta; Erez, Baruch; O’Reilly, Michael S.; Liu, Diane; Lee, J. Jack; Zhang, Li; Ping, Yuan; Behrens, Carmen; Soto, Luisa M. Solis; Heymach, John V.; Kim, Edward S.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lippman, Scott M.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Hong, Waun Ki; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2012-01-01

    CXCR2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been studied mainly in stromal cells and is known to increase tumor inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we examined the prognostic importance of CXCR2 in NSCLC and the role of CXCR2 and its ligands in lung cancer cells. The effect of CXCR2 expression on tumor cells was studied using stable knockdown clones derived from a murine KRAS/p53-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic potential and an orthotopic syngeneic mouse model and in vitro using a CXCR2 small molecule antagonist (SB225002). CXCR2 protein expression was analyzed in tumor cells from 262 NSCLC. Gene expression profiles for CXCR2 and its ligands (CXCR2 axis) were analyzed in 52 human NSCLC cell lines and 442 human lung adenocarcinomas. Methylation of CXCR2 axis promoters was determined in 70 human NSCLC cell lines. Invasion and metastasis were decreased in CXCR2 knockdown clones in vitro and in vivo. SB225002 decreased invasion in vitro. In lung adenocarcinomas, CXCR2 expression in tumor cells was associated with smoking and poor prognosis. CXCR2 axis gene expression profiles in human NSCLC cell lines and lung adenocarcinomas defined a cluster driven by CXCL5 and associated with smoking, poor prognosis and RAS pathway activation. Expression of CXCL5 was regulated by promoter methylation. The CXCR2 axis may be an important target in smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23204236

  9. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Tan, Yaoxi; Liang, Yan; Li, Yan; Chen, Lei; Wu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Period2 (Per2) is a key mammalian circadian clock protein, and additionally has a tumor suppressive function. The present study aimed to investigate its role in drug resistance in A549/cisplatin (DDP) lung adenocarcinoma cells. Per2 knockdown and overexpression in A549/DDP cells were used to compare cell proliferation (by MTT assay), apoptosis (active-caspase 3 western blot) and clone forming assay. The activation of AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated by a western blot assay. The Per2 expression level was decreased in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells. Per2 knockdown by short hairpin RNA protects A549/DDP cells from apoptosis, and promotes proliferation and migration. Per2 knockdown results in increased activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Overexpression of Per2 in A549/DDP cells may reduce the activity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and promote apoptosis of A549 cells. The results of the present study suggest that Per2 participates in AKT-mediated drug resistance in A549/DDP lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:28123577

  11. Immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cells express stem cell markers and differentiate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Haina; Dai, Wenting; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    The bovine mammary epithelial cell is a secretory cell, and its cell number and secretory activity determine milk production. In this study, we immortalized a bovine mammary epithelial cell line by SV40 large T antigen gene using a retrovirus based on Chinese Holstein primary mammary epithelial cells (CMEC) cultured in vitro. An immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line surpassed the 50-passage mark and was designated the CMEC-H. The immortalized mammary epithelial cells grew in close contact with each other and exhibited the typical cobblestone morphology characteristic with obvious boundaries. The telomerase expression of CMEC-H has consistently demonstrated the presence of telomerase activity as an immortalized cell line, but the cell line never induced tumor formation in nude mice. CMEC-H expressed epithelial (cytokeratins CK7, CK8, CK18, and CK19), mesenchymal (vimentin), and stem/progenitor (CD44 and p63) cell markers. The induced expression of milk proteins, αS1 -casein, β-casein, κ-casein, and butyrophilin, indicated that CMEC-H maintained the synthesis function of the mammary epithelial cells. The established immortalized bovine mammary epithelial cell line CMEC-H is capable of self-renewal and differentiation and can serve as a valuable reagent for studying the physiological mechanism of the mammary gland.

  12. Epithelial neoplasia in Drosophila entails switch to primitive cell states.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumbul J; Bajpai, Anjali; Alam, Mohammad Atif; Gupta, Ram P; Harsh, Sneh; Pandey, Ravi K; Goel-Bhattacharya, Surbhi; Nigam, Aditi; Mishra, Arati; Sinha, Pradip

    2013-06-11

    Only select cell types in an organ display neoplasia when targeted oncogenically. How developmental lineage hierarchies of these cells prefigure their neoplastic propensities is not yet well-understood. Here we show that neoplastic Drosophila epithelial cells reverse their developmental commitments and switch to primitive cell states. In a context of alleviated tissue surveillance, for example, loss of Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) tumor suppressor in the wing primordium induced epithelial neoplasia in its Homothorax (Hth)-expressing proximal domain. Transcriptional profile of proximally transformed mosaic wing epithelium and functional tests revealed tumor cooperation by multiple signaling pathways. In contrast, lgl(-) clones in the Vestigial (Vg)-expressing distal wing epithelium were eliminated by cell death. Distal lgl(-) clones, however, could transform when both tissue surveillance and cell death were compromised genetically and, alternatively, when the transcription cofactor of Hippo signaling pathway, Yorkie (Yki), was activated, or when Ras/EGFR signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, transforming distal lgl(-) clones displayed loss of Vg, suggesting reversal of their terminal cell fate commitment. In contrast, reinforcing a distal (wing) cell fate commitment in lgl(-) clones by gaining Vg arrested their neoplasia and induced cell death. We also show that neoplasia in both distal and proximal lgl(-) clones could progress in the absence of Hth, revealing Hth-independent wing epithelial neoplasia. Likewise, neoplasia in the eye primordium resulted in loss of Elav, a retinal cell marker; these, however, switched to an Hth-dependent primitive cell state. These results suggest a general characteristic of "cells-of-origin" in epithelial cancers, namely their propensity for switch to primitive cell states.

  13. Extracellular cleavage of E-cadherin promotes epithelial cell extrusion.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Adam G; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion and subsequent apoptosis is a key mechanism to prevent the accumulation of excess cells. By contrast, when driven by oncogene expression, apical cell extrusion is followed by proliferation and represents an initial step of tumorigenesis. E-cadherin (E-cad), the main component of adherens junctions, has been shown to be essential for epithelial cell extrusion, but its mechanistic contribution remains unclear. Here, we provide clear evidence that cell extrusion can be driven by the cleavage of E-cad, both in a wild-type and an oncogenic environment. We first show that CDC42 activation in a single epithelial cell results in its efficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive extrusion through MEK signalling activation and this is supported by E-cad cleavage. Second, using an engineered cleavable form of E-cad, we demonstrate that, by itself, truncation of extracellular E-cad at the plasma membrane promotes apical extrusion. We propose that extracellular cleavage of E-cad generates a rapid change in cell-cell adhesion that is sufficient to drive apical cell extrusion. Whereas in normal epithelia, extrusion is followed by apoptosis, when combined with active oncogenic signalling, it is coupled to cell proliferation.

  14. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  15. [Methotrexate as inducer of proinflammatory cytokines by epithelial cells].

    PubMed

    Morón-Medina, Alejandra; Viera, Ninoska; de Morales, Thaís Rojas; Alcocer, Sirley; Bohorquez, Dinorath

    2014-03-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a drug commonly used in childhood cancer, has also been indicated as a cytotoxic agent of the oral mucosa, which can trigger the inflammatory process and increase the vascularity of epithelial tissues during the early stages of oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to determine the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6 y TNF-alpha in epithelial cell cultures treated with MTX. Epithelial cells of human larynx, obtained from the cell line Hep-2, were cultured with different doses of MTX during different incubation times. The drug cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of the colorimetric test, which is based on the metabolic reduction of the bromide of 3-(4, 5-dimetiltiazol-2-ilo)-2,5-difeniltetrazol (MTT); and the proinflammatory cytokines production by the test enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cultures of HEp-2 cells showed increased production of proinflammatory cytokines at 72 hours with 0.32 microM of MTX. These results suggest that depending on the dose and exposure time, MTX alters the physiology of human epithelial cells, which may play an important role during the phases of initiation and development of oral mucositis.

  16. Hyperoxia-induced signal transduction pathways in pulmonary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zaher, Tahereh E.; Miller, Edmund J.; Morrow, Dympna M. P.; Javdan, Mohammad; Mantell, Lin L.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia is necessary to treat critically ill patients. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia leads to the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause acute inflammatory lung injury. One of the major effects of hyperoxia is the injury and death of pulmonary epithelium, which is accompanied by increased levels of pulmonary proinflammatory cytokines and excessive leukocyte infiltration. A thorough understanding of the signaling pathways leading to pulmonary epithelial cell injury/death may provide some insights into the pathogenesis of hyperoxia-induced acute inflammatory lung injury. This review focuses on epithelial responses to hyperoxia and some of the major factors regulating pathways to epithelial cell injury/death, and proinflammatory responses upon exposure to hyperoxia. We discuss in detail some of the most interesting players, such as, NF-κB, that can modulate both proinflammatory responses and cell injury/death of lung epithelial cells. A better appreciation for the functions of these factors will no doubt help us to delineate the pathways to hyperoxic cell death and proinflammatory responses. PMID:17349918

  17. TMIGD1 is a novel adhesion molecule that protects epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Emad; Bondzie, Philip A; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Meyer, Rosana D; Hartsough, Edward; Henderson, Joel M; Schwartz, John H; Chitalia, Vipul; Rahimi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative damage to renal tubular epithelial cells is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism implicated in both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. Because epithelial cell survival influences the outcome of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, identifying its molecular regulators could provide new insight into pathobiology and possible new therapeutic strategies for these diseases. We have identified transmembrane and immunoglobulin domain-containing 1 (TMIGD1) as a novel adhesion molecule, which is highly conserved in humans and other species. TMIGD1 is expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells and promotes cell survival. The extracellular domain of TMIGD1 contains two putative immunoglobulin domains and mediates self-dimerization. Our data suggest that TMIGD1 regulates transepithelial electric resistance and permeability of renal epithelial cells. TMIGD1 controls cell migration, cell morphology, and protects renal epithelial cells from oxidative- and nutrient-deprivation-induced cell injury. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell injury downregulates TMIGD1 expression and targets it for ubiquitination. Moreover, TMIGD1 expression is significantly affected in both acute kidney injury and in deoxy-corticosterone acetate and sodium chloride (deoxy-corticosterone acetate salt)-induced chronic hypertensive kidney disease mouse models. Taken together, we have identified TMIGD1 as a novel cell adhesion molecule expressed in kidney epithelial cells that protects kidney epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury to promote cell survival.

  18. Ultrastructural Assessment of 2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide activity on human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; de Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Longato, Giovanna Barbarini; Padilha, Rafael José Ribeiro; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Brayner, Fábio André; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate ultrastructural changes induced by (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (APHCA) treatment on human breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells MCF-7, besides the evaluation of phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in treated cells. Cell viability analysis demonstrated concentration and time-manner cytotoxicity. Treated MCF-7 cells did not expose phosphatidylserine residues to the external plasma membrane surface and DNA fragmentation was not visualized by electrophoresis. Light microscopy showed compromised cell density and presence of vacuolization after APHCA treatment with 60μM. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed hallmarks of autophagy, namely the presence of membrane bebbling and autophagosomes, besides shrunken cells and cell debris in treated MCF-7 cells. However, more specific tests such as the quantification of mammalian autophagy proteins are necessary to determine the kind of death that is trigged by APHCA.

  19. AM251 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Tomoyo; Uwabe, Kenichiro; Naito, Shoichi; Higashino, Kenichi; Nakano, Toru; Numata, Yoshito; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular epithelial cells is one of the causative mechanisms of kidney fibrosis. In our study, we screened lipophilic compounds using a lipid library including approximately 200 lipids to identify those that suppressed EMT induced by a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulus. Initial screening was performed with the immortalized HK-2 renal tubule epithelial cell line. The most promising compounds were further tested in RPTEC primary renal tubule epithelial cells. We found that the synthetic lipid AM251 suppressed two hallmark events associated with EMT, the upregulation of collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) and downregulation of E-cadherin. Though AM251 is known to act as an antagonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and an agonist for the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GRP55), the suppression of EMT by AM251 was not mediated through either receptor. Microarray analyses revealed that AM251 inhibited induction of several EMT transcription factors such as SNAIL1, which is the key inducer of EMT, and the AP-1 transcription factors FOSB and JUNB. Activation of SMAD2/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was inhibited by AM251, with greater inhibition of the latter, indicating that AM251 acted upstream of SMAD/p38 MAPK in the TGF-β signaling pathway. Our findings regarding the effects of AM251 on the TGF-β signaling pathway may inform development of a novel therapeutic agent suppressing EMT, thus preventing kidney fibrosis.

  20. AM251 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Tomoyo; Uwabe, Kenichiro; Naito, Shoichi; Higashino, Kenichi; Nakano, Toru; Numata, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular epithelial cells is one of the causative mechanisms of kidney fibrosis. In our study, we screened lipophilic compounds using a lipid library including approximately 200 lipids to identify those that suppressed EMT induced by a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulus. Initial screening was performed with the immortalized HK-2 renal tubule epithelial cell line. The most promising compounds were further tested in RPTEC primary renal tubule epithelial cells. We found that the synthetic lipid AM251 suppressed two hallmark events associated with EMT, the upregulation of collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) and downregulation of E-cadherin. Though AM251 is known to act as an antagonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and an agonist for the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GRP55), the suppression of EMT by AM251 was not mediated through either receptor. Microarray analyses revealed that AM251 inhibited induction of several EMT transcription factors such as SNAIL1, which is the key inducer of EMT, and the AP-1 transcription factors FOSB and JUNB. Activation of SMAD2/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was inhibited by AM251, with greater inhibition of the latter, indicating that AM251 acted upstream of SMAD/p38 MAPK in the TGF-β signaling pathway. Our findings regarding the effects of AM251 on the TGF-β signaling pathway may inform development of a novel therapeutic agent suppressing EMT, thus preventing kidney fibrosis. PMID:27936102

  1. Immunomodulatory Effects of Psyllium Extract on Helicobacter pylori Interaction With Gastric Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Abbas, Zaigham; Tariq, Kanwal

    2016-10-01

    Natural plant product Psyllium has anti-inflammatory activity that can modulate the function of cytokines. We determined the effect of Psyllium husk extract on interleukin (IL)-8 and NF-κB secretion by gastric epithelial cells in response to Helicobacter pylori Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) cells were pretreated with Psyllium extract in different concentrations before H pylori infection. Cell culture supernatant was analyzed for IL-8 and NF-κB by ELISA. RNA from cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction for messenger RNA expression of IL-8. Psyllium extract 5 and 10 μg/mL markedly (P < .001) lowered basal IL-8 by 64.71% and 74.51%, respectively, and H pylori-stimulated IL-8 was also (P < .001) lowered by 41.67% and 66.67%, respectively. Psyllium 5 and 10 μg/mL also reduced (P < .0001) cagA-positive H pylori-induced IL-8 mRNA expression by 42.3% and 67.6%, respectively. Psyllium also reduced (P = .0001) NF-κB in response to H pylori strains confirming its role as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  2. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air–liquid interface and human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells grown as polarized monolayers were infected apically with RV. Transmigration of bacteria (nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and others) was assessed by colony counting and transmission electron microscopy. Transepithelial resistance (RT) was measured by using a voltmeter. The distribution of zona occludins (ZO)-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Measurements and Main Results: Epithelial cells infected with RV showed 2-log more bound bacteria than sham-infected cultures, and bacteria were recovered from the basolateral media of RV- but not sham-infected cells. Infection of polarized airway epithelial cell cultures with RV for 24 hours caused a significant decrease in RT without causing cell death or apoptosis. Ultraviolet-treated RV did not decrease RT, suggesting a requirement for viral replication. Reduced RT was associated with increased paracellular permeability, as determined by flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. Neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β reversed corresponding cytokine-induced reductions in RT but not that induced by RV, indicating that the RV effect is independent of these proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting revealed the loss of ZO-1 from tight junction complexes in RV-infected cells. Intranasal inoculation of mice with RV1B also caused the loss of ZO-1 from the bronchial epithelium tight junctions in vivo. Conclusions: RV facilitates binding, translocation, and persistence of bacteria by disrupting airway epithelial barrier function. PMID:18787220

  3. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  4. Cadmium induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Pierpaolo; Carmignani, Marco; Volpe, Anna Rita; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Claudio, Luigi; Waalkes, Michael P; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Tokar, Erik J; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium, a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern, is a known human carcinogen. The prostate is a potential target for cadmium carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, cadmium may induce cell death by apoptosis in various cell types, and it has been hypothesized that a key factor in cadmium-induced malignant transformation is acquisition of apoptotic resistance. We investigated the in vitro effects produced by cadmium exposure in normal or tumor cells derived from human prostate epithelium, including RWPE-1 and its cadmium-transformed derivative CTPE, the primary adenocarcinoma 22Rv1 and CWR-R1 cells and LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 metastatic cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 24 hours with different concentrations of CdCl(2) and apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and expression of tumor suppressor proteins were analyzed. Subsequently, cellular response to cadmium was evaluated after siRNA-mediated p53 silencing in wild type p53-expressing RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, and after adenoviral p53 overexpression in p53-deficient DU145 and PC-3 cell lines. The cell lines exhibited different sensitivity to cadmium, and 24-hour exposure to different CdCl(2) concentrations induced dose- and cell type-dependent apoptotic response and inhibition of cell proliferation that correlated with accumulation of functional p53 and overexpression of p21 in wild type p53-expressing cell lines. On the other hand, p53 silencing was able to suppress cadmium-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cadmium can induce p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells and suggest p53 mutation as a possible contributing factor for the acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium prostatic carcinogenesis.

