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Sample records for adenocarcinoma hela cells

  1. Resistance of cervical adenocarcinoma cells (HeLa) to venom from the scorpion Centruroides limpidus limpidus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus (Cll) is a mixture of pharmacologically active principles. The most important of these are toxic proteins that interact both selectively and specifically with different cellular targets such as ion channels. Recently, anticancer properties of the venom from other scorpion species have been described. Studies in vitro have shown that scorpion venom induces cell death, inhibits proliferation and triggers the apoptotic pathway in different cancer cell lines. Herein, after treating human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells with Cll crude venom, their cytotoxic activity and apoptosis induction were assessed. Results Cll crude venom induced cell death in normal macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. However, through viability assays, HeLa cells showed high survival rates after exposure to Cll venom. Also, Cll venom did not induce apoptosis after performing ethidium bromide/acridine orange assays, nor was there any evidence of chromatin condensation or DNA fragmentation. Conclusions Crude Cll venom exposure was not detrimental to HeLa cell cultures. This may be partially attributable to the absence of specific HeLa cell membrane targets for molecules present in the venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus. Although these results might discourage additional studies exploring the potential of Cll venom to treat human papilloma cervical cancer, further research is required to explore positive effects of crude Cll venom on other cancer cell lines. PMID:24004568

  2. Methanolic extracts from brown seaweeds Dictyota cilliolata and Dictyota menstrualis induce apoptosis in human cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Telles, Cinthia Beatrice Silva; Costa, Mariana Santana Santos Pereira; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Costa, Leandro Silva; Keesen, Tatjana Souza Lima; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the second most common female tumor worldwide, surpassed only by breast cancer. Natural products from seaweeds evidencing apoptotic activity have attracted a great deal of attention as new leads for alternative and complementary preventive or therapeutic anticancer agents. Here, methanol extracts from 13 species of tropical seaweeds (Rhodophytas, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta) collected from the Northeast of Brazil were assessed as apoptosis-inducing agents on human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa). All extracts showed different levels of cytotoxicity against HeLa cells; the most potent were obtained from the brown alga Dictyota cilliolata (MEDC) and Dictyota menstrualis (MEDM). In addition, MEDC and MEDM also inhibits SiHa (cervix carcinoma) cell proliferation. Studies with these two extracts using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that HeLa cells exposed to MEDM and MEDC exhibit morphological and biochemical changes that characterize apoptosis as shown by loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and sub-G1 cell cycle phase accumulation, also MEDC induces cell cycle arrest in cell cycle phase S. Moreover, the activation of caspases 3 and 9 by these extracts suggests a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis route. However, other routes cannot be ruled out. Together, these results point out the methanol extracts of the brown algae D. mentrualis and D. cilliolata as potential sources of molecules with antitumor activity. PMID:25871374

  3. Modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis by trimethyltin chloride in human tumour cells: neuroblastoma SY5Y and cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa S3.

    PubMed

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Splettstoesser, Frank; Dopp, Elke; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2005-12-01

    Physiological modifications of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) levels trigger and/or regulate a diversity of cellular activities (e.g. neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, muscular contraction, cell proliferation), while calcium overloads could result in cytotoxicity. Previously, we have shown that trimethyltin chloride (Me3SnCl; TMT) modulates calcium homeostasis in cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa S3) cells [Florea, A.-M., Dopp, E., Büsselberg, D., 2005. TMT induces elevated calcium transients in HeLa cells: types and levels of response. Cell Calcium 37, 252-258]. Here we compare [Ca2+]i-changes induced by trimethyltin chloride in neuroblastoma SY5Y and HeLa S3 cells using calcium-sensitive dyes (fluo-4/AM (fluo-4) and rhod-2/AM (rhod-2)) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). TMT-induced calcium elevations in neuroblastoma SY5Y as well as in HeLa S3 cells. [Ca2+]i rose to a sustained plateau or to transient spikes. Overall, the detected averaged increase of the maximum calcium elevation were: 0.5 microM approximately 125.6%; 5 microM approximately 130.1%; 500 microM approximately 145% in HeLa S3 cells and 0.5 microM approximately 133.3%; 5 microM approximately 136.1%; 500 microM approximately 147.1% in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells. The calcium rise derived from internal stores did not significantly depend on the presence of calcium in the external solution: approximately 109% (no calcium added) versus approximately 117% (2 mM calcium; 5 microM TMT) in HeLa cells. This difference was similar in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells, were approximately 127% versus approximately 136% increase (5 microM TMT) were measured. Staining of calcium stores with rhod-2 showed a TMT-induced [Ca2+]i-decrease in the stores followed by an increase of the calcium concentration in the nuclei of the two cell lines tested. Our results suggest that toxic effects in human tumour cells after exposure to trimethyltin compounds might be due to an elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  4. Specific RNA-cleaving activities from HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, S; Yehle, C O; Robertson, H D; Dickson, E

    1980-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation of HeLa cells was carried out under gentle conditions to isolate enzymes that cleave RNA precursors in a specific manner. Four separate activities--cleavage of HeLa cell heterogeneous nuclear RNA, the HeLa cell 45S rRNA precursor, RNA . DNA hybrids (RNase H), and the Escherichia coli tRNATyr precursor (RNase P)--were revealed by these studies. The specificity and limited nature of these cleavages suggest that they are due to eukaryotic RNA-processing enzymes. The virtual absence of random nucleases from these enzymes was demonstrated by their inability to cleave the 8000-base early mRNA precursor of bacteriophage T7, E. coli 30S rRNA precursor, or HeLa cytoplasmic poly(A)-containing RNA. Images PMID:6930639

  5. Autophagy facilitates Salmonella replication in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong B; Croxen, Matthew A; Marchiando, Amanda M; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2014-03-11

    Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE As a host defense system, autophagy is known to target a population of Salmonella for degradation and hence restricting Salmonella replication. In contrast to this concept, a recent report showed that knockdown of Rab1, a GTPase required for autophagy of Salmonella, decreases Salmonella replication in HeLa cells. Here, we have reexamined the fate of Salmonella targeted by autophagy by various cell biology-based assays. We found that the association of autophagy components with cytosolic Salmonella increases shortly after initiation of intracellular bacterial replication. Furthermore, through a live-cell imaging method, a subset of cytosolic Salmonella was found to be extensively associated with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3, and they replicated quickly. Most importantly, depletion of autophagy components significantly reduced the replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells. Hence, in contrast to previous reports, we propose

  6. Primary cilia found on HeLa and other cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Tia J; Falk, Matthias M

    2015-11-01

    For many years now, researchers have known of a sensory appendage on the surface of most differentiated cell types called primary cilium. Primary cilia are both chemo- and mechano-sensory in function and have an obvious role in cell cycle control. Because of this, it has been thought that primary cilia are not found on rapidly proliferating cells, for example, cancer cells. Here we report using immunofluorescent staining for the ciliary protein Arl13b that primary cilia are frequently found on HeLa (human epithelial adenocarcinoma) and other cancer cell lines such as MG63 (human osteosarcoma) commonly used for cell culture studies and that the ciliated population is significantly higher (ave. 28.6% and 46.5%, respectively in starved and 15.7-18.6% in un-starved cells) than previously anticipated. Our finding impacts the current perception of primary cilia formed in highly proliferative cells.

  7. In vitro study of 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy for apoptosis in human cervical HeLa cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Firdous, S.; Khurshid, A.; Noreen, L.; Zaidi, S. S. Z.; Ikram, M.

    2009-12-01

    5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA), belonging among the promising second generation of sensitizers, was evaluated as an inducer of photodamage on HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma) cell line. A diode laser (635 nm) was used as a source for initiation of the photodynamic effect. We studied the influence of different incubation times, various concentrations of sensitizer, different irradiation doses and various combinations of sensitizer and light doses on the photodamage of HeLa cells. Viability of cells was determined by means of neutral red assay. The quantitative cellular uptake of ALA sensitizer was done by spectrophotometric measurements. No prominent cytotoxic or phototoxic effects on HeLa were observed due to sensitizer or light doses when studied independently of each other. However phototoxicity evoked by laser irradiated sensitizer was detected in HeLa cell line.

  8. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  9. NF-κB plays a key role in microcystin-RR-induced HeLa cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Xuezhen; Fan, Huihui; Li, Shangchun; Xie, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are well-known cyanobacterial toxins produced in eutrophic waters and can act as potential carcinogens and have caused serious risk to human health. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical actions of cells exposure to MCs have been reported, and the mechanisms of MC-induced tumorigenesis and apoptosis are still unknown. In this study, we performed the first comprehensive in vitro investigation on carcinogenesis associated with nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and its downstream genes in HeLa cells (Human cervix adenocarcinoma cell line from epithelial cells) exposure to MC-RR. HeLa cells were treated with 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 µg/mL MC-RR for 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. HeLa cells presented dualistic responses to different doses of MCs. CCK8 assay showed that MC-RR exposure evidently enhanced cell viability of HeLa cells at lower MCs doses. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that lower MCs doses promoted G1/S transition and cell proliferation while higher doses of MCs induced apoptosis, with a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that MC-RR could increase/decrease NF-κB activity at lower/higher MC-RR doses, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of NF-κB downstream target genes including c-FLIP, cyclinD1, c-myc, and c-IAP2 showed the same variation trend as NF-κB activity both at mRNA and protein levels, which were induced by lower doses of MC-RR and suppressed by higher doses. Our data verified for the first time that NF-κB pathway may mediate MC-induced cell proliferation and apoptosis and provided a better understanding of the molecular mechanism for potential carcinogenicity of MC-RR.

  10. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. )

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  11. Juglans mandshurica Maxim extracts exhibit antitumor activity on HeLa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xin, Nian; Hasan, Murtaza; Li, Wei; Li, Yan

    2014-04-01

    The present study examined the potential application of Juglans mandshurica Maxim extracts (HT) for cancer therapy by assessing their anti‑proliferative activity, reduction of telomerase activity, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in S phase in HeLa cells. From the perspective of using HT as a herbal medicine, photomicroscopy and florescent microscopy techniques were utilized to characterize the effect of the extracts on telomerase activity and cell morphology. Flow cytometry was employed to study apoptosis and cell cycle of HeLa cells, and DNA laddering was performed. The results showed that HT inhibited cell proliferation and telomerase activity, induced apoptosis and caused S phase arrest of HeLa cells in vitro. HT inhibited HeLa cell proliferation significantly, and the highest inhibition rate was 83.7%. A trap‑silver staining assay showed that HT was capable of markedly decreasing telomerase activity of HeLa cells and this inhibition was enhanced in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. Results of a Hoechst 33258 staining assay showed that HeLa cells treated by HT induced cell death. Through DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA ladders of HeLa cells treated with HT were observed, indicating apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HT exhibited anti‑tumor effects comprising the inhibition of growth and telomerase activity as well as apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells.

  12. Stable tRNA precursors in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, F; Matsubara, M; Kato, N

    1984-01-01

    Two tRNA precursors were isolated from 32P-labeled or unlabeled HeLa cells by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were sequenced. These were the precursors of tRNAMet and tRNALeu, and both contained four extra nucleotides including 5'-triphosphates at their 5'-end and nine extra nucleotides including oligo U at their 3'-end. These RNAs are the first naturally occurring tRNA precursors from higher eukaryotes whose sequences have been determined. In these molecules, several modified nucleosides such as m2G, t6A and ac4C in mature tRNAs were undermodified. Two additional hydrogen bonds were formed in the clover leaf structures of these tRNA precursors. These extra hydrogen bonds may be responsible for the stabilities of these tRNA precursors. Images PMID:6514577

  13. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    PubMed

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016.

  14. pH changes during in vitro adherence of Escherichia coli to HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, K; Mann, M D; Bowie, M D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli-induced acidic pH conditions were observed during the in vitro adherence of E. coli to HeLa cells. No pH changes occurred in the absence of adherence. This suggests that adherence affects the function or interaction of HeLa cells and E. coli. PMID:7927801

  15. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HELA CELLS INFECTED WITH ADENOVIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Carl G.; Hamlin, Alice; Parker, Esther; van Ravenswaay, Theodore

    1956-01-01

    HeLa cells were infected with adenoviruses (types 1–4) and sectioned for electron microscopy after intervals of 20 to 48 hours. Clusters of virus-like particles were found within the nuclei of infected cultures but not in those of uninfected controls. The particles were often arranged in rows as if in crystalline formation. Maximal diameter of particles was approximately 65 mµ, and internal bodies were demonstrated. Lesions of infected cells included target-like structures of the nuclear membrane, large nuclear vacuoles (type 2), and increased numbers of large irregular electron-dense granules in the cytoplasm 48 hours after infection. Examination of infected cultures by light microscopy, using the Feulgen reaction, showed intranuclear inclusion bodies and a cytopathogenic effect consisting of clumping of cells without pyknosis of nuclei. A lipide stain showed numerous cytoplasmic granules that were not identical with the large, irregular, electron-dense granules of the cytoplasm. Practically all the cells showed the viral cytopathogenic effect, but only a minority of cells were found to contain virus-like particles or intranuclear inclusion bodies. PMID:13357696

  16. Real-time sonoporation through HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotopoulis, Spiros; Delalande, Anthony; Pichon, Chantal; Postema, Michiel

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical mechanisms of sonoporation, to understand and ameliorate ultrasound-assisted drug and gene delivery. Sonoporation is the transient permeabilisation of a cell membrane with help of ultrasound and/or an ultrasound contrast agent, allowing for the trans-membrane delivery and cellular uptake of macromolecules between 10 kDa and 3 MDa. We studied the behaviour of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles near cancer cells at low acoustic amplitudes. After administering an ultrasound contrast agent, HeLa cells were subjected to 6.6-MHz ultrasound with a mechanical index of 0.2 and observed with a highspeed camera. Microbubbles were seen to enter cells and rapidly dissolve. The quick dissolution after entering suggests that the microbubbles lose (part of) their shell whilst entering. We have demonstrated that lipid-shelled microbubbles can be forced to enter cells at a low mechanical index. Hence, if a therapeutic load is added to the bubble, ultrasound-guided delivery could be facilitated at diagnostic settings. However, these results may have implications for the safety regulations on the use of ultrasound contrast agents for diagnostic imaging.

  17. The genomic and transcriptomic landscape of a HeLa cell line.

    PubMed

    Landry, Jonathan J M; Pyl, Paul Theodor; Rausch, Tobias; Zichner, Thomas; Tekkedil, Manu M; Stütz, Adrian M; Jauch, Anna; Aiyar, Raeka S; Pau, Gregoire; Delhomme, Nicolas; Gagneur, Julien; Korbel, Jan O; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2013-08-07

    HeLa is the most widely used model cell line for studying human cellular and molecular biology. To date, no genomic reference for this cell line has been released, and experiments have relied on the human reference genome. Effective design and interpretation of molecular genetic studies performed using HeLa cells require accurate genomic information. Here we present a detailed genomic and transcriptomic characterization of a HeLa cell line. We performed DNA and RNA sequencing of a HeLa Kyoto cell line and analyzed its mutational portfolio and gene expression profile. Segmentation of the genome according to copy number revealed a remarkably high level of aneuploidy and numerous large structural variants at unprecedented resolution. Some of the extensive genomic rearrangements are indicative of catastrophic chromosome shattering, known as chromothripsis. Our analysis of the HeLa gene expression profile revealed that several pathways, including cell cycle and DNA repair, exhibit significantly different expression patterns from those in normal human tissues. Our results provide the first detailed account of genomic variants in the HeLa genome, yielding insight into their impact on gene expression and cellular function as well as their origins. This study underscores the importance of accounting for the strikingly aberrant characteristics of HeLa cells when designing and interpreting experiments, and has implications for the use of HeLa as a model of human biology.

  18. Auranofin induces apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Shin, Hye Rim; Han, Bo Ram; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Woo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Auranofin (Au), an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase, is a known anti‑cancer drug. In the present study, the anti‑growth effect of Au on HeLa cervical cancer cells was examined in association with levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). Au inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 of ~2 µM at 24 h. This agent induced apoptosis and necrosis, accompanied by the cleavage of poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The pan‑caspase inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl‑Val‑Ala‑Asp‑fluoromethylketone, prevented apoptotic cell death and each of the assessed caspase inhibitors inhibited necrotic cell death induced by Au. With respect to the levels of ROS and GSH, Au increased intracellular O2•- in the HeLa cells and induced GSH depletion. The pan‑caspase inhibitor reduced the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in Au‑treated HeLa cells. The antioxidant, N‑acetyl cysteine, not only attenuated apoptosis and necrosis in the Au‑treated HeLa cells, but also decreased the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in the cells. By contrast, L‑buthionine sulfoximine, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, intensified cell death O2•- and GSH depletion in the Au‑treated HeLa cells. In conclusion, Au induced apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via the induction of oxidative stress and the depletion of GSH.

  19. Tumoricidal effects of nanomaterials in HeLa cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar-E-Alam, M.; Kishwar, S.; Khan, Y.; Siddique, M.; Atif, M.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2011-11-01

    The current study exhibits the cellular response of HeLa (cervical cancer) cells to metal oxides ultrafine nanomaterials e.g. manganese dioxide nanowires (MnO2 NRs), iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) and zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) as bare and as conjugated with photosensitizers. For cytotoxic evaluations, the cellular morphology, (MTT) assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were used for cases with and without photo sensitizer as well illuminated with UV-visible laser exposed conditions. Three different photosensitizers were tested. These are 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), Photofrin® and protopor phyrin dimethyl ester (PPDME). Significant loss in cell viability was noted with 100-500 μg/ml in bare and conjugated forms of the metal oxides used. The effect was insignificant with lower concentrations (0.05-50 μg/ml). While notable anticancer effect of 5-ALA under 30 J/cm2 of diode laser irradiation was noted as compared to other photo sensitizer. By increasing the UV irradiation time of labeled cells, generation of ROS was observed, indicating the possibility of achieving efficient photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  20. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  2. Vesical clear cell adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis: A mullerian tumor, indistinguishable from ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eirwen M; Sun, Ying; Richardson, Ingride; Frimer, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Endometriosis is associated with increased rates of ovarian, particularly clear cell, adenocarcinomas. Malignant transformation of ovarian endometriosis is most common but rare cases have been reported in the bladder, abdominal wall, diaphragm, and rectum. We present the case of a 44-year-old female with vesical clear cell adenocarcinoma arising in a background of endometriosis in the absence of other pelvic endometriosis. The malignancy was diagnosed on transurethral resection of bladder tumor and managed with radical surgery. Histology and immunohistochemical findings were consistent mullerian origin and indistinguishable from similar tumors arising in the female genital tract. Extrapolating from the gynecologic literature, the recommendation was made for adjuvant chemotherapy. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal treatment paradigm for ovarian and bladder clear cell adenocarcinomas. PMID:27660815

  3. Quercetin suppresses HeLa cells by blocking PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Fang, Yong; Wang, Shi-Xuan

    2014-10-01

    To explore the effect of quercetin on the proliferation and apoptosis of HeLa cells, HeLa cells were incubated with quercetin at different concentrations. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay, cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin-V/PI double labeled cytometry and DNA ladder assay. Cell cycle was flow cytometrically determined and the morphological changes of the cells were observed under a fluorescence microscope after Hoechst 33258 staining and the apoptosis-related proteins in the HeLa cells were assessed by Western blotting. The results showed that quercetin significantly inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and induced obvious apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, quercetin induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in cell cycle-dependent manner because quercetin could induce arrest of HeLa cells at G0/G1 phase. Quercetin treatment down-regulated the expression of the PI3K and p-Akt. In addition, quercetin could down-regulate expression of bcl-2, up-regulate Bax, but exerted no effect on the overall expression of Akt. We are led to conclude that quercetin induces apoptosis via PI3k/Akt pathways, and quercetin has potential to be used as an anti-tumor agent against human cervix cancer.

  4. Anticancer activity of Bombyx batryticatus ethanol extract against the human tumor cell line HeLa.

    PubMed

    Wu, W P; Cao, J; Wu, J Y; Chen, H; Wang, D

    2015-01-15

    Anticancer activity of Bombyx batryticatus ethanol extract (BBE) against HeLa cells was studied using cell viability, DNA fragmentation, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses. The BBE inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. The MTT assay indicated that the BBE induced cytotoxicity in HeLa cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. When HeLa cells were treated for 48 h, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value for the BBE was 1.564 mg/mL. The microscopy results showed that HeLa cells were severely distorted and showed slow growth; some cells became round in shape when treated with 5 mg/mL BBE for 24 h. The DNA ladder results revealed excessive DNA fragmentation in HeLa cells treated with 7 mg/mL BBE for 36 h. The proapoptotic activity of the BBE was attributed to its ability to modulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax genes. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Bax were remarkably higher whereas those of Bcl-2 were lower than those in the control cells; this led to an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in cells treated with the BBE for 36 h. The results suggest that the BBE might play an important role in tumor growth suppression by inducing apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells via the regulation of the Bcl-2- and Bax-mediated apoptotic pathways.

  5. The deubiquitinating enzyme activity of USP22 is necessary for regulating HeLa cell growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Li; Zheng, Jie; Tang, Li-Juan; Han, Wei; Wang, Jian-Min; Liu, Dian-Wu; Tian, Qing-Bao

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) can regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis in many cancer cell types, while it is still unclear whether the deubiquitinating enzyme activity of USP22 is necessary for these processes. As little is known about the impact of USP22 on the growth of HeLa cell, we observed whether USP22 can effectively regulate HeLa cell growth as well as the necessity of deubiquitinating enzyme activity for these processes in HeLa cell. In this study, we demonstrate that USP22 can regulate cell cycle but not apoptosis in HeLa cell. The deubiquitinating enzyme activity of USP22 is necessary for this process as confirmed by an activity-deleted mutant (C185S) and an activity-decreased mutant (Y513C). In addition, the deubiquitinating enzyme activity of USP22 is related to the levels of BMI-1, c-Myc, cyclin D2 and p53. Our findings indicate that the deubiquitinating enzyme activity of USP22 is necessary for regulating HeLa cell growth, and it promotes cell proliferation via the c-Myc/cyclin D2, BMI-1 and p53 pathways in HeLa cell.

  6. Locomotory invasion of human cervical epithelium and avian fibroblasts by HeLa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, E M

    1982-10-01

    The locomotory invasive ability of HeLa cells was tested against: (a) embryonic chick heart fibroblasts (CHF); and (b) normal epithelial cells from human cervix (HCE) in explant confrontations. Data for analyses were obtained from replicate cultures fixed 24 h after junction and from 24-h time-lapse films. The mean invasion index for HeLa versus CHF did not indicate significant obstruction but analyses of hourly radial advance and orientation frequencies showed that obstruction eventually developed as postjunctional incubation time increased. Early contacts between HeLa and CHF demonstrated non-reciprocity of type I contact inhibition of locomotion by the tumour cells, which continued moving in their original direction to underlap contact-inhibited fibroblasts and eventually to occupy spaces vacated by them. When CHF population density increased and free space diminished, HeLa cells displayed directional and probably substrate-dependent contact inhibition. The high invasion index of HeLa versus HCE was largely due to occupation of previous HCE territory by tumour cells and only occasionally to actual infiltration of the epithelial sheet. After contact with HeLa, ruffling substrate-adherent marginal epithelial cells displayed contractile, type I contact inhibition of locomotion. After orientation changes, they gradually retreated. Against HCE, HeLa cells exhibited non-reciprocity of type I contact inhibition and continued radially forward, following the retreating epithelial margin. They did not move onto exposed upper surfaces of epithelial cells and did not underlap marginal cells firmly adherent to the substratum. Invasion of the epithelial sheet was seen only when initial access beneath a cell with a non-adherent margin was available. The contact relationships of isolated invading HeLa cells with their epithelial neighbours suggested successive non-reciprocal contact inhibition reactions.

  7. Anticancer Activity of Certain Herbs and Spices on the Cervical Epithelial Carcinoma (HeLa) Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Berrington, Danielle; Lall, Namrita

    2012-01-01

    Acetone extracts of selected plant species were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity against a noncancerous African green monkey kidney (Vero) cell line and an adenocarcinoma cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line. The plants studied were Origanum vulgare L. (Oregano), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Upright and ground cove rosemary), Lavandula spica L. (Lavender), Laurus nobilis L. (Bay leaf), Thymus vulgaris L. (Thyme), Lavandula x intermedia L. (Margaret Roberts Lavender), Petroselinum crispum Mill. (Curly leaved parsley), Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (Fennel), and Capsicum annuum L. (Paprika). Antioxidant activity was determined using a quantitative DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl) assay. The rosemary species exhibited effective radical scavenging capacity with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 3.48 ± 0.218 μg/mL and 10.84 ± 0.125 μg/mL and vitamin C equivalents of 0.351 g and 1.09 g for McConnell's Blue and Tuscan Blue, respectively. Cytotoxicity was measured using XTT (Sodium 3'-[1-(phenyl amino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis-[4-methoxy-6-nitro] benzene sulfonic acid hydrate) colorimetric assay. Only L. nobilis and O. vulgare exhibited pronounced effects on the HeLa cell line. Dose-dependent studies revealed IC(50) of 34.46 ± 0.48 μg/mL and 126.3 ± 1.00 μg/mL on the HeLa cells and on the Vero cells 124.1 μg/mL ± 18.26 and 163.8 μg/mL ± 2.95 for L. nobilis and O. vulgare, respectively. Light (eosin and haematoxylin staining) and confocal microscopy (Hoechst 33342, acridine orange, and propidium iodide staining) were used to evaluate the cytotoxic mechanism of action for L. nobilis and O. vulgare. PMID:22649474

  8. PX-12-induced HeLa cell death is associated with oxidative stress and GSH depletion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye Rim; You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2013-12-01

    PX-12, as an inhibitor of thioredoxin (Trx), has antitumor activity. However, little is known about the toxicological effect of PX-12 on cervical cancer cells. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effects of PX-12 on HeLa cervical cancer cells in association with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels were investigated. Based on MTT assays, PX-12 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 value of ~7 μM at 72 h. DNA flow cytometry analysis indicated that 5 and 10 μM PX-12 significantly induced a G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle. PX-12 also increased the number of dead cells and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-positive cells, which was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. All the investigated caspase inhibitors significantly rescued certain cells from PX-12-induced HeLa cell death. With respect to ROS and GSH levels, PX-12 increased ROS levels (including O2(•-)) in HeLa cells and induced GSH depletion. N-acetyl cysteine markedly reduced the levels of O2(•-) in PX-12-treated HeLa cells, and prevented apoptotic cell death and GSH depletion in these cells. By contrast, L-buthionine sulfoximine intensified cell death and GSH depletion in PX-12-treated HeLa cells. To conclude, this is the first study to demonstrate that PX-12 inhibits the growth of HeLa cells via G2/M phase arrest, as well as inhibiting apoptosis; the effect was associated with intracellular increases in ROS levels and GSH depletion.

  9. Optimizing A Lipocomplex-Based Gene Transfer Method into HeLa Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, Alimohammad; Banan, Mehdi; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant steps in gene expression studies is transferring genes into cell cultures. Despite there are different methods for gene delivery such as viral and non-viral producers, some cationic lipid reagents have recently developed to transfect into mam- malian cell lines. The main aim of this study was optimizing and improving lipocomplex based transient transfection procedures into HeLa cell line which is being used widely as a typical cell in biological studies. This study was an experimental research. In this work, pCMV β-Gal DNA plasmid was used as a reporter DNA for determining the rate of gene transfection into HeLa cells. To accomplish the highest gene delivery into HeLa cells, optimizing experiments were car- ried out in different volumes of FuGENE-HD, Lipofectamine(TM)2000 and X-tremeGENE. Also, we investigated tranasfection efficiency in presence of various cell densities of HeLa cells. Then, transfection efficiency and cell toxicity were measured by beta gal staining and trypan blue methods, respectively. Using FuGENE-HD in volume of 4µl along with 10(5) HeLa cells, transfection efficiency was higher (43.66 ± 1.52%) in comparison with the cationic lipids Lipofectamine(TM)2000 and X-tremeGENE. In addition, the rate of cell toxicity in presence of FuGENE-HD was less than 5%. In summary, the cationic lipid FuGENE-HD indicates a suitable potential to transfer DNA into HeLa cells and it can be an efficient reagent for gene delivery for HeLa cells in vitro. Moreover, it is worth designing and optimizing gene transfer experiments for other cell lines with FuGENE-HD due to its low toxicity and high efficiency.

  10. Rheological properties of mammalian cell culture suspensions: Hybridoma and HeLa cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Ryu, D D; Ballica, R

    1993-03-25

    Data on viscous (eta') and elastic (eta'') components of the complex viscosity versus oscillatory angular frequency (0.01 to 4.0 rad/s) with increasing strains were obtained for hybridoma cell (62'D3) and HeLa cell (S3) suspensions in PBS at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction using a Weissenberg rheogoniometer equipped with two parallel plate geometry at ambient temperature. Both cell suspensions exhibited shear thinning behavior. From the measured viscoelastic properties, the yield stress was calculated. Hybridoma cell suspension (15 microm as the mean diameter of cells) showed the yield stress at 550 dyne/cm(2) that was 1.8 times higher than the value of HeLa cell suspension (22 microm mean diameter) as measured at the oscillatory angular frequency, 4.0 rad/s. The apparent viscosities of HeLa cell suspension at four concentrations and varying steady shear rate were also determined using the Brookfield rotational viscometer. The yield stress to steady shear test was about 130 dyne/cm(2) for HeLa cell suspension at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction. The apparent viscosity was in the range about 1 approximately 1000 Poise depending on the cell concentration and shear rate applied. A modified semiempirical Mooney equation, eta = eta(0) exp[K gamma(.)(-beta)phi(c)(1 - K'' sigmaphi(c) /D)] was derived based on the cell concentration, the cell morphology, and the steady shear rate. The beta, shear rate index, was estimated as 0.159 in the range of shear rate, 0.16 to 22.1 s(-1), for the cell volume fractions from 0.6 to 0.9 (mL/mL). In this study, the methods of determining the shear sensitivity and the viscous and the elastic components of mammalian cell suspensions are described under the steady shear field.

  11. The critical role of quercetin in autophagy and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Zhu, Dingjun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of quercetin on autophagy and apoptosis of cancer cells have been widely reported, while effects on HeLa cells are still unclear. Here, HeLa cells were subjected to quercetin treatment, and then proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy were evaluated using MTT, flow cytometry, and MDC staining, respectively. The LC3-I/II, Beclin 1, active caspase-3, and S6K1 phosphorylation were detected using Western blot assay. The ultrastructure of HeLa was observed via transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our findings showed that quercetin can dose-dependently inhibit the growth of HeLa cells. The MDC fluorescence was enhanced with increased concentration of quercetin and hit a plateau at 50 μmol/l. Western blot assay revealed that LC3-I/II ratio, Beclin 1, and active caspase-3 protein were enforced in a dose-dependent method. However, the phosphorylation of S6K1 gradually decreased, concomitant with an increase of autophagy. In addition, TEM revealed that the number of autophagic vacuoles was peaked at 50 μmol/l of quercetin. Besides, interference of autophagy with 3-MA led to proliferation inhibition and increased apoptosis in HeLa cells, accompanied by the decreased LC3-I/II conversion and the increased active caspase-3. In conclusion, quercetin can inhibit HeLa cell proliferation and induce protective autophagy at low concentrations; thus, 3-MA plus quercetin would suppress autophagy and effectively increased apoptosis.

  12. Apoptosis and necrosis in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa G and BSC-40 cells.

    PubMed

    Liskova, Jana; Knitlova, Jarmila; Honner, Richard; Melkova, Zora

    2011-09-01

    In most cells, vaccinia virus (VACV) infection is considered to cause a lytic cell death, an equivalent of necrosis. However, upon infection of the epithelial cell lines HeLa G and BSC-40 with VACV strain Western Reserve (WR), we have previously observed an increased activation of and activity attributable to caspases, a typical sign of apoptosis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the type of cell death in VACV-infected cells HeLa G and BSC-40. In a cell-based flow cytometric assay, we showed a specific activation of caspase-2 and 4 in HeLa G and BSC-40 cells infected with VACV, strain WR, while we did not find any effects of inhibitors of calpain and cathepsin D and E. The actual activity of the two caspases, but also of caspase-3, was then confirmed in lysates of infected HeLa G, but not in BSC-40 cells. Accordingly, poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage was found increased only in infected HeLa G cells. Consequently, we have determined morphological features of apoptosis and/or activity of the executioner caspase-3 in infected HeLa G cells in situ, while only a background apoptosis was observed in infected BSC-40 cells. Finally, vaccination strains Dryvax and Praha were found to induce apoptosis in both HeLa G and BSC-40 cells, as characterized morphologically and by PARP cleavage. These findings may be important for understanding the differences in VACV-host interactions and post-vaccination complications in different individuals.

  13. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-09-15

    The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC₅₀ value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  14. Baicalein induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Guo, Congshan; Yang, Yanhong; Li, Fenglin; Zhang, Yanxia; Jiang, Bin; Li, Qingwang

    2015-03-01

    A number of studies have shown that baicalein shows high antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the inhibitory effect of baicalein on human cervical cancer HeLa cells was studied in vitro. HeLa cells were treated with high (100 µg/ml) and low (50 µg/ml) doses of baicalein, and cell growth inhibition rates were examined by the MTT assay. The morphological changes of apoptotic cells were observed under the light and electron microscope, while the rate of cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins was analyzed by western blot, and caspase-3 activation was examined by a caspase-3 activity assay and spectrophotometry. The results demonstrated that baicalein inhibits the proliferation of HeLa cells and induces apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent pathway, through downregulation of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein and upregulation of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), Fas, Fas ligand (FasL) and caspase-8. Thus, we conclude that baicalein induces apoptosis of HeLa cells via the mitochondrial and the death receptor pathways. Cell apoptosis in HeLa cells was most likely promoted by the activation of the proteolytic enzyme caspase-3 in both pathways.

  15. The effect of uranyl acetate on human lymphoblastoid cells (RPMI 6410) and HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, F. N.; Yang-Steppuhn, S. E.; Lalonde, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    RPMI 6410 cells and HeLa cells were exposed to uranyl acetate. In RPMI 6410 cell cultures this produced single-membrane-bound presumably lysosomal bodies (called "uraniosomes") containing electron-dense crystals in the cultured cells and crystalline deposits in extracellular locations. Neither uraniosomes nor extracellular uranium deposits were found in HeLa cell cultures. All uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits analysed by electron-probed X-ray analysis were found to contain uranium, potassium and phosphorus. Traces of sulphur were detected in some but not all uraniosomes and extracellular uranium deposits. Traces of calcium were found in all extracellular uranium deposits and in some uraniosomes also. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7093141

  16. ALDH1 might influence the metastatic capability of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tingting; Lu, Rongbiao; Li, Yiqing; Peng, Yongpai; Ding, Miao; Xie, Xiaofei; Lin, Zhongqiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent data suggest that tumor persistence and recurrence could be caused by the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis and used as a CSC marker. We previously reported that cervical carcinoma contains a small subpopulation of cells expressing ALDH1 [1]. In this study, we used small interfering RNA to suppress ALDH1 expression and introduced an ALDH1 reporting vector into HeLa cells followed by various in vitro assays. We showed that knockdown of ALDH1 expression reduced the cell migration ability of HeLa cells, whereas augmented expression of ALDH1 increased cell migration. However, there was no difference in the cellular proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and invasion. These results indicate that ALDH1 is directly involved in HeLa migration.

  17. Cell Culture on Nanopillar Sheet: Study of HeLa Cells on Nanopillar Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinobu; Kojima, Hiroko; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Kuwabara, Kosuke; Miyauchi, Akihiro; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2005-09-01

    This is the first report of the successful culturing of HeLa cells on nanopillar sheets—a new type of cell culture dish—in a different way from that on flat petri dishes. Nanopillar sheets were fabricated with a high-aspect ratio structure with a diameter of 80-1000 nm and a height of 1-3 μm using nanoprint technology. Nanopillar structure with 500 nm diameter and 1 μm height enabled easy subculture of the cells from the sheets without the conventional trypsinization method. Moreover, the HeLa cells divided and proliferated on the sheets in the same way as on the flat surfaces with different manner of adhesion.

  18. HeLa cell heterogeneity and coxsackievirus B3 cytopathic effect: implications for inter-laboratory reproducibility of results.

    PubMed

    Carson, Steven D; Pirruccello, Samuel J

    2013-04-01

    Concerns over cell line identities and contamination have led investigators to acquire fresh stocks of HeLa CCL-2 cells, but results with the HeLa CCL-2 cells do not always reproduce results with HeLa cells that have long history in the laboratory. When used for TCID(50) assays of Coxsackievirus B3/28 (CVB3/28), HeLa CCL-2 cells returned titers for CVB3/28 that were more than ten-fold lower than titers obtained using laboratory HeLa cells. The viral cytopathic effect was less distinct in the HeLa CCL-2 cultures, suggestive of a mixed population of cells with varied susceptibility to viral cytopathic effect. Analysis of short tandem repeat markers confirmed the identities of the cell lines as HeLa. Subpopulations in the HeLa CCL-2 culture, separated easily based on the speed with which they were released by trypsin-EDTA, differed in their susceptibilities to CVB3/28 cytopathic effect, and in their expression of the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The distinctions between Lab HeLa and HeLa CCL-2 cells were less obvious when infected with CVB3/RD, a strain selected for growth in RD cells. Results that differ among laboratories may be due to the use of HeLa cell strains with different histories, and experiments using HeLa CCL-2 available from the American Type Culture Collection are probably incapable of reproducing many of the published studies of Coxsackievirus that have used HeLa cells with laboratory-dependent histories.

  19. Targeting cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Romain; Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Faivre, Sandrine; de Gramont, Armand; Raymond, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030. Current therapeutic options are limited, warranting an urgent need to explore innovative treatment strategies. Due to specific microenvironment constraints including an extensive desmoplastic stroma reaction, PDAC faces major metabolic challenges, principally hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Their connection with oncogenic alterations such as KRAS mutations has brought metabolic reprogramming to the forefront of PDAC therapeutic research. The Warburg effect, glutamine addiction, and autophagy stand as the most important adaptive metabolic mechanisms of cancer cells themselves, however metabolic reprogramming is also an important feature of the tumor microenvironment, having a major impact on epigenetic reprogramming and tumor cell interactions with its complex stroma. We present a comprehensive overview of the main metabolic adaptations contributing to PDAC development and progression. A review of current and future therapies targeting this range of metabolic pathways is provided. PMID:26164081

  20. Targeting Diamond Nanoparticles into Folate-Receptor Expressing HeLa Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, V. A.; Vorobey, A. V.; Pavich, T. A.; Opitz, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied binding of synthesized folic acid-diamond nanoparticle conjugates to proliferatively active HeLa cells. In order to determine the binding of the complex to the cells, we used spectral luminescence methods and microscopy, which let us visualize localization of the conjugate in the cellular system in vitro. We show that the conjugate under study binds to folate-receptor expressing HeLa cells. We have established a determining role for the folate receptor in binding of the conjugate to the cells. Our studies suggest that is it possible to use the conjugate as a targeted nanoplatform for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to tumor cells.

  1. Adhesion of Candida albicans to HeLa cells: studies using polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Masayoshi; Giummelly, Philippe; Yazawa, Shin; Okawa, Yoshio

    2007-03-01

    The adherence to HeLa cells by the yeast-type cells of the Candida albicans NIH A-207 strain cultivated for 2 d at 27 degrees C in the yeast extract-added Sabouraud liquid medium (YSLM) and the 500 mM galactose-added yeast nitrogen base medium (YNB-Gal) was compared. The yeast cells cultured in the YNB-Gal clearly increased the adherence to the HeLa cells compared to the YSLM. The adherence drastically decreased by pronase treatment of the yeast cells. Next, to define the sugar receptors of the yeast cells, lactosylceramide (LC)-, the H type 1 antigen (HA)-, Lewis(a) antigen (Le(a))-, mannan- and BSA-coated polystyrene beads were used for the adherence to the yeast cells. Only the LC- and HA-beads were bound to the yeast cells. The adherence of the two beads to the yeast cells cultured in the YNB-Gal was higher than that to the yeast cells cultured in the YSLM. The yeast cell wall mannan-coated polystyrene beads did not adhere at all to the Hela cells. Based on these results, it is evident that the protein parts involving the LC and HA receptors on the surface of the yeast cells correlate with the adherence to the HeLa cells. PMID:17329863

  2. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Junye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Yan; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Libo; Guo, Guozhen

    2010-07-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  3. Effect of rapeseed peptide on DNA damage and apoptosis in Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaohui; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Moucheng; Zhuang, Shiwen; Yu, Wancong

    2010-09-01

    Rapeseed peptide (RSP), obtained by hydrolyzing rapeseed protein, has anticancer activity. In this study, the effects of RSP on proliferation rate, morphological changes, DNA damage, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma (Hela) cells were investigated. RSP treatment at a concentration of 640 mg/L for 4 days inhibited Hela cell proliferation significantly, as determined by the MTT assay. We observed a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity induced by RSP at 20-640 mg/L. After 4 days of 320 mg/L RSP treatment, typical apoptotic changes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using the comet assay, we found dramatic comet tails, indicating DNA damage by RSP (20-640 mg/L). Moreover, RSP treatment caused inhibition of Hela cell growth, with cycle arrest in the S phase and apoptosis induction. Taken together, the results suggested that rapeseed peptide could be a potential antitumor compound with an apoptotic mode of action.

  4. Effects of TGF-β1 on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer Hela Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Xia; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Guo, Qing-Xi; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Cheng-Wan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on the proliferation and apoptosis of cervical cancer Hela cells in vitro. Human cervical cancer Hela cells were cultured in vitro and divided into the experimental and control groups. In the experimental groups, Hela cells were stimulated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/mL), while Hela cells cultured in serum-free medium without TGF-β1 were used as controls. The CCK8 method was adopted to detect the effect of TGF-β1 on Hela cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to determine cell apoptosis 72 h after TGF-β1 treatment. Compared with the control group, the CCK-8 tests showed that different concentrations of TGF-β1 had no obvious effect on Hela cell proliferation 24 h after treatment (P > 0.05). However, upon 48 or 72 h of treatment, TGF-β1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of Hela cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). The flow cytometry results indicated that TGF-β1 influenced the apoptosis of human cervical cancer Hela cells in a dose-dependent manner after 72 h of treatment (P < 0.05). TGF-β1 significantly inhibited the growth and induced the apoptosis of human cervical Hela cells in vitro.

  5. Dual Anti-Metastatic and Anti-Proliferative Activity Assessment of Two Probiotics on HeLa and HT-29 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Zahra; Karami, Fatemeh; Neyazi, Nadia; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Karimi, Roya; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Taheri, Behrooz; Motevaseli, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lactobacilli are a group of probiotics with beneficial effects on prevention of cancer. However, there is scant data in relation with the impacts of probiotics in late-stage cancer progration, especially metastasis. The present original work was aimed to evaluate the anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activity of lactobacillus rhamnosus supernatant (LRS) and lactobacillus crispatus supernatant (LCS) on the human cervical and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HeLa and HT-29, respectively). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, the anti-proliferative activities of LRS and LCS were determined through MTT assay. MRC-5 was used as a normal cell line. Expression analysis of CASP3, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 genes was performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), following the cell synchronization. Results Supernatants of these two lactobacilli had cytotoxic effect on HeLa, however LRS treatment was only effective on HT-29 cell line. In addition, LRS had no side-effect on normal cells. It was shown that CASP3 gene expression has been reduced after treatment with supernatants of two studied lactobacilli. According to our study, LRS and LCS are efficacious in the prevention of metastasis potency in HeLa cells with decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and increased expression of their inhibitors. In the case of HT-29 cells, only LRS showed this effect. Conclusion Herein, we have demonstrated two probiotics which have anti-metastatic effects on malignant cells and they can be administrated to postpone late-stage of cancer disease. LRS and LCS are effective on HeLa cell lines while only the effect of LRS is significant on HT-29, through cytotoxic and anti-metastatic mechanisms. Further assessments are required to evaluate our results on the other cancer cell lines, in advance to use these probiotics in other extensive trial studies. PMID:27551673

  6. Effect of a bispidinone analog on mitochondria‑mediated apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Myeongjin; Parthiban, Paramasivam; Hwang, Jiyoung; Zhang, Xin; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Dong Ho; Kim, Dong-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of 2,4,6,8-tetraaryl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-one (bispidinone) analogs on the in vitro growth of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. A series of 11 bispidinone analogs was synthesized with substituents, e.g., fluoro/methyl/ethyl/isopropyl/thiomethyl/methoxy groups, at various positions. These compounds were synthesized to identify which substituent and position induced the strongest cytotoxic effect in cancer cells. Among these synthetics, analog 9, which contains methoxy groups, had the most significant cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells, and its IC50 value was less than 13 µM. A WST-8 assay also showed that analog 9 inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells. By using DNA content analysis, we found that analog 9 induced sub-G1 and G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. A [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay suggested that analog 9 inhibited DNA replication in HeLa cells. On performing light microscopy, morphological changes such as cellular shrinkage and disruption, which are apoptotic features, were observed in HeLa cells. Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining and rhodamine-123 staining showed that analog 9 induced apoptosis and disrupted the intracellular mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa cells. The western blot analysis results suggested that analog 9 induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. In addition, we have shown that analog 9 may play a role in the Fas signaling apoptotic pathway.

  7. The haplotype-resolved genome and epigenome of the aneuploid HeLa cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Adey, Andrew; Burton, Joshua N; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hiatt, Joseph B; Lewis, Alexandra P; Martin, Beth K; Qiu, Ruolan; Lee, Choli; Shendure, Jay

    2013-08-01

    The HeLa cell line was established in 1951 from cervical cancer cells taken from a patient, Henrietta Lacks. This was the first successful attempt to immortalize human-derived cells in vitro. The robust growth and unrestricted distribution of HeLa cells resulted in its broad adoption--both intentionally and through widespread cross-contamination--and for the past 60 years it has served a role analogous to that of a model organism. The cumulative impact of the HeLa cell line on research is demonstrated by its occurrence in more than 74,000 PubMed abstracts (approximately 0.3%). The genomic architecture of HeLa remains largely unexplored beyond its karyotype, partly because like many cancers, its extensive aneuploidy renders such analyses challenging. We carried out haplotype-resolved whole-genome sequencing of the HeLa CCL-2 strain, examined point- and indel-mutation variations, mapped copy-number variations and loss of heterozygosity regions, and phased variants across full chromosome arms. We also investigated variation and copy-number profiles for HeLa S3 and eight additional strains. We find that HeLa is relatively stable in terms of point variation, with few new mutations accumulating after early passaging. Haplotype resolution facilitated reconstruction of an amplified, highly rearranged region of chromosome 8q24.21 at which integration of the human papilloma virus type 18 (HPV-18) genome occurred and that is likely to be the event that initiated tumorigenesis. We combined these maps with RNA-seq and ENCODE Project data sets to phase the HeLa epigenome. This revealed strong, haplotype-specific activation of the proto-oncogene MYC by the integrated HPV-18 genome approximately 500 kilobases upstream, and enabled global analyses of the relationship between gene dosage and expression. These data provide an extensively phased, high-quality reference genome for past and future experiments relying on HeLa, and demonstrate the value of haplotype resolution for

  8. Cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of aerial parts of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum on Hela, HT29 and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, A.; Ghannadi, A.; Mohebi, B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that some species of Cuscuta possess anticancer activity on various cell lines. Due to the lack of detailed researches on the cytotoxic effects of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants on the human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468), human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) and human uterine cervical carcinoma (Hela). Using maceration method, different extracts of aerial parts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were prepared. Extraction was performed using chloroform and ethanol/water (70/30). Total phenolic contents of the extracts were determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Using MTT assay, the cytotoxic activity of the extracts against HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells was evaluated. Extracts were considered cytotoxic when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. The poly-phenolic content of the hydroalcoholic and chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were 56.08 ± 4.11, 21.49 ± 2.00, 10.64 ± 0.86 and 4.81 ± 0.38, respectively. Our findings showed that the chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithyum significantly reduced the viability of Hela, HT-29 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Also, hydroalcoholic extracts of C. chinensis significantly decreased the viability of HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 cells. However, in the case of hydroalcoholic extracts of C. epithymum only significant decrease in the viability of MDA-MB-468 cells was observed (IC50 = 340 μg/ml). From these findings it can be concluded that C. chinensis and C. epithymum are good candidates for further study to find new possible cytotoxic agents. PMID:25657780

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotube interactions with HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Hadi N; Draper, Rockford K; Mikoryak, Carole; Walker, Erin Kate; Bajaj, Pooja; Musselman, Inga H; Daigrepont, Meredith C; Dieckmann, Gregg R; Pantano, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This work concerns exposing cultured human epithelial-like HeLa cells to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in cell culture media supplemented with serum. First, the as-received CoMoCAT SWNT-containing powder was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analyses. Characterizations of the purified dispersions, termed DM-SWNTs, involved atomic force microscopy, inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry, and absorption and Raman spectroscopies. Confocal microRaman spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that DM-SWNTs were taken up by HeLa cells in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion. Transmission electron microscopy revealed SWNT-like material in intracellular vacuoles. The morphologies and growth rates of HeLa cells exposed to DM-SWNTs were statistically similar to control cells over the course of 4 d. Finally, flow cytometry was used to show that the fluorescence from MitoSOX™ Red, a selective indicator of superoxide in mitochondria, was statistically similar in both control cells and cells incubated in DM-SWNTs. The combined results indicate that under our sample preparation protocols and assay conditions, CoMoCAT DM-SWNT dispersions are not inherently cytotoxic to HeLa cells. We conclude with recommendations for improving the accuracy and comparability of carbon nanotube (CNT) cytotoxicity reports. PMID:17956629

  10. Angiogenesis in cervical cancer is mediated by HeLa metabolites through endothelial cell tissue kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Strinivasen; Raidoo, Deshandra Munsamy

    2009-08-01

    High vascularity correlates with poor clinical outcome in cancer of the uterine cervix. We investigated whether human cervical cancer cell (HeLa) metabolites influenced endothelial cell proliferation through the serine protease, tissue kallikrein. The angiogenic potential of tissue kallikrein is proposed due to its proteolytic, mitogenic and invasive properties. Under pre-defined conditions, we examined the regulation of tissue kallikrein simultaneously in both endothelial and HeLa cells using immunochemistry, ELISA, cell proliferation assays and in situ RT-PCR. In an endothelial-cervical carcinoma conditioned-medium model, HeLa metabolites caused a dramatic decrease in endothelial cellular tissue kallikrein and a concomitant proliferation of endothelial cells. ELISA on the conditioned media showed a dose-dependent increase of tissue kallikrein, while in situ RT-PCR demonstrated no change in tissue kallikrein mRNA in both endothelial and HeLa cells when challenged with each other's metabolites. This demonstration of the ability of cervical cancer to simultaneously manipulate both tissue kallikrein processing within endothelial cells and angiogenesis is novel. Should this occur in vivo, the tissue kallikrein released from the endothelial cells into the microenvironment may simultaneously degrade the matrix and elicit a mitogenic effect by promoting angiogenesis. Pre-treatment with TK inhibitors and/or anti-angiogenic therapies may prove to benefit future cervical cancer patients. PMID:19578768

  11. Establishment of HeLa Cell Mutants Deficient in Sphingolipid-Related Genes Using TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components in eukaryotes and have various cellular functions. Recent developments in genome-editing technologies have facilitated gene disruption in various organisms and cell lines. We here show the disruption of various sphingolipid metabolic genes in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A TALEN pair targeting the human CERT gene (alternative name COL4A3BP) encoding a ceramide transport protein induced a loss-of-function phenotype in more than 60% of HeLa cells even though the cell line has a pseudo-triploid karyotype. We have isolated several loss-of-function mutant clones for CERT, UGCG (encoding glucosylceramide synthase), and B4GalT5 (encoding the major lactosylceramide synthase), and also a CERT/UGCG double-deficient clone. Characterization of these clones supported previous proposals that CERT primarily contributes to the synthesis of SM but not GlcCer, and that B4GalT5 is the major LacCer synthase. These newly established sphingolipid-deficient HeLa cell mutants together with our previously established stable transfectants provide a ‘sphingolipid-modified HeLa cell panel,’ which will be useful to elucidate the functions of various sphingolipid species against essentially the same genomic background. PMID:24498430

  12. Vaginal laparoscopically assisted radical trachelectomy in cervical clear cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iacoponi, Sara; Diestro, Maria Dolores; Zapardiel, Ignacio; Serrano, María; Santiago, Javier De

    2013-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the cervix is a rare condition that has shown an increase in incidence, especially in the 20- to 34-year-old group. Adenocarcinoma represents about 5–10% of all tumours in this area, and, among these, the clear cell type accounts for 4–9%. This type of tumour affects mainly postmenopausal women but also occurs in young women with a history of prenatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES). The prognosis for adenocarcinoma of the cervix is poor overall and worse for the clear cell variety. This article discusses a case of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the cervix, unrelated to intrauterine exposure to DES, in a woman of childbearing age who wished to preserve her fertility and was therefore treated by radical vaginal trachelectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. PMID:24244219

  13. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y

    1998-04-01

    Fuel leakage from underground storage tanks is a major source of groundwater contamination. Although the toxicity of regulated compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are well recognized, the cytotoxicity of their metabolites has not been studied extensively. In this study, Hela cells, propagated at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2-95% air, served as a target for evaluation of cytotoxicity of BTEX metabolites 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. The cells were exposed to different concentrations of the metabolites, which subsequently showed inhibition of cell growth and produced dose-related decreases in cell viability and cell protein content. The BTEX metabolites affected the levels of the polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine, which are known to be important in cell proliferation. The cytotoxic effects for these BTEX metabolites to Hela cells were 3-methylcatechol > 4-methylcatechol > 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid > 4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  15. Invasion of HeLa 229 cells by virulent Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Ewanowich, C A; Melton, A R; Weiss, A A; Sherburne, R K; Peppler, M S

    1989-01-01

    Phase-dependent invasive behavior of Bordetella pertussis was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated HeLa cell monolayers and by transmission electron microscopy. Several mutants of B. pertussis with Tn5 or Tn5 lac inserted into various vir-regulated genes were evaluated for differences in their invasive abilities. Mutants lacking filamentous hemagglutinin, pertussis toxin, and two as yet uncharacterized vir-regulated products had levels of invasion significantly lower than that of the parent strain BP338. In contrast, invasion by mutants lacking adenylate cyclase toxin was significantly increased compared with that of wild-type B. pertussis. This increase in invasion was eliminated when concentrations of intracellular cyclic 3'-5' AMP were stimulated by treating HeLa cells with cholera toxin or forskolin. Entry of B. pertussis occurred through a microfilament-dependent phagocytic process, as evidenced by the marked reduction in uptake following treatment of HeLa cells with cytochalasin D. Invasion was inhibited with polyclonal anti-B. pertussis and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antisera. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against lipooligosaccharide A reduced uptake by 65.5%. The preservation of HeLa cell integrity and the limited replication of intracellular bacteria suggest that invasion may represent a means by which B. pertussis evades an active host immune response. Images PMID:2547718

  16. A Novel Metabolite from Aspergillus ochraceus JGI 25 Showing Cytotoxicity to Hela Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nadumane, Varalakshmi K.; Venkat, Prerana; Pal, Anamika; Dharod, H.; Shukla, Megha; Prashanthi, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at the isolation of filamentous fungi, extraction of metabolites, and evaluation of the cytotoxic properties on HeLa cells and normal human lymphocytes. We isolated fungi from the soil by serial dilution method. One of the isolates was chosen and identified as Aspergillus ochraceus Wilhelm (Trichocomaceae) by standard techniques. The metabolites were extracted using methanol. Different concentrations of the extract were evaluated for their potential anticancer activity on HeLa cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and the safety of the extract was checked on normal human lymphocytes. The extract was purified by chromatographic techniques like thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, and subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. The extract showed significant cytotoxic potential on HeLa cells at low concentrations with a half maximal inhibitory concentration value of <50 μg/ml. The extract gave 10 fractions by thin layer chromatography, and fraction B had higher toxicity than the rest. This fraction gave a single peak by high-performance liquid chromatography and had a mass-to-charge ratio of 905.65, which did not match any of the earlier known fungal metabolites or metabolites from other strains of A. ochraceus. The metabolite from A. ochraceus is alkaloid in nature, cytotoxic to HeLa cells, and appears to be a novel with anticancer potentials, which could be explored further for characterization of the active component. PMID:24403650

  17. Inhibitory Effects and Underlying Mechanism of 7-Hydroxyflavone Phosphate Ester in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liguo; Chen, Xiaolan; Yang, Fang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Chrysin and its phosphate ester have previously been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in Hela cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be characterized. In the present study, we therefore synthesized diethyl flavon-7-yl phosphate (FP, C19H19O6P) by a simplified Atheron-Todd reaction, and explored its anti-tumor characteristics and mechanisms. Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by MTS, flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling techniques, respectively in human cervical cancer HeLa cells treated with 7-hydroxyflavone (HF) and FP. p21, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cAMP levels in Hela cells were analyzed by western blot and radioimmunoassay. Both HF and FP inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via induction of PCNA/p21 expression, cleaved caspase-3/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, elevation of cAMP levels, and cell cycle arrest with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 fraction. The effects of FP were more potent than those of HF. The interactions of FP with Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) and Ca2+-CaM-phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 were explored by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectra. FP, but not HF, formed non-covalent complexes with Ca2+-CaM-PDE1, indicating that FP is an inhibitor of PDE1, and resulting in elevated cellular cAMP levels. It is possible that the elevated cAMP levels inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in Hela cells through induction of p21 and cleaved caspase-3/PARP-1 expression, and causing down-regulation of PCNA and cell cycle arrest with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 and G2/M fractions. In conclusion, FP was shown to be a Ca2+-CaM-PDE inhibitor, which might account for its underlying anti-cancer mechanism in HeLa cells. These observations clearly demonstrate the special roles of phosphorylated flavonoids in biological processes, and suggest that FP might represent a potential

  18. Single HeLa and MCF-7 cell measurement using minimized impedance spectroscopy and microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min-Haw; Kao, Min-Feng; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    This study presents an impedance measurement system for single-cell capture and measurement. The microwell structure which utilizes nDEP force is used to single-cell capture and a minimized impedance spectroscopy which includes a power supply chip, an impedance measurement chip and a USB microcontroller chip is used to single-cell impedance measurement. To improve the measurement accuracy of the proposed system, Biquadratic fitting is used in this study. The measurement accuracy and reliability of the proposed system are compared to those of a conventional precision impedance analyzer. Moreover, a stable material, latex beads, is used to study the impedance measurement using the minimized impedance spectroscopy with cell-trapping device. Finally, the proposed system is used to measure the impedance of HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells. The impedance of single HeLa cells decreased from 9.55 × 103 to 3.36 × 103 Ω and the impedance of single MCF-7 cells decreased from 3.48 × 103 to 1.45 × 103 Ω at an operate voltage of 0.5 V when the excitation frequency was increased from 11 to 101 kHz. The results demonstrate that the proposed impedance measurement system successfully distinguishes HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells.

  19. Oxygen depletion speeds and simplifies diffusion in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Edwald, Elin; Stone, Matthew B; Gray, Erin M; Wu, Jing; Veatch, Sarah L

    2014-10-21

    Many cell types undergo a hypoxic response in the presence of low oxygen, which can lead to transcriptional, metabolic, and structural changes within the cell. Many biophysical studies to probe the localization and dynamics of single fluorescently labeled molecules in live cells either require or benefit from low-oxygen conditions. In this study, we examine how low-oxygen conditions alter the mobility of a series of plasma membrane proteins with a range of anchoring motifs in HeLa cells at 37°C. Under high-oxygen conditions, diffusion of all proteins is heterogeneous and confined. When oxygen is reduced with an enzymatic oxygen-scavenging system for ≥ 15 min, diffusion rates increase by > 2-fold, motion becomes unconfined on the timescales and distance scales investigated, and distributions of diffusion coefficients are remarkably consistent with those expected from Brownian motion. More subtle changes in protein mobility are observed in several other laboratory cell lines examined under both high- and low-oxygen conditions. Morphological changes and actin remodeling are observed in HeLa cells placed in a low-oxygen environment for 30 min, but changes are less apparent in the other cell types investigated. This suggests that changes in actin structure are responsible for increased diffusion in hypoxic HeLa cells, although superresolution localization measurements in chemically fixed cells indicate that membrane proteins do not colocalize with F-actin under either experimental condition. These studies emphasize the importance of controls in single-molecule imaging measurements, and indicate that acute response to low oxygen in HeLa cells leads to dramatic changes in plasma membrane structure. It is possible that these changes are either a cause or consequence of phenotypic changes in solid tumor cells associated with increased drug resistance and malignancy.

  20. Glycans coated silver nanoparticles induces autophagy and necrosis in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Mariano, Stefania; Dini, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the induction of autophagy by two concentrations (2×103 or 2×104 NPs/cell) of 30 nm sized β-D-Glucose- and β-D-Glucose/Sucrose-coated silver NanoParticles (AgNPs-G and AgNPs-GS respectively) in HeLa cells treated for 6, 12, 24 and 48 hrs. Cell viability was assessed by Neutral Red (NR) test and morphological evaluation. In addition ROS generation (NBT test) and induction of apoptosis/necrosis (Annexin V/Propidium Iodide-Annexin V/PI staining) and autophagy (Monodansylcadaverine-MDC staining) were evaluated. Cytotoxicity, ROS generation and morphology changes depend on NPs type and amount, and incubation time. As a general result, AgNPs-G are more toxic than AgNPs-GS. Moreover, the lowest AgNPs-GS concentration is ineffective on cell viability and ROS generation. Only 10% and 25% of viable HeLa cells were found at the end of incubation time in the presence of higher amount of AgNPs - G and AgNPs-GS respectively and in parallel ROS generation is induced. To elucidate the type of cell death, Annexin V/PI and MDC staining was performed. Interestingly, irrespective of coating type and NPs amount the percentage of apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-) is similar to viable HeLa cells. At contrary, we observed a NPs amount dependent autophagy and necrosis induction. In fact, the lower amount of NPs induces autophagy (MDC+/PI- cells) whereas the higher one induces necrosis (Annexin V+/PI+ cells). Our findings suggest that AgNPs-induced cytotoxicity depends on AgNPs amount and type and provide preliminary evidence of induction of autophagy in HeLa cells cultured in the presence of AgNPs.

  1. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-induced HeLa cell death is closely correlated with oxidative stress and thioredoxin 1 levels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which has anticancer effects. We evaluated the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA on HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC(50) of approximately 10 µM at 24 h, and induced apoptosis which was accompanied by the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 activation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψ(m)). All the tested caspase inhibitors prevented HeLa cell death induced by SAHA whereas TNF-α intensified apoptotic cell death in SAHA-treated HeLa cells. With respect to ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels, SAHA increased ROS levels, especially mitochondrial O(2)•- in HeLa cells and also induced GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors reduced the levels of ROS and GSH depletion in SAHA-treated HeLa cells whereas TNF-α enhanced the levels in these cells. The well-known antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) attenuated cell death and an increase in ROS levels was caused by SAHA. Moreover, SAHA decreased the levels of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) in HeLa cells. While the downregulation of Trx1 enhanced cell death and ROS levels in SAHA-treated HeLa cells, the overexpression of Trx1 attenuated the levels in these cells. In conclusion, SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cell via caspase-dependent apoptosis, which was influenced by the mitochondrial O(2)•- and Trx1 levels.

  2. Three-dimensional printing of Hela cells for cervical tumor model in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Yao, Rui; Ouyang, Liliang; Ding, Hongxu; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Kaitai; Cheng, Shujun; Sun, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing have enabled the direct assembly of cells and extracellular matrix materials to form in vitro cellular models for 3D biology, the study of disease pathogenesis and new drug discovery. In this study, we report a method of 3D printing for Hela cells and gelatin/alginate/fibrinogen hydrogels to construct in vitro cervical tumor models. Cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein expression and chemoresistance were measured in the printed 3D cervical tumor models and compared with conventional 2D planar culture models. Over 90% cell viability was observed using the defined printing process. Comparisons of 3D and 2D results revealed that Hela cells showed a higher proliferation rate in the printed 3D environment and tended to form cellular spheroids, but formed monolayer cell sheets in 2D culture. Hela cells in 3D printed models also showed higher MMP protein expression and higher chemoresistance than those in 2D culture. These new biological characteristics from the printed 3D tumor models in vitro as well as the novel 3D cell printing technology may help the evolution of 3D cancer study.

  3. Curcumin targeting the thioredoxin system elevates oxidative stress in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wenqing; Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Wu, Jincai; Fang, Jianguo

    2012-08-01

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH, is ubiquitous in all cells and involved in many redox-dependent signaling pathways. Curcumin, a naturally occurring pigment that gives a specific yellow color in curry food, is consumed in normal diet up to 100 mg per day. This molecule has also been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Curcumin has numerous biological functions, and many of these functions are related to induction of oxidative stress. However, how curcumin elicits oxidative stress in cells is unclear. Our previous work has demonstrated the way by which curcumin interacts with recombinant TrxR1 and alters the antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator in vitro. Herein we reported that curcumin can target the cytosolic/nuclear thioredoxin system to eventually elevate oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Curcumin-modified TrxR1 dose-dependently and quantitatively transfers electrons from NADPH to oxygen with the production of ROS. Also, curcumin can drastically down-regulate Trx1 protein level as well as its enzyme activity in HeLa cells, which in turn remarkably decreases intracellular free thiols, shifting the intracellular redox balance to a more oxidative state, and subsequently induces DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, curcumin-pretreated HeLa cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress. Knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes HeLa cells to curcumin cytotoxicity, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR1 by curcumin. Taken together, our data disclose a previously unrecognized prooxidant mechanism of curcumin in cells, and provide a deep insight in understanding how curcumin works in vivo. -- Highlights: ► Curcumin induces oxidative stress by targeting the thioredoxin system. ► Curcumin-modified TrxR quantitatively oxidizes NADPH to generate ROS. ► Knockdown of TrxR1 augments curcumin's cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. ► Curcumin

  4. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  5. Cytocompatibility of HeLa Cells to Nano-Sized Ceramics Particles.

    PubMed

    Seitoku, Eri; Abe, Shigeaki; Kusaka, Teruo; Nakamura, Mariko; Inoue, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the behaviors and cytocompatibility response of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells expose to nano-sized particles. Cultivated cells exposed to titanium oxide and indium oxide nanoparticles remained highly viable. In the presence of copper oxide (CuO); however, the cells became seriously inflamed. To understand the mechanism by which CuO causes cell death, we evaluated cell death and apoptosis cytometry. CuO induced cells apoptosis more strongly than exposure to titania nanoparticles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the nano-sized particles penetrate the cells.

  6. Cytocompatibility of HeLa Cells to Nano-Sized Ceramics Particles.

    PubMed

    Seitoku, Eri; Abe, Shigeaki; Kusaka, Teruo; Nakamura, Mariko; Inoue, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the behaviors and cytocompatibility response of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells expose to nano-sized particles. Cultivated cells exposed to titanium oxide and indium oxide nanoparticles remained highly viable. In the presence of copper oxide (CuO); however, the cells became seriously inflamed. To understand the mechanism by which CuO causes cell death, we evaluated cell death and apoptosis cytometry. CuO induced cells apoptosis more strongly than exposure to titania nanoparticles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the nano-sized particles penetrate the cells. PMID:27451635

  7. Investigation of the interactions between silver nanoparticles and Hela cells by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Xie, Shubao; Shen, Li; Du, Yu; He, Shali; Li, Qing; Liang, Zhongwei; Meng, Xin; Li, Bo; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Hongwei; Huang, Yanyi; Shao, Yuanhua

    2008-09-01

    The interactions between Hela cells and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with both IrCl(6)(2-/3-) and Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) as the dual mediators. IrCl(6)(2-), which can be produced in situ and react with AgNPs, is used as the mediator between the AgNPs on the cells and the SECM tip. Another redox couple, Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-), which has a similar hydrophilicity to IrCl(6)(2-/3-), but cannot react with AgNPs, is also employed for the contrast experiments. The cell array is cultured successfully onto a Petri dish by microcontact printing (muCP) technique, which can provide a basic platform for studying of single cells. The approach curve and line scan are the two methods of SECM employed here to study the Hela cells. The former can provide the information about the interaction between Hela cells and AgNPs whereas the later gives the cell imaging. The permeability of cell membranes and morphology are two main factors which have effects on the feedback mode signals when K(3)Fe(CN)(6) is used as the mediator. The permeability of the cell membranes can be ignored after interaction with high concentration of AgNP solution and the height of the Hela cells is slightly decreased in this process. The kinetic rate constants (k(0)) between IrCl(6)(2-) and Ag on the Hela cell can be evaluated using K(3)IrCl(6) as the mediator, and they are increased with the higher concentrations of the AgNP solutions. The k(0) is changed about 10 times from 0.43 +/- 0.04 x 10(-4) to 1.25 +/- 0.07 x 10(-4) and to 3.93 +/- 1.9 x 10(-4) cm s(-1) corresponding to 0, 1 and 5 mM of AgNO(3) solution. The experimental results demonstrate that the AgNPs can be adsorbed on the cell surface and detected by SECM. Thus, the amount of AgNPs adsorbed on cell membranes and the permeability or morphology changes can be investigated simultaneously using this approach. The dual mediator system and cell array fabricated by muCP technique can provide better

  8. Immuno-detection of OCTN1 (SLC22A4) in HeLa cells and characterization of transport function.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-11-01

    OCTN1 was immuno-detected in the cervical cancer cell HeLa, in which the complete pattern of acetylcholine metabolizing enzymes is expressed. Comparison of immuno-staining intensity of HeLa OCTN1 with the purified recombinant human OCTN1 allowed measuring the specific OCTN1 concentration in the HeLa cell extract and, hence calculating the HeLa OCTN1 specific transport activity that was about 10 nmol×min(-1)×mg protein(-1), measured as uptake of [(3)H]acetylcholine in proteoliposomes reconstituted with HeLa extract. This value was very similar to the specific activity of the recombinant protein. Acetylcholine transport was suppressed by incubation of the protein or proteoliposomes with the anti-OCTN1 antibody and was strongly inhibited by PLP and MTSEA, known inhibitors of OCTN1. The absence of ATP in the internal side of proteoliposomes strongly impaired transport function of both the HeLa and, as expected, the recombinant OCTN1. HeLa OCTN1 was inhibited by spermine, NaCl (Na(+)), TEA, γ-butyrobetaine, choline, acetylcarnitine and ipratropium but not by neostigmine. Besides acetylcholine, choline was taken up by HeLa OCTN1 proteoliposomes. The transporter catalyzed also acetylcholine and choline efflux which, differently from uptake, was not inhibited by MTSEA. Time course of [(3)H]acetylcholine uptake in intact HeLa cells was measured. As in proteoliposomes, acetylcholine transport in intact cells was inhibited by TEA and NaCl. Efflux of [(3)H]acetylcholine occurred in intact cells, as well. The experimental data concur in demonstrating a role of OCTN1 in transporting acetylcholine and choline in HeLa cells.

  9. Selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guihua

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells. Methods Proliferation assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, apoptosis detecting, flow cytometry and western blot were performed. Results It was found that treatment with propafenone at the concentration of 0.014 g/L or higher for 48 h could induce apoptosis in Hela cells greatly, while it was not observed in oxytetracycline and metamizole at the concentration of 0.20 g/L for 48 h. Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. The results of LDH assay demonstrated that the drugs at the test range of concentration did not cause necrosis in the cells. Propafenone could elevate the protein level of P53 effectively (P<0.01). Conclusions Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizol (dipyrone) all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. Propafenone also displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of Hela cells. PMID:24385693

  10. Interaction of outer envelope proteins of Chlamydia psittaci GPIC with the HeLa cell surface.

    PubMed

    Ting, L M; Hsia, R C; Haidaris, C G; Bavoil, P M

    1995-09-01

    The chlamydial life cycle involves the intimate interaction of components of the infectious elementary body (EB) surface with receptors on the susceptible eukaryotic cell plasma membrane. We have developed an in vitro ligand binding assay system for the identification and characterization of detergent-extracted EB envelope proteins capable of binding to glutaraldehyde-fixed HeLa cell surfaces. With this assay, the developmentally regulated cysteine-rich envelope protein Omp2 of Chlamydia psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis was shown to bind specifically to HeLa cells. HeLa cells bound Omp2 selectively over other cell wall-associated proteins, including the major outer membrane protein, and the binding of Omp2 was abolished under conditions which alter its conformation. Furthermore, trypsin treatment, which reduces EB adherence, resulted in the proteolytic removal of a small terminal peptide of Omp2 at the EB surface and inactivated Omp2 in the ligand binding assay, while having a negligible effect on the major outer membrane protein. Collectively, our results suggest that Omp2 possesses the capacity to engage in a specific interaction with the host eukaryotic cell. We speculate that, since Omp2 is present only in the infectious EB form, the observed in vitro interaction may be representative of a determining step of the chlamydial pathogenic process.

  11. Suberoyl bishydroxamic acid-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via ROS-independent, GSH-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Suberoyl bishydroxamic acid (SBHA) is a HDAC inhibitor that can regulate many biological functions including apoptosis and proliferation in various cancer cells. Here, we evaluated the effect of SBHA on the growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed in HeLa cells with an IC50 of approximately 15 μM at 72 h. SBHA also induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, as evidenced by sub-G1 cells, annexin V-FITC staining cells, activations of caspase 3 and 8, and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, all of the tested caspase inhibitors rescued some cells from SBHA-induced HeLa cell death. SBHA increased ROS levels including O2(•-) and induced GSH depletion in HeLa cells. Generally, caspase inhibitors did not affect ROS levels in SBHA-treated HeLa cells, but they significantly prevented GSH depletion in these cells. Furthermore, while the well-known antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and vitamin C, did not affect cell death, ROS level or GSH depletion in SBHA-treated HeLa cells, L-buthionine sulfoximine, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, enhanced cell death and GSH depletion in these cells. In conclusion, SBHA inhibits the growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells via caspase-dependent apoptosis, and the inhibition is independent of ROS level changes, but dependent on GSH level changes.

  12. Application of microarrays to identify and characterize genes involved in attachment dependence in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Jaluria, Pratik; Betenbaugh, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Frank, Bryan; Shiloach, Joseph

    2007-05-01

    The ability to modify cellular properties such as adhesion is of interest in the design and performance of biotechnology-related processes. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate the effectiveness of modulating cellular adhesion in HeLa cells from a genomics perspective. Using DNA microarrays, differences in gene expression between two phenotypically distinct, anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent, HeLa cell lines were identified. With the aid of several statistical methods and an extensive literature search, two genes were selected as potential targets for further study: siat7e and lama4. Subsequently, experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of siat7e and lama4 separately, on adhesion in HeLa cells by altering their expression in vivo. Decreasing the expression of siat7e, a type II membrane glycosylating sialyltransferase, in anchorage-independent HeLa cells using short interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in greater aggregation (i.e. clumping) and morphological changes as compared to untreated anchorage-independent HeLa cells. Similar effects were seen in anchorage-independent HeLa cells when the expression of lama4 which encodes laminin alpha4, a member of the laminin family of glycoproteins, was enhanced as compared to untreated anchorage-independent HeLa cells. Using a shear flow chamber, an attachment assay was developed; illustrating either increased expression of siat7e or decreased expression of lama4 in anchorage-dependent HeLa cells reduced cellular adhesion. Collectively, the results of this study are consistent with the roles siat7e and lama4 play in adhesion processes in vivo and indicate modifying the expression of either gene can influence adhesion in HeLa cells. The strategy of applying bioinformatics techniques to characterize and manipulate phenotypic behaviors is a powerful tool for altering the properties of various cell lines for desired biotechnology objectives. PMID:17240181

  13. Application of microarrays to identify and characterize genes involved in attachment dependence in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaluria, Pratik; Betenbaugh, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Frank, Bryan; Shiloach, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The ability to modify cellular properties such as adhesion is of interest in the design and performance of biotechnology-related processes. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate the effectiveness of modulating cellular adhesion in HeLa cells from a genomics perspective. Using DNA microarrays, differences in gene expression between two phenotypically distinct, anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent, HeLa cell lines were identified. With the aid of several statistical methods and an extensive literature search, two genes were selected as potential targets for further study: siat7e and lama4. Subsequently, experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of siat7e and lama4 separately, on adhesion in HeLa cells by altering their expression in vivo. Decreasing the expression of siat7e, a type II membrane glycosylating sialyltransferase, in anchorage-independent HeLa cells using short interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in greater aggregation (i.e. clumping) and morphological changes as compared to untreated anchorage-independent HeLa cells. Similar effects were seen in anchorage-independent HeLa cells when the expression of lama4 which encodes laminin α4, a member of the laminin family of glycoproteins, was enhanced as compared to untreated anchorage-independent HeLa cells. Using a shear flow chamber, an attachment assay was developed; illustrating either increased expression of siat7e or decreased expression of lama4 in anchorage-dependent HeLa cells reduced cellular adhesion. Collectively, the results of this study are consistent with the roles siat7e and lama4 play in adhesion processes in vivo and indicate modifying the expression of either gene can influence adhesion in HeLa cells. The strategy of applying bioinformatics techniques to characterize and manipulate phenotypic behaviors is a powerful tool for altering the properties of various cell lines for desired biotechnology objectives. PMID:17240181

  14. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance.

  15. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance. PMID:27019498

  16. Force versus position profiles of HeLa cells trapped in phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Steven L.; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Valley, Justin K.; Jamshidi, Arash; Wu, Ming C.

    2009-02-01

    Phototransistor-based Optoelectronic Tweezers (Ph-OET) enables optical manipulation of microscopic particles in physiological buffer solutions by creating electrical field gradients around them. A spatial light pattern is created by a DMD based projector focused through a microscope objective onto the phototransistor. In this paper we look into what differences there are in the trap stiffness profiles of HeLa cells trapped by Ph-OET compared to previous a-Si based OET devices. We find that the minimum trap size for a HeLa cell using a phototransistor with pixel pitch 10.35μm is 24.06μm in diameter which can move cells at 20μms-1 giving a trap stiffness of 8.38 x 10-7 Nm-1.

  17. Coxsackievirus B5 induced apoptosis of HeLa cells: Effects on p53 and SUMO

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Rogerio; Guerra-Sa, Renata; Arruda, Eurico

    2010-01-20

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), a human enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae, is a frequent cause of acute and chronic human diseases. The pathogenesis of enteroviral infections is not completely understood, and the fate of the CVB5-infected cell has a pivotal role in this process. We have investigated the CVB5-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells and found that it happens by the intrinsic pathway by a mechanism dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, associated with nuclear aggregation of p53. Striking redistribution of both SUMO and UBC9 was noted at 4 h post-infection, simultaneously with a reduction in the levels of the ubiquitin-ligase HDM2. Taken together, these results suggest that CVB5 infection of HeLa cells elicit the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by MDM2 degradation and p53 activation, destabilizing protein sumoylation, by a mechanism that is dependent on a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  18. HeLa cell nucleus, a source of thymidine for Trichomonas vaginalis growing in vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Lázaro, Mónica; González-Robles, Arturo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Arroyo, Rossana

    2005-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protist incapable of de novo purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. The lack of these de novo syntheses of nucleotides is supplemented with purine and pyrimidine salvage pathways. Likewise, T. vaginalis is incapable of converting its ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Therefore, the parasite must rely on the salvage of exogenous deoxyribonucleosides for DNA synthesis. It has been demonstrated that the parasite can incorporate external adenine and guanine in vitro, but no in vivo nucleotide source has been identified so far. Accordingly, we set out to determine if the parasite could incorporate 3H-thymidine from the nuclei of a cervical-derived cell line into its own DNA. By light and electron microscopy we found that the parasite was able to interact directly, both with mechanically isolated HeLa cell nuclei and with the nuclei released after the disruption of HeLa cell monolayers by the parasite. This study shows that T. vaginalis was capable of incorporating 3H-thymidine from labeled HeLa cells into its own DNA suggesting that the nuclei of this cervical cell line could be an in vivo source of nucleotides for T. vaginalis.

  19. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Results Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. Conclusions These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process. PMID:24044741

  20. Hemocyanin from Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Has Antiproliferative Effect against HeLa Cell In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuandao; Liu, Shangjie; Huang, Runqing; Zhong, Mingqi; Wei, Chiju; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) has been shown to participate in multiple roles of immune defence. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect and underpinning mechanism of HMC from Litopenaeus vannamei in vitro. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay indicated that HMC could dramatically inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, but not 293T cells under the same conditions. Moreover, typical morphological features of apoptosis in HeLa cells including the formation of apoptotic body-like vesicles, chromatin condensation and margination were observed by using 4, 6-diamidino-2- phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining and fluorescence analysis. An apoptotic DNA ladder from 180 to 300 bp was also detected. Furthermore, 10 variation proteins associated with apoptosis pathway, viz. G3PDH isoforms 1/2 (G3PDH1/2), aldosereductase, ectodemal dysplasia receptor associated death receptor domain isoform CRA_a (EDARADD), heat shock 60kD protein 1 variant 1 (HSP60), heat shock 70kDa protein 5 precursor (HSP70), heat shock protein 90kDa beta member 1 precursor (HSP90), 14-3-3 protein ζ/δ, Ran and ubiquitin activating enzyme E1(UBE1), were identified from HMC-treated HeLa cells by the proteomic and quantitative real-time RT-PCR strategies. Importantly, the reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and caspase-9/3 activities were changed significantly in HMC-treated HeLa cells. Together, the data suggests that L. vannamei HMC mediates antiproliferative properties through the apoptosis mechanism involving the mitochondria triggered pathway. PMID:27007573

  1. Hemocyanin from Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Has Antiproliferative Effect against HeLa Cell In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liyuan; Zhao, Xianliang; Zhang, Pei; Chen, Chuandao; Liu, Shangjie; Huang, Runqing; Zhong, Mingqi; Wei, Chiju; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) has been shown to participate in multiple roles of immune defence. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effect and underpinning mechanism of HMC from Litopenaeus vannamei in vitro. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay indicated that HMC could dramatically inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, but not 293T cells under the same conditions. Moreover, typical morphological features of apoptosis in HeLa cells including the formation of apoptotic body-like vesicles, chromatin condensation and margination were observed by using 4, 6-diamidino-2- phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining and fluorescence analysis. An apoptotic DNA ladder from 180 to 300 bp was also detected. Furthermore, 10 variation proteins associated with apoptosis pathway, viz. G3PDH isoforms 1/2 (G3PDH1/2), aldosereductase, ectodemal dysplasia receptor associated death receptor domain isoform CRA_a (EDARADD), heat shock 60kD protein 1 variant 1 (HSP60), heat shock 70kDa protein 5 precursor (HSP70), heat shock protein 90kDa beta member 1 precursor (HSP90), 14-3-3 protein ζ/δ, Ran and ubiquitin activating enzyme E1(UBE1), were identified from HMC-treated HeLa cells by the proteomic and quantitative real-time RT-PCR strategies. Importantly, the reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and caspase-9/3 activities were changed significantly in HMC-treated HeLa cells. Together, the data suggests that L. vannamei HMC mediates antiproliferative properties through the apoptosis mechanism involving the mitochondria triggered pathway. PMID:27007573

  2. Akt is translocated to the mitochondria during etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungduck; Je, Young-Tae; Chun, Kwang-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Akt, or protein kinase B, is a key serine-threonine kinase, which exerts anti-apoptotic effects and promotes cell proliferation in response to various stimuli. Recently, however, it was demonstrated that Akt exhibits a proapoptotic role in certain contexts. During etoposide‑induced apoptosis of HeLa cells, Akt enhances the interaction of second mitochondria‑derived activator of caspases/direct IAP binding protein with low pI (Smac/DIABLO) and X‑linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein by phosphorylating Smac at serine 67, and thus promotes apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying Akt regulation in etoposide‑mediated apoptosis remain to be determined. The present study investigated whether etoposide triggers the translocation of Akt into the mitochondria. It was found that Akt activity was increased and sustained during apoptosis triggered by etoposide in HeLa cells. During apoptosis, Akt was translocated from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria in a phosphoinositide 3‑kinase-dependent manner at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Concomitantly, the depletion of Akt in the nuclear fraction was observed after etoposide treatment from analysis of confocal microscopy. The results suggest that etoposide‑stimulated Akt is translocated into the mitochondria, thereby possibly enhancing its interaction with Smac and promoting apoptosis in HeLa cells. These results indicate that Akt may be a promising candidate for a pro-apoptotic approach in cancer treatment.

  3. Receptor ganglioside content of three hosts for Sendai virus. MDBK, HeLa, and MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Markwell, M A; Fredman, P; Svennerholm, L

    1984-08-01

    Specific gangliosides GD1a, GT1b and GQ1b isolated from brain have been shown to function as receptors for Sendai virus by conferring susceptibility to infection when they are incorporated into receptor-deficient cells (Markwell, M.A.K., Svennerholm, L. and Paulson, J.C. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5406-5410). The endogenous gangliosides of three commonly used hosts for Sendai virus: MDBK, HeLa, and MDCK cells were analyzed to determine the amount and type of receptor gangliosides present. In all three cell lines, GM3 was the major ganglioside component. The presence of GM1, GD1a and the more complex homologs of the gangliotetraose series was also established. In cell lines derived from normal tissue, MDBK and MDCK cells, gangliosides contributed 47-65% of the total sialic acid. In HeLa cells, gangliosides contributed substantially less (17% of the total sialic acid). The ganglioside content of each cell line was shown not to be immutable but instead to depend on the state of differentiation, passage number, and surface the cells were grown on. Thus, the ganglioside concentration of undifferentiated MDCK cells was found to be substantially greater than that of MDBK or HeLa cells, but decreased as the MDCK cells underwent differentiation. Changes in culture conditions that were shown to decrease the receptor ganglioside content of the cells resulted in a corresponding decrease in susceptibility to infection. The endogenous oligosialogangliosides present in susceptible host cells were shown to function as receptors for Sendai virus.

  4. Human androgen receptor expressed in HeLa cells activates transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Schmitt, J; Verhoeven, G; Stunnenberg, H G

    1994-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-responsive transcription factor, belonging to the class of steroid receptors. AR mutations have been associated with various X-linked diseases, characterized by complete or partial resistance to androgens. To further analyse the molecular mechanism of action of the AR, we have produced the human AR in HeLa cells with a Vaccinia virus expression system. Binding studies on infected HeLa cells demonstrate that the recombinant AR interacts specifically and with high affinity with natural and synthetic androgens. In a gel retardation assay the partially purified AR specifically recognizes an androgen response element of the rat prostatic binding protein gene. Moreover, the recombinant AR activates transcription in vitro from a synthetic promoter construct containing glucocorticoid response elements (GRE). Images PMID:8165128

  5. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity effect on HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhas, T. Stalin; Kumar, V. Ganesh; Karthick, V.; Govindaraju, K.; Shankara Narayana, T.

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells is reported. The biological synthesis involved the reduction of chloroauric acid led to the formation of AuNPs within 5 min at 60 °C and the formation of AuNPs was confirmed using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The AuNPs were stable; spherical in shape with well-defined dimensions, and the average size of the particle is 35 nm. A zeta potential value of -27.6 mV revealed synthesized AuNPs were highly stable. The synthesized AuNPs exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis was measured by DAPI (4‧,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining.

  6. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; Lan, Bei; He, Hao; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-10-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  7. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia; He, Hao

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  8. Effects of depsidones from Hypogymnia physodes on HeLa cell viability and growth.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, I Z; Najman, S; Jovanović, O; Petrović, G; Najdanović, J; Vasiljević, P; Smelcerović, A

    2014-01-01

    The anti-proliferative activitiy of Hypogymnia physodes methanol extracts (ME) and its main constituents, physodalic acid (P1), physodic acid (P2), and 3-hydroxy physodic acid (P3), was tested on human cancer HeLa cell lines. Three lichen depsidones, P1, P2 and P3, were isolated from H. physodes ME using column chromatography and their structures were determined by UV, ESI TOF MS, 1H and 13C NMR. The content of P1, P2 and P3 in ME was determined using reversed-phase highperformance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. P1-3 represented even 70 % of the studied extract. The HeLa cells were incubated during 24 and 72 h in the presence of ME and depsidones P1, P2 and P3, at concentrations of 10-1000 μg/ml. Compounds P2 and P3 showed higher activity than compound P1. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50, μg/ml) of P1, P2, P3 and ME for 24-h incubation were 964, 171, 97 and 254 μg/ml, respectively, while for 72-h incubation they were 283, 66, 63 and 68 μg/ml. As far as we know, this is the first report on the effect of H. physodes ME and their depsidones on HeLa cells. PMID:24785112

  9. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Yang, Yongbo

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  10. Trichostatin A induces apoptotic cell death of HeLa cells in a Bcl-2 and oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA) as a HDAC inhibitor can regulate many biological properties including apoptosis and cell proliferation in various cancer cells. Here, we evaluated the effect of TSA on the growth and death of HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition was observed in HeLa cells with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM at 72 h. This agent also induced apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by annexin V-FITC staining cells, caspase-3 activation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψm). In addition, the administration of Bcl-2 siRNA intensified TSA-induced HeLa cell death. All of the tested caspase inhibitors significantly rescued some cells from TSA-induced HeLa cell death. TSA increased O2•- level and induced GSH depletion in HeLa cells. Caspase inhibitors significantly attenuated O2•- level and GSH depletion in TSA-treated HeLa cells. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC; a well known antioxidant) significantly prevented cell death and GSH depletion in TSA-treated HeLa cells via decreasing O2•- level. In conclusion, TSA inhibited the growth of HeLa cells via Bcl-2-mediated apoptosis, which was closely related to O2•- and GSH content levels.

  11. Doxorubicin-induced cell death requires cathepsin B in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Bien, S; Rimmbach, C; Neumann, H; Niessen, J; Reimer, E; Ritter, C A; Rosskopf, D; Cinatl, J; Michaelis, M; Schroeder, H W S; Kroemer, H K

    2010-11-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B acts as a key player in apoptosis. Cathepsin B-mediated cell death is induced by various stimuli such as ischemia, bile acids or TNFα. Whether cathepsin B can be influenced by anticancer drugs, however, has not been studied in detail. Here, we describe the modulation of doxorubicin-induced cell death by silencing of cathepsin B expression. Previously, it was shown that doxorubicin, in contrast to other drugs, selectively regulates expression and activity of cathepsin B. Selective silencing of cathepsin B by siRNA or the cathepsin B specific inhibitor CA074Me modified doxorubicin-mediated cell death in Hela tumor cells. Both Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage were significantly reduced in cells lacking cathepsin B. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization as well as the release of cytochrome C and AIF from mitochondria into cytosol induced by doxorubicin were significantly diminished in cathepsin B suppressed cells. In addition, doxorubicin associated down-regulation of XIAP was not observed in cathepsin B silenced cells. Lack of cathepsin B significantly modified cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk1, Wee1 and p21 without significant changes in G(1), S or G(2)M cell cycle phases maybe indicating further cell cycle independent actions of these proteins. Consequently, cell viability following doxorubicin was significantly elevated in cells with cathepsin B silencing. In summary, our data strongly suggest a role of cathepsin B in doxorubicin-induced cell death. Therefore, increased expression of cathepsin B in various types of cancer can modify susceptibility towards doxorubicin. PMID:20709028

  12. Monoolein-based cubosomes affect lipid profile in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Antonella; Murgia, Sergio; Putzu, Danilo; Meli, Valeria; Falchi, Angela Maria

    2015-10-01

    Monoolein-based cubosomes are promising drug delivery nanocarriers for theranostic purposes. Nevertheless, a small amount of research has been undertaken to investigate the impact of these biocompatible nanoparticles on cell lipid profile. The purpose of the present investigation was to explore changes in lipid components occurring in human carcinoma HeLa cells when exposed to short-term treatments (2 and 4h) with monoolein-based cubosomes stabilized by Pluronic F108 (MO/PF108). A combination of TLC and reversed-phase HPLC with DAD and ELSD detection was performed to analyze cell total fatty acid profile and levels of phospholipids, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. The treatments with MO/PF108 cubosomes, at non-cytotoxic concentration (83μg/mL of MO), affected HeLa fatty acid profile, and a significant increase in the level of oleic acid 18:1 n-9 was observed in treated cells after lipid component saponification. Nanoparticle uptake modulated HeLa cell lipid composition, inducing a remarkable incorporation of oleic acid in the phospholipid and triacylglycerol fractions, whereas no changes were observed in the cellular levels of free cholesterol and cholesteryl oleate. Moreover, cell-based fluorescent measurements of intracellular membranes and lipid droplet content were assessed on cubosome-treated cells with an alternative technique using Nile red staining. A significant increase in the amount of the intracellular membranes and mostly in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was detected, confirming that monoolein-based cubosome treatment influences the synthesis of intracellular membranes and accumulation of lipid droplets.

  13. Study on effects of organic solvents on Hela cells by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Liting; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Xinlong; Marx, Lisa

    2012-11-01

    In the anticancer research with traditional Chinese medicine, many medicinally effective components can only dissolve in higher polar organic solvents, such as ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) etc. However, organic solvents may directly interfere with the accuracy of therapeutic efficacy evaluation. Therefore the study on effects of organic solvents with different concentrations on Hela cells is of great significance. The digital holography is a non-destructive and non-contact method to image the transparent sample without staining and with the high precision and high resolution. In this paper, the digital holography is proposed to replace the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium (MTT) or the Giemsa dye method. Based on the pre-magnification off-axis Fresnel digital holographic theory, an inverted microscopy system is built to obtain the phase-contrast images of the Hela cells, which are added different concentrations of organic solvents. Compared to the control group, there is significantly differences with the shapes of Hela cells with different organic solvents. The size of cell with ethanol 25% is no significantly difference with the control group. But the sizes of cells in the solutions with ethanol 12.5% and 50% are smaller than the control group. Next, the sizes of cells in the solutions with DMSO 12.5%, 25% and 50% are great smaller, compared with the control group. The results show that the digital holography has high practical value in detecting the changes in the shape of cells and is helpful in the choice of organic solvents for further apoptosis study.

  14. Gallic acid induces mitotic catastrophe and inhibits centrosomal clustering in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si; Guan, Xin; Grün, Christoph; Zhou, Zhiqin; Schepers, Ute; Nick, Peter

    2015-12-25

    Cancer cells divide rapidly, providing medical targets for anticancer agents. The polyphenolic gallic acid (GA) is known to be toxic for certain cancer cells. However, the cellular mode of action has not been elucidated. Therefore, the current study addressed a potential effect of GA on the mitosis of cancer cells. GA inhibited viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. We could show, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), that this inhibition was accompanied by elevated frequency of cells arrested at the G2/M transition. This cell-cycle arrest was accompanied by mitotic catastrophe, and formation of cells with multiple nuclei. These aberrations were preceded by impaired centrosomal clustering. We arrive at a model of action, where GA inhibits the progression of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase by impairing centrosomal clustering which will stimulate mitotic catastrophe. Thus, GA has potential as compound against cervical cancer.

  15. Down-regulation of microRNA-9 leads to activation of IL-6/Jak/STAT3 pathway through directly targeting IL-6 in HeLa cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangbo; Jia, Junqiao; Zhao, Lijun; Li, Xiaojun; Xie, Qing; Chen, Xiangmei; Wang, Jianliu; Lu, Fengmin

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA-9 (miR-9) presents to exert distinct and even opposite functions in different kinds of tumors through targeting different cellular genes. However, its role in cervical adenocarcinoma remains uncertain. Here, we report that miR-9 is down-regulated in cervical adenocarcinoma due to its frequent promoter-hypermethylation and exerts its tumor suppressor role through inhibiting several novel target genes, including interleukin-6 (IL-6). The promoters of miR-9 precursors (mir-9-1, -2, and -3) were hypermethylated in cervical adenocarcinoma tissues. Demethylation treatment of HeLa dramatically increased the expression of mature miR-9. Both in vitro and in vivo functional experiments confirmed that miR-9 can inhibit the proliferation, migration, and malignant transformation abilities of HeLa cells. Bioinformatics methods and array-based RNA expression profiles were used to screen the downstream target genes of miR-9. Dual-luciferase reporting assay, real-time qPCR, and ELISA or Western blot confirmed four genes (CKAP2, HSPC159, IL-6, and TC10) to be novel direct target genes of miR-9. Pathway annotation analysis of the differently expressed genes (DEGs) induced by ectopic miR-9 expression revealed the enrichment in Jak/STAT3 pathway, which is one of the downstream pathways of IL-6. Ectopic expression of miR-9 in HeLa inhibited Jak/STAT3 signaling activity. Moreover, such effect could be partially reversed by the addition of exogenous IL-6. In conclusion, our results here present a tumor suppressor potential of miR-9 in cervical adenocarcinoma for the first time and suggest that miR-9 could repress tumorigenesis through inhibiting the activity of IL-6/Jak/STAT3 pathway.

  16. [ENTRY OF FACULTATIVE PATHOGEN SERRATIA GRIMESII INTO HELA CELLS. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Bozhokina, E S; Kever, L V; Komissarchik, Ya Yu; Khaitlina, S Yu; Efremova, T N

    2015-01-01

    Facultative pathogens Serratia grimesii are able to invade eukaryotic cells where they have been found in vacuoles and free in the cytoplasm (Efremova et al., 2001; Bozhokina et al., 2011). However, efficiency of this invasion is low, and the mechanisms of the invasion related to the initial steps of the process are not known. In the present study, we have increased the invasion efficiency by incubation of HeLa cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) preceding the infection. In the NAC-pretreated cells, two modes of S. grimesii to enter HeLa cells were observed. In the most cases, the penetration of S. grimesii into the cell was consistent with the "zipper mechanism", involving specific interaction of bacterial invasin with a host cell surface receptor. However, in some cases, bacteria were trapped by membrane ruffling probably produced by injected bacterial proteins that trigger the bacterial uptake process, as described in the "trigger mechanism". Further elucidation of bacterial and cellular factors involved in the bacteria-host cell interaction should clarify whether two different mechanisms or a predominant one operate during S. grimesii invasion. PMID:26863770

  17. Identification of CELF1 RNA targets by CLIP-seq in human HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Le Tonquèze, Olivier; Gschloessl, Bernhard; Legagneux, Vincent; Paillard, Luc; Audic, Yann

    2016-06-01

    The specific interactions between RNA-binding proteins and their target RNAs are an essential level to control gene expression. By combining ultra-violet cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and massive SoliD sequencing we identified the RNAs bound by the RNA-binding protein CELF1, in human HeLa cells. The CELF1 binding sites deduced from the sequence data allow characterizing specific features of CELF1-RNA association. We present therefore the first map of CELF1 binding sites in human cells. PMID:27222809

  18. Identification of source of calcium in HeLa cells by femtosecond laser excitation.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Kong, Siu Kai; Chan, Kam Tai

    2010-01-01

    Calcium is an important messenger in cells and whose store and diffusion dynamics at the subcellular level remain unclear. By inducing a controlled slow subcellular Ca2+ release through femtosecond laser irradiation in HeLa cells immersed in different media, cytoplasm is identified to be the major intracellular Ca2+ store, with the nucleus being the minor store and the extracellular Ca2+ also contributing to the total cellular Ca2+ level. Furthermore, Ca2+ released in either the cytoplasm or nucleus diffuses into the nucleus or cytoplasm, respectively, at different rates and influences the Ca2+ release in those regions.

  19. Role of nuclear tubule on the apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Chan, Kam Tai; Kong, Siu Kai

    2010-05-01

    It was found that nuclear tubules (NTs) would develop inside the nuclei of HeLa cells when they were irradiated by a femtosecond laser at the wavelength of 1554 nm for 40 s or longer. These NTs provided a pathway for the excess calcium generated by the laser to diffuse from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Concurrently, the NTs served to spread mitochondria deep inside the nucleus so that they could initiate DNA fragmentations in regions covered by the NTs in the apoptotic cell. The role of NT as the precursor and passage to apoptosis is firmly established.

  20. Desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phosphate production in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, D. R.; Zamani, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Histamine stimulated the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates (IPn) in control HeLa cells with an EC50 of 3.7 +/- 0.7 microM in the presence of 10 mM LiCl. The maximum response to histamine after 15 min incubation was 43 +/- 5% over basal accumulation and occurred at a concentration of 1 mM histamine. 2. The histamine-induced IPn production in HeLa cells was confirmed as H1 receptor-mediated, since the H1 antagonist mepyramine (10(-6) M) inhibited the histamine response (10(-4) M) by 83 +/- 7%, whereas the H2 antagonist, ranitidine (10(-4) M), and H3 antagonist, thioperamide (10(-6) M), were ineffective. 3. Histamine (10(-4) M) pretreatment of HeLa cells for 30 min desensitized the subsequent histamine-induced IPn accumulation. The desensitized cells accumulated IPn in response to histamine with an EC50 of 1.7 +/- 0.7 microM after 15 min incubation. The maximum histamine-induced IPn accumulation at 10(-4) M was 19 +/- 5% over basal and was significantly lower (P < 0.03) than the maximum response in control cells. 4. The desensitization of histamine-induced IPn accumulation was time-dependent and, at a desensitizing histamine concentration of 10(-4) M, the half-maximal attenuation occurred after approximately 9 min and maximum desensitization was achieved by 15-20 min. The desensitization of the IPn accumulation was a reversible phenomenon and full recovery of the response occurred 150 min after the removal of the desensitizing histamine-containing medium. The half-time for the recovery of the histamine-induced response was estimated at 120 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358540

  1. Investigation of role of aspartame on apoptosis process in HeLa cells -->.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Mistry, Bhupendra; Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Noorzai, Rafi; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. The study reports that consumption of aspartame containing product could lead to cancer. However, the effect of aspartame on apoptosis process in cancer is not yet understood clearly. HeLa cells were exposed to different concentrations (0.01-0.05 mg/ml) of aspartame for 48 h. Cytotoxicity of aspartame on cancer cells was determined by SRB assay. The result indicates no significant changes on cell viability. Aspartame suppresses apoptosis process in cancer cells by down-regulation of mRNA expression of tumor suppressor gene p53, and pro-apoptotic gene bax. It up-regulates anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 mRNA expression. In addition, Ki 67 and PCNA mRNA, and protein expressions were determined. Taking all these together, we conclude that aspartame may be a potent substance to slow-down the apoptosis process in HeLa cells. Further works are ongoing to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism of aspartame in cancer cells. PMID:27298583

  2. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of Moringa oleifera Lam. callus and leaf extracts on Hela cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarain, Abbas; Asghari, Gholamreza; Ghassami, Erfaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are considerable attempts worldwide on herbal and traditional compounds to validate their use as anti-cancer drugs. Plants from Moringaceae family including Moringa oleifera possess several activities such as antitumor effect on tumor cell lines. In this study we sought to determine if callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera possess any cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-water (70-30) extracts of callus and leaf of M. oleifera were prepared by maceration method. The amount of phenolic compounds of the extracts was determined by Folin Ciocalteu method. The cytotoxicity of the extracts against Hela tumor cells was carried out using MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of the extract were added. Cells were incubated for 48 h and their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Cytotoxicity was considered when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera significantly decreased the viability of Hela cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, leaf extract of M. oleifera were more potent than that of callus extract. Conclusion: As the content of phenolic compounds of leaf extract was higher than that of callus extract, it can be concluded that phenolic compounds are involved in the cytotoxicity of M. oleifera. PMID:25337524

  3. Investigation of role of aspartame on apoptosis process in HeLa cells -->.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Mistry, Bhupendra; Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Noorzai, Rafi; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. The study reports that consumption of aspartame containing product could lead to cancer. However, the effect of aspartame on apoptosis process in cancer is not yet understood clearly. HeLa cells were exposed to different concentrations (0.01-0.05 mg/ml) of aspartame for 48 h. Cytotoxicity of aspartame on cancer cells was determined by SRB assay. The result indicates no significant changes on cell viability. Aspartame suppresses apoptosis process in cancer cells by down-regulation of mRNA expression of tumor suppressor gene p53, and pro-apoptotic gene bax. It up-regulates anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 mRNA expression. In addition, Ki 67 and PCNA mRNA, and protein expressions were determined. Taking all these together, we conclude that aspartame may be a potent substance to slow-down the apoptosis process in HeLa cells. Further works are ongoing to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism of aspartame in cancer cells.

  4. Akt mediates TIGAR induction in HeLa cells following PFKFB3 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Simon-Molas, Helga; Calvo-Vidal, María Nieves; Castaño, Esther; Rodríguez-García, Ana; Navarro-Sabaté, Àurea; Bartrons, Ramon; Manzano, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Neoplastic cells metabolize higher amounts of glucose relative to normal cells in order to cover increased energetic and anabolic needs. Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3) diminishes cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth in animals. In this work, we investigate the crosstalk between PFKFB3 and TIGAR (TP53-Induced Glycolysis and Apoptosis Regulator), a protein known to protect cells from oxidative stress. Our results show consistent TIGAR induction in HeLa cells in response to PFKFB3 knockdown. Upon PFKFB3 silencing, cells undergo oxidative stress and trigger Akt phosphorylation. This leads to induction of a TIGAR-mediated prosurvival pathway that reduces both oxidative stress and cell death. As TIGAR is known to have a role in DNA repair, it could serve as a potential target for the development of effective antineoplastic therapies. PMID:27491040

  5. Photodynamic Effect of Ni Nanotubes on an HeLa Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Hammad Aziz, Muhammad; Fakhar-E-Alam, M; Fatima, Mahvish; Shaheen, Fozia; Iqbal, Seemab; Atif, M; Talha, Muhammad; Mansoor Ali, Syed; Afzal, Muhammad; Majid, Abdul; Shelih Al Harbi, Thamir; Ismail, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M; AlSalhi, M S; Alahmed, Z A

    2016-01-01

    Nickel nanomaterials are promising in the biomedical field, especially in cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy, due to their distinctive chemical and physical properties. In this experiment, the toxicity of nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) were tested in an in vitro cervical cancer model (HeLa cell line) to optimize the parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for their greatest effectiveness. Ni NTs were synthesized by electrodeposition. Morphological analysis and magnetic behavior were examined using a Scanning electron microscope (SEM), an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. Phototoxic and cytotoxic effects of nanomaterials were studied using the Ni NTs alone as well as in conjugation with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA); this was performed both in the dark and under laser exposure. Toxic effects on the HeLa cell model were evaluated by a neutral red assay (NRA) and by detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, 10-200 nM of Ni NTs was prepared in solution form and applied to HeLa cells in 96-well plates. Maximum toxicity of Ni NTs complexed with 5-ALA was observed at 100 J/cm2 and 200 nM. Up to 65-68% loss in cell viability was observed. Statistical analysis was performed on the experimental results to confirm the worth and clarity of results, with p-values = 0.003 and 0.000, respectively. Current results pave the way for a more rational strategy to overcome the problem of drug bioavailability in nanoparticulate targeted cancer therapy, which plays a dynamic role in clinical practice. PMID:26990435

  6. Photodynamic Effect of Ni Nanotubes on an HeLa Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Hammad Aziz, Muhammad; Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Fatima, Mahvish; Shaheen, Fozia; Iqbal, Seemab; Atif, M.; Talha, Muhammad; Mansoor Ali, Syed; Afzal, Muhammad; Majid, Abdul; Shelih Al.Harbi, Thamir; Ismail, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M.; AlSalhi, M. S.; Alahmed, Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel nanomaterials are promising in the biomedical field, especially in cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy, due to their distinctive chemical and physical properties. In this experiment, the toxicity of nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) were tested in an in vitro cervical cancer model (HeLa cell line) to optimize the parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for their greatest effectiveness. Ni NTs were synthesized by electrodeposition. Morphological analysis and magnetic behavior were examined using a Scanning electron microscope (SEM), an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. Phototoxic and cytotoxic effects of nanomaterials were studied using the Ni NTs alone as well as in conjugation with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA); this was performed both in the dark and under laser exposure. Toxic effects on the HeLa cell model were evaluated by a neutral red assay (NRA) and by detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, 10–200 nM of Ni NTs was prepared in solution form and applied to HeLa cells in 96-well plates. Maximum toxicity of Ni NTs complexed with 5-ALA was observed at 100 J/cm2 and 200 nM. Up to 65–68% loss in cell viability was observed. Statistical analysis was performed on the experimental results to confirm the worth and clarity of results, with p-values = 0.003 and 0.000, respectively. Current results pave the way for a more rational strategy to overcome the problem of drug bioavailability in nanoparticulate targeted cancer therapy, which plays a dynamic role in clinical practice. PMID:26990435

  7. Photoirradiation study of gold nanospheres and rods in Vero and Hela cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gananathan, Poorani; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Elanchezhiyan, Manickan

    2014-03-01

    Photoirradiation effect of gold nanospheres in conjucation with green light and rods in conjugation with red light corresponds to their absorption wavelength range found to be appreciable. In this present work concentration of nanomaterial and light dose were optimized. Gold nanospheres were synthesized by reduction technique using Sodium Borohydrate as reducing agent and Trisodium Citrate as capping agent. Au nanorods having 680-900nm absorption were synthesized using reduction techniques with CTAB and BDAC polymers. From UV-Vis absorption and Transmission Electron Microscopy the size of nanoparticles were confirmed. 30nm Gold nanospheres and green light source of 530nm wavelength with power 30mW were applied to Vero and Hela cell lines shows higher toxicity for Hela cells. Nanorods were applied and irradiated with 680nm wavelength light source with light intensity 45mW. Post irradiation effect for 24hrs, 48hrs confirms cell proliferation in normal rate in viable cells. The morphological changes in irradiated spot leads to apoptotoic cell death was confirmed with microscopic imaging. The LD50 value was also calculated.

  8. αTAT1 downregulation induces mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, J-Y; Tsen, S-D; Chien, C-C; Liu, H-W; Tung, C-Y; Lin, C-H

    2016-01-01

    α-Tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (αTAT1) controls reversible acetylation on Lys40 of α-tubulin and modulates multiple cellular functions. αTAT1 depletion induced morphological defects of touch receptor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans and impaired cell adhesion and contact inhibition in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however, no morphological or proliferation defects in human RPE-hTERT cells were found after αTAT1-specific siRNA treatment. Here, we compared the effect of three αTAT1-specific shRNAs on proliferation and morphology in two human cell lines, HeLa and A549. The more efficient two shRNAs induced mitotic catastrophe in both cell lines and the most efficient one also decreased F-actin and focal adhesions. Further analysis revealed that αTAT1 downregulation increased γ-H2AX, but not other DNA damage markers p-CHK1 and p-CHK2, along with marginal change in microtubule outgrowth speed and inter-kinetochore distance. Overexpression of αTAT1 could not precisely mimic the distribution and concentration of endogenous acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tu), although no overt phenotype change was observed, meanwhile, this could not completely prevent αTAT1 downregulation-induced deficiencies. We therefore conclude that efficient αTAT1 downregulation could impair actin architecture and induce mitotic catastrophe in HeLa and A549 cells through mechanisms partly independent of Ac-Tu. PMID:27551500

  9. Metabolism of HeLa cells revealed through autofluorescence lifetime upon infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryakina, Tatyana Yu.; Su, Pin-Tzu; Syu, Wan-Jr; Allen Chang, C.; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a sensitive technique in monitoring functional and conformational states of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD),main compounds participating in oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this study, we have applied FLIM to characterize the metabolic changes in HeLa cells upon bacterial infection and made comparison with the results from the cells treated with staurosporine (STS), a well-known apoptosis inducer. The evolving of NADH's average autofluorescence lifetime during the 3 h after infection with enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or STS treatment has been observed. The ratio of the short and the long lifetime components' relative contributions of NADH increases with time, a fact indicating cellular metabolic activity, such as a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation over the course of infection, while opposite dynamics is observed in FAD. Being associated with mitochondria, FAD lifetimes and redox ratio could indicate heterogeneous mitochondrial function, microenvironment with bacterial infection, and further pathway to cell death. The redox ratios for both EHEC-infected and STS-treated HeLa cells have been observed and these observations also indicate possible apoptosis induced by bacterial infection.

  10. Two new palladium(II) complexes: synthesis, characterization and their interaction with HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Enjun; Lin, Lin; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Mingchang; Wang, Bo; Gao, Xianan

    2012-08-28

    Two complexes [Pd(L(1))(en)](2)·4H(2)O (1), [Pd(L(2))(en)]·2H(2)O (2), (L(1) = pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, L(2) = pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, and en = ethylenediamine) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, (1)H NMR and element analysis. X-ray analyses of complexes 1 and 2 revealed that 1 belongs to the triclinic system with space group P1(2), and 2 belongs to the monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/n. The binding of the complexes with HC-DNA (HeLa cells DNA, which was extracted by ourselves) were measured by fluorescence spectrum and viscometry. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrates the ability of the complexes to cleave the extracted HC-DNA. The complexes exhibit a higher cytotoxicity against tumor cells as against normal cells in vitro. Further more, apoptotic tests indicate that the complexes have an apoptotic effect on HeLa cells.

  11. Clonal variability of radiation-induced cisplatin resistant HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H; Marx, K

    1998-01-01

    Low-dose fractionated gamma-irradiation (3 cycles of 5x2 Gy) induces moderate cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells which is associated with alterations of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway (2). There is a considerable heterogeneity in cell survival among isolated resistant clones (Rf values between 1.4 to 2.4) and in the propensity of the cells to enter apoptosis. These variations are associated with altered activation of the apoptotic pathway by members of the TNF family. The membrane receptor CD95 (Apo-1/Fas), which is upregulated immediately after cisplatin exposure in parental HeLa cells, is expressed at various levels in the resistant clones. There are also changes in the formation of the inhibitor protein I kappa B, which regulates the antiapoptotic transcription factor NF kappa B. Since the response to radiation is unchanged, the results collectively suggest that changes in the activation of the caspase-dependent signalling cascade are involved in the death pathway initiated by cisplatin but not by radiation damage.