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  7. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is essential for prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqi; Balli, David; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Fulford, Logan; Hiller, Andrea; Misetic, Vinko; Zhang, Yufang; Paluch, Andrew M; Waltz, Susan E; Kasper, Susan; Kalin, Tanya V

    2013-08-02

    The treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenge. Identification of new molecular mechanisms that regulate PCa initiation and progression would provide targets for the development of new cancer treatments. The Foxm1 transcription factor is highly up-regulated in tumor cells, inflammatory cells, and cells of tumor microenvironment. However, its functions in different cell populations of PCa lesions are unknown. To determine the role of Foxm1 in tumor cells during PCa development, we generated two novel transgenic mouse models, one exhibiting Foxm1 gain-of-function and one exhibiting Foxm1 loss-of-function under control of the prostate epithelial-specific Probasin promoter. In the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of PCa that uses SV40 large T antigen to induce PCa, loss of Foxm1 decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Decreased prostate tumorigenesis was associated with a decrease in tumor cell proliferation and the down-regulation of genes critical for cell proliferation and tumor metastasis, including Cdc25b, Cyclin B1, Plk-1, Lox, and Versican. In addition, tumor-associated angiogenesis was decreased, coinciding with reduced Vegf-A expression. The mRNA and protein levels of 11β-Hsd2, an enzyme playing an important role in tumor cell proliferation, were down-regulated in Foxm1-deficient PCa tumors in vivo and in Foxm1-depleted TRAMP C2 cells in vitro. Foxm1 bound to, and increased transcriptional activity of, the mouse 11β-Hsd2 promoter through the -892/-879 region, indicating that 11β-Hsd2 was a direct transcriptional target of Foxm1. Without TRAMP, overexpression of Foxm1 either alone or in combination with inhibition of a p19(ARF) tumor suppressor caused a robust epithelial hyperplasia, but was insufficient to induce progression from hyperplasia to PCa. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is critical for prostate carcinogenesis, suggesting that inhibition of Foxm1 is a promising therapeutic approach for

  8. Rapamycin Prolongs the Survival of Corneal Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gidfar, Sanaz; Milani, Farnoud Y.; Milani, Behrad Y.; Shen, Xiang; Eslani, Medi; Putra, Ilham; Huvard, Michael J.; Sagha, Hossein; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2017-01-01

    Rapamycin has previously been shown to have anti-aging effects in cells and organisms. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of rapamycin on primary human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation and cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of differentiation markers was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-Galactosidase staining and by Western blot analysis of p16. Apoptosis was evaluated by a TUNEL assay. The results demonstrated that primary HCEC treated with rapamycin had lower proliferation but considerably longer survival in vitro. Rapamycin-treated cells maintained a higher capacity to proliferate after removal of rapamycin and expressed more keratin 14, N-Cadherin, DeltaNp63 and ABCG2, and less keratin 12, consistent with their less differentiated state. Rapamycin treated cells demonstrated less senescence by X-β-Gal SA staining and by lower expression of p16. Apoptosis was also lower in the rapamycin treated cells. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment of HCEC prevents the loss of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells to replicative senescence and apoptosis. Rapamycin may be a useful additive for ex vivo expansion of corneal epithelial cells. PMID:28054657

  9. Cell associated urokinase activity and colonic epithelial cells in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Doe, W F

    1991-01-01

    It is not known if urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is associated with normal colonic epithelial cells. The aims of this study were to determine if normal colonic epithelial cells have uPA activity and whether this is concentrated at the cell membrane. In addition, the contribution of colonic epithelial cell associated uPA activity to disease related pertubations of mucosal uPA activity were examined. A highly enriched population of colonic epithelial cells was isolated from resected colon or biopsy specimens by an enzymatic technique. uPA activity was measured in cell homogenates by a specific and sensitive colorimetric method and expressed relative to cellular DNA. In two experiments subcellular fractionation of colonic epithelial cells was performed by nitrogen cavitation followed by ultracentrifugation over a linear sucrose gradient. The fractions collected were analysed for uPA and organelle-specific enzyme activities. Normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity (mean (SEM) 5.6 (1.1) IU/mg, n = 18). This colocalised with fractions enriched for leucine-beta-naphthylamidase and 5'-nucleotidase, markers of plasma membrane. uPA activities in epithelial cells from cancerous colons (9.8 (3.1) n = 7) or from mucosa affected by inflammatory bowel disease (3.8 (0.7) n = 15) were not significantly different from normal (paired t test), while that in epithelial cells from greatly inflamed mucosa was similar to that from autologous normal or mildly inflamed areas (4.4 (1.2) v 5.9 (3.6), n = 9). Thus normal colonic epithelial cells have cell associated uPA activity which is concentrated on the plasma membranes, suggesting the presence of uPA receptors. Increased mucosal levels of uPA previously reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are not due to increased colonic epithelial cell associated uPA. PMID:1650741

  10. Modulation of Candida albicans attachment to human epithelial cells by bacteria and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, A; Davis, C P; Cohen, M S; Warren, M M

    1983-01-01

    The effects of carbohydrates (mannose and dextrose). Escherichia coli 07KL. and Klebsiella pneumoniae on Candida albicans attachment to epithelial cells was studied. Dextrose had no effect on yeast attachment to epithelial cells. Conversely, mannose significantly decreased both yeast and piliated bacterial attachment (E. coli 07KL, heavily piliated K. pneumoniae) whereas having no effect on nonpiliated K. pneumoniae attachment to epithelial cells. The number of yeasts attaching to epithelial cells was enhanced by preincubation of epithelial cells with piliated strains of bacteria, whereas preincubation with nonpiliated strains of bacteria had no effect on yeast attachment. Scanning electron microscopy showed that piliated bacteria and yeasts were juxtaposed on the epithelial cell surface. These data suggest that certain piliated strains of bacteria can enhance C. albicans attachment to epithelial cells and that type 1 pili of bacteria can be a factor in the enhanced attachment of C. albicans to epithelial cells. Images PMID:6132878

  11. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  12. Downregulation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 7A1 expression is important in enhancing cell proliferation in adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nawneet; Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Dubey, Ravi C; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-22

    Mitochondrial Dysfunction has been implicated in multiple human diseases, including cancer. Among all cancer, lung cancer is the most common type of cancer worldwide with low survival rates. Mammals possess multiple subunits of the mitochondrial enzyme Cytochrome C oxidase (COX). The COX subunits are expressed in a tissue specific manner and have been implicated in cancer cell metabolism although their molecular and regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. In this study, we aimed at identifying novel gene signatures in lung cancer. We performed extensive analysis of seven different Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets pertaining to different stages of lung adenocarcinoma and identified that multiple subunits of COX genes are differentially expressed in these patients. Amongst all COX genes, the expression of COX7A1 gene was observed to be highly down regulated in these patients. In order to validate the GEO datasets, we looked at the expression of multiple COX genes using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Our results confirmed that COX 7A1 gene expression was indeed highly reduced in these cells. Overexpression of COX7A1 in human lung cancer cells led to inhibition of cell proliferation and increase in cell death via apoptosis. These results indicated that low level of COX7A1 gene expression is essential to regulate cell viability and inhibit cell death in lung adenocarcinoma. Our study has identified COX7A1 as a novel gene that might play a crucial role in the etiology of lung adenocarcinoma and can serve as a biomarker for lung cancer disease progression.

  13. Different muscarinc receptors are involved in the proliferation of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Español, Alejandro J; Sales, María E

    2004-02-01

    We described that two different murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines, LM3 and LM2 constitutively expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchR). We here demonstrate, by competitive binding experiments with the tritiated muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate that M2 subtype predominates in both tumor cell lines. Concordantly immunoblotting assays indicate that mAchR exhibit the following order of expression: M2 > M4 > M3 > M1 > M5 in both tumor cell lines. Activation of mAchR with carbachol (CARB) increased proliferation in both tumor cell lines in a concentration dependent manner. In LM3 cells CARB promoted proliferation via M3 receptor activation via inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and nitric oxide production. CARB-induced LM2 cells proliferation needed both M2 and M1 receptor activation, promoting prostaglandin E2 liberation and arginase catabolism respectively, both of them involved in tumor cell growth.

  14. A novel closed cell culture device for fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Moriya, Noboru; Mizutani, Manabu; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-11-01

    Automation technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering would need to optimize the cell sheet fabrication process, stabilize cell sheet quality and reduce biological contamination risks. Biological contamination must be avoided in clinical settings. A closed culture system provides a solution for this. In the present study, we developed a closed culture device called a cell cartridge, to be used in a closed cell culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured on the surface of a porous membrane with 3T3 feeder cells, which are separate from the epithelial cells in the cell cartridges and in the cell-culture inserts as a control. To fabricate the stratified cell sheets, five different thicknesses of the membranes which were welded to the cell cartridge, were examined. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated in cell cartridges that were welded to a 25 µm-thick gas-permeable membrane, which was similar to the results with the cell-culture inserts. However, stratification of corneal epithelial cell sheets did not occur with cell cartridges that were welded to 100-300 µm-thick gas-permeable membranes. The fabricated cell sheets were evaluated by histological analyses to examine the expression of corneal epithelial-specific markers. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that a putative stem cell marker, p63, a corneal epithelial differentiation maker, CK3, and a barrier function marker, Claudin-1, were expressed in the appropriate position in the cell sheets. These results suggest that the cell cartridge is effective for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets.

  15. Combined neuroendocrine cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Tajiri, Takashi; Akimaru, Koho; Arima, Yasuo; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Naito, Zenya

    2006-04-01

    A 58-year-old man with a chief complaint of epigastralgia was admitted to our hospital. Physical examination disclosed a large, firm mass in the right hypochondrium. Abdominal computed tomography confirmed thickening of the gallbladder wall and a 15 x 8 cm mass occupying almost all of the right lobe and medial segment of the liver. With a preoperative diagnosis of malignant gallbladder tumor infiltrating the liver, right hepatic trisegmentectomy was performed. Histopathologic examination showed atypical cells with small round to oval nuclei and sparse eosinophilic cytoplasm, proliferating in a solid and focal nesting pattern. Near this small cell proliferation was a focus of tubular adenocarcinoma that showed a zone of transition from the small cell neuroendocrine pattern. The small cells demonstrated immunohistochemical reactivity for chromogranin A. Electron microscopy disclosed neurosecretory granules 150 nm in diameter, representing dense round core vesicles, confirming a neuroendocrine cell lineage. The patient was diagnosed with neuroendocrine cell carcinoma combined with adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. Tumor recurrence became evident 3 months after surgery, and he died 4 months after surgery.

  16. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis decreased invasion, suggesting the absence of a preformed pool of proteins involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Inhibition of bacterial and eukaryotic energy synthesis also decreased invasion, confirming that A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion is an active process. Bacterial adherence to KB cells was indicated by scanning electron microscopy of infected KB cells. Further, the addition of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific serum to the bacterial inoculum reduced invasion substantially, suggesting a role for bacterial attachment in invasion. Many of the adherent bacteria invaded the epithelial cells under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibited invasion by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Like that of many facultatively intracellular bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion was not affected by eukaryotic endosomal acidification. These are the first published observations describing the requirements for epithelial cell invasion by a periodontopathogen. They demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans utilizes a mechanism similar to those used by many but not all invasive bacteria to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8454326

  17. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  18. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: Response to toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.H.; LaMontagne, A.D.; Petito, C.T.; Rong, Xianhui )

    1989-03-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAmP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents.

  19. Keratin cytoskeletons in epithelial cells of internal organs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tung-Tien; Shih, Chiaho; Green, Howard

    1979-01-01

    An antiserum against human epidermal keratins was used to detect keratins in frozen sections of various rabbit and human tissues by indirect immunofluorescence. Strong staining was observed in all stratified squamous epithelia (epidermis, cornea, conjunctiva, tongue, esophagus, vagina, and anus), in epidermal appendages (hair follicle, sebaceous gland, ductal and myoepithelial cells of sweat glands), as well as in Hassall's corpuscles of the thymus, indicating that all contain abundant keratins. No staining by the antiserum was observed in fibroblasts, muscle of any type, cartilage, blood vessel, nerve tissue, iris or lens epithelium, or the glomerular or tubular cells of the kidney. In contrast, the antiserum stained the cells of most epithelia of the intestinal tract, urinary tract (urethra, bladder, ureter, collecting ducts of kidney), female genital tract (cervix, cervical glands, uterus, and oviduct), and respiratory tract (trachea and bronchi). Epithelial cells of the fine ductal system in the pancreas and submaxillary gland also stained well. When primary cultures of epithelial cells derived from bladder, intestine, kidney, and trachea were grown on glass coverslips and stained with anti-keratin, fiber networks similar to those of cultured keratinocytes were observed. These results show that keratins constitute a cytoskeleton in epithelial cells of diverse morphology and embryological origin. The stability of keratin filaments probably confers the structural strength necessary for cells covering a free surface. Keratin staining can be used to obtain information about the origin of cell lines. Images PMID:111242

  20. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor stimulation in human colonic epithelial cells induces intracellular calcium oscillations and proliferation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rey, Osvaldo; Young, Steven H; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Moyer, Mary P; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    The extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) is increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions in the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. However, the signaling mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. Here we examined signaling pathways activated by the CaR, including Ca(2+) oscillations, in individual human colon epithelial cells. Single cell imaging of colon-derived cells expressing the CaR, including SW-480, HT-29, and NCM-460 cells, shows that stimulation of this receptor by addition of aromatic amino acids or by an elevation of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration promoted striking intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to extracellular Ca(2+) were of sinusoidal pattern and mediated by the phospholipase C/diacylglycerol/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway as revealed by a biosensor that detects the accumulation of diacylglycerol in the plasma membrane. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to aromatic amino acids were of transient type, that is, Ca(2+) spikes that returned to baseline levels, and required an intact actin cytoskeleton, a functional Rho, Filamin A and the ion channel TRPC1. Further analysis showed that re-expression and stimulation of the CaR in human epithelial cells derived from normal colon and from colorectal adenocarcinoma inhibits their proliferation. This inhibition was associated with the activation of the signaling pathway that mediates the generation of sinusoidal, but not transient, intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. Thus, these results indicate that the CaR can function in two signaling modes in human colonic epithelial cells offering a potential link between gastrointestinal responses and food/nutrients uptake and metabolism.

  1. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  2. Cytotoxic Effect of Lipophilic Bismuth Dimercaptopropanol Nanoparticles on Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; Badireddy, Appala Raju; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Francisco, Contreras-Cordero Juan; Israel, Martinez-Gonzalez Gustavo; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Chellam, Shankararaman; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles have many interesting properties to be applied in biomedical and medicinal sectors, however their safety in humans have not been comprehensively investigated. The objective of this research was to determine the cytotoxic effect of bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles (BisBAL NPs) on epithelial cells. The nanoparticles are composed of 18.7 nm crystallites on average and have a rhombohedral structure, agglomerating into chains-like or clusters of small nanoparticles. Based on MTT viability assay and fluorescence microscopy, cytotoxicity was not observed on monkey kidney cells after growing with 5 µM of BisBAL NPs for 24 h. Employing same techniques, identical results were obtained with human epithelial cells (HeLa), showing a not strain-dependent phenomenon. The absence of toxic effects on epithelial cells growing with BisBAL NPs was corroborated with long-time experiments (24-72 hrs.), showing no difference in comparison with growing control (cells without nanoparticles). Further, genotoxicity assays, comet assay and fluorescent microscopy and electrophoresis in bromide-stained agarose gel revealed no damage to genomic DNA of MA104 cells after 24 h. of exposition to BisBAL NPs. Finally, the effect of bismuth nanoparticles on protein synthesis was studied in cells growing with BisBAL NPs for 24 h. SDS-PAGE assays showed no difference between treated and untreated cells, suggesting that BisBAL NPs did not interfere with protein synthesis. Hence BisBAL NPs do not appear to exert cytotoxic effects suggesting their biological compatibility with epithelial cells.

  3. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  4. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene delivery in pancreatic tumors

  5. Interleukin-22 promotes intestinal-stem-cell-mediated epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, Caroline A; Calafiore, Marco; Mertelsmann, Anna M; O'Connor, Margaret H; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F; Smith, Odette M; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas E; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E; Shroyer, Noah F; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hanash, Alan M

    2015-12-24

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Using ex vivo organoid cultures, here we show that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury, increase the growth of mouse small intestine organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both mouse and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in Lgr5(+) ISCs, and STAT3 was crucial for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation enhanced the recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft-versus-host disease. ATOH1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independently of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support the intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration.

  6. Bax is not involved in the resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-wei; Wang, Zhi-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a natural plant polyphenol widely present in foods such as grapes, wine, and peanuts. Previous studies indicate that RV has an ability to inhibit various stages of carcinogenesis and eliminate preneoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell. In this report, we analyzed whether Bax translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria during RV-induced apoptosis in single living cell using onfocal microscopey. Cells were transfected with GFP-Bax plasmid. Cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibition of RV on the cells viability. Apoptotic activity of RV was detected by Hoechst 33258 and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Our results showed that RV induced a dose-dependent apoptosis in which Bax did not translocate to mitochondrias.

  7. Directed differentiation of airway epithelial cells of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The ability to generate lung and airway epithelial cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) would have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening, and studies of human lung development. In this research, hBMSCs were cultured in specialized airway epithelial cell growth media for differentiation of airway epithelial cells, including keratinocyte growth factor transferrin, bovine pituitary extract, epinephrine, triiodothyronine and retinoic acid. The surfactant protein C, a specific marker of type II pneumocytes, and its corresponding protein were demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting after differentiation of airway epithelial cells, respectively. These cells were then transferred into an induced acute lung injury model. The results showed that the hBMSCs could induce differentiation in airway epithelial cells under the special conditions of the medium, the result for surfactant protein C was positive in differentiated airway epithelial cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting, and these cells were successfully colonized in the injured lung airway. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of airway epithelial cells can be specifically generated from hBMSCs and that induced cells may be allowed to participate in tissue repair.

  8. COMPARISON OF PM-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES BETWEEN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS AND NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS IN HUMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have linked exposures to particulate matter (PM) and increased pulmonary mortality and morbidity. Bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) are the primary target of PM. PM exposure induces a wide array of biological responses in BEC. Primary human BEC, however, need...

  9. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  10. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Therapeutic effects of sorafenib on the A549/DDP human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Qi; Wang, Yu-Lan; Li, Zhi-Ying; Lin, Ting-Yan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of sorafenib on the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells cultured in vitro. The A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cell strain was cultured in vitro, the cell culture group incubated in culture medium only was set as the control group (Group S0) and the four concentration gradients of sorafenib were added to the culture groups as the experimental groups: S1, 2 µmol/l; S2, 4 µmol/l; S3, 8 µmol/l; and S4, 16 µmol/l. The MTT assay was used to determine the growth inhibition rate of the cells, which were respectively subjected to sorafenib treatment for 24, 48 and 72 h. Flow cytometry was used to determine the rate of apoptosis of cells in each group following sorafenib treatment for 72 h. Furthermore, the Transwell invasion experiment was used to determine the effect on A549/DDP cell invasion following sorafenib treatment for 24 h. Based on the MTT assay, it was found that the inhibition rates of A549/DDP cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells in groups S1-4 following sorafenib treatment for 24 h were 4.58±2.82, 14.93±2.62, 37.58±7.13 and 58.39±8.15%, respectively. For 48 h, inhibition rates in S1-4 were 14.98±2.93, 26.28±7.31, 63.00±3.05 and 78.84±3.96%, respectively, and for 72 h, inhibition rates were 18.80±2.82, 32.71±2.55, 75.51±4.73 and 87.50±3.36%, respectively. The difference in the inhibition rates of cells among the experimental groups for the same incubation time showed statistical significance (P<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the rate of apoptosis in the control group was 8.88±0.81% following sorafenib treatment for 72 h, and the rates of apoptosis in groups S1-4 were, 12.84±0.24, 17.27±0.78, 21.98±0.75 and 49.67±1.38%, respectively. The rate of apoptosis in each experimental group was higher compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). The difference in the rate of apoptosis

  13. Concise review: limbal epithelial stem cell therapy: controversies and challenges.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Anna R; Daniels, Julie T

    2011-12-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are a population of stem cells responsible for maintenance and repair of the corneal surface. Injury and disease can result in a deficiency of these stem cells, the vision affecting condition called limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) in which the cornea becomes opaque, vascularized, and inflamed. Cultured LESC therapy was first described in 1997;29:19231932-19231932.and LESCs cultured from either patients or donors have been used to successfully treat LSCD. In this review, some of the challenges and controversies associated with cultured LESC therapy will be discussed including alternative stem cell sources.

  14. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    consisting of the proteins Rsu1, Integrin Linked Kinase (ILK), PINCH, and Parvin. The correct association of these proteins in a functional complex...impacting integrin function and actin polymerization. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Wound healing, cell migration, protein kinase C, protein kinase A 16. SECURITY...epithelial cell migration in wound healing. In addition, the correct association of these proteins in a functional complex depends on their phosphorylation

  15. Ultraviolet Irradiation-Induced Volume Alteration of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study is to understand how extracellular stresses, such as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, affect corneal epithelial cells. Cell volume changes, damage to corneal epithelial integrity, and cellular responses were assessed after exposure to UVC stresses. Methods Primary human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells were exposed to UVC light in culture conditions. Ultraviolet C irradiation–induced changes in cell size and volume were measured by real-time microscopy and self-quenching of the fluorescent dye calcein, respectively. The effects of UVC irradiation on Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and FAK-dependent integrin signaling were detected by ELISA, immunoblotting, and immunostaining. Results Ultraviolet C irradiation induced both size and volume shifts in human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells. Ultraviolet C irradiation-induced decrease of cell volume elicited activation of Src and FAK, characterized by increased phosphorylations of SrcY416, FAKY397, and FAKY925. In addition, immunostaining studies showed UVC irradiation–induced increases in phosphorylation of FAK and formation of integrin β5 clustering. Application of Kv channel blockers, including 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), α-DTX, and depressing substance-1 (BDS-1), effectively suppressed UVC irradiation–induced cell volume changes, and subsequently inhibited UVC irradiation–induced phosphorylation of Src/FAK, and formation of integrin β5 clustering, suggesting UVC irradiation–induced volume changes and Src/FAK activation. Hyperosmotic pressure–induced volume decreases were measured in comparison with effects of UVC irradiation on volume and Src/FAK activation. However, Kv channel blocker, 4-AP, had no effect on hyperosmotic pressure–induced responses. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that UVC irradiation–induced decreases in cell volume lead to Src/FAK activation due to a rapid loss of K ions through membrane Kv channels. PMID:27978555

  16. Limbal Stromal Tissue Specific Stem Cells and Their Differentiation Potential to Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-01-01

    From the derivation of the first human embryonic stem (hES) cell line to the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells; it has become evident that tissue specific stem cells are able to differentiate into a specific somatic cell types. The understanding of key processes such as the signaling pathways and the role of the microenvironment in epidermal/epithelial development has provided important clues for the derivation of specific epithelial cell types.Various differentiation protocols/methods were used to attain specific epithelial cell types. Here, we describe in detail the procedure to follow for isolation of tissue specific stem cells, mimicking their microenvironment to attain stem cell characteristics, and their potential differentiation to corneal epithelial cells.

  17. Review: Corneal epithelial stem cells, their niche and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells emerged as a concept during the second half of 19th century, first as a theoretical entity, but then became one of the most promising research fields in cell biology. This work describes the most important characteristics of adult stem cells, including the experimental criteria used to identify them, and discusses current knowledge that led to the proposal that stem cells existed in different parts of the eye, such as the retina, lens, conjunctiva, corneal stroma, Descemet’s membrane, and the subject of this review: the corneal epithelium. Evidence includes results that support the presence of corneal epithelial stem cells at the limbus, as well as the major obstacles to isolating them as pure cell populations. Part of this review describes the variation in the basement membrane composition between the limbus and the central cornea, to show the importance of the corneal stem cell niche, its structure, and the participation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in regulating corneal stem cell compartment. Results obtained by various laboratories suggest that the extracellular matrix plays a central role in regulating stem cell commitment, corneal differentiation, and participation in corneal wound healing, in addition to other environmental signals such as cytokines and growth factors. The niche could define cell division patterns in corneal stem cell populations, establishing whether stem cells divide asymmetrically or symmetrically. Characterization and understanding of the factors that regulate corneal epithelial stem cells should open up new paths for developing new therapies and strategies for accelerating and improving corneal wound healing. PMID:23901244

  18. Immunohistochemical Markers Distinguishing Cholangiocellular Carcinoma (CCC) from Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) Discovered by Proteomic Analysis of Microdissected Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Kälsch, Julia; Bertram, Stefanie; Megger, Dominik A.; Bracht, Thilo; Eisenacher, Martin; Kocabayoglu, Peri; Meyer, Helmut E.; Sipos, Bence; Baba, Hideo A.; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are two highly aggressive cancer types that arise from epithelial cells of the pancreatobiliary system. Owing to their histological and morphological similarity, differential diagnosis between CCC and metastasis of PDAC located in the liver frequently proves an unsolvable issue for pathologists. The detection of biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity for the differentiation of these tumor types would therefore be a valuable tool. Here, we address this problem by comparing microdissected CCC and PDAC tumor cells from nine and eleven cancer patients, respectively, in a label-free proteomics approach. The novel biomarker candidates were subsequently verified by immunohistochemical staining of 73 CCC, 78 primary, and 18 metastatic PDAC tissue sections. In the proteome analysis, we found 180 proteins with a significantly differential expression between CCC and PDAC cells (p value < 0.05, absolute fold change > 2). Nine candidate proteins were chosen for an immunohistochemical verification out of which three showed very promising results. These were the annexins ANXA1, ANXA10, and ANXA13. For the correct classification of PDAC, ANXA1 showed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% and ANXA10 a sensitivity of 90% at a specificity of 66%. ANXA13 was higher abundant in CCC. It presented a sensitivity of 84% at a specificity of 55%. In metastatic PDAC tissue ANXA1 and ANXA10 showed similar staining behavior as in the primary PDAC tumors (13/18 and 17/18 positive, respectively). ANXA13, however, presented positive staining in eight out of eighteen secondary PDAC tumors and was therefore not suitable for the differentiation of these from CCC. We conclude that ANXA1 and ANXA10 are promising biomarker candidates with high diagnostic values for the differential diagnosis of intrahepatic CCC and metastatic liver tumors deriving from PDAC. PMID:26644413

  19. Established thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cell-like cell lines differentiate into mature thymic epithelial cells and support T cell development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhan, Yu; Su, Juanjuan; Du, Yarui; Xu, Guoliang; Shi, Yufang; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Zhang, Xiaoren

    2013-01-01

    Common thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cells (TEPCs) differentiate into cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs), which are required for the development and selection of thymocytes. Mature TEC lines have been widely established. However, the establishment of TEPC lines is rarely reported. Here we describe the establishment of thymic epithelial stomal cell lines, named TSCs, from fetal thymus. TSCs express some of the markers present on tissue progenitor/stem cells such as Sca-1. Gene expression profiling verifies the thymic identity of TSCs. RANK stimulation of these cells induces expression of autoimmune regulator (Aire) and Aire-dependent tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in TSCs in vitro. TSCs could be differentiated into medullary thymic epithelial cell-like cells with exogenously expressed NF-κB subunits RelB and p52. Importantly, upon transplantation under the kidney capsules of nude mice, TSCs are able to differentiate into mature TEC-like cells that can support some limited development of T cells in vivo. These findings suggest that the TSC lines we established bear some characteristics of TEPC cells and are able to differentiate into functional TEC-like cells in vitro and in vivo. The cloned TEPC-like cell lines may provide useful tools to study the differentiation of mature TEC cells from precursors.

  20. In vitro methods to culture primary human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Sun, Yu Jia

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that much like leukemia, breast tumors are maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells are envisaged to be responsible for tumor formation and relapse. Therefore, knowledge about their nature will provide a platform to develop therapies to eliminate these breast cancer stem cells. This concept highlights the need to understand the mechanisms that regulate the normal functions of the breast stem cells and their immediate progeny as alterations to these same mechanisms can cause these primitive cells to act as cancer stem cells. The study of the primitive cell functions relies on the ability to isolate them from primary sources of breast tissue. This chapter describes processing of discarded tissue from reduction mammoplasty samples as sources of normal primary human breast epithelial cells and describes cell culture systems to grow single-cell suspensions prepared from these reduction samples in vitro.

  1. Microtubule organization is determined by the shape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan Manuel; Chumakova, Lyubov; Bulgakova, Natalia A.; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interphase microtubule organization is critical for cell function and tissue architecture. In general, physical mechanisms are sufficient to drive microtubule organization in single cells, whereas cells within tissues are thought to utilize signalling mechanisms. By improving the imaging and quantitation of microtubule alignment within developing Drosophila embryos, here we demonstrate that microtubule alignment underneath the apical surface of epithelial cells follows cell shape. During development, epidermal cell elongation and microtubule alignment occur simultaneously, but by perturbing cell shape, we discover that microtubule organization responds to cell shape, rather than the converse. A simple set of microtubule behaviour rules is sufficient for a computer model to mimic the observed responses to changes in cell surface geometry. Moreover, we show that microtubules colliding with cell boundaries zip-up or depolymerize in an angle-dependent manner, as predicted by the model. Finally, we show microtubule alignment responds to cell shape in diverse epithelia. PMID:27779189

  2. Sulforaphane‐induced apoptosis in Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell line XWLC‐05

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lan; Yao, Qian; Huang, Yun‐chao; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Chuan‐qiong; Fan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Xuanwei district in Yunnan Province has the highest incidence of lung cancer in China, especially among non‐smoking women. Cruciferous vegetables can reduce lung cancer risk by prompting a protective mechanism against respiratory tract inflammation caused by air pollution, and are rich in sulforaphane, which can induce changes in gene expression. We investigated the effect of sulforaphane‐induced apoptosis in Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell line (XWCL‐05) to explore the value of sulforaphane in lung cancer prevention and treatment. Methods Cell growth inhibition was determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay; cell morphology and apoptosis were observed under transmission electron microscope; cell cycle and apoptosis rates were detected using flow cytometry; B‐cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‐2) and Bcl‐2‐like protein 4 (Bax) messenger RNA expression were determined by quantitative PCR; and p53, p73, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), Bax, Bcl‐2, and caspase‐9 protein expression were detected by Western blotting. Results Sulforaphane inhibited XWLC‐05 cell growth with inhibitory concentration (IC)50 of 4.04, 3.38, and 3.02 μg/mL at 24, 48, and 72 hours, respectively. Sulforaphane affected the XWLC‐05 cell cycle as cells accumulated in the G2/M phase. The proportion of apoptotic cells observed was 27.6%. Compared with the control, the sulforaphane group showed decreased Bcl‐2 and p53 expression, and significantly increased p73, PUMA, Bax, and caspase‐9 protein expression (P < 0.05). Conclusion Sulforaphane induces Xuanwei lung adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis. Its possible mechanism may involve the upregulation of p73 expression and its effector target genes PUMA and Bax in lung cancer cells, downregulation of the anti‐apoptotic gene B cl ‐2, and activation of caspase‐9. It may also involve downregulation of the mutant p53 protein. PMID:27878984

  3. Type II alveolar epithelial cell in vitro culture in aerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1988-08-01

    A method of Type II alveolar epithelial cell culture in aerobiosis has been developed. Isolation of Type II cells was performed by digesting guinea-pig lung tissue with crude trypsin and elastase and using discontinuous Percoll density gradients. The Type II cells, as identified by light and electron microscopy, were cultured in aerobiosis for up to six days, in direct contact with the atmosphere in conditions mimicking those present in the lower respiratory tract. Significant activities of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), manganese dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found at the time of isolation. In contrast, cell glutathione content varied widely from one experiment to another. Changes of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated during cell culture in aerobiosis. SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase were significantly decreased after three days but were not significantly different between a three day and six day culture. Antioxidant changes did not influence the cell culture. In marked contrast, decrease in cell glutathione was associated with rapid cell death, whereas good cell survival was obtained at high levels of cell glutathione. Cell culture in aerobiosis will permit a precise evaluation of the effects of gases, particularly oxidant gases, on a primary culture of Type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  4. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles activate IL8-related inflammatory pathways in human colonic epithelial Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Kristin; Cossais, François; Neve, Horst; Klempt, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are widely used as food additive or coating material in products of the food and pharmaceutical industry. Studies on various cell lines have shown that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) induced the inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. However, the influences of TiO2 NPs' exposure on inflammatory pathways in intestinal epithelial cells and their differentiation have not been investigated so far. This study demonstrates that TiO2 NPs with particle sizes ranging between 5 and 10 nm do not affect enterocyte differentiation but cause an activation of inflammatory pathways in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. 5 and 10 nm NPs' exposures transiently induce the expression of ICAM1, CCL20, COX2 and IL8, as determined by quantitative PCR, whereas larger particles (490 nm) do not. Further, using nuclear factor (NF)-κB reporter gene assays, we show that NP-induced IL8 mRNA expression occurs, in part, through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  5. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin occurs commonly in the epithelial cells of juvenile polyps.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Michiko; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Carethers, John M; Doctolero, Ryan; Tajima, Akihiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Franklin, Wilbur A; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2005-01-01

    In the two conditions juvenile polyps (JPs) and juvenile polyposis coli (JPC), colonic polyps may have overlapping histologic and phenotypic appearance, but JPC confers a significant risk for colon adenocarcinoma. Although not thought to contain adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations, the status of beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs is not known. We evaluated beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs from children with JPs and JPC. Cases were identified through endoscopic procedure records. Immunohistochemistry was performed for beta-catenin and full-length APC protein. Loss of heterozygosity at the APC gene locus on chromosome 5 was assessed using two APC-linked microsatellite markers. Polyp and normal colonic tissue were analyzed from 36 children with JPs and 9 with JPC. Both APC and beta-catenin immunoreactivity were present in epithelial cells from all samples but in different patterns. In all normal colon and polyp samples, APC expression was cytoplasmic with maximal immunoreactivity in the goblet cells. In contrast, beta-catenin immunoreactivity in epithelial cells was limited to the plasma membrane in normal colon but was both cytoplasmic and nuclear in all 45 JPs. No evidence of APC gene loss of heterozygosity was found. In polyps from children with JPs and JPC, nuclear beta-catenin accumulation is a consistent feature, and it is not due to APC gene mutation or loss of full-length APC protein expression. Thus, beta-catenin accumulation may be intrinsic to the formation of juvenile-type polyps through an as-yet-undefined mechanism.

  6. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wu; Bai, Lin; Dai, Lyu-Xia; He, Xu; Zhou, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions. Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations. In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19. Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33 and 17p13.1-13.3. And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG). Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. PMID:26879013

  7. Crinane alkaloids of the amaryllidaceae with cytotoxic effects in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastida, Jaume; Cheesman, Lee; van Staden, Johannes

    2014-04-01

    The family Amaryllidaceae has a long history of usage in the traditional medicinal practices of the indigenous peoples of South Africa, with three of its species known to be used for cancer treatment. Furthermore, the Amaryllidaceae is widely recognized for its unique alkaloid constituents, several of which exhibit potent and selective cytotoxic activities. In this study, several crinane alkaloids derived from local Amaryllidaceae species were examined for cytotoxic effects against the human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line, of which distichamine was the most potent (IC50 2.2 microM).

  8. Molecular mechanisms of membrane polarity in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Campo, C; Mason, A; Maouyo, D; Olsen, O; Yoo, D; Welling, P A

    2005-01-01

    Exciting discoveries in the last decade have cast light onto the fundamental mechanisms that underlie polarized trafficking in epithelial cells. It is now clear that epithelial cell membrane asymmetry is achieved by a combination of intracellular sorting operations, vectorial delivery mechanisms and plasmalemma-specific fusion and retention processes. Several well-defined signals that specify polarized segregation, sorting, or retention processes have, now, been described in a number of proteins. The intracellular machineries that decode and act on these signals are beginning to be described. In addition, the nature of the molecules that associate with intracellular trafficking vesicles to coordinate polarized delivery, tethering, docking, and fusion are also becoming understood. Combined with direct visualization of polarized sorting processes with new technologies in live-cell fluorescent microscopy, new and surprising insights into these once-elusive trafficking processes are emerging. Here we provide a review of these recent advances within an historically relevant context.

  9. Expression of inducible nitric oxide in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Robbins, R A; Barnes, P J; Springall, D R; Warren, J B; Kwon, O J; Buttery, L D; Wilson, A J; Geller, D A; Polak, J M

    1994-08-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of subjects with several airway disorders. To determine if cytokines could stimulate epithelial cells accounting for the increased NO, the capacity of the proinflammatory cytokines (cytomix: tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and interferon-gamma) to increase inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was investigated in A549 and primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. Cytomix induced a time-dependent increase in nitrite levels in culture supernatant fluids (p < 0.05). Increased numbers of cells stained for iNOS and increased iNOS mRNA was detected in the cytokine-stimulated cells compared to control (p < 0.05). Dexamethasone diminished the cytokine-induced increase in nitrite, iNOS by immunocytochemistry, and iNOS mRNA. These data demonstrate that cytokines, such as those released by mononuclear cells, can induce lung epithelial iNOS expression and NO release, and that this is attenuated by dexamethasone.