  12. Exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles increases Staphylococcusaureusinfection of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Walker, Stephen. G.; Wang, Hong Zhan; Gondon, Chris; Brink, Peter; Guterman, Shoshana; Zawacki, Emma; Applebaum, Eliana; Rafailovich, Miriam; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Mironava, Tatsiana

    TiO2 is one of the most common nanoparticles in industry from food additives to energy generation. Even though TiO2 is also used as an anti-bacterial agent in combination with UV, we found that, in the absence of UV, exposure of HeLa cells to TiO2 nanoparticles largely increased their risk of bacterial invasion. HeLa cells cultured with low dosage rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0.1 mg/ml) for 24 hrs prior to exposure to bacteria had 350% and 250% respectively more bacteria infected per cell. The increase was attributed to increased LDH leakage, and changes in the mechanical response of the cell membrane. On the other hand, macrophages exposed to TiO2 particles ingested 40% fewer bacteria, further increasing the risk of infection. In combination, these two factors raise serious concerns regarding the impact of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles on the ability of organisms to resist bacterial infection.

  13. Modification of some biological properties of HeLa cells containing adeno-associated virus DNA integrated into chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, C; Schlehofer, J R

    1992-01-01

    Parvoviruses are known to interfere with cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Since infecting adeno-associated virus (AAV) frequently integrates its DNA into the cellular genome, we analyzed whether this integration influences the transformed phenotype of the human tumor cell line HeLa. Analysis of three independent HeLa cell clones with integrated AAV DNA (HA-3x, HA-16, and HA-28) revealed the following phenotypic changes of these cells: (i) reduced growth rate, (ii) increased serum requirement, (iii) reduced capacity for colony formation in soft agar, (iv) reduced cloning efficiency on plastic, (v) elevated sensitivity to genotoxic agents (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, human tumor necrosis factor alpha, UV irradiation [256 nm], and heat [42 degrees C]), and (vi) reduced sensitivity to the cytolytic effect of parvovirus H-1. Reduced growth rate and enhanced sensitivity to gamma irradiation were also observed in vivo when tumors from AAV DNA-containing HeLa cells were transplanted into nude mice. This alteration of the biological properties of HeLa cells was independent of the number of AAV genomes integrated, the physical structure of integrated AAV DNA, and the transcription of AAV genes. Integration of AAV DNA was found to occur preferentially on the long arm of chromosome 17 in the three HeLa cell clones analyzed. These findings demonstrate that genomic integration of AAV DNA can alter the biological properties of human tumor cells. Images PMID:1313913

  14. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  15. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, X X; Ma, Y F; Wang, Q S; Chen, Z L; Liao, R R; Pan, Y C

    2015-07-01

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. Yeast CUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study, CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  16. Loss of Selenium-Binding Protein 1 Decreases Sensitivity to Clastogens and Intracellular Selenium Content in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changhui; Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Ryan T. Y.; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesize that SBP1 sequesters cellular selenium and sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down SBP1 expression in HeLa cervical cancer cells by employing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach. Reduced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, paraquat and camptothecin, reactive oxygen species content, and intracellular retention of selenium after selenomethionine treatment were observed in SBP1 shRNA HeLa cells. Results from Western analyses showed that treatment of HeLa cells with selenomethionine resulted in increased SBP1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of SBP1 rendered HeLa cells increased expression of glutathione peroxidase-1 but not glutathione peroxidase-4 protein levels and accelerated migration from a wound. Altogether, SBP1 retains supplemental selenium and sensitizes HeLa cancer cells to clastogens, suggesting a new cancer treatment strategy by sequestering selenium through SBP1. PMID:27404728

  17. Loss of Selenium-Binding Protein 1 Decreases Sensitivity to Clastogens and Intracellular Selenium Content in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changhui; Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Ryan T Y; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesize that SBP1 sequesters cellular selenium and sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down SBP1 expression in HeLa cervical cancer cells by employing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach. Reduced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, paraquat and camptothecin, reactive oxygen species content, and intracellular retention of selenium after selenomethionine treatment were observed in SBP1 shRNA HeLa cells. Results from Western analyses showed that treatment of HeLa cells with selenomethionine resulted in increased SBP1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of SBP1 rendered HeLa cells increased expression of glutathione peroxidase-1 but not glutathione peroxidase-4 protein levels and accelerated migration from a wound. Altogether, SBP1 retains supplemental selenium and sensitizes HeLa cancer cells to clastogens, suggesting a new cancer treatment strategy by sequestering selenium through SBP1.

  18. Loss of Selenium-Binding Protein 1 Decreases Sensitivity to Clastogens and Intracellular Selenium Content in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changhui; Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Ryan T Y; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesize that SBP1 sequesters cellular selenium and sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down SBP1 expression in HeLa cervical cancer cells by employing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach. Reduced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, paraquat and camptothecin, reactive oxygen species content, and intracellular retention of selenium after selenomethionine treatment were observed in SBP1 shRNA HeLa cells. Results from Western analyses showed that treatment of HeLa cells with selenomethionine resulted in increased SBP1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of SBP1 rendered HeLa cells increased expression of glutathione peroxidase-1 but not glutathione peroxidase-4 protein levels and accelerated migration from a wound. Altogether, SBP1 retains supplemental selenium and sensitizes HeLa cancer cells to clastogens, suggesting a new cancer treatment strategy by sequestering selenium through SBP1. PMID:27404728

  19. Silencing Aurora-A with siRNA inhibits cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ning; Shi, Shunbin; Wang, Hongzhen; Wu, Guangzhou; Wang, Yunliang; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuanhua; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-09-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase, it plays important roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated the expression of AURKA in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, the role of small interference RNA targeting AURKA on growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines in vitro. The AURKA is highly expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down AURKA expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines H1299 and A549. The results indicated that depletion of AURKA could inhibit cell growth, cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The potential mechanisms of AURKA inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis are associated with downregulated RAF-1, CCND2, CCND3, CDK4, PAK4, EGFR and upregulated WEE1 expression. Furthermore, AURKA knockdown cooperated with vincristine (VCR) to repress A549 cell proliferation. Therefore, AURKA plays important roles in the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which suggests that AURKA could be a promising tool for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. PMID:27571708

  20. Hyperthermia enhances the reactivation of irradiated adenovirus in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piperakis, S. M.; McLennan, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The reactivation of U.V.-irradiated adenovirus 2 in HeLa cells is enhanced 8-9 fold if the cells are given a brief hyperthermic shock before infection. Maximum reactivation is achieved by heating for 10 min at 45.5 degrees C and with a delay of 36 h between heating and infection. The induction process requires protein synthesis only during the 3 h period immediately following heating; cycloheximide does not prevent the expression of enhanced reactivation if added to the cells after this time. Heat-enhanced reactivation exhibits properties similar in some respects to radiation-enhanced reactivation and indicates an increased capacity of the heated cells to tolerate DNA damage. PMID:6696820

  1. Branched dimerization of Tat peptide improves permeability to HeLa and hippocampal neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Monreal, I Abrrey; Liu, Qian; Tyson, Katherine; Bland, Tyler; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Adams, Erin V; Wayman, Gary A; Aguilar, Hector C; Saludes, Jonel P

    2015-03-28

    A dimeric branched peptide TATp-D designed as an analogue of the HIV-Tat protein transduction domain (TATp), a prototypical cell penetrating peptide (CPP), demonstrates significantly enhanced cell uptake at 0.25 to 2.5 μM. Live cell confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that multivalency dramatically improved the permeation potency of TATp-D to HeLa and primary hippocampal neuronal cells. The observed enhanced ability of TATp-D to translocate through the membrane is highlighted by a non-linear dependence on concentration, exhibiting the greatest uptake at sub-micromolar concentrations as compared to TATp. Multimerization via bis-Fmoc Lysine offered a synthetically straightforward method to investigate the effects of multivalent CPPs while offering orthogonal handles for cargo attachment, increasing the utility of CPPs at significantly lower concentrations. PMID:25733181

  2. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. PMID:27497983

  3. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8.

  4. Mechanistic aspects of fluorescent gold nanocluster internalization by live HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linxiao; Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We have studied cellular uptake of ultrasmall fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) by HeLa cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with quantitative image analysis. Water solubilized, lipoic acid-protected AuNCs, which had an overall hydrodynamic diameter of 3.3 nm and emitted fluorescence in the near-infrared region at ~700 nm, were observed to accumulate on the cell membrane prior to internalization. The internalization mechanisms were analyzed using inhibitors known to interfere with specific pathways. Cellular uptake of AuNCs is energy-dependent and involves multiple mechanisms: clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis appear to play a significant role, whereas the caveolin-mediated pathway contributes only to a lesser extent. Co-labeling of different cell organelles showed that intracellular trafficking of AuNCs mainly follows through endosomal pathways. The AuNCs were ultimately transferred to lysosomes; they were completely excluded from the nucleus even after 24 h.We have studied cellular uptake of ultrasmall fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) by HeLa cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with quantitative image analysis. Water solubilized, lipoic acid-protected AuNCs, which had an overall hydrodynamic diameter of 3.3 nm and emitted fluorescence in the near-infrared region at ~700 nm, were observed to accumulate on the cell membrane prior to internalization. The internalization mechanisms were analyzed using inhibitors known to interfere with specific pathways. Cellular uptake of AuNCs is energy-dependent and involves multiple mechanisms: clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis appear to play a significant role, whereas the caveolin-mediated pathway contributes only to a lesser extent. Co-labeling of different cell organelles showed that intracellular trafficking of AuNCs mainly follows through endosomal pathways. The AuNCs were ultimately transferred to lysosomes; they were completely excluded

  5. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior. PMID:26469886

  6. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  7. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  8. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-15

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  9. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior. PMID:26469886

  10. Passive permeability and effective pore size of HeLa cell nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Samudram, Arunkarthick; Mangalassery, Bijeesh M; Kowshik, Meenal; Patincharath, Nandakumar; Varier, Geetha K

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear pore complexes in the nuclear membrane act as the sole gateway of transport of molecules from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and vice versa. Studies on biomolecular transport through nuclear membranes provide vital data on the nuclear pore complexes. In this work, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran molecules as a model system and study the passive nuclear import of biomolecules through nuclear pore complexes in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. Experiments are carried out under transient conditions in the time lapse imaging scheme using an in-house constructed confocal laser scanning microscope. Transport rates of dextran molecules having molecular weights of 4-70 kDa corresponding to Stokes radius of 1.4-6 nm are determined. Analyzing the permeability of the nuclear membrane for different sizes the effective pore radius of HeLa cell nuclear membrane is determined to be 5.3 nm, much larger than the value reported earlier using proteins as probe molecules. The range of values reported for the nuclear pore radius suggest that they may not be rigid structures and it is quite probable that the effective pore size of nuclear pore complexes is critically dependent on the probe molecules and on the environmental factors.

  11. Mechanistic aspects of fluorescent gold nanocluster internalization by live HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linxiao; Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2013-02-21

    We have studied cellular uptake of ultrasmall fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) by HeLa cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy in combination with quantitative image analysis. Water solubilized, lipoic acid-protected AuNCs, which had an overall hydrodynamic diameter of 3.3 nm and emitted fluorescence in the near-infrared region at ∼700 nm, were observed to accumulate on the cell membrane prior to internalization. The internalization mechanisms were analyzed using inhibitors known to interfere with specific pathways. Cellular uptake of AuNCs is energy-dependent and involves multiple mechanisms: clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis appear to play a significant role, whereas the caveolin-mediated pathway contributes only to a lesser extent. Co-labeling of different cell organelles showed that intracellular trafficking of AuNCs mainly follows through endosomal pathways. The AuNCs were ultimately transferred to lysosomes; they were completely excluded from the nucleus even after 24 h.

  12. Rapid increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the HeLa cells after hypergravity exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.; Sato, Atsushige

    1990-01-01

    The IP3 level in HeLa cells has been elevated through the application in hypergravity in a time-dependent manner. The data obtained for the hydrolytic products of PIP2, IP3, and DG are noted to modulate c-myc gene expression. It is also established that the cAMP accumulation by the IBMX in hypergravity-exposed cells was suppressed relative to the control. In light of IP3 increase and cAMP decrease results, a single GTP-binding protein may play a role in the hypergravity signal transduction of HeLa cells by stimulating PLC while inhibiting adenylate cyclase.

  13. Heparin-mediated inhibition of Chlamydia psittaci adherence to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martín, C B; Ojcius, D M; Hsia, R; Hellio, R; Bavoil, P M; Dautry-Varsat, A

    1997-01-01

    The adherence of human strains of Chlamydia trachomatis has been recently shown to be inhibitable by heparin and heparitinase, leading to the proposal that Chlamydia binding to host cells may be mediated by a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent mechanism. We here describe the adherence of the guinea-pig pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci GPIC, to HeLa cells, which was measured by cytofluorometry with chlamydiae whose DNA was fluorescently labelled. Adherence could be inhibited by heat or trypsin pretreatment of the bacteria, and binding was much faster at 37 degrees C (reaching a plateau within 1 h) than 4 degrees C. Little binding remained when host cells were pre-fixed with paraformaldehyde, suggesting that host cell receptor mobility may be required for effective adherence. Visualization by confocal microscopy confirmed that the bacteria were at or near the host cell surface during the entire time-course of these experiments. Adherence increased as a function of pH between pH 6 and pH 8.0-8.5. Both adherence and infection of HeLa cells could be inhibited with heparin when the adherence step was performed at 4 degrees C, but only infection was inhibited when the adherence step was performed at 37 degrees C, even though heparitinase could block adherence at either 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Even at 4 degrees C, heparin-mediated inhibition was significantly lower at pH 8 than pH 7.4, suggesting that GAG-independent mechanisms may play a role in the higher adherence observed at basic pH. These results therefore demonstrate that a GAG-dependent adherence step may be operative in C. psittaci, and raise the possibility that other adherence mechanisms may also contribute to binding by this chlamydial strain. Furthermore, they suggest that there may not be a strict correlation between C. psittaci adherence and the ability to cause productive infections.

  14. Metabolic Conversion of Ceramides in HeLa Cells - A Cholesteryl Phosphocholine Delivery Approach.

    PubMed

    Kjellberg, Matti A; Lönnfors, Max; Slotte, J Peter; Mattjus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ceramides can be delivered to cultured cells without solvents in the form of complexes with cholesteryl phosphocholine. We have analysed the delivery of three different radiolabeled D-erythro-ceramides (C6-Cer, C10-Cer and C16-Cer) to HeLa cells, and followed their metabolism as well as the cell viability. We found that all three ceramides were successfully taken up by HeLa cells when complexed to CholPC in an equimolar ratio, and show that the ceramides show different rates of cellular uptake and metabolic fate. The C6-Cer had the highest incorporation rate, followed by C10-Cer and C16-Cer, respectively. The subsequent effect on cell viability strongly correlated with the rate of incorporation, where C6-Cer had the strongest apoptotic effects. Low-dose (1 μM) treatment with C6-Cer favoured conversion of the precursor to sphingomyelin, whereas higher concentrations (25-100 μM) yielded increased conversion to C6-glucosylceramide. Similar results were obtained for C10-Cer. In the lower-dose C16-Cer experiments, most of the precursor was degraded, whereas at high-dose concentrations the precursor remained un-metabolized. Using this method, we demonstrate that ceramides with different chain lengths clearly exhibit varying rates of cellular uptake. The cellular fate of the externally delivered ceramides are clearly connected to their rate of incorporation and their subsequent effects on cell viability may be in part determined by their chain length. PMID:26599810

  15. Acid stress suggests different determinants for polystyrene and HeLa cell adhesion in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Haddaji, N; Khouadja, S; Fdhila, K; Krifi, B; Ben Ismail, M; Lagha, R; Bakir, K; Bakhrouf, A

    2015-07-01

    Adhesion has been regarded as one of the basic features of probiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of acid stress on the functional properties, such as hydrophobicity, adhesion to HeLa cells, and composition of membrane fatty acids, of Lactobacillus probiotics strains. Two strains of Lactobacillus casei were used. Adhesion on polystyrene, hydrophobicity, epithelial cells adhesion, and fatty acids analysis were evaluated. Our results showed that the membrane properties such as hydrophobicity and fatty acid composition of stressed strains were significantly changed with different pH values. However, we found that acid stress caused a change in the proportions of unsaturated and saturated fatty acid. The ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acids observed in acid-stressed Lactobacillus casei cells was significantly higher than the ration in control cells. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in the adhesion ability of these strains to HeLa cells and to a polystyrene surface at low pH. The present finding could first add new insight about the acid stress adaptation and, thus, enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress. Second, no relationship was observed between changes in membrane composition and fluidity induced by acid treatment and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. In fact, the decrease of cell surface hydrophobicity and the adhesion ability to abiotic surface and the increase of the capacity of adhesion to biotic surface demonstrate that adhesive characteristics will have little relevance in probiotic strain-screening procedures.

  16. Genistein promotes cell death of ethanol-stressed HeLa cells through the continuation of apoptosis or secondary necrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a major target and treatment effect of multiple chemotherapeutical agents in cancer. A soybean isoflavone, genistein, is a well-studied chemopreventive agent and has been reported to potentiate the anticancer effect of some chemotherapeutics. However, its mechanistic basis of chemo-enhancement effect remains to be fully elucidated. Methods Apoptotic features of low concentration stressed cancer cells were studied by microscopic method, western blot, immunostaining and annexin V/PI assay. Genistein’s effects on unstressed cells and recovering cells were investigated using MTT cell viability assay and LDH cytotoxicity assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to analyze the possible gene targets involved in the recovery and genistein’s effect. Results Low-concentration ethanol stressed cancer cells showed apoptotic features and could recover after stress removal. In stressed cells, genistein at sub-toxic dosage promoted the cell death. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes MDM2 and XIAP during the recovery process in HeLa cells, and genistein treatment suppressed their expression. The application of genistein, MDM2 inhibitor and XIAP inhibitor to the recovering HeLa cells caused persistent caspase activity and enhanced cell death. Flow cytometry study indicated that genistein treatment could lead to persistent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and necrotic events in the recovering HeLa cells. Caspase activity inhibition shifted the major effect of genistein to necrosis. Conclusions These results suggested two possible mechanisms through which genistein promoted cell death in stressed cancer cells. Genistein could maintain the existing apoptotic signal to enhance apoptotic cell death. It could also disrupt the recovering process in caspase-independent manner, which lead to necrotic events. These effects may be related to the enhanced antitumor effect of chemotherapeutic drugs when they were

  17. Sodium butyrate induced structural changes in HeLa cell chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Reczek, P.R.; Weissman, D.; Huvos, P.E.; Fasman, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    Postsynthetic modifications of core histones by treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 5 mM sodium butyrate lead to alterations in the structure of high molecular weight chromatin. Whole chromatin from butyrate-treated cells, which results in highly acetylated core histones, has an ellipticity (theta)/sub 282.5/ of 3700 deg cm/sup 2/ dmol/sup -1/ (0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4) that is 1200 deg cm/sup 2/ dmol/sup -1/ less than chromatin from untreated HeLa cells, suggesting a more condensed structure. No difference in the circular dichroism spectra was observed in Hl-stripped, high molecular weight chromatin obtained from control and butyrate-treated cells at low (0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4) ionic strength.Thermal denaturation profiles of high molecular weight chromatin were resolved into three transitions and exhibited a shifting of hyperchromicity from transition I to transition III, at a higher T/sub m/, with butyrate treatment of HeLa cells, further indicating a more compact structure. Thermal denaturation profiles of Hl-stripped chromatin were not affected by butyrate treatment. Ionic strength studies in the range of 0-5 mM NaH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, 0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4, of high molecular weight chromatin exhibited a decrease in (theta)/sub 282.5/ and a shifting of hyperchromicity from transition I to transition III with increasing ionic strength. Control high molecular weight chromatin was more sensitive to changes in ionic strength than its highly acetylated counterpart. These results suggest that acetylation of histones alone does not result in a change in histone-DNA interaction but other changes associated with butyrate treatment most probably cause a more condensed structure, of the fraction studied herein, which is mediated by Hl or other materials removed during stripping in 0.35 M NaCl.

  18. Sodium butyrate induced structural changes in HeLa cell chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Reczek, P.R.; Weissman, D.; Huvos, P.E.; Fasman, G.D.

    1982-03-02

    Postsynthetic modifications of core histones by treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 5 mM sodium butyrate lead to alterations in the structure of high molecular weight chromatin. Whole chromatin from butyrate-treated cells, which results in highly acetylated core histones, has an ellipticity (THETA)/sub 282.5/ of 3700 deg cm/sup 2/ dmol/sup -1/ (0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4) that is 1200 deg cm/sup 2/ dmol/sup -1/ less than chromatin from untreated HeLa cells, suggesting a more condensed structure. No difference in the circular dichroism spectra was observed in Hl-stripped, high molecular weight chromatin obtained from control and butyrate-treated cells at low (0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4) ionic strength. Thermal denaturation profiles of high molecular weight chromatin were resolved into three transitions and exhibited a shifting of hyperchromicity from transition I to transition III, at a higher T/sub m/, with butyrate treatment of HeLa cells, further indicating a more compact structure. Thermal denaturation profiles of Hl-stripped chromatin were not affected by butyrate treatment. Ionic strength studies in the range of 0-5 mM NaH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, 0.2 mM EDTA, pH 7.4, of high molecular weight chromatin exhibited a decrease in (THETA)/sub 282.5/ and shifting of hyperchromicity from transition I to transition III with increasing ionic strength. Control high molecular weight chromatin was more sensitive to changes in ionic strength than its highly acetylated counterpart. These results suggest that acetylation of histones alone does not result in a change in histone-DNA interaction but other changes associated with butyrate treatment most probably cause a more condensed structure, of the fraction studied herein, which is mediated by Hl or other materials removed during stripping in 0.35 M NaCl.

  19. Anticancer effects of brominated indole alkaloid Eudistomin H from marine ascidian Eudistoma viride against cervical cancer cells (HeLa).

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Rajaian Pushpabai; Annappan, Murugan

    2015-01-01

    Marine invertebrates called ascidians are prolific producers of bioactive substances. The ascidian Eudistoma viride, distributed along the Southeast coast of India, was investigated for its in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells by the MTT assay. The crude methanolic extract of E. viride, with an IC50 of 53 μg/ml, was dose-dependently cytotoxic. It was more potent at 100 μg/ml than cyclohexamide (1 μg/ml), reducing cell viability to 9.2%. Among nine fractions separated by chromatography, ECF-8 exhibited prominent cytoxic activity at 10 μg/ml. The HPLC fraction EHF-21 of ECF-8 was remarkably dose- and time-dependently cytotoxic, with 39.8% viable cells at 1 μg/ml compared to 51% in cyclohexamide-treated cells at the same concentration; the IC50 was 0.49 μg/ml. Hoechst staining of HeLa cells treated with EHF-21 at 0.5 μg/ml revealed apoptotic events such an cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and formation of apoptotic bodies. Cell size and granularity study showed changes in light scatter, indicating the characteristic feature of cells dying by apoptosis. The cell-cycle analysis of HeLa cells treated with fraction EHF-21 at 1 μg/ml showed the marked arrest of cells in G0/G1, S and G2/M phases and an increase in the sub G0/G1 population indicated an increase in the apoptotic cell population. The statistical analysis of the sub-G1 region showed a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis. DNA fragmentation was also observed in HeLa cells treated with EHF-21. The active EHF-21 fraction, a brominated indole alkaloid Eudistomin H, led to apoptotic death of HeLa cells.

  20. Anticancer effects of brominated indole alkaloid Eudistomin H from marine ascidian Eudistoma viride against cervical cancer cells (HeLa).

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Rajaian Pushpabai; Annappan, Murugan

    2015-01-01

    Marine invertebrates called ascidians are prolific producers of bioactive substances. The ascidian Eudistoma viride, distributed along the Southeast coast of India, was investigated for its in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells by the MTT assay. The crude methanolic extract of E. viride, with an IC50 of 53 μg/ml, was dose-dependently cytotoxic. It was more potent at 100 μg/ml than cyclohexamide (1 μg/ml), reducing cell viability to 9.2%. Among nine fractions separated by chromatography, ECF-8 exhibited prominent cytoxic activity at 10 μg/ml. The HPLC fraction EHF-21 of ECF-8 was remarkably dose- and time-dependently cytotoxic, with 39.8% viable cells at 1 μg/ml compared to 51% in cyclohexamide-treated cells at the same concentration; the IC50 was 0.49 μg/ml. Hoechst staining of HeLa cells treated with EHF-21 at 0.5 μg/ml revealed apoptotic events such an cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and formation of apoptotic bodies. Cell size and granularity study showed changes in light scatter, indicating the characteristic feature of cells dying by apoptosis. The cell-cycle analysis of HeLa cells treated with fraction EHF-21 at 1 μg/ml showed the marked arrest of cells in G0/G1, S and G2/M phases and an increase in the sub G0/G1 population indicated an increase in the apoptotic cell population. The statistical analysis of the sub-G1 region showed a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis. DNA fragmentation was also observed in HeLa cells treated with EHF-21. The active EHF-21 fraction, a brominated indole alkaloid Eudistomin H, led to apoptotic death of HeLa cells. PMID:25550562

  1. Isolation of chromatin DNA tightly bound to the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuvichkin, Vasily Vladimirovich

    2012-11-01

    Recent discovery of the role of nuclear pores in transcription, predicted by our early DNA-membrane complex (DMC) model, makes membrane-bound DNA (MBD) isolation from the cell nucleus and analysis of the MBD actual. The method of MBD isolation proposed by us retains DMC integrity during isolation. We used HeLa cells for DMC extraction. Changing the ionic composition of the isolation medium and replacing DNase I, used commonly for chromatin destruction, with a set of restriction enzymes allowed us to isolate the MBD. Treatment of a nuclear membrane with proteinase K and ultrasound has been used to increase the yield of MBD. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified fraction of isolated DMC supports our previous model of nuclear envelope lipid-chromatin interaction in the nuclear pore assembly.

  2. Analysis of lysosomal membrane proteins exposed to melanin in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There have been developed to use targeting ability for antimicrobial, anticancerous, gene therapy and cosmetics through analysis of various membrane proteins isolated from cell organelles. Methods It was examined about the lysosomal membrane protein extracted from lysosome isolated from HeLa cell treated by 100 ppm melanin for 24 hours in order to find associated with targeting ability to melanin using by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. Results The result showed 14 up-regulated (1.5-fold) and 13 down-regulated (2.0-fold) spots in relation to melanin exposure. Conclusions It has been found that lysosomal membrane proteins are associated with melanin to decolorize and quantity through cellular activation of lysosome. PMID:27158002

  3. High LET radiation enhances nocodazole Induced cell death in HeLa cells through mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Libin; Dai, Zhongying; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Li, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    To understand how human tumor cells respond to the combined treatment with nocodazole and high LET radiation, alterations in cell cycle, mitotic disturbances and cell death were investigated in the present study. Human cervix carcinoma HeLa cells were exposed to nocodazole for 18 h immediately followed by high LET iron ion irradiation and displayed a sequence of events leading to DNA damages, mitotic aberrations, interphase restitution and endocycle as well as cell death. A prolonged mitotic arrest more than 10 h was observed following nocodazole exposure, no matter the irradiation was present or not. The occurrence of mitotic slippage following the mitotic arrest was only drug-dependent and the irradiation did not accelerate it. The amount of polyploidy cells was increased following mitotic slippage. No detectable G(2) or G(1) arrest was observed in cells upon the combined treatment and the cells reentered the cell cycle still harboring unrepaired cellular damages. This premature entry caused an increase of multipolar mitotic spindles and amplification of centrosomes, which gave rise to lagging chromosomal material, failure of cytokinesis and polyploidization. These mitotic disturbances and their outcomes confirmed the incidence of mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptotic features displayed by TUNEL method after the combined treatment. These results suggest that the addition of high-LET iron ion irradiation to nocodazole enhanced mitotic catastrophe and delayed apoptosis in HeLa cells. These might be important cell death mechanisms involved in tumor cells in response to the treatment of antimitotic drug combined with high LET radiation.

  4. Human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell: electrochemistry and nicotine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S C B; Santarino, I B; Enache, T A; Nunes, C; Laranjinha, J; Barbosa, R M; Oliveira-Brett, A M

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that colorectal cancer HT-29 cells can secrete epinephrine (adrenaline) in an autocrine manner to auto-stimulate cellular growth by adrenoreceptors activation, and that this secretion is enhanced by nicotine, showing an indirect relation between colorectal cancer and tobacco. The electrochemical behaviour of human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells from a colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, the hormone and neurotransmitter epinephrine, and nicotine, were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, using indium tin oxide (ITO), glassy carbon (GC) and screen printed carbon (SPC) electrodes. The oxidation of the HT-29 cells, previously grown onto ITO or SPC surfaces, followed an irreversible oxidation process that involved the formation of a main oxidation product that undergoes irreversible reduction, as in the epinephrine oxidation mechanism. The effect of nicotine stimulation of the HT-29 cells was also investigated. Nicotine, at different concentration levels 1, 2 and 15 mM, was introduced in the culture medium and an increase with incubation time, 0 to 3h and 30 min, of the HT-29 cells oxidation and reduction peaks was observed. The interaction of nicotine with the HT-29 cells stimulated the epinephrine secretion causing an increase in epinephrine release concentration, and enabling the conclusion that epinephrine and nicotine play an important role in the colorectal tumour growth.

  5. Aphidicolin does not inhibit DNA repair synthesis in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells. A radioautographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, N; Pedrali-Noy, G; Focher, F; Spadari, S

    1981-01-01

    A radioautographic examination of nuclear DNA synthesis in unirradiated and u.v.-irradiated HeLa cells, in the presence and in the absence of aphidicolin, showed that aphidicolin inhibits nuclear DNA replication and has no detectable effect on DNA repair synthesis. Although the results establish that in u.v.-irradiated HeLa cells most of the DNA repair synthesis is not due to DNA polymerase alpha, they do not preclude a significant role for this enzyme in DNA repair processes. Images PLATE 1 PMID:6803764

  6. Expression of cancer stem markers could be influenced by silencing of p16 gene in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Zhang, J; Shi, H

    2016-01-01

    Effect of the tumor suppression gene p16 on the biological characteristics of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells was explored. The expression of p16 protein was increased in HeLa tumor sphere cells, and no significant difference in tumor spheres from the first to the fourth passages. Compared with those of parental HeLa cells, the proportion of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ cells increased significantly in tumor spheres. However after the cells were silenced by the p16-sh289 vector, expression of P16 protein and the cell number of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ decreased. Moreover, HeLa cells with p16 gene silencing showed decreased abilities of sphere formation and matrigel invasion. More HeLa cells with p16 gene silence were needed for tumor formation in nude mice. Tumor size and weight in mouse model established with p16 gene silenced HeLa cells were less than those with HeLa parental cell model. The present results indicate that silencing of the p16 gene inhibits expression of cancer stem cell markers and tumorigenic ability of HeLa cells.

  7. [Localization of EGFP-DPF-1 expressed and secreted by HeLa cells in oocytes].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin Ping; Yan, Gui Jun; Gu, Zheng; Tso, Jia Ke

    2003-08-01

    The eukaryotic expression plasmid pEGFP-N1/DPF-1 was constructed through fusing rabbit oviduct-specific glycoprotein (DPF-1) gene to the 5' terminus of eGFP gene. After transfecting the recombinant plasmid into HeLa cells, we got some cell strains expressing and secreting eGFP-DPF-1 stably. The apparent molecular weight of the fusion protein was up to 120 KD indicating the fusion protein was modified. Rabbit oocyte-cumulus cells complexes (COC), the cumulus cells-deprived oocytes or oviductal oocytes were co-cultured with the cell strain or cultured in the conditioned medium derived from the cell strain to observe the distribution of DPF-1 in oocytes after incubation. The results revealed that DPF-1 but not GFP alone associated with zona pellucidae (ZP) of oocytes, especially in the inner layer of ZP, and was evenly distributed in dot-like shape on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast, the cumulus cells around the oocyte did not interfere the association of DPF-1 with oocyte, and no trace of DPF-1 was found in the cumulus cells. The experiment proved that the oviductin expressed and secreted by eukaryotic cells in vitro could bind to oocytes, and was directly observed by using green fluorescent protein as a tracer. These results provided some interesting informations for the further studying on the functions of the oviductin.

  8. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A M; Wietstock, S M; Ruyechan, W T

    1988-03-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. In contrast, the pH optimum of the HeLa DNA primase was very sharp and fell between pH 7.9 and 8.2. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase and was eluted from single-stranded DNA agarose at higher salt concentrations than the host primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degrees C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. Separation or decoupling could also be achieved by gel filtration of the HSV polymerase:primase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, we believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA.

  9. Overexpression of IGF-I receptor in HeLa cells enhances in vivo radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Haruna; Yu, Dong; Miura, Masahiko

    2007-11-30

    Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase whose activation strongly promotes cell growth and survival. We previously reported that IGF-IR activity confers intrinsic radioresistance in mouse embryo fibroblasts in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether tumor cells overexpressing IGF-IR exhibit radioresistance in vivo. For this purpose, we established HeLa cells that overexpress IGF-IR (HeLa-R), subcutaneously transplanted these cells into nude mice, and examined radioresponse in the resulting solid tumors. HeLa-R cells exhibited typical in vitro phenotypes generally observed in IGF-IR-overexpressing cells, as well as significant intrinsic radioresistance in vitro compared with parent cells. As expected, the transplanted HeLa-R tumors grew at a remarkably higher rate than parent tumors. Histological analysis revealed that HeLa-R tumors expressed more VEGF and had a higher density of tumor vessels. Unexpectedly, a marked growth delay was observed in HeLa-R tumors following 10 Gy of X-irradiation. Immunostaining of HeLa-R tumors for the hypoxia marker pimonidazole revealed a significantly lower level of hypoxic cells. Moreover, clamp hypoxia significantly increased radioresistance in HeLa-R tumors. Tumor microenvironments in vivo generated by the IGF-IR expression thus could be a major factor in determining the tumor radioresponse in vivo.

  10. Interaction between HeLa cells and adenovirus type 2 virions neutralized by different antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C E; Svensson, U K; Everitt, E

    1985-01-01

    Three adenovirus type 2-specified immunogens elicited neutralizing antibodies when injected into rabbits; these were the fiber, the hexon, and the penton base. Adenovirus type 2 virions, neutralized by antihexon- or anti-penton base antisera, attached to HeLa cells to the same extent as untreated control virus, and after attachment, neutralized viruses also became sensitive to DNase treatment. A fraction of 75 to 80% of the attached antibody-treated virions penetrated the plasma membrane, which should be compared with an 84 to 88% penetration level in the control series. A majority of the antihexon-neutralized virions was found in intracellular vesicles, as revealed with an electron microscope, but in the case of anti-penton base neutralization, a maximum of 50% of the virions was retained within vesicles, and ca. 30% was free in the cytoplasmic compartment. A value greater than 45% was never obtained for neutralization with a monospecific anti-penton base antiserum, which could imply the existence of alternative pathways for virus penetration into HeLa cells--one of these being sensitive to treatment with anti-penton base antiserum. Antisera containing antifiber specificities efficiently aggregated virions, and the aggregation data mirrored the degree of neutralization. Antifiber-neutralized virions attached to cells to a three- to five times greater extent than untreated control virus, but the former virions had a reduced ability to become sensitive to DNase treatment. Around 15% of the attached antifiber-treated virions was found as large aggregates inside multivesicular bodies or lysosomes. Images PMID:4068145

  11. The effect of MAPK inhibitors and ROS modulators on cell growth and death of H₂O₂-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2013-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence the signaling of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) involved in cell survival and death. In the present study, the toxicological effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on HeLa cervical cancer cells was evaluated following treatment with MAPK inhibitors [MAP kinase or ERK kinase (MEK), c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) or p38], N‑acetyl cysteine (NAC) and propyl gallate (PG) (well‑known antioxidants), or L‑buthionine sulfoximine [BSO; an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis]. Treatment with 100 µM H2O2 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and induced cell death, which was accompanied by loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm). H2O2 did not induce any specific phase arrests of the cell cycle. ROS levels increased, while GSH levels decreased in H2O2‑treated HeLa cells after 1 and 24 h of treatment. The MAPK inhibitors enhanced H2O2‑induced HeLa cell death, while only p38 inhibitor increased ROS levels. Both NAC and PG attenuated H2O2‑induced HeLa cell growth inhibition and death together with the suppression of ROS levels. BSO increased ROS levels in H2O2‑treated HeLa cells without increasing cell death. The levels of MMP (ΔΨm) loss and GSH depletion were not closely associated with the levels of apoptosis in HeLa cells treated with the MAPK inhibitors, NAC, PG or BSO, in the presence of H2O2. In conclusion, H2O2 induced HeLa cell growth inhibition and death. MAPK inhibitors generally enhanced H2O2‑induced HeLa cell death. In particular, p38 inhibitor increased ROS levels in H2O2‑treated HeLa cells, while NAC and PG attenuated H2O2‑induced HeLa cell death by suppressing ROS levels.

  12. Total Alkaloids of Sophora alopecuroides Inhibit Growth and Induce Apoptosis in Human Cervical Tumor HeLa Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Guang; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uygur females of Xinjiang have the higher incidence of cervical tumor in the country. Alkaloids are the major active ingredients in Sophora alopecuroides, and its antitumor effect was recognized by the medical profession. Xinjiang is the main site of S. alopecuroides production in China so these plants are abundant in the region. Studies on the antitumor properties of total alkaloids of S. alopecuroides (TASA) can take full use of the traditional folk medicine in antitumor unique utility. Objectives: To explore the effects of TASA on proliferation and apoptosis of human cervical tumor HeLa cells in vitro. Materials and Methods: TASA was extracted, purified, and each monomer component was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of TASA at different concentrations on the survival of HeLa cells was determined after 24 h using the Cell Counting Kit-8. In addition, cells were photographed using an inverted microscope to document morphological changes. The effect of TASA on apoptotic rate of HeLa cells was assessed by flow cytometry. Results: Monomers of TASA were found to be sophoridine, matrine, and sophocarpine. On treatment with 8.75 mg/ml of TASA, more than 50% of HeLa cells died, and cell death rate increased further with longer incubation. The apoptotic rates of HeLa cells in the experimental groups were 16.0% and 33.3% at concentrations of 6.25 mg/ml and 12.50 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: TASA can induce apoptosis in cervical tumor HeLa cells, and it has obvious inhibitory effects on cell growth. SUMMARY Total alkaloids of Sophora alopecuroides (TASA) exhibits anti-human cervical tumor propertiesMonomer component of TASA was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and its main effect component are sophoridine, matrine, and sophocarpineTASA inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa cells. Abbreviations used: TASA: Total alkaloids of S. alopecuroides, CCK-8: Cell Counting Kit-8, FBS: Fetal bovine serum, PBS

  13. Nutritional and metabolic requirements for the infection of HeLa cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hopper-Chidlaw, Amanda C; Rice, Christopher J; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the causative agent of a spectrum of human and animal diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. It is a food--and water--borne pathogen and infects via ingestion followed by invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and phagocytic cells. In this study we employed a mutational approach to define the nutrients and metabolic pathways required by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during infection of a human epithelial cell line (HeLa). We deleted the key glycolytic genes, pfkA and pfkB to show that S. Typhimurium utilizes glycolysis for replication within HeLa cells; however, glycolysis was not absolutely essential for intracellular replication. Using S. Typhimurium strains deleted for genes encoding components of the phosphotransferase system and glucose transport, we show that glucose is a major substrate required for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium in HeLa cells. We also deleted genes encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of gluconeogenic substrates and the glyoxylate shunt and show that neither of these pathways were required for intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium within HeLa cells.

  14. Depolymerization of cytokeratin intermediate filaments facilitates intracellular infection of HeLa cells by Bartonella henselae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caixia; Bai, Yajie; Liu, Qiyong; Li, Dongmei; Hong, Jiehua; Yang, Zhibiao; Cui, Li; Hua, Xiuguo; Yuan, Congli

    2013-05-01

    Bartonella henselae is capable of invading epithelial and endothelial cells by modulating the function of actin-dependent cytoskeleton proteins. Although understanding of the pathogenesis has been increased by the development of an in vitro infection model involving endothelial cells, little is known about the mechanism of interaction between B. henselae and epithelial cells. This study aims to identify the binding candidates of B. henselae in epithelial cells and explores their effect on B. henselae infection. Pull-down assays and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that some of the binding proteins (keratin 14, keratin 6, and F-actin) are cytoskeleton associated. B. henselae infection significantly induces the expression of the cytokeratin genes. Chemical disruption of the keratin network by using ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid promotes the intracellular persistence of B. henselae in HeLa cells. However, cytochalasin B and phalloidin treatment inhibits B. henselae invasion. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that B. henselae infection induces an F-actin-dependent rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. However, we demonstrated via immunofluorescent staining and whole-mount cell electron microscopy that keratin intermediate filaments are depolymerized by B. henselae. The results indicate that B. henselae achieves an intracellular persistence in epithelial cells through the depolymerization of cytokeratin intermediate filaments that are protective against B. henselae invasion.

  15. CDC42 Gtpase Activation Affects Hela Cell DNA Repair and Proliferation Following UV Radiation-Induced Genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Ascer, Liv G; Magalhaes, Yuli T; Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana H; Souza, Renan C; Forti, Fabio L

    2015-09-01

    Cell division control protein 42 (CDC42) homolog is a small Rho GTPase enzyme that participates in such processes as cell cycle progression, migration, polarity, adhesion, and transcription. Recent studies suggest that CDC42 is a potent tumor suppressor in different tissues and is related to aging processes. Although DNA damage is crucial in aging, a potential role for CDC42 in genotoxic stress remains to be explored. Migration, survival/proliferation and DNA damage/repair experiments were performed to demonstrate CDC42 involvement in the recovery of HeLa cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation-induced stress. Sub-lines of HeLa cells ectopically expressing the constitutively active CDC42-V12 mutant were generated to examine whether different CDC42-GTP backgrounds might reflect different sensitivities to UV radiation. Our results show that CDC42 constitutive activation does not interfere with HeLa cell migration after UV radiation. However, the minor DNA damage exhibited by the CDC42-V12 mutant exposed to UV radiation most likely results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint and reduced proliferation and survival. HeLa cells and Mock clones, which express endogenous wild-type CDC42 and show normal activity, are more resistant to UV radiation. None of these effects are altered by pharmacological CDC42 inhibition. Finally, the phosphorylation status of the DNA damage response proteins γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 was found to be delayed and attenuated, respectively, in CDC42-V12 clones. In conclusion, the sensitivity of HeLa cells to ultraviolet radiation increases with CDC42 over-activation due to inadequate DNA repair signaling, culminating in G2/M cell accumulation, which is translated into reduced cellular proliferation and survival.

  16. Lessons from HeLa Cells: The Ethics and Policy of Biospecimens.

    PubMed

    Beskow, Laura M

    2016-08-31

    Human biospecimens have played a crucial role in scientific and medical advances. Although the ethical and policy issues associated with biospecimen research have long been the subject of scholarly debate, the story of Henrietta Lacks, her family, and the creation of HeLa cells captured the attention of a much broader audience. The story has been a catalyst for policy change, including major regulatory changes proposed in the United States surrounding informed consent. These proposals are premised in part on public opinion data, necessitating a closer look at what such data tell us. The development of biospecimen policy should be informed by many considerations-one of which is public input, robustly gathered, on acceptable approaches that optimize shared interests, including access for all to the benefits of research. There is a need for consent approaches that are guided by realistic aspirations and a balanced view of autonomy within an expanded ethical framework. PMID:26979405

  17. Protein phosphatase PP1-NIPP1 activates mesenchymal genes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dessel, Nele; Boens, Shannah; Lesage, Bart; Winkler, Claudia; Görnemann, Janina; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-05-22

    The deletion of the protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulator known as Nuclear Inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) is embryonic lethal during gastrulation, hinting at a key role of PP1-NIPP1 in lineage specification. Consistent with this notion we show here that a mild, stable overexpression of NIPP1 in HeLa cells caused a massive induction of genes of the mesenchymal lineage, in particular smooth/cardiac-muscle and matrix markers. This reprogramming was associated with the formation of actin-based stress fibers and retracting filopodia, and a reduced proliferation potential. The NIPP1-induced mesenchymal transition required functional substrate and PP1-binding domains, suggesting that it involves the selective dephosphorylation of substrates of PP1-NIPP1. PMID:25907536

  18. Visualizing the molecular sociology at the HeLa cell nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Mahamid, Julia; Pfeffer, Stefan; Schaffer, Miroslava; Villa, Elizabeth; Danev, Radostin; Cuellar, Luis Kuhn; Förster, Friedrich; Hyman, Anthony A; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-02-26

    The molecular organization of eukaryotic nuclear volumes remains largely unexplored. Here we combined recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) to produce three-dimensional snapshots of the HeLa cell nuclear periphery. Subtomogram averaging and classification of ribosomes revealed the native structure and organization of the cytoplasmic translation machinery. Analysis of a large dynamic structure-the nuclear pore complex-revealed variations detectable at the level of individual complexes. Cryo-ET was used to visualize previously elusive structures, such as nucleosome chains and the filaments of the nuclear lamina, in situ. Elucidation of the lamina structure provides insight into its contribution to metazoan nuclear stiffness. PMID:26917770

  19. Methylation of nucleolar RNA in HeLa cells studied by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, J.; Martinez, A.; Renau-Piqueras, J.

    1984-01-01

    Methylation of nucleolar RNA was studied by autoradiography in HeLa cells using L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine and S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine as radioactive precursors. Pulse-labeling experiments show that nucleolar RNA methylation occurs on the newly synthesized RNA at the nucleolar fibrillar RNP component and mostly on the fibrillar ring of fibrillar centers, where pre-rRNA is being synthesized. Pulse-chase experiments show a shift of silver grains from the nucleolar fibrillar RNP component to the nucleolar granular component first and then to the cytoplasm. Labeling of nucleolar RNA via specific methylation permits the study of intranucleolar processing of pre-rRNA and confirms the sequence of labeling of the two nucleolar RNP components observed with radioactive uridine.

  20. Kin recognition between medial Golgi enzymes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Hoe, M H; Slusarewicz, P; Rabouille, C; Watson, R; Hunte, F; Watzele, G; Berger, E G; Warren, G

    1994-01-01

    The medial Golgi enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (NAGT I) and mannosidase II (Mann II), and the trans Golgi enzyme, beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT) were each retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by grafting on the cytoplasmic tail of the p33 invariant chain. Transient and stable expression of p33/NAGT I in HeLa cells caused relocation of endogenous Mann II to the ER and transient expression of p33/Mann II had a similar effect on endogenous NAGT I. Neither of these endogenous medial enzymes were affected by transient expression of p33/GalT. These data provide strong evidence for kin recognition between medial Golgi enzymes and suggest a role for them in the organization of the Golgi stack. Images PMID:8313901

  1. Intracellular viscoelasticity of HeLa cells during cell division studied by video particle-tracking microrheology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Kuo, Chia-Yu; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Wu, Kelly; Su, Pin-Tzu; Huang, Chien-Shiou; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Cell division plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. It is managed by a complex sequence of cytoskeleton alteration that induces dividing cells to change their morphology to facilitate their division. The change in cytoskeleton structure is expected to affect the intracellular viscoelasticity, which may also contribute to cellular dynamic deformation during cell division. However, the intracellular viscoelasticity during cell division is not yet well understood. In this study, we injected 100-nm (diameter) carboxylated polystyrene beads into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells and applied video particle tracking microrheology to measure their intracellular viscoelasticity at different phases during cell division. The Brownian motion of the intracellular nanoprobes was analyzed to compute the viscoelasticity of HeLa cells in terms of the elastic modulus and viscous modulus as a function of frequency. Our experimental results indicate that during the course of cell division, both intracellular elasticity and viscosity increase in the transition from the metaphase to the anaphase, plausibly due to the remodeling of cytoskeleton and redistributions of molecular motors, but remain approximately the same from the anaphase to the telophase.

  2. Oncogenic role of epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongyi; Wang, Xiaoshan; Yang, Xiaogang; Li, Haitao; Liu, Ben; Pan, Pinhua

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, which is the most common non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 (ECT2) is frequently upregulated and acts as an oncogene in various human cancers. In addition, ECT2 was reported to be upregulated in early stage lung adenocarcinoma. However, the detailed role of ECT2 in mediating the malignant phenotypes of lung adenocarcinoma cells has not previously been elucidated. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to examine ECT2 mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. MTT, wound healing and Transwell assays were conducted to determine cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, respectively. In the present study, ECT2 was significantly upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H650, EKVX, HCC4006, HCC827, HCC2935, Hop62 and A549), as compared with a normal lung epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). Moreover, knockdown of ECT2, induced by transfection with ECT2 siRNA, significantly inhibited the proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced A549 cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of ECT2 expression suppressed the migration and invasion of A549 cells, whereas overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of A549 cells. Notably, inhibition of ECT2 also suppressed the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it enhanced the expression level of E-cadherin, indicating that ECT2 is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells. On the contrary, overexpression of ECT2 enhanced the expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas it reduced the expression level of E-cadherin in A549 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that ECT2 has an oncogenic role in lung adenocarcinoma cells. Therefore, ECT2 may be a potential novel target for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheff, Jeremy D.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Reifman, Jaques; Rakesh, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    The heat-shock response is a key factor in diverse stress scenarios, ranging from hyperthermia to protein folding diseases. However, the complex dynamics of this physiological response have eluded mathematical modeling efforts. Although several computational models have attempted to characterize the heat-shock response, they were unable to model its dynamics across diverse experimental datasets. To address this limitation, we mined the literature to obtain a compendium of in vitro hyperthermia experiments investigating the heat-shock response in HeLa cells. We identified mechanisms previously discussed in the experimental literature, such as temperature-dependent transcription, translation, and heat-shock factor (HSF) oligomerization, as well as the role of heat-shock protein mRNA, and constructed an expanded mathematical model to explain the temperature-varying DNA-binding dynamics, the presence of free HSF during homeostasis and the initial phase of the heat-shock response, and heat-shock protein dynamics in the long-term heat-shock response. In addition, our model was able to consistently predict the extent of damage produced by different combinations of exposure temperatures and durations, which were validated against known cellular-response patterns. Our model was also in agreement with experiments showing that the number of HSF molecules in a HeLa cell is roughly 100 times greater than the number of stress-activated heat-shock element sites, further confirming the model’s ability to reproduce experimental results not used in model calibration. Finally, a sensitivity analysis revealed that altering the homeostatic concentration of HSF can lead to large changes in the stress response without significantly impacting the homeostatic levels of other model components, making it an attractive target for intervention. Overall, this model represents a step forward in the quantitative understanding of the dynamics of the heat-shock response. PMID:26200855

  4. Cytotoxic effects of native and recombinant frutalin, a plant galactose-binding lectin, on HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Nicolau, Ana; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2011-01-01

    Frutalin is the α-D-galactose-binding lectin isolated from breadfruit seeds. Frutalin was obtained from two different sources: native frutalin was purified from its natural origin, and recombinant frutalin was produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. This work aimed to study and compare the effect of native and recombinant frutalin on HeLa cervical cancer cells proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, the interaction between frutalin and the HeLa cells was investigated by confocal microscopy. Despite having different carbohydrate-binding affinities, native and recombinant frutalin showed an identical magnitude of cytotoxicity on HeLa cells growth (IC₅₀~100 μg/mL) and equally induced cell apoptosis. The interaction studies showed that both lectins were rapidly internalised and targeted to HeLa cell's nucleus. Altogether, these results indicate that frutalin action is not dependent on its sugar-binding properties. This study provides important information about the bioactivity of frutalin and contributes to the understanding of the plant lectins cytotoxic activity.

  5. Effect of Lon protease knockdown on mitochondrial function in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Chavatte, Laurent; Hamon, Marie-Paule; L'Hermitte-Stead, Caroline; Beaumatin, Florian; Priault, Muriel; Rustin, Pierre; Lombès, Anne; Friguet, Bertrand; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2014-05-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Lon protease is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Lon, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to loose integrity of mitochondrial genome and to be respiratory deficient. In order to address the role of Lon in mitochondrial functionality in human cells, we have set up a HeLa cell line stably transfected with a vector expressing a shRNA under the control of a promoter which is inducible with doxycycline. We have demonstrated that reduction of Lon protease results in a mild phenotype in this cell line in contrast with what have been observed in other cell types such as WI-38 fibroblasts. Nevertheless, deficiency in Lon protease led to an increase in ROS production and to an accumulation of carbonylated protein in the mitochondria. Our study suggests that Lon protease has a wide variety of targets and is likely to play different roles depending of the cell type.

  6. Analysis of mutational and clinicopathologic characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Shen, Xuxia; Shi, Jianxin; Chen, Haiquan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component is extremely rare and the cases reported in literature remain scarce. The biological behaviors, clinicopathologic characteristics, mutational status and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component are still uncertain. Methods Thirty-eight lung adenocarcinomas with clear cell component and 1659 lung adenocarcinomas were subjected to the study. All the corresponding clinicopathologic data, the distributions of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), and the status of gene mutations were investigated. Results Of 1697 adenocarcinomas, 38 (2.2%) had clear cell component. Fifty percent of adenocarcinomas with clear cell component (11/22) harbored EGFR mutation, 41 percent (9/22) harbored KRAS mutation and 5 percent (1/22) harbored AKT1 mutation. Univariable analysis revealed that sex, age, tumor stage, tumor size, nodal stage and pathology were all significant predictors of RFS and OS while the tumor size and nodal stage were still significant predictors in multivariable analysis. There were significantly differences in RFS and OS for lung adenocarcinomas with clear cell component compared with those lung adenocarcinomas. Conclusions Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell component is a rare, malignant tumor with poor prognosis and displays more frequent EGFR and KRAS mutations. PMID:27013585

  7. Sodium Kinetics of Na,K-ATPase α Isoforms in Intact Transfected HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zahler, Raphael; Zhang, Zhong-Ting; Manor, Mira; Boron, Walter F.

    1997-01-01

    By participating in the regulation of ion and voltage gradients, the Na-K pump (i.e., Na,K-ATPase) influences many aspects of cellular physiology. Of the four α isoforms of the pump, α1 is ubiquitous, α2 is predominant in skeletal muscle, and α3 is found in neurons and the cardiac conduction system. To determine whether the isoforms have different intracellular Na+ affinities, we used the Na+-sensitive dye sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) to measure pump-mediated Na+ efflux as a function of [Na+]i in human HeLa cells stably transfected with rat Na-K pump isoforms. We Na+-loaded the cells, and then monitored the time course of the decrease in [Na+]i after removing external Na+. All transfected rat α subunits were highly ouabain resistant: the α1 isoform is naturally resistant, whereas the α2 and α3 isoforms had been mutagenized to render them resistant. Thus, the Na+ efflux mediated by endogenous and transfected pumps could be separated by studying the cells at low (1 μM) and high (4 mM) ouabain concentrations. We found that the apparent Km for Na+ efflux attributable to the native human α1 isoform was 12 mM, which was similar to the Km of rat α1. The α2 and α3 isoforms had apparent Km's of 22 and 33 mM, respectively. The cells expressing α3 had a high resting [Na+]i. The maximal activity of native α1 in the α3-transfected cells was only ∼56% of native α1 activity in untransfected HeLa cells, suggesting that transfection with α3 led to a compensatory decrease in endogenous α1 pumps. We conclude that the apparent Km(Na+) for rat Na-K pump isoforms increases in the sequence α1 < α2 < α3. The α3 isoform may be suited for handling large Na+ loads in electrically active cells. PMID:9236212

  8. Pseudolaric acid B exerts antitumor activity via suppression of the Akt signaling pathway in HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqun; Hong, Li

    2015-08-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) is a diterpene acid isolated from the bark of the root and trunk of Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon (Pinaceae), which has demonstrated cytotoxic effects against various types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of PAB have remained to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of PAB on the viability and apoptosis of HeLa cells were investigated by MTT assay, flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, Rhodamine 123 staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PAB had antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on HeLa cells. PAB markedly inhibited HeLa cell viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that PAB induced apoptosis in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with PAB suppressed the expression of anti-apoptotic factor B cell lymphoma-2, and promoted the expression of pro-apoptotic factor Bcl-2-associated X protein. In addition, PAB induced an increase in Caspase-3 activity and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that this apoptosis may be mediated by mitochondrial pathways. Furthermore, the results of western blot analysis indicated that PAB was able to reduce Akt phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting the Akt pathway. These results suggested that PAB inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, and that the anti-tumor effects of PAB were associated with inhibition of the Akt pathway. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that PAB may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human cervical cancer. However, additional studies are required to investigate the underlying apoptotic mechanisms.