  10. Effects of weaning on intestinal crypt epithelial cells in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huansheng; Xiong, Xia; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells in the crypt proliferate in piglets in response to weaning. However, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. We examined 40 piglets from eight litters (five piglets per litter) that were weaned at the age of 14 d, and one piglet from each litter was randomly selected for closer investigation. Based on the distended intestinal sac method, we isolated crypt epithelial cells from the mid-jejunum on Days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-weaning. Protein expression was analyzed using either isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification or western blotting. Proteins related to the cell cycle, organization of the cellular macromolecular complex subunit, localization of cellular macromolecules, Golgi vesicle transport, fatty acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and translational initiation were mainly down-regulated, while those involved in glycolysis, cell cycle arrest, protein catabolism, and cellular amino acid metabolism were up-regulated. The amount of proteins active in the mTOR signaling pathway was generally decreased over time. These results indicate that weaning influences energy metabolism, cellular macromolecule organization and localization, and protein metabolism, thereby affecting the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in weaned piglets. Moreover, those cellular processes are possibly controlled by that signaling pathway. PMID:27830738

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  12. Spraying Respiratory Epithelial Cells to Coat Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Thiebes, Anja Lena; Albers, Stefanie; Klopsch, Christian; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Applying cells in a spray can overcome current hurdles in coating tissue engineered constructs with a thin layer of endo- or epithelial cells. We report here a structured study on the influences of spray application with a medical spray device on vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and respiratory epithelial cells (RECs) with and without fibrin gel. Next to viability and cytotoxicity assays, the in vitro differentiation capacity after spray processing was analyzed. For vSMC, no influence of air pressures till 0.8 bar could be shown, whereas the viability decreased for higher pressures. The viability of RECs was reduced to 88.5% with 0.4 bar air pressure. Lactate dehydrogenase-levels in the culture medium increased the first day after spraying but normalized afterward. In the short term, no differences by means of morphology and expression-specific markers for vSMCs and RECs were seen between the control and study group. In addition, in a long-term study for 28 days with the air–liquid interface, RECs differentiated and built up an organized epithelial layer with ciliary development that was comparable to the control for cells sprayed without fibrin gel. When spraying within fibrin gel, ciliary development was lower at 28 days. Thus, spraying of vSMCs and RECs was proved to be a suitable method for tissue engineering. Especially for RECs, this application is of special significance when coating luminal structures or other unfavorable topographies. PMID:26309803

  13. Asbestos exposure increases human bronchial epithelial cell fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gross, T J; Cobb, S M; Gruenert, D C; Peterson, M W

    1993-03-01

    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers results in fibrotic lung disease. The distal pulmonary epithelium is an early target of asbestos-mediated injury. Local plasmin activity may be important in modulating endoluminal inflammatory responses in the lung. We studied the effects of asbestos exposure on cell-mediated plasma clot lysis as a marker of pericellular plasminogen activation. Exposing human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to 100 micrograms/ml of asbestos fibers for 24 h resulted in increased plasma clot lysis. Fibrinolytic activity was augmented in a dose-dependent fashion, was not due to secreted protease, and occurred only when there was direct contact between the plasma clot and the epithelial monolayer. Further analysis showed that asbestos exposure increased HBE cell-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity in a time-dependent manner. The increased cell-associated PA activity could be removed by acid washing. The increase in PA activity following asbestos exposure required new protein synthesis because it was abrogated by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Therefore, asbestos exposure increases epithelial-mediated fibrinolysis by augmenting expression of uPA activity at the cell surface by mechanisms that require new RNA and protein synthesis. These observations suggest a novel mechanism whereby exposure of the distal epithelium to inhaled particulates may result in a chronic inflammatory response that culminates in the development of fibrotic lung disease.

  14. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  15. Generation of Spheres from Dental Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Natsiou, Despoina; Granchi, Zoraide; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro three-dimensional sphere model has already been established as an important tool in fundamental sciences. This model facilitates the study of a variety of biological processes including stem cell/niche functions and tissue responses to injury and drugs. Here we describe the complete protocol for the in vitro formation of spheres originated from the epithelium of rodent incisors. In addition, we show that in these spheres cell proliferation is maintained, as well as the expression of several key molecules characterizing stem cells such as Sox2 and p63. These epithelial dentospheres could be used as an in vitro model system for stem cell research purposes. PMID:28154538

  16. Hepatic stellate cells promote upregulation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Teruya; Shiraha, Hidenori; Sawahara, Hiroaki; Uchida, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Yasuto; Iwamuro, Masaya; Kataoka, Junro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Kuwaki, Takeshi; Onishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takaki, Akinobu; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-09-01

    Microenvironment plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is known as a tumor stemness marker of HCC. To investigate the relationship between microenvironment and stemness, we performed an in vitro co-culture assay. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) were co-cultured with the TWNT-1 immortalized hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which create a microenvironment with HCC. Cell proliferation ability was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while migration ability was assessed by a wound healing assay. Expression of EpCAM was analyzed by immunoblotting and FCM. HCC cell lines were co-cultured with TWNT-1 treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for TGF-β and HB-EGF; we then analyzed proliferation, migration ability and protein expression using the methods described above. Proliferation ability was unchanged in HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Migration ability was increased in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) directly (216.2±67.0, 61.0±22.0, 124.0±66.2 and 51.5±40.3%) and indirectly (102.5±22.0, 84.6±30.9, 86.1±25.7 and 73.9±29.7%) co-cultured with TWNT-1 compared with the HCC uni-culture. Immunoblot analysis revealed increased EpCAM expression in the HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Flow cytometry revealed that the population of E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ and EpCAM-positive cells increased and accordingly, EMT and stemness in the HCC cell line were activated. These results were similar in the directly and indirectly co-cultured samples, indicating that humoral factors were at play. Conversely, HCC cell lines co-cultured with siRNA‑treated TWNT-1 showed decreased migration ability, a decreased population of EpCAM-positive and E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ cells. Taken together, humoral factors secreted from TWNT-1

  17. Best immunohistochemical panel in distinguishing adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma of lung: tissue microarray assay in resected lung cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Shin, Hyeong Chan; Shin, Kyeong Cheol; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of the targeted therapies for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has generated a need for accurate histologic subtyping of NSCLC. In this study, we assessed the utility of immunohistochemical markers that could be helpful in distinction between adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We performed a battery of immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray for napsin-A, Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), p63, cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, thrombomodulin (CD141), Epithelial-related antigen (MOC-31), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), high-molecular-weight CK (HMWCK), p27kip1 (p27), and Rb protein in 129 resected primary NSCLC with 81 ADCs and 48 SCCs and 10 metastatic ADC to the lung (primary in colon, 7 cases; stomach, 2 cases; vagina, 1 case). Cases of ADC and SCC were morphologically unequivocal and solid tumors with no definite squamous or glandular differentiation were excluded for this analysis. Napsin-A and TTF-1 were positive in 81% and 70% of ADC and in 0% and 2% of SCC, respectively, whereas P63 and CK5/6 were positive in 91% and 90% of SCC and in 9% and 4% of ADC, respectively (P < .001). CD141 stained significantly higher in SCC over ADC (positive in 2% of ADC and 46% of SCC. MOC-31, CEA, COX-2, HMWCK, p27, and Rb appeared to be not useful markers in distinction between ADC and SCC because of their low specificity. None of metastatic ADC to the lung showed positive for napsin-A and TTF-1. It was evident that combination of napsin-A, TTF-1, CK5/6, and p63 was the best immunohistochemical panel in differentiating ADC from SCC of the lung in this study. CD141 appeared to be a potential new marker for SCC with high specificity. Cyclooxygenase 2, MOC-31, CEA, HMWCK, p27, and Rb showed less specificity for differentiation ADC from SCC.

  18. Progenitor Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple distinct epithelial domains are found throughout the airway that are distinguishable by location, structure, function, and cell-type composition. Several progenitor cell populations in the proximal airway have been identified to reside in confined microenvironmental niches including the submucosal glands (SMGs), which are embedded in the tracheal connective tissue between the surface epithelium and cartilage, and basal cells that reside within the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Current research suggests that regulatory pathways that coordinate development of the proximal airway and establishment of progenitor cell niches may overlap with pathways that control progenitor cell responses during airway regeneration following injury. SMGs have been shown to harbor epithelial progenitor cells, and this niche is dysregulated in diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, mechanisms that regulate progenitor cell proliferation and maintenance within this glandular niche are not completely understood. Here we discuss glandular progenitor cells during development and regeneration of the proximal airway and compare properties of glandular progenitors to those of basal cell progenitors in the SAE. Further investigation into glandular progenitor cell control will provide a direction for interrogating therapeutic interventions to correct aberrant conditions affecting the SMGs in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. PMID:24818588

  19. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies diverse roles of epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Takako; Sridharan, Anusha; Du, Yina; Guo, Minzhe; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Perl, Anne-Karina T.; Funari, Vincent A.; Gokey, Jason J.; Stripp, Barry R.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by airway remodeling, inflammation, alveolar destruction, and fibrosis. We utilized single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to identify epithelial cell types and associated biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. Transcriptomic analysis of normal human lung epithelial cells defined gene expression patterns associated with highly differentiated alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells, indicated by enrichment of RNAs critical for surfactant homeostasis. In contrast, scRNA-seq of IPF cells identified 3 distinct subsets of epithelial cell types with characteristics of conducting airway basal and goblet cells and an additional atypical transitional cell that contributes to pathological processes in IPF. Individual IPF cells frequently coexpressed alveolar type 1 (AT1), AT2, and conducting airway selective markers, demonstrating “indeterminate” states of differentiation not seen in normal lung development. Pathway analysis predicted aberrant activation of canonical signaling via TGF-β, HIPPO/YAP, P53, WNT, and AKT/PI3K. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy identified the disruption of alveolar structure and loss of the normal proximal-peripheral differentiation of pulmonary epithelial cells. scRNA-seq analyses identified loss of normal epithelial cell identities and unique contributions of epithelial cells to the pathogenesis of IPF. The present study provides a rich data source to further explore lung health and disease. PMID:27942595

  20. Building Epithelial Tissues from Skin Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, E.; Nowak, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The skin epidermis and its appendages provide a protective barrier that guards against loss of fluids, physical trauma, and invasion by harmful microbes. To perform these functions while confronting the harsh environs of the outside world, our body surface undergoes constant rejuvenation through homeostasis. In addition, it must be primed to repair wounds in response to injury. The adult skin maintains epidermal homeostasis, hair regeneration, and wound repair through the use of its stem cells. What are the properties of skin stem cells, when do they become established during embryogenesis, and how are they able to build tissues with such remarkably distinct architectures? How do stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis and repair wounds and how do they regulate the delicate balance between proliferation and differentiation? What is the relationship between skin cancer and mutations that perturbs the regulation of stem cells? In the past 5 years, the field of skin stem cells has bloomed as we and others have been able to purify and dissect the molecular properties of these tiny reservoirs of goliath potential. We report here progress on these fronts, with emphasis on our laboratory’s contributions to the fascinating world of skin stem cells. PMID:19022769

  1. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D.; Boudjadi, Salah

    2016-01-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt‐villus axis. One important check‐point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361–2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  2. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Elevated tropomyosin expression is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Eri; Hasanova, Nailia; Fatma, Nigar; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Singh, Dhirendra P

    2013-01-01

    Injury to lens epithelial cells (LECs) leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with resultant fibrosis. The tropomyosin (Tpm) family of cytoskeleton proteins is involved in regulating and stabilizing actin microfilaments. Aberrant expression of Tpms leads to abnormal morphological changes with disintegration of epithelial integrity. The EMT of LECs has been proposed as a major cause of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) after cataract surgery. Using in vivo rodent PCO and human cataractous LECs, we demonstrated that the aberrant expression of rat Tpm and human Tpm1α/2β suggested their association in remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton during EMT of LECs. Expression analysis from abnormally growing LECs after lens extraction revealed elevated expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for EMT. Importantly, these cells displayed increased expression of Tpm1α/2β following EMT/PCO formation. Expression of Tpm1α/2β was up-regulated in LECs isolated from cataractous lenses of Shumiya Cataract Rats (SCRs), compared with non-cataractous lenses. Also, LECs from human patients with nuclear cataract and anterior subcapsular fibrosis (ASF) displayed significantly increased expression of Tpm2β mRNA, suggesting that similar signalling invokes the expression of these molecules in LECs of cataractous SCR and human lenses. EMT was observed in LECs overexpressed with Tpm1α/2β, as evidenced by increased expression of α-SMA. These conditions were correlated with remodelling of actin filaments, possibly leading to EMT/PCO and ASF. The present findings may help clarify the condition of the actin cytoskeleton during morphogenetic EMT, and may contribute to development of Tpm-based inhibitors for postponing PCO and cataractogenesis.

  4. Azithromycin kills invasive Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2013-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans invades periodontal pocket epithelium and is therefore difficult to eliminate by periodontal scaling and root planing. It is susceptible to azithromycin, which is taken up by many types of mammalian cells. This led us to hypothesize that azithromycin accumulation by gingival epithelium could enhance the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans. [(3)H]azithromycin transport by Smulow-Glickman gingival epithelial cells and SCC-25 oral epithelial cells was characterized. To test our hypothesis, we infected cultured Smulow-Glickman cell monolayers with A. actinomycetemcomitans (Y4 or SUNY 465 strain) for 2 h, treated them with gentamicin to eliminate extracellular bacteria, and then incubated them with azithromycin for 1 to 4 h. Viable intracellular bacteria were released, plated, and enumerated. Azithromycin transport by both cell lines exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was competitively inhibited by l-carnitine and several other organic cations. Cell incubation in medium containing 5 μg/ml azithromycin yielded steady-state intracellular concentrations of 144 μg/ml in SCC-25 cells and 118 μg/ml in Smulow-Glickman cells. Azithromycin induced dose- and time-dependent intraepithelial killing of both A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Treatment of infected Smulow-Glickman cells with 0.125 μg/ml azithromycin killed approximately 29% of the intraepithelial CFU of both strains within 4 h, while treatment with 8 μg/ml azithromycin killed ≥82% of the CFU of both strains (P < 0.05). Addition of carnitine inhibited the killing of intracellular bacteria by azithromycin (P < 0.05). Thus, human gingival epithelial cells actively accumulate azithromycin through a transport system that facilitates the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans and is shared with organic cations.

  5. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: response to toxic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, R H; LaMontagne, A D; Petito, C T; Rong, X H

    1989-01-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Great differences were evident even among those cells derived from stratified squamous epithelia (epidermal, esophageal, vaginal, forestomach) despite their expression of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities to similar degrees. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Although expressing keratinocyte character (transglutaminase activity and envelope forming ability), the cells thus retain some hormonal character that may be modulated by cAMP-dependent kinase activity. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 4. PMID:2466642

  6. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens. PMID:25426769

  7. Role of coagulation in the recruitment of colon adenocarcinoma cells to thrombus under shear

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Asako; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastases can appear on the peritoneum and in lymph nodes, liver, and lungs, suggesting both hematogenous and lymphatic spreading of the primary tumor. While antithrombotic agents have been shown to reduce both long-term incidence and metastasis, the role of coagulation in facilitating metastasis is ill defined. We investigated the kinetics and molecular mechanisms of metastatic colon adenocarcinoma cell recruitment to thrombi under shear flow, ex vivo. Platelet aggregates were formed by perfusing citrated anticoagulated whole blood over immobilized fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen. Thrombi were formed by perfusing recalcified whole blood over fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen in the presence of coagulation. Cultured colon adenocarcinoma cells (SW620) were perfused either during or following platelet aggregate or thrombus formation. The degree of transient tumor cell interactions (recruitment, rolling, and release) and the number of firmly adhered tumor cells were quantified using fluorescence microscopy. Platelet aggregates and thrombi formed on either fibrinogen- or fibrillar-collagen supported SW620 cell interactions and adhesion under shear. Thrombi or fibrin supported a greater degree of SW620 cell interactions and adhesion compared with platelet aggregates or fibrinogen, respectively, demonstrating that coagulation promoted SW620 cell recruitment under shear. Interestingly, in the absence of anticoagulation, we observed SW620 preferentially binding to thrombus-bound polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The addition of purified PMNs to thrombi resulted in a doubling of the number of interacting and bound SW620 cells. Since thrombi often accumulate and activate leukocytes, our findings suggest that leukocytes may play a role in localizing metastases to sites of thrombogenesis. PMID:23903698

  8. CCL20, (gamma)(delta) T cells, and IL-22 in corneal epithelial healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After corneal epithelial abrasion, leukocytes and platelets rapidly enter the corneal stroma, and CCR6 (+) IL-17(+) gamma delta T cells migrate into the epithelium. Gamma delta T-cell-deficient (TCRd(-/-)) mice have significantly reduced inflammation and epithelial wound healing. Epithelial CCL20 mR...

  9. Left–right asymmetric cell intercalation drives directional collective cell movement in epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Emi; Isomura, Ayako; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kuranaga, Erina

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenetic epithelial movement occurs during embryogenesis and drives complex tissue formation. However, how epithelial cells coordinate their unidirectional movement while maintaining epithelial integrity is unclear. Here we propose a novel mechanism for collective epithelial cell movement based on Drosophila genitalia rotation, in which epithelial tissue rotates clockwise around the genitalia. We found that this cell movement occurs autonomously and requires myosin II. The moving cells exhibit repeated left–right-biased junction remodelling, while maintaining adhesion with their neighbours, in association with a polarized myosin II distribution. Reducing myosinID, known to cause counter-clockwise epithelial-tissue movement, reverses the myosin II distribution. Numerical simulations revealed that a left–right asymmetry in cell intercalation is sufficient to induce unidirectional cellular movement. The cellular movement direction is also associated with planar cell-shape chirality. These findings support a model in which left–right asymmetric cell intercalation within an epithelial sheet drives collective cellular movement in the same direction. PMID:26656655

  10. Live-cell Imaging and Quantitative Analysis of Embryonic Epithelial Cells in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sagar D.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic epithelial cells serve as an ideal model to study morphogenesis where multi-cellular tissues undergo changes in their geometry, such as changes in cell surface area and cell height, and where cells undergo mitosis and migrate. Furthermore, epithelial cells can also regulate morphogenetic movements in adjacent tissues1. A traditional method to study epithelial cells and tissues involve chemical fixation and histological methods to determine cell morphology or localization of particular proteins of interest. These approaches continue to be useful and provide "snapshots" of cell shapes and tissue architecture, however, much remains to be understood about how cells acquire specific shapes, how various proteins move or localize to specific positions, and what paths cells follow toward their final differentiated fate. High resolution live imaging complements traditional methods and also allows more direct investigation into the dynamic cellular processes involved in the formation, maintenance, and morphogenesis of multicellular epithelial sheets. Here we demonstrate experimental methods from the isolation of animal cap tissues from Xenopus laevis embryos to confocal imaging of epithelial cells and simple measurement approaches that together can augment molecular and cellular studies of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:20498627

  11. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  12. siRNA targeting of Trop2 suppresses the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Ye-Han; Zhang, Li-Xin; Lu, Hui-Yu; Jiang, Ai-Gui

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced inhibition of the Trop2 gene on the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells. A recombinant adenovirus expression vector, which contained siRNA targeting open reading frames for Trop2 (rAd5-siTrop2), was transfected into lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells. Three groups were included in the study, namely the Ctrl (non-transfected control), rAd5-siCtrl (native control) and rAd5-siTrop2 (knockdown Trop2 gene) groups. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Trop2 were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of cyclin Dl and phospho-extracellular signal regulated kinase (p-ERK)-1 were detected using western blot analysis. The effects of Trop2 inhibition on the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells were investigated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Transwell assay. Trop2-targeted siRNA recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed. The recombinant adenovirus vector, rAd5-siTrop2, significantly downregulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of Trop2 in the lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells, with cyclin D1 and p-ERK-1 expression downregulated simultaneously. In addition, following the silencing of Trop2, the proliferation and invasion rates of the lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells were reduced. Therefore, the results indicated that Trop2 serves a key function in the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma H460 cells in vitro.

  13. Data for comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz, Teresa; Ramos Gómez, Yassel; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Fernández Masso, Julio R.; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Arielis; Cruz García, Yiliam; Guirola-Cruz, Osmany; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Javier González, Luis; Tiscornia, Inés; Victoria, Sabina; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Besada Pérez, Vladimir; Guerra Vallespi, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-552 is a second generation antitumor peptide that displays potent cytotoxicity in lung and colon cancer cells. The nuclear subproteome of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells treated with CIGB-552 peptide was identified and analyzed [1]. This data article provides supporting evidence for the above analysis. PMID:26306321

  14. Oral Epithelial Cell Responses to Multispecies Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Peyyala, R.; Kirakodu, S.S.; Novak, K.F.; Ebersole, J.L

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms. PMID:23300185

  15. Two-stage induced differentiation of OCT4+/Nanog+ stem-like cells in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meili; Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Yanwei; Wu, Lixia; Chang, David W.; Zhao, Picheng; Dong, Qianggang; Wu, Xifeng; Han, Baohui

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like cells in solid tumors are purported to contribute to cancer development and poor treatment outcome. The abilities to self-renew, differentiate, and resist anticancer therapies are hallmarks of these rare cells, and steering them into lineage commitment may be one strategy to curb cancer development or progression. Vitamin D is a prohormone that can alter cell growth and differentiation and may induce the differentiation cancer stem-like cells. In this study, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4)-positive/Nanog homeobox (Nanog)- positive lung adenocarcinoma stem-like cells (LACSCs) were enriched from spheroid cultured SPC-A1 cells and differentiated by a two-stage induction (TSI) method, which involved knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) expression (first stage) followed by sequential induction with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3, VD3) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) treatment (second stage). The results showed the HIF1α-knockdowned cells displayed diminished cell invasion and clonogenic activities. Moreover, the TSI cells highly expressed tumor suppressor protein p63 (P63) and forkhead box J1 (FOXJ1) and lost stem cell characteristics, including absent expression of OCT4 and Nanog. These cells regained sensitivity to cisplatin in vitro while losing tumorigenic capacity and decreased tumor cell proliferation in vivo. Our results suggest that induced transdifferentiation of LACSCs by vitamin D and SAHA may become novel therapeutic avenue to alter tumor cell phenotypes and improve patient outcome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development and progression of lung cancer may involve rare population of stem-like cells that have the ability to grow, differentiate, and resist drug treatment. However, current therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on tumor characteristics and neglected the potential source of cells that may contribute to poor clinical outcome. We generated lung adenocarcinoma stem-like cells from

  16. Protective autophagy is involved in resistance towards MET inhibitors in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Magali; Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Blaukat, Andree; Bladt, Friedhelm; Fey, Martin F; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Tschan, Mario P

    2013-02-08

    MET, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an important role, both in normal cellular function as well as in oncogenesis. In many cancer types, abnormal activation of MET is related to poor prognosis and various strategies to inhibit its function, including small molecule inhibitors, are currently in preclinical and clinical evaluation. Autophagy, a self-digesting recycling mechanism with cytoprotective functions, is induced by cellular stress. This process is also induced upon cytotoxic drug treatment of cancer cells and partially allows these cells to escape cell death. Thus, since autophagy protects different tumor cells from chemotherapy-induced cell death, current clinical trials aim at combining autophagy inhibitors with different cancer treatments. We found that in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line GTL-16, where MET activity is deregulated due to receptor overexpression, two different MET inhibitors PHA665752 and EMD1214063 lead to cell death paralleled by the induction of autophagy. A combined treatment of MET inhibitors together with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or genetically impairing autophagy by knocking down the key autophagy gene ATG7 further decreased cell viability of gastric cancer cells. In general, we observed the induction of cytoprotective autophagy in MET expressing cells upon MET inhibition and a combination of MET and autophagy inhibition resulted in significantly decreased cell viability in gastric cancer cells.

  17. Maintenance of Epithelial Stem Cells by Cbl Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    our research findings during the entire grant period (Sept. 2010 – Aug. 2013). 1. Analysis of Cbl functions in progenitor-type mammary epithelial...catenin pathway, but further investigation is required to establish this. 2. Analysis of Cbl functions in vivo using gene mutant mouse models We...Nandwani N, Gu H, Band V, Band H. Rapidly fatal myeloproliferative disorders in mice with deletion of Casitas B-cell lymphoma (Cbl) and Cbl-b in

  18. Norepinephrine potentiates proinflammatory responses of human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Vulchanova, Lucy; Witta, Samantha R; Dai, Yuying; Jones, Bryan J; Brown, David R

    2013-06-15

    The vaginal epithelium provides a barrier to pathogens and recruits immune defenses through the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Several studies have shown that mucosal sites are innervated by norepinephrine-containing nerve fibers. Here we report that norepinephrine potentiates the proinflammatory response of human vaginal epithelial cells to products produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes menstrual toxic shock syndrome. The cells exhibit immunoreactivity for catecholamine synthesis enzymes and the norepinephrine transporter. Moreover, the cells secrete norepinephrine and dopamine at low concentrations. These results indicate that norepinephrine may serve as an autocrine modulator of proinflammatory responses in the vaginal epithelium.

  19. Interaction between submicron COD crystals and renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hua; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Yang, Ru-E

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to investigate the adhesion characteristics between submicron calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with a size of 150 ± 50 nm and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero cells) before and after damage, and to discuss the mechanism of kidney stone formation. Methods Vero cells were oxidatively injured by hydrogen peroxide to establish a model of injured cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe Vero–COD adhesion. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry was used to quantitatively measure the amount of adhered COD microcrystals. Nanoparticle size analyzer and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to measure the change in the zeta potential on the Vero cell surface and the change in osteopontin expression during the adhesion process, respectively. The level of cell injury was evaluated by measuring the changes in malonaldehyde content, and cell viability during the adhesion process. Results The adhesion capacity of Vero cells in the injury group to COD microcrystals was obviously stronger than that of Vero cells in the control group. After adhesion to COD, cell viability dropped, both malonaldehyde content and cell surface zeta potential increased, and the fluorescence intensity of osteopontin decreased because the osteopontin molecules were successfully covered by COD. Submicron COD further damaged the cells during the adhesion process, especially for Vero cells in the control group, leading to an elevated amount of attached microcrystals. Conclusion Submicron COD can further damage injured Vero cells during the adhesion process. The amount of attached microcrystals is proportional to the degree of cell damage. The increased amount of microcrystals that adhered to the injured epithelial cells plays an important role in the formation of early-stage kidney stones. PMID:22973095

  20. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  1. Erythropoietin Induces an Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition-like Process in Mammary Epithelial Cells MCF10A.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Moreno, Alejandra; Rodriguez-Monterrosas, Cecilia; Cortes-Reynosa, Pedro; Perez-Carreon, Julio Isael; Perez Salazar, Eduardo

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been used to treat anemia of cancer patients, because it stimulates erythropoiesis. However, treatment of breast cancer patients with EPO has been associated with poor prognosis and decrease of survival. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process by which epithelial cells are transdifferentiated to a mesenchymal state. It has been implicated in tumor progression, because epithelial cells acquire the capacity to execute the multiple steps of invasion/metastasis process. However, the role of EPO on EMT process in human mammary epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we demonstrate that EPO promotes a decrease of E-cadherin expression, an increase of N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail2 expression, activation of FAK and Src kinases and an increase of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretions. Moreover, EPO induces an increase of NFκB DNA binding activity, an increase of binding of p50 and p65 NFκB subunits to Snail1 promoter, migration and invasion in mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A. In summary, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that EPO induces an EMT-like process in mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  3. [Endometrial adenocarcinoma and clear cell carcinoma in a young woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Liu, Nan; Liu, Guo-Bing

    2016-05-01

    A 26-year-old unmarried woman with irregular menstruation for 4 years was admitted for an intrauterine space-occupying mass. Pathological examination before surgery showed moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopically assisted epifascial panhysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimens reported moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma and stage II clear cell carcinoma. The patient then received chemotherapy and remained alive without evidence of recurrence. Young women with polycystic ovarian syndrome are at high risk of developing endometrial carcinoma, but concurrent clear cell carcinoma is rare. Careful evaluation before and after treatment are essential to improve the patients prognosis.

  4. Epithelial stem cells are formed by small-particles released from particle-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wuyi; Zhu, Xiao Ping; Han, Xiu Juan; Nuo, Mu; Wang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Recent spatiotemporal report demonstrated that epidermal stem cells have equal potential to divide or differentiate, with no asymmetric cell division observed. Therefore, how epithelial stem cells maintain lifelong stem-cell support still needs to be elucidated. In mouse blood and bone marrow, we found a group of large cells stained strongly for eosin and containing coiled-tubing-like structures. Many were tightly attached to each other to form large cellular clumps. After sectioning, these large cell-clumps were composed of not cells but numerous small particles, however with few small “naked” nuclei. The small particles were about 2 to 3 μm in diameter and stained dense red for eosin, so they may be rich in proteins. Besides the clumps composed of small particles, we identified clumps formed by fusion of the small particles and clumps of newly formed nucleated cells. These observations suggest that these small particles further fused and underwent cellularization. E-cadherin was expressed in particle-fusion areas, some “naked” nuclei and the newly formed nucleated cells, which suggests that these particles can form epithelial cells via fusion and nuclear remodeling. In addition, we observed similar-particle fusion before epithelial cellularization in mouse kidney ducts after kidney ischemia, which suggests that these particles can be released in the blood and carried to the target tissues for epithelial-cell regeneration. Oct4 and E-cadherin expressed in the cytoplasmic areas in cells that were rich in protein and mainly located in the center of the cellular clumps, suggesting that these newly formed cells have become tissue-specific epithelial stem cells. Our data provide evidence that these large particle-producing cells are the origin of epithelial stem cells. The epithelial stem cells are newly formed by particle fusion. PMID:28253358

  5. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  6. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo . E-mail: miyazawa@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with {delta}-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol.

  7. A dynamic podosome-like structure of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Spinardi, Laura; Rietdorf, Jens; Nitsch, Lucio; Bono, Maria; Tacchetti, Carlo; Way, Michael; Marchisio, Pier Carlo

    2004-05-01

    Focal contacts and hemidesmosomes are cell-matrix adhesion structures of cultured epithelial cells. While focal contacts link the extracellular matrix to microfilaments, hemidesmosomes make connections with intermediate filaments. We have analyzed hemidesmosome assembly in 804G carcinoma cells. Our data show that hemidesmosomes are organized around a core of actin filaments that appears early during cell adhesion. These actin structures look similar to podosomes described in cells of mesenchymal origin. These podosome-like structures are distinct from focal contacts and specifically contain Arp3 (Arp2/3 complex), cortactin, dynamin, gelsolin, N-WASP, VASP, Grb2 and src-like kinase(s). The integrin alpha3beta1 is localized circularly around F-actin cores and co-distributes with paxillin, vinculin, and zyxin. We also show that the maintenance of the actin core and hemidesmosomes is dependent on actin polymerization, src-family kinases, and Grb2, but not on microtubules. Video microscopy analysis reveals that assembly of hemidesmosomes is preceded by recruitment of beta4 integrin subunit to the actin core before its positioning at hemidesmosomes. When 804G cells are induced to migrate, actin cores as well as hemidesmosomes disappear and beta4 integrin subunit becomes co-localized with dynamic actin at leading edges. We show that podosome-like structures are not unique to cells of mesenchymal origin, but also appear in epithelial cells, where they seem to be related to basement membrane adhesion.

  8. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  9. Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Hodgson, J L; Jones, D W; Corbeil, R R; Widders, P R; Stephens, L R

    1989-01-01

    Adherence of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) in vitro was investigated with fresh washed bovine VECs and log-phase cultures of T. foetus. Observation under phase-contrast microscopy showed that T. foetus usually adhered first by the posterior flagellum and later by the body. Significantly more keratinized squamous epithelial cells were detected with attached parasites than nonkeratinized round epithelial cells. The optimal pH range for attachment was 6.0 to 7.5, with peak attachment at pH 6.5 for squamous VECs. Surface-reactive bovine antiserum to T. foetus prevented adherence to bovine squamous VECs. Inhibition of adherence occurred at nonagglutinating, nonimmobilizing serum dilutions. Antiserum fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G1 inhibited adherence, but fractions enriched for immunoglobulin G2 did not. The inhibitory antiserum was specific for several medium- to high-molecular-weight membrane antigens as detected in Western blots (immunoblots). The ability of surface-reactive antibodies to prevent adherence and to agglutinate and immobilize T. foetus indicates that they may be protective. Images PMID:2471692

  10. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    robust and reproducible methodology to detect, quantify and isolate stem cells in normal human mammary tissue, using a xenotransplantation system...covers the first year of the grant, during which substantial progress has been made in the development and validation of the xenotransplantation assay...Subrenal xenotransplantation surgery. The hair on the back of anesthetized mice was shaved, and the skin swabbed with 70% alcohol. An anterior to

  11. Expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in endometrial adenocarcinoma: variations in conventional tumor areas and in microcystic, elongated and fragmented glands.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Colin J R; Crook, Maxine L; Leung, Yee C; Platten, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinomas may show a distinctive pattern of invasion characterized by the presence of microcystic, elongated and fragmented glands, often most evident along the advancing tumor margin. Earlier, we have shown that these changes appear restricted to low-grade endometrioid carcinomas, many of which show focal mucinous differentiation and lymphovascular space invasion. However, the molecular alterations associated with this morphological alteration are not known. In this study, we have examined immunoreactivity for the cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin D1, p16 and beta-catenin in 22 endometrial carcinomas, specifically comparing the results in conventional tumor areas and in foci in which the glands exhibited microcystic, elongated and fragmented appearances. The conventional neoplastic glands exhibited cyclin D1 and p16 expression in most cases, with >50% tumor cells positive in 8 cases and 11 tumors, respectively. Membranous expression of beta-catenin was usually preserved, with variable cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. Cyclin D1 and beta-catenin predominantly stained cells at the peripheral or basal aspect of the conventional glands, whereas p16 was more uniformly expressed centrally. Tumor foci composed of microcystic, fragmented and elongated glands showed strong expression of cyclin D1 and p16, sometimes in contrast to unstained contiguous or adjacent conventional neoplastic elements, and there was also loss or fragmentation of membranous beta-catenin staining. Intravascular tumor cells also expressed cyclin D1 and p16 and therefore the immunostains often highlighted subtle foci of lymphovascular invasion. The heterogeneous expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins within endometrial adenocarcinoma illustrates the importance of assessing microanatomical variations in immunoreactivity, particularly at the advancing margin of tumors. The upregulation of cyclin D1 and p16, together with loss of membranous beta-catenin expression in

  12. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    9 Appendix……………………………………………………………………………… 10 Eirew,P., Stingl,J., Raouf,A., Turashvili,G., Aparicio ,S., Emerman,J.T., and Eaves,C.J. A...Peter Eirew, John Stingl, Afshin Raouf, Gulisa Turashvili, Samuel Aparicio , Joanne Emerman and Connie Eaves. A method for quantifying normal human...Eirew, Afshin Raouf, John Stingl, Gulisa Turashvili, Allen Delaney, Joanne Emerman, Marco Marra and Samuel Aparicio . “Stem Cells in the Mammary Gland

  13. Deoxyelephantopin impedes mammary adenocarcinoma cell motility by inhibiting calpain-mediated adhesion dynamics and inducing reactive oxygen species and aggresome formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Leng; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-04-15

    We previously showed that deoxyelephantopin (DET), a plant sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits more profound suppression than paclitaxel (PTX) of lung metastasis of mammary adenocarcinoma TS/A cells in mice. Proteomics studies suggest that DET affects actin cytoskeletal protein networks and downregulates calpain-mediated proteolysis of several actin-associated proteins, whereas PTX mainly interferes with microtubule proteins. Here, DET was observed to significantly deregulate adhesion formation in TS/A cells, probably through inhibition of m-calpain activity. Epithelial growth factor (EGF)-mediated activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 and formation of lamellipodia in TS/A cells were remarkably suppressed by DET treatment. Further, DET impaired vesicular trafficking of EGF and induced protein carbonylation and formation of centrosomal aggregates in TS/A cells. DET-induced reactive oxygen species were observed to be the upstream stimulus for the formation of centrosomal ubiquitinated protein aggregates that might subsequently restrict cancer cell motility. PTX, however, caused dramatic morphological changes, interfered with microtubule networking, and moderately inhibited calpain-mediated cytoskeletal and focal adhesion protein cleavage in TS/A cells. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the pharmacological action of DET against metastatic mammary cell migration and suggests that modulation of oxidative stress might be a potential strategy for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  14. Synthesis of sulfated oligosaccharides by cystic fibrosis trachea epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mendicino, J; Sangadala, S

    1999-11-01

    The mucin glycoproteins in tracheal mucus of patients with cystic fibrosis is more highly sulfated than the corresponding secretions from healthy individuals [16]. In order to further characterize these differences in sulfation and possibly also glycosylation patterns, we compared the structures of sulfated mucin oligosaccharides synthesized by continuously cultured human tracheal cells transformed by simian virus 40. The synthesis of highly sulfated oligosaccharide chains in mucins secreted by normal human epithelial and submucosal cell lines were compared with mucins formed by cystic fibrosis tracheal epithelial and submucosal cell lines. The epithelial cell lines from cystic fibrosis trachea showed a higher rate of sulfate uptake and a significantly higher rate of synthesis and sulfation of high molecular weight chains. Mucins synthesized by each cell line in the presence of 35SO4 were isolated and oligosaccharide chains were released by beta-elimination and separated by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The sulfated high molecular weight chains synthesized by the cystic fibrosis cell lines were characterized by methylation analysis and sequential glycosidase digestion before and after desulfation. Carbohydrate analysis yielded Fuc, Gal and GlcNAc in a ratio of 1:2:2.2 and only one galactosaminitol residue for about every 150-200 sugar residues present. The average molecular size of oligosaccharide chains in these fractions was between 30,000-40,000 daltons. These studies show that increased sulfation of oligosaccharides in mucins synthesized by cells from cystic fibrosis trachea is accompanied by a significant increase in the extension of a basic branched structure present in many of the lower molecular weight oligosaccharides.