  9. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response PMID:26609356

  10. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial clinical response. PMID:26609356

  11. Anticancer Activity of a Hexapeptide from Skate (Raja porosa) Cartilage Protein Hydrolysate in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xin; Zhao, Yu-Qin; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Chi, Chang-Feng; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hexapeptide Phe-Ile-Met-Gly-Pro-Tyr (FIMGPY), which has a molecular weight of 726.9 Da, was separated from skate (Raja porosa) cartilage protein hydrolysate using ultrafiltration and chromatographic methods, and its anticancer activity was evaluated in HeLa cells. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that FIMGPY exhibited high, dose-dependent anti-proliferation activities in HeLa cells with an IC50 of 4.81 mg/mL. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescence staining and flow cytometry methods confirmed that FIMGPY could inhibit HeLa cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Western blot assay revealed that the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and relative intensity of caspase-3 in HeLa cells treated with 7-mg/mL FIMGPY were 2.63 and 1.83, respectively, significantly higher than those of the blank control (p < 0.01). Thus, FIMGPY could induce apoptosis by upregulating the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. Using a DNA ladder method further confirmed that the anti-proliferation activity of FIMGPY was attributable to its role in inducing apoptosis. These results suggest that FIMGPY from skate cartilage protein hydrolysate may have applications as functional foods and nutraceuticals for the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:27537897

  12. Anticancer Activity of a Hexapeptide from Skate (Raja porosa) Cartilage Protein Hydrolysate in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xin; Zhao, Yu-Qin; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Chi, Chang-Feng; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hexapeptide Phe-Ile-Met-Gly-Pro-Tyr (FIMGPY), which has a molecular weight of 726.9 Da, was separated from skate (Raja porosa) cartilage protein hydrolysate using ultrafiltration and chromatographic methods, and its anticancer activity was evaluated in HeLa cells. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that FIMGPY exhibited high, dose-dependent anti-proliferation activities in HeLa cells with an IC50 of 4.81 mg/mL. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescence staining and flow cytometry methods confirmed that FIMGPY could inhibit HeLa cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Western blot assay revealed that the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and relative intensity of caspase-3 in HeLa cells treated with 7-mg/mL FIMGPY were 2.63 and 1.83, respectively, significantly higher than those of the blank control (p < 0.01). Thus, FIMGPY could induce apoptosis by upregulating the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. Using a DNA ladder method further confirmed that the anti-proliferation activity of FIMGPY was attributable to its role in inducing apoptosis. These results suggest that FIMGPY from skate cartilage protein hydrolysate may have applications as functional foods and nutraceuticals for the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:27537897

  13. Anticancer Activity of a Hexapeptide from Skate (Raja porosa) Cartilage Protein Hydrolysate in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xin; Zhao, Yu-Qin; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Chi, Chang-Feng; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hexapeptide Phe-Ile-Met-Gly-Pro-Tyr (FIMGPY), which has a molecular weight of 726.9 Da, was separated from skate (Raja porosa) cartilage protein hydrolysate using ultrafiltration and chromatographic methods, and its anticancer activity was evaluated in HeLa cells. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that FIMGPY exhibited high, dose-dependent anti-proliferation activities in HeLa cells with an IC50 of 4.81 mg/mL. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescence staining and flow cytometry methods confirmed that FIMGPY could inhibit HeLa cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Western blot assay revealed that the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and relative intensity of caspase-3 in HeLa cells treated with 7-mg/mL FIMGPY were 2.63 and 1.83, respectively, significantly higher than those of the blank control (p < 0.01). Thus, FIMGPY could induce apoptosis by upregulating the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. Using a DNA ladder method further confirmed that the anti-proliferation activity of FIMGPY was attributable to its role in inducing apoptosis. These results suggest that FIMGPY from skate cartilage protein hydrolysate may have applications as functional foods and nutraceuticals for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  14. Cytological and cytochemical studies of HeLa cells infected with adeno-viruses.

    PubMed

    BOYER, G S; LEUCHTENBERGER, C; GINSBERG, H S

    1957-03-01

    The sequential morphological and cytochemical alterations in HeLa cells infected with adenovirus types 1 to 4 are described. Each of the four viruses studied led to consistent and reproducible cytological changes not observed in uninfected control cultures. All four agents produced striking and characteristic changes in the nuclei of infected cells. Alterations in the cytoplasm, though present, were less marked, particularly in the early stages of infection. In cells infected with type 1 or 2 adenovirus, rounded intranuclear inclusions which progressed from eosinophilic and Feulgen-negative to basophilic and Feulgen-positive, together with a homogeneous glassy, Feulgen-positive nuclear background, were prominent features. Cells infected with type 3 or 4 adenovirus exhibited marked rearrangement of basophilic nuclear material and sharply defined crystal-like inclusions, predominantly intranuclear in location, which also varied from Feulgen-negative to positive. In terms of detailed cytological effects, therefore, the four agents could be divided into two subgroups, viz., types 1 and 2 on the one hand and types 3 and 4 on the other. Measurement of DNA in individual nuclei by means of Feulgen microspectrophotometry revealed the values in infected cells to be increased above the levels of the uninfected controls.

  15. Apigenin inhibits HeLa sphere-forming cells through inactivation of casein kinase 2α.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Xiao-Cheng; Xiao, Qiao; Quan, Mei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) has been implicated in stem cell maintenance and its aberrant activation has been demonstrated in several types of cancer, including cervical cancer. In the present study, it was demonstrated that the sphere-forming cells (SFCs) of HeLa cell lines exhibited self-renewal capacity, indicating that they possessed the properties of cervical cancer stem-like cells. HeLa-derived SFCs exhibited a higher level of CK2α protein, compared with the parental cells. Apigenin, a dietary flavonoid, led to a dose-dependent inhibition of the self-renewal capacity and the protein expression of CK2α in HeLa-derived SFCs. Furthermore, forced overexpression of CK2α resulted in a decrease in the inhibition of CK2α expression and the self-renewal capacity induced by apigenin in HeLa-derived SFCs. These results suggested that apigenin inhibits the self-renewal capacity of HeLa-derived SFCs through downregulation of CK2α expression.

  16. Induction of functional beta-adrenergic receptors in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, J F; Smith, C C; Henneberry, R C

    1977-01-01

    HeLa cells contain beta-adrenergic receptors that are characterized by specific binding of I[3H]dihydroalprenolol, increased 3':5'-cyclic AMP production in intact cells after incubation with l-isoproterenol, and increased adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] activity in the presence of l-isoproterenol. After cells were cultured with butyrate, the number of beta-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP production in intact cells, and adenylate cyclase activation by l-isoproterenol were increased severalfold over those of untreated cells. The increase involved the induction of synthesis of new receptor molecules with identical affinities for l-[3H]-dihydroalprenolol; all three processes were blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. This induction was relatively specific for butyric acid and only the closely related short-chain fatty acids, propionic and valeric acids, were capable of partially inducing the same effect. In contrast to induction of beta-adrenergic binding sites, there was no increase in basal or fluoride-activated adenylate cyclase activity, indicating that the beta-adrenergic receptor and adenylate cyclase and different molecules that may be controlled separately. PMID:191837

  17. Binucleated HeLa cells are formed by cytokinesis failure in starvation and keep the potential of proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazunori; Watanabe, Sumiko; Hayashida, Ryo; Sugishima, Setsuo; Iwasaka, Tsuyoshi; Kaku, Tsunehisa

    2016-08-01

    Many cytological studies have reported that the numbers of binucleated cells were elevated in various tumors. However, binucleated cells are observed in not only malignant tumors but also normal tissues. Thus, the clinical significance of binucleated cells is controversial. Here we attempted to elucidate the characteristics of binucleated HeLa cells using time-lapse microscopy. To examine the frequency, viability, proliferation, and formation mechanism of binucleated cells, we grew HeLa cells on chamber slides and tissue culture dishes in DMEM supplemented with (10, 3, 1 and 0.5 % media) and without fetal bovine serum (0 % medium). The proliferation was evaluated by the medium improvement examination (cultured for 2 more days in 10% medium after culturing in 0% medium; starvation). In the 0 % medium, 150 binucleated cells were formed by cytokinesis failure. There were significantly more binucleated cells in the 0 % medium than in the 10, 3, 1 and 0.5 % media. About twice the number of binucleated cells underwent mitosis in the improvement examinations than in the serum-free examination. We found here that starvation induced the binucleation of HeLa cells and that some binucleated cells can reproduce. These findings might be helpful for understanding binucleated cells in tumors.

  18. Label-Free and Continuous-Flow Ferrohydrodynamic Separation of HeLa Cells and Blood Cells in Biocompatible Ferrofluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wujun; Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Liu, Yufei; He, Jian; Qiu, Hong; Wang, Lianchun; Nagy, Tamas; Querec, Troy D.; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a label-free, low-cost, and fast ferrohydrodynamic cell separation scheme is demonstrated using HeLa cells (an epithelial cell line) and red blood cells. The separation is based on cell size difference, and conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains the viability of cells during and after the assay for downstream analysis. The scheme offers moderate-throughput (≈106 cells h−1 for a single channel device) and extremely high recovery rate (>99%) without the use of any label. It is envisioned that this separation scheme will have clinical applications in settings where rapid cell enrichment and removal of contaminating blood will improve efficiency of screening and diagnosis such as cervical cancer screening based on mixed populations in exfoliated samples. PMID:27478429

  19. N-methylation of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the core proteins on the 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (hnRNP) from HeLa cells contain N/sup G/,N/sup G/-dimethyl-L-arginine (uDMA). 3-deazaadenosine (c/sup 3/Ado), an inhibitor of and substrate for s-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, has been used to study the methylation patterns of the individual polypeptides. Trimethyllysine and uDMA formation in total cellular protein were inhibited in the presence of the drug while other methylated basic amino acids were unaffected. This inhibition was reversed within 60 min after removal of the drug from the medium. Monolayer HeLa cultures were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)-L-methoinine for 12 hours in the presence of 50 uM c/sup 3/Ado. Purified particles were obtained by centrifugation of nuclear extracts on sucrose density gradients. The core proteins were isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, acid hydrolyzed and analyzed for radioactivity incorporated into methionine and methylated basic amino acids. The ratio of radioactivity incorporated into uDMA relative to that into methionine for the two major particle proteins with molecular weights of 31,000 (A/sub 1/) and 43,000 (A/sub 2/) was about 2.0 and 0.2 in control cultures. In the presence of c/sup 3/Ado, these ratios were depressed 60 to 80%. Results of pulse-chase experiments suggested that A/sub 1/ and A/sub 2/ are metabolically stable proteins (t/sub 0.5/ > 75 hr), whether or not the proteins were undermethylated. Monomethyl-L-arginine may be a precursor in the formation of u-DMA.

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase is required for cell survival and growth in HeLa-S3 cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuhong; Huang, Dongyang; Liu, Yanmin; Pan, Xiaokang; Zhang, Jing; Liang, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Activation of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is linked to cancer cell survival in a variety of cancer cell lines, particularly under conditions of stress. As a potent activator of AMPK, metformin has become a hot topic of discussion for its effect on cancer cell. Here, we report that AMPK activated by metformin promotes HeLa-S3 cell survival and growth in vivo. Our results show that metformin inhibited cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells, but not in LKB1-deficient HeLa-S3 cells. Re-expression of LKB-1 in HeLa-S3 cells restored the growth inhibitory effect of metformin, indicating a requirement for LKB-1 in metformin-induced growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPK activation exerted a protective effect in HeLa-S3 cells by relieving ER stress, modulating ER Ca(2+) storage, and finally contributing to cellular adaptation and resistance to apoptosis. Our findings identify a link between AMPK activation and cell survival in HeLa-S3 cells, which demonstrates a beneficial effect of AMPK activated by metformin in cancer cell, and suggests a discrete re-evaluation on the role of metformin/AMPK activation on tumor cell growth, proliferation, and on clinical application in cancer therapy.

  1. Trefoil factor 3 as a novel biomarker to distinguish between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Nan; Wang, Shu-Jing; Pandey, Vijay; Chen, Ping; Li, Qing; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Wu, Qiang; Lobie, Peter E

    2015-05-01

    In carcinoma, such as of the lung, the histological subtype is important to select an appropriate therapeutic strategy for patients. However, carcinomas with poor differentiation cannot always be distinguished on the basis of morphology alone nor on clinical findings. Hence, delineation of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the 2 most common epithelial-origin carcinomas, is pivotal for selection of optimum therapy. Herein, we explored the potential utility of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) as a biomarker for primary lung adenocarcinoma and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas derived from different organs. We observed that 90.9% of lung adenocarcinomas were TFF3-positive, whereas no expression of TFF3 was observed in squamous cell carcinomas. The subtype of lung carcinoma was confirmed by four established biomarkers, cytokeratin 7 and thyroid transcription factor 1 for adenocarcinoma and P63 and cytokeratin 5/6 for squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, expression of TFF3 mRNA was observed by quantitative PCR in all of 11 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and highly correlated with markers of the adenocarcinomatous lineage. In contrast, little or no expression of TFF3 was observed in 4 lung squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. By use of forced expression, or siRNA-mediated depletion of TFF3, we determined that TFF3 appeared to maintain rather than promote glandular differentiation of lung carcinoma cells. In addition, TFF3 expression was also determined in adenocarcinomas from colorectum, stomach, cervix, esophagus, and larynx. Among all these extrapulmonary carcinomas, 93.7% of adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 2.9% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. Totally, 92.9% of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 1.5% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. In conclusion, TFF3 is preferentially expressed in adenocarcinoma and may function as an additional

  2. Trefoil Factor 3 as a Novel Biomarker to Distinguish Between Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Nan; Wang, Shu-Jing; Pandey, Vijay; Chen, Ping; Li, Qing; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Wu, Qiang; Lobie, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In carcinoma, such as of the lung, the histological subtype is important to select an appropriate therapeutic strategy for patients. However, carcinomas with poor differentiation cannot always be distinguished on the basis of morphology alone nor on clinical findings. Hence, delineation of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the 2 most common epithelial-origin carcinomas, is pivotal for selection of optimum therapy. Herein, we explored the potential utility of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) as a biomarker for primary lung adenocarcinoma and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas derived from different organs. We observed that 90.9% of lung adenocarcinomas were TFF3-positive, whereas no expression of TFF3 was observed in squamous cell carcinomas. The subtype of lung carcinoma was confirmed by four established biomarkers, cytokeratin 7 and thyroid transcription factor 1 for adenocarcinoma and P63 and cytokeratin 5/6 for squamous cell carcinoma. Furthermore, expression of TFF3 mRNA was observed by quantitative PCR in all of 11 human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and highly correlated with markers of the adenocarcinomatous lineage. In contrast, little or no expression of TFF3 was observed in 4 lung squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. By use of forced expression, or siRNA-mediated depletion of TFF3, we determined that TFF3 appeared to maintain rather than promote glandular differentiation of lung carcinoma cells. In addition, TFF3 expression was also determined in adenocarcinomas from colorectum, stomach, cervix, esophagus, and larynx. Among all these extrapulmonary carcinomas, 93.7% of adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 2.9% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. Totally, 92.9% of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibited TFF3 positivity, whereas only 1.5% of squamous cell carcinomas were TFF3-positive. In conclusion, TFF3 is preferentially expressed in adenocarcinoma and may function as an

  3. Targeting Thioredoxin Reductase by Parthenolide Contributes to Inducing Apoptosis of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongzhu; Zhang, Junmin; Yao, Juan; Liu, Yaping; Fang, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    Parthenolide (PTL), a major active sesquiterpene lactone from the herbal plant Tanacetum parthenium, has been applied in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Although PTL demonstrates potent anticancer efficacy in numerous types of malignant cells, the cellular targets of PTL have not been well defined. We reported here that PTL interacts with both cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2), two ubiquitous selenocysteine-containing antioxidant enzymes, to elicit reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in HeLa cells. PTL selectively targets the selenocysteine residue in TrxR1 to inhibit the enzyme function, and further shifts the enzyme to an NADPH oxidase to generate superoxide anions, leading to reactive oxygen species accumulation and oxidized thioredoxin. Under the conditions of inhibition of TrxRs in cells, PTL does not cause significant alteration of cellular thiol homeostasis, supporting selective target of TrxRs by PTL. Importantly, overexpression of functional TrxR1 or Trx1 confers protection, whereas knockdown of the enzymes sensitizes cells to PTL treatment. Targeting TrxRs by PTL thus discloses an unprecedented mechanism underlying the biological activity of PTL, and provides deep insights to understand the action of PTL in treatment of cancer. PMID:27002142

  4. Partitioning of the Golgi apparatus during mitosis in living HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shima, D T; Haldar, K; Pepperkok, R; Watson, R; Warren, G

    1997-06-16

    The Golgi apparatus of HeLa cells was fluorescently tagged with a green fluorescent protein (GFP), localized by attachment to the NH2-terminal retention signal of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (NAGT I). The location was confirmed by immunogold and immunofluorescence microscopy using a variety of Golgi markers. The behavior of the fluorescent Golgi marker was observed in fixed and living mitotic cells using confocal microscopy. By metaphase, cells contained a constant number of Golgi fragments dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Conventional and cryoimmunoelectron microscopy showed that the NAGT I-GFP chimera (NAGFP)-positive fragments were tubulo-vesicular mitotic Golgi clusters. Mitotic conversion of Golgi stacks into mitotic clusters had surprisingly little effect on the polarity of Golgi membrane markers at the level of fluorescence microscopy. In living cells, there was little self-directed movement of the clusters in the period from metaphase to early telophase. In late telophase, the Golgi ribbon began to be reformed by a dynamic process of congregation and tubulation of the newly inherited Golgi fragments. The accuracy of partitioning the NAGFP-tagged Golgi was found to exceed that expected for a stochastic partitioning process. The results provide direct evidence for mitotic clusters as the unit of partitioning and suggest that precise regulation of the number, position, and compartmentation of mitotic membranes is a critical feature for the ordered inheritance of the Golgi apparatus. PMID:9182657

  5. Girdin expression in cervical carcinoma and its role in the malignant properties of HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PING; REN, YA-LI; LI, JIA-LIANG; LUO, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality in females worldwide, with the majority of cases reported in developing countries. The molecular mechanisms of this disease are unclear. However, increasing evidence indicates that the expression or overexpression of Girdin is associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of cancer types. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential association between Girdin expression, and malignant properties of cervical cancer lesions and HeLa cells. Girdin protein expression was examined in 87 samples of cervical squamous cell lesions, including intraepithelial neoplasia (grades I and III) and invasive carcinoma, using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. A short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach was employed to specifically suppress the expression of Girdin mRNA in HeLa cells in vitro, allowing the role of Girdin in a number of malignant properties to be evaluated. Girdin protein was observed in the cytoplasm of 79/87 (90.8%) cervical cancer lesion specimens. However, no positive Girdin signals were identified in healthy cervical squamous epithelium samples. Furthermore, a significant correlation between Girdin expression and lesion grade was identified (Spearman's correlation coefficient, 0.566; P<0.001). When Girdin was suppressed by Girdin shRNA, the rate of HeLa cell growth was significantly reduced in vitro (P<0.05). Additional analysis determined that Girdin was associated with serum-deprived induced HeLa apoptosis. Thus, patients with high-grade cervical cancer tumors exhibited a strong expression for Girdin, and Girdin appears to key in HeLa cell proliferation and serum-deprived induced apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Girdin may be important in the process of cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:27073494

  6. Saffold virus type 3 (SAFV-3) persists in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Toshiki; Hosomi, Takushi; Okuwa, Takako; Muraki, Yasushi; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    Saffold virus (SAFV) was identified as a human cardiovirus in 2007. Although several epidemiological studies have been reported, they have failed to provide a clear picture of the relationship between SAFV and human diseases. SAFV genotype 3 has been isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid specimen of patient with aseptic meningitis. This finding is of interest since Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), which is the closely related virus, is known to cause a multiple sclerosis-like syndrome in mice. TMEV persistently infects in mouse macrophage cells in vivo and in vitro, and the viral persistence is essential in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. The precise mechanism(s) of SAFV infection still remain unclear. In order to clarify the SAFV pathogenicity, in the present study, we studied the possibilities of the in vitro persistent infection of SAFV. The two distinct phenotypes of HeLa cells, HeLa-N and HeLa-R, were identified. In these cells, the type of SAFV-3 infection was clearly different. HeLa-N cells were lyticly infected with SAFV-3 and the host suitable for the efficient growth. On the other hand, HeLa-R cells were persistently infected with SAFV-3. In addition, the SAFV persistence in HeLa-R cells is independent of type I IFN response of host cells although the TMEV persistence in mouse macrophage cells depends on the response. Furthermore, it was suggested that SAFV persistence may be influenced by the expression of receptor(s) for SAFV infection on the host cells. The present findings on SAFV persistence will provide the important information to encourage the research of SAFV pathogenicity.

  7. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  8. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Urethra: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra (CCAU) is extremely rare and a number of clinicians may be unfamiliar with its diagnosis and biological behaviour. Aims. To review the literature on CCAU. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results/Literature Review. (i) CCAU occurs in adults and in women in the great majority of cases. (ii) It has a particular association with urethral diverticulum, which has been present in 56% of the patients; is indistinguishable from clear cell adenocarcinoma of the female genital tract but is not associated with endometriosis; and probably does not arise by malignant transformation of nephrogenic adenoma. (iii) It is usually, readily distinguished from nephrogenic adenoma because of greater cytological a-typicality and mitotic activity and does not stain for prostate-specific antigen or prostatic acid phosphatase. (iv) It has been treated by anterior exenteration in women and cystoprostatectomy in men and at times by radiotherapy; chemotherapy has rarely been given. (v) CCAU is aggressive with low 5-year survival rates. (vi) There is no consensus opinion of treatment options that would improve the prognosis. Conclusions. Few cases of CCAU have been reported. Urologists, gynaecologists, pathologists, and oncologists should report cases of CCAU they encounter and enter them into a multicentric trial to determine the best treatment options that would improve the prognosis. PMID:25685552

  9. Cytochalasin B induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Yi, Myeongjin; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yi; Jung, Jee H; Kim, Dong-Kyoo

    2013-10-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) is a cell-permeable mycotoxin. It inhibits cytoplasmic division by blocking the formation of contractile microfilaments, it inhibits cell movement and induces nuclear extrusion. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of CB in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. CB showed significant cytotoxicity, with an IC50 of 7.9 µM, in a WST-8 assay and significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, results from Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-staining indicated that CB induced early apoptosis of HeLa cells in a time-dependent manner. The cells exhibited apoptotic morphology, including cell shrinkage and nuclear condensation. CB induced cell cycle arrest at the S phase. We also observed inhibition of DNA replication in a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Furthermore, CB induced a time-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blot analysis showed an increase in levels of mitochondrial factors Bax and Bcl-2, which was followed by activation of caspase-9 and -3. These results suggested that CB induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent pathway in HeLa cells. PMID:23863920

  10. LIV-1 suppression inhibits HeLa cell invasion by targeting ERK1/2-Snail/Slug pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Le; Chen Wei; Taylor, Kathryn M.; Cai Bin; Li Xu

    2007-11-09

    It was reported that expression of the estrogen-regulated zinc transporter LIV-1 was particularly high in human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. This result prompted us to study the role that LIV-1 played in human cervical cancer. The results of real-time PCR showed that LIV-1 mRNA was significantly higher in cervical cancer in situ than in normal tissues. RNAi mediated suppression of LIV-1 in HeLa cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasive ability, but had no effect on cell apoptosis. Furthermore, LIV-1 suppression is accompanied by down-regulation of p44/42 MAPK, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, Snail and Slug expression levels. Hence, our data provide the first evidence that LIV-1 mRNA is overexpressed in cervical cancer in situ and is involved in invasion of cervical cancer cells through targeting MAPK-mediated Snail and Slug expression.

  11. Stimulation of HeLa cell growth by physiological concentrations of 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Zarkovic, N; Ilic, Z; Jurin, M; Schaur, R J; Puhl, H; Esterbauer, H

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the growth response of HeLa cells over a prolonged period of time to a single exposure of physiological and supraphysiological concentrations of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a peroxidation product of omega-6-polyunsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, the growth modulating effect of serum factors, particularly albumin, on the growth pattern was examined. The effects of HNE on the growth rate and viability of the cells, as well as on the incorporation of labelled amino acids were monitored daily over a period of four days. Fetal calf serum not only had a growth stimulating effect but also modulated the action of HNE. In neither respect was albumin able to substitute for serum indicating that the influence of serum was not exerted via an albumin-HNE conjugate. HNE had a clear dose-dependent effect and a distinction could be made between a supraphysiological concentration (100 microM), which was primarily cytotoxic and a physiological range (below 10 microM) which showed growth modulatory effects. These effects consisted of a transient inhibition in the initial phase of the cell growth, which under optimal conditions (in presence of serum) was followed by a period of increased proliferation, compared to untreated control cultures, until confluence was attained. It is suggested that HNE is not only a toxic product of lipid peroxidation, but a physiological growth regulating factor as well.

  12. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy on lipid droplets in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinia, Hilde A.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Bonn, Mischa; Müller, Michiel

    2007-07-01

    Lipid droplets have become a major research topic recently, as they are found to be involved in obesity related diseases. Most of this research has been focused on the localization of the proteins playing a role in lipid droplet formation or breakdown. The role of different lipid species however remains unclear because it is difficult to distinguish different fatty acids with the present microscopy techniques. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is the non-linear analogue of spontaneous Raman scattering. Multiplex CARS microscopy can provide quantitative, chemical and physical information, making it an excellent tool to study the composition and thermodynamic phase of lipid droplets. To investigate the potential of CARS in this field, we have incubated HeLa cells with four different fatty acids, varying in saturation. The fatty acids were internalized by the cells and stored as lipid droplets, which we imaged with multiplex CARS microscopy. We were able to distinguish either of the fatty acids as such in lipid droplets inside the cells. Furthermore, we found that solid phase fatty acids were fluidized when present in lipid droplets. This illustrates the potential of CARS microscopy to elucidate the possible role of the chemistry of fatty acids in lipid droplet regulation.

  13. Curcumin causes DNA damage and affects associated protein expression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Chou, Yu-Ru; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Au, Man-Kuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and it is a prominent cause of cancer mortality. Curcumin is one of the major compounds from Turmeric and has been shown to induce cytotoxic cell death in human cervical cancer cells. However, there is no study to show curcumin induced DNA damage action via the effect on the DNA damage and repair protein in cervical cancer cells in detail. In this study, we investigated whether or not curcumin induced cell death via DNA damage, chromatin condensation in human cervical cancer HeLa cells by using comet assay and DAPI staining, respectively, we found that curcumin induced cell death through the induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation. Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy examination were used to examine the effects of curcumin on protein expression associated with DNA damage, repair and translocation of proteins. We found that curcumin at 13 µM increased the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, early-onset breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1, p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 in HeLa cells. Results from confocal laser systems microscopy indicated that curcumin increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 from cytosol to nuclei in HeLa cells. In conclusion, curcumin induced cell death in HeLa cells via induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation in vitro. PMID:27499229

  14. Curcumin causes DNA damage and affects associated protein expression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Chou, Yu-Ru; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Au, Man-Kuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and it is a prominent cause of cancer mortality. Curcumin is one of the major compounds from Turmeric and has been shown to induce cytotoxic cell death in human cervical cancer cells. However, there is no study to show curcumin induced DNA damage action via the effect on the DNA damage and repair protein in cervical cancer cells in detail. In this study, we investigated whether or not curcumin induced cell death via DNA damage, chromatin condensation in human cervical cancer HeLa cells by using comet assay and DAPI staining, respectively, we found that curcumin induced cell death through the induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation. Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy examination were used to examine the effects of curcumin on protein expression associated with DNA damage, repair and translocation of proteins. We found that curcumin at 13 µM increased the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, early-onset breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1, p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 in HeLa cells. Results from confocal laser systems microscopy indicated that curcumin increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 from cytosol to nuclei in HeLa cells. In conclusion, curcumin induced cell death in HeLa cells via induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation in vitro.

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of pentakis(aziridino)thiatriazadiphosphorine oxide (SOAz)-induced changes in cell cycle progression of HeLa and HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Hecquet, C; Nafziger, J; Ronot, X; Marie, J P; Adolphe, M

    1985-02-01

    The treatment of HeLa and HL-60 cells with various concentrations of pentakis(arizidino)thiatriazadiphosphorine oxide results in inhibition of growth and modification of cell cycle distribution. These phenomena were observed at 10(-4) M and 5 X 10(-5) M for HeLa cells and 10(-5) M and 5 X 10(-6) M for HL-60 cells. The estimation of DNA content by flow cytometry showed an important shift in the distribution of cycling cells with a striking arrest in G2 for both cell lines with a concomitant late S-phase accumulation for HeLa cells. Incubation of cells in drug-free medium 3 days after treatment did not show any change in DNA distribution, suggesting the irreversibility of drug action.

  16. Photodynamic therapy of HeLa cell cultures by using LED or laser sources.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, María E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Garavaglia, Mario

    2016-07-01

    The photodynamic therapy (PDT) on HeLa cell cultures was performed utilizing a 637nm LED lamp with 1.06W power and m-tetrahydroxyphenyl chlorin (m-THPC) as photosensitizer and compared to a laser source emitting at 654nm with the same power. Intracellular placement of the photosensitizer and the effect of its concentration (CP), its absorption time (TA) and the illumination time (TI) were evaluated. It was observed that for CP>40μg/ml and TA>24h, m-THPC had toxicity on cells in culture, even in the absence of illumination. For the other tested concentrations, the cells remained viable if not subjected to illumination doses. No effect on cells was observed for CP<0.05μg/ml, TA=48h and TI=10min and they continued proliferating. For drug concentrations higher than 0.05μgml(-1), further deterioration is observed with increasing TA and TI. We evaluated the viability of the cells, before and after the treatment, and by supravital dyes, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopies, evidence of different types of cell death was obtained. Tetrazolium dye assays after PDT during different times yielded similar results for the 637nm LED lamp with an illuminance three times greater than that of the 654nm laser source. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using a LED lamp as alternative to laser source. Here the main characteristic is not the light coherence but achieving a certain light fluence of the appropriate wavelength on cell cultures. We conclude that the efficacy was achieved satisfactorily and is essential for convenience, accessibility and safety. PMID:27152675

  17. Radiosensitivity of polyamine-depleted HeLa cells and modulation by the aminothiol WR-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Schroeder, K.K.

    1994-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured HeLa cells was increased upon depletion of the natural cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine through treatment of cultures with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. This increased radiosensitivity was manifested as a decrease in the D{sub 0} and by the absence of a shoulder in the survival curves. However, our previous studies have shown that the initial yield of X-ray-induced DNA damage did not appear to be elevated in polyamine-depleted cells. In addition, polyamine-depleted cells exhibited markedly altered X-ray-induced changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle characterized by increased time of onset and lengthened duration of G{sub 2}-phase delay. Addition of polyamines to cultures for short periods prior to irradiation restored normal radioresistence and reversed the anomalous features of the G{sub 2}-phase delay profile. Polyamine supplementation experiments as well as studies in which combinations of inhibitors were employed to modulate specific polyamine levels suggest that spermidine may play a primary role in governing cellular radioresponsiveness. The radioprotective aminothiol WR-1065 protected normal and polyamine-depleted cells to a proportionately similar extent (protection factor of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively) but had no apparent ability to restore the shoulder or alter the G{sub 2}-phase delay markedly in polyamine-depleted cells. The findings reported here extend our previous observations that polyamine depletion results in a compromised ability to respond to X irradiation and suggest that a defect in repair and/or the G{sub 2}-phase delay response may be the determining factors. 34 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Radiosensitivity of polyamine-depleted HeLa cells and modulation by the aminothiol WR-1065.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R D; Schroeder, K K

    1994-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured HeLa cells was increased upon depletion of the natural cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine through treatment of cultures with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. This increased radiosensitivity was manifested as a decrease in the D0 and by the absence of a shoulder in the survival curves. However, our previous studies have shown that the initial yield of X-ray-induced DNA damage did not appear to be elevated in polyamine-depleted cells. In addition, polyamine-depleted cells exhibited markedly altered X-ray-induced changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle characterized by increased time of onset and lengthened duration of G2-phase delay. Addition of polyamines to cultures for short periods prior to irradiation restored normal radioresistance and reversed the anomalous features of the G2-phase delay profile. Polyamine supplementation experiments as well as studies in which combinations of inhibitors were employed to modulate specific polyamine levels suggest that spermidine may play a primary role in governing cellular radioresponsiveness. The radioprotective aminothiol WR-1065 protected normal and polyamine-depleted cells to a proportionately similar extent (protection factor of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively) but had no apparent ability to restore the shoulder or alter the G2-phase delay markedly in polyamine-depleted cells. The findings reported here extend our previous observations that polyamine depletion results in a compromised ability to respond to X irradiation and suggest that a defect in repair and/or the G2-phase delay response may be the determining factors. PMID:8265790

  19. Securinine from Phyllanthus glaucus Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława; Ochocka, J. Renata

    2016-01-01

    Background The Securinega-type alkaloids occur in plants belonging to Euphorbiaceae family. One of the most widely distributed alkaloid of this group is securinine, which was identified next to allosecurinine in Phyllanthus glaucus (leafflower). Recently, some Securinega-type alkaloids have paid attention to its antiproliferative potency towards different cancer cells. However, the cytotoxic properties of allosecurinine have not yet been evaluated. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extract, alkaloid fraction obtained from P. glaucus, isolated securinine and allosecurinine against HeLa cells was evaluated by real-time xCELLigence system and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V and 7-amino-actinomycin (7-AAD) staining and confirmed with fluorescent Hoechst 33342 dye. The assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), caspase-3/7 activity and cell cycle analysis were measured by flow cytometry. The enzymatic activity of caspase-9 was assessed by a luminometric assay. The expression of apoptosis associated genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results The experimental data revealed that securinine and the alkaloid fraction were significantly potent on HeLa cells growth inhibition with IC50 values of 7.02 ± 0.52 μg/ml (32.3 μM) and 25.46 ± 1.79 μg/ml, respectively. The activity of allosecurinine and Phyllanthus extract were much lower. Furthermore, our study showed that the most active securinine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in the tested cells, increased the percentage of ROS positive cells and depolarized cells as well as stimulated the activity of ERK1/2, caspase-9 and -3/7. Securinine also induced cell cycle arrest in S phase. Real-time PCR analysis showed high expression of TNFRSF genes in the cells stimulated with securinine. Conclusions Securinine

  20. Biological and clinical significance of NAC1 expression in cervical carcinomas: a comparative study between squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yeasmin, Shamima; Nakayama, Kentaro; Rahman, Mohammed Tanjimur; Rahman, Munmun; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Otuski, Yoshiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Satoru; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the biological and clinical significance of NAC1 (nucleus accumbens associated 1) expression in both cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry, the frequency of positive NAC1 expression in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (31.0%; 18/58) was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinomas (16.2%; 12/74) (P = .043). NAC1 gene amplification was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 5 (7.2%) of 69 squamous cell carcinomas. NAC1 amplification was not identified in the adenocarcinomas (0%; 0/58). Positive NAC1 expression was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival in squamous cell carcinomas (P < .0001). A multivariate analysis showed that positive NAC1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival after standard radiotherapy (P = .0003). In contrast to squamous cell carcinomas, positive NAC1 expression did not correlate with shorter overall survival in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (P = .317). Profound growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased cell migration and invasion were observed in silencing RNA-treated cancer cells with NAC1 overexpression compared with cancer cells without NAC1 expression. NAC1 overexpression stimulated proliferation, migration, and invasion in the cervical cancer cell lines TCS and Hela P3, which normally lack NAC1 expression. These findings indicate that NAC1 overexpression is critical to the growth and survival of cervical carcinomas irrespective of histologic type. Furthermore, they suggest that NAC1 silencing RNA-induced phenotypes depend on the expression status of the targeted cell line. Therefore, cervical carcinoma patients with NAC1 expression may benefit from a targeted therapy irrespective of histologic type.

  1. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  2. (-)-Anonaine induces apoptosis through Bax- and caspase-dependent pathways in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Yi; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Lu, Fung-Jou; Hung, Ray-Ping; Chen, Chi-Hung; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2008-08-01

    (-)-Anonaine has been shown to have some anticancer activities, but the mechanisms of (-)-anonaine inducing cell death of human cancer cells is not fully understood. We investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis induced by (-)-anonaine in human HeLa cancer cells. Treatment with (-)-anonaine induces dose-dependent DNA damage that is correlated with increased intracellular nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, glutathione depletion, disruptive mitochondrial transmembrane potential, activation of caspase 3, 7, 8, and 9, and poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. Our data indicate that (-)-anonaine up-regulated the expression of Bax and p53 proteins in HeLa cancer cells. The apoptosis and expression of Bax induced by (-)-anonaine could be inhibited when the HeLa cells were pretreated with Boc-Asp(OMe)-fmk, which is a broad caspases inhibitor. There was no obvious DNA damage in the (-)-anonaine-treated Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cell lines. Both Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cell lines are kidney epithelial cellular morphology. These results suggest that (-)-anonaine might be considered a potent compound for chemotherapy against cervical cancer or a health food supplement for cancer chemoprevention.

  3. Reovirus type 3 synthesizes proteins in interferon-treated HeLa cells without reversing the antiviral state.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Esteban, M; Carrasco, L

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with human lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN-alpha) does not inhibit reovirus type 3 protein synthesis during virus infection. In contrast, reovirus translation is blocked by treatment of L cells with mouse IFN-alpha. The (2'-5')A synthetase activity is induced in HeLa cells by IFN-alpha treatment and is activated after reovirus infection, since cell lysates from these cells synthesize in vitro (2'-5')A oligonucleotides. The IFN-induced protein kinase activity is also triggered in those lysates upon dsRNA addition. Thus, contrary to DNA-containing viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus, reovirus infection does not destroy or reverse the IFN-induced antiviral state. In support of this conclusion, superinfection with poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus of reovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with IFN leads only to a blockade of translation of the former viruses. These results provide a remarkable example where in the same cells doubly infected with two different viruses, the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha is manifested by selectively inhibiting translation of one kind of virus (poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus) without affecting the translation of reovirus type 3. In addition, these results indicate that the resistance of reovirus translation to inhibition by IFN is different from the mechanism of resistance induced by DNA-containing viruses.

  4. Studies on the control of ribosomal RNA synthesis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chesterton, C J; Coupar, B E; Butterworth, P H; Green, M H

    1975-09-01

    In many eucaryotic systems protein synthesis is coupled to ribosomal RNA synthesis such that shut-down of the former causes inhibition of the latter. We have investigated this stringency phenomenon in HeLa cells. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin cause inactivation of both processes but valine starvation totally inhibits only the processing of 45-S RNA. DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from A, B and C (or I, II and III respectively) were extracted, separated partially by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and their activity levels determined. These do not decrease significantly during inhibition of protein synthesis. To find out whether or not form A is bound to its template under these conditions, proteins were removed from chromatin with the detergent sarkosyl. This does not affect bound RNA polymerase. Inhibition of protein synthesis caused up to 50% reduction in endogenous alpha-amanitin-insensitive chromatin-RNA-synthesising activity. This reduced level of activity was not affected by sarkosyl treatment. Levels in normal cells were stimulated. This result indicates that the form A RNA polymerase is not bound to its template when protein synthesis is inhibited.

  5. Axin is expressed in mitochondria and suppresses mitochondrial ATP synthesis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed that axin is involved in numerous cellular functions beyond the negative regulation of β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Previously, an association of ectopic axin with mitochondria was observed. In an effort to investigate the relationship between axin and mitochondria, we found that axin expression suppressed cellular ATP production, which was more apparent as axin expression levels increased. Also, mitochondrial expression of axin was observed using two axin-expressing HeLa cell models: doxycycline-inducible ectopic axin expression (HeLa-axin) and axin expression enhanced by long-term treatment with XAV939 (HeLa-XAV). In biochemical analysis, axin is associated with oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV and is involved in defects in the assembly of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. Functionally, axin expression reduced the activity of OXPHOS complex IV and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), suggesting axin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Subsequent studies using various inhibitors of Wnt signaling showed that the reduction in cellular ATP levels was weaker in cases of ICAT protein expression and treatment with iCRT3 or NSC668036 compared with XAV939 treatment, suggesting that XAV939 treatment affects ATP synthesis in addition to suppressing Wnt signaling activity. Axin-mediated regulation of mitochondrial function may be an additional mechanism to Wnt signaling for regulation of cell growth. PMID:26704260

  6. Axin is expressed in mitochondria and suppresses mitochondrial ATP synthesis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed that axin is involved in numerous cellular functions beyond the negative regulation of β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Previously, an association of ectopic axin with mitochondria was observed. In an effort to investigate the relationship between axin and mitochondria, we found that axin expression suppressed cellular ATP production, which was more apparent as axin expression levels increased. Also, mitochondrial expression of axin was observed using two axin-expressing HeLa cell models: doxycycline-inducible ectopic axin expression (HeLa-axin) and axin expression enhanced by long-term treatment with XAV939 (HeLa-XAV). In biochemical analysis, axin is associated with oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV and is involved in defects in the assembly of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. Functionally, axin expression reduced the activity of OXPHOS complex IV and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), suggesting axin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Subsequent studies using various inhibitors of Wnt signaling showed that the reduction in cellular ATP levels was weaker in cases of ICAT protein expression and treatment with iCRT3 or NSC668036 compared with XAV939 treatment, suggesting that XAV939 treatment affects ATP synthesis in addition to suppressing Wnt signaling activity. Axin-mediated regulation of mitochondrial function may be an additional mechanism to Wnt signaling for regulation of cell growth.

  7. Heat Inactivation of Garlic (Allium sativum) Extract Abrogates Growth Inhibition of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Renuka; Murray, Matthew J J; Murray, James T

    2016-07-01

    The potential anticancer properties of garlic (Allium sativum) may depend on the method of preparation and its storage. Storage of garlic has not been thoroughly investigated to determine whether anticancer properties are retained. Garlic was prepared and processed to mimic normal options for storage and preparation for consumption. Cytotoxicity was determined by crystal violet assay and mechanisms of cytotoxicity were established by microscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western immunoblotting. Significant (P < 0.0001) cytotoxicity was observed in all preparations, except with boiled (cooked) garlic. Depending on the method of storage, garlic extract induced either type I or type II programmed cell death, detectable by caspase 9 cleavage, or Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and LC3-II accumulation, respectively. The conflicting literature on the anticancer properties of garlic may be explained by differences in processing and storage. This study has highlighted that the potency of the antiproliferative properties of cooked garlic, compared to the uncooked form, is diminished in HeLa cells. PMID:27176674

  8. Suppression of NYVAC Infection in HeLa Cells Requires RNase L but Is Independent of Protein Kinase R Activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Nájera, José Luis; Baldanta, Sara; Rodriguez, Dolores; Way, Michael; Esteban, Mariano; Guerra, Susana

    2015-12-09

    Protein kinase R (PKR) and RNase L are host cell components that function to contain viral spread after infections. In this study, we analyzed the role of both proteins in the abortive infection of human HeLa cells with the poxvirus strain NYVAC, for which an inhibition of viral A27L and B5R gene expression is described. Specifically, the translation of these viral genes is independent of PKR activation, but their expression is dependent on the RNase L activity.

  9. Stem cells as the root of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Balic, Anamaria; Dorado, Jorge; Alonso-Gomez, Mercedes; Heeschen, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells play a crucial role not only in the generation and maintenance of different tissues, but also in the development and progression of malignancies. For the many solid cancers, it has now been shown that they harbor a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells that bear stem cell features and therefore, these cells are termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-propagating cells. CSC are exclusively tumorigenic and essential drivers for tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma does not only contain one homogeneous population of CSC rather than diverse subpopulations that may have evolved during tumor progression. One of these populations is called migrating CSC and can be characterized by CXCR4 co-expression. Only these cells are capable of evading the primary tumor and traveling to distant sites such as the liver as the preferred site of metastatic spread. Clinically even more important, however, is the observation that CSC are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy resulting in their relative enrichment during treatment and rapid relapse of disease. Many laboratories are now working on the further in-depth characterization of these cells, which may eventually allow for the identification of their Achilles heal and lead to novel treatment modalities for fighting this deadly disease.

  10. Anticancer activity of synthetic bis(indolyl)methane-ortho-biaryls against human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Jamsheena, Vellekkatt; Shilpa, Ganesan; Saranya, Jayaram; Harry, Nissy Ann; Lankalapalli, Ravi Shankar; Priya, Sulochana

    2016-03-01

    Bis(indolyl)methane appended biaryls were designed, synthesized and evaluated in human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa) for their anticancer activities and compared against normal rat cardiac myoblasts (H9C2) cells. Compounds 1-12 were synthesized, with variations in one of the phenyl unit, in a single step by condensation of biaryl-2-carbaldehydes with indole in the presence of para-toluenesulfonic acid. Compound 1 exhibited a GI50 value of 11.00 ± 0.707 μM and the derivatives, compounds 4 and 11 showed a GI50 value of 8.33 ± 0.416 μM and 9.13 ± 0.177 μM respectively in HeLa cells and was found to be non-toxic to H9C2 cells up to 20 μM. Furthermore, compounds 1, 4 and 11 induced caspase dependent cellular apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited the cell migration and downregulated the production of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HeLa cells.

  11. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant activity and toxicity of Peumus boldus water extracts on HeLa and Caco-2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Falé, P L; Amaral, F; Amorim Madeira, P J; Sousa Silva, M; Florêncio, M H; Frazão, F N; Serralheiro, M L M

    2012-08-01

    This work aimed to study the inhibition on acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), the antioxidant activity and the toxicity towards Caco-2 and HeLa cells of aqueous extracts of Peumus Boldus. An IC(50) value of 0.93 mg/mL, for AChE inhibition, and EC(50) of 18.7 μg/mL, for the antioxidant activity, was determined. This activity can be attributed to glycosylated flavonoid derivatives detected, which were the main compounds, although boldine and other aporphine derivatives were also present. No changes in the chemical composition or the biochemical activities were found after gastrointestinal digestion. Toxicity of P. boldus decoction gave an IC(50) value 0.66 mg/mL for HeLa cells, which caused significant changes in the cell proteome profile. PMID:22617353

  13. Direct observation of potassium ions in HeLa cell with ion-selective nano-pipette probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Tomohide; Iwata, Futoshi; Yamazaki, Koji; Wan Son, Jong; Lee, Joo-Kyung; Ho Park, Bae; Kawai, Tomoji

    2012-02-01

    The local concentration of potassium ion in a single HeLa cell was observed with an ion-selective nano-pipette probe. Ion selectivity was achieved by using a polyvinyl chloride film with selected ionophores placed within the nano-pipette. Both alternating and constant bias voltages were applied to the counter electrode for the observation of local ion concentrations with a response time of less than 0.1 s. These measurements were enabled by a low-current detection system prepared specifically for this study. The difference in local potassium concentrations between inside a living HeLa cell and the surrounding solution was approximately 100 mM, while no difference in potassium ion concentration was observed between the interior of dead cells and the surrounding solution.

  14. Inhibitory activity of synthesized acetylated Procyanidin B1 analogs against HeLa S3 cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Syuhei; Ishihara, Sayaka; Okamoto, Taisuke; Doi, Syoma; Harui, Kota; Higashino, Yusuke; Kawasaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Saito, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins, also known as condensed tannins and/or oligomeric flavonoids, occur in many edible plants and have various interesting biological activities. Previously, we reported a synthetic method for the preparation of various procyanidins in pure form and described their biological activities. Here, we describe the synthesis of procyanidin B1 acetylated analogs and discuss their inhibition activities against HeLa S3 cell proliferation. Surprisingly, the lower-unit acetylated procyanidin B1 strongly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa S3 cells. This molecule showed much stronger inhibitory activity than did epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), green tea polyphenol, and dimeric compounds that included EGCG as a unit. This result suggests that the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the upper-units in flavan-3-ols are important for their inhibitory activity against cancer cell proliferation and that a hydrophobic lower unit dimer enhances this activity. PMID:24500007

  15. Persistent Infection of Cells in Culture by Measles Virus II. Effect of Measles Antibody on Persistently Infected HeLa Sublines and Recovery of a HeLa Clonal Line Persistently Infected with Incomplete Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rustigian, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Rustigian, Robert (Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass.). Persistent infection of cells in culture by measles virus. II. Effect of measles antibody on persistently infected HeLa clonal line persistently infected with incomplete virus. J. Bacteriol. 92:1805–1811. 1966.—The effect of viral antibody on persistent infection of HeLa cells by the Edmonston strain of measles virus was investigated by culturing cells from three persistently infected clones in medium supplemented with human immune globulin. The three infected HeLa clones were isolated from a persistently infected parent line. Two sublines which were grown in the presence of measles antibody developed a nonyielder state, wherein there is no detectable virus infectious for normal HeLa cultures. There is, however, continued synthesis of intracellular viral antigen and formation of viral intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. The development of a nonyielder state was associated with a marked decrease in the degree of hemadsorption in cultures of both sublines. Further studies of the viral properties of non-yielder HeLa cell populations were made with a clone obtained from one of these sublines by plating under antibody. Persistent infection in this line was characterized by synthesis of incomplete virus even when the cells were cultured thereafter in anti-body-free medium. This was evidenced by (i) failure to recover infectious virus from the clonal population despite continued formation of intracellular viral antigen and viral intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in a majority of the cells, (ii) the presence of only a few cells with surface viral antigen(s) including hemagglutinin, and (iii) the relatively weak antibody response to viral envelope antigen(s) after injection of cells into guinea pigs. PMID:5334769

  16. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Kai; Jin, Faguang

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  17. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    PubMed

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  18. Accurate transcription of simian virus 40 chromatin in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, J N; Radonovich, M; Salzman, N P

    1982-01-01

    During simian virus 40 viral maturation, a series of modifications occur which alter the composition of viral nucleoprotein complexes. As a consequence, the chromatin that is extracted from extracellular simian virus 40 virions exhibits properties that are similar to those of transcriptionally active eucaryotic chromatin. The influence of this chromatin structure on specific RNA initiation by RNA polymerase II was examined by using the in vitro HeLa cell extract of Manley et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:3855-3859, 1980). The 5' ends of RNA transcripts were positioned by the "run-off" assay, in which transcripts extend from the initiation site to termination sites created by restriction cleavage and by S1 nuclease analysis, using DNA probes labeled at their 5' termini. Two major early RNA transcripts, which originated at map positions 5,240 +/- 10 and 5,145 +/- 10, and two major late RNA transcripts, which originated at map positions 325 +/- 10 and 185 +/- 10, were identified. Transcripts were initiated with comparable relative efficiencies at the same 5' site when either purified DNA or chromatin was used as the template. Our results suggest that extracellular simian virus 40 virion chromatin modifications do not regulate simian virus 40 promoter selection but function to increase the accessibility of RNA promoter sequences to RNA polymerase II and allow efficient elongation of the RNA chain after the initiation event. Images PMID:6294328

  19. Molecular crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy induced by a novel 2-methoxyestradiol analogue in cervical adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 2-Methoxyestradiol has been shown to induce both autophagy and apoptosis in various carcinogenic cell lines. Although a promising anti-cancer agent, it has poor bioavailability and rapid in vivo metabolism which decreases its efficiency. In order to improve 2-methoxyestradiol’s anti-proliferative properties, a novel 2-methoxyestradiol analogue, 2-ethyl-3-O-sulphamoyl-estra-1,3,5 (10)16-tetraene (ESE-16), was previously in silico-designed in our laboratory. This study investigated ESE-16 for its anti-proliferative potential on a cervical adenocarcinoma cell (HeLa) cell line. Additionally, the possible intracellular crosstalk mechanisms between the two types of cell death were investigated. Methods and results HeLa cells exposed to 0.5 μM ESE-16 for 24 hours showed morphological evidence of both apoptotic and autophagic death pathways as assessed by polarization-optical transmitted light differential interference contrast microscopy, fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometric cyclin B1 quantification revealed induction of programmed cell death after halting cell cycle progression in metaphase. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that ESE-16 caused microtubule fragmentation. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle progression and phosphatidylserine flip determination confirmed induction of apoptosis. Moreover, an increase in aggresome formation and microtubule-associated protein light chain, LC3, was demonstrated indicative of autophagy. Both caspase 8 and 3 were upregulated in a spectrophotometric analysis, indicating the involvement of the extrinsic pathway of apoptotic induction. Conclusions We conclude that the novel in silico-designed compound, ESE-16, exerts its anti-proliferative effect on the tumorigenic human epithelial cervical (HeLa) cells by sequentially targeting microtubule integrity, resulting in a metaphase block, causing induction of both autophagic and apoptotic cell death via a crosstalk mechanism that

  20. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cells on the growth of HepG2 and Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaohui; Matsumoto, Rena; Yang, Pengyuan; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) accumulate at carcinomas and have a great impact on cancer cell's behavior. Here we demonstrated that hMSCs could display both the promotional and inhibitive effects on growth of HepG2 and Hela cells by using the conditioned media, indirect co-culture, and cell-to-cell co-culture. Cell growth was increased following the addition of lower proportion of hMSCs while decreased by treatment of higher proportion of hMSCs. We also established a novel noninvasive label way by using internalizing quantum dots (i-QDs) for study of cell-cell contact in the co-culture, which was effective and sensitive for both tracking and distinguishing different cells population without the disturbance of cells. Furthermore, we investigated the role of hMSCs in regulation of cell growth and showed that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways were involved in hMSC-mediated cell inhibition and proliferation. Our findings suggested that hMSCs regulated cancer cell function by providing a suitable environment, and the discovery from the study would provide some clues for development of effective strategy for hMSC-based cancer therapies.

  1. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44 nm (NP44) and 100 nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors. PMID:26585375

  2. Basal cell adenocarcinomas of the major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L; Wiscovitch, J G

    1990-04-01

    Basal cell adenoma of salivary gland has become an established variant of monomorphic adenoma since its segregation from pleomorphic adenoma in 1967. Although there have been many comprehensive reports about benign basal cell adenomas, only rare case reports of malignant basal cell type neoplasms have appeared in the literature. Described in this report are the clinicopathologic features of 29 cases labeled basal cell adenocarcinomas that had morphologic characteristics of basal cell adenomas but infiltrative, perineural, and intravascular growth features that indicated a malignant potential. With limited follow-up, seven tumors are known to have recurred, and three of these metastasized to lymph nodes and lung. One patient died with extensive local spread of the tumor. All patients were adults. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life, and there was no gender predilection. The parotid gland was the predominant site. A solid type growth configuration was most frequent; membranous, trabecular, and tubular types were less frequent, in that order. Three patients also had dermal cylindromas, perhaps indicative of a salivary gland-skin adnexal diathesis that has been previously reported.

  3. Inhibition of collagen peptidase in HeLa cells and human tumours by compounds including drugs used in cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Boggust, W. A.; McGauley, H.

    1978-01-01

    Collagen-peptidase activity in extracts of HeLa cells and human tumours is inactivated by Razoxane (ICRF-159), cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, thiotepa, aprotinin, EDTA and phenanthroline. As this activity, in association with other enzymes, may contribute to tissue lysis in cancers, chemical intervention may reduce invasiveness and modify the processes of infiltration and metastasis. Accordingly, some drugs used in therapy or for the prevention of metastasis may produce their observed effects by a combination of factors including enzyme inhibition. PMID:212092

  4. Ctotoxic and apoptogenic effects of Perovskia abrotanoides flower extract on MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Geryani, Mohamad Ali; Mahdian, Davood; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Hosseini, Azar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Perovskia abrotanoides Karel, belongs to the family Lamiaceae and grows wild alongside the mountainous roads inarid and cold climate of Northern Iran. The anti-tumor activity of P. abrotanoides root extract has been shown previously. This study was designed to examine in vitro anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of flower extract of P. abrotanoides on MCF-7 and Hela cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cells were cultured in DMEM medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, 100 units/ml penicillin and 100 µg/ml streptomycin and incubated with different concentrations of plant extracts. Cell viability was quantified by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using propidium iodide (PI) staining of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). Results: P. abrotanoides extract inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a time and dose-dependent manner and 1000 µg/ml of extract following 48h of incubation was the most cytotoxic dose against Hela cell in comparison with other doses; however, in MCF-7 cells,1000 and 500 µg/ml PA induced toxicity at all time points but with different features.. Analysis of flowcytometry histogram of treated cells compared with control cells indicated that the cytotoxic effect is partly due toapoptosis induction. Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extract of P. abrotanoides flowers inhibits the growth of MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines, partly via inducing apoptosis. Their inhibitory effect was increased in a time and dose-dependent manner, especially in MCF7 cells. However, further studies are needed to reveal the mechanisms of P. abrotanoides extract-induced cell death. PMID:27516981

  5. Clear cell adenocarcinoma present exclusively within endometrial polyp: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial polyp is a common benign lesion that protrudes into the endometrial surface. The incidence of carcinoma within endometrial polyp is thought to be low, however, postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps are at an increased risk. Endometrial clear cell adenocarcinoma is a distinct and relatively rare subtype of endometrial carcinoma, and recent studies have proposed putative precursor lesions of clear cell adenocarcinoma, namely clear cell endometrial glandular dysplasia (EmGD) and clear cell endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (EIC). Herein, we describe two cases of clear cell adenocarcinoma present exclusively within endometrial polyp and discuss the association of its precursor. Two postmenopausal Japanese females, 66-year-old (Case 1) and 54-year-old (Case 2) presented with abnormal genital bleeding. Cytological examination of both cases revealed adenocarcinoma, thus, hysterectomy was performed. Histopathological studies demonstrated clear cell adenocarcinoma within exclusively endometrial polyp in both cases. The peculiar finding in Case 1 was presence of atypical glandular cells with large round to oval nuclei and clear cytoplasm within the atrophic endometrial glands in the surrounding endometrial tissue, which corresponded to clear cell EIC. A recent study showed that 33% of uteri had at least one focus of clear cell EmGD in endometrial polyps. Accordingly, clear cell adenocarcinoma and clear cell EmGD can occur in association with endometrial polyps more frequently than previously thought. Therefore, detailed histopathological examination is important in diagnosis of endometrial polyps, especially in the postmenopausal women, moreover cytological examination is a useful tool in the postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G; Edwards, Paul A W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines-ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4-all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  7. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  8. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC.