  15. Adrenomedullin promotes the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through recruitment of myelomonocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaosen; Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Shan; Wang, Chunying; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2016-01-01

    Stromal infiltration of myelomonocytic cells is a hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is related to a poor prognosis. However, the detailed mechanism for the recruitment of myelomonocytic cells to pancreatic cancer tissue remains unclear. In the present study, pancreatic cancer cells secreted high levels of adrenomedullin (ADM), and CD11b+ myelomonocytic cells expressed all components of ADM receptors, including GPR182, CRLR, RAMP2 and RAMP3. ADM enhanced the migration and invasion of myelomonocytic cells through activation of the MAPK, PI3K/Akt and eNOS signaling pathways, as well as the expression and activity of MMP-2. ADM also promoted the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of myelomonocytic cells by increasing expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. In addition, ADM induced macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to express pro-tumor phenotypes. ADM knockdown in tumor-bearing mice or administration of AMA, an ADM antagonist, significantly inhibited the recruitment of myelomonocytic cells and tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, in vivo depletion of myelomonocytic cells using clodronate liposomes suppressed the progression of PDAC. These results reveal a novel function of ADM in PDAC, and suggest ADM is a promising target in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27391260

  16. miR-200 Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion and Metastasis by Targeting Flt1/VEGFR1

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Jonathon D.; Zang, Yi; Ahn, Young-Ho; Yang, Yanan; Gibbons, Don L.; Baird, Brandi N.; Alvarez, Cristina; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Liu, Diane D.; Saintigny, Pierre; Heymach, John V.; Creighton, Chad J.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    The microRNA-200 (miR-200) family is part of a gene expression signature that predicts poor prognosis in lung cancer patients. In a mouse model of K-ras/p53-mutant lung adenocarcinoma, miR-200 levels are suppressed in metastasis-prone tumor cells, and forced miR-200 expression inhibits tumor growth and metastasis, but the miR-200 target genes that drive lung tumorigenesis have not been fully elucidated. Here, we scanned the genome for putative miR-200 binding sites and found them in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of 35 genes that are amplified in human cancer. Mining of a database of resected human lung adenocarcinomas revealed that the levels of one of these genes, Flt1/VEGFR1, correlate inversely with duration of survival. Forced miR-200 expression suppressed Flt1 levels in metastasis-prone lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from K-ras/p53-mutant mice, and negatively regulated the Flt1 3′-UTR in reporter assays. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) isolated from murine lung adenocarcinomas secreted abundant VEGF and enhanced tumor cell invasion in coculture studies. CAF-induced tumor cell invasion was abrogated by VEGF neutralization or Flt1 knockdown in tumor cells. Flt1 knockdown decreased the growth and metastasis of tumor cells in syngeneic mice. We conclude that miR-200 suppresses lung tumorigenesis by targeting Flt1. PMID:21115742

  17. Paget cells in the esophagus: assessment of their histopathologic features and near-universal association with underlying esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Wang, Huamin; Wang, Kenneth K; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2008-07-01

    Pagetoid spread of primary esophageal melanomas and several cases of pagetoid esophageal squamous cell carcinoma are known. However, true esophageal Paget disease (intraepithelial growth of neoplastic cells with glandular differentiation) has only rarely been reported. We encountered 3 endoscopic biopsy specimens containing Paget cells in squamous epithelium associated with adenocarcinomas in Barrett esophagus (BE) and in the esophagogastric junction. To determine the prevalence of Paget cells in the esophagus, we studied 81 endoscopic mucosal resections and 27 esophagectomies from patients with invasive or intramucosal adenocarcinoma, and compared the findings to a control group of 47 endoscopic mucosal resections and 25 esophagectomies from patients with high-grade dysplasia in BE. Paget cells were present in squamous epithelium overlying 5 (4.9%) of 108 adenocarcinomas but in none (0%) of 72 BE with high-grade dysplasia (P=0.16). A computerized search for primary Paget disease using the terms "Paget's and esophagus" or "pagetoid and esophagus" from 1994 to 2007 did not yield any additional cases. Among the 8 patients with Paget cells (including the 2 index biopsies) there were no differences in either sex distribution (7M:1F) or age (mean 62.4 y) as compared with 103 adenocarcinomas without Paget cells (93M:10F, P=0.58; mean age 69.2 y, P=0.78). Morphologically, all adenocarcinomas with Paget cells contained at least a component of diffuse, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and 1 was a signet ring cell carcinoma. Paget cells involved only squamous epithelium directly above the poorly differentiated tumor foci. Histochemistry for periodic acid-Schiff with diastase (PAS-D) and mucicarmine, and immunohistochemistry for CK7, CK20, p53, and E-cadherin, were performed on 7 Paget cases with the following results: PAS-D+ (7 of 7, 100%), mucicarmine+ (6 of 7, 86%), CK7+ (7 of 7, 100%), CK20+ (5 of 7, 71%), p53 overexpression (3 of 7, 43%), and E-cadherin loss

  18. Slugging their way to immortality: driving mammary epithelial cells into a stem cell-like state.

    PubMed

    Soady, Kelly; Smalley, Matthew J

    2012-09-10

    Delineating the molecular factors that define and maintain the mammary stem cell state is vital for understanding normal development and tumourigenesis. A recent study by Guo and colleagues identifies two master transcriptional regulators of mammary stem cells, Slug and Sox9, ectopic expression of which confers stem cell attributes on differentiated mammary epithelial cells. Slug and Sox9 expression was also shown to determine in vivo metastatic potential of human breast cancer cell lines. Understanding these factors in the context of normal lineage differentiation is an important step toward elucidating the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and the origins of cancer stem cells.

  19. Human induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation and direct transdifferentiation into corneal epithelial-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Rafat, Mehrdad; Knoflach, Viktoria; Skonieczna, Magdalena; Hudecki, Andrzej; Małecki, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ghavami, Seaid; Łos, Marek J.

    2016-01-01

    The corneal epithelium is maintained by a small pool of tissue stem cells located at the limbus. Through certain injuries or diseases this pool of stem cells may get depleted. This leads to visual impairment. Standard treatment options include autologous or allogeneic limbal stem cell (LSC) transplantation, however graft rejection and chronic inflammation lowers the success rate over long time. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have opened new possibilities for treating various diseases with patient specific cells, eliminating the risk of immune rejection. In recent years, several protocols have been developed, aimed at the differentiation of iPS cells into the corneal epithelial lineage by mimicking the environmental niche of limbal stem cells. However, the risk of teratoma formation associated with the use of iPS cells hinders most applications from lab into clinics. Here we show that the differentiation of iPS cells into corneal epithelial cells results in the expression of corneal epithelial markers showing a successful differentiation, but the process is long and the level of gene expression for the pluripotency markers does not vanish completely. Therefore we set out to determine a direct transdifferentiation approach to circumvent the intermediate state of pluripotency (iPS-stage). The resulting cells, obtained by direct transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into limbal cells, exhibited corneal epithelial cell morphology and expressed corneal epithelial markers. Hence we shows for the first time a direct transdifferentiation of human dermal fibroblasts into the corneal epithelial lineage that may serve as source for corneal epithelial cells for transplantation approaches. PMID:27275539

  20. Influences of nanomaterials on the barrier function of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shariq; Rytting, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to exciting opportunities in medicine, energy, manufacturing, and other fields. Nevertheless, it is important to adequately assess the potential impacts of nanomaterial exposure. This chapter focuses on the interactions of nanomaterials with epithelial barriers in the lungs, intestine, kidneys, skin, and placenta. Methods for determining transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular permeability are described. Effects on cell viability and barrier integrity depend on the chemical nature of the nanomaterial, nanoparticle size, surface coatings, and concentration. Disruption of tight junctions can affect permeability and interfere with normal regulatory processes of the epithelial barrier. Future research is needed to better understand the possibilities and the limits of novel approaches in nanotechnology.

  1. Efficient cultivation conditions for human limbal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Kum; Lee, Jae Lim; Oh, Joo Youn; Shin, Mi Sun; Shin, Kyeong Seon; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak; Park, Ki Sook; Son, Young Sook

    2008-10-01

    To compare the stem niche in different culture conditions of limbal epithelial cells, the suspended human limbal epithelial cells (HLECs) were seeded on the 3T3-pretreated plates and the other suspended cells were plated on amniotic membranes (AMs) which were either cryo-preserved or freeze-dried. All were cultured for 10 to 12 days. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2), p63, cytokeratin 12, and connexin 43 were performed in cultivated HLECs and their expression levels were compared. The mRNA expression of all markers examined showed no statistically significant differences between the cells on cryo-preserved and on freeze-dried AM. The expression of p63 and cytokeratin 12 in cultivated cells on AMs were significantly lower than those in 3T3-cocultured cells on RT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. Cultivated HLECs on AMs showed reduced proliferation and differentiation while maintaining stem-property regardless of the preservative method of AM.

  2. Signet ring cell-type adenocarcinoma arising in a mature teratoma of the testis

    PubMed Central

    HA, HONG KOO; LEE, WAN; LEE, SANG DON; LEE, JEONG ZOO; CHUNG, MOON KEE

    2010-01-01

    A 48-year-old male who presented with an enlarged right scrotum was diagnosed with malignant transformation of testicular teratoma. Physical examination revealed a right scrotal mass of hard consistency with no inguinal lymphadenopathy. Since prepuberty, his right testis had been larger than the left one, with no pain or tenderness. Computed tomography and bone scan revealed retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and multiple bone metastases. Right orchiectomy was performed immediately, and a pathological examination revealed a mature teratoma associated with adenocarcinoma, showing signet ring cell differentiation. Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy was administered; however, the metastatic lesions progressed, and the patient succumbed to the disease after 15 months. Only a few cases of primary malignant transformation of teratoma in the testis have been reported, and this is the first case report of primary malignant transformation of teratoma in the testis with signet ring cell-type differentiation. PMID:22966298

  3. Pulmonary mixed squamous cell and glandular papilloma mimicking adenocarcinoma: a case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dongliang; Jiang, Yanxia; Wang, Jigang; Ding, Li; Xin, Fangjie; Zhao, Han; Li, Yujun

    2013-08-01

    Mixed squamous cell and glandular papilloma of the lung is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. Here we present another case of mixed squamous cell and glandular papilloma in a 64-year-old female nonsmoker. Histologically, the tumor was composed of mainly papillary structures covered with squamous, glandular and transitional epithelium. Some glandular structures extending into adjacent bronchiolar and alveolar spaces with mucus were similar to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the different kinds of epithelia had similar immunophenotype. The different components were positive for cytokeratin (CK)7, CK19, CAM5.2, CK5/6, CK34βE12, and TTF-1, but negative for CK20. The transitional morphology and immunohistochemistry indicate the different components likely come from a same kind of progenitor in the bronchiolar wall.

  4. Targeting the cell cycle in esophageal adenocarcinoma: an adjunct to anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Dibb, Martyn; Ang, Yeng S

    2011-04-28

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer death in men in the developed world. Continuing poor outcomes with conventional therapies that predominantly target apoptosis pathways have lead to increasing interest in treatments that target the cell cycle. A large international effort has led to the development of a large number of inhibitors, which target cell cycle kinases, including cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases and polo-like kinase. Initial phase I/II trials in solid tumors have often demonstrated only modest clinical benefits of monotherapy. This may relate in part to a failure to identify the patient populations that will gain the most clinical benefit. Newer compounds lacking the side effect profile of first-generation compounds may show utility as adjunctive treatments targeted to an individual's predicted response to treatment.

  5. Targeting the cell cycle in esophageal adenocarcinoma: An adjunct to anticancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dibb, Martyn; Ang, Yeng S

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer death in men in the developed world. Continuing poor outcomes with conventional therapies that predominantly target apoptosis pathways have lead to increasing interest in treatments that target the cell cycle. A large international effort has led to the development of a large number of inhibitors, which target cell cycle kinases, including cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases and polo-like kinase. Initial phase I/II trials in solid tumors have often demonstrated only modest clinical benefits of monotherapy. This may relate in part to a failure to identify the patient populations that will gain the most clinical benefit. Newer compounds lacking the side effect profile of first-generation compounds may show utility as adjunctive treatments targeted to an individual’s predicted response to treatment. PMID:21547123

  6. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  7. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  8. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte–Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte–epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  9. SMAC mimetic Debio 1143 synergizes with taxanes, topoisomerase inhibitors and bromodomain inhibitors to impede growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Matthew A.; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Iyidogan, Pinar; Theodosakis, Nicholas; Platt, James T.; Levy, Frederic; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Wang, Shaomeng; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Stern, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting anti-apoptotic proteins can sensitize tumor cells to conventional chemotherapies or other targeted agents. Antagonizing the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) with mimetics of the pro-apoptotic protein SMAC is one such approach. We used sensitization compound screening to uncover possible agents with the potential to further sensitize lung adenocarcinoma cells to the SMAC mimetic Debio 1143. Several compounds in combination with Debio 1143, including taxanes, topoisomerase inhibitors, and bromodomain inhibitors, super-additively inhibited growth and clonogenicity of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Co-treatment with Debio 1143 and the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 suppresses the expression of c-IAP1, c-IAP2, and XIAP. Non-canonical NF-κB signaling is also activated following Debio 1143 treatment, and Debio 1143 induces the formation of the ripoptosome in Debio 1143-sensitive cell lines. Sensitivity to Debio 1143 and JQ1 co-treatment was associated with baseline caspase-8 expression. In vivo treatment of lung adenocarcinoma xenografts with Debio 1143 in combination with JQ1 or docetaxel reduced tumor volume more than either single agent alone. As Debio 1143-containing combinations effectively inhibited both in vitro and in vivo growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells, these data provide a rationale for Debio 1143 combinations currently being evaluated in ongoing clinical trials and suggest potential utility of other combinations identified here. PMID:26485762

  10. Epithelial cells from smokers modify dendritic cell responses in the context of influenza infection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for infection with influenza, but the mechanisms underlying this susceptibility remain unknown. To ascertain if airway epithelial cells from smokers demonstrate a decreased ability to orchestrate an influenza...

  11. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  12. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  13. Proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) reveals mechanisms of cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Mariana Lopes; Palma, Camila de Souza; Thomé, Carolina Hassibe; Lanfredi, Guilherme Pauperio; Poersch, Aline; Faça, Vitor Marcel

    2017-01-16

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-orchestrated process that culminates with loss of epithelial phenotype and gain of a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. EMT enhances cancer cell invasiveness and drug resistance, favoring metastasis. Dysregulation of transcription factors, signaling pathways, miRNAs and growth factors including EGF, TGF-beta and HGF can trigger EMT. In ovarian cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior. Here, the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line Caov-3 was induced to EMT with EGF in order to identify specific mechanisms controlled by this process. Caov-3 cells induced to EMT were thoroughly validated and a combination of subcellular proteome enrichment, GEL-LC-MS/MS and SILAC strategy allowed consistent proteome identification and quantitation. Protein network analysis of differentially expressed proteins highlighted regulation of metabolism and cell cycle. Activation of relevant signaling pathways, such as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/Erk MAPK, in response to EGF-induced EMT was validated. Also, EMT did not affected the proliferation rate of Caov-3 cells, but led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase regulated by increased levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, independently of p53. Furthermore, a decrease in G1 and G2 checkpoint proteins was observed, supporting the involvement of EGF-induced EMT in cell cycle control.

  14. Xanthohumol inhibits the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway and suppresses cell growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Kurzepa, Jacek; Gagoś, Mariusz; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2016-05-16

    Aberrant activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway has been frequently observed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and its important role in cancer progression and malignant transformation has been documented. Hence, the ERK1/2 kinase cascade becomes a potential molecular target in cancer treatment. Xanthohumol (XN, a prenylated chalcone derived from hope cones) is known to possess a broad spectrum of chemopreventive and anticancer activities. In our studies, the MTT and BrdU assays revealed that XN demonstrated greater antiproliferative activity against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells than against the lung adenocarcinoma H1563 cell line. We observed that XN was able to suppress the activities of ERK1/2 and p90RSK kinases, followed by inhibition of phosphorylation and activation of the CREB protein. Additionally, the XN treatment of the cancer cells caused upregulation of key cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 as well as downregulation of cyclin D1. As a result, the cytotoxic effect of XN was attributed to the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and induction of apoptosis indicated by increased caspase-3 activity. Thus, XN might be a promising anticancer drug candidate against lung carcinomas.

  15. Doxorubicin delivery enhanced by electroporation to gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells with P-gp overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kulbacka, Julita; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Choromańska, Anna; Rembiałkowska, Nina; Surowiak, Paweł; Kulbacki, Marek; Kotulska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation (EP) can effectively support the penetration of macromolecules from the extracellular space into cells. Electropores induced by the influence of electromagnetic field generate additional paths of transport for macromolecules. The aim of this study was evaluation of the electroporation effect on doxorubicin transport efficiency to human colon (LoVo and LoVo/DX) and gastric (EPG85-257/P and EPG85-257/RDB) adenocarcinoma cells with overexpression of P-glycoprotein and murine macrophage cell line (P388/D1). In our EP experiments cells were placed into a cuvette with aluminum electrodes and pulsed with five square electric pulses of 1300 V/cm and duration of 50 μs each. Cells were also treated with low doxorubicin concentration ([DOX]=1.7 μM). The ultrastructure (TEM) and changes of P-glycoprotein expression of tumor cells subjected to electric field were monitored. The mitochondrial cell function and trypan blue staining were evaluated after 24h. Our results indicate the most pronounced effect of EP with DOX and disturbed ultrastructure in resistant gastric and colon cells with decrease of P-gp expression. Electroporation may be an attractive delivery method of cytostatic drugs in chemotherapy, enabling reduction of drug dose, exposure time and side effects.