  9. Apoptosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells induced by LED-activated pheophorbide a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xia, X. S.; Bai, D. Q.; Lin, H. D.; Xu, C. S.

    2011-02-01

    Apoptosis is an important form of cell death. The present study investigated apoptotic cell death of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells treated by LED-activated pheophorbide a (Pa) using nuclear staining and flow cytometric analysis with Annexin V/PI staining 8 h after LED-activated Pa. We further investigated the changes of mitochondrial membrane potential 3 h after LED-activated Pa. The results showed that apoptosis significantly occurred and mitochondrial membrane potential markedly decreased in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells after LED-activated Pa. Our data demonstrated that LED-activated Pa could remarkably induce apoptosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells, and the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential might be an important event in the apoptosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells after LED-activated Pa.

  10. Effects of overexpression of PTP36, a putative protein tyrosine phosphatase, on cell adhesion, cell growth, and cytoskeletons in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Takada, T; Mori, Y; Oh-hora, M; Uchida, Y; Kosugi, A; Miyake, K; Hamaoka, T

    1999-04-30

    Non-receptor-type putative protein tyrosine phosphatase-36 (PTP36), also known as PTPD2/Pez, possesses a domain homologous to the N-terminal half of band 4.1 protein. To gain insight into the biological function of PTP36, we established a HeLa cell line, HtTA/P36-9, in which the overexpression of PTP36 was inducible. PTP36 expressed in HeLa cells was enriched in the cytoskeleton near the plasma membrane. There was little endogenous PTP36 detectable in uninduced HtTA/P36-9 cells or in the parental HeLa cells. Upon induction of PTP36 overexpression, HtTA/P36-9 cells spread less well, grew more slowly, and adhered to the extracellular matrix proteins less well than uninduced cells. Moreover, decreases in the actin stress fibers and the number of focal adhesions were observed. The tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase induced by lysophosphatidic acid was suppressed in the HtTA/P36-9 cells overexpressing PTP36. These results indicate that PTP36 affects cytoskeletons, cell adhesion, and cell growth, thus suggesting that PTP36 is involved in their regulatory processes. PMID:10212280

  11. Ethanol Metabolism by HeLa Cells Transduced with Human Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes: Control of the Pathway by Acetaldehyde Concentration†

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Michinaga; Cyganek, Izabela; Sanghani, Paresh C.; Cho, Won Kyoo; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human class I alcohol dehydrogenase 2 isoenzymes (encoded by the ADH1B locus) have large differences in kinetic properties; however, individuals inheriting the alleles for the different isoenzymes exhibit only small differences in alcohol elimination rates. This suggests that other cellular factors must regulate the activity of the isoenzymes. Methods The activity of the isoenzymes expressed from ADH1B*1, ADH1B*2, and ADH1B*3 cDNAs was examined in stably transduced HeLa cell lines, including lines which expressed human low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). The ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol was compared with that of HeLa cells expressing rat class I ADH (HeLa-rat ADH cells), rat hepatoma (H4IIEC3) cells, and rat hepatocytes. Results The isoenzymes had similar protein half-lives in the HeLa cells. Rat hepatocytes, H4IIEC3 cells, and HeLa-rat ADH cells oxidized ethanol much faster than the cells expressing the ADH1B isoenzymes. This was not explained by high cellular NADH levels or endogenous inhibitors; but rather because the activity of the β1 and β2 ADHs were constrained by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, as shown by the increased rate of ethanol oxidation by cell lines expressing β2 ADH plus ALDH2. Conclusion The activity of the human β2 ADH isoenzyme is sensitive to inhibition by acetaldehyde, which likely limits its activity in vivo. This study emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low steady–state acetaldehyde concentration in hepatocytes during ethanol metabolism. PMID:21166830

  12. p53, Bcl-2 and cox-2 are involved in berberine hydrochloride-induced apoptosis of HeLa229 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Yu, Hai-Zhong; Huang, Sheng-Mou; Zheng, Yu-Lan

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine hydrochloride on the proliferation and apoptosis of HeLa229 human cervical cancer cells. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to examine the cytotoxicity of berberine hydrochloride against HeLa229 cells. The effects of berberine hydrochloride on the apoptosis of HeLa229 cells was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and the mRNA expression levels of p53, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and cyclooxygenase‑2 (cox‑2) were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Berberine hydrochloride inhibited the proliferation of HeLa229 cells in a dose‑dependent manner; minimum cell viability (3.61%) was detected following treatment with 215.164 µmol/l berberine hydrochloride and the half maximal inhibitory concentration value was 42.93 µmol/l following treatment for 72 h. In addition, berberine hydrochloride induced apoptosis in HeLa229 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Berberine hydrochloride upregulated the mRNA expression levels of p53, and downregulated mRNA expression levels of Bcl‑2 and cox‑2, in a dose‑dependent manner. In conclusion, berberine hydrochloride inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of HeLa229 cells, potentially via the upregulation of p53 and the downregulation of Bcl‑2 and cox‑2 mRNA expression levels. PMID:27601129

  13. Unusual prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on cell cycle kinetics in solid tumors remains largely unknown because of technical limitations and these tumors' complicated structures. In this study, we analyzed intratumoral cell cycle kinetics after X-irradiation of tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), a novel system to visualize cell cycle kinetics in vivo. Cell cycle kinetics after X-irradiation was examined by using tumor sections and in vivo real-time imaging system in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa cells expressing Fucci. We found that G2 arrest was remarkably prolonged, up to 5 days after 10-Gy irradiation, in contrast to monolayer cultures where G2 arrest returned within 24 h. Cells isolated from tumors 5 days after irradiation exhibited a higher surviving fraction than those isolated immediately or one day after irradiation. In this study, we clearly demonstrated unusual post-irradiation cell cycle kinetics in tumor xenografts derived from HeLa-Fucci cells. Our findings imply that prolonged G2 arrest occurring in tumor microenvironments following irradiation may function as a radioresistance mechanism.

  14. Proteolysis in heat-stressed HeLa cells. Stabilization of ubiquitin correlates with the loss of proline endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Pratt, G; Hough, R; Rechsteiner, M

    1989-07-25

    When intact HeLa cells were incubated at 45 degrees C, there was progressive inactivation of proline endopeptidase. Rapid loss of the enzyme did not occur in extracts maintained at 45 degrees C. Since Western blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed no decrease in the immunoreactive 70-kDa proline endopeptidase band, its in vivo disappearance apparently results from irreversible denaturation or modification. Loss of proline endopeptidase activity was paralleled by reduced degradation of injected ubiquitin and bovine serum albumin. In contrast, proteolysis of injected lysozyme or pancreatic trypsin inhibitor was barely affected. Electrophoretic analysis of ubiquitin or bovine serum albumin retrieved from heated HeLa cells showed that the injected proteins were intact. Thus, the presence of proline endopeptidase appears to be required for initial cleavage of these two substrates, but it has not been shown that the enzyme is directly responsible. Selective stabilization of a subset of the injected proteins does, however, demonstrate the existence of distinct proteolytic pathways in HeLa cytosol. PMID:2545710

  15. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  16. Two new neolignans from Patrinia scabra with potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa and MNK-45 cells.

    PubMed

    Di, Lei; Yan, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ling-Yu; Ma, Wei; Wang, Kai-Jin; Li, Ning

    2013-10-01

    Two new neolignans, patrineolignan A (1) and patrineolignan B (2), together with seven known lignans, were isolated from the 90 % aqueous EtOH extract of the roots of Patrinia scabra. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data (HRESIMS, IR, 1D and 2D NMR) and comparison with literature data. The two new neolignans were evaluated in vitro for cytotoxic properties against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell line and gastric carcinoma MNK-45 cell line using the microculture tetrazolium assay, and both 1 and 2 exhibited strongly cytotoxic activity against the two tumor cell lines. PMID:23737105

  17. Cytotoxic evaluation of volatile oil from Descurainia sophia seeds on MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Khodarahmi, E.; Asghari, G.H.; Hassanzadeh, F.; Mirian, M.; Khodarahmi, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Descurainia sophia is a plant widely distributed and used as folk medicine throughout the world. Different extracts of aerial parts and seeds of this plant have been shown to inhibit the growth of different cancer cell lines in vitro. In this study, cytotoxic activity of D. sophia seed volatile oil was evaluated. D. sophia seed powder was mixed with distilled water and left at 25 °C for 17 h (E1), 23 h (E2) and 28 h (E3) to autolyse. Then, the volatile fractions of E1, E2, and E3 were collected after steam distillation for 3 h. Cytotoxic effects of the volatile oils alone or in combination with doxorubicin (mixture of E1 or E2 at 50 μg/ml or E1 at 100 μg/ml with doxorubicin at 0.1, 1, 10 μM) against MCF-7 cell line were determined using MTT assay. Cytotoxic effect of E1 volatile oil was also determined on HeLa cell line. The results indicated that 1-buten-4-isothiocyanate was the major isothiocyanate found in the volatile oils. The results of cytotoxic evaluations showed that volatile constituents were more toxic on MCF-7 cells with IC50< 100 μg/ml than HeLa cells with IC50> 100 μg/ml. No significant differences were observed between cytotoxic activities of E1, E2 and E3 on MCF-7 cell line. Concomitant use of E1 and E2 (50 μg/ml) with doxurubicin (1 μM) significantly reduced the viability of MCF-7 cells compared to the negative control, doxorubicin alone, or each volatile fraction. The same result was obtained on HeLa cells, when E1 (100 μg/ml) was concurrently used with doxorubicin (1 μM). PMID:26487894

  18. Endonuclease G depletion may improve efficiency of first generation adenovirus vector DNA replication in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2015-01-01

    First generation adenovirus (Ad5 ΔE1,E3) vectors are able to replicate their DNA in many tumour cells and can be used for oncotherapy. Highest rates of viral DNA replication occur in the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. In this study, we tried to increase the efficiency of Ad5 ΔE1,E3 DNA replication in the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by using RNA interference (RNAi) to target endonuclease G (EndoG) whose depletion leads to an accumulation of cells in the G2/M transition. Targeting of EndoG by an shRNA encoded on an Ad5 ΔE1,E3 vector resulted in an early proliferation defect of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. This effect coincided with enhanced DNA replication and encoded transgene expression of an Ad5 ΔE1,E3 vector. Applied in high concentrations, the EndoG-targeting Ad5 ΔE1,E3 vector showed enhanced HeLa cell killing ability relative to control Ad5 ΔE1,E3 vectors. These effects are most likely the result of EndoG depletion, which causes cells to accumulate in the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and extends favourable cellular conditions for Ad5 ΔE1,E3 DNA replication. Targeting of EndoG by RNAi may be a viable strategy for improving both the levels of transgene expression and the oncolytic properties of first generation adenovirus vectors.

  19. Paclitaxel-resistant HeLa cells have up-regulated levels of reactive oxygen species and increased expression of taxol resistance gene 1.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenxiang; Wang, Yuxia; Sun, Gaoying; Zhang, Xiaojin; Wei, Yongqing; Li, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-07-01

    This study is to establish a paclitaxel (PTX)-resistant human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell line (HeLa/PTX) and to investigate its redox characteristics and the expression of taxol resistance gene 1 (Txr1). HeLa cells were treated with PTX and effects of PTX on cell proliferation were detected through cell counting and the MTT assay. Levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced glutathione (GSH), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as the ratio of GSH to GSSG were measured by the 2,7-difluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) method and the 5,5'dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) method. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined by the nitrite formation method, the molybdate colorimetric method, and the DTNB colorimetric method, respectively. The level of Txr1 mRNA was determined by real-time PCR. Compared with the regular HeLa cells, HeLa/PTX cells were larger in size and had more cytoplasmic granules. The population doubling time for HeLa/PTX cells was 1.32 times of that of HeLa cells (P<0.01). HeLa/PTX cells showed stronger resistance to PTX than HeLa cells with a resistance index of 122.69. HeLa/PTX cells had higher levels of ROS (P<0.01) and Txr1 mRNA (P<0.01), lower level of GSH (P < 0.05), and lower activities of SOD (P<0.01) and GPx (P < 0.05) than HeLa cells. HeLa/PTX cells, with higher levels of ROS and Txr1 mRNA expression, are more resistant to PTX than HeLa cells.

  20. Genes for collagen types I, IV, and V are transcribed in HeLa cells but a postinitiation block prevents the accumulation of type I mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, J.J.; Wroth, T.H.; Ackerman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen mRNA synthesis in HeLa cells was evaluated by in vitro transcription of type I collagen DNA, nuclear run-on studies, and steady-state mRNA analysis. Type I collagen mRNA was accurately initiated by HeLa cell RNQA polymerase II in nuclear extracts, and run-on analysis indicated that mRNAs for collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(III), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V) were synthesized in HeLa cells. However, on assessing the steady-state levels of mRNAs of collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V), no type I mRNA was found in HeLa cells while types {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(V) collagen mRNAs were observed. These results suggest that a postinitiation process prevents the accumulation of type I collagen mRNAs in HeLa cells. Persistence of types IV and V collagen mRNAs is consistent with the involvement of types IV and V collagen in adhesion of HeLa cells to glass or plastic.

  1. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  2. Anti-apoptotic effect of caspase inhibitors on H₂O₂-treated HeLa cells through early suppression of its oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in cervical cancer cells may be of toxicological interest. In the present study, the effects of exogenous H2O2 on cell growth and death in HeLa cervical cancer cells were investigated, and the anti-apoptotic effects of various caspase (pan-caspase, caspase-3, -8 or -9) inhibitors on H2O2-treated HeLa cells were also evaluated with regard to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels. Based on MTT assays, H2O2 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 value of ~75 µM at 24 h. H2O2 increased the number of dead cells and Annexin V-FITC-positive cells in the HeLa cells, which was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3 and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm). However, relatively higher doses of H2O2 induced necrosis in HeLa cells. Caspase inhibitors significantly prevented H2O2-induced HeLa cell death. H2O2 increased ROS including O2•- at 24 h and increased the activity of catalase in HeLa cells. H2O2 also increased the ROS level at 1 h, and several caspase inhibitors attenuated the increased level at 1 h but not at 6, 12 and 24 h. H2O2 decreased the GSH level in HeLa cells at 1 h, and several caspase inhibitors attenuated the decreased level of GSH at this time. H2O2 induced GSH depletion at 24 h. In conclusion, H2O2 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells via apoptosis and/or necrosis, which was accompanied by intracellular increases in ROS levels and GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors are suggested to suppress H2O2-induced oxidative stress to rescue HeLa cells at the early time point of 1 h.

  3. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  4. Yeast tRNA3Leu gene transcribed and spliced in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Standring, D N; Venegas, A; Rutter, W J

    1981-01-01

    A cloned yeast tRNA3Leu gene containing a 33-base intervening sequence (IVS) is selectively transcribed by a soluble extract from HeLa cells. The 130-nucleotide tRNA3Leu precursor RNA formed is colinear with the gene and contains approximately 4 leader nucleotides and up to 9 trailer nucleotides. The IVS is accurately and efficiently removed by an endogenous HeLa excision-ligase activity to yield the spliced tRNA, the free IVS, and the half-tRNA intermediates. The splicing reaction occurs without prior 5' and 3' maturation of the precursor but, with this exception, this pattern of synthesis and subsequent maturation of the tRNA3Leu precursor conforms to the scheme for tRNA biosynthesis deduced for the xenopus system. Indeed, the two systems utilize similar or identical tRNA3Leu precursors. Our results stress the extraordinary conservation of tRNA biosynthesis in eukaryotes and demonstrate that a HeLa extract provides a useful system for investigating this process. Images PMID:6796956

  5. MicroRNA-21 promotes cell proliferation and down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qing; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2009-10-23

    MicroRNAs are involved in cancer-related processes. The microRNA-21(miR-21) has been identified as the only miRNA over-expressed in a wide variety of cancers, including cervical cancer. However, the function of miR-21 is unknown in cervical carcinomas. In this study, we found that the inhibition of miR-21 in HeLa cervical cancer cells caused profound suppression of cell proliferation, and up-regulated the expression of the tumor suppressor gene PDCD4. We also provide direct evidence that PDCD4-3'UTR is a functional target of miR-21 and that the 18 bp putative target site can function as the sole regulatory element in HeLa cells. These results suggest that miR-21 may play an oncogenic role in the cellular processes of cervical cancer and may serve as a target for effective therapies.

  6. Radiosensitization effect of folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles on HeLa cancer cells under orthovoltage superficial radiotherapy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshgard, Karim; Hashemi, Bijan; Arbabi, Azim; Javad Rasaee, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    Due to the high atomic number of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), they are known as new radiosensitizer agents for enhancing the efficiency of superficial radiotherapy techniques by increasing the dose absorbed in tumor cells wherein they can be accumulated selectively. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of various common low energy levels of orthovoltage x-rays and megavoltage γ-rays (Co-60) on enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of HeLa cancer cells in the presence of conjugated folate and non-conjugated (pegylated) GNPs. To achieve this, GNPs with an average diameter of 52 nm were synthesized and conjugated to folic acid molecules. Pegylated GNPs with an average diameter of 47 nm were also synthesized and used as non-conjugated folate GNPs. Cytotoxicity assay of the synthesized folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs was performed using different levels of nanoparticle concentration incubated with HeLa cells for 24 h. The radiosensitizing effect of both the conjugated and pegylated GNPs on the cells at a concentration of 50 µM was compared using MTT as well as clonogenic assays after exposing them to 2 Gy ionizing radiation produced by an orthovoltage x-ray machine at four different kVps and γ-rays of a Co-60 unit. Significant differences were noted among various irradiated groups with and without the folate conjugation, with an average dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.64 ± 0.05 and 1.35 ± 0.05 for the folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs, respectively. The maximum DEF was obtained with the 180 kVp x-ray beam for both of the GNPs. Folate-conjugated GNPs can significantly enhance the cell killing potential of orthovoltage x-ray energies (especially at 180 kVp) in folate receptor-expressing cancer cells, such as HeLa, in superficial radiotherapy techniques.

  7. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy.

  8. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  9. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  10. Celecoxib, a COX-2 Selective Inhibitor, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest at the G2/M Phase in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Setiawati, Agustina; Setiawati, Agustina

    2016-01-01

    Celecoxib, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, showed cytotoxic effects in many cancer cell lines including cervical cancer cells. This study investigated the effect of celecoxib on cell cycle arrest in HeLa cervical cancer cells through p53 expression. In vitro anticancer activity was determined with the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. A double staining method was applied to investigate the mechanism of cell death, cell cycling was analyzed by flow cytometryand immunocytochemistry was employed to stain p53 expression in cells. Celecoxib showed strong cytotoxic effects and induced apoptosis with an IC50 value of 40 μM. It induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase by increasing level of p53 expression on HeLa cells. PMID:27221835

  11. Co-encapsulation of chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in PEGylated liposomes circumvents multidrug resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Li; Tu, Wei-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Chrysophsin-1, an amphipathic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide, is isolated from the gills of the red sea bream and possesses different structure and mechanism(s) in comparison with traditional multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators. For the purpose of reducing off-target normal cell toxicity, it is rational to incorporate chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in a PEGylated liposomal formulation. In the present study, we report a multifunctional liposomes with epirubicin as an antineoplastic agent and an apoptosis inducer, as well as chrysophsin-1 as a MDR transporter inhibitor and an apoptosis modulator in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Co-incubation of HeLa cells with PEGylated liposomal formulation of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 resulted in a significant increase in the cytotoxicity of epirubicin. The liposomal formulations of epirubicin and/or chrysophsin-1 were shown to considerably improve the intracellular H2O2 and O2(-) levels of HeLa cells. Furthermore, these treatments were found to extensively reduce mRNA expression levels of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2. The addition of chrysophsin-1 in liposomes was demonstrated to substantially enhance the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in HeLa cells. Moreover, the PEGylated liposomes of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 were also found to significantly increase the mRNA expressions of p53, Bax, and Bcl-2. The ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 was noticeably amplified in the presence of these formulations. Apoptosis induction was also validated by chromatin condensation, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, the increased sub-G1 phase of cell cycle, and more populations of apoptosis using annexin V/PI assay. These formulations were verified to increase the activity and mRNA expression levels of caspase-9 and caspases-3. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that cotreatment with free or liposomal chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin leads to cell death in human cervical cancer cells through the ROS

  12. Antiproliferative and Apoptosis Inducing Effects of Non-Polar Fractions from Lawsonia inermis L. in Cervical (HeLa) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Paramjeet; Kumar, Subodh; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2015-04-01

    Two non-polar fractions viz. hexane (Hex-LI) and chloroform fraction (CHCl3-LI) of Lawsonia inermis were studied for their antiproliferative potential in various cancer cell lines viz. HeLa, MCF-7, A549 and C6 glioma cells. Both the fractions showed more than 60 % of growth inhibition in all the tested cell lines at highest tested concentration. In clonogenic assay, different concentrations of Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI decreased the number and size of colonies as compared to control in HeLa cells. The apoptotic effects as nuclear condensation, fragmentation were visualized with Hoechst-33342 staining of HeLa cells using confocal microscope. Both fractions induced apoptotic cell death in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells as evident from flow cytometric analysis carried out using Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dyes. CHCl3-LI treated cells significantly induced apoptosis (25.43 %) in comparison to control. Results from Neutral Comet assay demonstrated that both fractions induced double stranded breaks (DSB's) in HeLa cells. Our data indicated that Hex-LI and CHCl3-LI treated cells showed significant increase of 32.2 and 18.56 % reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in DCFH-DA assay respectively. Further, experimental studies to decipher exact pathway via which these fractions induce cell death are in progress.

  13. Comprehensive High-Throughput RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Contamination of Multiple Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Lines with HeLa Cell Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Michael J.; Baddoo, Melody; Nanbo, Asuka; Xu, Miao; Puetter, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to explore infectious agents associated with nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs), we employed our high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis pipeline, RNA CoMPASS, to investigate the presence of ectopic organisms within a number of NPC cell lines commonly used by NPC and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) researchers. Sequencing data sets from both CNE1 and HONE1 were found to contain reads for human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18). Subsequent real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis on a panel of NPC cell lines identified HPV-18 in CNE1 and HONE1 as well as three additional NPC cell lines (CNE2, AdAH, and NPC-KT). Further analysis of the chromosomal integration arrangement of HPV-18 in NPCs revealed patterns identical to those observed in HeLa cells. Clustering based on human single nucleotide variation (SNV) analysis of two separate HeLa cell lines and several NPC cell lines demonstrated two distinct clusters with CNE1, as well as HONE1 clustering with the two HeLa cell lines. In addition, duplex-PCR-based genotyping showed that CNE1, CNE2, and HONE1 do not have a HeLa cell-specific L1 retrotransposon insertion, suggesting that these three HPV-18+ NPC lines are likely products of a somatic hybridization with HeLa cells, which is also consistent with our RNA-seq-based gene level SNV analysis. Taking all of these findings together, we conclude that a widespread HeLa contamination may exist in many NPC cell lines, and authentication of these cell lines is recommended. Finally, we provide a proof of concept for the utility of an RNA-seq-based approach for cell authentication. IMPORTANCE Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines are important model systems for analyzing the complex life cycle and pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Using an RNA-seq-based approach, we found HeLa cell contamination in several NPC cell lines that are commonly used in the EBV and related fields. Our data support the notion that contamination resulted from

  14. Visualisation of cell cycle modifications by X-ray irradiation of single HeLa cells using fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators.

    PubMed

    Kaminaga, K; Noguchi, M; Narita, A; Sakamoto, Y; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of X-ray irradiation on mammalian cell cycle dynamics, single cells using the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) technique were tracked. HeLa cells expressing Fucci were used to visualise cell cycle modifications induced by irradiation. After cultured HeLa-Fucci cells were exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, fluorescent cell images were captured every 20 min for 48 h using a fluorescent microscope. Time dependence of the fluorescence intensity of S/G2 cells was analysed to examine the cell cycle dynamics of irradiated and non-irradiated control cells. The results showed that irradiated cells could be divided into two populations: one with similar cell cycle dynamics to that of non-irradiated cells, and another displaying a prolonged G2 phase. Based on these findings, it is proposed in this article that an underlying switch mechanism is involved in cell cycle regulation and the G2/M checkpoint of HeLa cells.

  15. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Hong; Huang, Ming; Zheng, Xi; Feng, Lixing; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the expression of Na, K

  16. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qingxi; Zhen, Hong; Huang, Ming; Zheng, Xi; Feng, Lixing; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the expression of Na, K

  17. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qingxi; Zhen, Hong; Huang, Ming; Zheng, Xi; Feng, Lixing; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the expression of Na, K

  18. Suppressive Effect of Constructed shRNAs against Apollon Induces Apoptosis and Growth Inhibition in the HeLa Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Saeideh; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Sharifi, Zohreh; Kazemi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer worldwide. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) block apoptosis; therefore, therapeutic strategies targeting IAPs have attracted the interest of researchers in recent years. Apollon, a member of IAPs, inhibits apoptosis and cell death. RNA interference is a pathway in which small interfering RNA (siRNA) or shRNA (short hairpin RNA) inactivates the expression of target genes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of constructed shRNAs on apoptosis and growth inhibition through the suppression of apollon mRNA in HeLa cell line. Methods: Three shRNAs with binding ability to three different target sites of the first region of apollon gene were designed and cloned in pRNAin-H1.2/Neo vector. shRNA plasmids were then transfected in HeLa cells using electroporation. Down-regulation effects of apollon and the viability of HeLa cells were analyzed by RT-PCR, lactate dehydrogenase assay, and MTT assay, respectively. Also, the induction and morphological markers of apoptosis were evaluated by caspase assay and immunocytochemistry method. Results: The expression of shRNA in HeLa cells caused a significant decrease in the level of apollon mRNA1. In addition, shRNA1 effectively increased the mRNA level of Smac (as the antagonist of apollon), reduced the viability of HeLa cells and exhibited immunocytochemical apoptotic markers in this cell line. Conclusion: Apollon gene silencing can induce apoptosis and growth impairment in HeLa cells. In this regard, apollon can be considered a candidate therapeutic target in HeLa cells as a positive human papillomavirus cancer cell line. PMID:26748613

  19. miR-143 is associated with proliferation and apoptosis involving ERK5 in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Jiahe; Luo, Siyu; Yi, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Quanqing; Wen, Yurong

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate expression of microRNA (miR) is strongly associated with carcinogenesis. miR-143 was reported to be one of the most prominent miRs implicated in the genesis and progression of human cancer. However, its correlation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that miR-143 is able to suppress the proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells and induce cell apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The present study also investigated the potential targets of miR-143, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) and its downstream substrate oncoprotein c-Fos, both of which are involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Upon increasing the miR-143 level, the ERK5 and c-Fos protein expression was significantly decreased without the effect of ERK5 transcription. Therefore, miR-143 is able to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells, potentially through negative regulation of ERK5 at its post-transcriptional stage. PMID:27698893

  20. miR-143 is associated with proliferation and apoptosis involving ERK5 in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Jiahe; Luo, Siyu; Yi, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Quanqing; Wen, Yurong

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate expression of microRNA (miR) is strongly associated with carcinogenesis. miR-143 was reported to be one of the most prominent miRs implicated in the genesis and progression of human cancer. However, its correlation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that miR-143 is able to suppress the proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells and induce cell apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The present study also investigated the potential targets of miR-143, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) and its downstream substrate oncoprotein c-Fos, both of which are involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Upon increasing the miR-143 level, the ERK5 and c-Fos protein expression was significantly decreased without the effect of ERK5 transcription. Therefore, miR-143 is able to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells, potentially through negative regulation of ERK5 at its post-transcriptional stage.

  1. Circulating Tumor Cells in the Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are elements of indisputable significance as they seem to be responsible for the onset of metastasis. Despite this, research into CTCs and their clinical application have been hindered by their rarity and heterogeneity at the molecular and cellular level, and also by a lack of technical standardization. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Its incidence has increased so much in recent years that new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed. Preliminary findings suggest that CTCs could represent an effective, non-invasive, real-time assessable biomarker in all stages of EAC. This review provides an overview of EAC and CTC characteristics and reports the main research results obtained on CTCs in this setting. The need to carry out further basic and translational research in this area to confirm the clinical usefulness of CTCs and to provide oncologists with a tool to improve therapeutic strategies for EAC patients was herein highlighted. PMID:27527155

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nishant; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Hutfless, Susan M; Wang, Yuxuan; David, Stefan; Cheng, Yulan; Twaddell, William S; Latt, Nyan L; Shin, Eun J; Wang, Li-Dong; Wang, Liang; Yang, Wancai; Velculescu, Victor E; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2012-10-01

    Esophageal cancer ranks sixth in cancer death. To explore its genetic origins, we conducted exomic sequencing on 11 esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) and 12 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) from the United States. Interestingly, inactivating mutations of NOTCH1 were identified in 21% of ESCCs but not in EACs. There was a substantial disparity in the spectrum of mutations, with more indels in ESCCs, A:T>C:G transversions in EACs, and C:G>G:C transversions in ESCCs (P < 0.0001). Notably, NOTCH1 mutations were more frequent in North American ESCCs (11 of 53 cases) than in ESCCs from China (1 of 48 cases). A parallel analysis found that most mutations in EACs were already present in matched Barrett esophagus. These discoveries highlight key genetic differences between EACs and ESCCs and between American and Chinese ESCCs, and suggest that NOTCH1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the esophagus. Finally, we provide a genetic basis for the evolution of EACs from Barrett esophagus.

  3. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of HeLa cells following stimulation with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Lingjiao; Liu, Zhuo; Xie, Liping; Wang, Shuo

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is established as an effective adjuvant intravesical treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. BCG is also effective in the treatment of Condylomata acuminata caused by low-risk human papilloma virus (HPV). The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of BCG for the treatment of cervical cancer or HPV high-risk infections. BCG-activated killer (BAK) cells were incubated with a high-risk HPV18-infected cervical cancer cell line, HeLa. The cell cycle distribution and apoptotic index of the HeLa cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. The alterations of HPV-E7, retinoblastoma (RB) and E2F1 levels were detected at the transcriptional and translational levels. The BAK cell cytotoxicity to HeLa cells was 24.08, 14.74 and 6.8% and the natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity was 17.62, 10.78 and 5.8% at the E/T ratios of 40:1, 20:1 and 10:1, respectively. The BAK cells significantly induced the apoptosis of HeLa cells to result in an apoptosis level of 24.2% compared with 13.45% by the NK cell treatment at the ratio of 20:1. BAK cells inhibit the proliferation of HeLa cells by G(1)/S cell cycle arrest and this may be associated with the RB/E2F1 pathway. However, G(1)/S arrest and the alteration of RB protein (pRB) and E2F1 levels in the HeLa cells did not show significant differences between the BAK cell- and NK cell-treated groups. HPV-E7 appeared not to be associated with the alteration in cell cycle progression. This study showed that immunotherapy may be a potential treatment for cervical cancer and that BCG immunotherapy may be an alternative and effective method, but further experiments and clinical trials are required to verify this effect.

  4. Characterization of adenovirus type 2 transcriptional complexes isolated from infected HeLa cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, J; Brison, O; Kedinger, C; Chambon, P

    1976-01-01

    HeLa cell nuclei, isolated 17 h after infection with human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2), were treated with 200 mM ammonium sulfate. The extract (S200 fraction) contained 50 to 70% of the nonintegrated Ad2 DNA, which was in the form of nucleoprotein complexes. These complexes contained native, intact Ad2 DNA (with the exception of replicative intermediates) and could be partially purified and resolved by velocity gradient centrifugation. Using high-salt (200 mM ammonium sulfate) incubation conditions, more than 95% of the nuclear RNA polymerase activity belonged to class B. About 45% of the class B enzyme molecules bound to DNA in the nuclei (those "engaged" in RNA synthesis) were released from the nuclei in the form of Ad2 transcriptional complexes by treatment with 200 mM ammonium sulfate. At least 90% of the RNA synthesized in high salt in the nuclei or in the S200 fraction was Ad2 specific, and essentially all of this RNA was complementary to the l strand of Ad2 DNA. These findings are compatible with what is known about Ad2-specific RNA synthesis in vivo. The analysis of the RNA synthesized from partially purified transcriptional complexes supports the contention that its transcription is almost entirely asymmetric, and that the asymmetry observed in vivo is not a consequence of the rapid degradation of h-strand transcripts. The RNA synthesized in vitro in the absence of detectable RNase activity sedimented with a maximum size of 35 to 40S. Less than 5% of the nuclear or the S200 fraction RNA polymerase activity was class C when assayed under non-reinitiating conditions. Although much of the RNA synthesized by the class C enzyme was Ad2 specific, 5.5S virus-associated RNA was not the predominant product. The isolation of Ad2 DNA transcriptional complexes provides an attractive system for further characterizing the Ad2 DNA template used for transcription and for studying the regulation of the expression of the Ad2 genome during the productive infection cycle. PMID

  5. Synchronous Primary Lung Cancer Presenting with Small Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Ken; Yamato, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masashi; Takamori, Hiroyuki; Karasuno, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple synchronous primary lung cancers presenting with different histologic types are uncommon. Among reported cases with different histologic findings, only a few had small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and adenocarcinoma. This unusual combination of lung cancers has not been well reported. In this report, we describe two cases of synchronous primary lung cancer presenting with lymph node metastasis of SCLC and early-stage adenocarcinoma. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation was not detected in either SCLC or adenocarcinoma in the two cases. PMID:25832826

  6. Photodynamic effects induced by meso-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole and its cyclodextrin conjugates on cytoskeletal components of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Barata, Joana F B; Zamarrón, Alicia; Neves, M Graça P M S; Faustino, M Amparo F; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Röder, Beate; Juarranz, Ángeles; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize new corrole β-cyclodextrin conjugates βCD1 (with one β-cyclodextrin moiety) and βCD2 (with two β-cyclodextrin moieties) from 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFC) and to test in vitro the efficacy of these compounds towards tumoral HeLa cells. No dark cytotoxicity was observed for TPFC and βCD1 at the concentration used for PDT cell treatment, even during long incubation periods (24 h). Fluorescence microscopy showed that TPFC and βCD1 accumulate in HeLa cells at lysosomes and in the Golgi apparatus, respectively. The cell survival after the PDT treatment with visible light was dependent on light exposure level and compound concentration. βCD1 was able to penetrate efficiently in the cytoplasm of the HeLa cells. In particular, we have analyzed the photodynamic effect of the corrole derivatives on the microtubules of HeLa cells and the morphological alterations on the mitotic spindle. TPFC and βCD1 caused photocytotoxicity in tumoral HeLa cells and induced a rapid metaphase blockage of cells that also showed clearly altered configurations of the mitotic spindle. The results showed that TPFC has the highest photosensitizing efficiency on tumoral cells.

  7. Nature of Transient Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in HeLa Cells by Parainfluenza Virus 1 (Sendai)

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Pinhas; Kohn, Alexander

    1971-01-01

    Adsorption of ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus, at high or low multiplicity, to HeLa cells caused a transient increased incorporation of 3H-thymidine into the cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In HeLa cells synchronized by a double-thymidine block, this increased incorporation of thymidine during the S phase lasted from about 30 to 90 min after virus adsorption. The observations that the kinetics of accumulation of radioactive thymidine in the nucleotide pool did not differ in control and in the virus-treated cells and that the 32P incorporation into the DNA of the virus-treated cells was inhibited at the same time indicate that the augmented incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA results from a transient block in the endogenous pathway of thymidine synthesis. Chromatographic analysis of the nucleotide pool of the virus-treated cells labeled with 14C-formate indicates that methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate to thymidine monophosphate is inhibited. It is suggested that the inhibition is caused by a block of either the thymidilate synthetase or some step in the tetrahydrofolate cycle. PMID:4332139

  8. Cytoskeletal rearrangements and the functional role of T-plastin during entry of Shigella flexneri into HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an enteroinvasive bacterium which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A major feature of its pathogenic potential is the capacity to invade epithelial cells. Shigella entry into epithelial cells is considered a parasite-induced internalization process requiring polymerization of actin. Here we describe the cytoskeletal rearrangements during S. flexneri invasion of HeLa cells. After an initial contact of the bacterium with the cell surface, distinct nucleation zones of heavy chain actin polymerization appear in close proximity to the contact site underneath the parasite with long filaments being polymerized. These structures then push cellular protrusions that rise beside the entering bacterium, being sustained by tightly bundled long actin filaments organized in parallel orientation with their positive ends pointing to the cytoplasmic membrane. Finally, the cellular projections coalesce above the bacterial body, leading to its internalization. In addition, we found the actin-bundling protein plastin to be concentrated in these protrusions. Since plastin is known to bundle actin filaments in parallel orientation, colocalization of parallel actin filaments and plastin in the cellular protrusions strongly suggested a functional role of this protein in the architecture of parasite-induced cellular projections. Using transfection experiments, we show the differential recruitment of the two plastin isoforms (T- and L-) into Shigella entry zones. By transient expression of a truncated T-plastin which is deprived of one of its actin-binding sites, we also demonstrate the functional role of T-plastin in Shigella entry into HeLa cells. PMID:7721941

  9. Erythropoietin Receptor Antagonist Suppressed Ectopic Hemoglobin Synthesis in Xenografts of HeLa Cells to Promote Their Destruction.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Koike, Eiji; Obata, Koshiro; Shiota, Mitsuru; Kotani, Yasushi; Musha, Terunaga; Tsuji-Kawahara, Sachiyo; Satou, Takao; Masuda, Seiji; Okano, Junko; Yamasaki, Harufumi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Uesugi, Tadao; Nakao, Shinichi; Hoshiai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore a cause-oriented therapy for patients with uterine cervical cancer that expresses erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR). Epo, by binding to EpoR, stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells into hemoglobin-containing red blood cells. In this study, we report that the HeLa cells in the xenografts expressed ε, γ, and α globins as well as myoglobin (Mb) to produce tetrameric α2ε2 and α2γ2 and monomeric Mb, most of which were significantly suppressed with an EpoR antagonist EMP9. Western blotting revealed that the EMP9 treatment inhibited the AKT-pAKT, MAPKs-pMAPKs, and STAT5-pSTAT5 signaling pathways. Moreover, the treatment induced apoptosis and suppression of the growth and inhibited the survival through disruption of the harmonized hemoprotein syntheses in the tumor cells concomitant with destruction of vascular nets in the xenografts. Furthermore, macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells with intense HIF-1α expression recruited significantly more in the degenerating foci of the xenografts. These findings were associated with the enhanced expressions of nNOS in the tumor cells and iNOS in macrophages and NK cells in the tumor sites. The treated tumor cells exhibited a substantial number of perforations on the cell surface, which indicates that the tumors were damaged by both the nNOS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in the tumor cells as well as the iNOS-induced NO production in the innate immune cells. Taken together, these data suggest that HeLa cells constitutively acquire ε, γ and Mb synthetic capacity for their survival. Therefore, EMP9 treatment might be a cause-oriented and effective therapy for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. PMID:25874769

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment to HeLa CD4 Cells Is CD4 Independent and gp120 Dependent and Requires Cell Surface Heparans

    PubMed Central

    Mondor, Isabelle; Ugolini, Sophie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Hx10) virions to two different cell lines was analyzed by using a novel assay based on the detection, by anti-HLA-DR-specific antibodies, of HLA-DR+ virus binding to HLA-DR− cells. Virion attachment to the CD4+-T-cell line A3.01 was highly CD4 dependent in that it was potently inhibited by CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), and little virus binding to the CD4− sister A2.01 line was observed. By contrast, virion binding to HeLa cells expressing moderate or high levels of CD4 was equivalent to, or lower than, binding to wild-type CD4− HeLa cells. Moreover, several CD4 MAbs did not reduce, but enhanced, HIV-1 attachment to HeLa-CD4 cells. CD4 was required for infection of HeLa cells, however, demonstrating a postattachment role for this receptor. MAbs specific for the V2 and V3 loops and the CD4i epitope of gp120 strongly inhibited virion binding to HeLa-CD4 cells, whereas MAbs specific for the CD4bs and the 2G12 epitopes enhanced attachment. Despite this, all gp120- and gp41-specific MAbs tested neutralized infectivity on HeLa-CD4 cells. HIV-1 attachment to HeLa cells was only partially inhibited by MAbs specific for adhesion molecules present on the virus or target cells but was completely blocked by polyanions such as heparin, dextran sulfate, and pentosan sulfate. Treatment of HeLa-CD4 cells with heparinases completely eliminated HIV attachment and infection, strongly implicating cell surface heparans in the attachment process. CD4 dependence for HIV-1 attachment to target cells is thus highly cell line specific and may be replaced by other ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:9557643

  11. SPONTANEOUS AND MNNG-INDUCED REVERSION OF AN EGFP CONSTRUCT IN HELA CELLS: AN ASSAY FOR OBSERVING MUTATIONS IN LIVING CELLS BY FLUORESCENT MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A HeLa cell line stably expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein (EGFP) gene, interrupted by the IVS2-654 intron, was studied without treatment and after treatment with a single standard dose of 15 ?M of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). This assay was done ...

  12. Global gene expression profiling of HeLa and HepG2 cells in response to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J.; Lacy, S.; Wilson, B.

    Microgravity is considered a major environmental factor that affects cells and tissues causing adverse effects to human health during space flight Ground-based gravity simulation experiments at the cellular and molecular levels have given much insight into the underlying molecular and cellular alterations induced by microgravity stress In the present study we investigated microgravity effects on human cell lines such as HeLa cells and HepG2 cells under simulated microgravity conditions using the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor Gene expression profiles of time course microgravity treated cells were displayed through DNA microarray analysis Some of the microgravity-responsive genes were further validated using Northern and RT-PCR techniques The identified set of genes that are preferentially altered in microgravity conditions may constitute part of the major space genes that together play a major check-and-balance role ultimately determining the outcome of a cell or an organism in response to microgravity conditions

  13. Lactoferrin and free secretory component of human milk inhibit the adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Andréa Nascimento; Giugliano, Loreny Gimenes

    2001-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea caused by Escherichia coli is an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is considered one of the major causes of diarrhoea in children living in developing countries. The ability of diarrhoeagenic strains of E. coli to adhere to and colonize the intestine is the first step towards developing the disease. EPEC strains adhere to enterocytes and HeLa cells in a characteristic pattern known as localized adherence. Many epidemiological studies of diarrhoea have shown that breast-feeding protects infants from intestinal infections. Both immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin elements of human milk are thought to contribute to the protection from diarrhoeal agents. Results The effects of human milk and its protein components on the localized adherence of EPEC were investigated. Non-immunoglobulin components of human milk responsible for the inhibition of EPEC adhesion to HeLa cells were isolated by chromatographic fractionation of human whey proteins. Besides secretory immunoglobulin A, which has been previously reported to affect the adhesion of EPEC, free secretory component (fSC) and lactoferrin (Lf) were isolated. Even in concentrations lower than those usually found in whole milk, fSC and Lf were able to inhibit the adhesion of EPEC. α-lactalbumin was also isolated, but showed no activity on EPEC adhesion. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the immunoglobulin fraction, the free secretory component and lactoferrin of human milk inhibit EPEC adhesion to HeLa cells. These results indicate that fSC and Lf may be important non-specific defence factors against EPEC infections. PMID:11690544

  14. Mechanical trapping of the nucleus on micropillared surfaces inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells but not cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Hamaji, Yumi; Sato, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2015-07-16

    The interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix on a topographically patterned surface can result in changes in cell shape and many cellular functions. In the present study, we demonstrated the mechanical deformation and trapping of the intracellular nucleus using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfabricated substrates with an array of micropillars. We investigated the differential effects of nuclear deformation on the proliferation of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and cervical cancer HeLa cells. Both types of cell spread normally in the space between micropillars and completely invaded the extracellular microstructures, including parts of their cytoplasm and their nuclei. We found that the proliferation of SMCs but not HeLa cells was dramatically inhibited by cultivation on the micropillar substrates, even though remarkable deformation of nuclei was observed in both types of cells. Mechanical testing with an atomic force microscope and a detailed image analysis with confocal microscopy revealed that SMC nuclei had a thicker nuclear lamina and greater expression of lamin A/C than those of HeLa cells, which consequently increased the elastic modulus of the SMC nuclei and their nuclear mechanical resistance against extracellular microstructures. These results indicate that the inhibition of cell proliferation resulted from deformation of the mature lamin structures, which might be exposed to higher internal stress during nuclear deformation. This nuclear stress-induced inhibition of cell proliferation occurred rarely in cancer cells with deformable nuclei.

  15. Mechanical trapping of the nucleus on micropillared surfaces inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells but not cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Hamaji, Yumi; Sato, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2015-07-16

    The interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix on a topographically patterned surface can result in changes in cell shape and many cellular functions. In the present study, we demonstrated the mechanical deformation and trapping of the intracellular nucleus using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfabricated substrates with an array of micropillars. We investigated the differential effects of nuclear deformation on the proliferation of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and cervical cancer HeLa cells. Both types of cell spread normally in the space between micropillars and completely invaded the extracellular microstructures, including parts of their cytoplasm and their nuclei. We found that the proliferation of SMCs but not HeLa cells was dramatically inhibited by cultivation on the micropillar substrates, even though remarkable deformation of nuclei was observed in both types of cells. Mechanical testing with an atomic force microscope and a detailed image analysis with confocal microscopy revealed that SMC nuclei had a thicker nuclear lamina and greater expression of lamin A/C than those of HeLa cells, which consequently increased the elastic modulus of the SMC nuclei and their nuclear mechanical resistance against extracellular microstructures. These results indicate that the inhibition of cell proliferation resulted from deformation of the mature lamin structures, which might be exposed to higher internal stress during nuclear deformation. This nuclear stress-induced inhibition of cell proliferation occurred rarely in cancer cells with deformable nuclei. PMID:26054426

  16. The space of enzyme regulation in HeLa cells can be inferred from its intracellular metabolome.

    PubMed

    Diener, Christian; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Felipe; Encarnación, Sergio; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo

    2016-06-23

    During the transition from a healthy state to a cancerous one, cells alter their metabolism to increase proliferation. The underlying metabolic alterations may be caused by a variety of different regulatory events on the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level whose identification contributes to the rational design of therapeutic targets. We present a mechanistic strategy capable of inferring enzymatic regulation from intracellular metabolome measurements that is independent of the actual mechanism of regulation. Here, enzyme activities are expressed by the space of all feasible kinetic constants (k-cone) such that the alteration between two phenotypes is given by their corresponding kinetic spaces. Deriving an expression for the transformation of the healthy to the cancer k-cone we identified putative regulated enzymes between the HeLa and HaCaT cell lines. We show that only a few enzymatic activities change between those two cell lines and that this regulation does not depend on gene transcription but is instead post-transcriptional. Here, we identify phosphofructokinase as the major driver of proliferation in HeLa cells and suggest an optional regulatory program, associated with oxidative stress, that affects the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  17. The space of enzyme regulation in HeLa cells can be inferred from its intracellular metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Felipe; Encarnación, Sergio; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo

    2016-01-01

    During the transition from a healthy state to a cancerous one, cells alter their metabolism to increase proliferation. The underlying metabolic alterations may be caused by a variety of different regulatory events on the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level whose identification contributes to the rational design of therapeutic targets. We present a mechanistic strategy capable of inferring enzymatic regulation from intracellular metabolome measurements that is independent of the actual mechanism of regulation. Here, enzyme activities are expressed by the space of all feasible kinetic constants (k-cone) such that the alteration between two phenotypes is given by their corresponding kinetic spaces. Deriving an expression for the transformation of the healthy to the cancer k-cone we identified putative regulated enzymes between the HeLa and HaCaT cell lines. We show that only a few enzymatic activities change between those two cell lines and that this regulation does not depend on gene transcription but is instead post-transcriptional. Here, we identify phosphofructokinase as the major driver of proliferation in HeLa cells and suggest an optional regulatory program, associated with oxidative stress, that affects the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:27335086

  18. tRNA Modifying Enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, Determine Sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Masato; Okada, Kaoru; Yazama, Futoshi; Konishi, Hiroaki; Xiao, Yegui; Qi, Guangying; Shimamoto, Fumio; Ota, Takahide; Temme, Achim; Tatsuka, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Nonessential tRNA modifications by methyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved and have been reported to stabilize mature tRNA molecules and prevent rapid tRNA decay (RTD). The tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, are mammalian orthologs of yeast Trm4 and Trm8, which are required for protecting tRNA against RTD. A simultaneous overexpression of NSUN2 and METTL1 is widely observed among human cancers suggesting that targeting of both proteins provides a novel powerful strategy for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that combined knockdown of NSUN2 and METTL1 in HeLa cells drastically potentiate sensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) whereas heat stress of cells revealed no effects. Since NSUN2 and METTL1 are phosphorylated by Aurora-B and Akt, respectively, and their tRNA modifying activities are suppressed by phosphorylation, overexpression of constitutively dephosphorylated forms of both methyltransferases is able to suppress 5-FU sensitivity. Thus, NSUN2 and METTL1 are implicated in 5-FU sensitivity in HeLa cells. Interfering with methylation of tRNAs might provide a promising rationale to improve 5-FU chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:25233213

  19. Specific proteins synthesized during the viral lytic cycle in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells: analysis by high-resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, L.; Bravo, R.

    1986-05-01

    The proteins synthesized in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells have been analyzed at different times after infection by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Vaccinia-infected cells present up to 198 polypeptides (138 acidic, isoelectric focusing; 60 basic, nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) not detected in control cells. Cells infected in the presence of cycloheximide show 81 additional polypeptides after cycloheximide removal, resulting in a total estimate of 279 proteins induced after vaccinia infection. The glycoproteins made at various time postinfection were also analyzed. At least 13 proteins labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine were detected in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells.

  20. Fisetin induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells through ERK1/2-mediated activation of caspase-8-/caspase-3-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tsai, Su-Ju; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Huang, Yi-Chang; Bau, Da-Tian; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid that has been reported to inhibit the proliferation and to induce apoptotic cell death in several tumor cells. However, the apoptosis-inducing effect of fisetin on tumor cell lines was investigated besides HeLa cells. In this study, we found that fisetin induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by nuclear staining of 4'-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), flow cytometry assay, and Annexin-V/PI double-labeling. In addition, fisetin triggered the activations of caspases-3 and -8 and the cleavages of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, resulting in apoptosis induction. Moreover, treatment of HeLa cells with fisetin induced a sustained activation of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) or transfection with the mutant ERK1/2 expression vector significantly abolished the fisetin-induced apoptosis through the activation of caspase-8/-3 pathway. The in vivo xenograft mice experiments revealed that fisetin significantly reduced tumor growth in mice with HeLa tumor xenografts. In conclusion, our results indicated that fisetin exhibited anti-cancer effect and induced apoptosis in HeLa cell lines both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Fibrillarin, a nucleolar protein, is required for normal nuclear morphology and cellular growth in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mohammed Abdullahel; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Ma, Nan; Takata, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Masami; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi . E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Fibrillarin is a key small nucleolar protein in eukaryotes, which has an important role in pre-rRNA processing during ribosomal biogenesis. Though several functions of fibrillarin are known, its function during the cell cycle is still unknown. In this study, we confirmed the dynamic localization of fibrillarin during the cell cycle of HeLa cells and also performed functional studies by using a combination of immunofluorescence microscopy and RNAi technique. We observed that depletion of fibrillarin has almost no effect on the nucleolar structure. However, fibrillarin-depleted cells showed abnormal nuclear morphology. Moreover, fibrillarin depletion resulted in the reduction of the cellular growth and modest accumulation of cells with 4n DNA content. Our data suggest that fibrillarin would play a critical role in the maintenance of nuclear shape and cellular growth.

  2. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  3. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate shows anti-proliferative activity in HeLa cells targeting tubulin-microtubule equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Subhendu; Ganguli, Arnab; Das, Amlan; Nag, Debasish; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2015-12-01

    In this study our main objective was to find out a novel target of the major bioactive green tea polyphenol, Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), in cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. We found that EGCG showed antiproliferative activity against HeLa cells through depolymerization of cellular microtubule. EGCG also prevented the reformation of the cellular microtubule network distorted by cold treatment and inhibited polymerization of tubulin in cell-free system with IC50 of 39.6 ± 0.63 μM. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis showed that EGCG prevented colchicine binding to tubulin and in silico study revealed that EGCG bound to the α-subunit of tubulin at the interphase of the α-and β-heterodimers and very close to colchicine binding site. The binding is entropy driven (ΔS(0) was 18.75 ± 1.48 cal K(-1) mol(-1)) with Kd value of 3.50 ± 0.40 μM. This is a novel mechanism of antipriliferative activity of EGCG.

  5. Inhibition of thioredoxin reductase by alantolactone prompts oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin; Li, Ya; Duan, Dongzhu; Yao, Juan; Gao, Kun; Fang, Jianguo

    2016-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) isoenzymes, TrxR1 in cytosol or nucleus, TrxR2 in mitochondria, and TrxR3 in testis, are essential seleno-flavoenzymes with a conserved penultimate selenocysteine (Sec) residue at the C-terminus, and have attracted increasing interests as potential targets for development of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The sesquiterpene lactone alantolactone (ATL), an active component from the traditional folk medicine Inula helenium, has been documented possessing multiple pharmacological functions, especially the anticancer activity. However, the underlying mechanism has not been well defined. We reported that ATL inhibits both the recombinant TrxR and the enzyme in the cellular environment. The alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone moiety in ATL and the Sec residue in TrxR are critical for targeting TrxR by ATL. By employing our newly developed pull down assay, we demonstrated the remarkable elevation of the oxidized thioredoxin in HeLa cells after ATL treatment. In addition, ATL elicits accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and eventually induces apoptosis of HeLa cells. Importantly, overexpression of the functional TrxR attenuates the cytotoxicity of ATL, while knockdown of the enzyme sensitizes the cells to ATL treatment. Targeting TrxR thus discloses a novel molecular mechanism underlying the cellular action of ATL, and sheds light in considering the usage of ATL as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26686580

  6. Emodin induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer hela cells via intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emodin is a natural anthraquinone derivative isolated from the Rheum palmatum L. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of emodin on the apoptosis of the human cervical cancer line HeLa and to identify the mechanisms involved. Methods Relative cell viability was assessed by MTT assay after treatment with emodin. Cell apoptosis was detected with TUNEL, Hoechst 33342 staining and quantified with flow cytometry using annexin FITC-PI staining. Results The percentage of apoptotic cells was 0.8, 8.2, 22.1, and 43.7%, respectively. The mRNA levels of Caspase-9, -8 and −3 detected by Real-time PCR after treatment with emodin were significantly increased. Emodin increased the protein levels of Cytochome c, Apaf-1, Fas, FasL, and FADD but decreased the protein levels of Pro-caspase-9, Pro-caspase-8 and Pro-caspase-3. Conclusion We conclude that the emodin inhibited HeLa proliferation by inducing apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. PMID:23866157

  7. Inhibition of thioredoxin reductase by alantolactone prompts oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junmin; Li, Ya; Duan, Dongzhu; Yao, Juan; Gao, Kun; Fang, Jianguo

    2016-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) isoenzymes, TrxR1 in cytosol or nucleus, TrxR2 in mitochondria, and TrxR3 in testis, are essential seleno-flavoenzymes with a conserved penultimate selenocysteine (Sec) residue at the C-terminus, and have attracted increasing interests as potential targets for development of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The sesquiterpene lactone alantolactone (ATL), an active component from the traditional folk medicine Inula helenium, has been documented possessing multiple pharmacological functions, especially the anticancer activity. However, the underlying mechanism has not been well defined. We reported that ATL inhibits both the recombinant TrxR and the enzyme in the cellular environment. The alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone moiety in ATL and the Sec residue in TrxR are critical for targeting TrxR by ATL. By employing our newly developed pull down assay, we demonstrated the remarkable elevation of the oxidized thioredoxin in HeLa cells after ATL treatment. In addition, ATL elicits accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and eventually induces apoptosis of HeLa cells. Importantly, overexpression of the functional TrxR attenuates the cytotoxicity of ATL, while knockdown of the enzyme sensitizes the cells to ATL treatment. Targeting TrxR thus discloses a novel molecular mechanism underlying the cellular action of ATL, and sheds light in considering the usage of ATL as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent.

  8. Physico-chemical characteristics of ZnO nanoparticles-based discs and toxic effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mahmud, Shahrom; Seeni, Azman; Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Sendi, Rabab

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated physico-chemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-based discs and their toxicity on human cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. ZnO NPs (80 nm) were produced by the conventional ceramic processing method. FESEM analysis indicated dominant structure of nanorods with dimensions 100-500 nm in length, and 20-100 nm in diameter. The high content of ZnO nanorods in the discs probably played significant role in toxicity towards HeLa cells. Structural defects (oxygen vacancies and zinc/oxygen interstitials) were revealed by PL spectra peaks at 370-376 nm and 519-533 nm for the ZnO discs. The structural, optical and electrical properties of prepared sample have influenced the toxicological effects of ZnO discs towards HeLa cell lines via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), internalization, membrane damage, and eventually cell death. The larger surface to volume area of the ZnO nanorods, combined with defects, stimulated enhanced toxicity via ROS generation hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and superoxide anion. The preliminary results confirmed the ZnO-disc toxicity on HeLa cells was significantly associated with the unique physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs and to our knowledge, this is the first cellular study for treatment of HeLa cells with ZnO discs made from 80 nm ZnO particles.