  16. Previous heat shock treatment inhibits Mayaro virus replication in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, P L; Godinho-Netto, M C; Carvalho Mda, G

    1997-01-01

    Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were submitted to mild or severe heat shock (42 degrees C or 44 degrees C) for 1 h, while another group of cells was double-heat-shocked (submitted to 42 degrees C for 1 h, returned to 37 degrees C for 3 h, then exposed to 44 degrees C for 1 h). After each heat treatment, the cells were infected with Mayaro virus for 24 h and incubated at 37 degrees C. The results showed that the double-heat-shocked thermotolerant cells exhibited a 10(4)-fold virus titre inhibition, despite the recovery of protein synthesis and original morphology 24 h post-infection. In contrast, cells submitted to mild or severe heat shock exhibited weaker inhibition of Mayaro virus titre (10(2)-fold). The mildly heat-shocked cells also presented a full recovery in protein synthesis, which was not observed in severely heat-shocked cells. These results indicate that exposure of A549 cells to a mild or to a double heat shock treatment before Mayaro virus infection induces an antiviral state.

  17. Rab27A regulates exosome secretion from lung adenocarcinoma cells A549: involvement of EPI64.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhai; Hu, Yunsheng; Jiang, Tao; Han, Yong; Han, Guoliang; Chen, Jiakuan; Li, Xiaofei

    2014-11-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted into the extracellular compartment by exocytosis. The unique composition of exosomes can be transported to other cells which allow cells to exert biological functions at distant sites. However, in lung cancer, the regulation of exosome secretion was poorly understood. In this study, we employed human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells to determine the exosome secretion and involved regulation mechanism. We found that Rab27A was expressed in A549 cells and the reduction of Rab27A by Rab27A-specific shRNA could significantly decrease the secretion of exosome by A549 cells. EPI64, a candidate GAP that is specific for Rab27, was also detected in A549 cells. By pull-down assay, we found that EPI64 participated in the exosome secretion of A549 cells by acting as a specific GAP for Rab27A, not Rab27B. Overexpression of EPI64 enhanced exosome secretion. Taken together, in A549 cells, EPI64 could regulate the exosome secretion by functioning as a GAP specific for Rab27A.

  18. Mechanism of arctigenin-mediated specific cytotoxicity against human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Susanti, Siti; Iwasaki, Hironori; Inafuku, Masashi; Taira, Naoyuki; Oku, Hirosuke

    2013-12-15

    The lignan arctigenin (ARG) from the herb Arctium lappa L. possesses anti-cancer activity, however the mechanism of action of ARG has been found to vary among tissues and types of cancer cells. The current study aims to gain insight into the ARG mediated mechanism of action involved in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in lung adenocarcinoma cells. This study also delineates the cancer cell specificity of ARG by comparison with its effects on various normal cell lines. ARG selectively arrested the proliferation of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase through the down-regulation of NPAT protein expression. This down-regulation occurred via the suppression of either cyclin E/CDK2 or cyclin H/CDK7, while apoptosis was induced through the modulation of the Akt-1-related signaling pathway. Furthermore, a GSH synthase inhibitor specifically enhanced the cytotoxicity of ARG against cancer cells, suggesting that the intracellular GSH content was another factor influencing the susceptibility of cancer cells to ARG. These findings suggest that specific cytotoxicity of ARG against lung cancer cells was explained by its selective modulation of the expression of NPAT, which is involved in histone biosynthesis. The cytotoxicity of ARG appeared to be dependent on the intracellular GSH level.

  19. Resistance of cervical adenocarcinoma cells (HeLa) to venom from the scorpion Centruroides limpidus limpidus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus (Cll) is a mixture of pharmacologically active principles. The most important of these are toxic proteins that interact both selectively and specifically with different cellular targets such as ion channels. Recently, anticancer properties of the venom from other scorpion species have been described. Studies in vitro have shown that scorpion venom induces cell death, inhibits proliferation and triggers the apoptotic pathway in different cancer cell lines. Herein, after treating human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells with Cll crude venom, their cytotoxic activity and apoptosis induction were assessed. Results Cll crude venom induced cell death in normal macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. However, through viability assays, HeLa cells showed high survival rates after exposure to Cll venom. Also, Cll venom did not induce apoptosis after performing ethidium bromide/acridine orange assays, nor was there any evidence of chromatin condensation or DNA fragmentation. Conclusions Crude Cll venom exposure was not detrimental to HeLa cell cultures. This may be partially attributable to the absence of specific HeLa cell membrane targets for molecules present in the venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus. Although these results might discourage additional studies exploring the potential of Cll venom to treat human papilloma cervical cancer, further research is required to explore positive effects of crude Cll venom on other cancer cell lines. PMID:24004568

  20. Different effects of bile acids, ursodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid, on cell growth and cell death in human colonic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Fuke, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomoko; Miyashita, Kazumi; Yamanaka, Takenari; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nabeshima, Kazuo; Nakano, Takeshi; Takase, Koujiro

    2005-10-01

    Secondary bile acids have been implicated as an important etiological factor in colorectal cancer. We investigated the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the growth and cytotoxicity in HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells. Proliferation assay, cell cycle analysis and cell death characterization by bile acids were performed. Both UDCA and DCA reduced their proliferation rate of HT29 over 48 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner compared with control cultures. In terms of cell cycle effects, however, UDCA induced G2/M arrest, while DCA induced G1 arrest in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. As for the effects of each bile acid on cell toxicity, UDCA induced early apoptosis and DCA induced both early apoptosis and necrosis. Bile acids play an important role in regulating cell survival and cell death in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  1. Stereological Quantification of Cell-Cycle Kinetics and Mobilization of Epithelial Stem Cells during Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Eduardo; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Galván-Hernández, Claudio I; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a stereology method to obtain reliable estimates of the total number of proliferative and migratory epithelial cells after wounding. Using pulse and chase experiments with halogenated thymidine analogs such as iododeoxyuridine (IdU) and chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU), it is possible to track epithelial populations with heterogeneous proliferative characteristics through skin compartments. The stereological and tissue processing methods described here apply widely to address important questions of skin stem-cell biology.

  2. Protocadherin-1 Localization and Cell-Adhesion Function in Airway Epithelial Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Faura Tellez, Grissel; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Nijboer-Brinksma, Susan; Vandepoele, Karl; Noordhoek, Jacobien A.; Heijink, Irene; de Vries, Maaike; Smithers, Natalie P.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Wiffen, Laura; van Roy, Frans; Holloway, John W.; Lackie, Peter M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The asthma gene PCDH1 encodes Protocadherin-1, a putative adhesion molecule of unknown function expressed in the airway epithelium. Here, we characterize the localization, differential expression, homotypic adhesion specificity and function of PCDH1 in airway epithelial cells in asthma. Methods We performed confocal fluorescence microscopy to determine subcellular localization of PCDH1 in 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) grown at air-liquid interface. Next, to compare PCDH1 expression and localization in asthma and controls we performed qRT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy in PBECs and immunohistochemistry on airway wall biopsies. We examined homotypic adhesion specificity of HEK293T clones overexpressing fluorescently tagged-PCDH1 isoforms. Finally, to evaluate the role for PCDH1 in epithelial barrier formation and repair, we performed siRNA knockdown-studies and measured epithelial resistance. Results PCDH1 localized to the cell membrane at cell-cell contact sites, baso-lateral to adherens junctions, with increasing expression during epithelial differentiation. No differences in gene expression or localization of PCDH1 isoforms expressing the extracellular domain were observed in either PBECs or airway wall biopsies between asthma patients and controls. Overexpression of PCDH1 mediated homotypic interaction, whereas downregulation of PCDH1 reduced epithelial barrier formation, and impaired repair after wounding. Conclusions In conclusion, PCDH1 is localized to the cell membrane of bronchial epithelial cells baso-lateral to the adherens junction. Expression of PCDH1 is not reduced nor delocalized in asthma even though PCDH1 contributes to homotypic adhesion, epithelial barrier formation and repair. PMID:27701444

  3. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  4. Effects of amniotic epithelial cell transplantation in endothelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Vácz, Gabriella; Cselenyák, Attila; Cserép, Zsuzsanna; Benkő, Rita; Kovács, Endre; Pankotai, Eszter; Lindenmair, Andrea; Wolbank, Susanne; Schwarz, Charlotte M.; Horváthy, Dénes B.; Kiss, Levente; Hornyák, István; Lacza, Zsombor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) are promising tools for endothelial repair in vascular regenerative medicine. We hypothesized that these epithelial cells are capable of repairing the damaged endothelial layer following balloon injury of the carotid artery in adult male rats. Results Two days after injury, the transplanted hAECs were observed at the luminal side of the arterial wall. Then, 4 weeks after the injury, significant intimal thickening was observed in both untreated and cell implanted vessels. Constriction was decreased in both implanted and control animals. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a few surviving cells in the intact arterial wall, but no cells were observed at the site of injury. Interestingly, acetylcholine-induced dilation was preserved in the intact side and the sham-transplanted injured arteries, but it was a trend toward decreased vasodilation in the hAECs’ transplanted vessels. Conclusion We conclude that hAECs were able to incorporate into the arterial wall without immunosuppression, but failed to improve vascular function, highlighting that morphological implantation does not necessarily result in functional benefits and underscoring the need to understand other mechanisms of endothelial regeneration. PMID:28180006

  5. Breast primary epithelial cells that escape p16-dependent stasis enter a telomere-driven crisis state.

    PubMed

    Feijoo, Purificación; Terradas, Mariona; Soler, David; Domínguez, Daniel; Tusell, Laura; Genescà, Anna

    2016-01-13

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women, but some basic questions remain in breast cancer biology. To answer these, several cell models were developed. Recently, the use of improved cell-culture conditions has enabled the development of a new primary cell model with certain luminal characteristics. This model is relevant because, after the introduction of a specific set of genetic elements, the transformed cells yielded tumors resembling human adenocarcinomas in mice. The use of improved cell-culture conditions supporting the growth of these breast primary epithelial cells was expected to delay or eliminate stress-induced senescence and lead to the propagation of normal cells. However, no studies have been carried out to investigate these points. Propagation of breast primary epithelial cells was performed in WIT medium on Primaria plates. Immunofluorescence, western blot and qRT-PCR were used to detect molecular markers, and to determine the integrity of DNA damage-response pathways. Promoter methylation of p16 (INK4a) was assessed by pyrosequencing. In order to obtain a dynamic picture of chromosome instability over time in culture, we applied FISH methodologies. To better link chromosome instability with excessive telomere attrition, we introduced the telomerase reverse transcriptase human gene using a lentiviral vector. We report here that breast primary epithelial cells propagated in vitro with WIT medium on Primaria plates express some luminal characteristics, but not a complete luminal lineage phenotype. They undergo a p16-dependent stress-induced senescence (stasis), and the cells that escape stasis finally enter a crisis state with rampant chromosome instability. Chromosome instability in these cells is driven by excessive telomere attrition, as distributions of chromosomes involved in aberrations correlate with the profiles of telomere signal-free ends. Importantly, ectopic expression of the human TERT gene rescued their chromosomal

  6. MUC1 enhances invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Subramani, Durai B.; Besmer, Dahlia; Nath, Sritama; Tinder, Teresa L.; Bajaj, Ekta; Shanmugam, Kandavel; Lee, Yong Yook; Hwang, Sun IL; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2010-01-01

    Increased motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snai1 and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that trigger this process by repressing E-cadherin and enhancing vimentin and N-Cadherin protein expression. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in pancreatic tumors remain elusive. MUC1, a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is associated with the most invasive forms of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDA). In this study, we show that over expression of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer cells triggers the molecular process of EMT which translates to increased invasiveness and metastasis. EMT was significantly reduced when Muc1 was genetically deleted in a mouse model of PDA or when all seven tyrosines in the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 were mutated to phenylalanine (mutated MUC1 CT). Using proteomics, RT-PCR, and Western blotting, we revealed a significant increase in vimentin, Slug and Snail expression with repression of E-Cadherin in MUC1-expressing cells compared to cells expressing the mutated MUC1 CT. In the cells that carried the mutated MUC1 CT, MUC1 failed to co-immunoprecipitate with β-catenin and translocate to the nucleus thereby blocking transcription of the genes associated with EMT and metastasis. Thus, functional tyrosines are critical in stimulating the interactions between MUC1 and β-catenin and their nuclear translocation to initiate the process of EMT. This study signifies the oncogenic role of MUC1 CT and is the first to identify a direct role of the MUC1 in initiating EMT during pancreatic cancer. The data may have implications in future design of MUC1-targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21102519

  7. In vitro adhesion of Escherichia coli to porcine small intestinal epithelial cells: pili as adhesive factors.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E; Fusco, P C; Brinton, C C; Moon, H W

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains with pili (K99 or 987P) known to facilitate intestinal colonization adhered in vitro to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. These strains adhered equally to both ileal and jejunal epithelial cells. A laboratory E. coli strain that has type 1 pili also adhered to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. When nonpiliated cells derived from 987P+, K99+, or type 1 pilus+ strains were used for in vitro adhesion assays, they failed to adhere. The attachment of piliated bacteria to epithelial cells was a saturable process that plateaued at 30 to 40 bacterial cells attached per epithelial cell. Competitive inhibition of bacterial cell attachment to epithelial cells with purified pili showed that only purified 987P competed against the 987P+ strain and only purified type 1 pili competed against the type 1 pilus+ strain. Competition between a K99+ strain and K99 was not consistently achieved. K99+, 987P+, and type 1 pilus+ bacteria could be prevented from adhering to epithelial cells by Fab fragments specific for K99, 987P, or type 1 pili, respectively. Fab fragments specific for non-K99 bacterial surface antigens did not inhibit adhesion of the K99+ strain. It is concluded that adhesion of E. coli to porcine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is mediated by pili and that the epithelial cells used apparently had different receptors for different pili. PMID:357285

  8. In vitro adhesion of Escherichia coli to porcine small intestinal epithelial cells: pili as adhesive factors.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R E; Fusco, P C; Brinton, C C; Moon, H W

    1978-08-01

    Escherichia coli strains with pili (K99 or 987P) known to facilitate intestinal colonization adhered in vitro to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. These strains adhered equally to both ileal and jejunal epithelial cells. A laboratory E. coli strain that has type 1 pili also adhered to porcine intestinal epithelial cells. When nonpiliated cells derived from 987P+, K99+, or type 1 pilus+ strains were used for in vitro adhesion assays, they failed to adhere. The attachment of piliated bacteria to epithelial cells was a saturable process that plateaued at 30 to 40 bacterial cells attached per epithelial cell. Competitive inhibition of bacterial cell attachment to epithelial cells with purified pili showed that only purified 987P competed against the 987P+ strain and only purified type 1 pili competed against the type 1 pilus+ strain. Competition between a K99+ strain and K99 was not consistently achieved. K99+, 987P+, and type 1 pilus+ bacteria could be prevented from adhering to epithelial cells by Fab fragments specific for K99, 987P, or type 1 pili, respectively. Fab fragments specific for non-K99 bacterial surface antigens did not inhibit adhesion of the K99+ strain. It is concluded that adhesion of E. coli to porcine intestinal epithelial cells in vitro is mediated by pili and that the epithelial cells used apparently had different receptors for different pili.

  9. Oncolytic Activity of Avian Influenza Virus in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuto, Matteo S.; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Pavone, Silvia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Capua, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal form of human cancer, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. Building on the observation that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a tropism for the pancreas in vivo, the present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of IAVs as oncolytic agents for killing human PDA cell lines. Receptor characterization confirmed that human PDA cell lines express the alpha-2,3- and the alpha-2,6-linked glycan receptor for avian and human IAVs, respectively. PDA cell lines were sensitive to infection by human and avian IAV isolates, which is consistent with this finding. Growth kinetic experiments showed preferential virus replication in PDA cells over that in a nontransformed pancreatic ductal cell line. Finally, at early time points posttreatment, infection with IAVs caused higher levels of apoptosis in PDA cells than gemcitabine and cisplatin, which are the cornerstone of current therapies for PDA. In the BxPC-3 PDA cell line, apoptosis resulted from the engagement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, IAVs did not induce apoptosis in nontransformed pancreatic ductal HPDE6 cells. Using a model based on the growth of a PDA cell line as a xenograft in SCID mice, we also show that a slightly pathogenic avian IAV significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, these results are the first to suggest that IAVs may hold promise as future agents of oncolytic virotherapy against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. IMPORTANCE Despite intensive studies aimed at designing new therapeutic approaches, PDA still retains the most dismal prognosis among human cancers. In the present study, we provide the first evidence indicating that avian IAVs of low pathogenicity display a tropism for human PDA cells, resulting in viral RNA replication and a potent induction of apoptosis in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. These

  10. Preferential metabolism of N-nitrosodiethylamine by two cell lines derived from human pulmonary adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Falzon, M.; McMahon, J.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Schuller, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Diethylnitrosamine (DEN), in common with other nitrosamines, is a carcinogenic agent which produces tumors in a wide variety of tissues in experimental animals. The pulmonary Clara cell is a major target of N-nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis in hamsters and rats. DEN is believed to require metabolic activation to elicit its carcinogenic effects. The metabolism of (/sup 14/C)DEN was studied in two cell lines derived from human lung adenocarcinomas and two cell lines derived from human small cell lung cancers by monitoring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production and covalent binding of radiolabel from (/sup 14/C)DEN to the cell protein and DNA fractions. (/sup 14/C)DEN was metabolized by adenocarcinoma-derived NCI-H322 (with Clara cell features) and NCI-H358 (with features of alveolar type II cells) but not by NCI-H69 and NCI-H128 (derived from small cell carcinoma). Metabolism was markedly inhibited by heat denaturation of the cell protein. (/sup 14/C)DEN metabolism by NCI-H322 was greatly decreased when the incubation was carried out under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of a carbon monoxide enriched atmosphere. These results suggested the involvement of the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase enzyme system. Metabolism by NCI-H358 was also decreased in the absence of oxygen or presence of carbon monoxide although the effects were relatively small compared with the results with NCI-H322. On the other hand, aspirin or indomethacin, which are inhibitors of the fatty acid cyclooxygenase component of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase, preferentially inhibited (/sup 14/C)DEN metabolism by NIC-H358. There were little or no effects of these inhibitors on the metabolism of DEN in NCI-H322. The data suggest that DEN metabolism in different lung cell types may be carried out by different enzyme systems which in turn may contribute to the selective effect of DEN in the lung.