  9. Basal cell adenocarcinoma and Basal cell adenoma of the salivary glands: a clinicopathological review of seventy tumors with comparison of morphologic features and growth control indices.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas C; Robinson, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Basal cell adenoma and basal cell adenocarcinoma represent uncommon basaloid salivary gland neoplasms that show marked morphologic similarity. We wished to compare clinical outcome and morphologic features as well as growth and proliferation associated markers for both neoplasms. We reviewed the pathologic features of 70 neoplasms diagnosed as basal cell adenoma or basal cell adenocarcinoma. Observations included maximum mitotic activity and presence or absence of invasion into surrounding normal tissues as well as immunohistochemical studies for Ki-67, caspase 3, p53, and bcl-2. Establishing malignancy on the basis of invasion into surrounding benign tissues, 41 basal cell adenomas and 29 basal cell adenocarcinomas were identified. For tumors with follow-up, recurrence rates were 6.7 % for basal cell adenoma and 16.7 % for basal cell adenocarcinoma. One patient with basal cell adenocarcinoma had distant metastases and died of disease. Overall basal cell adenocarcinomas showed significantly higher values for growth and proliferation markers compared to basal cell adenomas. Salivary gland basal cell adenoma and basal cell adenocarcinoma show morphologic similarity. Basal cell adenocarcinoma can exhibit a locally aggressive behavior and has potential metastatic behavior. The overall mitotic rate and Ki-67 expression were higher in basal cell adenocarcinoma compared to basal cell adenoma, but overlap between the results of these observations in each tumor did not allow for accurate diagnosis or prediction of outcome in individual cases. We conclude that morphologic observation of local tissue invasion is the best marker for separating basal cell adenoma from basal cell adenocarcinoma.

  10. Effects of osmotic manipulation of intracellular hydration of HeLa S-3 cells on their proton NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, D N; Rimmington, J E; Foster, M A

    1990-01-01

    Pellets of HeLa from suspension cultured cells in isotonic medium (300 mosmolar) were introduced into a Bruker CXP100 NMR spectrophotometer at 80 mHz within 5 min of the start of centrifugation. T1 and T2 times were measured within a total elapsed time of 20-25 min at 80 mHz and 37 degrees C, and averaged 1430 msec and 120 msec, respectively. Extrapolation to zero extracellular space gave a corrected T1 of 1370 msec. For cells collected after 10 min in hypotonic medium (down to 30 mosmolar) increased proton density correlated well with increased cell water content, but relaxation times did not rise in proportion to that predicted for the entry of "bulk" water (T1 of 4700 msec), except when swelling approached lysis point. Cells partially dehydrated by 10 min in hypertonic medium of up to 1500 mosmolar have also been analyzed, but once again the shortening of T1 was not proportional to the loss of "free" (bulk phase) water. At the upper limit of hypertonic treatment, lacunae or vacuoles of a watery nature separated within the cytomatrix, preventing maximum dehydration. The relationship of cell water to T1 is complex over the whole range of tonicity that HeLa S-3 cells tolerate. The data indicate, however, that hypotonically induced water probably has an average T1 time considerably lower than bulk phase water. In contrast, raising the total extracellular volume with medium had precisely the predicted effect on T1 time, further strengthening the case that water taken up by cell acquires a shorter T1 time. Cells adapting to hypotonic conditions oscillated in size and water content over 2-3 hr before returning to near their initial volume. Under these circumstances, T1 oscillated in the same way but with a reduced amplitude, consistent with the above findings.

  11. Purification and characterization of the glycoprotein hormone. cap alpha. -subunit-like material secreted by HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.S.; Rimerman, R.A.

    1988-08-23

    The protein secreted by HeLa cells that cross-reacts with antiserum developed against the ..cap alpha..-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been purified approximately 30,000-fold from concentrated culture medium by organic solvent fractionation followed by ion exchange, gel filtration, and lectin affinity chromatography. The final preparation had a specific activity (by RIA) of 6.8 x 10/sup 5/ ng of ..cap alpha../mg of protein and appeared homogeneous by electrophoresis on reducing/denaturing polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). Amino acid analysis indicated that HeLa-..cap alpha.. had a composition very similar to that of the urinary hCG ..cap alpha..-subunit. However, comparison of hCG-..cap alpha.. and HeLa-..cap alpha.. demonstrated that the tumor-associated subunit was not identical with its normal counterpart. The purified tumor protein had an apparent molecular weight greater than that of the urinary ..cap alpha..-subunit when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and this difference was even greater when a partially purified preparation was examined by an immunoblot technique (Western). Isoelectric focusing of the HeLa and hCG subunits demonstrated that the tumor protein had a lower pI. Immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis of ..cap alpha..-subunit from HeLa cultures labeled with (/sup 3/H)fucose indicated that the tumor subunit was fucosylated, whereas analysis of hCG-..cap alpha.. hydrosylates by HPLC confirmed previous reports that the placental subunit does not contain fucose. The results indicate that, regardless of whether or not a single ..cap alpha..-subunit gene is being expressed in both normal and neoplastic tissues, posttranslational modifications lead to a highly altered subunit in the tumor. The differences observed may be useful in diagnosing neoplastic vs hyperplastic conditions and may lend insight into the mechanism of ectopic hormone production by tumors.

  12. Introduction of disease-related mitochondrial DNA deletions into HeLa cells lacking mitochondrial DNA results in mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, J; Ohta, S; Kikuchi, A; Takemitsu, M; Goto, Y; Nonaka, I

    1991-01-01

    Mutant mitochondrial DNA with large-scale deletions (delta-mtDNA) has been frequently observed in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), a subgroup of the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. To exclude involvement of the nuclear genome in expression of the mitochondrial dysfunction characteristic of CPEO, we introduced the mtDNA of a CPEO patient into clonal mtDNA-less HeLa cells and isolated cybrid clones. Quantitation of delta-mtDNA in the cybrids revealed that delta-mtDNA was selectively propagated with higher levels of delta-mtDNA correlating with slower cellular growth rate. In these cybrid clones, translational complementation of the missing tRNAs occurred only when delta-mtDNA was less than 60% of the total mtDNA, whereas accumulation of delta-mtDNA to greater than 60% resulted in progressive inhibition of overall mitochondrial translation as well as reduction of cytochrome c oxidase activity throughout the organelle population. Because these cybrids shared the same nuclear background as HeLa cells, these results suggest that large-scale deletion mutations of mtDNA alone are sufficient for the mitochondrial dysfunction characteristic of CPEO. Images PMID:1720544

  13. Time-course proteomics dataset monitoring HeLa cells subjected to DTT induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhe; Rendleman, Justin; Vogel, Christine

    2016-09-01

    The data described here provide an analysis of the dynamic response of HeLa cell proteome to dithiothreitol (DTT) inducing stress of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During ER stress, accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins in the lumen of the ER initiates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), resulting in a large-scale redistribution of proteins. We used label-free mass spectrometry to monitor the proteomic changes of HeLa cells during a 30-h time course, monitoring eight time points (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 30 h). The data are associated with the research article "Differential dynamics of the mammalian mRNA and protein expression response to misfolding stress" [1], which discusses a core dataset of 1237 proteins. Here, we present the extended dataset of 2131 proteins. The raw mass spectrometry data and the analysis results have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002039. PMID:27547793

  14. Time-course proteomics dataset monitoring HeLa cells subjected to DTT induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhe; Rendleman, Justin; Vogel, Christine

    2016-09-01

    The data described here provide an analysis of the dynamic response of HeLa cell proteome to dithiothreitol (DTT) inducing stress of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During ER stress, accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins in the lumen of the ER initiates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), resulting in a large-scale redistribution of proteins. We used label-free mass spectrometry to monitor the proteomic changes of HeLa cells during a 30-h time course, monitoring eight time points (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 30 h). The data are associated with the research article "Differential dynamics of the mammalian mRNA and protein expression response to misfolding stress" [1], which discusses a core dataset of 1237 proteins. Here, we present the extended dataset of 2131 proteins. The raw mass spectrometry data and the analysis results have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002039.

  15. BAD, a Proapoptotic Protein, Escapes ERK/RSK Phosphorylation in Deguelin and siRNA-Treated HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Samra; Urooj, Mahwish; Saleem, Shamiala; Gillani, Zeeshan; Shaheen, Sumaira; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Iqbal, Zafar; Ansari, Shakeel Ahmed; Haque, Absarul; Asif, Muhammad; Mir, Manzoor Ahmad; Ali, Ashraf; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    This study has been undertaken to explore the therapeutic effects of deguelin and specific siRNAs in HeLa cells. The data provided clearly show the silencing of ERK 1/2 with siRNAs and inhibition of ERK1/2 with deguelin treatment in HeLa cells. Additionally, we are providing information that deguelin binds directly to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 in the hydrophobic grooves, thereby releasing BAD and BAX from dimerization with these proteins. This results in increased apoptotic activity through the intrinsic pathway involved in rupture of mitochondrial membrane and release of cytochrome C. Evidence for inhibition of ERK1/2 by deguelin and escape of BAD phosphorylation at serine 112 through ERK/RSK pathway has been further fortified by obtaining similar results by silencing ERK 1/2 each with specific siRNAs. Increase in BAD after treatment with deguelin or siRNAs has been interpreted to mean that deguelin acts through several alternative pathways and therefore can be used as effective therapeutic agent.

  16. MCPIP1 contributes to the toxicity of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 in HeLa cells by the inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Skalniak, Lukasz; Dziendziel, Monika; Jura, Jolanta

    2014-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that the treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 results in the induction of expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 induced protein 1 (MCPIP1). MCPIP1 is a ribonuclease, responsible for the degradation of transcripts encoding certain pro-inflammatory cytokines. The protein is also known as an inhibitor of NF-κB transcription factor. Thanks to its molecular properties, MCPIP1 is considered as a regulator of inflammation, differentiation, and survival. Using siRNA technology, we show here that MCPIP1 expression contributes to the toxic properties of MG-132 in HeLa cells. The inhibition of proteasome by MG-132 and epoxomicin markedly increased MCPIP1 expression. While MG-132 induces HeLa cell death, down-regulation of MCPIP1 expression by siRNA partially protects HeLa cells from MG-132 toxicity and restores Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, inhibited by MG-132 treatment. Inversely, overexpression of MCPIP1 decreased constitutive activity of NF-κB and limited the survival of HeLa cells, as we have shown in the previous study. Interestingly, although MG-132 decreased the expression of IκBα and increased p65 phosphorylation, the inhibition of constitutive NF-κB activity was observed in MG-132-treated cells. Since the elevated constitutive activity of NF-κB is one of the mechanisms providing increased survival of cancer cells, including HeLa cells, we propose that death-promoting properties of MCPIP1 in MG-132-treated HeLa cells may, at least partially, derive from the negative effect on the constitutive NF-κB activity.

  17. Diffuse and extreme vacuolization of tumour cells in rectal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy: an unusual finding.

    PubMed

    Amico, P; Greco, P

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of diffuse and extreme cytoplasmic vacuolization of tumour cells in a rectal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant treatment. A 64-year-old man with a moderately differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed by endoscopic rectal biopsy, underwent surgical treatment after chemoradiotherapy. Residual tumour mass was represented by foci of neoplastic cells with the morphological features of conventional type adenocarcinoma, and surprisingly, by numerous areas consisting of several giant vacuoles, variable in size, merging to form multilocular spaces separated by a rim of cell membrane with a "plant-like" appearance. Cytoplasmic vacuolization may represent a distinct form of cell death, and pathologists should carefully consider this unusual and potentially alarming morphological change among the chemoradiotherapy-induced effects on tumour mass.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans Initiation of HeLa 299 Cell-Associated Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Balbina J; Sigar, Ira M; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Halkyard, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), and type-2 (HSV-2), Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans co-habit the oral and genital mucosa, their interaction is poorly understood. We determined the effect HSV has on bacterial and/or fungal adherence, the initial step in biofilm formation. HeLa229 cells were infected with HSV-1 (KOS) gL86 or HSV-2 (KOS) 333gJ (-) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 50 and 10. S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and/or C. albicans (yeast forms or germ tube forms) were co-incubated for 30 min (37 °C; 5 % CO2; 5:1 organism: HeLa cell ratio; n = 16) with virus-infected HeLa cells or uninfected HeLa cell controls. Post-incubation, the monolayers were washed (3x; PBS), lysed (RIPA), and the lysate plated onto Fungisel and/or mannitol salts agar for standard colony count. The level of HeLa-associated S. aureus was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) for both HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells, as compared to virus-free HeLa cell controls (38 and 59 % of control, respectively). In contrast, HSV-1 and HSV-2 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced HeLa cell association of C. albicans yeast forms and germ tube approximately two-fold, respectively. The effect of S. aureus on germ tube and yeast form adherence to HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells was specific for the Candida phenotype tested. Our study suggests that HSV, while antagonist towards S. aureus adherence enhances Candida adherence. Furthermore, the combination of the three pathogens results in S. aureus adherence that is either unaffected, or partially restored depending on both the herpes viral species and the fungal phenotype present.

  19. Photodynamic performance of zinc phthalocyanine in HeLa cells: A comparison between DPCC liposomes and BSA as delivery systems.

    PubMed

    M Garcia, Angélica; de Alwis Weerasekera, Hasitha; Pitre, Spencer P; McNeill, Brian; Lissi, Eduardo; Edwards, Ana M; Alarcon, Emilio I

    2016-10-01

    Comparable intracellular concentrations (≈30pmol/10(6) cells) of bovine serum albumin-ZnPc (BSA) adduct outperformed dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) liposomes containing ZnPc at photodynamic-killing of human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) after only 15min of irradiation using red light (λ>620nm, 30W/cm(2)). This result could not be simply explained in terms of dye aggregation within the carrier, since in the liposomes the dye was considerably less aggregated than in bovine serum albumin, formulation that was capable to induce cell apoptosis upon red light exposure. Thus, using specific organelle staining, our cumulative data points towards intrinsic differences in intra-cellular localization depending on the cargo vehicle used, being ZnPc:BSA preferentially located in the near vicinity of the nucleus and in the Golgi structures, while the liposomal formulation ZnPc:DPPC was preferentially located in cellular membrane and cytoplasm. In addition to those differences, using real-time advanced fluorescence lifetime imaging of HeLa cells loaded with the photosensitizer contained in the different vehicles, we have found that only for the ZnPc:BSA formulation, there was no significant changes in the fluorescence lifetime of the photosensitizer inside the cells. This contrasts with the in situ≈two-fold reduction of the fluorescence lifetime measured for the liposomal ZnPc formulation. Those observations point towards the superiority of the protein to preserve dye aggregation, and its photochemical activity, post-cell uptake, demonstrating the pivotal role of the delivery vehicle at determining the ultimate fate of a photosensitizer. PMID:27614847

  20. Photodynamic performance of zinc phthalocyanine in HeLa cells: A comparison between DPCC liposomes and BSA as delivery systems.

    PubMed

    M Garcia, Angélica; de Alwis Weerasekera, Hasitha; Pitre, Spencer P; McNeill, Brian; Lissi, Eduardo; Edwards, Ana M; Alarcon, Emilio I

    2016-10-01

    Comparable intracellular concentrations (≈30pmol/10(6) cells) of bovine serum albumin-ZnPc (BSA) adduct outperformed dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) liposomes containing ZnPc at photodynamic-killing of human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) after only 15min of irradiation using red light (λ>620nm, 30W/cm(2)). This result could not be simply explained in terms of dye aggregation within the carrier, since in the liposomes the dye was considerably less aggregated than in bovine serum albumin, formulation that was capable to induce cell apoptosis upon red light exposure. Thus, using specific organelle staining, our cumulative data points towards intrinsic differences in intra-cellular localization depending on the cargo vehicle used, being ZnPc:BSA preferentially located in the near vicinity of the nucleus and in the Golgi structures, while the liposomal formulation ZnPc:DPPC was preferentially located in cellular membrane and cytoplasm. In addition to those differences, using real-time advanced fluorescence lifetime imaging of HeLa cells loaded with the photosensitizer contained in the different vehicles, we have found that only for the ZnPc:BSA formulation, there was no significant changes in the fluorescence lifetime of the photosensitizer inside the cells. This contrasts with the in situ≈two-fold reduction of the fluorescence lifetime measured for the liposomal ZnPc formulation. Those observations point towards the superiority of the protein to preserve dye aggregation, and its photochemical activity, post-cell uptake, demonstrating the pivotal role of the delivery vehicle at determining the ultimate fate of a photosensitizer.

  1. 8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl Tovarol Induces Paraptosis Like Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Jiang, Yingnan; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl tovarol (TAW) is a germacrane-type sesquiterpenoid that can be isolated from the roots of Ferula dissecta (Ledeb.) Ledeb. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects induced by TAW were screened on some types of tumor cells, and the mechanism was investigated on TAW-induced growth inhibition, including paraptosis and autophagy in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. TAW-induced paraptosis involved extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization in the absence of caspase activation. Additionally, TAW evoked cell paraptotic death mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Autophagy induced by TAW was found to antagonize paraptosis in HeLa cells. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin and suppressed by the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA). Loss of beclin 1 (an autophagic regulator) function led to promote ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that TAW induces paraptosis like cell death and protective autophagy in HeLa cells, which would provide a new clue for exploiting TAW as a promising agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  2. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis: an extremely rare neoplasm of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, K-W; Lin, V C-H; Chang, I-W

    2013-12-01

    Clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCA) in the urinary tract is a rare neoplasm morphologically identical to the Müllerian counterpart. Clear cell adenocarcinoma is extremely rare in the upper urinary tract. We present a case with CCA of the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor exhibited exophytic growth with predominantly tubulocystic structures, as well as solid and papillary patterns. The neoplastic cells were cuboidal with clear to pale eosinophilic cytoplasm and abundant intracellular and extracellular eosinophilic hyaline globules. By immunohistochemically, the tumor was labeled by cytokeratins and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β. The patient was still alive without evidence of recurrence in the follow-up period of nineteen months after diagnosis. PMID:24375047

  3. Enhanced Cellular Uptake of Albumin-Based Lyophilisomes when Functionalized with Cell-Penetrating Peptide TAT in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Bracht, Etienne; Versteegden, Luuk R. M.; Stolle, Sarah; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Woestenenk, Rob; Raavé, René; Hafmans, Theo; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Brock, Roland; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of biodegradable proteinaceous nano/micrometer capsules with potential use as drug delivery carrier. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) including the TAT peptide have been successfully implemented for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargos including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. In the present study, lyophilisomes were modified using CPPs in order to achieve enhanced cellular uptake. Lyophilisomes were prepared by a freezing, annealing, and lyophilization method and a cystein-elongated TAT peptide was conjugated to the lyophilisomes using a heterobifunctional linker. Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) was utilized to acquire a lyophilisome population with a particle diameter smaller than 1000 nm. Cultured HeLa, OVCAR-3, Caco-2 and SKOV-3 cells were exposed to unmodified lyophilisomes and TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes and examined with FACS. HeLa cells were investigated in more detail using a trypan blue quenching assay, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. TAT-conjugation strongly increased binding and cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in a time-dependent manner in vitro, as assessed by FACS. These results were confirmed by confocal microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy indicated rapid cellular uptake of TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes via phagocytosis and/or macropinocytosis. In conclusion, TAT-peptides conjugated to albumin-based lyophilisomes are able to enhance cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in HeLa cells. PMID:25369131

  4. Apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by a new targeting photosensitizer-based PDT via a mitochondrial pathway and ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghong; Li, Lei; Li, Pengxi; Li, Yi; Chen, Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a viable treatment for many cancers. To decrease the cutaneous photosensitivity induced by PDT, many attempts have been made to search for a targeting photosensitizer; however, few reports describe the molecular mechanism of PDT mediated by this type of targeting photosensitizer. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PDT induced by a new targeting photosensitizer (PS I), reported previously by us, on HeLa cells. Apoptosis is the primary mode of HeLa cell death in our system, and apoptosis occurs in a manner dependent on concentration, irradiation dose, and drug–light intervals. After endocytosis mediated by the folate receptor, PS I was primarily localized to the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of HeLa cells. PS I PDT resulted in rapid increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Ca2+ concentration, both of which reached a peak nearly simultaneously at 15 minutes, followed by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential at 30 minutes, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, and upregulation of Bax expression. Meanwhile, activation of caspase-3, -9, and -12, as well as induction of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), in HeLa cells after PS I PDT was also detected. These results suggest that apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by PS I PDT is not only triggered by ROS but is also regulated by Ca2+ overload. Mitochondria and the ER serve as the subcellular targets of PS I PDT, the effective activation of which is responsible for PS I PDT-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMID:25897245

  5. Apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by a new targeting photosensitizer-based PDT via a mitochondrial pathway and ER stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghong; Li, Lei; Li, Pengxi; Li, Yi; Chen, Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a viable treatment for many cancers. To decrease the cutaneous photosensitivity induced by PDT, many attempts have been made to search for a targeting photosensitizer; however, few reports describe the molecular mechanism of PDT mediated by this type of targeting photosensitizer. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PDT induced by a new targeting photosensitizer (PS I), reported previously by us, on HeLa cells. Apoptosis is the primary mode of HeLa cell death in our system, and apoptosis occurs in a manner dependent on concentration, irradiation dose, and drug-light intervals. After endocytosis mediated by the folate receptor, PS I was primarily localized to the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of HeLa cells. PS I PDT resulted in rapid increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Ca(2+) concentration, both of which reached a peak nearly simultaneously at 15 minutes, followed by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential at 30 minutes, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, and upregulation of Bax expression. Meanwhile, activation of caspase-3, -9, and -12, as well as induction of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), in HeLa cells after PS I PDT was also detected. These results suggest that apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by PS I PDT is not only triggered by ROS but is also regulated by Ca(2+) overload. Mitochondria and the ER serve as the subcellular targets of PS I PDT, the effective activation of which is responsible for PS I PDT-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  6. Intracellular localization analysis of npAu-PpIX in HeLa cells using specific dyes and confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblero-Bartolón, Victoria Gabriela; Maldonado-Alvarado, Elizabeth; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva

    2012-10-01

    Cervical carcinoma (CC) represents the second leading cause of cancer death in Mexican women. No conventional treatments are being developed such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), involving the simultaneous presence of a photosensitizer (Ps), light of a specific wavelength and tissue oxygen. On the other hand, it has seen that the use of gold nanoparticles coupled to protoporphyrin IX increases the effectiveness of PDT. The aim of this study was to determine the site of accumulation of the conjugate npAu-PpIX in cells of cervical cancer by the use of specific dyes and confocal microscopy. The results indicate that the gold nanoparticles coupled to protoporphyrin IX are accumulated in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of HeLa cells.

  7. A Critical Role for Rac1 in Tumor Progression of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Carolina; Céspedes, María Virtudes; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; del Pulgar, María Teresa Gómez; Boluda, Alicia; Oroz, Lourdes García; Cejas, Paloma; Nistal, Manuel; Mangues, Ramón; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is the second cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Rac1 is a member of the family of Rho GTPases that regulates many intracellular signaling pathways, including those involved in tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis. We have investigated the role of Rac1 in colorectal tumor progression by genetic modification of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line SW620 to either overexpress Rac1 or lack Rac1 expression. Tumor behavior was studied by orthotopic injection of stably modified cell lines into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice, a model that replicates the histopathological appearance and clinical behavior of human colorectal adenocarcinoma in humans. While overexpression of Rac1 resulted in an accelerated tumorigenic process, inducing a faster mortality rate, inhibition of Rac1 completely suppressed tumor formation. These results suggest that Rac1 plays a major role in colorectal adenocarcinoma progression. Finally, interference with Rac1 function may provide an important tool to block the malignant phenotype of colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:18165265

  8. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat- shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat- shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin. PMID:3029142

  9. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  10. Axitinib affects cell viability and migration of a primary foetal lung adenocarcinoma culture.

    PubMed

    Menna, Cecilia; De Falco, Elena; Pacini, Luca; Scafetta, Gaia; Ruggieri, Paola; Puca, Rosa; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Ciccone, Anna Maria; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Calogero, Antonella; Ibrahim, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Fetal lung adenocarcinoma (FLAC) is a rare variant of lung adenocarcinoma. Studies regarding FLAC have been based only on histopathological observations, thus representative in vitro models of FLAC cultures are unavailable. We have established and characterized a human primary FLAC cell culture, exploring its biology, chemosensitivity, and migration. FLAC cells and specimen showed significant upregulation of VEGF165 and HIF-1α mRNA levels. This observation was confirmed by in vitro chemosensitivity and migration assay, showing that only Axitinib was comparable to Cisplatin treatment. We provide a suitable in vitro model to further investigate the nature of this rare type of cancer. PMID:24380379

  11. Melatonin sensitizes human cervical cancer HeLa cells to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis: effects on oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Pariente, Roberto; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B; Espino, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has antitumor activity via several mechanisms including its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects as well as its potent antioxidant actions, although recent evidence has indicated that melatonin may perform pro-oxidant actions in tumor cells. Therefore, melatonin may be useful in the treatment of tumors in association with chemotherapy drugs. This study was intended to evaluate the in vitro effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic actions of various chemotherapeutic agents in cervical cancer HeLa cells. Herein, we found that both melatonin and three of the chemotherapeutic drugs tested, namely cisplatin (CIS), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and doxorubicin, induced a decrease in HeLa cell viability. Furthermore, melatonin significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of such chemotherapeutic agents. Consistently, costimulation of HeLa cells with any chemotherapeutic agent in the presence of melatonin further increased caspase-3 activation, particularly in CIS- and 5-FU-challenged cells. Likewise, concomitant treatments with melatonin and CIS significantly enhanced the ratio of cells entering mitochondrial apoptosis due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, substantially augmented the population of apoptotic cells, and markedly enlarged DNA fragmentation compared to the treatments with CIS alone. Nonetheless, melatonin only displayed moderate chemosensitizing effects in 5-FU-stimulated HeLa cells, as suggested by slight increments in the percentage of cells stimulated for ROS production and in the proportion of early apoptotic cells compared to the treatments with 5-FU alone. In summary, our findings provided evidence that in vitro melatonin strongly enhances CIS-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HeLa cells and, hence, the indoleamine could be potentially applied to cervical cancer treatment as a powerful synergistic agent.

  12. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN

  13. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hembram, Dambarudhar Shiba Sankar; Haremaki, Takahiro; Hamatsu, Jumpei; Inoue, Jin; Kamoshida, Hajime; Ikeya, Teppei; Mishima, Masaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ito, Yutaka

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •We performed time-resolved NMR observations of calbindin D{sub 9k} in HeLa cells. •Stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration was observed by in-cell NMR. •Calbindin D{sub 9k} showed the state-transition from Mg{sup 2+}- to Ca{sup 2+}-bound state in cells. •We provide a useful tool for in situ monitoring of the healthiness of the cells. -- Abstract: Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca{sup 2+}-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration during experiments, human calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N SOFAST–HMQC experiments of calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D{sub 9k} (P47M + C80) is initially in the Mg{sup 2+}-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca{sup 2+}-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca{sup 2+} into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of

  14. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein associated polypeptide N accelerates cell proliferation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Jiancheng

    2015-10-01

    The spliceosome, the large RNA‑protein molecular complex, is crucial for pre‑mRNA splicing. Several antitumor drugs have been found to tightly bind to the components of the spliceosome and mutations in the spliceosome have been reported in several types of cancer. However, the involvement of the spliceosome in pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unclear. In the present study, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein associated polypeptide N (SNRPN), a key constituent of spliceosomes, was disrupted in BxPC‑3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells using lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi). It was found that knockdown of SNRPN reduced the proliferation ability of BxPC‑3 cells, as determined by an MTT assay. Furthermore, cell colony formation was impaired in SNRPN depleted adenocarcinoma cells and cell cycle analysis showed that depletion of SNRPN led to S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results suggest that SNRPN is a key player in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth, and targeted loss of SNRPN may be a potential therapeutic method for pancreatic cancer.

  15. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA by down-regulation of deoxyguanosine kinase expression in non-proliferating HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Maribel; Johansson, Magnus . E-mail: magnus.johansson@ki.se; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-07-15

    Purine deoxyribonucleotides required for mitochondrial DNA replication are either imported from the cytosol or derived from phosphorylation of deoxyadenosine or deoxyguanosine catalyzed by mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK). DGUOK deficiency has been linked to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes suggesting an important role for this enzyme in dNTP supply. We have generated HeLa cell lines with 20-30% decreased levels of DGUOK mRNA by the expression of small interfering RNAs directed towards the DGUOK mRNA. The cells with decreased expression of the enzyme showed similar levels of mtDNA as control cells when grown exponentially in culture. However, mtDNA levels rapidly decreased in the cells when cell cycle arrest was induced by serum starvation. DNA incorporation of 9-{beta}-D-arabino-furanosylguanine (araG) was lower in the cells with decreased deoxyguanosine kinase expression, but the total rate of araG phosphorylation was increased in the cells. The increase in araG phosphorylation was shown to be due to increased expression of deoxycytidine kinase. In summary, our findings show that DGUOK is required for mitochondrial DNA replication in resting cells and that small changes in expression of this enzyme may cause mitochondrial DNA depletion. Our data also suggest that alterations in the expression level of DGUOK may induce compensatory changes in the expression of other nucleoside kinases.

  16. Apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration in human HeLa tumour cells by photoproducts of Rose Bengal acetate.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Elisa; Tenuzzo, Bernadette; Palazzo, Fabio; Chionna, Alfonsina; Dini, Luciana

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration after photodamage exerted by incubation of HeLa cells with Rose Bengal acetate-derivative (RBAc) followed by irradiation for a total dose of 1.6 J/cm2. This treatment was previously demonstrated to reduce cell viability under mild treatment conditions, suggesting the restoration of the photoactive molecule in particularly sensitive cell sites. Indeed, Rose Bengal (RB) is a very efficient photosensitizer, whose photophysical properties are inactivated by addition of the quencher group acetate. The RBAc behaves as a fluorogenic substrate by entering easily the cells where the original, photoactive molecule is restored by specific esterases. Different intracellular sites of photodamage of RB are present. In particular, fluorescence imaging of Rodamine 123 and JC-1 labelled cells showed altered morphology and loss of potential membrane of mitochondria. MTT and NR assays gave indications of alteration of mitochondrial and lysosomal enzyme activities. These damaged sites were likely responsible for triggering apoptosis. Significant amount of apoptotic cell death (about 40%) was induced after light irradiation followed RBAc incubation as revealed by morphological (modification of cell shape and blebs formation), cytochemical (FITC-Annexin-V positive cells) and nuclear fragmentation assays.

  17. Modulation of Poliovirus Replicative Fitness in HeLa Cells by Deoptimization of Synonymous Codon Usage in the Capsid Region

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Cara Carthel; Shaw, Jing; Campagnoli, Ray; Jorba, Jaume; Vincent, Annelet; Quay, Jacqueline; Kew, Olen

    2006-01-01

    We replaced degenerate codons for nine amino acids within the capsid region of the Sabin type 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain with corresponding nonpreferred synonymous codons. Codon replacements were introduced into four contiguous intervals spanning 97% of the capsid region. In the capsid region of the most highly modified virus construct, the effective number of codons used (NC) fell from 56.2 to 29.8, the number of CG dinucleotides rose from 97 to 302, and the G+C content increased from 48.4% to 56.4%. Replicative fitness in HeLa cells, measured by plaque areas and virus yields in single-step growth experiments, decreased in proportion to the number of replacement codons. Plaque areas decreased over an ∼10-fold range, and virus yields decreased over an ∼65-fold range. Perhaps unexpectedly, the synthesis and processing of viral proteins appeared to be largely unaltered by the restriction in codon usage. In contrast, total yields of viral RNA in infected cells were reduced ∼3-fold and specific infectivities of purified virions (measured by particle/PFU ratios) decreased ∼18-fold in the most highly modified virus. The replicative fitness of both codon replacement viruses and unmodified viruses increased with the passage number in HeLa cells. After 25 serial passages (∼50 replication cycles), most codon replacements were retained, and the relative fitness of the modified viruses remained well below that of the unmodified virus. The increased replicative fitness of high-passage modified virus was associated with the elimination of several CG dinucleotides. Potential applications for the systematic modulation of poliovirus replicative fitness by deoptimization of codon usage are discussed. PMID:16537593

  18. Targeting Pro-Apoptotic TRAIL Receptors Sensitizes HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells to Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maduro, John H.; Vries, Elisabeth de; Meersma, Gert-Jan; Hougardy, Brigitte; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Jong, Steven de

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of irradiation in combination with drugs targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor (DR)4 and DR5 and their mechanism of action in a cervical cancer cell line. Methods and Materials: Recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and the agonistic antibodies against DR4 and DR5 were added to irradiated HeLa cells. The effect was evaluated with apoptosis and cytotoxicity assays and at the protein level. Membrane receptor expression was measured with flow cytometry. Small-interfering RNA against p53, DR4, and DR5 was used to investigate their function on the combined effect. Results: rhTRAIL and the agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies strongly enhanced 10-Gy-induced apoptosis. This extra effect was 22%, 23%, and 29% for rhTRAIL, DR4, and DR5, respectively. Irradiation increased p53 expression and increased the membrane expression of DR5 and DR4. p53 suppression, as well as small-interfering RNA against DR5, resulted in a significant downregulation of DR5 membrane expression but did not affect apoptosis induced by irradiation and rhTRAIL. After small-interfering RNA against DR4, rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis and the additive effect of irradiation on rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis were abrogated, implicating an important role for DR4 in apoptosis induced through irradiation in combination with rhTRAIL. Conclusion: Irradiation-induced apoptosis is strongly enhanced by targeting the pro-apoptotic TRAIL receptors DR4 or DR5. Irradiation results in a p53-dependent increase in DR5 membrane expression. The sensitizing effect of rhTRAIL on irradiation in the HeLa cell line is, however especially mediated through the DR4 receptor.

  19. Loss of FADS2 Function Severely Impairs the Use of HeLa Cells as an In Vitro Model for Host Response Studies Involving Fatty Acid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jaudszus, Anke; Degen, Christian; Barth, Stephan W.; Klempt, Martin; Schlörmann, Wiebke; Roth, Alexander; Rohrer, Carsten; Sauerwein, Helga; Sachse, Konrad; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Scope Established epithelial cell lines equipped with pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 are common tools for immune response studies on invading pathogens, e.g. the obligate intracellular species of Chlamydia. Moreover, such models are widely used to elucidate fatty acid-mediated immune effects. In several transformed cell lines, however, unusual loss of metabolic functions was described. The cell lines A549 and HeLa are poorly characterized in this respect. Therefore, we comparatively assessed the metabolic capacity of A549 and HeLa prior to proposed application as in vitro model for fatty acid effects on chlamydial infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We incubated both cell lines either with substrates (C18∶2n−6 or C18∶3n−3) or products (C18∶3n−6, C18∶4n−3) of fatty acid desaturase-2 (FADS2), and analysed the fatty acid profiles after 24 h and 72 h by gas chromatography. Based on these data, we suspected that the complete discontinuation of normal biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in HeLa was due to loss of FADS2 function. Consequently, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation was less inducible by TLR2 stimulation in HeLa, likely as a result of not only insufficient supply of precursors but also weak cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) response. In accordance, Chlamydia infection rates were consistently lower in HeLa than in A549. Sequence analysis revealed no alteration within the FADS2 gene in HeLa. The FADS2 expression level, however, was significantly lower and, in contrast to A549, not regulated by C18∶2n−6. A549 exhibited regular fatty acid metabolism and enzyme functionality. Conclusions/Significance Our data show that HeLa cells considerably differ from A549 at several stages of fatty acid metabolism. The poor metabolic potential of HeLa, mainly concerning FADS2 upstream of COX-2 function, calls into question whether these cells represent a good model to unveil fatty acid or

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  1. HeLa Cells Containing a Truncated Form of DNA Polymerase Beta are More Sensitized to Alkylating Agents than to Agents Inducing Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Khanra, Kalyani; Chakraborty, Anindita; Bhattacharyya, Nandan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effects of alkylating and oxidative stress inducing agents on a newly identified variant of DNA polymerase beta (polβ Δ208-304) specific for ovarian cancer. Pol β Δ208-304 has a deletion of exons 11-13 which lie in the catalytic part of enzyme. We compared the effect of these chemicals on HeLa cells and HeLa cells stably transfected with this variant cloned into in pcDNAI/neo vector by MTT, colony forming and apoptosis assays. Polβ Δ208-304 cells exhibited greater sensitivity to an alkylating agent and less sensitivity towards H2O2 and UV when compared with HeLa cells alone. It has been shown that cell death in Pol β Δ208-304 transfected HeLa cells is mediated by the caspase 9 cascade. Exon 11 has nucleotidyl selection activity, while exons 12 and 13 have dNTP selection activity. Hence deletion of this part may affect polymerizing activity although single strand binding and double strand binding activity may remain same. The lack of this part may adversely affect catalytic activity of DNA polymerase beta so that the variant may act as a dominant negative mutant. This would represent clinical significance if translated into a clinical setting because resistance to radiation or chemotherapy during the relapse of the disease could be potentially overcome by this approach.

  2. Properties of the deoxycholate-solubilized HeLa cell plasma membrane receptor for binding group B coxsackieviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Krah, D L; Crowell, R L

    1985-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of deoxycholate-solubilized HeLa cell plasma membrane receptors for binding group B coxsackieviruses were determined. Receptors eluted from Sepharose 4B with an apparent molecular weight of 275,000 and sedimented with an S value of between 14.7 and 4.9 and a buoyant density of 1.06 to 1.10 g/cm3. Virus-binding activity was destroyed after treatment with proteases, glycosidases, and periodate but was unaffected by lipases or reducing or alkylating agents. Additionally, lectins, including concanavalin A, adsorbed receptors and inhibited virus attachment. The composite data suggested that glycoprotein is an integral part of the receptors for binding virus. PMID:2983096

  3. Interaction of C60 fullerene complexed to doxorubicin with model bilipid membranes and its uptake by HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Prylutskyy, Yu; Bychko, A; Sokolova, V; Prylutska, S; Evstigneev, M; Rybalchenko, V; Epple, M; Scharff, P

    2016-02-01

    With an aim to elucidate the effects of C60 fullerene complexed with antibiotic doxorubicin (Dox) on model bilipid membranes (BLM), the investigation of the electrical properties of BLM under the action of Dox and C60 fullerene, and of their complex, C60+Dox,was performed. The complex as well as its components exert a clearly detectable influence on BLM, which is concentration-dependent and also depends on phospholipid composition. The mechanism of this effect originates either from intermolecular interaction of the drug with fatty-acid residues of phospholipids, or from membranotropic effects of the drug-induced lipid peroxidation, or from the sum of these two effects. By fluorescence microscopy the entering of C60 + Dox complex into HeLa cells was directly shown.

  4. Enzymatic properties of viral replication complexes isolated from adenovirus type 2-infected HeLa cell nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Brison, O; Kedinger, C; Wilhelm, J

    1977-01-01

    When HeLa cell nuclei, isolated 17 h after infection with adenovirus type 2 (Ad2), were extracted with 200 mM ammonium sulfate, Ad2 nucleoprotein complexes were selectively released. These complexes contained a DNA polymerase activity that corresponded to DNA polymerase molecules actively engaged in Ad2 DNA replication. Under our high-salt (200 mM ammonium sulfate) incubation conditions, where no reinitiation occurred, full-length Ad2 DNA chains were synthesized by elongation of chains that had been initiated in vivo. This conclusion was further supported by density labeling experiments indicating that the in vitro DNA synthesis was semiconservative. Evidence is presented suggesting that at least part of the DNA polymerase molecules engaged in Ad2 DNA replication belong to the gamma class. PMID:916022

  5. Labeling of HeLa cells using ZrO2:Yb3+-Er3+ nanoparticles with upconversion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceja-Fdez, Andrea; López-Luke, Tzarara; Oliva, Jorge; Vivero-Escoto, Juan; Gonzalez-Yebra, Ana Lilia; Rojas, Ruben A. Rodriguez; Martínez-Pérez, Andrea; de la Rosa, Elder

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the synthesis, structural characterization, and optical properties of ZrO2:Yb3+-Er3+ (2-1 mol%) nanocrystals. The nanoparticles were coated with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) and further modified with biomolecules, such as Biotin-Anti-rabbit (mouse IgG) and rabbit antibody-AntiKi-67, through a conjugation method. The conjugation was successfully confirmed by Fourier transform infrared, zeta potential, and dynamic light scattering. The internalization of the conjugated nanoparticles in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells was followed by two-photon confocal microscopy. The ZrO2:Yb3+-Er3+ nanocrystals exhibited strong red emission under 970-nm excitation. Moreover, the luminescence change due to the addition of APTES molecules and biomolecules on the nanocrystals was also studied. These results demonstrate that ZrO2:Yb3+-Er3+ nanocrystals can be successfully functionalized with biomolecules to develop platforms for biolabeling and bioimaging.

  6. The Induction of Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in HeLa and MCF-7 Cells by Teucrium sandrasicum, Having Effective Antioxidant Properties.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Leman; Nakipoğlu, Mahmure; Kavakcıoğlu, Berna; Tongul, Burcu; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe

    2016-03-01

    The hidromethanolic (Met/W), ethyl acetate (EA(EA/W)), and water (W(EA/W)) extracts from Teucrium sandrasicum leaves (L) and flowers (F) were investigated for antioxidant properties and antiproliferative effects on HeLa, MCF-7, and L929. The highest DPPH scavenging, metal chelating capacities, and total phenolic and flavonoid contents were observed in Met/WL. The highest hydroxyl scavenging and reducing power capacities were found in EA(EA/W)L. Met/WL, EA(EA/W)L and EA(EA/W)F inhibited cancer cell growths, while they did not show significant cytotoxicity on L929. While the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were generally close to controls in HeLa, they were induced in MCF-7 with the treatment of Met/WL, EA(EA/W)L, and EA(EA/W)F and acted as antioxidant for L929. The highest apoptosis inductions were observed in Met/WL-treated HeLa and EA(EA/W)L-treated MCF-7, which were supported with the changes in mitochondrial membrane potentials. The highest caspase-9 activities were found in Met/WL-treated HeLa and EA(EA/W)F-treated MCF-7. Caspase-3 activity was only induced in EA(EA/W)F-treated HeLa.

  7. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Label-free electrochemiluminescence biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of telomerase activity in HeLa cells based on extension reaction and intercalation of Ru(phen)3 (2.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue; Yang, Linlin; Yue, Guiyin; Chen, Lifen; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2016-10-01

    Telomerase is one of the most common markers of human malignant tumors, such as uterine, stomach, esophageal, breast, colorectal, laryngeal squamous cell, thyroid, bladder, and so on. It is necessary to develop some sensitive but convenient detection methods for telomerase activity determination. In this study, a label-free and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor has been fabricated to detect the activity of telomerase extracted from HeLa cells. Thiolated telomerase substrate (TS) primer was immobilized on the gold electrode surface through gold-sulfur (Au-S) interaction and then elongated by telomerase specifically. Then, it was hybridized with complementary DNA to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments on the electrode surface, and Ru(phen)3 (2+) has been intercalated into the dsDNA grooves to act as the ECL probe. The enhanced ECL intensity has a linear relationship with the number of HeLa cells in the range of 5∼5000 and with a detection limit of 2 HeLa cells. The proposed ECL biosensor has high specificity to telomerase in the presence of common interferents. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were <5 % at 100 HeLa cells. The proposed method provides a convenient approach for telomerase-related cancer screening or diagnosis.

  9. shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 inhibit lung adenocarcinoma cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiuxiang; Wang, Yifang; Zheng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunqing; Su, Benli; Nie, Huiling; Zhao, Baoxia; Zhao, Xinyu; Yang, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Bmi-1 has been implicated in cancer cell growth and metastasis in a variety of tumor types. In this study, we sought to evaluate the expression of Bmi-1 in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and to determine if a correlation exists between Bmi-1 expression and clinical features of lung cancer, such as metastasis. Our results showed that Bmi-1 expression is increased in lung cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, and is associated with clinical features of lung cancer, including clinical stage and distant metastasis. We were then interested in determining if shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 would inhibit metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells. To this end, we chose the most efficient shRNA duplexes targeting Bmi-1, and constructed two stably transfected lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549 and SPCA1). The shRNA-mediated knockdown of Bmi-1 significantly reduced migration in vitro, and metastasis in vivo, of A549 and SPCA1 cells. More importantly, knockdown of Bmi-1 also upregulated PTEN expression, and downregulated p-Akt and VEGF expression. These data support the hypothesis that Bmi-1 regulates key pathways involved in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  10. The effect of photodynamic treatment on the morphological and mechanical properties of the HeLa cell line.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Petr; Tomankova, Katerina; Malohlava, Jakub; Zapletalova, Jana; Vujtek, Milan; Safarova, Klara; Jancik, Dalibor; Kolarova, Hana

    2013-09-01

    High resolution imaging of biological structures and changes induced by various agents such as drugs and toxins is commonly performed by fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM). Although high-resolution imaging is possible with EM, the requirements for fixation and staining of samples for image contrast severely limits the study of living organisms. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), on the other hand, is capable of simultaneous nanometer spatial resolution and piconewton force detection, allowing detailed study of cell surface morphology and monitoring cytomechanical information. We present a method that images and studies mechanically characterized cells using AFM. We used a HeLa cell line (cervix carcinoma cell), which is sensitive to photodynamic treatment (PDT); growth media as a scanning surrounding; atomic force microscopy NT-MDT Aura for cytomechanical measurement; and scanning electron microscope Hitachi Su 6600 for control images of the cells. The modulus of elasticity for intact and photodynamically damaged cells can indicate mechanical changes to the main properties of cells. Cell elasticity changes can provide information on the degree or value of cell damage, for example after PDT. Measurements were carried out on approximately sixty cells, including three independent experiments on a control group and on sixty cells in a photodamaged group. Cells before PDT show higher elasticity: the median of Young´s modulus on the nucleus was 35.283 kPa and outside of the nucleus 107.442 kPa. After PDT, the median of Young's modulus on the nucleus was 61.144 kPa and outside of the nucleus was 193.605 kPa.

  11. The enhanced inhibitory effect of different antitumor agents in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems on human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kalantari, Azin; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Róka, Eszter; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Póka, Róbert; Kozma, Bence; Bácskay, Ildikó

    2015-07-21

    The aim of this study was to develop topical self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) containing antitumor agents (bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide) and to investigate their inhibitory potential in SMEDDS on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The physicochemical properties of cytostatic drug loaded SMEDDS were characterized. The cytotoxicity of main components of SMEDDS was also investigated. Their IC50 values were determined. HeLa cells were treated by different concentrations of cisplatin, bleomycin and ifosfamide alone and in various SMEDDS. The inhibitory effect on cell growth was analyzed by MTT cell viability assay. Inflammation is a driving force that accelerates cancer development. The inhibitory effect of these antitumor agents has also been tested on HeLa cells in the presence of inflammatory mediators (IL-1-β, TNF-α) as an in vitro model of inflamed human cervix. Significant differences in the cytotoxicity of cytostatic drugs alone and in SMEDDS have been found in a concentration-dependent manner. The self-micro emulsifying system may potentiate the effectiveness of bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide topically. The effect of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents was decreased significantly in the presence of inflammatory mediators. According to our experiments, the optimal SMEDDS formulation is 1:1:2:6:2 ratios of Isopropyl myristate, Capryol 90, Kolliphor RH 40, Cremophor RH40, Transcutol HP and Labrasol. It can be concluded that SMEDDS may increase the inhibitory effect of bleomycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Inflammation on HeLa cells hinders the effectiveness of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents. Our results might ensure useful data for development of optimal antitumor formulations.

  12. Cancer Stem Cell Markers CD44, CD133 in Primary Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Anahita; Naghshvar, Farshad; Khanari, Somaieh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are unique subpopulations that have the capacity to drive malignant progression with renewal abilities. Recently the role of some of CSCs in gastric adenocarcinoma has been studied. This study was performed in order to evaluate CD44 and CD133 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 95 primary gastric adenocarcinoma and their relation to clinical and pathological parameters of these tumors. There was a significant correlation between CD44 expression and cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion, no lymphatic/vascular invasion and moderate differentiation. There was a significant correlation between CD133 expression and patient's age (> 65 years), cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion and moderate differentiation. CSC markers like CD 44 and CD133 had high expression in primary gastric adenocarcinoma and had some relations to clinical and pathological parameters of tumors. PMID:25635255

  13. Cancer Stem Cell Markers CD44, CD133 in Primary Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Anahita; Naghshvar, Farshad; Khanari, Somaieh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are unique subpopulations that have the capacity to drive malignant progression with renewal abilities. Recently the role of some of CSCs in gastric adenocarcinoma has been studied. This study was performed in order to evaluate CD44 and CD133 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 95 primary gastric adenocarcinoma and their relation to clinical and pathological parameters of these tumors. There was a significant correlation between CD44 expression and cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion, no lymphatic/vascular invasion and moderate differentiation. There was a significant correlation between CD133 expression and patient's age (> 65 years), cancer subtype (intestinal), tumor size (4-8 cm), depth of invasion and moderate differentiation. CSC markers like CD 44 and CD133 had high expression in primary gastric adenocarcinoma and had some relations to clinical and pathological parameters of tumors. PMID:25635255

  14. A molecular understanding of D-homoestrone-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Minorics, Renáta; Bózsity, Noémi; Molnár, Judit; Wölfling, János; Mernyák, Erzsébet; Schneider, Gyula; Ocsovszki, Imre; Zupkó, István

    2015-10-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (ME), one of the most widely investigated A-ring-modified metabolites of estrone, exerts significant anticancer activity on numerous cancer cell lines. Its pharmacological actions, including cell cycle arrest, microtubule disruption and pro-apoptotic activity, have already been described in detail. The currently tested D-ring-modified analogue of estrone, D-homoestrone, selectively inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle blockade, resulting in the development of apoptosis. The question arose of whether the difference in the chemical structures of these analogues can influence the mechanism of anticancer action. The aim of the present study was therefore to elucidate the molecular contributors of intracellular processes induced by D-homoestrone in HeLa cells. Apoptosis triggered by D-homoestrone develops through activation of the intrinsic pathway, as demonstrated by determination of the activities of caspase-8 and -9. It was revealed that D-homoestrone-treated HeLa cells are not able to enter mitosis because the cyclin-dependent kinase 1-cyclin B complex loses its activity, resulting in the decreased inactivation of stathmin and a concomitant disturbance of microtubule formation. However, unlike 2-ME, D-homoestrone does not exert a direct effect on tubulin polymerization. These results led to the conclusion that the D-homoestrone-triggered intracellular processes resulting in a cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells differ from those in the case of 2-ME. This may be regarded as an alternative mechanism of action among steroidal anticancer compounds.

  15. NHE1 mediates migration and invasion of HeLa cells via regulating the expression and localization of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yani; Wang, Jian; Jin, Weina; Wang, Lihong; Li, Huawen; Ma, Li; Li, Qinghua; Pang, Tianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), acting as an important regulator of intracellular pH (pH(i)) and extracellular pH (pH(e)), has been known to play a key role in the metastasis of many solid tumours. However, the exact mechanism underlying these processes, especially in cervical cancer, is still poorly understood. In the current study, we first showed that the inhibition of NHE1 activity by the specific inhibitor cariporide could suppress migration and invasion of HeLa cells in vitro. Moreover, cariporide also reversed the enhanced migration and invasion in HeLa cells by overexpressed membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Subsequently, our results showed that NHE1 regulated the expression of MT1-MMP at both messenger RNA and protein levels as well as its localization. Meanwhile, we observed slight modification in the morphology of HeLa cell after treating with cariporide. The present work indicates that NHE1 mediates HeLa cell metastasis via regulating the expression and localization of MT1-MMP and provides a theoretical basis for the development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting cervical cancer.

  16. Highly selective fluorescence imaging of zinc distribution in HeLa cells and Arabidopsis using a naphthalene-based fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ha; Lee, Jin Hyeok; Jung, Sung Ho; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Feng, Mingxiao; Kim, Jae-Yean; Lee, Jae-Hong; Lee, Hoyeon; Kim, Jong Seung; Kang, Chulhun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2015-05-01

    2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)naphthalene-based probe 1 was found to exhibit a dramatic enhancement in fluorescence upon addition of Zn(2+), but not with any other metal ions. Probe 1 as a chemoprobe enabled high-resolution fluorescence imaging of zinc ions in HeLa cells and Arabidopsis.

  17. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis.

  18. Visualizing cell-cycle kinetics after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuaki; Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-12-10

    Hypoxia induces G1 arrest in many cancer cell types. Tumor cells are often exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, especially under acute hypoxic conditions in vivo. In this study, we investigated cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Hypoxic treatment halted cell-cycle progression during mid-S to G2 phase, as determined by the cell cycle-regulated E3 ligase activities of SCF(Skp2) and APC/C(Cdh1), which are regulators of the Fucci probes; however, the DNA content of the arrested cells was equivalent to that in G1 phase. After reoxygenation, time-lapse imaging and DNA content analysis revealed that all cells reached G2 phase, and that Fucci fluorescence was distinctly separated into two fractions 24h after reoxygenation: red cells that released from G2 arrest after repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) exhibited higher clonogenic survival, whereas most cells that stayed green contained many DSBs and exhibited lower survival. We conclude that hypoxia disrupts coordination of DNA synthesis and E3 ligase activities associated with cell-cycle progression, and that DSB repair could greatly influence cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  19. Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression.

    PubMed

    Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Gomes, Rogério; Proença-Módena, José Luiz; da Silva, Andrei Furlan; Carminati, Patricia Oliveira; Silva, Maria Lucia; Santos, Rodrigo Ivo Marques; Arruda, Eurico

    2010-04-01

    Oropouche (OROV) is a single-stranded RNA arbovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, which has caused over half a million cases of febrile illness in Brazil in the past 30 years. OROV fever has been registered almost exclusively in the Amazon region, but global warming, deforestation and redistribution of vectors and animal reservoirs increases the risk of Oropouche virus emergence in other areas. OROV causes a cytolytical infection in cultured cells with characteristic cytopathic effect 48h post-infection. We have studied the mechanisms of apoptosis induced by OROV in HeLa cells and found that OROV causes DNA fragmentation detectable by gel electrophoresis and by flow cytometric analysis of the Sub-G1 population at 36h post-infection. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome C and activation of caspases 9 and 3 were also detected by western blot analysis. Lack of apoptosis induced by UV-inactivated OROV reveals that virus-receptor binding is not sufficient to induce cell death. Results obtained in cells treated with chloroquine and cycloheximide indicated that viral uncoating and replication are required for apoptosis induction by OROV. Furthermore, treatment of the cells with pan-caspase inhibitor prevented OROV-induced apoptosis without affecting virus progeny production. The results show that OROV infection in vitro causes apoptosis by an intracellular pathway involving mitochondria, and activated by a mechanism dependent on viral replication and protein synthesis.

  20. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase on the radiation response of HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burgman, P.; Konings, A.W. )

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in X-ray-induced cell killing, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), and formation and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. As tools we used the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB). Both drugs inhibited PLD repair equally well but did not increase radiation-induced cell killing when cells were plated immediately after irradiation. 3AB affected repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, while 4AB had no effect. When 3AB was combined with aphidicolin (APC), it was found that the amount of DNA damage increased during the postirradiation incubation period. This means that the presence of 3AB stimulates the formation of DNA damage after X-irradiation. It is concluded that 3AB and 4AB sensitize HeLaS3 cells for radiation-induced cell killing by inhibiting repair of PLD. Because of the different effects of both inhibitors on repair of PLD and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage (a process known to be affected by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation), it is concluded that the observed inhibition of PLD repair is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, and that the inhibitors affect repair of PLD and repair of DNA damage through independent mechanisms.

  1. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K.; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26905939

  2. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26905939

  3. Cellular Cultivation: Growing HeLa Cells Using Standard High School Laboratory Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woloschak, Gayle; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes experiments to culture cells in a laboratory that provide students with hands-on experience in manipulating cells and a chance to observe cell growth characteristics first hand. Exposes students to sterile technique, cell culture, cell growth concepts, and eukaryotic cell structure. (JRH)

  4. A systems biology analysis of the changes in gene expression via silencing of HPV-18 E1 expression in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Andres; Wang, Lu; Koriyama, Chihaya; Eizuru, Yoshito; Jordan, King; Akiba, Suminori

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have reported the detection of a truncated E1 mRNA generated from HPV-18 in HeLa cells. Although it is unclear whether a truncated E1 protein could function as a replicative helicase for viral replication, it would still retain binding sites for potential interactions with different host cell proteins. Furthermore, in this study, we found evidence in support of expression of full-length HPV-18 E1 mRNA in HeLa cells. To determine whether interactions between E1 and cellular proteins play an important role in cellular processes other than viral replication, genome-wide expression profiles of HPV-18 positive HeLa cells were compared before and after the siRNA knockdown of E1 expression. Differential expression and gene set enrichment analysis uncovered four functionally related sets of genes implicated in host defence mechanisms against viral infection. These included the toll-like receptor, interferon and apoptosis pathways, along with the antiviral interferon-stimulated gene set. In addition, we found that the transcriptional coactivator E1A-binding protein p300 (EP300) was downregulated, which is interesting given that EP300 is thought to be required for the transcription of HPV-18 genes in HeLa cells. The observed changes in gene expression produced via the silencing of HPV-18 E1 expression in HeLa cells indicate that in addition to its well-known role in viral replication, the E1 protein may also play an important role in mitigating the host's ability to defend against viral infection.

  5. Myricetin and methyl eugenol combination enhances the anticancer activity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction of cis-platin against HeLa cervical cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jin-Ling; Shi, Song; Shen, Yan-Li; Wang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Drug combination therapies are common practice in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of myricetin (MYR), methyl eugenol (MEG) and cisplatin (CP) both separately as well as in combination against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. To demonstrate whether MYR and MEG enhance the anticancer activity of CP against cervical cancer cells, we treated HeLa cells with MYR and MEG alone or in combination with cisplatin and evaluated cell growth and apoptosis using MTT (3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazol 2yl) 2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, LDH release assay, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that, as compared to single drug treatment, the combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in greater effect in inhibiting cancer cell growth and inducing apoptosis. Cell apoptosis induction, Caspase-3 activity, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss were systematically studied to reveal the mechanisms of synergy between MYR, MEG and CP. Combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in more potent apoptosis induction as revealed by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258 and AO-ETBR staining. The combination treatment also increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase dramatically as compared to single drug treatment. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΛΨm) as well as Caspase-3 activity was much higher in combination treatment as compared to single drug treatment. Findings of this investigation suggest that MYR and MEG combined with cisplatin is a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach in human cervical cancer.

  6. Analysis of energy metabolism of HeLa cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukina, Maria; Shirmanova, Marina; Dudenkova, Varvara; Druzhkova, Irina; Shumilova, Anastasia; Zagaynova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to study energy metabolism in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in vitro and in vivo using two-photon FLIM. Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence lifetimes of free and protein-bound forms of NAD(P)H and FAD and their relative contributions. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize tissue structure. Cellular metabolism was analyzed in cancer cells co-cultured with human fibroblasts and in tumor xenografts transplanted to nude mice. In the HeLa-huFB co-culture we observed a metabolic shift from OXPHOS toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis to OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. In the tumor tissue we detected metabolic heterogeneity with more glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells in the stroma-rich zones. The results of the study are of a great importance for understanding metabolic behavior of tumors and for development of anticancer drugs targeted to metabolic pathways.

  7. Acetylation of core histones in response to HDAC inhibitors is diminished in mitotic HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Patzlaff, Jason S.; Terrenoire, Edith; Turner, Bryan M.; Earnshaw, William C.; Paulson, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a key modification that regulates chromatin accessibility. Here we show that treatment with butyrate or other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors does not induce histone hyperacetylation in metaphase-arrested HeLa cells. When compared to similarly treated interphase cells, acetylation levels are significantly decreased in all four core histones and at all individual sites examined. However, the extent of the decrease varies, ranging from only slight reduction at H3K23 and H4K12 to no acetylation at H3K27 and barely detectable acetylation at H4K16. Our results show that the bulk effect is not due to increased or butyrate-insensitive HDAC activity, though these factors may play a role with some individual sites. We conclude that the lack of histone acetylation during mitosis is primarily due to changes in histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or changes in chromatin. The effects of protein phosphatase inhibitors on histone acetylation in cell lysates suggest that the reduced ability of histones to become acetylated in mitotic cells depends on protein phosphorylation. PMID:20452346

  8. Representing life as opposed to being: the bio-objectification process of the HeLa cells and its relation to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Svalastog, Anna Lydia; Martinelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The immortal HeLa cells case is an intriguing example of bio-objectification processes with great scientific, social, and symbolic impacts. These cells generate questions about representation, significance, and value of the exceptional, variety, individuality, and property. Of frightening (a lethal cancer) and emarginated (a black, poor woman) origins, with their ability to “contaminate” cultures and to “spread” into spaces for becoming of extraordinary value for human knowledge, well-being, and economy advancements, HeLa cells have represented humanity, and emphasized the importance of individual as a core concept of the personalized medicine. Starting from the process leading from HeLa “cells” to HeLa “bio-objects,” we focus on their importance as high quality bio-specimen. We discuss the tension between phenomenological characteristic of fundamental biological research and the variety of material and methodologies in epidemiology and personalized medicine. The emerging methodologies and societal changes reflect present EU policies and lead toward a new paradigm of science. PMID:23986283

  9. Metformin inhibits growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis via the mitochondria-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JUNLING; GAO, QIULING; WANG, DECUI; WANG, ZHIQIANG; HU, CHUN

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is commonly used to treat type II diabetes, although it may also reduce the risk of cancer and improve the associated prognosis. However, its mode of action in cancer remains unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of metformin on lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and identified molecular mechanisms of metformin activity. The A549 cells were treated with metformin at different concentrations and cell viability was assayed by using an MTT assay. The cell cycle and the apoptosis rate were assayed by flow cytometry. Nude mice were transplanted with A549 cells and the tumor growth inhibition rate was detected. Once the A549 cells had been treated with 20 mM metformin for 48 h, the cell cycle was arrested in the G0/Gl phase and the apoptosis rate was 20.57±3.16%. The expression of the B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-extra large proteins was downregulated following metformin treatment, while Bax protein expression was significantly increased. Tumor size in the high-dose metformin and cisplatin plus metformin groups was significantly smaller, and the inhibition rates were 41.3 and 72.9%, respectively, compared with the control group. These results indicated that metformin displays anticancer activity against lung adenocarcinoma by causing G1 arrest of the cell cycle and subsequent cell apoptosis through the mitochondria-dependent pathway in A549 cells. Furthermore, it was found that metformin dramatically inhibited lung adenocarcinoma tumor growth in vivo. These data suggest that metformin may become a potential cytotoxic drug in the prevention and treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26622674

  10. 1-(2-Hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione Induces G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Autophagy in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jie-Heng; Hsu, Li-Sung; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lin, Chih-Li; Pan, Min-Hsiung; Hong, Hui-Mei; Chen, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The natural agent, 1-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione (HMDB), has been reported to have growth inhibitory effects on several human cancer cells. However, the role of HMDB in cervical cancer remains unclear. Herein, we found that HMDB dose- and time-dependently inhibited growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells, accompanied with G1 cell cycle arrest. HMDB decreased protein expression of cyclins D1/D3/E and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 2/4/6 and reciprocally increased mRNA and protein levels of CDK inhibitors (p15, p16, p21, and p27), thereby leading to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. HMDB also triggered the accumulation of acidic vesicles and formation of microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), followed by increased expression of LC3 and Beclin-1 and decreased expression of p62, suggesting that HMDB triggered autophagy in HeLa cells. Meanwhile, suppression of the expression of survivin and Bcl-2 implied that HMDB-induced autophagy is tightly linked to apoptosis. Exploring the action mechanism, HMDB induced autophagy via the modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mTOR signaling pathway rather than the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. These results suggest that HMDB inhibits HeLa cell growth by eliciting a G1 arrest through modulation of G1 cell cycle regulators and by concomitantly inducing autophagy through the mediation of AMPK-mTOR and Akt-mTOR pathways, and may be a promising antitumor agent against cervical cancer. PMID:27527160

  11. 1-(2-Hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione Induces G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Autophagy in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jie-Heng; Hsu, Li-Sung; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lin, Chih-Li; Pan, Min-Hsiung; Hong, Hui-Mei; Chen, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The natural agent, 1-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione (HMDB), has been reported to have growth inhibitory effects on several human cancer cells. However, the role of HMDB in cervical cancer remains unclear. Herein, we found that HMDB dose- and time-dependently inhibited growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells, accompanied with G1 cell cycle arrest. HMDB decreased protein expression of cyclins D1/D3/E and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 2/4/6 and reciprocally increased mRNA and protein levels of CDK inhibitors (p15, p16, p21, and p27), thereby leading to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. HMDB also triggered the accumulation of acidic vesicles and formation of microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), followed by increased expression of LC3 and Beclin-1 and decreased expression of p62, suggesting that HMDB triggered autophagy in HeLa cells. Meanwhile, suppression of the expression of survivin and Bcl-2 implied that HMDB-induced autophagy is tightly linked to apoptosis. Exploring the action mechanism, HMDB induced autophagy via the modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mTOR signaling pathway rather than the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. These results suggest that HMDB inhibits HeLa cell growth by eliciting a G1 arrest through modulation of G1 cell cycle regulators and by concomitantly inducing autophagy through the mediation of AMPK-mTOR and Akt-mTOR pathways, and may be a promising antitumor agent against cervical cancer. PMID:27527160

  12. Activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the activity of icariin against human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Di, Shouyin; Fan, Chongxi; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Miaomiao; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Bodong; Xin, Zhenlong; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Weimiao; Zhou, Yongan; Li, Xiaofei; Yan, Xiaolong

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of icariin (ICA) against human lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and explored the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (ERS) signaling in this process. ICA treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the viability of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Additionally, ICA exhibited potent anticancer activity, as evidenced by reductions in A549 cell adhesion, migration and intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and increases in the apoptotic index, Caspase 3 activity, and reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, ICA treatment increased the expression of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK, ATF6, GRP78, p-eIF2α, and CHOP), up-regulated the apoptosis-related protein PUMA and down-regulated the anti-apoptosis-related protein Bcl2. The down-regulation of ERS signaling using PERK siRNA desensitized lung adenocarcinoma cells to ICA treatment, whereas the up-regulation of ERS signaling using thapsigargin (THA) sensitized lung adenocarcinoma cells to ICA treatment. Additionally, ICA inhibited the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell xenografts by increasing the expression of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK and CHOP), up-regulating PUMA, and down-regulating Bcl2. These data indicate that ICA is a potential inhibitor of lung adenocarcinoma cell growth by targeting ERS signaling and suggest that the activation of ERS signaling may represent a novel therapeutic intervention for lung adenocarcinoma.

  13. Anticancer effects of the engineered stem cells transduced with therapeutic genes via a selective tumor tropism caused by vascular endothelial growth factor toward HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sun; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) expressing bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) and/or human interferon-beta (IFN-β) gene against HeLa cervical cancer and the migration factors of the GESTECs toward the cancer cells. Anticancer effect of GESTECs was examined in a co-culture with HeLa cells using MTT assay to measure cell viability. A transwell migration assay was performed so as to assess the migration capability of the stem cells to cervical cancer cells. Next, several chemoattractant ligands and their receptors related to a selective migration of the stem cells toward HeLa cells were determined by real-time PCR. The cell viability of HeLa cells was decreased in response to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a prodrug, indicating that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a toxic metabolite, was converted from 5-FC by CD gene and it caused the cell death in a co-culture system. When IFN-β was additionally expressed with CD gene by these GESTECs, the anticancer activity was significantly increased. In the migration assay, the GESTECs selectively migrated to HeLa cervical cancer cells. As results of real-time PCR, chemoattractant ligands such as MCP-1, SCF, and VEGF were expressed in HeLa cells, and several receptors such as uPAR, VEGFR2, and c-kit were produced by the GESTECs. These GESTECs transduced with CD gene and IFN-β may provide a potential of a novel gene therapy for anticervical cancer treatments via their selective tumor tropism derived from VEGF and VEGFR2 expressions between HeLa cells and the GESTECs.

  14. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  15. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  16. Unravelling the potential of a new uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) from Arabidopsis thaliana in sensitizing HeLa cells towards 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sharmila; Sanpui, Pallab; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-10-01

    In silico studies with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtUPRT) revealed its lower binding energies for uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared to those of bacterial UPRT indicating the prospective of AtUPRT in gene therapy implications. Hence, AtUPRT was cloned and stably expressed in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) to investigate the effect of prodrug 5-FU on these transfected cancer cells. The treatment of AtUPRT-expressing HeLa (HeLa-UPP) cells with 5-FU for 72h resulted in significant decrease in cell viability. Moreover, 5-FU was observed to induce apoptosis and perturb mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa-UPP cells. While cell cycle analysis revealed significant S-phase arrest as a result of 5-FU treatment in HeLa-UPP cells, quantitative gene expression analysis demonstrated simultaneous upregulation of important cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 and p21. The survival fractions of non-transfected, vector-transfected and AtUPRT-transfected HeLa cells, following 5-FU treatment, were calculated to be 0.425, 0.366 and 0.227, respectively.

  17. IL-6 Antibody and RGD Peptide Conjugated Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer for Targeted Drug Delivery of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Chou, Hsiao-Ying; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2016-01-14

    In this study, PAMAM dendrimer (G4.5) was conjugated with two targeting moieties, IL-6 antibody and RGD peptide (G4.5-IL6 and G4.5-RGD conjugates). Doxorubicin anticancer drug was physically loaded onto G4.5-IL6 and G4.5-RGD with the encapsulation efficiency of 51.3 and 30.1% respectively. The cellular internalization and uptake efficiency of G4.5-IL6/DOX and G4.5-RGD/DOX complexes was observed and compared by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using HeLa cells, respectively. The lower IC50 value of G4.5-IL6/DOX in comparison to G4.5-RGD/DOX is indication that higher drug loading and faster drug release rate corresponded with greater cytotoxicity. The cytotoxic effect was further verified by increment in late apoptotic/necrotic cells due to delivery of drug through receptor-mediated endocytosis. On the basis of these results, G4.5-IL6 is a better suited carrier for targeted drug delivery of DOX to cervical cancer cells. PMID:26670944

  18. Analysis of Relevant Parameters for Autophagic Flux Using HeLa Cells Expressing EGFP-LC3.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Braceras, Sandra; Escalante, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (called just autophagy hereafter) is an intracellular degradation machinery essential for cell survival under stress conditions and for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The hallmark of autophagy is the formation of double membrane vesicles that engulf cytoplasmic material. These vesicles, called autophagosomes, mature by fusion with endosomes and lysosomes that allows the degradation of the cargo. Autophagy is a dynamic process regulated at multiple steps. Assessment of autophagy is not trivial because the number autophagosomes might not necessarily reflect the real level of autophagic degradation, the so-called autophagic flux. Here, we describe an optimized protocol for the analysis of relevant parameters of autophagic flux using HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-LC3. These cells are a convenient tool to determine the influence of the downregulation or overexpression of specific proteins in the autophagic flux as well as the analysis of autophagy-modulating compounds. Western blot analysis of relevant parameters, such as the levels of EGFP-LC3, free EGFP generated by autophagic degradation and endogenous LC3·I-II are analyzed in the presence and absence of the autophagic inhibitor chloroquine. PMID:27613046

  19. Hypoxia Strongly Affects Mitochondrial Ribosomal Proteins and Translocases, as Shown by Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Paula A.; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Jeppesen Edin, Nina F.; Christoffersen, Stine; Krengel, Ute; Pettersen, Erik O.; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and common characteristic of many human tumors. It is a challenge clinically due to the correlation with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Understanding the biochemical response to hypoxia would facilitate the development of novel therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here, we investigate alterations in gene expression in response to hypoxia by quantitative proteome analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with LCMS/MS. Human HeLa cells were kept either in a hypoxic environment or under normoxic conditions. 125 proteins were found to be regulated, with maximum alteration of 18-fold. In particular, three clusters of differentially regulated proteins were identified, showing significant upregulation of glycolysis and downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and translocases. This interaction is likely orchestrated by HIF-1. We also investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cell cycle, which shows accumulation in G1 and a prolonged S phase under these conditions. Implications. This work not only improves our understanding of the response to hypoxia, but also reveals proteins important for malignant progression, which may be targeted in future therapies. PMID:26421188

  20. DIDS (4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate) directly inhibits caspase activity in HeLa cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Rangel, E; López-Méndez, MC; García, L; Guerrero-Hernández, A

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism of cell demise in multicellular organisms and Cl− transport has an important role in the progression of the apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). DIDS (4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate) is one of the most commonly used Cl− transport inhibitors that eliminates or reduces different apoptotic hallmarks such as AVD, caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation. DIDS is also a protein crosslinker that alkylates either amino or thiol groups. Since caspases are thiol proteases, our aim was to study whether DIDS could directly inhibit the activity of these proteases. Here, we show that caspase activity induced by 4 h incubation with staurosporine was inhibited by DIDS in HeLa cells that were maintained in the absence of serum for 24 h. Interestingly, the caspase-inhibitory effect of DIDS is downstream to the inhibition of cytochrome c release, suggesting that DIDS might be also acting at the apoptosome. Moreover, DIDS was able to inhibit capase-3, -9, and -8 activities in cell lysates, implying that DIDS can react with and directly block caspases. Our data suggest that antiapoptotic activity of DIDS involves not only inhibition of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) at the mitochondria and Cl− channels at the plasma membrane, but also a third mechanism based on the direct inhibition of caspases. PMID:27551467

  1. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of minor salivary and seromucous glands of the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, I; Soares, J

    1996-05-01

    Basal cell adenocarcinoma of salivary glands is an uncommon and recently described entity occurring almost exclusively at the major salivary glands. This report provides an overview of the clinicopathologic profile of this neoplasm by including the personal experience on the clinical features, microscopic and ultrastructural characteristics, proliferation activity, and DNA tumor patterns of 12 lesions occurring at the minor salivary glands of the head and neck region, where basal cell adenocarcinoma is probably an underecognized entity, previously reported under different designations. Basal cell adenocarcinoma predominates at the seventh decade without sex preference. The tumors affecting the minor salivary glands occur most frequently at the oral cavity (jugal mucosa, palate) and the upper respiratory tract. The prevalent histologic tumor pattern is represented by solid neoplastic aggregates with a peripheral cell palisading arrangement frequently delineated by basement membrane-like material. The neoplastic clusters are formed by two cell populations: the small dark cell type (that predominates) and a large cell type. Necrosis, either of the comedo or the apoptotic type, is a frequent finding. Perineural growth occurs in 50% of the cases and vascular permeation in 25%. Immunohistochemistry identifies a dual differentiation with a reactivity pattern indicative of ductal epithelial and myoepithelial differentiation, which can be confirmed by electron microscopy. The differential diagnosis of the neoplasm includes its benign counterpart, the basal cell adenoma, solid variant of adenoid cystic carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, and basaloid squamous carcinoma. The tumors recur more frequently than lesions originating in major salivary glands. Mortality is associated with the anatomic site of the lesion, advanced stage, residual neoplasia at surgery, and tumor recurrence. The importance of recognizing basal cell adenocarcinoma outside major salivary glands is

  2. Characterization and cellular localization of nucleophosmin/B23 in HeLa cells treated with selected cytotoxic agents (studies of B23-translocation mechanism).

    PubMed

    Chan, P K

    1992-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that nucleophosmin/B23, an abundant nucleolar phosphoprotein, accumulated in the nucleoplasm (B23-translocation) of cells after exposure to selected cytotoxic drugs. Attempts were made to understand the B23-translocation mechanism. This paper reports that: (1) B23-translocation is a reversible process. Upon removal of camptothecin, which induced B23-translocation in HeLa cells, nucleophosmin/B23 relocalized into nucleoli within 2 h. Relocation occurs in the presence of cycloheximide which inhibits new protein synthesis. There is no reduction or degradation of nucleophosmin/B23 detected during drug treatments. Nucleophosmin/B23 has a half-life of 18-20 h. Taken together, these results indicate that B23-translocation is a reversible process. Drug treatment causes redistribution of nucleophosmin/B23 in nucleoplasm. (2) Inhibition of RNA synthesis does not cause the B23-translocation. Over 80% of RNA synthesis was inhibited in HeLa cells by treatment with actinomycin D, camptothecin, and methotrexate. While actinomycin D and camptothecin cause B23-translocation in all cells, 40% of methotrexate-treated cells remain untranslocated. (3) There is no significant change of phosphorylation in nucleophosmin/B23 during drug treatment. An identical oligomeric cross-linkage pattern was obtained in drug-treated cells. (4) HeLa cells treated with B23-translocation effective drugs have small and round nucleoli while control cells have large and irregular-shaped nucleoli. PMID:1426041

  3. The antiarrhythmic peptide rotigaptide (ZP123) increases gap junction intercellular communication in cardiac myocytes and HeLa cells expressing connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Thomas C; Thomas, Dafydd; Petersen, Jørgen S; Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of rotigaptide (ZP123), a stable hexapeptide with antiarrhythmic properties, on gap junction mediated intercellular communication in contracting rat neonatal cardiac myocytes, HL-1 cells derived from cardiac atrium and in HeLa cells transfected with cDNA encoding Cx43-GFP, Cx32-GFP, Cx26-GFP, wild-type Cx43 or wild-type Cx26. Intercellular communication was monitored before and after treatment with rotigaptide following microinjection of small fluorescent dyes (MW<1 kDa). The communication-modifying effect of rotigaptide was confined to cells expressing Cx43 since the peptide had no effect on dye transfer in HeLa cells expressing Cx32-GFP, Cx26-GFP or wild-type Cx26. In contrast, HeLa cells expressing Cx43-GFP exposed to 50 nM rotigaptide for 5 h showed a 40% increase in gap junction mediated communication. Rotigaptide (50 nM) increased intercellular dye transfer in myocytes and atrial HL-1 cells, where Cx43 is the dominant connexin. However, it caused no change in cell beating rates of cardiac myocytes. Western blot analysis showed that rotigaptide did not modify the overall level of Cx43 expression and changes in the phosphorylation status of the protein were not observed. We conclude that the effects of rotigaptide were confined to cells expressing Cx43. PMID:16415913

  4. Accurate identification of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) inhibitors using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) plays an irreplaceable role in detoxification of bilirubin and many drugs (e.g., SN-38). Here we aimed to explore the potential of UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells) as a tool to accurately identify UGT1A1 inhibitors. 2. Determination of glucuronidation rates (β-estradiol and SN-38 as the substrates) was performed using HeLa1A1 cells and uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA)-supplemented cDNA expressed UGT1A1 enzyme (or microsomes). The inhibitory effects (IC50 values) of 20 structurally diverse compounds on the UGT1A1 activity were determined using HeLa1A1 cells and microsomal incubations. 3. In HeLa1A1 cells, the IC50 values for inhibition of β-estradiol glucuronidation by the tested compounds ranged from 0.33 to 94.6 µM. In the microsomal incubations, the IC50 values ranged from 0.47 to 155 µM. It was found that the IC50 values of all test compounds derived from the cells were well consistent with those from the microsomes (deviated by less than two-fold). Further, the IC50 values from the cells were strongly correlated with those from microsomes (r = 0.944, p < 0.001). Likewise, the IC50 values (0.37-77.3 µM) for inhibition of SN-38 glucuronidation in the cells were close to those (0.42-122 µM) for glucuronidation inhibition in microsomes. A strong correlation was also observed between the two sets of IC50 values (r = 0.978, p < 0.001). 4. In conclusion, UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells were an appropriate tool to accurately depict the inhibition profiles of chemicals against UGT1A1. PMID:26068529

  5. Gemcitabine response in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells is synergistically enhanced by dithiocarbamate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Donadelli, Massimo; Costanzo, Chiara; Zaniboni, Tatyana; Dando, Ilaria; Franchini, Marta; Arpicco, Silvia; Scarpa, Aldo; Palmieri, Marta

    2011-04-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a common malignancy that remains refractory to all available therapies, including the gold standard drug gemcitabine (GEM). We investigated the effect of the combination of GEM and each of the ionophore compounds pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and disulfiram [DSF; 1-(diethylthiocarbamoyldisulfanyl)-N,N-diethylmethanethioamide] on p53(-/-) pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth. PDTC or DSF synergistically inhibited cell proliferation when used in combination with GEM by inducing apoptotic cell death. This effect was associated with an increased mitochondrial O(2)(•-) production and was further enhanced by zinc ions. Basal levels of mitochondrial O(2)(•-) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) strictly correlated with the IC(50) for GEM or the percentage of synergism. Thus, the most relevant values of the antiproliferative synergism were obtained in GEM-resistant pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Interestingly, the GEM-sensitive T3M4 cells transfected with MnSOD expression vector showed mitochondrial O(2)(•-) and IC(50) for GEM similar to those of resistant cell lines. In vivo experiments performed on nude mice xenotransplanted with the GEM-resistant PaCa44 cell line showed that only the combined treatment with GEM and DSF/Zn completely inhibited the growth of the tumoral masses. These results and the consideration that DSF is already used in clinics strongly support the GEM and DSF/Zn combination as a new approach to overcoming pancreatic cancer resistance to standard chemotherapy.

  6. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptotic pathway and mitochondrial dysregulation in HeLa cells treated with dichloromethane extract of Dillenia suffruticosa

    PubMed Central

    Wan Nor Hafiza, Wan Abd Ghani; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Tor, Yin Sim; Foo, Jhi Biau; Armania, Nurdin; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl acetate and dichloromethane extract of Dillenia suffruticosa (EADS and DCMDS, respectively) can be a potential anticancer agent. The effects of EADS and DCMDS on the growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells and the expression of apoptotic-related proteins had been investigated in vitro. Cytotoxicity of the extracts toward the cells was determined by 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the effects on cell cycle progression and the mode of cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry technique, while the effects on apoptotic-related genes and proteins were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Treatment with DCMDS inhibited (P < 0.05) proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. The expression of cyclin B1 was downregulated that led to G2/M arrest in the cells after treatment with DCMDA. In summary, DCMDS induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptotic pathway and dysregulation of mitochondria. The data suggest the potential application of DCMDS in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27041866

  8. Dock10, a Cdc42 and Rac1 GEF, induces loss of elongation, filopodia, and ruffles in cervical cancer epithelial HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lafuente, Natalia; Alcaraz-García, María-José; García-Serna, Azahara-María; Sebastián-Ruiz, Silvia; Moya-Quiles, María-Rosa; García-Alonso, Ana-María; Parrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Dock10 is one of the three members of the Dock-D family of Dock proteins, a class of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. Its homologs Dock9 and Dock11 are Cdc42 GEFs. Dock10 is required for maintenance of rounded morphology and amoeboid-type movement. Full-length isoforms of Dock10 have been recently cloned. Here, we address GTPase specificity and GEF activity of Dock10. In order of decreasing intensity, Dock10 interacted with nucleotide-free Rac1, Cdc42, and Rac3, and more weakly with Rac2, RhoF, and RhoG. Inducible expression of Dock10 in HeLa epithelial cells promoted GEF activity on Cdc42 and Rac1, and a morphologic change in two-dimensional culture consisting in loss of cell elongation, increase of filopodia, and ruffles. Area in contact with the substrate of cells that spread with non-elongated morphology was larger in cells expressing Dock10. Inducible expression of constitutively active mutants of Cdc42 and Rac1 in HeLa cells also induced loss of elongation. However, Cdc42 induced filopodia and contraction, and Rac1 induced membrane ruffles and flattening. When co-expressed with Dock10, Cdc42 potentiated filopodia, and Rac1 potentiated ruffles. These results suggest that Dock10 functions as a dual GEF for Cdc42 and Rac1, affecting cell morphology, spreading and actin cytoskeleton protrusions of adherent HeLa cells. PMID:25862245

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptotic pathway and mitochondrial dysregulation in HeLa cells treated with dichloromethane extract of Dillenia suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Wan Nor Hafiza, Wan Abd Ghani; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Tor, Yin Sim; Foo, Jhi Biau; Armania, Nurdin; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl acetate and dichloromethane extract of Dillenia suffruticosa (EADS and DCMDS, respectively) can be a potential anticancer agent. The effects of EADS and DCMDS on the growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells and the expression of apoptotic-related proteins had been investigated in vitro. Cytotoxicity of the extracts toward the cells was determined by 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the effects on cell cycle progression and the mode of cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry technique, while the effects on apoptotic-related genes and proteins were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Treatment with DCMDS inhibited (P < 0.05) proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. The expression of cyclin B1 was downregulated that led to G2/M arrest in the cells after treatment with DCMDA. In summary, DCMDS induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptotic pathway and dysregulation of mitochondria. The data suggest the potential application of DCMDS in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27041866

  10. Resistance of cyclooxygenase-2 expressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells against γδ T cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Daniel; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kellner, Christian; Peipp, Matthias; Sebens, Susanne; Kabelitz, Dieter; Wesch, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The prostaglandin (PG) synthetase cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) promotes tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in a variety of human cancer entities including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we demonstrate that in PDAC cells such as Colo357 cells, enhanced Cox-2 expression and increased release of the Cox-2 metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes resistance against γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Co-culture with activated γδ T cells induced an upregulation of Cox-2 expression in Colo357 cells, and thereby an enhanced PGE2 release, in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) secretion from γδ T cells. The PGE2-mediated inhibition of γδ T cell cytotoxicity against Cox-2-expressing PDAC cells can be partially overcome by Cox-2 inhibitors. Our results show that differences between PDAC cells in regards to sensitivity to γδ T-cell cytotoxicity can be due to distinct levels of Cox-2 expression associated with varying amounts of PGE2 release. While γδ T cell cytotoxicity against PDAC cells expressing low levels of Cox-2 can be effectively enhanced by tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] with specificity for Vγ9 T cell receptor and HER-2/neu on PDAC cells, a combination of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] and Cox-2 inhibitor is necessary to induce complete lysis of Cox-2 high expressing Colo357. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] that enhances γδ T-cell cytotoxicity and Cox-2 inhibitors that overcome PGE2-mediated resistance of PDAC cells to the cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells might offer a promising combined immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25949900

  11. Association to HeLa cells and surface behavior of exogenous gangliosides studied with a fluorescent derivative of GM1

    SciTech Connect

    Masserini, M.; Giuliani, A.; Palestini, P.; Acquotti, D.; Pitto, M.; Chigorno, V.; Tettamanti, G. )

    1990-01-23

    Cultured HeLa cells were incubated with pyrene-GM1/{sup 3}H-radiolabeled GM1 ganglioside (1:4 M/M) mixtures for various times. The process of association of pyrene-GM1 with cells was qualitatively and quantitatively the same as that of {sup 3}H-GM1. The pyrene-GM1 and {sup 3}H-GM1 proportions in the various forms of association with cells were similar to that of the starting ganglioside mixture. After 2-h incubation, the association of ganglioside with cells was well established whereas almost no metabolic processing had occurred. During a 24-h incubation, pyrene- and {sup 3}H-GM1 underwent similar metabolic processing and gave rise to catabolic (GM2 and GM3) and anabolic (GDla) derivatives. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments carried out with the excimer formation technique on subcellular fractions containing plasma membranes showed that exogenous ganglioside was, in part, associated with the cells in a micellar form removable by trypsin treatment, and in part inserted in a seemingly molecular dispersion. Addition of Ca{sup 2+} salts caused aggregation of the ganglioside, as indicated by the increase of the excimer:monomer fluorescence ratio. The phenomenon was Ca{sup 2+} concentration dependent (maximum at 10 mM), and subsequent addition of EDTA has no effect. The saccharide portion of exogenously incorporated pyrene-GM1 was available to interact with external ligands, as shown by its ability to bind cholera toxin whose addition reduced the collision rate among the ganglioside lipid moieties.

  12. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Jin, Faguang

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy.

  13. Involvement of the heparan sulphate-binding proteins of Helicobacter pylori in its adherence to HeLa S3 and Kato III cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Murillo, M A; Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ho, B; Ascencio, F

    2001-04-01

    To determine whether Helicobacter pylori heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) are involved in the adherence of H. pylori to HeLa and Kato III cells, monolayers were pre-incubated with various preparations and concentrations of H. pylori HSBPs at 37 degrees C, washed and then challenged with bacteria. HSBPs did not prevent but enhanced H. pylori adherence. However, challenging cultured cells with H. pylori previously incubated with rabbit anti-HSBP IgG resulted in significant inhibition of bacterial adherence. These data demonstrate that the extracellular HSBP plays an important role in promoting H. pylori attachment to Kato III and HeLa S3 cells, that adhesion of H. pylori to Kato III and HeLa S3 cells is promoted by the presence of the 71.5-kDa extracellular HSBP and that rabbit polyclonal antibodies against this HSBP can inhibit adhesion of H. pylori to the cultured cell lines and detach cell-bound H. pylori. PMID:11289517

  14. PVM/MA-shelled selol nanocapsules promote cell cycle arrest in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selol is an oily mixture of selenitetriacylglycerides that was obtained as a semi-synthetic compound containing selenite. Selol is effective against cancerous cells and less toxic to normal cells compared with inorganic forms of selenite. However, Selol’s hydrophobicity hinders its administration in vivo. Therefore, the present study aimed to produce a formulation of Selol nanocapsules (SPN) and to test its effectiveness against pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Results Nanocapsules were produced through an interfacial nanoprecipitation method. The polymer shell was composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride) (PVM/MA) copolymer. The obtained nanocapsules were monodisperse and stable. Both free Selol (S) and SPN reduced the viability of A549 cells, whereas S induced a greater reduction in non-tumor cell viability than SPN. The suppressor effect of SPN was primarily associated to the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle, as was corroborated by the down-regulations of the CCNB1 and CDC25C genes. Apoptosis and necrosis were induced by Selol in a discrete percentage of A549 cells. SPN also increased the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative cellular damage and to the overexpression of the GPX1, CYP1A1, BAX and BCL2 genes. Conclusions This study presents a stable formulation of PVM/MA-shelled Selol nanocapsules and provides the first demonstration that Selol promotes G2/M arrest in cancerous cells. PMID:25149827

  15. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  16. The role of STAT-6 as a key transcription regulator in HeLa cell death induced by IFN-γ/TNF-α co-immobilized on nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibin; Guan, Yan-Qing; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Based on the fact that the transcription of STAT-1 plus its Serine 727 and Tyrosine 701 phosphorylation is not the pre-requisite for the cell death signal transduction in the IFN-γ signaling pathway induced by co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α, we investigate both in vitro and in vivo the key transcription regulators to promote the signal transduction of HeLa cells. It is found that IFN-γ R2 is the important death signal receptor in the HeLa cell death by RNA interference. Checking the expression of the whole transcription (STAT) protein family reveals that STAT-6 is highly expressed in comparison with the other STAT proteins. The gene silence of IFN-γ R2 leads to the down-regulation of STAT-6 and phosphorylation-STAT-6 (p-STAT-6) expressions. The successful gene silence of STAT-6 results in the reduction of HeLa cell programmed death and the expression of several important key factors related to programmed cell death (p53, Bcl-2, and Bax). More importantly, our in vivo experiments by injecting nanoparticle drug carriers with the co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α into nude mice model confirm the high expression of STAT-6 and p-STAT-6. It is thus concluded that, in response to IFN-γ, the co-immobilized IFN-γ/TNF-α unusually promotes the activation of STAT-6 rather than STAT-1, resulting in the enhanced cell programmed death in HeLa. The present work reveals the gene-level molecular mechanism of IFN-γ/TNF-α co-immobilized on biomaterials as a potentially effective therapy against cancer cells.

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide-caused changes in pro- and anti-angiogenic factor levels could contribute to an anti-angiogenic response in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra Arslan; İmir, Nilüfer; Koçak, Orhan; Kuruoğlu, Aykut; Fışkın, Kayahan

    2015-10-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used in biological research as a general solvent. While it has been previously demonstrated that DMSO possesses a wide range of pharmacological effects, there is no published work regarding the effects of DMSO on pro-angiogenic factor levels. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of DMSO on the levels of three pro-angiogenic factors released from HeLa cells in vitro. Cells were treated with two different and previously determined concentrations of DMSO. The cytotoxic effects of DMSO concentrations on HeLa cells were determined via MTT. Survival rates of DMSO-treated cells were determined by Invitrogen live/dead viability/cytotoxicity kit and trypan blue exclusion assay. Changes in the pro-angiogenic levels in media were evaluated by Cayman's Substance P Enzyme Immunoassay ELISA kit. Vascular endothelial growth factor ELISA kit and interferon gamma ELISA kit for substance P, VEGF and IFNγ respectively. Changes in substance P levels were corrected by standard western blotting. Changes in VEGF and IFNγ levels were corrected both by western blot and real time PCR. Treatment with 1.4 μM DMSO caused a time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation at 24, 48 and 72 h. 1.4 μM DMSO caused a significant reduction in VEGF levels at 72 h of incubation and sharp increases in IFNγ levels at both 48 and 72 h of incubation. According to real time PCR analyses, DMSO (1.4 μM) exhibited an inhibitory effect on VEGF but acted as an augmenter of IFNγ release on HeLa cells in vitro. This is the first report showing that the general solvent DMSO suppressed HeLa cell proliferation, decreased the levels of two pro-angiogenic factors (substance P and VEGF) and increased the release of an anti-angiogenic factor IFNγ in vitro.

  18. Human Papillomavirus E6 Knockdown Restores Adenovirus Mediated-estrogen Response Element Linked p53 Gene Transfer in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Koji; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Ishiko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The p53 gene is inactivated by the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein in the majority of cervical cancers. Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with siRNA for HPV E6 permitted adenovirus-mediated transduction of a p53 gene linked to an upstream estrogen response element (ERE). Our previous study in non-siRNA treated HHUA cells, which are derived from an endometrial cancer and express estrogen receptor β, showed enhancing effects of an upstream ERE on adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction. In HeLa S3 cells treated with siRNA for HPV E6, adenovirus-mediated transduction was enhanced by an upstream ERE linked to a p53 gene carrying a proline variant at codon 72, but not for a p53 gene with arginine variant at codon 72. Expression levels of p53 mRNA and Coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR) mRNA after adenovirus-mediated transfer of an ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) were higher compared with those after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells. Western blot analysis showed lower β-tubulin levels and comparatively higher p53/β-tubulin or CAR /β-tubulin ratios in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with those in non-siRNA-treated cells. Apoptosis, as measured by annexin V binding, was higher after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with that after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated cells.

  19. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tian, Tian; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, we examined the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of histamine increased ALDH1 high population, which was consistent with the result that histamine enhanced the invasive ability and the resistance to anticancer drug. Among 4 types of histamine receptors, histamine H1 and H2 receptor (H1R and H2R) were expressed in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line. The addition of H1R agonist but not H2R agonist increased ALDH1. The antagonist H1R but not H2R inhibited the effect of histamine on ALDH1 expression. These results indicated that histamine increased the expression of ALDH1 via H1R but not H2R. These findings may provide the evidence for exploring a new strategy to suppress CICs by inhibiting ALDH1 expression with histamine.

  20. Carboxylic monolayer formation for observation of intracellular structures in HeLa cells with direct electron beam excitation-assisted fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuriko; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular structures of HeLa cells are observed using a direct electron beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this microscope, a silicon nitride membrane is used as a culture plate, which typically has a low biocompatibility between the sample and the silicon nitride surface to prevent the HeLa cells from adhering strongly to the surface. In this work, the surface of silicon nitride is modified to allow strong cell attachment, which enables high-resolution observation of intracellular structures and an increased signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the penetration depth of the electron beam is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. We can conclude from the results of the observations and simulations that the surface modification technique is promising for the observation of intracellular structures using the D-EXA microscope. PMID:26309772

  1. Effects of Yeast and Bacterial Commensals and Pathogens of the Female Genital Tract on the Transepithelial Electrical Resistance of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsata, Vassiliki; Velegraki, Aristea; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Bagos, Pantelis; Magana, Maria; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Commensals of the human body can shift to a pathogenic phase when the host immune system is impaired. This study aims to investigate the effect of seven yeast and two bacterial commensals and opportunistic pathogens isolated from blood and the female genital tract on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of human cervical epithelial cell cultures (HeLa). The pathogens Candida tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caused a significant decrease in TER as compared to the controls; Lactobacillus spp caused a significant increase in TER versus the controls and Escherichia coli had no effect on the TER of the cell monolayers. The above data show that Candida spp., S. cerevisiae and Lactobacillus spp. have a non-selective effect on the TER of HeLa cell monolayers. These results are consistent with the in vivo non-selective action of these microorganisms on the various human mucosal epithelia. PMID:27335621

  2. Antiproliferative activity of methanolic extracts from two green algae, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rizoclonium riparium on HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural compounds can be alternative sources for finding new lead anti-cancer molecules. Marine algae have been a traditional source for bioactive compounds. Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rhizoclonium riparium are two well distributed saline/brackish water algae from Sundarbans. There’s no previous report of these two for their anti-proliferative activities. Methods Cytotoxicity of the algal methanolic extracts (AMEs) on HeLa cells were assayed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Morphological examinations were done by Haematoxylin, Hoechst 33258 and Acridine orange staining. DNA fragmentation was checked. Gene expressions of Cysteine aspartate protease (Caspase) 3, Tumor protein (TP) 53, Bcl-2 associated protein X (Bax) were studied by Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) keeping Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as internal control. Protein expressions were studied for Caspase 3, phospho-p53, Bax, Microtubule associated proteins-1/ light chain B (MAP1/LC3B) by western blot. Results The AMEs were found to be cytotoxic with Inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values 309.048 ± 3.083 μg/ml and 506.081 ± 3.714 μg/ml for E. intestinalis and R. riparium extracts respectively. Treated cells became round with blebbings with condensed nuclei. Acidic lysosomal vacuoles formation occurred in treated cells. Expression of apoptotic genes in both mRNA and protein level was lowered. Expression of LC3B-II suggested occurrence of autophagy in treated cells. Conclusions These two algae can be potent candidates for isolating new lead anticancer molecules. So they need further characterization at both molecular and structural levels. PMID:24355313

  3. Defective interfering influenza viruses and host cells: establishment and maintenance of persistent influenza virus infection in MDBK and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    De, B K; Nayak, D P

    1980-12-01

    WSN (H0N1) influenza virus upon undiluted passages in different species of cells, namely, bovine kidney (MDBK), chicken embryo (CEF), and HeLa cells, produced a varying amount of defective interfering (DI) virus which correlated well with the ability of the species of cell to produce infectious virus. However, the nature of the influenza DI viral RNA produced from a single clonal stock was essentially identical in all three cells types, suggesting that these cells do not exert a great selective pressure in the amplification of specific DI viral RNAs either at early or late passages. DI viruses produced from one subtype (H0N1) could interfere with the replication of infectious viruses belonging to other subtypes (H1N1, H3N2). DI viral RNAs could also replicate with the helper function of other subtype viruses. The persistent infection of MDBK and HeLa cells could be initiated by coinfecting cells with both temperature-sensitive mutants (ts-) and DI influenza viruses. Persistently infected cultures cultures at early passages (up to passage 7) showed a cyclical pattern of cell lysis and virus production (crisis), whereas, at later passages (after passage 20), they produced little or no virus and were resistant to infection by homologous virus but not by heterologous virus. The majority of persistently infected cells, however, contained the complete viral genome since they expressed viral antigens and produced infectious centers. Selection of a slow-growing temperature-sensitive variant rather than the presence of DI virus or interferon appears to be critical in maintaining persistent influenza infection in these cells.

  4. Hsp105 family proteins suppress staurosporine-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi; Saito, Youhei; Hatayama, Takumi . E-mail: hatayama@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-10-15

    Hsp105 (Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}), major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells, belong to a subgroup of the HSP70 family, HSP105/110. Previously, we have shown that Hsp105{alpha} has completely different effects on stress-induced apoptosis depending on cell type. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hsp105{alpha} regulates stress-induced apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we established HeLa cells that overexpress either Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} by removing doxycycline and examined how Hsp105 modifies staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Apoptotic features such as the externalization of phosphatidylserine on the plasma membrane and nuclear morphological changes were induced by the treatment with STS, and the STS-induced apoptosis was suppressed by overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. In addition, we found that overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by preventing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which results in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, was also suppressed by the overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. Thus, it is suggested that Hsp105 suppresses the stress-induced apoptosis at its initial step, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells.

  5. [Construction of ADAMTS13-pEGFP-N1 vector and its expression in HeLa cells].

    PubMed

    Ling, Jing; Ma, Zhen-Ni; Su, Jian; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2013-02-01

    This study was aimed to construct a pEGFP-N1 vector of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13, a disintegrin and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13) so as to pave the way for further studying its synthesis and secretion. Human full-length cDNA sequence of ADAMTS13 was acquired by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Phusion(®) High-Fidelity (NEB), then the PCR product was double digested with EcoRI and XhoI. After digestion, the ADAMTS13 cDNA sequence was purified and recombined with the pEGFP-N1 vector. The DNA sequence analysis showed that ADAMTS13 was ligated to the pEGFP-N1 vector correctly. After transient expression in HeLa cells, the expression of EGFP could be detected by fluorescent microscopy, and the expression of ADAMTS13 protein could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. It is concluded that the ADAMTS13-pEGFP-N1 vector is successfully constructed, and it can be widely used in further research on the mechanism of the synthesis and secretion of ADAMTS13. PMID:23484705

  6. Differential mitotic activation of endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Takahisa; Nakayama, Yuji; Hoshino, Masaki; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Obata, Yuuki; Matsuda, Daisuke; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2007-10-01

    Src-family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) play an important role in mitosis. Despite overlapping expression of multiple SFK members, little is known about how individual SFK members are activated in M phase. Here, we examined mitotic activation of endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn, which are co-expressed in HeLa cells. c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn were activated at different levels in M phase, and the activation was inhibited by Cdc2 inactivation. Mitotic c-Src and c-Yes exhibited normal- and retarded-electrophoretic-mobility forms on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, whereas Lyn did not show mobility retardation. Like c-Src, the retardation of electrophoretic mobility of c-Yes was caused by Cdc2-mediated phosphorylation. The normal- and retarded-mobility forms of c-Src were comparably activated, but activation of the retarded-mobility form of c-Yes was higher than that of the normal-mobility form of c-Yes. Thus, these results suggest that endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn are differentially activated through Cdc2 activation during M phase.

  7. Nucleotide sequences of cDNAs for human papillomavirus type 18 transcripts in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yutaka; Tsunokawa, Youko; Takebe, Naoko; Terada, Masaaki; Sugimura, Takashi ); Nawa, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Shigetada )

    1988-05-01

    HeLa cells expressed 3.4- and 1.6-kilobase (kb) transcripts of the integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 genome. Two types of cDNA clones representing each size of HPV type 18 transcript were isolated. Sequence analysis of these two types of cDNA clones revealed that the 3.4-kb transcript contained E6, E7, the 5{prime} portion of E1, and human sequence and that the 1.6-kb transcript contained spliced and frameshifted E6 (E6{sup *}), E7, and human sequence. There was a common human sequence containing a poly(A) addition signal in the 3{prime} end portions of both transcripts, indicating that they were transcribed from the HPV genome at the same integration site with different splicing. Furthermore, the 1.6-kb transcript contained both of the two viral TATA boxes upstream of E6, strongly indicating that a cellular promoter was used for its transcription.

  8. Hochu‑ekki‑to (Bu‑zhong‑yi‑qi‑tang), a herbal medicine, enhances cisplatin‑induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tetsuo; Kita, Kazuko; Sato, Chihomi; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    Hochu‑ekki‑to (HET), a Kampō herbal medicine composed of ten medicinal plants, is traditionally used to improve the general state of patients with malignant diseases such as cancer. Recent studies showed that HET had an anti‑cancer effect against several cancer cell lines in vitro by inducing apoptosis. However, high doses of HET may have cytotoxic effects attributed to saponins or detergent‑like compounds. Therefore, the present study used low doses of HET (50 µg/ml), which did not affect cell viability, to evaluate its synergistic anti‑cancer effects with cisplatin. HeLa cells were cultured for 24 h with 50 µg/ml HET, followed by cisplatin treatment for 24 h at various concentrations. Subsequently, the sensitivity of the cells to cisplatin was assessed using a colony survival and a crystal violet cell viability assay. Furthermore, cisplatin‑induced apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Proteins associated with cell viability and apoptosis, including phosphorylated (p‑)Akt, p53, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and active caspase‑3 were analyzed by immunoblotting. The present study revealed that cell survival was decreased and apoptosis was increased in HeLa cells pre‑treated with HET prior to cisplatin treatment compared with HET‑untreated cells. Furthermore, protein expression of p53 and active caspase‑3 was increased, while the expression of p‑Akt as well as the Bcl‑2/Bax ratio, an index of survival activity in cells, were decreased in the HET‑pre‑treated cells compared with those in HET‑untreated cells following incubation with cisplatin. In conclusion, the present study indicated that HET enhanced cisplatin‑induced apoptosis of HeLa cells and that the administration of HET may therefore be clinically beneficial alongside apoptosis‑inducing chemotherapy.

  9. Role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression, and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Poorigali Raghavendra-Rao; Arathi, Bangalore Prabhashankar; Vijay, Kariyappa; Baskaran, Vallikannan; Lakshminarayana, Rangaswamy

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells (5 × 10(3)) were treated with different concentrations (25-100 µM) of β-carotene (BC) or lutein (L) or astaxanthin (AST) dissolved in 0.5% of tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and fetal bovine serum (FBS), respectively. The effect of delivery vehicle on carotenoids uptake, cytotoxicity, oxidative status, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis was examined after 48 h of incubation. The results shown that, cell viability reduced significantly in a dose- and time-dependent manner irrespective of carotenoid delivered in vehicles. Cellular uptake of BC delivered in THF was higher by 49.1, 29.7% and L delivered through THF was higher by 41.7 and 37.5% than DMSO and FBS, respectively. While, AST delivered through DMSO was higher by 36.1 and 43.7% than the THF and FBS, respectively. In case of cells treated either with BC or L delivered through THF and AST in DMSO decreased the glutathione and increased the malondialdehyde levels. The net increase in the G 2/M phase percentage of cell cycle progression was observed in carotenoid-treated cells. The % induction of apoptosis by BC or L delivered with THF and AST in DMSO was higher than other treated groups. In conclusion, choice of suitable vehicle for specific carotenoids delivery is essential that in turn may influence on cell proliferation and cell-based assays.

  10. Effects of activated aflatoxin B/sub 1/ and caffeine on DNA replicon initiation in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.; Painter, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Afatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) is activated by a rat microsomal extract (S-9) to form a product that inhibits DNA synthesis in HeLa cells. At 10/sup -7/ M, AFB/sub 1/ inhibited initiation of replicons, as shown in alkaline sucrose gradient profiles 30 min after incubation with the drug. Ninety minutes later, the profile of treated cells was similar to that of control, but 4 h later there was another effect on replicon initiation. At 10/sup -6/ M, the inhibition of initiation was greater than at 10/sup -7/ M and increased progressively. Four hours after removal of the drug, the gradient profile showed low amounts of radioactivity in all size classes of DNA. When cells were incubated in medium containing caffeine (2 mM) even as late as 60 min after incubation with AFB/sub 1/, the inhibition of replicon initiation was prevented. If caffeine was later removed from the medium, replicon initiation was then inhibited. At 10/sup -7/ M or 10/sup -6/ M, AFB/sub 1/ had little immediate effect on chain elongation, but at 10/sup -5/ M, the gradient profiles showed an accumulation of low molecular weight DNA molecules, with no radioactivity in the region of high molecular weight DNA, owing to a block to chain elongation; this was not affected by caffeine. These results suggest that AFB/sub 1/ induces damage that changes the fonformation of chromatin so that initiation of new replicons cannot occur; in the presence of caffeine this change does not occur and DNA replication is not inhibited.

  11. Extracellular gentamicin reduces the activity of connexin hemichannels and interferes with purinergic Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Vania A.; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Cea, Luis A.; Salas, José D.; Vargas, Aníbal A.; Verdugo, Christian A.; Jara, Oscar; Martínez, Agustín D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) and hemichannels (HCs) are composed of protein subunits termed connexins (Cxs) and are permeable to ions and small molecules. In most organs, GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, while HCs communicate the intra and extracellular compartments. In this way, both channel types coordinate physiological responses of cell communities. Cx mutations explain several genetic diseases, including about 50% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. However, the possible involvement of Cxs in the etiology of acquired hearing loss remains virtually unknown. Factors that induce post-lingual hearing loss are diverse, exposure to gentamicin an aminoglycoside antibiotic, being the most common. Gentamicin has been proposed to block GJCs, but its effect on HCs remains unknown. In this work, the effect of gentamicin on the functional state of HCs was studied and its effect on GJCs was reevaluated in HeLa cells stably transfected with Cxs. We focused on Cx26 because it is the main Cx expressed in the cochlea of mammals where it participates in purinergic signaling pathways. We found that gentamicin applied extracellularly reduces the activity of HCs, while dye transfer across GJCs was not affected. HCs were also blocked by streptomycin, another aminoglycoside antibiotic. Gentamicin also reduced the adenosine triphosphate release and the HC-dependent oscillations of cytosolic free-Ca2+ signal. Moreover, gentamicin drastically reduced the Cx26 HC-mediated membrane currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Therefore, the extracellular gentamicin-induced inhibition of Cx HCs may adversely affect autocrine and paracrine signaling, including the purinergic one, which might partially explain its ototoxic effects. PMID:25237294

  12. Extracellular gentamicin reduces the activity of connexin hemichannels and interferes with purinergic Ca(2+) signaling in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Vania A; Retamal, Mauricio A; Cea, Luis A; Salas, José D; Vargas, Aníbal A; Verdugo, Christian A; Jara, Oscar; Martínez, Agustín D; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) and hemichannels (HCs) are composed of protein subunits termed connexins (Cxs) and are permeable to ions and small molecules. In most organs, GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, while HCs communicate the intra and extracellular compartments. In this way, both channel types coordinate physiological responses of cell communities. Cx mutations explain several genetic diseases, including about 50% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. However, the possible involvement of Cxs in the etiology of acquired hearing loss remains virtually unknown. Factors that induce post-lingual hearing loss are diverse, exposure to gentamicin an aminoglycoside antibiotic, being the most common. Gentamicin has been proposed to block GJCs, but its effect on HCs remains unknown. In this work, the effect of gentamicin on the functional state of HCs was studied and its effect on GJCs was reevaluated in HeLa cells stably transfected with Cxs. We focused on Cx26 because it is the main Cx expressed in the cochlea of mammals where it participates in purinergic signaling pathways. We found that gentamicin applied extracellularly reduces the activity of HCs, while dye transfer across GJCs was not affected. HCs were also blocked by streptomycin, another aminoglycoside antibiotic. Gentamicin also reduced the adenosine triphosphate release and the HC-dependent oscillations of cytosolic free-Ca(2+) signal. Moreover, gentamicin drastically reduced the Cx26 HC-mediated membrane currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Therefore, the extracellular gentamicin-induced inhibition of Cx HCs may adversely affect autocrine and paracrine signaling, including the purinergic one, which might partially explain its ototoxic effects.

  13. Ferritin heavy chain-mediated iron homoeostasis regulates expression of IL-10 in Chlamydia trachomatis-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Vardhan, Harsh; Gupta, Rishein; Jha, Rajneesh; Bhengraj, Apurb Rashmi; Mittal, Aruna

    2011-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of sexually transmitted infection worldwide, in which disease outcome is determined by the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory host immune responses. Iron plays important roles in regulation and enhancement of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Earlier studies have established essentiality of iron in C. trachomatis infection; however, there is lack of study wherein modulatory effect of iron regulated protein [FHC (ferritin heavy chain)] in regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL (interleukin)-10 has been investigated. In this study, immunoblotting results showed the up-regulation of FHC in C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells in comparison with mock (in vitro control). Further secretory IL-10 level was significantly increased (P<0.001) or decreased (P<0.001) in response to iron supplementation [FAC (ferric ammonium citrate)] and depletion [DFO (deferoxamine)], respectively. However, in C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells, levels of IL-10 remain higher, irrespective of availability of iron in comparison with their respective control. These results showed that secretion of IL-10 and expressions of FHC have concordance. Further, to understand interdependence of IL-10 and iron homoeostasis (regulation), the levels of IL-10 were compared with iron-responsive GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in HeLa-229 cells. The mean fluorescent intensities of GFP were in accordance with levels of IL-10 in C. trachomatis-infected cells. These results showed the association of secreted IL-10, FHC and iron homoeostasis in C. trachomatis-infected HeLa-229 cells. This study provides insight into host-Chlamydia interaction at the crossroad of iron metabolism and immune responses and may help in realizing the potential of iron homoeostasis modulators in treatment of chronic chlamydial infection.

  14. Synchronous ipsilateral sebaceous lymphadenoma and acinic cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, M; Fernández, N; Val-Bernal, J F

    1999-11-01

    The synchronous or metachronous occurrence of 2 tumors of the salivary glands in a patient is rare. These tumors are usually benign and of the same histologic type. Here we report a 78-year-old woman who developed a sebaceous lymphadenoma and an acinic cell adenocarcinoma simultaneously in the left parotid gland. To our knowledge, this combination of neoplasms has not been reported before.

  15. Using HeLa cell stress response to introduce first year students to the scientific method, laboratory techniques, primary literature, and scientific writing.