  11. Photodynamic action of palmatine hydrochloride on colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Xiao, Qicai; Zhang, Na; Xue, Changhu; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Zhang, Hongwei; Xu, Chuanshan; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2016-09-01

    Palmatine hydrochloride (PaH) is a natural active compound from a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The present study aims to evaluate the effect of PaH as a new photosensitizer on colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells upon light irradiation. Firstly, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of PaH were measured using a UV-vis spectrophotometer and RF-1500PC spectrophotometer, respectively. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) production of PaH was determined using 1, 3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF). Dark toxicity of PaH was estimated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular uptake of PaH in HT-29 cells was detected at different time intervals. Subellular localization of PaH in HT-29 cells was observed using confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. For photodynamic treatment, HT-29 cells were incubated with PaH and then irradiated by visible light (470nm) from a LED light source. Photocytotoxicity was investigated 24h after photodynamic treatment using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was observed 18h after photodynamic treatment using a flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining. Results showed that PaH has an absorption peak in the visible region from 400nm to 500nm and a fluorescence emission peak at 406nm with an excitation wavelength of 365nm. PaH was activated by the 470nm visible light from a LED light source to produce (1)O2. Dark toxicity showed that PaH alone treatment had no cytotoxicity to HT-29 cancer cells and NIH-3T3 normal cells after incubation for 24h. After incubation for 40min, the cellular uptake of PaH reached to the maximum and PaH was located in mitochondria. Photodynamic treatment of PaH demonstrated a significant photocytotoxicity on HT-29 cells. The rate of cell death increased significantly in a PaH concentration-dependent and light dose-dependent manner. Further evaluation revealed that the early and late apoptotic rate of HT-29 cells increased remarkably up to 21.54% and 5.39% after photodynamic treatment of

  12. Oncogenic ALK regulates EMT in non-small cell lung carcinoma through repression of the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Matteo; Poggio, Teresa; Panizza, Elena; Wang, Qi; Minero, Valerio G.; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Compagno, Mara; Altruda, Fiorella; Monti, Stefano; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) carries chromosomal rearrangements involving the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) gene. ALK-rearranged NSCLC are typically adenocarcinoma characterized by a solid signet-ring cell pattern that is frequently associated with a metastatic phenotype. Recent reports linked the presence of ALK rearrangement to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in NSCLC, but the extent and the mechanisms of an ALK-mediated EMT in ALK-rearranged NSCLC are largely unknown. We found that the ALK-rearranged H2228 and DFCI032, but not the H3122, cell lines displayed a mesenchymal phenotype. In these cell lines, oncogenic ALK activity dictated an EMT phenotype by directly suppressing E-cadherin and up-regulating vimentin expression, as well as expression of other genes involved in EMT. We found that the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 1 (ESRP1), a key regulator of the splicing switch during EMT, was repressed by EML4-ALK activity. The treatment of NSCLC cells with ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) led to up-regulation of ESRP1 and E-cadherin, thus reverting the phenotype from mesenchymal to epithelial (MET). Consistently, ESRP1 knock-down impaired E-cadherin up-regulation upon ALK inhibition, whereas enforced expression of ESRP1 was sufficient to increase E-cadherin expression. These findings demonstrate an ALK oncogenic activity in the regulation of an EMT phenotype in a subset of NSCLC with potential implications for the biology of ALK-rearranged NSCLC in terms of metastatic propensity and resistance to therapy. PMID:27119231

  13. Sinomenine inhibits proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    LV, YIFEI; LI, CHANGSHUN; LI, SHUANG; HAO, ZHIMING

    2011-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum. Results of studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and anti-arthritic effects of SIN are partially attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. COX-2 overexpression is associated with enhanced proliferation and angiogenesis of gastric cancer (GC). SGC-7901 cells were treated with different concentrations of SIN in order to observe its effect on the proliferation of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells and to explore the potential underlying molecular mechanism via the detection of COX-2 expression. Celecoxib was used as the positive control. Morphological alterations of the cells were observed microscopically. Cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. COX-2 expression was detected using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that SIN inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In the presence of SIN or celecoxib, SGC-7901 cells became round and detached morphologically, indicating cell apoptosis. The expression of COX-2 was inhibited by SIN in a dose-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings indicate that the protective effects of SIN are mediated through the inhibition of COX-2 expression. These findings suggest a novel therapy to treat inflammation-mediated gastric adenocarcinomata. PMID:22848259

  14. Primula auriculata Extracts Exert Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effects against HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Sahar; Ebrahim, Karim; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primula auriculata (Tootia) is one of the most important local medicinal plants in Hamedan district, Iran. To investigate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of crude methanolic extract and different fraction of it, we compared several methods on HT-29 human colon Adenocarcinoma cells. Cancer cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4, 5‑dimethylthiazolyl)2, 5‑diphenyl‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis induction was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (acridin orange/ethidium bromide, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, TUNEL assay and Caspase-3 activity assay). Crude methanolic extract (CM) inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among solvent fractions, the dichloromethane fraction (CF) was found to be the most toxic compared to other fractions. With double staining methods, high percentage of 40 µg/mL of (CM) and (CF) treated cells exhibited typical characteristics of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis induction was also revealed by apoptotic fragmentation of nuclear DNA and activation of caspas-3 in treated cells. These findings indicate that crude methanolic extract and dichloromethan fraction of P.auriculata induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in colon cancer cells and could be used as a source for new lead structures in drug design to combat colon cancer. PMID:27610172

  15. Evaluation of interacellular tamoxifen-induced fluorescence in tamoxifen-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Nathalie; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel; Gramain, Marie-Pierre; Bour, Corinne; Marchal, Sophie; Parache, Robert M.; Guillemin, Francois H.; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    1997-12-01

    A tamoxifen resistant cell line (MCF7TAM) was established from tamoxifen sensitive MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells expressing estrogen receptors. The resistant cell line was found to express estrogen receptors to similar level as the parent cell line but the receptors were found to be altered, having lost their ability to bind estradiol or tamoxifen. The fluorescence of eosin-tamoxifen ionic association was used to investigate intracellular location of tamoxifen in both sensitive and resistant cell lines. Fluorescence emission spectra of eosin, tamoxifen and eosin-tamoxifen complex ((lambda) exc equals 480 nm) were analyzed and showed that maximal fluorescence intensity of the complex ((lambda) em equals 540 nm) was four times higher than that of eosin alone while tamoxifen alone did not emit any fluorescence in this spectral range. In MCF-7 cells, tamoxifen was found to be diffusively located in the cytoplasm and nuclear fluorescence intensity was significantly lower. No difference was observed in fluorescence intensity or location in tamoxifen resistant cells, although it has been previously correlated with clinical responsiveness. Improvement of this fluorescence microscopy methodology appears necessary to provide accurate results taking into account the complexity of tamoxifen resistance molecular pathways.

  16. Identification of Distinct Tumor Subpopulations in Lung Adenocarcinoma via Single-Cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Min, Jae-Woong; Kim, Woo Jin; Han, Jeong A; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Hae-Ock; Choi, Sun Shim

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing, which is used to detect clinically important tumor subpopulations, is necessary for understanding tumor heterogeneity. Here, we analyzed transcriptomic data obtained from 34 single cells from human lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). To focus on the intrinsic transcriptomic signatures of these tumors, we filtered out genes that displayed extensive expression changes following xenografting and cell culture. Then, we performed clustering analysis using co-regulated gene modules rather than individual genes to minimize read drop-out errors associated with single-cell sequencing. This combined approach revealed two distinct intra-tumoral subgroups that were primarily distinguished by the gene module G64. The G64 module was predominantly composed of cell-cycle genes. E2F1 was found to be the transcription factor that most likely mediates the expression of the G64 module in single LADC cells. Interestingly, the G64 module also indicated inter-tumoral heterogeneity based on its association with patient survival and other clinical variables such as smoking status and tumor stage. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of single-cell RNA sequencing and the strength of our analytical pipeline for the identification of tumor subpopulations.

  17. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  18. RABL6A Promotes Oxaliplatin Resistance in Tumor Cells and Is a New Marker of Survival for Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Viviane P; Askeland, Ryan W; Zhang, Xuefeng; Reed, Sara M; Tompkins, Van S; Hagen, Jussara; McDowell, Bradley D; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J; Weydert, Jamie A; Mezhir, James J; Quelle, Dawn E

    2013-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by early recurrence following pancreatectomy, rapid progression, and chemoresistance. Novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed to both stratify patients for clinical trials and select patients for adjuvant therapy regimens. This study sought to determine the biological significance of RABL6A (RAB, member RAS oncogene family-like protein 6 isoform A), a novel pancreatic protein, in PDAC. Analyses of RABL6A protein expression in PDAC specimens from 73 patients who underwent pancreatic resection showed that RABL6A levels are altered in 74% of tumors relative to adjacent benign ductal epithelium. Undetectable RABL6A expression, found in 7% (5/73) of patients, correlated with improved overall survival (range 41 to 118 months with 3/5 patients still living), while patients with RABL6A expression had a worse outcome (range 3.3 to 100 months, median survival 20.3 months) (P = 0.0134). In agreement with those findings, RABL6A expression was increased in pancreatic cancer cell lines compared to normal pancreatic epithelial cells, and its knockdown inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Moreover, RABL6A depletion selectively sensitized cells to oxaliplatin-induced arrest and death. This work reveals that RABL6A promotes the proliferation, survival, and oxaliplatin resistance of PDAC cells, whereas its loss is associated with extended survival in patients with resected PDAC. Such data suggest RABL6A is a novel biomarker of PDAC and potential target for anticancer therapy.

  19. Bimodal Analysis of Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration in Two Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Alka A.; Lu, Jenny; Jeon, Junhwan; Weaver, Alissa M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the “directional-mode” (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the “re-orientation-mode” (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the two-hour mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration. PMID:18982450

  20. Xenobiotic induction of quinone oxidoreductase activity in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tumminia, S J; Rao, P V; Zigler, J S; Russell, P

    1993-12-08

    Xenobiotic regulatory elements have been identified for enzymes which ameliorate oxidative damage in cells. Zeta (zeta)-crystallin, a taxon-specific enzyme/crystallin shown to be a novel NADPH-dependent quinone reductase, is found in a number of tissues and cell types. This study shows that zeta-crystallin is present in mouse lens epithelium, as well as in the alpha TN4 mouse lens epithelial cell line. To determine whether zeta-crystallin is an inducible quinone reductase, cell cultures were exposed to the xenobiotics, 1,2-naphthoquinone and beta-naphthoflavone. Assays of cellular homogenates showed that quinone reductase activity was stimulated greater than 70% and 90%, respectively, over the control cells. This observed activity was sensitive to dicumarol, a potent inhibitor of quinone reductase activity. 1,2-Naphthoquinone- and beta-naphthoflavone-exposed cells were found to exhibit 1.47- and 1.68-fold increases, respectively, in zeta-crystallin protein concentration. A comparable increase in zeta-crystallin mRNA was indicative of an induction in zeta-crystallin expression in response to naphthalene challenge. Lens epithelial cells were also checked for DT-diaphorase, a well-known cellular protective enzyme which can catalyze the two-electron reduction of quinones. Slot blot analyses indicated that alpha TN4 cells exposed to 1,2-naphthoquinone and beta-naphthoflavone exhibited 2.71- and 6.81-fold increases in DT-diaphorase concentration when compared to the control cells. The data suggest that while DT-diaphorase is most likely responsible for the majority of the observed increase in quinone reductase activity, the zeta-crystallin gene also undergoes activation which is apparently mediated by a xenobiotic-responsive element.

  1. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial sodium channels in rat alveolar type 2 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshizumi; Helms, My N; Eaton, Amity F; Self, Julie; Ramosevac, Semra; Jain, Lucky; Bao, Hui-Fang; Eaton, Douglas C

    2013-03-15

    We and others have shown that epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) in alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells are activated by β2 agonists, steroid hormones, elevated oxygen tension, and by dopamine. Although acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) have been previously described in the lung, there are few reports of whether cholinergic agonists alter sodium transport in the alveolar epithelium. Therefore, we investigated how cholinergic receptors regulate ENaC activity in primary cultures of rat AT2 cells using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings to assess ENaC activity. We found that the muscarinic agonists, carbachol (CCh) and oxotremorine, activated ENaC in a dose-dependent manner but that nicotine did not. CCh-induced activation of ENaC was blocked by atropine. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry suggested that muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (mAChRs) but not nicotinic receptors were present in AT2 cells. Endogenous RhoA and GTP-RhoA increased in response to CCh and the increase was reduced by pretreatment with atropine. We showed that Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), abolished endogenous ENaC activity and inhibited the activation of ENaC by CCh. We also showed that ROCK signaling was necessary for ENaC stability in 2F3 cells, a model for AT2 cells. Our results showed that muscarinic agonists activated ENaC in rat AT2 cells through M2 and/or M3 mAChRs probably via a RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  2. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Chronic Cervicitis, Cervical Adenocarcinoma, Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Squamus Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaie-Kashani, Elahe; Bouzari, Majid; Talebi, Ardeshir; Arbabzadeh-Zavareh, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Recent studies show that human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is present in all cervical carcinomas and in some cervicitis cases, with some geographical variation in viral subtypes. Therefore determination of the presence of HPV in the general population of each region can help reveal the role of these viruses in tumors. Objectives: This study aimed to estimate the frequency of infection with HPV in cervicitis, cervical adenocarcinoma, intraepithelial neoplasia and squamus cell carcinoma samples from the Isfahan Province, Iran. Patients and Methods: One hundred and twenty two formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples of crevicitis cases and different cervix tumors including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (I, II, III), squamus cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma were collected from histopathological files of Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan. Data about histopathological changes were collected by reexamination of the hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. DNA was extracted and subjected to Nested PCR using consensus primers, MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+, designed for amplification of a conserved region of the genome coding for L1 protein. Results: In total 74.5% of the tested samples were positive for HPV. Amongst the tested tumors 8 out of 20 (40%) of CIN (I, II, III), 5 out of 21 (23.8%) of adenocarcinoma cases and 78 out of 79 chronic cervicitis cases were positive for HPV. Conclusions: The rate of different carcinomas and also the rate of HPV infection in each case were lower than other reports from different countries. This could be correlated with the social behavior of women in the area, where they mostly have only one partner throughout their life, and also the rate of smoking behavior of women in the studied population. On the other hand the rate of HPV infection in chronic cervicitis cases was much higher than cases reported by previous studies. This necessitates more

  3. Nerve growth factor modulate proliferation of cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyu; Li, Zhongguo; Qiu, Liangxiu; Zhao, Changsong; Hu, Zhulin

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF. MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570 nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did. Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  4. Force dependence of phagosome trafficking in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Rebekah; Koll, Andrew T.; Altman, David

    2014-09-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play an integral role in the renewal of photoreceptor disk membranes. As rod and cone cells shed their outer segments, they are phagocytosed and degraded by the RPE, and a failure in this process can result in retinal degeneration. We have studied the role of myosin VI in nonspecific phagocytosis in a human RPE primary cell line (ARPE-19), testing the hypothesis that this motor generates the forces required to traffic phagosomes in these cells. Experiments were conducted in the presence of forces through the use of in vivo optical trapping. Our results support a role for myosin VI in phagosome trafficking and demonstrate that applied forces modulate rates of phagosome trafficking.

  5. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  6. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Jelena R; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H

    2015-09-15

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49f(hi)/EpCAM(-) population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis.

  7. Metformin inhibits salivary adenocarcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuqi; Yu, Tao; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Tianqing; Zhou, Yang; He, Fan; Kurago, Zoya; Myssiorek, David; Wu, Yingjie; Lee, Peng; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of metformin have been observed in many types of cancer. However, its effect on human salivary gland carcinoma is unknown. The effect of metformin alone or in combination with pp242 (an mTOR inhibitor) on salivary adenocarcinoma cells growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that metformin suppressed HSY cell growth in vitro in a time and dose dependent manner associated with a reduced expression of MYC onco-protein, and the same inhibitory effect of metformin was also confirmed in HSG cells. In association with the reduction of MYC onco-protein, metformin significantly restored p53 tumor suppressor gene expression. The distinctive effects of metformin and PP242 on MYC reduction and P53 restoration suggested that metformin inhibited cell growth through a different pathway from PP242 in salivary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the anti-tumor efficacy of metformin was confirmed in vivo as indicated by the increases of tumor necrosis and reduced proliferation in xenograft tumors from metformin treated group. For the first time, the inhibitory effect of metformin on human salivary gland tumor cells was documented. Moreover, metformin inhibitory effects were enhanced by mTOR inhibitor suggesting that metformin and mTOR inhibitor utilize distinctive signaling pathways to suppress salivary tumor growth. PMID:26885449

  8. Characterization of binding of four monoclonal antibodies to the human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, K; Marks, A; Baumal, R

    1987-05-01

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (10B, IgG1; 8C, IgG2a; M2A, IgG2a; M2D, IgG2b) were characterized with respect to their binding to the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY, using displacement assays and Scatchard plot analyses. The four mAb reacted with different antigens on the surface of HEY cells, with affinity constants ranging from 1 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) M-1. The number of binding sites per cell for each antibody was approximately 2 X 10(4). mAb 8C and M2D remained associated with the cell surface following binding to their respective antigens, while mAb 10B was rapidly internalized, with 50% of the bound mAb being lost from the cell surface during 4 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. These different binding characteristics of the mAb may influence their ability to target radioactivity and cytotoxic drugs to HEY cells.

  9. Antiproliferative effects and mechanisms of liver X receptor ligands in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Candelaria, Nicholes R; Addanki, Sridevi; Zheng, Jine; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Karaboga, Husna; Dey, Prasenjit; Gabbi, Chiara; Vedin, Lise-Lotte; Liu, Ka; Wu, Wanfu; Jonsson, Philip K; Lin, Jean Z; Su, Fei; Bollu, Lakshmi Reddy; Hodges, Sally E; McElhany, Amy L; Issazadeh, Mehdi A; Fisher, William E; Ittmann, Michael M; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Lin, Chin-Yo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is difficult to detect early and is often resistant to standard chemotherapeutic options, contributing to extremely poor disease outcomes. Members of the nuclear receptor superfamily carry out essential biological functions such as hormone signaling and are successfully targeted in the treatment of endoc