    PubMed

    Resendes, Karen K

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating scientific literacy into inquiry driven research is one of the most effective mechanisms for developing an undergraduate student's strength in writing. Additionally, discovery-based laboratories help develop students who approach science as critical thinkers. Thus, a three-week laboratory module for an introductory cell and molecular biology course that couples inquiry-based experimental design with extensive scientific writing was designed at Westminster College to expose first year students to these concepts early in their undergraduate career. In the module students used scientific literature to design and then implement an experiment on the effect of cellular stress on protein expression in HeLa cells. In parallel the students developed a research paper in the style of the undergraduate journal BIOS to report their results. HeLa cells were used to integrate the research experience with the Westminster College "Next Chapter" first year program, in which the students explored the historical relevance of HeLa cells from a sociological perspective through reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In this report I detail the design, delivery, student learning outcomes, and assessment of this module, and while this exercise was designed for an introductory course at a small primarily undergraduate institution, suggestions for modifications at larger universities or for upper division courses are included. Finally, based on student outcomes suggestions are provided for improving the module to enhance the link between teaching students skills in experimental design and execution with developing student skills in information literacy and writing.

  16. The Cytotoxicity Mechanism of 6-Shogaol-Treated HeLa Human Cervical Cancer Cells Revealed by Label-Free Shotgun Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Peng, Yong-Bo; Qi, Lian-Wen; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Le-Le; Liu, E-Hu; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in the world. 6-Shogaol is a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale). In this paper, we demonstrated that 6-shogaol induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial pathway were involved in 6-shogaol-mediated apoptosis. Proteomic analysis based on label-free strategy by liquid chromatography chip quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was subsequently proposed to identify, in a non-target-biased manner, the molecular changes in cellular proteins in response to 6-shogaol treatment. A total of 287 proteins were differentially expressed in response to 24 h treatment with 15 μM 6-shogaol in HeLa cells. Significantly changed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by multiple analyzing software. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) suggested that 14-3-3 signaling is a predominant canonical pathway involved in networks which may be significantly associated with the process of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by 6-shogaol. In conclusion, this work developed an unbiased protein analysis strategy by shotgun proteomics and bioinformatics analysis. Data observed provide a comprehensive analysis of the 6-shogaol-treated HeLa cell proteome and reveal protein alterations that are associated with its anticancer mechanism. PMID:23243437

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF A BACTERIAL GROWTH INHIBITOR FROM HELA CELLS: A KETOALDEHYDE

    PubMed Central

    Sparkes, Brian G.; Kenny, C. Paul

    1969-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting factor found earlier in human cell cultures appeared to be a ketoaldehyde. An infrared spectral study of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives suggested that the ketoaldehyde was 4-hydroxy-2-ketobutyraldehyde. The compound, when synthesized, gave the same DNPH derivatives as the natural substance. PMID:5264149

  18. Activin a signaling regulates cell invasion and proliferation in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Le Bras, Gregoire F.; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Romero-Morales, Alejandra I.; Quast, Laura L.; Zaika, Alexander I.; El-Rifai, Wael; Andl, Thomas; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    TGFβ signaling has been implicated in the metaplasia from squamous epithelia to Barrett's esophagus and, ultimately, esophageal adenocarcinoma. The role of the family member Activin A in Barrett's tumorigenesis is less well established. As tumorigenesis is influenced by factors in the tumor microenvironment, such as fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, we aimed to determine if epithelial cell-derived Activin affects initiation and progression differently than Activin signaling stimulation from a mimicked stromal source. Using Barrett's esophagus cells, CPB, and the esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines OE33 and FLO-1, we showed that Activin reduces colony formation only in CPB cells. Epithelial cell overexpression of Activin increased cell migration and invasion in Boyden chamber assays in CPB and FLO-1 cells, which exhibited mesenchymal features such as the expression of the CD44 standard form, vimentin, and MT1-MMP. When grown in organotypic reconstructs, OE33 cells expressed E-cadherin and Keratin 8. As mesenchymal characteristics have been associated with the acquisition of stem cell-like features, we analyzed the expression and localization of SOX9, showing nuclear localization of SOX9 in esophageal CPB and FLO-1 cells. In conclusion, we show a role for autocrine Activin signaling in the regulation of colony formation, cell migration and invasion in Barrett's tumorigenesis. PMID:26447543

  19. Curcumin and Ellagic acid synergistically induce ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 accumulation and apoptosis in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devbrat; Basu, Soumya; Parija, Lucy; Rout, Deeptimayee; Manna, Sanjeet; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Debata, Priya Ranjan

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the cervix continue to be a global health issue, and the medication for the treatment for chronic HPV infection so far has not been effective. Potential anticancer and anti HPV activities of two known phytochemicals, Curcumin and Ellagic acid were evaluated in HeLa cervical cancer cells. Curcumin is a natural compound found in the root of Curcuma longa plant and Ellagic acid a polyphenol found in fruits of strawberries, raspberries and walnuts. The combination of Curcumin and Ellagic acid at various concentrations showed better anticancer properties than either of the drug when used alone as evidenced by MTT assay. Besides this, Curcumin and Ellagic acid also restore p53, induce ROS formation and DNA damage. Mechanistic study further indicated that Curcumin and Ellagic acid show anti-HPV activity as evidenced by decrease in the HPV E6 oncoprotein on HeLa cells. PMID:27261574

  20. Curcumin and Ellagic acid synergistically induce ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 accumulation and apoptosis in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devbrat; Basu, Soumya; Parija, Lucy; Rout, Deeptimayee; Manna, Sanjeet; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Debata, Priya Ranjan

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the cervix continue to be a global health issue, and the medication for the treatment for chronic HPV infection so far has not been effective. Potential anticancer and anti HPV activities of two known phytochemicals, Curcumin and Ellagic acid were evaluated in HeLa cervical cancer cells. Curcumin is a natural compound found in the root of Curcuma longa plant and Ellagic acid a polyphenol found in fruits of strawberries, raspberries and walnuts. The combination of Curcumin and Ellagic acid at various concentrations showed better anticancer properties than either of the drug when used alone as evidenced by MTT assay. Besides this, Curcumin and Ellagic acid also restore p53, induce ROS formation and DNA damage. Mechanistic study further indicated that Curcumin and Ellagic acid show anti-HPV activity as evidenced by decrease in the HPV E6 oncoprotein on HeLa cells.

  1. Myricetin and methyl eugenol combination enhances the anticancer activity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction of cis-platin against HeLa cervical cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jin-Ling; Shi, Song; Shen, Yan-Li; Wang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Drug combination therapies are common practice in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of myricetin (MYR), methyl eugenol (MEG) and cisplatin (CP) both separately as well as in combination against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. To demonstrate whether MYR and MEG enhance the anticancer activity of CP against cervical cancer cells, we treated HeLa cells with MYR and MEG alone or in combination with cisplatin and evaluated cell growth and apoptosis using MTT (3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazol 2yl) 2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, LDH release assay, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that, as compared to single drug treatment, the combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in greater effect in inhibiting cancer cell growth and inducing apoptosis. Cell apoptosis induction, Caspase-3 activity, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss were systematically studied to reveal the mechanisms of synergy between MYR, MEG and CP. Combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in more potent apoptosis induction as revealed by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258 and AO-ETBR staining. The combination treatment also increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase dramatically as compared to single drug treatment. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΛΨm) as well as Caspase-3 activity was much higher in combination treatment as compared to single drug treatment. Findings of this investigation suggest that MYR and MEG combined with cisplatin is a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach in human cervical cancer. PMID:25972998

  2. Visualizing the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced cell kinetics in multicellular spheroids consisting of HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We visualized radiation-induced cell kinetics in spheroids. •HeLa-Fucci cells were used for detection of cell-cycle changes. •Radiation-induced G2 arrest was prolonged in the spheroid. •The inner and outer cell fractions behaved differently. -- Abstract: In this study, we visualized the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced tumor cell kinetics. For this purpose, we utilized a multicellular spheroid model, with a diameter of ∼500 μm, consisting of HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci). In live spheroids, a confocal laser scanning microscope allowed us to clearly monitor cell kinetics at depths of up to 60 μm. Surprisingly, a remarkable prolongation of G2 arrest was observed in the outer region of the spheroid relative to monolayer-cultured cells. Scale, an aqueous reagent that renders tissues optically transparent, allowed visualization deeper inside spheroids. About 16 h after irradiation, a red fluorescent cell fraction, presumably a quiescent G0 cell fraction, became distinct from the outer fraction consisting of proliferating cells, most of which exhibited green fluorescence indicative of G2 arrest. Thereafter, the red cell fraction began to emit green fluorescence and remained in prolonged G2 arrest. Thus, for the first time, we visualized the prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in spheroids and the differences in cell kinetics between the outer and inner fractions.

  3. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  4. A clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Dianbin; Shi, Xuetao; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old male was referred to our department for a gallbladder mass. He denied any history of alcohol consumption or cholecystitis and smoking. Hepatitis B surface antigen test and antihepatitis C antibody test were found to be negative. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen were elevated (CA19-9 was 59.92 U/mL and carcinoembryonic antigen was 12.64 ng/mL), whereas alpha-fetoprotein was below the normal limit (2.46 ng/mL). Computed tomography scan revealed a solid mass with measurements of 4.6×5.6×7.1 cm, which nearly filled the whole gallbladder space. Radical cholecystectomy, including segments IV B and V of the liver and lymphadenectomy, was performed. The neoplasm in gallbladder was completely resected, and the patient obtained a negative margin. Histological and immunohistochemical profile suggested a clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation. After reviewing the literature, we reported that this case is the first identified case of cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with extensive hepatoid differentiation. However, clinical features of clear cell adenocarcinoma with hepatoid differentiation remain unclear due to the extremely rare incidence. There was no indication of adjuvant chemotherapy and no literature has been reported on the application of chemotherapy. This case showed a promising clinical outcome after curative resection, which indicated that surgical treatment could be potentially considered for suitable patients. PMID:27703378

  5. Disturbance in function and expression of condensin affects chromosome compaction in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lei; Wang, Hongzhen; Tang, Wen; Liu, Wenguang; Hao, Shui; Zeng, Xianlu

    2011-07-01

    Condensin, a major non-histone protein complex on chromosomes, is responsible for the formation of rod-shaped chromosome in mitosis. A heterodimer composed of SMC2 (structural maintenance of chromosomes) and SMC4 subunits constitutes the core part of condensin. Although extensive studies have been done in yeast, fruit fly and Xenopus to uncover the mechanisms and molecular nature of SMC proteins, little is known about the complex in mammalian cells. We have conducted a series of experiments to unveil the nature of condensin complex in human chromosome formation. The results show that overexpression of the C-terminal domain of SMC subunits disturbs chromosome condensation, leading to formation of swollen chromosomes, while knockdown of SMC subunits severely disturbs mitotic chromosome formation, resulting in chromatin bridges between daughter cells and multiple nuclei in single cells. The salt extraction assay indicates that a fraction of the condensin complex is bound to chromatin in interphase, but most of the condensin bind to chromatin at the onset of mitosis. Thus, disturbance in condensin function or expression affects chromosome condensation and influences mitotic progression.

  6. Hypergravity signal transduction in HeLa cells with concomitant phosphorylation of proteins immunoprecipitated with anti-microtubule-associated protein antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Whitson, Peggy A.; Sato, Atsushige; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that hypergravity (35g) stimulates the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and decreases adenosine 3-prime,5-prime-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels in HeLa cells. It is proposed that IP3 and cAMP may act as second messengers in hypergravity signal transduction. Phosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins in both the detergent-soluble and -insoluble fractions suggests that cytoskeletal structures may be influenced by gravity.

  7. Intracellular Uptake and Trafficking of Difluoroboron Dibenzoylmethane-Poly(lactic acid) Nanoparticles in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Janette; Xie, Jiansong; Chen, Yin Jie; Pei, Hua; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, nanoparticles based on difluoroboron dibenzoylmethane-poly(lactic acid) (BF2dbmPLA) are prepared. Polylactic acid or polylactide is a commonly used degradable polymer, while the boron dye possesses a large extinction coefficient, high emission quantum yield, 2-photon absorption, and sensitivity to the surrounding environment. BF2dbmPLA exhibits molecular weight-dependent emission properties, and can be formulated as stable nanoparticles, suggesting that its unique optical properties may be useful in multiple contexts for probing intracellular environments. Here we show that BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles are internalized into cultured HeLa cells by endocytosis, and that within the cellular milieu they retain their fluorescence properties. BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles are photostable, resisting laser-induced photobleaching under conditions that destroy the fluorescence of a common photostable probe, LysoTracker™ blue. Their endocytosis is also lipid raft-dependent, as evidenced by their significant co-localization with cholera toxin B subunit in membrane compartments after uptake, and their sensitivity of uptake to methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Additionally, BF2dbmPLA nanoparticle endocytosis utilizes microtubules and actin filaments. Internalized BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles do not accumulate in acidic late endosomes and lysosomes, but within a perinuclear non-lysosomal compartment. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using novel BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles exhibiting diverse emission properties for in situ, live cell imaging, and suggest that their endogenous uptake occurs through a lipid-raft dependent endocytosis mechanism. PMID:20420413

  8. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  9. Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell features producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Hada, Masao; Oyama, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for lung cancer. Histopathologically, most of the resected tumor was composed of polygonal cells with foamy cytoplasm, and the cells were arranged predominantly in acinar patterns. In this case, although the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was high before surgery, it normalized after resection. The tumor was considered a carbohydrate antigen 19-9-producing tumor, which was further supported by the results of immunohistochemical analysis. Adenocarcinoma with clear cell features, producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is an exceedingly rare entity.

  10. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  11. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland with rare scalp metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ahmet; Cuce, Ferhat; Simsek, Hakan; Topuz, Ali Kıvanc; Duz, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors constitute 3% of tumors in the body. Salivary gland tumors constitute 4% to 10.80% of all tumors in the head and neck tumors and most of them originate from the parotid gland. Most salivary gland tumors are benign. Basal cell adenocarcinoma is a rare salivary gland tumour. Most appear to be benign clinically. Metastases have occurred in less than 10% of patients. A 58-year-old female patient was admitted with the complaint of a growing mass at the top of her head. She was operated for parotid adenocarcinoma two years ago. Computed Tomography (CT) was performed to clarify the relationship between the mass with the calvarium and intracranial region. There is a risk of malignancy in scalp and calvarium lesions. Patients must be subjected to preoperative radiological evaluations.

  12. Rac1 GTPase-deficient HeLa cells present reduced DNA repair, proliferation, and survival under UV or gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana H; Magalhaes, Yuli T; Forti, Fabio Luis

    2015-06-01

    Rac1 GTPase controls essential cellular functions related to the cytoskeleton, such as motility and adhesion. Rac1 is overexpressed in many tumor cells, including breast cancers, where it is also involved in the proliferation and checkpoint control necessary for the cell's recovery after exposure to ionizing radiation. However, its role in DNA damage and repair remains obscure in other tumor cells and under different genotoxic conditions. Here, we compare HeLa cells with mutants exogenously expressing a dominant-negative Rac1 (HeLa-Rac1-N17) by their responses to DNA damage induced by gamma or UV radiation. In HeLa cells, these treatments led to increased levels of active Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and of stress fibers, with a diminished ability to migrate compared to untreated cells. However, the reduction of Rac1-GTP in Rac1-N17-deficient clones resulted in much higher levels of polymerized stress fibers accompanied by a strong impairment of cell migration, even after both radiation treatments. With regard to proliferation and genomic stability, dominant-negative Rac1 cells were more sensitive to gamma and UV radiation, exhibiting reduced proliferation and survival consistent with increased DNA damage and delayed or reduced DNA repair observed in this Rac1-deficient clone. The DNA damage response, as indicated by pH2AX and pChk1 levels, was increased in HeLa cells but was not effectively triggered in the Rac1-N17 clone after radiation treatment, which is likely the main cause of DNA damage accumulation. These data suggest that Rac1 GTPase plays an important role in signaling and contributes to the sensitivity of cervical cancer cells under UV or gamma radiation treatments.

  13. Haematogenous dissemination of cells from human renal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Glaves, D.; Huben, R. P.; Weiss, L.

    1988-01-01

    Estimates were made of the rates at which cancer cells were released directly into the renal vein in patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for primary renal cancer. Cancer cells were counted in blood samples taken from the renal vein using a density gradient centrifugation procedure, and identified using immunocytochemical techniques, on the basis of their cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins. Cancer cells were released as single cells and multicell emboli in 8/10 patients, in numbers varying widely between 14-7509 emboli ml-1 of blood. Despite a calculated median input into the metastatic process of 3.7 x 10(7) cancer cells per day for at least 180 days, only 3/10 patients had extraperitoneal metastases prior to surgery and only 1 of the remaining disease-free patients subsequently developed distant metastases over a maximum 35 month period. These results are discussed in terms of primary tumour kinetics and metastatic inefficiency. Images Figure 1 PMID:3279993

  14. Cyclopedic protein expression analysis of cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells from six tumours.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Watanabe, M; Ohashi, E; Uyama, R; Takauji, S; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Ogawa, H; Sugano, S; Sasaki, N

    2006-06-01

    We characterised cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells by exhaustive step protein expression analysis to identify factors associated with tumour progression or metastasis of canine mammary gland tumour. Cultured adenocarcinoma cells derived from a total of 3 primary and 3 metastatic lesions from 3 dogs (CHMp/m, CIPp/m and CNMp/m, where CHM, CIP, and CNM indicate the 3 animals) were used in this study. The expression of 24 proteins reported to be related to tumourigenesis or malignancy of human breast cancers were examined by Western blot analysis using 24 antibodies. The expression of sialyl Lewis X [sLe(x)] was only observed in CHMm cells, which were derived from pleural effusion. This expression was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The levels of some factors, such as 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, differed among cells or between the primary and metastatic cells in the pair. Though the difference in their expression was not consistent within the cells from primary and metastatic origin, this characterisation should provide useful information for further molecular analysis of these cultured cells. Since some of the factors, such as sLe(x), 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, showed different levels of expression in the pair, these cultured cells might be meaningful tools for clarification of distant metastasis in canine mammary gland tumours.

  15. Cleavage of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4G by Exogenously Added Hybrid Proteins Containing Poliovirus 2Apro in HeLa Cells: Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Isabel; Carrasco, Luis

    1999-01-01

    Efficient cleavage of both forms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G-1 and eIF4G-2) has been achieved in HeLa cells by incubation with hybrid proteins containing poliovirus 2Apro. Entry of these proteins into cells is promoted by adenovirus particles. Substantial levels of ongoing translation on preexisting cellular mRNAs still continue for several hours after eIF4G degradation. Treatment of control HeLa cells with hypertonic medium causes an inhibition of translation that is reversed upon restoration of cells to normal medium. Protein synthesis is not restored in cells lacking intact eIF4G after hypertonic treatment. Notably, induction of synthesis of heat shock proteins still occurs in cells pretreated with poliovirus 2Apro, suggesting that transcription and translation of these mRNAs takes place even in the presence of cleaved eIF4G. Finally, the synthesis of luciferase was examined in a HeLa cell line bearing the luciferase gene under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Transcription of the luciferase gene and transport of the mRNA to the cytoplasm occurs at control levels in eIF4G-deficient cells. However, luciferase synthesis is strongly inhibited in these cells. These findings indicate that intact eIF4G is necessary for the translation of mRNAs not engaged in translation with the exception of heat shock mRNAs but is not necessary for the translation of mRNAs that are being translated. PMID:10082510

  16. Transportation of Berberine into HepG2, HeLa and SY5Y Cells: A Correlation to Its Anti-Cancer Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu-Nong; Liang, Yin-Wen; Feng, Tian-Shi; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Hao; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Lei, Fan; Ding, Yi; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The anti-cancer activities of berberine (BBR) have been reported extensively in various cancer cell lines. However, the minimal inhibitory concentrations of BBR varied greatly among different cell lines and very few studies have been devoted to elucidate this aspect. In this study, we employed three cancer cell lines, HepG2, HeLa and SY5Y, to compare the transportation and distribution of BBR. HPLC results demonstrated that BBR was capable of penetrating all the cell lines whereas the cumulative concentrations were significantly different. HepG2 cells accumulated higher level of BBR for longer duration than the other two cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed the BBR binding site on P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp). In addition, we elucidated that BBR regulated P-gp at both mRNA and protein levels. BBR induced the transcription and translation of P-gp in HeLa and SY5Y cells, whereas BBR inhibited P-gp expression in HepG2 cells. Further study showed that BBR regulates P-gp expression depending on different mechanisms (or affected by different factors) in different cell lines. To summarize, our study has revealed several mechanistic aspects of BBR regulation on P-gp in different cancer cell lines and might shed some useful insights into the use of BBR in the anti-cancer drug development. PMID:25402492

  17. Aptamer based electrochemical sensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachna; Varun Agrawal, Ved; Sharma, Pradeep; Varshney, R.; Sinha, R. K.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2012-04-01

    We report results of the studies relating to development of an aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for detection of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The aminated 85-mer DNA aptamer probe specific for the A549 cells has been covalently immobilized onto silane self assembled monolayer (SAM) onto ITO surface using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The results of cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry studies reveal that the aptamer functionalized bioelectrode can specifically detect lung cancer cells in the concentration range of 103 to 107 cells/ml with detection limit of 103 cells/ml within 60 s. The specificity studies of the bioelectrode have been carried out with control KB cells. No significant change in response is observed for control KB cells as compared to that of the A549 target cells.

  18. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  19. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  20. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  1. Low-Dose Cadmium Upregulates VEGF Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuhong; Wang, Bei; Li, Liqun; Dong, Fengyun; Chen, Xiaocui; Li, Yan; Dong, Xiuzhen; Wada, Youichiro; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2015-08-28

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and environmental toxin. Exposure to Cd has been associated with a variety of human cancers. In this study, we performed in vitro assays to examine the effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl₂) on A549 cells, a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Cd does not affect proliferation, migration, or apoptosis of A549 cells at concentrations of 0.1-10 μM. At 0.5 and 1 μM, Cd increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively), but not basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) in A549 cells. The conditioned media were collected from the A549 cells treated with 1 μM Cd and were co-cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Upon treatment with the conditioned media, the proliferation and migration of HUVECs significantly increased (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively), while apoptosis remained unchanged. In addition, 1 μM Cd increases the level of hypoxia inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α), which is a positive regulator of VEGF expression. Although low-dose Cd does not directly affect the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells, it might facilitate the development of tumors through its pro-angiogenic effects.

  2. Aldehydic DNA lesions in calf thymus DNA and HeLa S3 cells produced by bacterial quinone metabolites of fluoranthene and pyrene.

    PubMed

    Zielinska-Park, Joanna; Nakamura, Jun; Swenberg, James A; Aitken, Michael D

    2004-09-01

    There is increasing concern that compounds formed during the chemical or biological transformation of pollutants in the environment may be more detrimental to human and environmental health than the original pollutant. In this study, two bacterial transformation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pyrene-4,5-quinone (P45Q) and fluoranthene-2,3-quinone (F23Q), were evaluated for mutagenicity by measuring aldehydic DNA lesions (ADL) in calf thymus DNA and HeLa S3 cells. Both quinones caused oxidative DNA damage in vitro through a copper-mediated redox cycle and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide and copper were essential for causing oxidative DNA damage and glutathione (GSH) prevented DNA damage from F23Q better than from P45Q. In experiments using HeLa cells, F23Q decreased cell viability, but did not produce measurable levels of ADL or base oxidation. To test the hypothesis that DNA damage was being prevented by conjugation of F23Q with GSH, GSH-depleted cells were treated with both quinones. GSH depletion did not increase the toxicity of F23Q or cause it to oxidize DNA. Treatment of HeLa cells with metal chelators did not decrease F23Q toxicity. It is therefore possible that F23Q affected cell viability through a ROS-independent mechanism, either by conjugation with essential cellular proteins or through cellular or mitochondrial membrane damage, which precluded oxidation of DNA. In contrast, P45Q caused both ADL and base oxidation in cells. Neocuproine reduced the amount of ADL caused by P45Q, indicating that copper was still important for the intracellular generation of damaging oxidants. P45Q is a novel metabolite and its effects on DNA have not been investigated previously. This study exemplifies the importance of considering not only primary environmental pollutants, but also their biologically or chemically generated transformation products.

  3. Quantum dots (QDs) restrain human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell proliferation through inhibition of the ROCK-c-Myc signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Qu, Guangbo; Zhang, Changwen; Zhang, Shuping; He, Jiuyang; Sang, Nan; Liu, Sijin

    2013-03-01

    Cancers often cause significant morbidity and even death to patients. To date, conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, are often limited; meanwhile, novel anticancer therapeutics are urgently needed to improve clinical treatments. Rapid application of nanotechnology and nanomaterials represents a promising vista for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics. However, how to integrate the novel properties of nanotechnology and nanomaterials into cancer treatment warrants close investigation. In the current study, we report a novel finding about the inhibitory effect of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity in cervical carcinoma HeLa cells associated with the attenuation of the ROCK-c-Myc signaling. We mechanistically demonstrated that QD-conducted ROCK inhibition greatly diminished c-Myc protein stability due to reduced phosphorylation, and also suppressed its activity in transcribing target genes (e.g. HSPC111). Thus, the treatment of QDs greatly restrained HeLa cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase due to the reduced ability of c-Myc in driving cell proliferation. Additionally, since HSPC111, one of the c-Myc targets, is involved in regulating cell growth through ribosomal biogenesis and assembly, the downregulation of HSPC111 could also contribute to diminished proliferation in HeLa cells upon QD treatment. These results together suggested that inhibition of ROCK activity or ROCK-mediated c-Myc signaling in tumor cells upon QD treatment might represent a promising strategy to restrain tumor progression for human cervical carcinoma.

  4. Novel microtubule-targeted agent 6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin induces G2-M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi-ming; Zhou, Yu-bo; Xie, Chuan-ming; Chen, Dong-mei; Li, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To identify a novel coumarin analogue with the highest anticancer activity and to further investigate its anticancer mechanisms. Methods: The viability of cancer cells was investigated using the MTT assay. The cell cycle progression was evaluated using both flow cytometric and Western blotting analysis. Microtubule depolymerization was observed with immunocytochemistry in vivo and a tubulin depolymerization assay in vitro. Apoptosis was demonstrated using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) double-staining and sub-G1 analysis. Results: Among 36 analogues of coumarin, 6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin showed the best anticancer activity (IC50 value about 200 nmol/L) in HCT116 cells. The compound had a broad spectrum of anticancer activity against 9 cancer cell lines derived from colon cancer, breast cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, leukemia, epidermoid cancer with IC50 value of 75 nmol/L–1.57 μmol/L but with low cytotocitity against WI-38 human lung fibroblasts (IC50 value of 12.128 μmol/L). The compound (0.04–10 μmol/L) induced G2-M phase arrest in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was reversible after the compound was removed. The compound (10–300 μmol/L) induced the depolymerization of purified porcine tubulin in vitro. Finally, the compound (0.04–2.5 μmol/L) induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Conclusion: 6-Chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin is a novel microtubule-targeting agent that induces G2–M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMID:22266726

  5. Short-term desensitization of the histamine H1 receptor in human HeLa cells: involvement of protein kinase C dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, M. J.; Bloemers, S. M.; Leurs, R.; Tertoolen, L. G.; Bast, A.; de Laat, S. W.; Timmerman, H.

    1992-01-01

    1. In this study we have investigated the effects of short-term exposure of cells to histamine on the subsequent H1 receptor responsiveness in HeLa cells, using Ca2+ fluorescence microscopy and video digital imaging. 2. In HeLa cells, histamine (100 microM) induces an immediate H1 receptor-mediated biphasic elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) (basal [Ca2+]i: 81 +/- 30 nM, histamine-induced Ca2+ response: first phase: 1135 +/- 79 nM; second phase: 601 +/- 52 nM, n = 11). 3. The histamine H1 receptors on HeLa cells are readily susceptible to desensitization since repetitive exposure of the same group of cells to histamine (100 microM) markedly affected the release and influx component of the induced Ca2+ response (second application of histamine: first phase: 590 +/- 92 nM, second phase: 279 +/- 47 nM; third application of histamine: first phase: 454 +/- 127 nM, second phase: 240 +/- 45 nM, n = 6). Video digital imaging revealed an increase in the lag time between stimulation and monitoring of the Ca2+ response and a reduced increase in [Ca2+]i after desensitization with histamine. 4. Neither the release component of the ATP response (50 microM) nor the caffeine (3 mM)-induced Ca2+ release were found to be affected by desensitization with 100 microM histamine. However, the second phase of the ATP response was significantly reduced after desensitization with histamine (control cells: 516 +/- 33 nM; desensitized cells: 331 +/- 96 nM, n = 4, P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1422591

  6. Differences in Innate Immune Responses (In Vitro) to HeLa Cells Infected with Nondisseminating Serovar E and Disseminating Serovar L2 of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Darville, Toni L.; Cuozzo, Francis P.; Ferguson, Kaethe; Wyrick, Priscilla B.

    2002-01-01

    The inflammatory response associated with Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections is thought to be initiated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines from infected epithelial cells. This study focuses on the interactions between C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells and immune cells involved in the early stages of infection, i.e., neutrophils and macrophages. First, we showed that the expression of interleukin-11 (IL-11), an anti-inflammatory cytokine mainly active on macrophages, was upregulated at the mRNA level in the genital tracts of infected mice. Second, incubation of differentiated THP-1 (dTHP-1) cells or monocyte-derived macrophages (MdM) with basal culture supernatants from C. trachomatis serovar E- or serovar L2-infected HeLa cells resulted in macrophage activation with a differential release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and upregulation of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO) but not of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA expression. Third, coculture of infected HeLa cells with dTHP-1 cells resulted in a reduction in chlamydial growth, which was more dramatic for serovar E than for L2 and which was partially reversed by the addition of anti-TNF-α antibodies for serovar E or exogenous tryptophan for both serovars but was not reversed by the addition of superoxide dismutase or anti-IL-8 or anti-IL-1β antibodies. A gamma interferon-independent IDO mRNA upregulation was also detected in dTHP-1 cells from infected cocultures. Lastly, with a two-stage coculture system, we found that (i) supernatants from neutrophils added to the apical side of infected HeLa cell cultures were chlamydicidal and induced MdM to express antichlamydial activity and (ii) although polymorphonuclear leukocytes released more proinflammatory cytokines in response to serovar E- than in response to L2-infected cells, MdM were strongly activated by serovar L2 infection, indicating that the early inflammatory response generated with a nondisseminating or a disseminating strain is

  7. Differences in innate immune responses (in vitro) to HeLa cells infected with nondisseminating serovar E and disseminating serovar L2 of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Darville, Toni L; Cuozzo, Francis P; Ferguson, Kaethe; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2002-06-01

    The inflammatory response associated with Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections is thought to be initiated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines from infected epithelial cells. This study focuses on the interactions between C. trachomatis-infected HeLa cells and immune cells involved in the early stages of infection, i.e., neutrophils and macrophages. First, we showed that the expression of interleukin-11 (IL-11), an anti-inflammatory cytokine mainly active on macrophages, was upregulated at the mRNA level in the genital tracts of infected mice. Second, incubation of differentiated THP-1 (dTHP-1) cells or monocyte-derived macrophages (MdM) with basal culture supernatants from C. trachomatis serovar E- or serovar L2-infected HeLa cells resulted in macrophage activation with a differential release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and upregulation of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO) but not of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 mRNA expression. Third, coculture of infected HeLa cells with dTHP-1 cells resulted in a reduction in chlamydial growth, which was more dramatic for serovar E than for L2 and which was partially reversed by the addition of anti-TNF-alpha antibodies for serovar E or exogenous tryptophan for both serovars but was not reversed by the addition of superoxide dismutase or anti-IL-8 or anti-IL-1beta antibodies. A gamma interferon-independent IDO mRNA upregulation was also detected in dTHP-1 cells from infected cocultures. Lastly, with a two-stage coculture system, we found that (i) supernatants from neutrophils added to the apical side of infected HeLa cell cultures were chlamydicidal and induced MdM to express antichlamydial activity and (ii) although polymorphonuclear leukocytes released more proinflammatory cytokines in response to serovar E- than in response to L2-infected cells, MdM were strongly activated by serovar L2 infection, indicating that the early inflammatory response generated with a nondisseminating or a disseminating

  8. Evidence for a factor required for transcriptional stimulation by the chimeric acidic activator GAL-VP16 in HeLa cell extracts.

    PubMed Central

    White, J H; Brou, C; Wu, J; Burton, N; Egly, J M; Chambon, P

    1991-01-01

    We provide biochemical evidence for the existence of a transcriptional intermediary factor (TIF) in HeLa whole-cell extracts (WCE) that is distinct from the basic transcription factors and that is required for transcriptional stimulation by the chimeric acidic activator GAL-VP16. We have fractionated HeLa WCE by heparin-agarose chromatography. Of transcriptionally active fractions eluting in a step between 0.24 and 0.6 M KCl, the initial fractions are refractory to GAL-VP16 stimulation, whereas subsequent fractions are strongly stimulated by the activator. Aliquots of GAL-VP16-responsive fractions efficiently complement refractory fractions for transcriptional stimulation. Aliquots of responsive fractions are also far more efficient than those of refractory fractions in overcoming transcriptional inhibition that is brought about by high concentrations of GAL-VP16. Experiments performed with heat-treated WCE support the idea that HeLa cells contain a TIF that is essential for GAL-VP16 stimulation, but that is not required for basal transcription. Addition of recombinant yeast or human transcription factor TFIID (rTFIIDY and rTFIIDH, respectively) to a WCE heated at 48 degrees C for 15 min restores basal transcription, but in neither case is the reconstituted system activated by GAL-VP16. However, a 45 degrees C heat-treated WCE reconstituted with either rTFIIDH or rTFIIDY is stimulated by GAL-VP16, suggesting that a HeLa TIF can be selectively inactivated by heating at 48 degrees C, but not at 45 degrees C. Interestingly, a TFIID fraction partially purified from HeLa cell extracts, but not rTFIIDH, efficiently relieves transcriptional inhibition by GAL-VP16, suggesting that there may be an association between TIF(s) and TFIID and, moreover, that TIF(s) may be the direct target of the acidic domain of GAL-VP16. In summary, our results support the existence of a TIF that is not essential for basal transcription but that is required to mediate the stimulatory activity

  9. Histogenesis of hollow cell ball structure of ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, I; Kiguchi, K; Ishiwata, C; Soma, M; Nakaguchi, T; Ono, I; Tachibana, T; Hashimoto, H; Ishikawa, H; Nozawa, S

    1997-09-01

    Hollow cell ball structure is often found in the ascites of adenocarcinoma patients. How to form a hollow cell ball structure was studied in vivo and in vitro, using the human cell lines derived from ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas. The hollow cell ball structure was formed by horizontal rotation culture of 1 x 10(7) single-suspended cells for 24 hours or by transplanting 1 x 10(6) single-suspended cells into the peritoneal cavity of nude mouse for 24 hours. At one month after transplantation hemi-cyst and hollow cell ball structure were formed in the outermost layer of the grafted tumor on the intraperitoneal serous membrane in the nude mouse. And also great number of floating hollow cell ball structure in the ascites were observed. These results suggest that mechanisms of formation of hollow cell ball structure found in the ascites; one by cell aggregate of single cells, sometimes inner cells of cell aggregate fall into necrosis or secretes mucus inside and make a hollow cell ball structure and another by the removed as the hollow cell ball structure grown from hemi-cyst on the surface of intraperitoneal grafted tumor. PMID:9436041

  10. Bax is not involved in the resveratrol-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-wei; Wang, Zhi-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a natural plant polyphenol widely present in foods such as grapes, wine, and peanuts. Previous studies indicate that RV has an ability to inhibit various stages of carcinogenesis and eliminate preneoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell. In this report, we analyzed whether Bax translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria during RV-induced apoptosis in single living cell using onfocal microscopey. Cells were transfected with GFP-Bax plasmid. Cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibition of RV on the cells viability. Apoptotic activity of RV was detected by Hoechst 33258 and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Our results showed that RV induced a dose-dependent apoptosis in which Bax did not translocate to mitochondrias.

  11. Cytotoxicity of different extracts of arial parts of Ziziphus spina-christi on Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Shirani, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that plants from the family Rhamnaceae possess anticancer activity. In this study, we sought to determine if Ziziphus spina-christi, a species from this family, has cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: Using maceration method, different extracts of leaves of Z. spina-christi were prepared. Hexane, chloroform, chloroform-methanol (9:1), methanol-water (7:1) methanol, butanol and water were used for extraction, after preliminary phytochemical analyses were done. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts against Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of extracts were added. After incubation of cells for 72 h, their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Extracts were considered cytotoxic when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Hexane, chloroform, chloroform-methanol, butanol, methanol-water and aqueous extracts of Z. spina-christi significantly and concentration-dependently reduced viability of Hela and MAD-MB-468 cells. In the both cell lines, chloroform-methanol extract of Z. spina-christi was more potent than the other extracts. Results: From the finding of this study it can be concluded that Z. spina-christi is a good candidate for further study for new cytotoxic agents. PMID:24627846

  12. Characterization of prostatic epithelial cell lines derived from transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model.

    PubMed

    Foster, B A; Gingrich, J R; Kwon, E D; Madias, C; Greenberg, N M

    1997-08-15

    To develop a syngeneic transplantable system to study immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of prostate cancer, three cell lines were established from a heterogeneous 32 week tumor of the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP is a transgenic line of C57BL/6 mice harboring a construct comprised of the minimal -426/+28 rat probasin promoter driving prostate-specific epithelial expression of the SV40 large T antigen. TRAMP males develop histological prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia by 8-12 weeks of age that progress to adenocarcinoma with distant metastases by 24-30 weeks of age. The three cell lines (TRAMP-C1, TRAMP-C2, and TRAMP-C3) express cytokeratin, E-cadherin, and androgen receptor by immunohistochemical analysis and do not appear to have a mutated p53. Although TRAMP-C1 and TRAMP-C2 are tumorigenic when grafted into syngeneic C57BL/6 hosts, TRAMP-C3 grows readily in vitro but does not form tumors. The T antigen oncoprotein is not expressed by the cell lines in vitro or in vivo. The rationale for establishing multiple cell lines was to isolate cells representing various stages of cellular transformation and progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease that could be manipulated in vitro and, in combination with the TRAMP model, provide a system to investigate therapeutic interventions, such as immunotherapy prior to clinical trials. PMID:9269988

  13. Effect of normal endometrial stroma on growth and differentiation in Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Julia T; Lessey, Bruce A; Seppälä, Markku; Kaufman, David G

    2002-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is characterized by alterations in the stromal cells and the supporting extracellular matrix in addition to the intrinsic alterations of the malignant epithelial cells. We have developed a cell culture model that demonstrates the role of stromal cells in the regulation of proliferation, hormone responsiveness, and differentiation of an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line (Ishikawa). Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from normal primary human endometrial stromal cells grown on plastic or within the basement membrane extract, Matrigel. The CM produced by stromal cells cultured in contact with Matrigel markedly inhibited Ishikawa cell proliferation compared with CM from stromal cells cultured on plastic. Ishikawa cell proliferation varied with steroid hormone treatment in the presence of CM from stromal cells embedded in Matrigel. When the Ishikawa cells were placed in coculture in contact with stromal cells in Matrigel, production of a differentiated epithelial secretory product, glycodelin, was induced. Gene expression of stromal cell hormone receptors, growth factors, and integrins was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR in the presence of Matrigel to determine the potential factors involved in stromal regulatory function. These combined studies imply that the phenotype of the Ishikawa cells can be induced to differentiate to more closely resemble normal endometrial epithelium by reintroduction of stromal factors and appropriate extracellular matrix. Additionally, the study shows that basement membrane proteins influence the regulatory function of stromal cells as they mediate epithelial cell growth.

  14. The epimer of kaurenoic acid from Croton antisyphiliticus is cytotoxic toward B-16 and HeLa tumor cells through apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, V C; Pereira, S I V; Coppede, J; Martins, J S; Rizo, W F; Beleboni, R O; Marins, M; Pereira, P S; Pereira, A M S; Fachin, A L

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of death in developing countries due to increased life expectancy of the population and changes in lifestyle. Studies on active principles of plant have motivated researchers to develop new antitumor agents that are specific and effective for treatment of neoplasms. Kaurane diterpenes are considered important compounds in the development of new and highly effective anticancer chemotherapeutic agents due to their cytotoxic properties in the induction of apoptosis. We evaluated the cytotoxic and apoptotic activity of the epimer of kaurenoic acid (EKA) isolated from the medicinal plant Croton antisyphiliticus (Euphorbiaceae) toward tumor cell lines HeLa and B-16 and normal fibroblasts 3T3. Based on analyses with the MTT test, EKA showed cytotoxic activity, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 59.41, 68.18 and 60.30 µg/mL for the B-16, HeLa and 3T3 cell lines, respectively. The assay for necrotic or apoptotic cells by differential staining showed induction of apoptosis in all three cell lines. We conclude that EKA is not selective between tumor and normal cell lines; the mechanism of action of EKA is induction of apoptosis, which is part of the innate mechanism of cell defense against neoplasia.

  15. Comparative proteomic analyses demonstrate enhanced interferon and STAT-1 activation in reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Peyman; Komher, Krysten; Severini, Giulia; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses are exclusively and intimately dependent upon their host cells for replication. During replication viruses induce profound changes within cells, including: induction of signaling pathways, morphological changes, and cell death. Many such cellular perturbations have been analyzed at the transcriptomic level by gene arrays and recent efforts have begun to analyze cellular proteomic responses. We recently described comparative stable isotopic (SILAC) analyses of reovirus, strain type 3 Dearing (T3D)-infected HeLa cells. For the present study we employed the complementary labeling strategy of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) to examine HeLa cell changes induced by T3D, another reovirus strain, type 1 Lang, and UV-inactivated T3D (UV-T3D). Triplicate replicates of cytosolic and nuclear fractions identified a total of 2375 proteins, of which 50, 57, and 46 were significantly up-regulated, and 37, 26, and 44 were significantly down-regulated by T1L, T3D, and UV-T3D, respectively. Several pathways, most notably the Interferon signaling pathway and the EIF2 and ILK signaling pathways, were induced by virus infection. Western blots confirmed that cells were more strongly activated by live T3D as demonstrated by elevated levels of key proteins like STAT-1, ISG-15, IFIT-1, IFIT-3, and Mx1. This study expands our understanding of reovirus-induced host responses. PMID:25905045

  16. Luotonin-A based quinazolinones cause apoptosis and senescence via HDAC inhibition and activation of tumor suppressor proteins in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Ramineni; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Gaikwad, Hanmant K; Janardhan, Sridhara; Bantu, Rajashaker; Nagarapu, Lingaiah; Sastry, G Narahari; Ganesh, A Raksha; Bhadra, Manikapal

    2015-04-13

    A series of novel quinazolinone hybrids were synthesized by employing click chemistry and evaluated for anti-proliferative activities against MCF-7, HeLa and K562 cell lines. Among these cell lines, HeLa cells were found to respond effectively to these quinazolinone hybrids with IC50 values ranging from 5.94 to 16.45 μM. Some of the hybrids (4q, 4r, 4e, 4k, 4t, 4w) with promising anti-cancer activity were further investigated for their effects on the cell cycle distribution. FACS analysis revealed the G1 cell cycle arrest nature of these hybrids. Further to assess the senescence inducing ability of these compounds, a senescence associated β-gal assay was performed. The senescence inducing nature of these compounds was supported by the effect of hybrid (4q) on p16 promoter activity, the marker for senescence. Moreover, cells treated with most effective compound (4q) show up-regulation of p53, p21 and down-regulation of HDAC-1, HDAC-2, HDAC-5 and EZH2 mRNA levels. Docking results suggest that, the triazole nitrogen showed Zn(+2) mediated interactions with the histidine residue of HDACs.

  17. [Peripheral lung adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma: evaluation with first-pass perfusion imaging using 64-detector row CT].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yang, Zhigang; Chen, Tianwu; Yu, Jianqun; Deng, Yuping; Li, Zhenlin

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics of time attenuation curve and CT perfusion parameters for pulmonary adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. 58 cases of pulmonary adenocarcinomas and 27 cases of squamous cell carcinomas underwent first pass CT perfusion imaging with 64-row MDCT. Data were analyzed using commercial software to generate time attenuation curve (TAC) and CT perfusion parameters, including perfusion, peak enhanced (PE), time to peak (TTP), and blood volume (BV). For TAC, there were 36.2% of type I and 63.8% of type II in adenocarcinomas, while there were 22.2% of type I and 77.8% of type II in squamous cell carcinomas. There was not significant difference (P>0.05). Perfusion, PE, TTP and BV of adenocarcinomas were 63.2 +/- 45.4 ml x min(-1) x ml(-1), 60.2 +/- 46.6 Hu, 34.8 +/- 10.2 s and 34.3 +/- 23.6 ml x 100 g(-1), respectively, while 54.3 +/- 50.2 ml x min(-1) x ml(-1), 48.5 +/- 34.9 Hu, 36.1 +/- 11.2 s and 27.6 +/- 21.7 ml x 100 g(-1), for squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. No significant differences were found between groups (P>0.05). No significant differences in TAC and CT perfusion parameters were found between adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

  18. Global quantitative proteomics reveal up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins upon depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A, is a translation factor essential for protein synthesis, cell growth and animal development. By use of a adenoviral eIF5A shRNA, we have achieved an effective depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells and undertook in vivo comprehensive proteomic analyses to examine the effects of eIF5A depletion on the total proteome and to identify cellular pathways influenced by eIF5A. The proteome of HeLa cells transduced with eIF5A shRNA was compared with that of scramble shRNA-transduced counterpart by the iTRAQ method. We identified 972 proteins consistently detected in three iTRAQ experiments and 104 proteins with significantly altered levels (protein ratio ≥1.5 or ≤0.66, p-value ≤0.05) at 72 h and/or 96 h of Ad-eIF5A-shRNA transduction. The altered expression levels of key pathway proteins were validated by western blotting. Integration of functional ontology with expression data of the 104 proteins revealed specific biological processes that are prominently up- or down-regulated. Heatmap analysis and Cytoscape visualization of biological networks identified protein folding as the major cellular process affected by depletion of eIF5A. Our unbiased, quantitative, proteomic data demonstrate that the depletion of eIF5A leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress, an unfolded protein response and up-regulation of chaperone expression in HeLa cells. PMID:27180817

  19. The cytotoxic effects of titanium oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles oh Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Applebaum, Ariella; Applebaum, Eliana; Guterman, Shoshana; Applebaum, Kayla; Grossman, Daniel; Gordon, Chris; Brink, Peter; Wang, H. Z.; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    The importance of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO), inorganic metal oxides nanoparticles (NPs) stems from their ubiquitous applications in personal care products, solar cells and food whitening agents. Hence, these NPs come in direct contact with the skin, digestive tracts and are absorbed into human tissues. Currently, TiO2 and ZnO are considered safe commercial ingredients by the material safety data sheets with no reported evidence of carcinogenicity or ecotoxicity, and do not classify either NP as a toxic substance. This study examined the direct effects of TiO2 and ZnO on HeLa cells, a human cervical adenocarcinonma cell line, and their membrane mechanics. The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used in addition to immunohistochemistry staining, TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additionally, we examined the effects of dexamethasone (DXM), a glucocorticoid steroid known to have an effect on cell membrane mechanics. Overall, TiO2 and ZnO seemed to have an adverse effect on cell membrane mechanics by effecting cell proliferation, altering cellular structure, decreasing cell-cell adhesion, activating existing ion channels, increasing membrane permeability, and possibly disrupting cell signaling.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) mediates the effects of hypoxia on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J; Zhu, F F; Nie, M F

    2015-04-13

    Hypoxia reduces the oxygen supply to tumor cells and may limit tumor cell growth. However, hypoxia promotes tumor cell metabolic adaptation, apoptosis resistance, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) may be responsible for these hypoxia-induced changes. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and HIF-2α knockdown in HeLa cells. HIF-2α shRNA lentivirus was used to knock down HIF-2α expression; cell viability, colony formation, invasion capacity, and gene expression were assessed. Hypoxia promoted HeLa cell growth, whereas knockdown of HIF-2α expression reduced HeLa cell viability under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. Knockdown of HIF-2α expression also reduced HeLa cell colony formation and invasion capacity under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor was reduced after knockdown of HIF-2α expression, with a greater effect observed under hypoxic conditions. HIF-2α mediated the hypoxia-induced effect on the promotion of HeLa cell viability, colony formation, and invasion capacity in vitro. Further studies are needed to confirm the in vivo relevance of hypoxia and HIF-2α.

  1. Improvement in antiproliferative activity of Angelica gigas Nakai by solid dispersion formation via hot-melt extrusion and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunyao; Piao, Jingpei; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kang, Wie-Soo; Kim, Hye-Young

    2015-01-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) is one of the most popular herbal medicines and widely used as a functional food product. In this study, AGN was firstly processed by a low-temperature turbo mill and a hot melting extruder to reduce particle size and form solid dispersion (SD). Anticancer activity against HeLa cells was then examined. AGN-SD based on Soluplus was formed via hot-melt extrusion (HME) and showed the strongest cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells. In addition, the possible mechanism of cell death induced by AGN-SD on HeLa cells was also investigated. AGN-SD decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, increased the production of reactive oxygen species, regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and induced G2/M phase arrest in HeLa cells. This study suggested that AGN-SD based on Soluplus and the method to improve antiproliferative effect by SD formation via HME may be suitable for application in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26057458

  2. Improvement in antiproliferative activity of Angelica gigas Nakai by solid dispersion formation via hot-melt extrusion and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunyao; Piao, Jingpei; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kang, Wie-Soo; Kim, Hye-Young

    2015-01-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) is one of the most popular herbal medicines and widely used as a functional food product. In this study, AGN was firstly processed by a low-temperature turbo mill and a hot melting extruder to reduce particle size and form solid dispersion (SD). Anticancer activity against HeLa cells was then examined. AGN-SD based on Soluplus was formed via hot-melt extrusion (HME) and showed the strongest cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells. In addition, the possible mechanism of cell death induced by AGN-SD on HeLa cells was also investigated. AGN-SD decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, increased the production of reactive oxygen species, regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and induced G2/M phase arrest in HeLa cells. This study suggested that AGN-SD based on Soluplus and the method to improve antiproliferative effect by SD formation via HME may be suitable for application in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Anti-ERBB2 sh-RNA Suppress Cell Growth in ERBB2-Overexpressing Upper Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arrington, Amanda K.; Davydova, Julia; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Yamamoto, Masato

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ERBB2 is overexpressed in 15–25% of upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. We use a stable lentiviral shRNA model to demonstrate that ERBB2 suppression in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas with documented ERBB2 amplification effectively decreases ERBB2 protein levels and decreases cell viability. Further, we evaluate tumor growth of cells treated with the ERBB2 shRNA. METHODS Three upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells lines with varying ERBB2 levels were treated with one of three separate lentiviral GFP-labeled ERBB2 shRNA vectors or a nonsilencing control shRNA vector for 6 hours. Protein levels on Day 6 and cell viability was evaluated on Days 3–10. A xenograft in vivo experiment was performed using OE19 cells pretransduced with ERBB2 shRNA to evaluate tumor growth. RESULTS ERBB2 protein levels decreased by 80%. ERBB2 knockdown significantly decreased cell viability in cell lines with high ERBB2 levels. In vivo tumor growth was suppressed in ERBB2 shRNA treated groups. CONCLUSION ERBB2 suppression based on a stable lentiviral shRNA transfection system effectively decrease cell viability in cell lines with amplification of ERBB2 as compared to cell lines without overexpression. ERBB2 knockdown significantly decreases tumor growth in vivo. ERBB2-directed therapy may be of benefit in the subset of patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas exhibiting overamplification of ERBB2. PMID:19813066

  4. The apoptotic volume decrease is an upstream event of MAP kinase activation during Staurosporine-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yuichi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasunobu

    2012-01-01

    Persistent cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD), is a pivotal event of apoptosis. Activation of the volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl(-) channel (VSOR) is involved in the AVD induction. On the other hand, activation of the MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade is also known to play a critical role in apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the AVD induction and the stress-responsive MAPK cascade activation during the apoptosis process induced by staurosporine (STS) in HeLa cells. STS was found to induce AVD within 2-5 min and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK after over 20-30 min. VSOR blockers suppressed not only STS-induced AVD but also phosphorylation of JNK and p38 as well as activation of caspase-3/7. Moreover, a p38 inhibitor, SB203580, and a JNK inhibitor, SP600125, failed to affect STS-induced AVD, whereas these compounds reduced STS-induced activation of caspase-3/7. Also, treatment with ASK1-specific siRNA suppressed STS-induced caspase-3/7 activation without affecting the AVD induction. Furthermore, sustained osmotic cell shrinkage per se was found to trigger phosphorylation of JNK and p38, caspase activation, and cell death. Thus, it is suggested that activation of p38 and JNK is a downstream event of AVD for the STS-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells.

  5. mRNAs containing the unstructured 5' leader sequence of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 translate inefficiently in lysates from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hann, L E; Gehrke, L

    1995-01-01

    Poliovirus infection is accompanied by translational control that precludes translation of 5'-capped mRNAs and facilitates translation of the uncapped poliovirus RNA by an internal initiation mechanism. Previous reports have suggested that the capped alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (AIMV CP RNA), which contains an unstructured 5' leader sequence, is unusual in being functionally active in extracts prepared from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells (PI-extracts). To identify the cis-acting nucleotide elements permitting selective AIMV CP expression, we tested capped mRNAs containing structured or unstructured 5' leader sequences in addition to an mRNA containing the poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Translations were performed with PI-extracts and extracts prepared from mock-infected HeLa cells (MI-extracts). A number of control criteria demonstrated that the HeLa cells were infected by poliovirus and that the extracts were translationally active. The data strongly indicate that translation of RNAs lacking an internal ribosome entry site, including AIMV CP RNA, was severely compromised in PI-extracts, and we find no evidence that the unstructured AIMV CP RNA 5' leader sequence acts in cis to bypass the poliovirus translational control. Nevertheless, cotranslation assays in the MI-extracts demonstrate that mRNAs containing the unstructured AIMV CP RNA 5' untranslated region have a competitive advantage over those containing the rabbit alpha-globin 5' leader. Previous reports of AIMV CP RNA translation in PI-extracts likely describe inefficient expression that can be explained by residual cap-dependent initiation events, where AIMV CP RNA translation is competitive because of a diminished quantitative requirement for initiation factors. PMID:7609069

  6. Bioactivation of the citrus flavonoid nobiletin by CYP1 enzymes in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Surichan, Somchaiya; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Sifakis, Stavros; Koutala, Eleni; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Arroo, Randolph R J; Boarder, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated cytochrome P450 CYP1-mediated metabolism and CYP1-enzyme induction by naturally occurring flavonoids in cancer cell line models. The arising metabolites often exhibit higher activity than the parent compound. In the present study we investigated the CYP1-mediated metabolism of the citrus polymethoxyflavone nobiletin by recombinant CYP1 enzymes and MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Incubation of nobiletin in MCF7 cells produced one main metabolite (NM1) resulting from O-demethylation in either A or B rings of the flavone moiety. Among the three CYP1 isoforms, CYP1A1 exhibited the highest rate of metabolism of nobiletin in recombinant CYP microsomal enzymes. The intracellular CYP1-mediated bioconversion of the flavone was reduced in the presence of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-selective inhibitors α-napthoflavone and acacetin. In addition nobiletin induced CYP1 enzyme activity, CYP1A1 protein and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in MCF7 cells at a concentration dependent manner. MTT assays in MCF7 cells further revealed that nobiletin exhibited significantly lower IC50 (44 μM) compared to cells treated with nobiletin and CYP1A1 inhibitor (69 μM). FACS analysis demonstrated cell a cycle block at G1 phase that was attenuated in the presence of CYP1A1 inhibitor. Taken together the data suggests that the dietary flavonoid nobiletin induces its own metabolism and in turn enhances its cytostatic effect in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, via CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 upregulation.

  7. Role of coagulation in the recruitment of colon adenocarcinoma cells to thrombus under shear

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Asako; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastases can appear on the peritoneum and in lymph nodes, liver, and lungs, suggesting both hematogenous and lymphatic spreading of the primary tumor. While antithrombotic agents have been shown to reduce both long-term incidence and metastasis, the role of coagulation in facilitating metastasis is ill defined. We investigated the kinetics and molecular mechanisms of metastatic colon adenocarcinoma cell recruitment to thrombi under shear flow, ex vivo. Platelet aggregates were formed by perfusing citrated anticoagulated whole blood over immobilized fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen. Thrombi were formed by perfusing recalcified whole blood over fibrinogen or fibrillar collagen in the presence of coagulation. Cultured colon adenocarcinoma cells (SW620) were perfused either during or following platelet aggregate or thrombus formation. The degree of transient tumor cell interactions (recruitment, rolling, and release) and the number of firmly adhered tumor cells were quantified using fluorescence microscopy. Platelet aggregates and thrombi formed on either fibrinogen- or fibrillar-collagen supported SW620 cell interactions and adhesion under shear. Thrombi or fibrin supported a greater degree of SW620 cell interactions and adhesion compared with platelet aggregates or fibrinogen, respectively, demonstrating that coagulation promoted SW620 cell recruitment under shear. Interestingly, in the absence of anticoagulation, we observed SW620 preferentially binding to thrombus-bound polym